Science.gov

Sample records for active inflammatory disease

  1. Sleep disorders and inflammatory disease activity: chicken or the egg?

    PubMed

    Parekh, Parth J; Oldfield Iv, Edward C; Challapallisri, Vaishnavi; Ware, J Catsby; Johnson, David A

    2015-04-01

    Sleep dysfunction is a highly prevalent condition that has long been implicated in accelerating disease states characterized by having an inflammatory component such as systemic lupus erythematosus, HIV, and multiple sclerosis. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, debilitating disease that is characterized by waxing and waning symptoms, which are a direct result of increased circulating inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have demonstrated sleep dysfunction and the disruption of the circadian rhythm to result in an upregulation of inflammatory cytokines. Not only does this pose a potential trigger for disease flares but also an increased risk of malignancy in this subset of patients. This begs to question whether or not there is a therapeutic role of sleep cycle and circadian rhythm optimization in the prevention of IBD flares. Further research is needed to clarify the role of sleep dysfunction and alterations of the circadian rhythm in modifying disease activity and also in reducing the risk of malignancy in patients suffering from IBD.

  2. Noninvasive Markers of Disease Activity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Sunanda

    2014-01-01

    It is often difficult to assess disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Noninvasive biomarkers are a means of quantifying often nebulous symptoms without subjecting patients to endoscopy or radiation. This paper highlights markers present in feces, serum, or urine that have all been compared with the gold standard, histologic analysis of endoscopically collected specimens. Two categories of markers are featured: well-researched markers of mucosal inflammation with high sensitivity and specificity (calprotectin, lactoferrin, and S100A12) and novel promising markers, some of which are already clinically employed for reasons unrelated to IBD (interleukin [IL]-17, IL-33/ST2, adenosine deaminase, polymorphonuclear elastase, matrix metalloproteinase-9, neopterin, serum M30, and fecal immunohistochemistry). The data pertaining to the more-established markers are intended to highlight recent clinical applications for these markers (ie, assessing disease outside of the colon or in the pediatric population as well as being a cost-saving alternative to colonoscopy to screen for IBD). As there is no evidence to date that a specific marker will accurately be able to represent the entire IBD patient population, it is likely that a combination of the existing markers will be most clinically relevant to the practicing gastroenterologist attempting to evaluate disease severity in a specific patient. Familiarity with the most promising emerging markers will allow a better understanding of new studies and their impact on patient care. PMID:27551251

  3. Microscopic features for initial diagnosis and disease activity evaluation in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Bressenot, Aude; Geboes, Karel; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2013-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by 2 major entities: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). In clinical practice, separation of UC and CD has been based on a variety of clinical features, symptoms, endoscopic and radiological, gross and microscopic characteristics. The microscopic diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease is based on a combination of 2 types of lesions: architectural abnormalities and inflammatory features. However, microscopic distinction between these 2 entities can be difficult and often results in an interim diagnosis of "indeterminate colitis." Recommendations are made to encourage pathologists to give an indication of the activity of the disease: in UC, biopsies are used to discriminate between quiescent disease, inactive disease, and different grades of activity; in CD, evaluation of disease activity is limited and inactivity in the biopsy may not reflect inactivity in the patient. The aim of this review was to summarize microscopic features of inflammatory bowel disease for initial diagnosis and evaluation of disease activity in both CD and UC.

  4. Inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment drives primary human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Matziolis, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Füchtmeier, Bernd; Gaber, Timo; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank; Hoff, Paula

    2012-06-01

    The role of human chondrocytes in the pathogenesis of cartilage degradation in rheumatic joint diseases has presently gained increasing interest. An active chondrocyte participation in local inflammation may play a role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory joint diseases and in a disruption of cartilage repair mechanisms resulting in cartilage degradation. In the present study, we hypothesized that inflammatory synovial fluid triggers human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory processes in rheumatic joint diseases. Primary human chondrocytes were incubated in synovial fluids gained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis arthritis and reactive arthritis. The detection of vital cell numbers was determined by using Casy Cell Counter System. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin-V and 7AAD staining. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was determined by a multiplex suspension array. Detection of vital cells showed a highly significant decrease in chondrocyte numbers. Flow cytometry demonstrated a significant increase in apoptotic chondrocytes after the incubation. An active secretion of cytokines such as MCP-1 and MIF by chondrocytes was observed. The inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment mediates apoptosis and cell death of chondrocytes. Moreover, in terms of cytokine secretion, it also induces an active participation of chondrocytes in ongoing inflammation.

  5. Linking estrogen receptor β expression with inflammatory bowel disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Pierdominici, Marina; Maselli, Angela; Varano, Barbara; Barbati, Cristiana; Cesaro, Paola; Spada, Cristiano; Zullo, Angelo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Rosati, Marco; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Limiti, Maria Rosaria; Guidi, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) whose pathogenesis is only poorly understood. Estrogens have a complex role in inflammation and growing evidence suggests that these hormones may impact IBD pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction (p < 0.05) of estrogen receptor (ER)β expression in peripheral blood T lymphocytes from CD/UC patients with active disease (n = 27) as compared to those in remission (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 29). Accordingly, in a subgroup of CD/UC patients undergoing to anti-TNF-α therapy and responsive to treatment, ERβ expression was higher (p < 0.01) than that observed in not responsive patients and comparable to that of control subjects. Notably, ERβ expression was markedly decreased in colonic mucosa of CD/UC patients with active disease, reflecting the alterations observed in peripheral blood T cells. ERβ expression inversely correlated with interleukin (IL)-6 serum levels and exogenous exposure of both T lymphocytes and intestinal epithelial cells to this cytokine resulted in ERβ downregulation. These results demonstrate that the ER profile is altered in active IBD patients at both mucosal and systemic levels, at least in part due to IL-6 dysregulation, and highlight the potential exploitation of T cell-associated ERβ as a biomarker of endoscopic disease activity. PMID:26497217

  6. Protease-activated receptors and prostaglandins in inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Terence; Henry, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a novel family of G protein-coupled receptors. Signalling through PARs typically involves the cleavage of an extracellular region of the receptor by endogenous or exogenous proteases, which reveals a tethered ligand sequence capable of auto-activating the receptor. A considerable body of evidence has emerged over the past 20 years supporting a prominent role for PARs in a variety of human physiological and pathophysiological processes, and thus substantial attention has been directed towards developing drug-like molecules that activate or block PARs via non-proteolytic pathways. PARs are widely expressed within the respiratory tract, and their activation appears to exert significant modulatory influences on the level of bronchomotor tone, as well as on the inflammatory processes associated with a range of respiratory tract disorders. Nevertheless, there is debate as to whether the principal response to PAR activation is an augmentation or attenuation of airways inflammation. In this context, an important action of PAR activators may be to promote the generation and release of prostanoids, such as prostglandin E2, which have well-established anti-inflammatory effects in the lung. In this review, we primarily focus on the relationship between PARs, prostaglandins and inflammatory processes in the lung, and highlight their potential role in selected respiratory tract disorders, including pulmonary fibrosis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This article is part of a themed issue on Mediators and Receptors in the Resolution of Inflammation. To view this issue visit http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121548564/issueyear?year=2009 PMID:19845685

  7. Inflammatory bowel diseases activity in patients undergoing pelvic radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Seisen, Thomas; Klotz, Caroline; Mazeron, Renaud; Maroun, Pierre; Petit, Claire; Deutsch, Eric; Bossi, Alberto; Haie-Meder, Christine; Chargari, Cyrus; Blanchard, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Background Few studies with contradictory results have been published on the safety of pelvic radiation therapy (RT) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods From 1989 to 2015, a single center retrospective analysis was performed including all IBD patients who received pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT) for a pelvic malignancy. Treatment characteristics, IBD activity and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were examined. Results Overall, 28 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) (n=13) or ulcerative colitis (n=15) were included in the present study. Median follow-up time after irradiation was 5.9 years. Regarding IBD activity, only one and two patients experienced a severe episode within and after 6 months of follow-up, respectively. Grade 3/4 acute GI toxicity occurred in 3 (11%) patients, whereas one (3.6%) patient experienced late grade 3/4 GI toxicity. Only patients with rectal IBD location (P=0.016) or low body mass index (BMI) (P=0.012) experienced more severe IBD activity within or after 6 months following RT, respectively. Conclusions We report an acceptable tolerance of RT in IBD patients with pelvic malignancies. Specifically, a low risk of uncontrolled flare-up was observed. PMID:28280621

  8. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... work? How does inflammatory bowel disease interfere with digestion? Who gets inflammatory bowel disease? How is inflammatory ... top How does inflammatory bowel disease interfere with digestion? When the small intestine becomes inflamed, as in ...

  9. Curcumin in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Shehzad, Adeeb; Rehman, Gauhar; Lee, Young Sup

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric is also used as a remedy for the treatment and prevention of inflammatory diseases. Acute and chronic inflammation is a major factor in the progression of obesity, type II diabetes, arthritis, pancreatitis, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases, as well as certain types of cancer. Turmeric has a long history of use in Ayurvedic medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Recent studies on the efficacy and therapeutic applicability of turmeric have suggested that the active ingredient of tumeric is curcumin. Further, compelling evidence has shown that curcumin has the ability to inhibit inflammatory cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis through multiple molecular targets and mechanisms of action. Curcumin is safe, non-toxic, and mediates its anti-inflammatory effects through the down-regulation of inflammatory transcription factors, cytokines, redox status, protein kinases, and enzymes that all promote inflammation. In addition, curcumin induces apoptosis through mitochondrial and receptor-mediated pathways, as well as activation of caspase cascades. In the current study, the anti-inflammatory effects of curcumin were evaluated relative to various chronic inflammatory diseases. Based on the available pharmacological data obtained from in vitro and in vivo research, as well as clinical trials, an opportunity exists to translate curcumin into clinics for the prevention of inflammatory diseases in the near future.

  10. Zinc distribution in blood components, inflammatory status, and clinical indexes of disease activity during zinc supplementation in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Peretz, A; Nève, J; Jeghers, O; Pelen, F

    1993-05-01

    The effects of zinc supplementation on zinc status and on clinical and biological indicators of inflammation were investigated in 18 patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases and in 9 healthy control subjects. Patients with mild and recent onset disease were assigned to a 60-d trial to receive either 45 mg Zn (as gluconate)/d or a placebo, while control subjects received the zinc supplement. Baseline mean plasma zinc of the patients was low whereas mononuclear cell zinc content was elevated, suggesting a redistribution of the element related to the inflammatory process rather than to a zinc-deficient state. Zinc supplementation increased plasma zinc to a similar extent in patients and in control subjects, which suggested no impairment of zinc intestinal absorption as a result of the inflammatory process. On the contrary, erythrocyte and leukocyte zinc concentrations were not modified in the two groups examined. No beneficial effect of zinc treatment could be demonstrated on either clinical or inflammation indexes.

  11. Serum Inflammatory Mediators as Markers of Human Lyme Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Soloski, Mark J.; Crowder, Lauren A.; Lahey, Lauren J.; Wagner, Catriona A.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines and cytokines are key signaling molecules that orchestrate the trafficking of immune cells, direct them to sites of tissue injury and inflammation and modulate their states of activation and effector cell function. We have measured, using a multiplex-based approach, the levels of 58 immune mediators and 7 acute phase markers in sera derived from of a cohort of patients diagnosed with acute Lyme disease and matched controls. This analysis identified a cytokine signature associated with the early stages of infection and allowed us to identify two subsets (mediator-high and mediator-low) of acute Lyme patients with distinct cytokine signatures that also differed significantly (p<0.0005) in symptom presentation. In particular, the T cell chemokines CXCL9 (MIG), CXCL10 (IP-10) and CCL19 (MIP3B) were coordinately increased in the mediator-high group and levels of these chemokines could be associated with seroconversion status and elevated liver function tests (p = 0.027 and p = 0.021 respectively). There was also upregulation of acute phase proteins including CRP and serum amyloid A. Consistent with the role of CXCL9/CXCL10 in attracting immune cells to the site of infection, CXCR3+ CD4 T cells are reduced in the blood of early acute Lyme disease (p = 0.01) and the decrease correlates with chemokine levels (p = 0.0375). The levels of CXCL9/10 did not relate to the size or number of skin lesions but elevated levels of serum CXCL9/CXCL10 were associated with elevated liver enzymes levels. Collectively these results indicate that the levels of serum chemokines and the levels of expression of their respective chemokine receptors on T cell subsets may prove to be informative biomarkers for Lyme disease and related to specific disease manifestations. PMID:24740099

  12. Advances in the assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Camilleri, M.; Proano, M. )

    1989-07-01

    Knowledge of the severity and extent of the inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases provides a means of determining rational therapeutic strategies in affected patients. During the past 3 decades, several clinical, laboratory, and combined indices have been proposed for the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease; refinements in radiologic methods and the availability of endoscopy and biopsy have facilitated the accurate assessment of the extent and severity of the disease. In relapsing conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, however, the use of such procedures is limited by the radiation exposure or the relatively invasive nature of the technique. In this article, we review the proposed methods and recent advances in assessment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease; we also discuss possible strategies at the time of diagnosis, during recurrence, and in evaluation of the efficacy of drug or dietic therapy. 58 references.

  13. Impact of physical activity on inflammation: effects on cardiovascular disease risk and other inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cicero, Arrigo

    2012-01-01

    Since the 19th century, many studies have enlightened the role of inflammation in atherosclerosis, changing our perception of “vessel plaque due to oxidized lipoproteins”, similar to a “rusted pipe”, towards a disease with involvement of many cell types and cytokines with more complex mechanisms. Although “physical activity” and “physical exercise” are two terms with some differences in meaning, compared to sedentary lifestyle, active people have lower cardiovascular risk and lower inflammatory markers. Activities of skeletal muscle reveal “myokines” which have roles in both the immune system and adipose tissue metabolism. In vitro and ex-vivo studies have shown beneficial effects of exercise on inflammation markers. Meanwhile in clinical studies, some conflicting results suggested that type of activity, exercise duration, body composition, gender, race and age may modulate anti-inflammatory effects of physical exercise. Medical data on patients with inflammatory diseases have shown beneficial effects of exercise on disease activity scores, patient well-being and inflammatory markers. Although the most beneficial type of activity and the most relevant patient group for anti-inflammatory benefits are still not clear, studies in elderly and adult people generally support anti-inflammatory effects of physical activity and moderate exercise could be advised to patients with cardiovascular risk such as patients with metabolic syndrome. PMID:23185187

  14. Novel specific microRNA biomarkers in idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease unrelated to disease activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jingmei; Welker, Noah C; Zhao, Zijin; Li, Yong; Zhang, Jianjun; Reuss, Sarah A; Zhang, Xinjun; Lee, Hwajeong; Liu, Yunlong; Bronner, Mary P

    2014-04-01

    The diagnosis of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease can be challenging. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate protein synthesis through post-transcriptional suppression. This study is to identify new miRNA markers in inflammatory bowel disease, and to examine whether miRNA biomarkers might assist in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Illumina small RNA sequencing was performed on non-dysplastic fresh-frozen colonic mucosa samples of the distalmost colectomy tissue from 19 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (10 ulcerative colitis and 9 Crohn disease) and 18 patients with diverticular disease serving as controls. To determine differentially expressed miRNAs, the USeq software package identified 44 miRNAs with altered expression (fold change ≥ 2 and false discovery rate ≤ 0.10) compared with the controls. Among them, a panel of nine miRNAs was aberrantly expressed in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease. Validation assays performed using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) on additional frozen tissue from ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, and control groups confirmed specific differential expression in inflammatory bowel disease for miR-31, miR-206, miR-424, and miR-146a (P<0.05). The expression of these four miRNAs was further evaluated on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue of the distalmost colectomy mucosa from cohorts of diverticular disease controls (n=29), ulcerative colitis (n=36), Crohn disease (n=26), and the other diseases mimicking inflammatory bowel disease including infectious colitis (n=12) and chronic ischemic colitis (n=19), again confirming increased expression specific to inflammatory bowel disease (P<0.05). In summary, we demonstrate that miR-31, miR-206, miR-424, and miR-146a are novel specific biomarkers of inflammatory bowel disease. Furthermore, miR-31 is universally expressed in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease not only in fresh-frozen but also in formalin

  15. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Karen A; Breuer, Christopher K

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an important cause of gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents. The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing; therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of the presentation of this disease in the pediatric population. Laboratory tests, radiology studies, and endoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and differentiating between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Once diagnosed, the goal of medical management is to induce remission of disease while minimizing the side effects of the medication. Specific attention needs to be paid to achieving normal growth in this susceptible population. Surgical management is usually indicated for failure of medical management, complication, or malignancy. Algorithms for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease are presented. The specific psychosocial issues facing these patients are also discussed in this review as are the future goals of research in the complex problem of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16718840

  16. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) - CDC Fact Sheet Untreated sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) can cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), a ... tubal blockage; •• Ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the womb); •• Infertility (inability to get pregnant); •• Long-term pelvic/abdominal ...

  17. Faecal alpha-1-antitrypsin and excretion of 111indium granulocytes in assessment of disease activity in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, W; Becker, W; Mössner, J; Koch, W; Reiners, C

    1987-01-01

    Intestinal protein loss in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases may be easily determined by measurement of alpha-1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) stool concentration and alpha 1-AT clearance. Both parameters were significantly raised in 36 and 34 patients respectively with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, compared with eight patients with non-inflammatory bowel diseases, or 19 healthy volunteers. There was wide range of overlap between active and inactive inflammatory disease. Contrary to serum alpha 1-AT, faecal excretion and clearance of alpha 1-AT did not correlate with ESR, serum-albumin, orosomucoid, and two indices of disease activity. A comparison of alpha 1-AT faecal excretion and clearance with the faecal excretion of 111In labelled granulocytes in 27 patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, showed no correlation between the intestinal protein loss and this highly specific marker of intestinal inflammation. Enteric protein loss expressed by faecal excretion and clearance of alpha 1-AT does not depend on mucosal inflammation only, but may be influenced by other factors. PMID:3495470

  18. Evaluation of inflammatory activity in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Eduardo Garcia; Torres, Henrique Osvaldo da Gama; Martins, Fabiana Paiva; Ferrari, Maria de Lourdes de Abreu; Andrade, Marcella Menezes; da Cunha, Aloísio Sales

    2012-01-01

    Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis evolve with a relapsing and remitting course. Determination of inflammatory state is crucial for the assessment of disease activity and for tailoring therapy. However, no simple diagnostic test for monitoring intestinal inflammation is available. Noninvasive markers give only indirect assessments of disease activity. Histopathological or endoscopical examinations accurately assess inflammatory activity, but they are invasive, time consuming and expensive and therefore are unsuitable for routine use. Imaging procedures are not applicable for ulcerative colitis. The usefulness of ultrasound and Doppler imaging in assessing disease activity is still a matter of discussion for Crohn’s disease, and an increased interest in computed tomography enterograph (CTE) has been seen, mainly because it can delineate the extent and severity of bowel wall inflammation, besides detecting extraluminal findings. Until now, the available data concerning the accuracy of magnetic resonance enterography in detecting disease activity is less than CTE. Due to this, clinical activity indices are still commonly used for both diseases. PMID:22408345

  19. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection and inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, and other female reproductive organs. It causes scarring ... United States. Gonorrhea and chlamydia, two sexually transmitted diseases, are the most common causes of PID. Other ...

  20. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weström, L., Joesoef, R., Reynolds, G., Hagdu, A., Thompson, S.E. (1992). Pelvic inflammatory disease and fertility. A ... Weström, L., Joesoef, R., Reynolds, G., Hagdu, A., Thompson, S.E. (1992). Pelvic inflammatory disease and fertility. A ...

  1. [Cardiovascular disease and systemic inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Cuende, José I; Pérez de Diego, Ignacio J; Godoy, Diego

    2016-01-01

    More than a century of research has shown that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process more than an infiltrative or thrombogenic process. It has been demonstrated epidemiologically and by imaging techniques, that systemic inflammatory diseases (in particular, but not exclusively, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus) increase the atherosclerotic process, and has a demonstrated pathophysiological basis. Furthermore, treatments to control inflammatory diseases can modify the course of the atherosclerotic process. Although there are no specific scales for assessing cardiovascular risk in patients with these diseases, cardiovascular risk is high. A number of specific risk scales are being developed, that take into account specific factors such as the degree of inflammatory activity.

  2. Bisphosphonate effects in cancer and inflammatory diseases: in vitro and in vivo modulation of cytokine activities.

    PubMed

    Santini, Daniele; Fratto, Maria E; Vincenzi, Bruno; La Cesa, Annalisa; Dianzani, Caterina; Tonini, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are endogenous pyrophosphate analogs in which a carbon atom replaces the central atom of oxygen. They are indicated in non-neoplastic diseases including osteoporosis, corticosteroid-induced bone loss, Paget disease, and in cancer-related diseases such as neoplastic hypercalcemia, multiple myeloma and bone metastases secondary to breast and prostate cancer. There is now extensive in vitro evidence suggesting a direct antitumor effect of bisphosphonates at different levels of action. Some new in vitro and in vivo studies support the cytostatic effects of bisphosphonates on tumor cells, and the effects on the regulation of cell growth, apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell adhesion, and invasion, with particular attention to biological properties. Well designed clinical trials are necessary to investigate whether the antitumor potential of bisphosphonates may be clinically relevant. On the basis of their effects on macrophages, we may divide bisphosphonates into two distinct categories: aminobisphosphonates, which sensitize macrophages to an inflammatory stimulus inducing an acute-phase response, and non-aminobisphosphonates that can be metabolized into macrophages and that may inhibit the inflammatory response of macrophages. There is evidence of aminobisphosphonate-induced pro-inflammatory response, in particular, related to modifications of the cytokine network. Several in vivo studies have demonstrated an acute-phase reaction after the first administration of aminobisphosphonates, with a significant increase in the main pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, a peculiar aspect concerning the action of non-aminobisphosphonates seems to be an anti-inflammatory activity caused by the inhibition of the release of inflammatory mediators from activated macrophages, such as interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-1. The inhibition of inflammatory responses is demonstrated in both in vivo and in vitro models. This activity suggests the use of non

  3. A Descriptive Survey of Inflammatory Bowel Disease within the Active Army Population (1971-1982).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    DISEASE WITHIN THE ACTIVE ARMY POPULATATION (1971-1.982) 12. PERSONAL AUTHORS S MAJOR GEORGE M. GRASKI 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14...by Crohn and Ginsburg in 3 1932. The disease itself consists of an inflammatory condition of the bowel which extends through the gut to adjoining...No 1, June 1963, p. 14. S 1 0Vibeke Binder, "Incidence and Prevalence of Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s Disease in the County of Copenhagen, 1962 to

  4. Recent Trends in Pharmacological Activity of Alkaloids in Animal Colitis: Potential Use for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Brito, Alba Regina Monteiro; Luiz-Ferreira, Anderson

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic and disrupted inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. IBD have two main conditions, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, and have been extensively investigated in recent years. Antibiotics derived from salicylates, steroids, immunosuppressors, and anti-TNF therapy are part of the therapeutic arsenal for IBD. However, very often patients stop responding to treatments over the time. In this context, searching for alternative agents is crucial for IBD clinical management. Natural products derived from medicinal plants are an interesting therapeutic alternative, since several studies have proven effective treatments in animal models of intestinal inflammation. Several naturally occurring compounds are potent antioxidants, both as free radical scavengers and as modulators of antioxidant enzymes expression and activity. A number of natural compounds have also been proved to inhibit the release of proinflammatory cytokines, decreasing the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which is important to the inflammatory response in IBD. The alkaloids are substances of a very diverse class of plant secondary metabolites; an extensive list of biological activities has been attributed to alkaloids, such as being anticholinergic, antitumor, diuretic, antiviral, antihypertensive, antiulcer, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory. In the present work, studies on the pharmacological activity of alkaloids in experimental models of IBD were reviewed. PMID:28191024

  5. Markers of inflammation, activation of blood platelets and coagulation disorders in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Matowicka-Karna, Joanna

    2016-04-13

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. It is a group of chronic disorders characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal track with unknown etiology. Currently applied biomarkers include CRP, ESR, pANCA, ASCA, and fecal calprotectin. The etiopathogenesis of IBD is multifactorial. In patients with IBD in inflamed alimentary tract mucosa the number of recruited monocytes and activated macrophages which are source of cytokines. In IBD, the exacerbation is accompanied by thrombocytosis. Platelets play a crucial role in the hemostasis and inflammatory response. Selectins, which regulates the hemostasis and inflammatory response, stimulates the secretion of many inflammatory mediators such as β-thromboglobuline, CD40L, fibrinogen, IL-1β, platelet factor-4. In the course of IBD the following changes are observed: an increase in the number of platelets (reactive thrombocytosis), PDW and PCT, reduction in MPV, increased production and excretion of granular content products (P-selectin, GP53, β-TG, PF-4, vWF, fibrinolytic inhibitors).

  6. Macrophage polarization in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Cun; Zou, Xian-Biao; Chai, Yan-Fen; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are two hallmarks of macrophages. M1 macrophages (classically activated macrophages) are pro-inflammatory and have a central role in host defense against infection, while M2 macrophages (alternatively activated macrophages) are associated with responses to anti-inflammatory reactions and tissue remodeling, and they represent two terminals of the full spectrum of macrophage activation. Transformation of different phenotypes of macrophages regulates the initiation, development, and cessation of inflammatory diseases. Here we reviewed the characters and functions of macrophage polarization in infection, atherosclerosis, obesity, tumor, asthma, and sepsis, and proposed that targeting macrophage polarization and skewing their phenotype to adapt to the microenvironment might hold great promise for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  7. Evolution of Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okin, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The association of inflammation with modern human diseases (e.g. obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer) remains an unsolved mystery of current biology and medicine. Inflammation is a protective response to noxious stimuli that unavoidably occurs at a cost to normal tissue function. This fundamental tradeoff between the cost and benefit of the inflammatory response has been optimized over evolutionary time for specific environmental conditions. Rapid change of the human environment due to niche construction outpaces genetic adaptation through natural selection, leading increasingly to a mismatch between the modern environment and selected traits. Consequently, multiple tradeoffs that affect human physiology are not optimized to the modern environment, leading to increased disease susceptibility. Here we examine the inflammatory response from an evolutionary perspective. We discuss unique aspects of the inflammatory response and its evolutionary history that can help explain the association between inflammation and modern human diseases. PMID:22975004

  8. Stressful life events and psychosocial correlates of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulos, George; Chouliaras, George; Margoni, Daphne; Korlou, Sophia; Hantzara, Vassiliki; Panayotou, Ioanna; Roma, Eleftheria; Liakopoulou, Magda; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitris C

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the association of psychiatric and psychosocial correlates with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) activity in children and adolescents. METHODS A total of 85 pediatric IBD patients (in remission or active state of the disease) and their parents completed a series of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews measuring life events, depression, anxiety, family dysfunction, and parent mental health. Differences between the remission and the IBD active group and the association of any significant variable with the disease activity state were examined. RESULTS Parents of children being in active state of the disease reported more life events (P = 0.005) and stressful life events (P = 0.048) during the past year and more mental health symptoms (P < 0.001), while the children themselves reported higher levels of anxiety symptoms (P = 0.017) compared to the remission group. In the logistic regression multivariate analysis, the only predictor which had a significant positive effect on the probability of the patients being in active state was parent mental health symptoms (OR = 4.8; 95%CI: 1.2-25.8). CONCLUSION Life events, child anxiety and parent mental health symptoms may be important correlates of pediatric IBD activity and targets of thorough assessment and treatment. PMID:27679771

  9. Peripheral inflammatory disease associated with centrally activated IL-1 system in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Lampa, Jon; Westman, Marie; Kadetoff, Diana; Agréus, Anna Nordenstedt; Le Maître, Erwan; Gillis-Haegerstrand, Caroline; Andersson, Magnus; Khademi, Mohsen; Corr, Maripat; Christianson, Christina A; Delaney, Ada; Yaksh, Tony L; Kosek, Eva; Svensson, Camilla I

    2012-07-31

    During peripheral immune activation caused by an infection or an inflammatory condition, the innate immune response signals to the brain and causes an up-regulation of central nervous system (CNS) cytokine production. Central actions of proinflammatory cytokines, in particular IL-1β, are pivotal for the induction of fever and fatigue. In the present study, the influence of peripheral chronic joint inflammatory disease in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on CNS inflammation was investigated. Intrathecal interleukin (IL)-1β concentrations were markedly elevated in RA patients compared with controls or with patients with multiple sclerosis. Conversely, the anti-inflammatory IL-1 receptor antagonist and IL-4 were decreased in RA cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 levels in the CSF did not differ between patients and controls. Concerning IL-1β, CSF concentrations in RA patients were higher than in serum, indicating local production in the CNS, and there was a positive correlation between CSF IL-1β and fatigue assessments. Next, spinal inflammation in experimental arthritis was investigated. A marked increase of IL-1β, IL-18, and tumor necrosis factor, but not IL-6 mRNA production, in the spinal cord was observed, coinciding with increased arthritis scores in the KBxN serum transfer model. These data provide evidence that peripheral inflammation such as arthritis is associated with an immunological activation in the CNS in both humans and mice, suggesting a possible therapeutic target for centrally affecting conditions as fatigue in chronic inflammatory diseases, for which to date there are no specific treatments.

  10. Phospholipid transfer protein activity is associated with inflammatory markers in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Marian C; Brown, B Greg; Marino Larsen, Emily K; Frutkin, Andrew D; O'Brien, Kevin D; Albers, John J

    2006-01-01

    Plasma phospholipid lipid transfer protein (PLTP) has several known key functions in lipoprotein metabolism. Recent studies suggest that it also may play a role in the inflammatory response. Inflammatory cell activity contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. To seek further evidence for the association of PLTP with inflammation, we studied the relationship between PLTP activity and five inflammatory markers [C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), interleukin 6 (IL-6), white blood cells (WBC), and fibrinogen] in 93 patients with low HDL and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Plasma PLTP activity had the strongest correlation with CRP (r=0.332, P<0.001) followed by SAA (r=0.239, P=0.021). PLTP, CRP, and SAA were significantly associated with body mass index (BMI), insulin or glucose, apolipoprotein (apo) B, and/or apo E level (r=0.264-0.393, P<0.01). PLTP, SAA, and IL-6 also were associated with the concentration of HDL particles without apo A-II [Lp(A-I)](r=0.373-0.472, P<0.005, n=56), but not particles with apo A-II. Smoking was associated with increased PLTP activity, CRP, and WBC, and hypertension with increased PLTP activity. In linear models, CRP remained significantly associated with PLTP after adjustment of CVD risk factors and insulin resistance. Also, much of the variability of plasma PLTP activity was explained by CRP, BMI, Lp(A-I), smoking, glucose, and blood pressure. These findings show for the first time that plasma PLTP activity is associated positively with CRP in CVD, a state of chronic inflammation.

  11. EFFECT OF PREGNANE XENOBIOTIC RECEPTOR ACTIVATION ON INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE TREATED WITH RIFAXIMIN.

    PubMed

    Wan, Y C; Li, T; Han, Y-D; Zhang, H-Y; Lin, H; Zhang, B

    2015-01-01

    The causes and pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) are still not clearly understood. This study aims to prove the important role of rifaximin played in inflammatory reaction caused by abnormity of the intestinal mucosal immune system. Intestinal microflora can greatly promote and maintain the inflammatory reaction of IBD, therefore, antibiotics can be used to treat IBD. Rifaximin is a medicine usually used for local intestinal infection. Many clinical and basic studies have shown that both a single application of rifaximin and the joint application with other medicines could achieve a good efficacy. This paper studied the activation of Pregnane Xenobiotic Receptor (PXR) in treating IBD with rifaximin and analyzed its efficacy in IBD when PXR was involved in the transport of medicine and metabolism. The results prove that rifaximin can not only serve as an anti-microbial drug, but can activate PXR and actually weaken the reaction of IBD. Thus it is safe to say that rifaximin has great potential in treating IBD.

  12. Vitamin D in inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wöbke, Thea K.; Sorg, Bernd L.; Steinhilber, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Changes in vitamin D serum levels have been associated with inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis (MS), atherosclerosis, or asthma. Genome- and transcriptome-wide studies indicate that vitamin D signaling modulates many inflammatory responses on several levels. This includes (i) the regulation of the expression of genes which generate pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenases or 5-lipoxygenase, (ii) the interference with transcription factors, such as NF-κB, which regulate the expression of inflammatory genes and (iii) the activation of signaling cascades, such as MAP kinases which mediate inflammatory responses. Vitamin D targets various tissues and cell types, a number of which belong to the immune system, such as monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs) as well as B- and T cells, leading to individual responses of each cell type. One hallmark of these specific vitamin D effects is the cell-type specific regulation of genes involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes and the interplay between vitamin D signaling and other signaling cascades involved in inflammation. An important task in the near future will be the elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms that are involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses by vitamin D on the molecular level by the use of techniques such as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), ChIP-seq, and FAIRE-seq. PMID:25071589

  13. Serum platelet factor 4 is a reliable activity parameter in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Yu, Na; Jia, Ya-Xu; Wan, Shu-Jun; Wang, Fang-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the diagnostic utility of serum platelet factor 4 (PF4) levels and to assess its accuracy in detecting inflammatory bowel disease activity. This study included 45 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 45 patients with Crohn disease (CD), and 30 control subjects at Jinling Hospital between May 2014 and July 2015. Laboratory tests measured white blood count, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and platelet count. PF4 was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to disease activity: active and inactive. Median PF4 values dramatically increased in UC and CD patients compared with the healthy group (UC: 26.64 [20.00–36.22] mg/mL vs 20.02 [14.63–26.83] mg/mL, P = 0.002; CD: 25.56 [18.57–36.36] mg/mL vs 20.02 [14.63–26.83] mg/mL, P = 0.014); however, the serum PF4 levels between UC and CD failed to show a significant difference (26.64 [20.00–36.22] mg/mL vs 25.56 [18.57–36.36] mg/mL, P = 0.521). Furthermore, serum PF4 levels were elevated in both UC and CD patients with active disease (UC: 20.19 [14.89–23.53] mg/mL vs 28.86 [22.57–37.29] mg/mL, P < 0.001; CD: 18.33 [16.72–25.77] mg/mL vs 34.38 [22.58–39.92] mg/mL, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed higher PF4 level as an independent predictor of disease activity in UC and CD patients (UC: odds ratio 30.375, P = 0.002; CD: odds ratio 54.167, P < 0.001). The cut-off level of PF4 for distinguishing active from inactive UC patients was 24.1 mg/mL. While in CD patients, the cut-off level of PF4 was 19.24 mg/mL. Serum PF4 levels could be a potential biomarker for monitoring the disease activity of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:28296751

  14. Increasing Patient Activation Could Improve Outcomes for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shawn L; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease process that often requires the integration of skills from various health care providers to adequately meet the needs of patients with IBD. The medical and surgical treatment options for IBD have become more complicated and are frequently a source of angst for both the patient and provider. However, it has become more important than ever to engage patients in navigating the treatment algorithm. Although novel in the IBD world, the concept of patients' becoming more active and effective managers of their care has been well studied in other disease processes such as diabetes mellitus and mental illness. This idea of patient activation refers to a patient understanding his or her role in the care process and having the skill sets and self-reliance necessary to manage his or her own health care. Over the past decade, evidence supporting the role of patient activation in chronic illness has grown, revealing improved health outcomes, enhanced patient experiences, and lower overall costs. Patient activation can be measured, and interventions have been shown to improve levels of activation over time and influence outcomes. A focus on patient activation is very appropriate for patients with IBD because this may potentially serve as a tool for IBD providers to not only improve patient outcomes and experience but also reduce health care costs.

  15. Pelvic inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pelvic inflammatory disease is caused by infection of the upper female genital tract and is often asymptomatic. Pelvic inflammatory disease is the most common gynaecological reason for admission to hospital in the US, and is diagnosed in approximately 1% of women aged 16 to 45 years consulting their GP in England and Wales. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: How do different antimicrobial regimens compare when treating women with confirmed pelvic inflammatory disease? What are the effects of routine antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease before intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) insertion? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up to date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 13 RCTs or systematic reviews of RCTs that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (oral, parenteral, different durations, different regimens) and routine antibiotic prophylaxis (before intrauterine device insertion in women at high risk or low risk). PMID:24330771

  16. Nutritional Strategies in the Management of Adult Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Dietary Considerations from Active Disease to Disease Remission.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Douglas L; Limketkai, Berkeley; Medici, Valentina; Saire Mendoza, Mardeli; Palmer, Lena; Bechtold, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of chronic, lifelong, and relapsing illnesses, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, which involve the gastrointestinal tract. There is no cure for these diseases, but combined pharmacological and nutritional therapy can induce remission and maintain clinical remission. Malnutrition and nutritional deficiencies among IBD patients result in poor clinical outcomes such as growth failure, reduced response to pharmacotherapy, increased risk for sepsis, and mortality. The aim of this review is to highlight the consequences of malnutrition in the management of IBD and describe nutritional interventions to facilitate induction of remission as well as maintenance; we will also discuss alternative delivery methods to improve nutritional status preoperatively.

  17. Health-related quality of life in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease depends on disease activity and psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, G; Erhard, D; Petersen, M; Parzer, P; Schlarb, A A; Resch, F; Brunner, R; Hoffmann, G F; Lenhartz, H; Richterich, A

    2015-04-01

    Adolescent patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) show an increased risk for behavioral and emotional dysfunction. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is influenced by medical illnesses, as well as by psychiatric disorders, but for adolescents with IBD, the extent to which HRQoL is influenced by these two factors is unclear. For 47 adolescent IBD patients, we analyzed disease activity, HRQoL and whether or not a psychiatric disorder was present. Disease activity was estimated using pediatric Ulcerative Colitis Activity Index and pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index. The IMPACT-III and the EQ-5D were used to measure HRQoL and QoL, respectively. In addition, patient and parent diagnostic interviews were performed. 55.3 % patients fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for one or more psychiatric disorders. In all patients, psychiatric comorbidity together with disease activity contributed to a reduction in quality of life. Adolescents with IBD are at a high risk for clinically relevant emotional or behavioral problems resulting in significantly lower HRQoL. We conclude that accessible, optimally structured psychotherapeutic and/or psychiatric help is needed in adolescent patients with IBD.

  18. Rapid fecal calprotectin testing to assess for endoscopic disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease: A diagnostic cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kwapisz, Lukasz; Mosli, Mahmoud; Chande, Nilesh; Yan, Brian; Beaton, Melanie; Micsko, Jessica; Mennill, Pauline W.; Barnett, William; Bax, Kevin; Ponich, Terry; Howard, John; Tirolese, Anthony; Lannigan, Robert; Gregor, James

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: With increasing numbers of patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), it is important to identify noninvasive methods of detecting disease activity. The aim of this study is to examine the diagnostic accuracy of fecal rapid calprotectin (FC) testing in the detection of endoscopically active IBD. Patients and Methods: All consecutive patients presenting to outpatient clinics with lower gastrointestinal symptoms were prospectively recruited. Patients provided FC samples. Sensitivity (Sn), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for FC were calculated. Receiver–operator characteristics (ROC) curve was used to identify the ideal FC cutoff that predicts endoscopic disease activity. Correlation between FC and endoscopic disease activity, disease location, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured. Results: One hundred and twenty-six patients, of whom 52% were females, were included in the final analysis with a mean age of 44.4 ± 16.7 years. Comparing FC to endoscopic findings, the following results were calculated: A cutoff point of 100 μg/g showed Sn = 83%, Sp = 67%, PPV = 65%, and NPV = 85%; and 200 μg/g showed Sn = 66%, Sp = 82%, PPV = 73%, and NPV = 77%. Based on ROC curve, the best FC cutoff point to predict endoscopic disease activity was 140 μg/g. Using this reference, FC levels strongly correlated with colorectal, ileocolonic, and ileal disease and predicted endoscopic activity. Conclusions: FC is an accurate test when used as an initial screening tool for patients suspected of having active IBD. Given its noninvasive nature, it may prove to reduce the need for colonoscopy and be an added tool in the management of IBD. PMID:26655130

  19. Inflammatory cervicovaginal cytology is associated with disease activity in juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Febronio, M V; Pereira, R M R; Bonfa, E; Takiuti, A D; Pereyra, E A G; Silva, C A A

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate cervicovaginal cytology in adolescents with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE) and to compare them to controls. Fifty-two female adolescents with JSLE (ACR criteria) were compared to 52 age-matched healthy controls. All Pap smears were evaluated by the same cytopathologist blinded to gynecology examination (Bethesda 2001). The mean age of JSLE patients and controls were similar (16.17 +/- 1.94 versus 16.13 +/- 2.16 years, P = 0.92). The cervicovaginal cytology was found to be similar in both groups, although sexual intercourses in the last month were less frequent in JSLE than controls (23% versus 59.6%, P = 0.0003). Only one patient (2%) with JSLE versus two controls (4%) had cervical dysplasia (LGSIL) and human papilomavirus (P = 1.0). Candida spp vaginitis was observed in seven JSLE (14%) versus none in controls (P = 0.012) and was associated with immunosuppressive drugs (P = 0.01) and high dose of prednisone (P = 0.002). Of interest, inflammatory cervicovaginal cytology was observed in 21 (60%) of patients with SLEDAI > or = 4 and only four (23%) of those with SLEDAI < 4 (P = 0.001). Likewise, a higher frequency of inflammatory changes was also observed in virgin JSLE (57% versus 8%, P = 0.005). Our findings supports the notion that female genital tract may be a potential target organ in SLE since cervical inflammation is associated to disease activity independently of sexual activity.

  20. 3-Hydroxyflavone and structural analogues differentially activate pregnane X receptor: Implication for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Lau, Aik Jiang; Chang, Thomas K H

    2015-10-01

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR; NR1I2) is a member of the superfamily of nuclear receptors that regulates the expression of genes involved in various biological processes, including drug transport and biotransformation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of 3-hydroxyflavone and its structurally-related analogues on PXR activity. 3-Hydroxyflavone, galangin, kaempferol, querceetin, isorhamnetin, and tamarixetin, but not but not datiscetin, morin, myricetin, or syringetin, activated mouse PXR, as assessed in a cell-based reporter gene assay. By comparison, 3-hydroxyflavone activated rat PXR, whereas 3-hydroxyflavone, galangin, quercetin, isorhamnetin, and tamarixetin activated human PXR (hPXR). A time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer competitive ligand-binding assay showed binding to the ligand-binding domain of hPXR by 3-hydroxyflavone, galangin, quercetin, isorhamnetin, and tamarixetin. 3-Hydroxyflavone and galangin, but not quercetin, isorhamnetin, or tamarixetin, recruited steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)-1, SRC-2, and SRC-3 to hPXR. In LS180 human colon adenocarcinoma cells, 3-hydroxyflavone, quercetin, and tamarixetin increased CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and ABCB1 mRNA expression, whereas galangin and isorhamnetin increased CYP3A4 and ABCB1 but not CYP3A5 mRNA expression. Datiscetin, kaempferol, morin, myricetin, and syringetin did not attenuate the extent of hPXR activation by rifampicin, suggesting they are not hPXR antagonists. Overall, flavonols activate PXR in an analogue-specific and species-dependent manner. Substitution at the C2' or C5' position of 3-hydroxyflavone with a hydroxyl or methoxy group rendered it incapable of activating hPXR. Understanding the structure-activity relationship of flavonols in hPXR activation may facilitate nutraceutical development efforts in the treatment of PXR-associated intestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  1. Pelvic inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pelvic inflammatory disease is caused by infection of the upper female genital tract and is often asymptomatic. Pelvic inflammatory disease is the most common gynaecological reason for admission to hospital in the USA and is diagnosed in almost 2% of women aged 16 to 45 years consulting their GP in England and Wales. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of empirical treatment compared with treatment delayed until the results of microbiological investigations are known? How do different antimicrobial regimens compare? What are the effects of routine antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease before intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) insertion? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found nine systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (oral, parenteral, empirical treatment, treatment guided by test results, different durations, outpatient, inpatient), and routine antibiotic prophylaxis (before intrauterine device insertion in women at high risk or low risk). PMID:19450319

  2. Vitamin D and inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kai; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    Beyond its critical function in calcium homeostasis, vitamin D has recently been found to play an important role in the modulation of the immune/inflammation system via regulating the production of inflammatory cytokines and inhibiting the proliferation of proinflammatory cells, both of which are crucial for the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Several studies have associated lower vitamin D status with increased risk and unfavorable outcome of acute infections. Vitamin D supplementation bolsters clinical responses to acute infection. Moreover, chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular disease, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic kidney disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and others, tend to have lower vitamin D status, which may play a pleiotropic role in the pathogenesis of the diseases. In this article, we review recent epidemiological and interventional studies of vitamin D in various inflammatory diseases. The potential mechanisms of vitamin D in regulating immune/inflammatory responses in inflammatory diseases are also discussed. PMID:24971027

  3. Chronic inflammatory systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Rainer H.; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that during chronic inflammatory systemic diseases (CIDs) maladaptations of the immune, nervous, endocrine and reproductive system occur. Maladaptation leads to disease sequelae in CIDs. The ultimate reason of disease sequelae in CIDs remained unclear because clinicians do not consider bodily energy trade-offs and evolutionary medicine. We review the evolution of physiological supersystems, fitness consequences of genes involved in CIDs during different life-history stages, environmental factors of CIDs, energy trade-offs during inflammatory episodes and the non-specificity of CIDs. Incorporating bodily energy regulation into evolutionary medicine builds a framework to better understand pathophysiology of CIDs by considering that genes and networks used are positively selected if they serve acute, highly energy-consuming inflammation. It is predicted that genes that protect energy stores are positively selected (as immune memory). This could explain why energy-demanding inflammatory episodes like infectious diseases must be terminated within 3–8 weeks to be adaptive, and otherwise become maladaptive. Considering energy regulation as an evolved adaptive trait explains why many known sequelae of different CIDs must be uniform. These are, e.g. sickness behavior/fatigue/depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, anorexia, malnutrition, muscle wasting—cachexia, cachectic obesity, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, alterations of steroid hormone axes, disturbances of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, hypertension, bone loss and hypercoagulability. Considering evolved energy trade-offs helps us to understand how an energy imbalance can lead to the disease sequelae of CIDs. In the future, clinicians must translate this knowledge into early diagnosis and symptomatic treatment in CIDs. PMID:26817483

  4. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the term used for a group of diseases with yet unknown etiology, prevalence of which is increasing almost everywhere in the world. The disease was almost non-existent four decades ago in the east, including the middle-east, while now a days it is seen more and more. In addition to the increasing prevalence, our knowledge about its pathogenesis, clinical course, diagnosis, and treatment has changed dramatically over the past couple of decades. This has changed our concept of this group of diseases, their diagnosis, treatment, and treatment goals. Considering the vast literature on the subject, it is timely to review major topics in IBD with a look on the regional progress and knowledge as well. This essay is aimed to cover this task. PMID:24829639

  5. Indium 111-granulocyte scanning in the assessment of disease extent and disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease. A comparison with colonoscopy, histology, and fecal indium 111-granulocyte excretion

    SciTech Connect

    Saverymuttu, S.H.; Camilleri, M.; Rees, H.; Lavender, J.P.; Hodgson, H.J.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1986-05-01

    Indium 111-leukocyte scanning has recently been introduced as a new method for imaging inflammatory bowel disease. The technique has recently been made more specific for acute inflammation by labeling a pure granulocyte fraction rather than the conventional mixed leukocyte preparation. We now report a prospective study comparing 111In-granulocyte scanning with endoscopy, histology, and fecal 111In-granulocyte excretion for the assessment of disease extent and severity in colonic inflammatory bowel disease. In 52 patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, disease extent and severity were assessed macroscopically, histologically, or by scanning using a numerical grading system. Excellent correlations were found between both endoscopy and histology and 111In scans (r = 0.90 (endoscopy) and r = 0.90 (histology) for extent; r = 0.86 and r = 0.91 for disease activity). Severity graded by scanning also showed a close correlation with fecal 111In-granulocyte excretion (r = 0.90). Indium 111-granulocyte scans are a rapid, accurate, noninvasive means of assessing both disease extent and severity of colonic involvement in inflammatory bowel disease.

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease unclassified

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ning; Chen, Wei-xing; Chen, Shao-hua; Xu, Cheng-fu; Li, You-ming

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are idiopathic, chronic, and inflammatory intestinal disorders. The two main types, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD), sometimes mimic each other and are not readily distinguishable. The purpose of this study was to present a series of hospitalized cases, which could not initially be classified as a subtype of IBD, and to try to note roles of the terms indeterminate colitis (IC) and inflammatory bowel disease unclassified (IBDU) when such a dilemma arises. Methods: Medical records of 477 patients hospitalized due to IBD, during the period of January 2002 to April 2009, were retrospectively studied in the present paper. All available previous biopsies from endoscopies of these patients were reanalyzed. Results: Twenty-seven of 477 IBD patients (5.7%) had been initially diagnosed as having IBDU. Of them, 23 received colonoscopy and histological examinations in our hospital. A total of 90% (9/10) and 66.7% (4/6) of patients, respectively, had a positive finding via wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). The barium-swallow or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) was performed on 11 patients. Positive changes were observed under computer tomographic (CT) scanning in 89.5% (17/19) of patients. Reasonable treatment strategies were employed for all patients. Conclusions: Our data indicate that IBDU accounts for 5.7% of initial diagnoses of IBD. The definition of IBDU is valuable in clinical practice. For those who had no clear clinical, endoscopic, histological, or other features affording a diagnosis of either UC or CD, IBDU could be used parenthetically. PMID:21462383

  7. Beyond endoscopic assessment in inflammatory bowel disease: real-time histology of disease activity by non-linear multimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernavskaia, Olga; Heuke, Sandro; Vieth, Michael; Friedrich, Oliver; Schürmann, Sebastian; Atreya, Raja; Stallmach, Andreas; Neurath, Markus F.; Waldner, Maximilian; Petersen, Iver; Schmitt, Michael; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    Assessing disease activity is a prerequisite for an adequate treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition to endoscopic mucosal healing, histologic remission poses a promising end-point of IBD therapy. However, evaluating histological remission harbors the risk for complications due to the acquisition of biopsies and results in a delay of diagnosis because of tissue processing procedures. In this regard, non-linear multimodal imaging techniques might serve as an unparalleled technique that allows the real-time evaluation of microscopic IBD activity in the endoscopy unit. In this study, tissue sections were investigated using the non-linear multimodal microscopy combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon excited auto fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG). After the measurement a gold-standard assessment of histological indexes was carried out based on a conventional H&E stain. Subsequently, various geometry and intensity related features were extracted from the multimodal images. An optimized feature set was utilized to predict histological index levels based on a linear classifier. Based on the automated prediction, the diagnosis time interval is decreased. Therefore, non-linear multimodal imaging may provide a real-time diagnosis of IBD activity suited to assist clinical decision making within the endoscopy unit.

  8. Beyond endoscopic assessment in inflammatory bowel disease: real-time histology of disease activity by non-linear multimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chernavskaia, Olga; Heuke, Sandro; Vieth, Michael; Friedrich, Oliver; Schürmann, Sebastian; Atreya, Raja; Stallmach, Andreas; Neurath, Markus F.; Waldner, Maximilian; Petersen, Iver; Schmitt, Michael; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Assessing disease activity is a prerequisite for an adequate treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. In addition to endoscopic mucosal healing, histologic remission poses a promising end-point of IBD therapy. However, evaluating histological remission harbors the risk for complications due to the acquisition of biopsies and results in a delay of diagnosis because of tissue processing procedures. In this regard, non-linear multimodal imaging techniques might serve as an unparalleled technique that allows the real-time evaluation of microscopic IBD activity in the endoscopy unit. In this study, tissue sections were investigated using the non-linear multimodal microscopy combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon excited auto fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG). After the measurement a gold-standard assessment of histological indexes was carried out based on a conventional H&E stain. Subsequently, various geometry and intensity related features were extracted from the multimodal images. An optimized feature set was utilized to predict histological index levels based on a linear classifier. Based on the automated prediction, the diagnosis time interval is decreased. Therefore, non-linear multimodal imaging may provide a real-time diagnosis of IBD activity suited to assist clinical decision making within the endoscopy unit. PMID:27406831

  9. Pivotal Role of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase-Activated Protein Kinase 2 in Inflammatory Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Feng; Deng, Jing; Wang, Gang; Ye, Richard D.; Christman, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase (MK2) is exclusively regulated by p38 MAPK in vivo. Upon activation of p38 MAPK, MK2 binds with p38 MAPK, leading to phosphorylation of TTP, Hsp27, Akt and Cdc25 that are involved in regulation of various essential cellular functions. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about molecular mechanisms of MK2 in regulation of TNF-α production, NADPH oxidase activation, neutrophil migration, and DNA-damage-induced cell cycle arrest which are involved in the molecular pathogenesis of acute lung injury, pulmonary fibrosis, and non-small-cell lung cancer. Collectively current and emerging new information indicate that developing MK2 inhibitors and blocking MK2-mediated signal pathways is a potential therapeutic strategy for treatment of inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases and lung cancer. PMID:26119506

  10. Anaemia in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Günter; Schett, Georg

    2013-04-01

    Anaemia is frequently observed in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Depending on its severity, anaemia negatively affects cardiovascular performance, physical activity and the quality of life of patients. However, anaemia is considered to be a symptom of the underlying inflammatory disease and, thus, neglected as a complex medical condition that warrants specific diagnosis and treatment. Although inflammation-induced alterations in iron homeostasis and erythropoiesis have a dominant role in the pathogenesis of this type of anaemia, multiple other factors such as chronic blood loss, haemolysis, disease and treatment-associated adverse effects or vitamin deficiencies can also take part in the development of anaemia. Accordingly, the prevalence of anaemia is positively associated with the severity of the underlying disease. This Review will summarize epidemiological data on anaemia in inflammatory rheumatic diseases, along with a detailed description of underlying pathophysiological pathways, available diagnostic tools and practical diagnostic strategies. Discussion of established and newly emerging treatment regimens, as well as the need for further research in this clinically relevant field, will also be included.

  11. Inflammatory Cyclooxygenase Activity and PGE2 Signaling in Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Jenny U.; Woodling, Nathaniel S.; Shi, Ju; Andreasson, Katrin I.

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a fundamental driving force in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the setting of accumulating immunogenic Aß peptide assemblies, microglia, the innate immune cells of the brain, generate a non-resolving immune response and fail to adequately clear accumulating Aß peptides, accelerating neuronal and synaptic injury. Pathological, biomarker, and imaging studies point to a prominent role of the innate immune response in AD development, and the molecular components of this response are beginning to be unraveled. The inflammatory cyclooxygenase-PGE2 pathway is implicated in pre-clinical development of AD, both in epidemiology of normal aging populations and in transgenic mouse models of Familial AD. The cyclooxygenase-PGE2 pathway modulates the inflammatory response to accumulating Aß peptides through actions of specific E-prostanoid G-protein coupled receptors.

  12. [Correlation between clinical parameters and quantitative analysis of inflammatory infiltrate. Importance in the diagnosis of active periodontal disease].

    PubMed

    Mendieta Fiter, C

    1989-05-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the destruction in chronic periodontal disease occurs in relatively short periods of time which are followed of prolonged periods of inactivity. These bursts of activity are characterized by an increase in the inflammatory reaction. It has been the purpose of this paper to study the correlation between the clinical measurements of periodontal disease and the histomorphometric quantification of areas of dense inflammatory infiltrate. The results of this study show that the clinical parameters that measure gingival inflammation or loss of periodontal attachment are useful to distinguish pathology from normal (p less than 0.003), but lack sensitivity to detect burst of periodontal disease activity (p greater than 0.05).

  13. Cardiovascular disease in inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Santos; Nurmohamed, Michael T; González-Gay, Miguel A

    2016-10-01

    Chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD), including rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis, are prevalent conditions worldwide, with a considerable burden on healthcare systems. They are associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. In this review, we focused on the epidemiology, traditional CV risk factors, genetics, and the link between chronic inflammation, atherosclerosis, and CV disease. Remarkably, patients with IRD have higher vulnerability to atheromatous plaques. The risk of unstable plaques is higher in patients with rheumatoid arthritis than in controls. Active disease is a characteristic ascribed to vulnerability and rupture of plaques and a cause of thrombosis in IRD. Management of CV risk in patients with IRD includes optimal control of disease activity. CV risk stratification by applying risk charts is also essential. Imaging techniques might be useful to determine the actual CV risk of patients with IRD who are included in the category of intermediate or moderate CV risk.

  14. Beta-glucuronidase and Beta-glucosidase activity in stool specimens of children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mroczyńska, Marta; Galecka, Miroslawa; Szachta, Patrycja; Kamoda, Dorota; Libudzisz, Zdzislawa; Roszak, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the differences in the activity of beta-glucuronidase and beta-glucosidase in stool specimens of children with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) and healthy subjects. The disease activity was determined according to the PCDAI scale (Crohn disease) and Truelove-Witts scale (Ulcerative colitis). Enzyme activity was determined by spectrophotometry. There was a correlation between the level of beta - glucosidase activity in stool and patient's age in the group of healthy controls, but not in the IBD group. beta-glucosidase activity in IBD and healthy subjects stool specimens did not differ significantly. The activity of beta-glucuronidase in children with IBD was two times lower than in the healthy group and was correlated with age in children with IBD, but not in the group of healthy ones.

  15. Sexual dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Leyla J; Patil, Seema A; Cross, Raymond K

    2015-04-01

    Sexual health is a broad term that encompasses a variety of functions including sexual thoughts, desire, arousal, intercourse, orgasm, and the impact of body image. Sexual dysfunction in individuals with inflammatory bowel disease is multifactorial including the impact of psychosocial factors, disease activity, medical therapies, surgical interventions, body image perceptions and changes, hypogonadism, and pelvic floor disorders. Providers caring for patients with inflammatory bowel disease should be cognizant of these concerns and develop management plans and techniques for earlier diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Physical activity, by enhancing parasympathetic tone and activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, is a therapeutic strategy to restrain chronic inflammation and prevent many chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Heidi L; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2013-05-01

    Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death in the world and chronic inflammation is a key contributor to many chronic diseases. Accordingly, interventions that reduce inflammation may be effective in treating multiple adverse chronic conditions. In this context, physical activity is documented to reduce systemic low-grade inflammation and is acknowledged as an anti-inflammatory intervention. Furthermore, physically active individuals are at a lower risk of developing chronic diseases. However the mechanisms mediating this anti-inflammatory phenotype and range of health benefits are unknown. We hypothesize that the "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" (CAP) mediates the anti-inflammatory phenotype and range of health benefits associated with physical activity. The CAP is an endogenous, physiological mechanism by which acetylcholine from the vagus nerve, interacts with the innate immune system to modulate and restrain the inflammatory cascade. Importantly, higher levels of physical activity are associated with enhanced parasympathetic (vagal) tone and lower levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of low-grade inflammation. Accordingly, physical activity, by enhancing parasympathetic tone and activating the CAP, may be a therapeutic strategy to restrain chronic inflammation and prevent many chronic diseases.

  17. Genome-wide association study implicates immune activation of multiple integrin genes in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Katrina M; Moutsianas, Loukas; Lee, James C; Lamb, Christopher A; Luo, Yang; Kennedy, Nicholas A; Jostins, Luke; Rice, Daniel L; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Ji, Sun-Gou; Heap, Graham; Nimmo, Elaine R; Edwards, Cathryn; Henderson, Paul; Mowat, Craig; Sanderson, Jeremy; Satsangi, Jack; Simmons, Alison; Wilson, David C; Tremelling, Mark; Hart, Ailsa; Mathew, Christopher G; Newman, William G; Parkes, Miles; Lees, Charlie W; Uhlig, Holm; Hawkey, Chris; Prescott, Natalie J; Ahmad, Tariq; Mansfield, John C; Anderson, Carl A; Barrett, Jeffrey C

    2017-02-01

    Genetic association studies have identified 215 risk loci for inflammatory bowel disease, thereby uncovering fundamental aspects of its molecular biology. We performed a genome-wide association study of 25,305 individuals and conducted a meta-analysis with published summary statistics, yielding a total sample size of 59,957 subjects. We identified 25 new susceptibility loci, 3 of which contain integrin genes that encode proteins in pathways that have been identified as important therapeutic targets in inflammatory bowel disease. The associated variants are correlated with expression changes in response to immune stimulus at two of these genes (ITGA4 and ITGB8) and at previously implicated loci (ITGAL and ICAM1). In all four cases, the expression-increasing allele also increases disease risk. We also identified likely causal missense variants in a gene implicated in primary immune deficiency, PLCG2, and a negative regulator of inflammation, SLAMF8. Our results demonstrate that new associations at common variants continue to identify genes relevant to therapeutic target identification and prioritization.

  18. Reduction in diversity of the colonic mucosa associated bacterial microflora in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ott, S J; Musfeldt, M; Wenderoth, D F; Hampe, J; Brant, O; Fölsch, U R; Timmis, K N; Schreiber, S

    2004-01-01

    Background and aims: The intestinal bacterial microflora plays an important role in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As most of the colonic bacteria cannot be identified by culture techniques, genomic technology can be used for analysis of the composition of the microflora. Patients and methods: The mucosa associated colonic microflora of 57 patients with active inflammatory bowel disease and 46 controls was investigated using 16S rDNA based single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprint, cloning experiments, and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Full length sequencing of 1019 clones from 16S rDNA libraries (n = 3) revealed an overall bacterial diversity of 83 non-redundant sequences—among them, only 49 known bacterial species. Molecular epidemiology of the composition of the colonic microflora was investigated by SSCP. Diversity of the microflora in Crohn’s disease was reduced to 50% compared with controls (21.7 v 50.4; p<0.0001) and to 30% in ulcerative colitis (17.2 v 50.4; p<0.0001). The reduction in diversity in inflammatory bowel disease was due to loss of normal anaerobic bacteria such as Bacteroides species, Eubacterium species, and Lactobacillus species, as revealed by direct sequencing of variable bands and confirmed by real time PCR. Bacterial diversity in the Crohn’s group showed no association with CARD15/NOD2 status. Conclusions: Mucosal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease is associated with loss of normal anaerobic bacteria. This effect is independent of NOD2/CARD15 status of patients. PMID:15082587

  19. Cannabis for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Naftali, Timna; Mechulam, Raphael; Lev, Lihi Bar; Konikoff, Fred M

    2014-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been used for centuries as a treatment for a variety of ailments. It contains over 60 different cannabinoid compounds. Studies have revealed that the endocannabinoid system is involved in almost all major immune events. Cannabinoids may, therefore, be beneficial in inflammatory disorders. In murine colitis, cannabinoids decrease histologic and microscopic inflammation. In humans, cannabis has been used to treat a plethora of gastrointestinal problems, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and diabetic gastroparesis. Despite anecdotal reports on medical cannabis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), there are few controlled studies. In an observational study in 30 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), we found that medical cannabis was associated with improvement in disease activity and reduction in the use of other medications. In a more recent placebo-controlled study in 21 chronic CD patients, we showed a decrease in the CD activity index >100 in 10 of 11 subjects on cannabis compared to 4 of 10 on placebo. Complete remission was achieved in 5 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group and 1 of 10 in the placebo group. Yet, in an additional study, low-dose cannabidiol did not have an effect on CD activity. In summary, evidence is gathering that manipulating the endocannabinoid system can have beneficial effects in IBD, but further research is required to declare cannabinoids a medicine. We need to establish the specific cannabinoids, as well as appropriate medical conditions, optimal dose, and mode of administration, to maximize the beneficial effects while avoiding any potential harmful effects of cannabinoid use.

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase 13 modulates intestinal epithelial barrier integrity in inflammatory diseases by activating TNF

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E; Dejonckheere, Eline; Van Hauwermeiren, Filip; Lodens, Sofie; De Rycke, Riet; Van Wonterghem, Elien; Staes, An; Gevaert, Kris; López-Otin, Carlos; Libert, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Several pathological processes, such as sepsis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are associated with impairment of intestinal epithelial barrier. Here, we investigated the role of matrix metalloproteinase MMP13 in these diseases. We observed that MMP13−/− mice display a strong protection in LPS- and caecal ligation and puncture-induced sepsis. We could attribute this protection to reduced LPS-induced goblet cell depletion, endoplasmic reticulum stress, permeability and tight junction destabilization in the gut of MMP13−/− mice compared to MMP13+/+ mice. Both in vitro and in vivo, we found that MMP13 is able to cleave pro-TNF into bioactive TNF. By LC-MS/MS, we identified three MMP13 cleavage sites, which proves that MMP13 is an alternative TNF sheddase next to the TNF converting enzyme TACE. Similarly, we found that the same mechanism was responsible for the observed protection of the MMP13−/− mice in a mouse model of DSS-induced colitis. We identified MMP13 as an important mediator in sepsis and IBD via the shedding of TNF. Hence, we propose MMP13 as a novel drug target for diseases in which damage to the gut is essential. PMID:23723167

  1. Endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Carter, D; Lang, A; Eliakim, R

    2013-09-01

    Small bowel imaging and endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) underwent a lot of change and advancement in the recent years. Modalities have shifted from gastroscopy, colonoscopy and small bowel follow through, to ileo-colonoscopy, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR), enteroscopy, wireless video capsule endoscopy and balloon assisted enteroscopy. Nowadays endoscopy has a major role in the diagnosis of IBD, assessing its extent, treating some of its complications (stricture, bleeding), assessing the success of various treatments (mucosal healing), and as a predictor of disease course. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a relatively new "toy" allowing direct, patient friendly, visualization of the entire small bowel mucosa. It has gained a substantial role in the evaluation of patients with suspected Chron's Disease (CD) and indeterminate colitis. WCE has a high positive predictive value in patients with suspected CD, when one uses more than two of the International Conference on Capsule Endoscopy (ICCE) criteria, and not less important, a very high negative predictive value in patients with suspected CD. Its role in patients with known CD, assessing their disease activity and extent, its role in assessing postsurgical small bowel recurrence and its role in the evaluation of mucosal healing are still unclear. Balloon assisted enteroscopy has established its role as a complementary tool in cases where there is need of biopsies or treatment (dilatation of strictures). The present review will summarize the role of endoscopy in the diagnosis of IBD, in assessing its activity, its management, interventional endoscopy and cancer surveillance.

  2. Modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR γ) by conjugated fatty acid in obesity and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gaofeng; Chen, Xiaoe; Li, Duo

    2015-02-25

    Conjugated fatty acids including conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) have drawn significant attention for their variety of biologically beneficial effects. Evidence suggested that CLA and CLNA could play physiological roles by regulating the expression and activity of PPAR γ. This review summarizes the current understanding of evidence of the role of CLA (cis-9,trans-11 CLA and trans-10,cis-12 CLA) and CLNA (punicic acid and α-eleostearic acid) in modulating the expression or activity of PPAR γ that could in turn be employed as complementary treatment for obesity and inflammatory bowel disease.

  3. Oxidative stress and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Almenier, Hazem A; Al Menshawy, Hazem H; Maher, Maha M; Al Gamal, Salah

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing and remitting inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract. The exact cause of IBD remains undetermined, the condition appears to be related to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. While many gaps in our knowledge still exist, the last two decades have witnessed an unprecedented progress not only in the etiology ; but mainly in the mechanisms underlying the chronic inflammatory response, immunologic and genetic aspects. We review some recent points of research in pathogenesis with special stress on oxidative stress and its correlations with disease activity.

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of fruit fractions in vitro, mediated through toll-like receptor 4 and 2 in the context of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nasef, Noha Ahmed; Mehta, Sunali; Murray, Pamela; Marlow, Gareth; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2014-11-19

    Pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-Like Receptor 2 (TLR2) and 4 (TLR4) are important in detecting and responding to stress and bacterial stimuli. Defect or damage in the TLR2 and TLR4 pathways can lead to sustained inflammation, characteristic of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The goal of this study was to identify fruit fractions that can be tested further to develop them as complementary therapies for IBD. In order to do this, we identified fruit fractions that mediate their anti-inflammatory response through the TLR4 and TLR2 pathway. Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK)-hTLR4 and hTLR2 cells were stimulated with their respective ligands to induce inflammation. These cells were treated with one of the 12 fractionated fruits and the inflammatory effect measured. 10 of the fruits came up as anti-inflammatory in the hTLR4 assay and nine in the hTLR2 assays. Many of the fruit fractions mediated their anti-inflammatory actions either mainly in their hydrophobic fractions (such as elderberry) or hydrophilic fractions (such as red raspberry), or both. The strongest anti-inflammatory effects were seen for feijoa and blackberry. This study shows that fruits can have multiple fractions eliciting anti-inflammatory effects in a pathway specific manner. This suggests that the compounds found in fruits can act together to produce health benefits by way of reducing inflammation. Exploiting this property of fruits can help develop complimentary therapies for inflammatory diseases.

  5. The Gut Microbiota in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Donal; Shanahan, Fergus

    2017-03-01

    Genes, bacteria, and immunity contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Most genetic risk relates to defective sensing of microbes and their metabolites or defective regulation of the host response to the microbiota. Because the composition of the microbiota shapes the developing immune system and is determined in early life, the prospect of therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota in adulthood after the onset of disease is questionable. However, the microbiota may be a marker of risk and a modifier of disease activity and a contributor to extraintestinal manifestations and associations in some patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  6. Managing Pain in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R. Carter W.; Wallace, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Pain is a common complaint in inflammatory bowel disease, and it has significant consequences for patients' quality of life. A thorough evaluation to determine the source of patients' pain should include clinical, laboratory, radiologic, and endoscopic assessments as indicated. Differentiating among active inflammation, secondary complications, and functional pain can be complicated. Even when all active disease is adequately treated, clinicians are often left with the difficulty of managing chronic pain. This paper will review the benefits and limitations of several commonly used treatments and promising future therapies. A suggested treatment algorithm will provide some guidance in this challenging area of inflammatory bowel disease management. PMID:22298998

  7. Biomarkers of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fengming, Yi; Jianbing, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease mostly involved with intestine with unknown etiology. Diagnosis, evaluation of severity, and prognosis are still present as challenges for physicians. An ideal biomarker with the characters such as simple, easy to perform, noninvasive or microinvasive, cheap, rapid, and reproducible is helpful for patients and clinicians. Currently biomarkers applied in clinic include CRP, ESR, pANCA, ASCA, and fecal calprotectin. However, they are far from ideal. Lots of studies are focused on seeking for ideal biomarker for IBD. Herein, the paper reviewed recent researches on biomarkers of IBD to get advances of biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24963213

  8. Proteomics and chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Felley-Bosco, Emanuela; André, Muriel

    2004-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are relatively frequent in developed countries. Physiopathological events involved in the etiology of IBDs include activation of immune, mesenchymal and epithelial cells. This review gives an overview of the currently applied proteomics technologies. It describes metabolic changes and goes into the approaches using this methodology to understand the molecular mechanisms implicated in the development of the disease.

  9. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammatory Bowel Disease? Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Symptoms include abdominal ... become pregnant? Women with ulcerative colitis and inactive Crohn’s disease are as likely to become pregnant as women ...

  10. Respiratory burst activity of intestinal macrophages in normal and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mahida, Y R; Wu, K C; Jewell, D P

    1989-01-01

    Macrophages isolated from normal mucosa (greater than 5 cm from tumour) and inflamed mucosa (from patients with inflammatory bowel disease) of colon and ileum were studied for their ability to undergo a respiratory burst as assessed by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium to formazan. Using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonised zymosan as triggers, only a minority (median: 8% for zymosan and 9% for PMA) of macrophages isolated from normal colonic mucosa demonstrated release of oxygen radicals. In contrast, a significantly greater (median: 17% for zymosan and 45% for PMA) proportion of macrophages isolated from inflamed colonic mucosa were able to undergo respiratory burst. Studies with normal and inflamed ileum showed similar results. Stimulation of macrophages isolated from normal colon with interferon-gamma produced only a small increase in the proportion of cells showing release of oxygen radicals. We conclude that the respiratory burst capacity of majority of macrophages isolated from normal colon and ileum is downregulated and a greater proportion of macrophages isolated from inflamed colon and ileum are able to undergo a respiratory burst. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2511088

  11. IL-18 and Cutaneous Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji hyun; Cho, Dae Ho; Park, Hyun Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-18, an IL-1 family cytokine, is a pleiotropic immune regulator. IL-18 plays a strong proinflammatory role by inducing interferon (IFN)-γ. Previous studies have implicated IL-18 in the pathogenesis of various diseases. However, it is not well understood biologic activities of IL-18 in the diverse skin diseases. Here, we have reviewed the expression and function of IL-18 in skin diseases including inflammatory diseases. This article provides an evidence-based understanding of the role of IL-18 in skin diseases and its relationship with disease activities. PMID:26690141

  12. Serum platelet factor 4 is a reliable activity parameter in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Yu, Na; Jia, Ya-Xu; Wan, Shu-Jun; Wang, Fang-Yu

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the diagnostic utility of serum platelet factor 4 (PF4) levels and to assess its accuracy in detecting inflammatory bowel disease activity.This study included 45 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 45 patients with Crohn disease (CD), and 30 control subjects at Jinling Hospital between May 2014 and July 2015. Laboratory tests measured white blood count, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and platelet count. PF4 was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to disease activity: active and inactive.Median PF4 values dramatically increased in UC and CD patients compared with the healthy group (UC: 26.64 [20.00-36.22] mg/mL vs 20.02 [14.63-26.83] mg/mL, P = 0.002; CD: 25.56 [18.57-36.36] mg/mL vs 20.02 [14.63-26.83] mg/mL, P = 0.014); however, the serum PF4 levels between UC and CD failed to show a significant difference (26.64 [20.00-36.22] mg/mL vs 25.56 [18.57-36.36] mg/mL, P = 0.521). Furthermore, serum PF4 levels were elevated in both UC and CD patients with active disease (UC: 20.19 [14.89-23.53] mg/mL vs 28.86 [22.57-37.29] mg/mL, P < 0.001; CD: 18.33 [16.72-25.77] mg/mL vs 34.38 [22.58-39.92] mg/mL, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed higher PF4 level as an independent predictor of disease activity in UC and CD patients (UC: odds ratio 30.375, P = 0.002; CD: odds ratio 54.167, P < 0.001). The cut-off level of PF4 for distinguishing active from inactive UC patients was 24.1 mg/mL. While in CD patients, the cut-off level of PF4 was 19.24 mg/mL.Serum PF4 levels could be a potential biomarker for monitoring the disease activity of inflammatory bowel disease.

  13. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T

    2015-08-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets-such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide, and polyol diet; the specific carbohydrate diet; the anti-inflammatory diet; and the Paleolithic diet-have become popular. This article discusses the diets commonly recommended to IBD patients and reviews the supporting data.

  14. Diet in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mazen; Saeian, Kia

    2011-04-01

    The past few years have seen a great expansion of our understanding of the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Much of the progress has been on the genetic basis of disease as well as the role of microbiota. These findings have magnified the role of the environmental component of this rather complex process. Recent advances have emanated from more in-depth, comprehensive, and at times nontraditional inquiry into the potential role of diet through its anti-inflammatory properties and modulation of microbiota. This concise review focuses on the novel aspects of research related to the potential role of diet in IBD.

  15. The Isothiocyanate Isolated from Moringa oleifera Shows Potent Anti-Inflammatory Activity in the Treatment of Murine Subacute Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Giacoppo, Sabrina; Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; De Nicola, Gina Rosalinda; Iori, Renato; Rollin, Patrick; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2017-02-01

    The present study was aimed at estimating a possible neuroprotective effect of glucomoringin (GMG) [4-(α-L-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl glucosinolate] bioactivated with the enzyme myrosinase to form the corresponding isothiocyanate [4-(α-L-rhamnopyranosyloxy)benzyl C; moringin] in the treatment or prevention of Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, the beneficial effects of moringin were compared with those of pure GMG, not enzymatically activated, in an in vivo experimental mouse model of subacute PD. Subacute PD was induced in C57BL/6 mice by administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Mice were pretreated daily for 1 week with moringin (10 mg/kg +5 μL myrosinase/mouse) and with GMG (10 mg/kg). Behavioral evaluations were also performed to assess motor deficits and bradykinesia in MPTP mice. Besides, assuming that pretreatment with moringin could modulate the triggering of inflammatory cascade with a correlated response, we tested its in vitro anti-inflammatory activity by using a model of RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. Achieved results in vivo showed a higher efficacy of moringin compared with GMG not only to modulate the inflammatory pathway but also oxidative stress and apoptotic pathways. In addition, the greater effectiveness of moringin in countering mainly the inflammatory pathway has been corroborated by the results obtained in vitro. The relevance and innovation of the present study lie in the possible use of a safe formulation of a bioactive compound, resulting from exogenous myrosinase hydrolysis of the natural phytochemical GMG, which can be used in clinical practice as a useful drug for the treatment or prevention of PD.

  16. [Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Meier, R

    1996-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease is still unknown. Several potential mechanisms are discussed. The etiological and therapeutic importance of nutrition is controversial. Though changes in dietary habits and incidence of inflammatory bowel disease during the last century were in parallel, no specific nutritional factor has been isolated. No dietary prophylaxis of inflammatory bowel disease is yet known; all dietary therapies in inflammatory bowel disease aim to improve nutritional support and to diminish inflammation by bowel rest. Children and adolescents gain in weight and height. Total parenteral nutrition will not substantially reduce disease activity and operation rates. Total parenteral nutrition can only be recommended in ulcerative colitis patients with severe disease in the initial phase and in Crohn's patients with severe malnutrition and intestinal complications. Enteral nutrition support is less effective in ulcerative colitis than in Crohn's disease. Reported remission rates on enteral nutrition are 25% for ulcerative colitis and up to 80% for Crohn. However, in active Crohn's disease enteral nutrition is less effective than standard therapy with methylprednisolone and sulfasalizine. It is generally believed that nutrition therapy in combination with drugs is the best treatment modality. There is no evidence to support the importance of any combination of the formula diets such as elemental, oligopeptide, or polymeric formulations. Administration of formula diets by nasogastric tubes all show similar remission rates. Whether newer diets supplemented with arginine, glutamine, omega-3-fatty acids or short chain fatty acids increase remission rates is not known. Further studies in this field are warranted.

  17. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Children)

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a defect in the body's immune system . continue What Are the Symptoms of IBD? Inflammatory bowel disease can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe. Symptoms can include: diarrhea that happens again and again, with or without ...

  18. Pharmacological nutrition in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Campos, F G; Waitzberg, D L; Teixeira, M G; Mucerino, D R; Kiss, D R; Habr-Gama, A

    2003-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases--ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease--are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with a high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission of disease in adults and promoting growth in children. Recent research has focused on the use of specific nutrients as primary treatment agents. Although some reports have indicated that glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants and immunonutrition with omega-3 fatty acids are an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, the beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these nutrients still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  19. Activation of coagulation in bullous pemphigoid and other eosinophil-related inflammatory skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marzano, A V; Tedeschi, A; Berti, E; Fanoni, D; Crosti, C; Cugno, M

    2011-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is a skin disease caused by autoantibodies to hemidesmosomal proteins BP180 and BP230, with eosinophils participating in blister formation. Tissue factor (TF), the initiator of coagulation, is embodied within the eosinophil granules and exposed upon activation. We evaluated the coagulation activation in patients with BP (63), chronic urticaria (CU; 20), atopic dermatitis (AD; 14), cutaneous drug reactions (CDRs; six), psoriasis (20), dermatitis herpetiformis (DH; four) and primary cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL; five), and in 40 healthy controls. Prothrombin fragment F1+2 and d-dimer (coagulation markers) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in all plasma samples and BP blister fluid. Skin TF expression was evaluated immunohistochemically in the patients and 20 controls. F1+2 and d-dimer levels were higher in BP plasma than in control plasma (P = 0·0001 for both), and dramatically high in blister fluid; both correlated positively with disease severity, esinophil counts and anti-BP180 antibodies (P = 0·006–0·0001). Plasma F1+2 and d-dimer levels were higher in the CU, AD and CDR patients than in controls (P = 0·0001 for all), but normal in the psoriasis, DH and CTCL patients. Skin TF was expressed in the BP (P = 0·0001), CU (P = 0·0001), AD (P = 0·001) and CDR patients (P = 0·01), but not in the psoriasis, DH or CTCL patients. Co-localization confocal microscopy studies confirmed eosinophils as the source of TF in 10 BP patients. The coagulation cascade is activated in BP and other eosinophil-mediated skin disorders, but not in non-eosinophil driven conditions. This hypercoagulability may contribute to inflammation, tissue damage and, possibly, thrombotic risk. PMID:21488867

  20. Outcome measures in inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are generally multifaceted disorders and, therefore, measurement of multiple outcomes is relevant to most of these diseases. Developments in outcome measures in the rheumatic diseases are promoted by the development of successful treatments. Outcome measurement will increasingly deal with measurement of low levels of disease activity and avoidance of disease consequences. It is an advantage for patient management and knowledge transfer if the same outcomes are used in practice and in trials. Continuous measures of change are generally the most powerful and, therefore, are preferred as primary outcomes in trials. For daily clinical practice, outcome measures should reflect the patients' state and have to be easily derivable. The objective of this review is to describe recent developments in outcome measures for inflammatory rheumatic diseases for trials and clinical practice, with an emphasis on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:19849821

  1. Inflammatory diseases modelling in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Morales Fénero, Camila Idelí; Colombo Flores, Alicia Angelina; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2016-01-01

    The ingest of diets with high content of fats and carbohydrates, low or no physical exercise and a stressful routine are part of the everyday lifestyle of most people in the western world. These conditions are triggers for different diseases with complex interactions between the host genetics, the metabolism, the immune system and the microbiota, including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), obesity and diabetes. The incidence of these disorders is growing worldwide; therefore, new strategies for its study are needed. Nowadays, the majority of researches are in use of murine models for understand the genetics, physiopathology and interaction between cells and signaling pathways to find therapeutic solutions to these diseases. The zebrafish, a little tropical water fish, shares 70% of our genes and conserves anatomic and physiological characteristics, as well as metabolical pathways, with mammals, and is rising as a new complementary model for the study of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Its high fecundity, fast development, transparency, versatility and low cost of maintenance makes the zebrafish an interesting option for new researches. In this review, we offer a discussion of the existing genetic and induced zebrafish models of two important Western diseases that have a strong inflammatory component, the IBD and the obesity. PMID:26929916

  2. Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities of Bouvardia ternifolia: potential implications in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, Giovanni; Huerta-Reyes, Maira; González-Cortazar, Manasés; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique; Silva-García, Raúl; Román-Ramos, Rubén; Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo

    2015-07-01

    Bouvardia ternifolia has been used medicinally to treat inflammation. In the present study, we investigate the anti-Alzheimer's potential effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of B. ternifolia through evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities, quantification of the percentage inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity, protection effect against β-amyloid fibrillar-induce neurotoxicity, and the identification of the main constituents. Our results show that B. ternifolia extract and ethyl acetate fraction induced anti-inflammatory effects by reducing inflammation by >70 %, while antioxidant test revealed significant IC50 values for flavonoid content fraction (30.67 ± 2.09 μg/ml) and ethyl acetate fraction (42.66 ± 0.93 μg/ml). The maximum inhibition of acetylcholinesterase was exhibited by scopoletin content fraction (38.43 ± 3.94 %), while ethyl acetate fraction exerted neuroprotective effect against β-amyloid peptide (83.97 ± 5.03 %). Phytochemical analysis, showed the presence of 3-O-quercetin glucopyranoside (415 mg/g), rutin (229.9 mg/g), ursolic and oleanolic acid (54 and 20.8 mg/g respectively), 3-O-quercetin rhamnopyranoside (12.8 mg/g), chlorogenic acid (9.5 mg/g), and scopoletin (1.38 mg/g). Our findings support the use of B. ternifolia since the extract induced significant neuroprotection against β-amyloid peptide, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-acetylcholinesterase effects that could be attributed to its contents of polyphenols, coumarins, and triterpenes, and encourage further studies for development of this extract as therapeutic agent in treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Selective Vitamin D Receptor Activation as Anti-Inflammatory Target in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Donate-Correa, J.; Domínguez-Pimentel, V.; Méndez-Pérez, M. L.; Muros-de-Fuentes, M.; Mora-Fernández, C.; Martín-Núñez, E.; Cazaña-Pérez, V.; Navarro-González, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor (VDR) activator used for treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease (CKD), has been associated with survival advantages, suggesting that this drug, beyond its ability to suppress parathyroid hormone, may have additional beneficial actions. In this prospective, nonrandomised, open-label, proof-of-concept study, we evaluated the hypothesis that selective vitamin D receptor activation with paricalcitol is an effective target to modulate inflammation in CKD patients. Eight patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate between 15 and 44 mL/min/1.73 m2 and an intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) level higher than 110 pg/mL received oral paricalcitol (1 μg/48 hours) as therapy for secondary hyperparathyroidism. Nine patients matched by age, sex, and stage of CKD, but a PTH level <110 pg/mL, were enrolled as a control group. Our results show that five months of paricalcitol administration were associated with a reduction in serum concentrations of hs-CRP (13.9%, P < 0.01), TNF-α (11.9%, P = 0.01), and IL-6 (7%, P < 0.05), with a nonsignificant increase of IL-10 by 16%. In addition, mRNA expression levels of the TNFα and IL-6 genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells decreased significantly by 30.8% (P = 0.01) and 35.4% (P = 0.01), respectively. In conclusion, selective VDR activation is an effective target to modulate inflammation in CKD. PMID:24511210

  4. Selective vitamin D receptor activation as anti-inflammatory target in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Donate-Correa, J; Domínguez-Pimentel, V; Méndez-Pérez, M L; Muros-de-Fuentes, M; Mora-Fernández, C; Martín-Núñez, E; Cazaña-Pérez, V; Navarro-González, J F

    2014-01-01

    Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor (VDR) activator used for treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease (CKD), has been associated with survival advantages, suggesting that this drug, beyond its ability to suppress parathyroid hormone, may have additional beneficial actions. In this prospective, nonrandomised, open-label, proof-of-concept study, we evaluated the hypothesis that selective vitamin D receptor activation with paricalcitol is an effective target to modulate inflammation in CKD patients. Eight patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate between 15 and 44 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and an intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) level higher than 110 pg/mL received oral paricalcitol (1  μg/48 hours) as therapy for secondary hyperparathyroidism. Nine patients matched by age, sex, and stage of CKD, but a PTH level <110 pg/mL, were enrolled as a control group. Our results show that five months of paricalcitol administration were associated with a reduction in serum concentrations of hs-CRP (13.9%, P < 0.01), TNF-α (11.9%, P = 0.01), and IL-6 (7%, P < 0.05), with a nonsignificant increase of IL-10 by 16%. In addition, mRNA expression levels of the TNFα and IL-6 genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells decreased significantly by 30.8% (P = 0.01) and 35.4% (P = 0.01), respectively. In conclusion, selective VDR activation is an effective target to modulate inflammation in CKD.

  5. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Gil, A

    2002-10-01

    Inflammation is overall a protective response, whose main goal is to liberate the human being of cellular lesions caused by micro-organisms, toxins, allergens, etc., as well as its consequences, and of death cells and necrotic tissues. Chronic inflammation, which is detrimental to tissues, is the basic pathogenic mechanism of hypersensitivity reactions against xenobiotics. Other frequent pathologies, for instance atherosclerosis, chronic hepatitis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), liver cirrhosis, lung fibrosis, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis are also chronic inflammatory diseases. Chemical mediators of inflammation are derived from blood plasma or different cell-type activity. Biogenic amines, eicosanoids and cytokines are within the most important mediators of inflammatory processes. The different activities of eicosanoids derived from arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6) versus those derived from eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5 n-3) are one of the most important mechanisms to explain why n-3, or omega-3, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) exhibit anti-inflammatory properties in many inflammatory diseases. Dietary supplements ranging 1-8 g per day of n-3 PUFA have been reportedly beneficial in the treatment of IBD, eczema, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, recent experimental studies in rats with experimental ulcerative colitis, induced by intrarectal injection of trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid, have documented that treatment with n-3 long-chain PUFA reduces mucosal damage as assessed by biochemical and histological markers of inflammation. Moreover, the defence antioxidant system in this model is enhanced in treated animals, provided that the n-3 PUFA supply is adequately preserved from oxidation.

  6. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets—such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide, and polyol diet; the specific carbohydrate diet; the anti-inflammatory diet; and the Paleolithic diet—have become popular. This article discusses the diets commonly recommended to IBD patients and reviews the supporting data. PMID:27118948

  7. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Treatment and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) STDs & Infertility STDs & Pregnancy Syphilis Trichomoniasis Other STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive Health ... Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) STDs & Infertility STDs & Pregnancy Syphilis Trichomoniasis Other STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive Health ...

  8. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) STDs & Infertility STDs & Pregnancy Syphilis Trichomoniasis Other STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive Health ... Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) STDs & Infertility STDs & Pregnancy Syphilis Trichomoniasis Other STDs See Also Pregnancy Reproductive Health ...

  9. Fatigue is highly associated with poor health-related quality of life, disability and depression in newly-diagnosed patients with inflammatory bowel disease, independent of disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, B L; Zoëga, H; Shah, S A; LeLeiko, N; Lidofsky, S; Bright, R; Flowers, N; Law, M; Moniz, H; Merrick, M; Sands, B E

    2014-01-01

    Background Fatigue is common in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Data on fatigue in newly diagnosed patients are unavailable. Aim To report prevalence of fatigue in newly diagnosed CD and UC patients and examine its association with health-related quality of life (HRQOL), depression and disability. Methods The Ocean State Crohn's and Colitis Area Registry (OSCCAR) is a statewide cohort of newly diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease patients in Rhode Island. Fatigue was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue Scale. Patients were administered instruments measuring HRQOL, overall disability and work impairment, and depression. Results Fatigue was prevalent in 26.4% of 220 subjects. Cohen's d effect sizes for fatigue were large: Short-Form 36 Health Survey mental health component (CD 1.5, UC 1.4) and physical health component (CD 1.4, UC 1.4), EuroQol-5D valuation of current health state (CD 1.2, UC 1.0), Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (CD 1.9, UC 1.6) and Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale (CD 1.8, UC 1.7). Fatigued patients reported more work impairment (Score difference: CD 29.5%, UC 23.8%) and activity impairment (score difference: CD 32.3%, UC 25.7%) on the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire. Fatigue's association with all scores remained highly significant despite controlling for disease activity. Conclusions Fatigue is strongly associated with poor HRQOL, disability and depression similarly in CD and UC even when controlling for disease activity. Fatigue's association with a wide range of patient-reported outcome measures suggests that monitoring fatigue is a simple way to screen for overall disruption in patient life. PMID:24612278

  10. Zinc absorption in inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Valberg, L.S.; Flanagan, P.R.; Kertesz, A.; Bondy, D.C.

    1986-07-01

    Zinc absorption was measured in 29 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and a wide spectrum of disease activity to determine its relationship to disease activity, general nutritional state, and zinc status. Patients with severe disease requiring either supplementary oral or parenteral nutrition were excluded. The mean 65ZnCl2 absorption, in the patients, determined using a 65Zn and 51Cr stool-counting test, 45 +/- 17% (SD), was significantly lower than the values, 54 +/- 16%, in 30 healthy controls, P less than 0.05. Low 65ZnCl2 absorption was related to undernutrition, but not to disease activity in the absence of undernutrition or to zinc status estimated by leukocyte zinc measurements. Mean plasma zinc or leukocyte zinc concentrations in patients did not differ significantly from controls, and only two patients with moderate disease had leukocyte zinc values below the 5th percentile of normal. In another group of nine patients with inflammatory bowel disease of mild-to-moderate severity and minimal nutritional impairment, 65Zn absorption from an extrinsically labeled turkey test meal was 31 +/- 10% compared to 33 +/- 7% in 17 healthy controls, P greater than 0.1. Thus, impairment in 65ZnCl2 absorption in the patients selected for this study was only evident in undernourished persons with moderate or severe disease activity, but biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency was uncommon, and clinical features of zinc depletion were not encountered.

  11. [Inflammatory bowel disease: importance of nutrition today].

    PubMed

    Jorquera Plaza, F; Espinel Díez, J; Olcoz Goñi, J L

    1997-01-01

    Malnutrition is a very common situation in patients inflammatory with intestinal disease (IID), which can be caused by a multitude of factors. It has been shown that nutritional support not only improves the nutritional condition of the patients, but in Crohn's disease it also has an effect on the activity of the disease, although this effect is smaller than that of steroids. Elemental diets are no more efficient than polymeric diets except under very special circumstances, but they are more expensive and patients tolerate them worse. A digestive pause is not recommended unless there is an absolute contraindication for the use of the digestive tract. Therefore, parenteral nutrition, which is more expensive and can cause serious complications, will be reserved for very specific indications. The use of fish oil supplements, either because it competes with arachidonic acid and prevents the initiation of the inflammatory cascade, or because it decreases the production of cytokines, has shown to be potentially useful in inflammatory intestinal disease, and this must be confirmed by further studies. Short chain fatty acids enemas have shown promising results in distal ulcerative colitis but the lack of homogeneity in the studies makes it necessary for these results to be consolidated in new studies. Nutritional support is especially interesting in children with inflammatory intestinal disease given that the growth retardation which is often seen in severe cases, can be controlled by adequate enteral or parenteral diets.

  12. Inflammatory bowel diseases: principles of nutritional therapy.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Waitzberg, Dan L; Teixeira, Magaly Gemio; Mucerino, Donato Roberto; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Kiss, Desidério R

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease- are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and to prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission in adults and promoting growth in children. Due to its low complication rate and lower costs, enteral nutrition should be preferred over total parenteral nutrition whenever possible. Both present equal effectiveness in primary therapy for remission of active Crohn's disease. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted, especially in patients presumed to need total parenteral nutrition. Recent research has focused on the use of nutrients as primary treatment agents. Immunonutrition is an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, modulating the inflammation and changing the eicosanoid synthesis profile. However, beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these and other nutrients (glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants) still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  13. Association Between Genetic Variation in FOXO3 and Reductions in Inflammation and Disease Activity in Inflammatory Polyarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Viatte, Sebastien; Lee, James C.; Fu, Bo; Espéli, Marion; Lunt, Mark; De Wolf, Jack N. E.; Wheeler, Lily; Reynolds, John A.; Castelino, Madhura; Symmons, Deborah P. M.; Lyons, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Genetic variation in FOXO3 (tagged by rs12212067) has been associated with a milder course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and shown to limit monocyte‐driven inflammation through a transforming growth factor β1–dependent pathway. This genetic association, however, has not been consistently observed in other RA cohorts. We sought to clarify the contribution of FOXO3 to prognosis in RA by combining detailed analysis of nonradiographic disease severity measures with an in vivo model of arthritis. Methods Collagen‐induced arthritis, the most commonly used mouse model of RA, was used to assess how Foxo3 contributes to arthritis severity. Using clinical, serologic, and biochemical methods, the arthritis that developed in mice carrying a loss‐of‐function mutation in Foxo3 was compared with that which occurred in littermate controls. The association of rs12212067 with nonradiographic measures of RA severity, including the C‐reactive protein level, the swollen joint count, the tender joint count, the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints, and the Health Assessment Questionnaire score, were modeled longitudinally in a large prospective cohort of patients with early RA. Results Loss of Foxo3 function resulted in more severe arthritis in vivo (both clinically and histologically) and was associated with higher titers of anticollagen antibodies and interleukin‐6 in the blood. Similarly, rs12212067 (a single‐nucleotide polymorphism that increases FOXO3 transcription) was associated with reduced inflammation, both biochemically and clinically, and with lower RA activity scores. Conclusion Consistent with its known role in restraining inflammatory responses, FOXO3 limits the severity of in vivo arthritis and, through genetic variation that increases its transcription, is associated with reduced inflammation and disease activity in RA patients, effects that result in less radiographic damage. PMID:27214848

  14. Genetics of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Dermot P B; Kugathasan, Subra; Cho, Judy H

    2015-10-01

    In this review, we provide an update on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, we summarize progress in defining the functional consequences of associated alleles for coding and noncoding genetic variation. In the small minority of loci where major association signals correspond to nonsynonymous variation, we summarize studies defining their functional effects and implications for therapeutic targeting. Importantly, the large majority of GWAS-associated loci involve noncoding variation, many of which modulate levels of gene expression. Recent expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have established that the expression of most human genes is regulated by noncoding genetic variations. Significant advances in defining the epigenetic landscape have demonstrated that IBD GWAS signals are highly enriched within cell-specific active enhancer marks. Studies in European ancestry populations have dominated the landscape of IBD genetics studies, but increasingly, studies in Asian and African-American populations are being reported. Common variation accounts for only a modest fraction of the predicted heritability and the role of rare genetic variation of higher effects (ie, odds ratios markedly deviating from 1) is increasingly being identified through sequencing efforts. These sequencing studies have been particularly productive in more severe very early onset cases. A major challenge in IBD genetics will be harnessing the vast array of genetic discovery for clinical utility through emerging precision medical initiatives. In this article, we discuss the rapidly evolving area of direct-to-consumer genetic testing and the current utility of clinical exome sequencing, especially in very early onset, severe IBD cases. We summarize recent progress in the pharmacogenetics of IBD with respect to partitioning patient responses to anti-TNF and thiopurine therapies. Highly collaborative studies across research centers and

  15. Dietary fortificant iron intake is negatively associated with quality of life in patients with mildly active inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anaemia and oral iron supplementation have been associated negatively with quality of life, and with adverse effects, respectively, in subjects with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Hence, the risk-benefit ratio of oral iron is not understood in this patient group. The present case–control study investigated whether dietary iron intake impacts on quality of life in IBD patients. Methods Quality of life, habitual dietary iron intakes and iron requirements were assessed in 29 patients with inactive or mildly active IBD as well as in 28 healthy control subjects. Results As expected, quality of life was worse in IBD patients as a whole in comparison to healthy controls according to EuroQol score and EuroQol VAS percentage (6.9 ± 1.6 vs 5.3 ± 0.6; p< 0.0001 and 77 ± 14% vs 88 ± 12%; p=0.004 respectively). For IBD subjects, 21/29 were iron deplete based upon serum iron responses to oral iron but, overall, were non-anaemic with mean haemoglobin of 13.3 ± 1.5 g/dL, and there was no difference in their quality of life compared to 8/29 iron replete subjects (Hb 14.0 ± 0.8 g/dL). Interestingly, total dietary iron intake was significantly negatively associated with quality of life in IBD patients, specifically for non-haem iron and, more specifically, for fortificant iron. Moreover, for total non-haem iron the negative association disappeared when fortificant iron values were subtracted. Finally, further sub-analysis indicated that the negative association between (fortificant) dietary iron intake and quality of life in IBD patients is driven by findings in patients with mildly active disease rather than in patients with quiescent disease. Conclusions Iron deficiency per se (i.e. without concomitant anaemia) does not appear to further affect quality of life in IBD patients with inactive or mildly active disease. However, in this preliminary study, dietary iron intake, particularly fortificant iron, appears to be significantly negatively

  16. Evaluation of nitric oxide scavenging activity, in vitro and ex vivo, of selected medicinal plants traditionally used in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Basu, Subhalakshmi; Hazra, Banasri

    2006-10-01

    Steroidal and non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, despite their various side effects, are in great demand worldwide. Alternatively, herbal formulations provide relief to a large percentage of the population suffering from inflammatory diseases. Therefore, such practices need to be rationalized through a mechanistic approach. Thus, four traditional medicinal plants, namely Ventilago madraspatana Gaertn., Rubia cordifolia Linn., Lantana camara Linn. and Morinda citrifolia Linn. were selected for a study on the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO*), a key mediator in the phenomenon of inflammation, signifying the presence of effective antiinflammatory constituents therein. Plant samples were extracted with different solvents for evaluation of their inhibitory activity on NO* produced in vitro from sodium nitroprusside, and in LPS-activated murine peritoneal macrophages, ex vivo. Further, the inhibition of NO* synthesis was correlated with the reduction of iNOS protein expression through Western blot. Notable NO* scavenging activity was exhibited in vitro by some extracts of V. madraspatana, R. cordifolia and L. camara (IC(50) < 0.2 mg/mL). Most of them showed marked inhibition (60%-80%), ex vivo, at a dose of 80 microg/mL without appreciable cytotoxic effect on the cultured macrophages. Immunoblot analysis confirmed that the modulatory effect of the samples had occurred through suppression of iNOS protein.

  17. Epidemiology and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2013-03-14

    The role of alcohol in causing or aggravating the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease is unclear. For finding a conclusive answer for this valuable question we conducted this review. Only two studies were identified that successfully fulfilled our inclusive criteria. Usual consumption of alcohol reduced the risk compared with less frequent use (odds ratio = 0.57, 95%CI: 0.37-0.86). Light alcoholic drinking has protective effects against development of ulcerative colitis. But this inverse association disappeared when smoking was included.

  18. Transcription Factors Regulating Inflammatory Cytokine Production Are Differentially Expressed in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Behçet Disease Depending on Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Min-Yeong; Yun, Su Jin; Lee, Mi Jin; Kim, Kyongmin

    2017-01-01

    Background Behçet disease (BD) is a relapsing inflammatory disease with increased production of inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well known. Objective To analyze whether the differential expression of transcription factors is involved in the increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 production by PBMCs of BD patients compared to healthy controls (HCs). Methods Expression of transcription factors was examined by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Cytokine production by CD11b+ cells transfected with siRNAs against transcription factors was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results In the absence of lipopolysaccharide stimulation, the transcript level of CCAAT-enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) β was increased in PBMCs from patients with active BD compared to that in PBMCs from patients with stable BD. The C/EBPδ transcript level was higher in PBMCs from patients with active BD than in those from HCs. The activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) transcript level was increased in PBMCs from patients with stable BD compared to that in PBMCs from HCs. siRNAs targeting C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ significantly reduced the production of IL-6 and TNF-α in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated CD11b+ cells from patients with BD as well as from HCs. Conclusion We found differential expression of C/EBPβ, C/EBPδ, and ATF3 in PBMCs from patients with BD depending on disease activity, indicating the involvement of these molecules in BD pathogenesis.

  19. Targeting mast cells in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Reber, Laurent L; Frossard, Nelly

    2014-06-01

    Although mast cells have long been known to play a critical role in anaphylaxis and other allergic diseases, they also participate in some innate immune responses and may even have some protective functions. Data from the study of mast cell-deficient mice have facilitated our understanding of some of the molecular mechanisms driving mast cell functions during both innate and adaptive immune responses. This review presents an overview of the biology of mast cells and their potential involvement in various inflammatory diseases. We then discuss some of the current pharmacological approaches used to target mast cells and their products in several diseases associated with mast cell activation.

  20. Over-reaching beyond disease activity: the influence of anxiety and medical economic burden on health-related quality of life in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xia-peng; Mao, Ren; Chen, Bai-li; Qiu, Yun; Zhang, Sheng-hong; He, Yao; Chen, Jie; Zeng, Zhi-rong; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Chen, Min-hu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Many patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have impaired health-related quality of life (HRQOL). The influence of psychological and economic factors on HRQOL has not been fully elucidated in IBD. Therefore, we aimed to identify the predictors of HRQOL in an IBD cohort. Patients and methods This was a cross-sectional cohort study of patients presenting to our tertiary IBD center. HRQOL was measured using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ). Anxiety and depression were assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Perceived stress and perceived social support were also assessed by standardized scales. Demographic, socioeconomic and clinical data were obtained from a prespecified questionnaire and patients’ medical records. Univariate analyses and multiple regression analysis were performed to identify predictors of HRQOL. Results A total of 242 IBD patients were recruited, and the questionnaire return rate was 90.5% (219/242). The prevalence rates of anxiety and depression were 24.7% and 17.4%, respectively. In all, 30.6% of the patients spent over half of their income to cover medical costs. Multivariate analysis revealed that anxiety symptoms (P<0.001), active disease (P<0.001) and higher medical expenditures (P=0.001) were strong and independent predictors of reduced HRQOL. Conclusion Psychological factors and costs of medical care strongly impair HRQOL in IBD, independent of the disease activity. Psychological counseling and socioeconomic support programs should be considered for integration into the management of IBD patients. PMID:28053510

  1. Quantitative assessment of overall inflammatory bowel disease activity using labelled leucocytes: a direct comparison between indium-111 and technetium-99m HMPAO methods.

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, J C; Giaffer, M H; Tindale, W B; Holdsworth, C D

    1995-01-01

    The ideal imaging method in inflammatory bowel disease would reliably detect inflammation, identify the correct intestinal location, and assess the severity of the disease. The aim of this study was to compare scintigraphic methods of quantifying overall disease activity using both indium-111 (111In) and technetium-99M (99mTc) HMPAO labelled leucocyte scans. The four day faecal excretion of 111In was measured after 111In scintigraphy in 24 patients known to have inflammatory bowel disease. The same patients also underwent 99mTc HMPAO scanning. The scans were performed 10 days or less apart with no changes in treatment between scans. Bowel activity on the 99mTc HMPAO scans was assessed using a computer based method (scan score) and a visual grading method in a further 54 99mTc HMPAO. The results showed a close correlation between inflammatory activity defined by faecal 111In excretion and the scan score generated from the computer analysis of the 99mTc HMPAO image (Spearman rank correlation: rs = 0.78; p < 0.001). Accurate information to localise inflammatory activity could be obtained by simple visual assessment of both types of scan images, although image quality was superior with 99mTc HMPAO. Qualification of disease activity from 99mTc HMPAO images by visual grading was associated with a large variability, only 69% of scans had similar scores when graded by three observers. Computer generated image analysis was more reproducible. In conclusion, in inflammatory bowel disease 99mTc HMPAO scintigraphy and faecal 111In excretion correlated well. Either method can quantify and localise the inflammation. As 99mTc HMPAO scanning provides a quicker result, with a lower radiation dose, and avoids faecal collection, it may be the preferred method. Images Figure 2 PMID:8549945

  2. Microbiota biodiversity in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a significant role in human health and energy balance, and provides protection against disease states. An altered balance between microbiota and its host (dysbiosis) would appear to contribute to the development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Crohn’s Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC). CD and UC are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tes. PMID:24684926

  3. Mucosal cytokine network in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, Akira; Yagi, Yuhki; Shioya, Makoto; Nishida, Atsushi; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) are characterized by ongoing mucosal inflammation in which dysfunction of the host immunologic response against dietary factors and commensal bacteria is involved. The chronic inflammatory process leads to disruption of the epithelial barrier, and the formation of epithelial ulceration. This permits easy access for the luminal microbiota and dietary antigens to cells resident in the lamina propria, and stimulates further pathological immune cell responses. Cytokines are essential mediators of the interactions between activated immune cells and non-immune cells, including epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The clinical efficacy of targeting TNF-α clearly indicates that cytokines are the therapeutic targets in IBD patients. In this manuscript, we focus on the biological activities of recently-reported cytokines [Interleukin (IL)-17 cytokine family, IL-31 and IL-32], which might play a role through interaction with TNF-α in the pathophysiology of IBD. PMID:18777592

  4. Video capsule endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has evolved to become an important tool for the non-invasive examination of the small bowel, which hitherto had been relatively inaccessible to direct visualisation. VCE has been shown to play a role in monitoring the activity of small bowel Crohn’s disease and can be used to assess the response to anti-inflammatory treatment in Crohn’s disease. For those patients with Crohn’s disease who have undergone an intestinal resection, VCE has been assessed as a tool to detect post-operative recurrence. VCE may also aid in the reclassification of patients with a diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unclassified to Crohn’s disease. The evolution of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) has expanded the application of this technology further. The use of CCE to assess the activity of ulcerative colitis has been described. This advance in capsule technology has also fuelled interest in its potential role as a minimally invasive tool to assess the whole of GI tract opening the possibility of its use for the panenteric assessment of Crohn’s disease. VCE is a safe procedure. However, the risk of a retained capsule is higher in patients with suspected or confirmed Crohn’s disease compared with patients having VCE examination for other indications. A retained video capsule is rare after successful passage of a patency capsule which may be utilised to pre-screen patients undergoing VCE. This paper describes the use of VCE in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27499830

  5. Inflammatory bowel disease and thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Zezos, Petros; Kouklakis, Georgios; Saibil, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of vascular complications. Thromboembolic complications, both venous and arterial, are serious extraintestinal manifestations complicating the course of IBD and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Patients with IBD are more prone to thromboembolic complications and IBD per se is a risk factor for thromboembolic disease. Data suggest that thrombosis is a specific feature of IBD that can be involved in both the occurrence of thromboembolic events and the pathogenesis of the disease. The exact etiology for this special association between IBD and thromboembolism is as yet unknown, but it is thought that multiple acquired and inherited factors are interacting and producing the increased tendency for thrombosis in the local intestinal microvasculature, as well as in the systemic circulation. Clinicians’ awareness of the risks, and their ability to promptly diagnose and manage tromboembolic complications are of vital importance. In this review we discuss how thromboembolic disease is related to IBD, specifically focusing on: (1) the epidemiology and clinical features of thromboembolic complications in IBD; (2) the pathophysiology of thrombosis in IBD; and (3) strategies for the prevention and management of thromboembolic complications in IBD patients. PMID:25320522

  6. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Giannini, S; Martes, C

    2006-09-01

    Anemia is a frequent extraenteric complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). A systematic review of the literature shows that the overall prevalence of anemia ranges from 8.8% to 73.7% but differs whether in a setting of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. A disabling complication of IBD, anemia worsens the patient's general condition and quality of life, and increases hospitalization rates. Different factors, including vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency, bone marrow suppression secondary to drug therapy, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the coexistence of myelodysplastic syndromes are involved in the pathogenesis of anemia in IBD. The main types of anemia in IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia accompanying chronic diseases. Correct diagnostic definition of anemia is a fundamental step in guiding the choice of therapeutic options, since the co-presence of different pathogenetic factors may sometimes require a more complex treatment plan. A review of anemia in IBD, its pathogenetic features, epidemiology, diagnosis and therapy based on evidence from recent studies is the focus of this article.

  7. Changes in ion transport in inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Michael

    2006-03-29

    Ion transport is essential for maintenance of transmembranous and transcellular electric potential, fluid transport and cellular volume. Disturbance of ion transport has been associated with cellular dysfunction, intra and extracellular edema and abnormalities of epithelial surface liquid volume. There is increasing evidence that conditions characterized by an intense local or systemic inflammatory response are associated with abnormal ion transport. This abnormal ion transport has been involved in the pathogenesis of conditions like hypovolemia due to fluid losses, hyponatremia and hypokalemia in diarrhoeal diseases, electrolyte abnormalities in pyelonephritis of early infancy, septicemia induced pulmonary edema, and in hypersecretion and edema induced by inflammatory reactions of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract. Components of membranous ion transport systems, which have been shown to undergo a change in function during an inflammatory response include the sodium potassium ATPase, the epithelial sodium channel, the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and calcium activated chloride channels and the sodium potassium chloride co-transporter. Inflammatory mediators, which influence ion transport are tumor necrosis factor, gamma interferon, interleukins, transforming growth factor, leukotrienes and bradykinin. They trigger the release of specific messengers like prostaglandins, nitric oxide and histamine which alter ion transport system function through specific receptors, intracellular second messengers and protein kinases. This review summarizes data on in vivo measurements of changes in ion transport in acute inflammatory conditions and in vitro studies, which have explored the underlying mechanisms. Potential interventions directed at a correction of the observed abnormalities are discussed.

  8. Immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ardid, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of idiopathic, chronic and relapsing inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. Familial and epidemiological studies have stressed the involvement of genetic factors and have also shown the critical role of environmental factors such as sanitation and hygiene in the development of IBD. However, the molecular mechanisms of intestinal inflammation in IBD have long remained unknown. In recent years, the study of susceptibility genes involved in the detection of bacterial components and in the regulation of the host immune response has shed light onto the potential role of intestinal pathogens and gut flora in IBD immunobiology. This review presents current knowledge on intestinal epithelial barrier alterations and on dysfunction of mucosal innate and acquired immune responses in IBD. The data support the etiological hypothesis which argues that pathogenic intestinal bacteria and/or infectious agents initiate and perpetuate the inflammation of the gut through disruption of tolerance towards the commensal microbiota in an individual with genetic vulnerability. PMID:21487504

  9. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  10. MR colonography in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rimola, Jordi; Ordás, Ingrid

    2014-02-01

    MR colonography has a high diagnostic accuracy for detecting Crohn disease (CD) activity and determining the extent and severity of lesions. In the setting of stricturing CD, MR colonography can provide a detailed map of the lesions, which is useful for clinical decision making. MR colonography can be used as an alternative to conventional colonoscopy in the setting of CD, or as a complementary tool in selected patients with ulcerative colitis. This article reviews the spectrum of MR colonography findings in colonic inflammatory bowel disease and discusses the potential applications and limitations of MR colonography.

  11. The role of methionine metabolism in inflammatory bowel disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methionine (Met) cycle activity is critical for normal cell functions. Met metabolites S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and methylthioadenosine (MTA) are anti-inflammatory, yet their role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is poorly understood. We hypothesize that active IBD leads to changes in Met metab...

  12. Disease monitoring in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shannon; Malter, Lisa; Hudesman, David

    2015-01-01

    The optimal method for monitoring quiescent disease in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis is yet to be determined. Endoscopic evaluation with ileocolonoscopy is the gold standard but is invasive, costly, and time-consuming. There are many commercially available biomarkers that may be used in clinical practice to evaluate disease status in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the most widely adopted biomarkers are C-reactive protein (CRP) and fecal calprotectin (FC). This review summarizes the evidence for utilizing CRP and FC for monitoring IBD during clinical remission and after surgical resection. Endoscopic correlation with CRP and FC is evaluated in each disease state. Advantages and drawbacks of each biomarker are discussed with special consideration of isolated ileal CD. Fecal immunochemical testing, traditionally used for colorectal cancer screening, is mentioned as a potential new alternative assay in the evaluation of IBD. Based on a mixture of information gleaned from biomarkers, clinical status, and endoscopic evaluation, the best treatment decisions can be made for the patient with IBD. PMID:26523100

  13. Interaction of obesity and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Jason W; Zisman, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory condition of unknown etiology that is thought to result from a combination of genetic, immunologic and environmental factors. The incidence of IBD has been increasing in recent decades, especially in developing and developed nations, and this is hypothesized to be in part related to the change in dietary and lifestyle factors associated with modernization. The prevalence of obesity has risen in parallel with the rise in IBD, suggesting a possible shared environmental link between these two conditions. Studies have shown that obesity impacts disease development and response to therapy in patients with IBD and other autoimmune conditions. The observation that adipose tissue produces pro-inflammatory adipokines provides a potential mechanism for the observed epidemiologic links between obesity and IBD, and this has developed into an active area of investigative inquiry. Additionally, emerging evidence highlights a role for the intestinal microbiota in the development of both obesity and IBD, representing another potential mechanistic connection between the two conditions. In this review we discuss the epidemiology of obesity and IBD, possible pathophysiologic links, and the clinical impact of obesity on IBD disease course and implications for management. PMID:27672284

  14. Chinese herbal medicine (Tuhuai extract) exhibits topical anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activity in murine disease models

    PubMed Central

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Shi, Yuejun; Man, Mona; Lee, Seung Hun; Demerjian, Marianne; Chang, Sandra; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Elias, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    While psoriasis is one of the most common skin disorders in humans, effective, safe and inexpensive treatments are still largely unavailable. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been used for centuries for treating psoriasis and several reports claim that systemic administration of one such CHM, Tuhuai, mainly composed of flos sophorae, smilax glabra roxb and licorice, is effective in psoriasis. However, the mechanisms by which this CHM improves psoriasis are not yet clear. Two universal features of psoriasis are epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. Moreover, drugs that specifically inhibit epidermal hyperplasia and/or inflammation are widely used to treat psoriasis. Here, we investigated whether topical applications of Tuhuai extract exhibit anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activities in two murine models of inflammatory dermatoses. To assess Tuhuai's potential anti-proliferative effect, we disrupted epidermal barrier function twice-daily for 4 days in normal hairless mice followed by topical applications of either 1% Tuhuai extract or Vehicle to both flanks immediately after each barrier perturbation. Changes in epidermal proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL staining. To assess the anti-inflammatory effects of Tuhuai, both irritant (phorbol ester) and acute allergic contact dermatitis (oxazolone) models were used. Whereas topical Tuhuai extract did not alter epidermal proliferation or induce irritation in normal skin, it both reduced epidermal hyperplasia in the epidermal hyperproliferative model, and reduced inflammation in both irritant and allergic contact dermatitis models. As topical Tuhuai extract exhibits anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory properties in a variety of human models of inflammatory dermatoses, Tuhuai could provide an effective, relatively safe and inexpensive therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses, including psoriasis. PMID:18341576

  15. Chinese herbal medicine (Tuhuai extract) exhibits topical anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activity in murine disease models.

    PubMed

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Shi, Yuejun; Man, Mona; Lee, Seung Hun; Demerjian, Marianne; Chang, Sandra; Feingold, Kenneth R; Elias, Peter M

    2008-08-01

    While psoriasis is one of the most common skin disorders in humans, effective, safe and inexpensive treatments are still largely unavailable. Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been used for centuries for treating psoriasis and several reports claim that systemic administration of one such CHM, Tuhuai, mainly composed of flos sophorae, smilax glabra roxb and licorice, is effective in psoriasis. However, the mechanisms by which this CHM improves psoriasis are not yet clear. Two universal features of psoriasis are epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation. Moreover, drugs that specifically inhibit epidermal hyperplasia and/or inflammation are widely used to treat psoriasis. Here, we investigated whether topical applications of Tuhuai extract exhibit anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory activities in two murine models of inflammatory dermatoses. To assess Tuhuai's potential anti-proliferative effect, we disrupted epidermal barrier function twice-daily for 4 days in normal hairless mice followed by topical applications of either 1% Tuhuai extract or Vehicle to both flanks immediately after each barrier perturbation. Changes in epidermal proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and TUNEL staining. To assess the anti-inflammatory effects of Tuhuai, both irritant (phorbol ester) and acute allergic contact dermatitis (oxazolone) models were used. Whereas topical Tuhuai extract did not alter epidermal proliferation or induce irritation in normal skin, it both reduced epidermal hyperplasia in the epidermal hyperproliferative model, and reduced inflammation in both irritant and allergic contact dermatitis models. As topical Tuhuai extract exhibits anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory properties in a variety of human models of inflammatory dermatoses, Tuhuai could provide an effective, relatively safe and inexpensive therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory dermatoses, including psoriasis.

  16. Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum procumbens): no evidence for anti-inflammatory activity in the treatment of arthritic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, L. W.; Znamirowska, M.; Paul, C. J.

    1983-01-01

    Devil's Claw (Harpagophytum procumbens), an herbal product being marketed in Canada as a home remedy for the relief of arthritic disease, was screened for efficacy with standard preclinical screening methods. At doses 100 times or greater than the recommended daily dose for humans, Devil's Claw was completely ineffective in reducing edema of the rat hind foot induced by either lambda-carrageenan or Mycobacterium butyricum. At concentrations of up to 1 x 10(5) microgram/ml, Devil's Claw was also ineffective as an in-vitro inhibitor of prostaglandin synthetase. These results indicate that Devil's Claw lacks the anti-inflammatory properties possessed by all antiarthritic drugs of the nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory analgesic type. PMID:6407745

  17. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unknown, but it is thought to arise from an aberrant immune response to a change in colonic environment in a genetically susceptible individual. The intestinal microbiota are located at the complex interface of the epithelial barrier and are sensitive to changes in environmental factors, such as diets, drugs or smoking and signals derived from the intestinal immune system and the gut-brain axis. In patients with IBD, an imbalance in the structural and/or functional configuration of the intestinal microbiota leading to the disruption of the host-microorganism homeostasis (dysbiosis) has been reproducibly reported. As animal models of IBD require gut bacteria to induce inflammation, it is hypothesized that the dysbiosis observed in patients is not only a surrogate of changes at the intestinal barrier but also a potential cause or at least enhancer of the mucosal inflammatory process. That burgeoning notion has stimulated thoughts to modify the intestinal microbiota and rekindled interest in previous work on the efficacy of antibiotics in patients with IBD. The feasibility and tremendous success of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) to treat antibiotic resistant Clostridium difficile has finally paved the way to embark into the unchartered territory of IBD using FMT. Different routes and number of administrations, choices of donors, disease status and permitted therapies might have contributed to mixed results, particularly from the so far published randomized controlled trials. However, microbiome analysis suggests that a durable transplantation of donor bacteria to the host appears feasible and might be associated with a higher likelihood of response. On the other hand, this raises the concern of transplanting not only anti-inflammatory active bacteria and their products, but also not-yet-known dispositions for other diseases including cancer. Attempts are being made to better characterize those components of

  18. Mucins and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, T.; Longman, R.; Corfield, A.; Probert, C.

    2000-01-01

    There is a layer of mucus lining the gastrointestinal tract, which acts as both a lubricant and as a physical barrier between luminal contents and the mucosal surface. The mucins that make up this layer consist of a protein backbone with oligosaccharides attached to specific areas of the protein core. These areas are called the variable number tandem repeat regions. The degree of glycosylation of the mucins is central to their role in the mucus barrier. The oligosaccharides are variable and complex. It has been demonstrated that the degree of sulphation and sialylation and the length of the oligosaccharide chains all vary in inflammatory bowel disease. These changes can alter the function of the mucins. Mucins are broadly divided into two groups, those that are secreted and those that are membrane bound. The major mucins present in the colorectum are MUC1, MUC2, MUC3, and MUC4.
Trefoils are a group of small peptides that have an important role in the mucus layer. Three trefoils have been demonstrated so far. They seem to play a part in mucosal protection and in mucosal repair. They may help to stabilise the mucus layer by cross linking with mucins to aid formation of stable gels. Trefoils can be expressed in the ulcer associated cell lineage, a glandular structure that can occur in the inflamed mucosa. There seem to be differences in the expression of trefoils in the colon and the small bowel, which may imply different method of mucosal repair.


Keywords: mucins; trefoil; Crohn's disease; colitis PMID:10908374

  19. Risk of cardiovascular disease in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping; Jia, Fangyuan; Zhang, Bao; Zhang, Peiying

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) can arise because of chronic inflammation and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one such disease where the risk for CVD and eventual heart failure is increased considerably. The incidence of IBD, which refers to both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, has been on the increase in several countries and is a potential risk factor for CVD. Although IBD can potentially cause venous thromboembolism, its significance in arterial stiffening, atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction is only being realized now and it is currently under debate. However, several studies with large groups of patients have demonstrated the association of IBD with heart disease. It has been suggested that systemic inflammation as observed in IBD patients leads to oxidative stress and elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which lead to phenotypic changes in smooth muscle cells and sets into motion a series of events that culminate in atherosclerosis and CVD. Besides the endogenous factors and cytokines, it has been suggested that due to the compromised intestinal mucosal barrier, endotoxins and bacterial lipopolysaccharides produced by intestinal microflora can enter into circulation and activate inflammatory responses that lead to atherosclerosis. Therapeutic management of IBD-associated heart diseases cannot be achieved with simple anti-inflammatory drugs such as corticosteroids and anti-TNF-α antibodies. Treatment with existing medications for CVDs, aspirin, platelet aggregation inhibitors and statins is found to be acceptable and safe. Nevertheless, further research is needed to assess their efficacy in IBD patients suffering from heart disease. PMID:28352306

  20. Skin Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Brian L.; Chandra, Stephanie; Shih, David Quan

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disease that affects the intestinal tract via an inflammatory process. Patients who suffer from IBD often have diseases that affect multiple other organ systems as well. These are called extraintestinal manifestations and can be just as, if not more debilitating than the intestinal inflammation itself. The skin is one of the most commonly affected organ systems in patients who suffer from IBD. The scientific literature suggests that a disturbance of the equilibrium between host defense and tolerance, and the subsequent over-activity of certain immune pathways are responsible for the cutaneous disorders seen so frequently in IBD patients. The purpose of this review article is to give an overview of the types of skin diseases that are typically seen with IBD and their respective pathogenesis, proposed mechanisms, and treatments. These cutaneous disorders can manifest as metastatic lesions, reactive processes to the intestinal inflammation, complications of IBD itself, or side effects from IBD treatments; these can be associated with IBD via genetic linkage, common autoimmune processes, or other mechanisms that will be discussed in this article. Ultimately, it is important for healthcare providers to understand that skin manifestations should always be checked and evaluated for in patients with IBD. Furthermore, skin disorders can predate gastrointestinal symptoms and thus may serve as important clinical indicators leading physicians to earlier diagnosis of IBD. PMID:22347192

  1. Important cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Trost, L; McDonnell, J

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has many extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. Anyone presenting with IBD should be examined for cutaneous manifestations. Pyoderma gangrenosum is a severe painful ulcerating disease that requires moist wound management and, in the absence of secondary infection, systemic corticosteroids, cyclosporine, or both. Infliximab may also be used. Erythema nodosum is a common cause of tender red nodules of the shins. Management includes leg elevation, NSAIDs, and potassium iodide. Oral manifestations of IBD include aphthous stomatitis, mucosal nodularity (cobblestoning), and pyostomatitis vegetans. Treatment should be directed both at the cutaneous lesions and at the underlying systemic condition. PMID:16143688

  2. [Medical therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2007-06-17

    The therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases is based on 5-aminosalicylates (5-ASAs) that are the forefront of treatment of mild-to-moderate active disease and maintenance; steroids are used for the treatment of moderate-to-severe active disease; immunosuppressives and sometimes antibiotics in moderate-to-severe disease; maintenance and for the treatment of selected complications. The last few years have witnessed a significant change in the treatment of Crohn's disease. Based on evidence from new clinical studies and recent meta-analyses, the role of and indications for conventional therapy have been reassessed. The 5-ASAs are nowadays less frequently used in both active disease and maintenance therapy. Instead, budesonide has been introduced in the treatment of mild-to-moderate ileal disease. Besides the modest use of 5-ASAs, steroids are prescribed for active colonic disease. Immunosuppressives, especially azathioprine, are more commonly used in moderate-to-severe disease as well as in maintenance. The preferred maintenance regimen following medically- and surgically-induced remission, in addition to relationship between medical and surgical therapies, has also changed. The recent introduction of new "biological" therapy represents a major, promising change in the therapy of resistant and penetrating disease.

  3. Folate Receptor-Targeted Diagnostics and Therapeutics for Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, an innate immune response mediated by macrophages, forms the first line of defence to protect our body from the invasion of various pathogens. Although inflammation is a defensive response, chronic inflammation has been regarded as the major cause of many types of human diseases such as inflammatory/autoimmune diseases, cancers, neurological diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Folate receptor (FR) is a cell surface glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein, and its three isoforms, FR-α, FR-β, and FR-γ, are found in humans. Interestingly, FRs are highly expressed on a variety of cells, including cancer cells and activated macrophages, whereas their expression on normal cells is undetectable, indicating that FR-targeting could be a good selective strategy for the diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of cancers and activated macrophage-mediated inflammatory diseases. Previous studies successfully showed FR-targeted imaging of many types of cancers in animal models as well as human patients. Recently, a number of emerging studies have found that activated macrophages, which are critical players for a variety of inflammatory diseases, highly express FRs, and selective targeting of these FR-positive activated macrophages is a good approach to diagnose and treat inflammatory diseases. In this review, we describe the characteristics and structure of FRs, and further discuss FR-targeted diagnostics and therapeutics of human diseases, in particular, activated macrophage-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:28035209

  4. Macrophage Targeted Theranostics as Personalized Nanomedicine Strategies for Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sravan Kumar; Janjic, Jelena M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory disease management poses challenges due to the complexity of inflammation and inherent patient variability, thereby necessitating patient-specific therapeutic interventions. Theranostics, which integrate therapeutic and imaging functionalities, can be used for simultaneous imaging and treatment of inflammatory diseases. Theranostics could facilitate assessment of safety, toxicity and real-time therapeutic efficacy leading to personalized treatment strategies. Macrophages are an important cellular component of inflammatory diseases, participating in varied roles of disease exacerbation and resolution. The inherent phagocytic nature, abundance and disease homing properties of macrophages can be targeted for imaging and therapeutic purposes. This review discusses the utility of theranostics in macrophage ablation, phenotype modulation and inhibition of their inflammatory activity leading to resolution of inflammation in several diseases. PMID:25553105

  5. Medicinal plants used in treatment of inflammatory skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Skin is an organ providing contact with the environment and protecting the human body from unfavourable external factors. Skin inflammation, reflected adversely in its functioning and appearance, also unfavourably affects the psyche, the condition of which is important during treatment of chronic skin diseases. The use of plants in treatment of inflammatory skin diseases results from their influence on different stages of inflammation. The paper presents results of the study regarding the anti-inflammatory activity of the plant raw material related to its influence on skin. The mechanism of action, therapeutic indications and side effects of medicinal plants used for treatment of inflammatory diseases of the skin are described. PMID:24278070

  6. Interleukin-6 blockade in ocular inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mesquida, M; Leszczynska, A; Llorenç, V; Adán, A

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key cytokine featuring redundancy and pleiotropic activity. It plays a central role in host defence against environmental stress such as infection and injury. Dysregulated, persistent interleukin (IL)-6 production has been implicated in the development of various autoimmune, chronic inflammatory diseases and even cancers. Significant elevation of IL-6 has been found in ocular fluids derived from refractory/chronic uveitis patients. In experimental autoimmune uveitis models with IL-6 knock-out mice, IL-6 has shown to be essential for inducing inflammation. IL-6 blockade can suppress acute T helper type 17 (Th17) responses via its differentiation and, importantly, can ameliorate chronic inflammation. Tocilizumab, a recombinant humanized anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, has been shown to be effective in several autoimmune diseases, including uveitis. Herein, we discuss the basic biology of IL-6 and its role in development of autoimmune conditions, focusing particularly on non-infectious uveitis. It also provides an overview of efficacy and safety of tocilizumab therapy for ocular inflammatory diseases. PMID:24528300

  7. Immune gene expression profiling of Proliferative Kidney Disease in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reveals a dominance of anti-inflammatory, antibody and T helper cell-like activities.

    PubMed

    Gorgoglione, Bartolomeo; Wang, Tiehui; Secombes, Christopher J; Holland, Jason W

    2013-07-16

    The myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is the causative agent of Proliferative Kidney Disease (PKD) targeting primarily the kidney of infected fish where it causes a chronic lymphoid immunopathology. Although known to be associated with suppression of some cellular aspects of innate immunity and a prominent lymphocytic hyperplasia, there remains a considerable knowledge gap in our understanding of the underlying immune mechanisms driving PKD pathogenesis. To provide further insights, the expression profiles of a panel of innate/inflammatory and adaptive immune molecules were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss following a natural exposure to the parasite. Relative to controls, fish with early to advanced stages of kidney pathology exhibited up-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-11, although remaining refractory towards genes indicative of macrophage activity. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and anti-inflammatory markers, including cathelicidin (CATH) and IL-10 were markedly up-regulated during clinical disease. Up-regulation of adaptive immune molecules, including cell markers and antibody genes reflect the lymphocytic dominance of this disease and the likely importance of lymphocyte subsets in PKD pathogenesis. Up-regulation of T helper (TH) cell-like response genes and transcription factors implies that T. bryosalmonae may elicit a complex interplay between TH cell subsets. This work, for the first time in the study of fish-myxozoan interactions, suggests that PKD pathogenesis is shaped by an anti-inflammatory phenotype, a profound B cell/antibody response and dysregulated TH cell-like activities. A better understanding of the functional roles of fish immune cells and molecules in PKD pathogenesis may facilitate future development of control measures against this disease.

  8. Immune gene expression profiling of Proliferative Kidney Disease in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reveals a dominance of anti-inflammatory, antibody and T helper cell-like activities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The myxozoan Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is the causative agent of Proliferative Kidney Disease (PKD) targeting primarily the kidney of infected fish where it causes a chronic lymphoid immunopathology. Although known to be associated with suppression of some cellular aspects of innate immunity and a prominent lymphocytic hyperplasia, there remains a considerable knowledge gap in our understanding of the underlying immune mechanisms driving PKD pathogenesis. To provide further insights, the expression profiles of a panel of innate / inflammatory and adaptive immune molecules were examined in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss following a natural exposure to the parasite. Relative to controls, fish with early to advanced stages of kidney pathology exhibited up-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-11, although remaining refractory towards genes indicative of macrophage activity. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and anti-inflammatory markers, including cathelicidin (CATH) and IL-10 were markedly up-regulated during clinical disease. Up-regulation of adaptive immune molecules, including cell markers and antibody genes reflect the lymphocytic dominance of this disease and the likely importance of lymphocyte subsets in PKD pathogenesis. Up-regulation of T helper (TH) cell-like response genes and transcription factors implies that T. bryosalmonae may elicit a complex interplay between TH cell subsets. This work, for the first time in the study of fish-myxozoan interactions, suggests that PKD pathogenesis is shaped by an anti-inflammatory phenotype, a profound B cell / antibody response and dysregulated TH cell-like activities. A better understanding of the functional roles of fish immune cells and molecules in PKD pathogenesis may facilitate future development of control measures against this disease. PMID:23865616

  9. Pelvic inflammatory disease among female recruit trainees, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2002-2012.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, Patricia

    2013-09-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a bacterial infection causing an inflammatory reaction in the upper genital tract. It can be treated with antibiotics, but since it is often asymptomatic, women often delay seeking health care, which may result in long-term sequelae such as infertility. Among 161,501 female recruits who began basic training between January 2002 and December 2011, 1,750 (1.1%) met the surveillance case definition for PID during the 12 months following completion of their basic military training. The overall incidence rate (11.2 per 1,000 person-years) showed a stable trend during the surveillance period, with the exception of a decline for females accessed in 2011. The unadjusted rates were higher among women who were not screened for chlamydia during basic training. Compared to their respective counterparts, rates were higher in service women aged 17-20, of black, non-Hispanic race/ethnicity, married, in the Army, and who had a chlamydia diagnosis after basic training. The lowest rates were among women 25 years and older, other race/ethnicity, and in the Coast Guard. The findings in this report may warrant further evaluation of the long-term impact of chlamydia screening programs for recruit trainees on PID and PID-related sequelae among service women.

  10. Extraintestinal Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schoepfer, Alain; Scharl, Michael; Lakatos, Peter L.; Navarini, Alexander; Rogler, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Extraintestinal manifestations (EIM) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are frequent and may occur before or after IBD diagnosis. EIM may impact the quality of life for patients with IBD significantly requiring specific treatment depending on the affected organ(s). They most frequently affect joints, skin, or eyes, but can also less frequently involve other organs such as liver, lungs, or pancreas. Certain EIM, such as peripheral arthritis, oral aphthous ulcers, episcleritis, or erythema nodosum, are frequently associated with active intestinal inflammation and usually improve by treatment of the intestinal activity. Other EIM, such as uveitis or ankylosing spondylitis, usually occur independent of intestinal inflammatory activity. For other not so rare EIM, such as pyoderma gangrenosum and primary sclerosing cholangitis, the association with the activity of the underlying IBD is unclear. Successful therapy of EIM is essential for improving quality of life of patients with IBD. Besides other options, tumor necrosis factor antibody therapy is an important therapy for EIM in patients with IBD. PMID:26154136

  11. Report: impact of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Sheila M

    2016-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), 2 conditions characterized by chronic inflammation. Approximately 1.17 million people in the United States are affected by these 2 conditions. It is theorized that a genetic susceptibility coupled with environmental factors, such as smoking, antibiotics, oral contraceptives, appendectomy, or diet, may influence the development of IBD. Patients with UC and CD may exhibit similar symptoms, and the conditions are often misclassified, as there is a lack of standard criteria for diagnosing IBD. Therefore, it is important for clinicians to rule out any diarrhea-related conditions for an accurate diagnosis. UC and CD typically manifest in early adulthood, and the chronic nature of these conditions greatly impacts a patient's perception, body image, and quality of life. The inability to participate in social activities due to UC and CD impacts not only patients, but also those with whom they have close relationships.

  12. Delayed puberty associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, Anne B; Savage, Martin O; Sanderson, Ian R

    2003-02-01

    Delayed puberty frequently complicates the clinical course of young patients with inflammatory bowel disease, more often in Crohn's disease than ulcerative colitis. Undernutrition has been thought to be the main reason for delayed puberty in these patients. However, puberty may be delayed despite a normal nutritional status. Observations in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in rats with experimental colitis suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a direct adverse influence, independent of undernutrition, on the onset and progression of puberty. Serum androgens are consistently reported to be reduced in patients with delayed puberty and inflammatory bowel disease. This reduction is not necessarily secondary to a reduction in gonadotrophins as serum concentrations of gonadotrophins have been reported to be normal or even increased in some studies. Management of delayed puberty involves calorie supplements to correct undernutrition and treatment of inflammation. Observations in boys with delayed puberty and controlled studies in experimental models of intestinal inflammation suggest that testosterone therapy can accelerate puberty.

  13. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... eats. The two major types of IBD are Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Crohn's disease is when the lining and wall of the intestines become inflamed and ulcers develop. Although Crohn's disease can happen in any part of the digestive ...

  14. The genetic background of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Rotter, J I

    2000-01-01

    Available evidence indicates that genetic factors are essential in providing the susceptibility to the majority of the various forms of inflammatory bowel disease occurring in man. It is also clear that the genetic susceptibility to these diseases is complex, and that more than one gene may predispose (the concept of multilocus/oligogenic inheritance), and likely in different etiologic combinations (the concept of genetic heterogeneity). Paradigms are now available that should lead to the identification of a number of these predisposing genes. These paradigms include the candidate gene approach, systematic genome wide scans, and mouse human synteny. While genome wide scans are currently limited to multiplex family linkage studies, both candidate genes and mouse human synteny can be approached in either linkage or association paradigms. Eventually whole genome association studies will be available as well. Identification of inflammatory bowel disease predisposing genes should lead to their incorporation in studies of natural history, investigation of environmental risk factors, and especially utilization of genetic markers in clinical trials. This will allow us to identify the best therapy available for the individual patient based on their unique genetic constitution. With advances in molecular technology, the search for genes influencing traits and diseases with a complex genetic background, such as the inflammatory bowel diseases, has become a realistic task. Although exogenous or infectious agents may contribute to the pathogenesis or may trigger the onset of disease, and the immune system almost certainly mediates the tissue damage, it is clear from available data that genetic factors determine the susceptibility of a given individual to inflammatory bowel disease (reviewed below). Thus, genetic studies are essential for the delineation of the basic etiologies of the various forms of inflammatory bowel disease and thus can aid in the development of radically

  15. Skin gangrene as an extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease*

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Yumi Cristina; Capareli, Gabriela Cunha; Boin, Maria Fernanda Feitosa de Camargo; Lellis, Rute; de Freitas, Thaís Helena Proença; Simone, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases can commonly present many cutaneous lesions which can contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or its activity. The most frequent cutaneous or mucocutaneous manifestations suggesting ulcerative rectocolitis activity are erythema nodosum (3-10%), pyoderma gangrenosum (5-12%) and aphthous stomatitis (4%). Other reactive skin manifestations related to immunological mechanisms associated with the inflammatory bowel disease are: Sweet's syndrome, arthritis-dermatitis syndrome associated with inflammatory bowel disease and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. We describe the case of a young man with diagnosis of ulcerative rectocolitis, which presented an extensive cutaneous gangrene secondary to microvascular thrombosis. The case represents a dermatologic rarity and should be recognized as a cutaneous manifestation related to the hypercoagulability state observed in the disease's activity. PMID:25387503

  16. Skin gangrene as an extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Yumi Cristina; Capareli, Gabriela Cunha; Boin, Maria Fernanda Feitosa de Camargo; Lellis, Rute; Freitas, Thaís Helena Proença de; Simone, Karine

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases can commonly present many cutaneous lesions which can contribute to the diagnosis of the disease or its activity. The most frequent cutaneous or mucocutaneous manifestations suggesting ulcerative rectocolitis activity are erythema nodosum (3-10%), pyoderma gangrenosum (5-12%) and aphthous stomatitis (4%). Other reactive skin manifestations related to immunological mechanisms associated with the inflammatory bowel disease are: Sweet's syndrome, arthritis-dermatitis syndrome associated with inflammatory bowel disease and leukocytoclastic vasculitis. We describe the case of a young man with diagnosis of ulcerative rectocolitis, which presented an extensive cutaneous gangrene secondary to microvascular thrombosis. The case represents a dermatologic rarity and should be recognized as a cutaneous manifestation related to the hypercoagulability state observed in the disease's activity.

  17. Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies: definition and management of refractory disease.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Mariana; Marinho, António

    2011-09-01

    Adult idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, commonly referred to as myositis, are a heterogeneous group of diseases with an autoimmune etiology. In this review, the authors are going to focus on myositis excluding inclusion body myositis. They will review the prognostic factors (for mortality and response to steroids), define refractory disease, introduce a new concept (presumed refractory disease), analyze definitions of active disease, damage and improvement criteria, and summarize therapeutic alternatives for refractory patients, based on different disease phenotypes.

  18. Evaluation of Serum Trace Element Levels and Superoxide Dismutase Activity in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Translating Basic Research into Clinical Application.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Erfan; Qujeq, Durdi; Taheri, Hassan; Hajian-Tilaki, Karimollah

    2016-11-18

    The relationship of minerals and trace elements with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is complex. Alterations in their metabolism can be induced by the diseases and their complications. To study the role of trace elements in IBD patients' serum zinc and copper and their related enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), activity were measured in patients with IBD patients as well as in healthy subjects. In addition, the correlation between serum trace element levels, albumin, total protein, urea level, copper/zinc ratio, and disease activity (DA) was determined in these subjects. Serum samples were obtained from 35 patients (19 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 16 Crohn's disease (CD)) in the active phase of the disease and 30 healthy control subjects. Serum levels of zinc, copper, SOD activity, albumin, total protein, and urea were measured. The results were compared between the two groups using independent Student's t test in statistical analysis. Serum levels of zinc, SOD activity, albumin, and total protein were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in patients than controls, while serum urea level was significantly higher in patients compared to controls. Copper concentrations did not differ between patients with IBD (mean ± SD, 58.8 ± 20.7 μg/d) and controls (55.57 ± 12.6 μg/d). Decreased levels of zinc and SOD activity are associated with increased inflammatory processes indicating inappropriate antioxidant system in patients with IBD. Additionally, lower levels of albumin and total protein with higher level of urea reflect metabolic problems in liver system.

  19. Innate immune dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gersemann, M; Wehkamp, J; Stange, E F

    2012-05-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms that cause the two types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are still under investigation. Nevertheless, there is broad agreement that luminal microbes are of particular relevance in the development of these conditions. In recent years, increasing evidence has shown that defects in the innate immunity are at the centre of both types of IBD. The innate intestinal barrier is provided by the epithelium which secretes antimicrobial peptides (so-called defensins) that are retained in the mucus layer. In ileal CD, the alpha-defensins are lacking owing to several Paneth cell defects. In colonic CD, the expression of beta-defensins is inadequate. This may be related to downregulation of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma and in some cohorts is associated with a reduced HBD2 gene copy number. In UC, the mucus layer, which protects the host from the enormous amounts of luminal microbes, is defective. This is accompanied by an insufficient differentiation from intestinal stem cells towards goblet cells. All these disturbances in the gut barrier shift the balance from epithelial defence towards bacterial offence. The current treatment for CD and UC is based on suppression of this secondary inflammatory process. In future, patients may benefit from new therapeutic approaches stimulating the protective innate immune system.

  20. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  1. Inflammatory signaling in Alzheimer disease and depression.

    PubMed

    Barber, Robert

    2011-08-01

    To help define the relationships among inflammation, Alzheimer disease, and depression, the Texas Alzheimer's Research Consortium analyzed an array of inflammatory biomarkers in a cohort of patients with Alzheimer disease and in controls. Inflammation severity was highly correlated with earlier age at onset of Alzheimer disease and was also associated with cognitive decline. The relationship between inflammation and depression was not as clear, and it varied with aspects of depression, gender, and the presence of Alzheimer disease.

  2. Biopharmaceuticals: reference products and biosimilars to treat inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Gils, Ann; Bertolotto, Antonio; Mulleman, Denis; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Declerck, Paul J

    2017-02-20

    Biopharmaceuticals are primarily therapeutic proteins developed to perform specific functions by acting on the disease pathophysiology. Compared to low molecular chemically synthesized drugs, production of biopharmaceuticals is much more complex and routes of administration and pharmacokinetics differ. Biopharmaceuticals are blockbusters in the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, rheumatic diseases, and inflammatory bowel diseases, and the introduction of these drugs has revolutionized treatment. Disadvantages include their high costs and the fact that they can evoke antidrug antibodies leading to decreased efficacy. Treatment can be optimized through the development of dosing algorithms and cost can be reduced by biosimilars, after a comparable biological activity, safety, and efficacy have been demonstrated.

  3. New pharmaceuticals in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Łodyga, Michał; Eder, Piotr; Bartnik, Witold; Gonciarz, Maciej; Kłopocka, Maria; Linke, Krzysztof; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Radwan, Piotr; Rydzewska, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    This paper complements the previously published Guidelines of the Working Group of the Polish Society of Gastroenterology and former National Consultant in Gastroenterology regarding the management of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Attention was focused on the new pharmaceutical recently registered for inflammatory bowel disease treatment.

  4. Extraintestinal Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burakoff, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease are prevalent in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The most common manifestations involve the musculoskeletal and dermatologic systems. Other manifestations involve the hepatopan-creatobiliary system (eg, primary sclerosing cholangitis) as well as the ocular, renal, and pulmonary systems. A multidisciplinary team approach is often needed for effective management, and emergency situations require prompt evaluation. PMID:21857821

  5. The hookworm pharmacopoeia for inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Severine; Ferreira, Ivana; Loukas, Alex

    2013-03-01

    In the developed world, declining prevalence of parasitic infections correlates with increased incidence of allergic and autoimmune disorders. Current treatments for these chronic inflammatory conditions have little to no effect on their prevalence and are referred to as "controllers" rather than cures. There has been limited success in therapeutically targeting allergic and autoimmune pathways, leaving an unmet need for development of effective anti-inflammatories. We discuss the benefit of hookworm infections and the parasite's ability to condition the immune system to prevent allergic asthma and inflammatory bowel diseases. We then examine the immunomodulatory properties of selected hookworm-derived proteins in these two models of inflammation. While hookworm protein therapy has yet to be fully exploited, the identification of these proteins and the mechanisms by which they skew the immune system will provide new avenues for controlling and optimally reversing key pathological processes important in allergic and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  6. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Children)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel disease (or IBD ). IBD most often affects people between 15 and 35 years old, but has even been found in children as ... don't think that IBD is caused by emotional stress or specific foods. You ... in families. About 20% of people with the disease also have a relative who ...

  7. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting a sexually transmitted disease (STD) , such as chlamydia or gonorrhea. Girls who have sex with different ... look for signs of infection, including STDs like chlamydia and gonorrhea. Sometimes doctors need an ultrasound or ...

  8. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sexually transmitted disease (STD) , such as chlamydia or gonorrhea. Girls who have sex with different partners or ... signs of infection, including STDs like chlamydia and gonorrhea. Sometimes doctors need an ultrasound or CAT scan ...

  9. The Immunological Basis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francesca A. R.; Rodrigues, Bruno L.; Ayrizono, Maria de Lourdes S.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic ailments, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis being the most important. These diseases present an inflammatory profile and they differ according to pathophysiology, the affected area in the gastrointestinal tract, and the depth of the inflammation in the intestinal wall. The immune characteristics of IBD arise from abnormal responses of the innate and adaptive immune system. The number of Th17 cells increases in the peripheral blood of IBD patients, while Treg cells decrease, suggesting that the Th17/Treg proportion plays an important role in the development and maintenance of inflammation. The purpose of this review was to determine the current state of knowledge on the immunological basis of IBD. Many studies have shown the need for further explanation of the development and maintenance of the inflammatory process. PMID:28070181

  10. Inflammatory Cutaneous Diseases in Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Paola; Cavaliere, Giovanni; Zavattaro, Elisa; Veronese, Federica; Fava, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplant recipients frequently suffer from skin infections and malignancies, possibly due to the effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. While the relationships between immunosuppression and these pathological conditions have been widely investigated, little is known about the relative incidence and characteristics of inflammatory skin diseases in this type of patient. In this study, we analyze the incidence of a number of inflammatory cutaneous diseases in a cohort of patients who underwent kidney transplantation. Although our study shows a relatively low incidence of these pathologies in transplanted patients—in agreement with the general action of immunosuppressant therapies in reducing inflammation—we scored a different efficacy of the various immunosuppressive regimens on inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. This information can be key for designing immunosuppressive regimens and devising accurate follow-up protocols. PMID:27548160

  11. Role of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Exacerbations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Long, Millie D.; Kappelman, Michael D.; Martin, Christopher F.; Chen, Wenli; Anton, Kristen; Sandler, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    GOALS To determine the role of NSAIDs in activation of IBD. BACKGROUND Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may activate inflammatory pathways in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). STUDY Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of American (CCFA) Partners is an ongoing cohort study of patients living with IBD. All data are self-reported via the internet. We identified a sub-cohort of participants whose disease activity, based on short Crohn’s Disease Activity Index (sCDAI) and simple clinical colitis activity index (SCCAI), indicated remission. Pattern of use of NSAIDs was measured at baseline, and disease activity assessment was performed 6 months later. We used multivariate binomial regression to determine effects of NSAIDs on disease activity. RESULTS A total of 791 individuals in remission had baseline and follow data available for analysis. Of these, 247 Crohn’s disease (CD) patients (43.2%) and 89 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients (40.6%) reported NSAID use. CD patients with NSAID use ≥ 5 times/monthly had greater risk of active disease at follow-up (23% v. 15%, p=0.04); (adjusted risk ratio (RR) 1.65; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12–2.44). No effect was observed in patients with UC (22% vs 21%, p=0.98; adjusted RR 1.25; 95% CI, 0.81–1.92). Acetaminophen use was associated with active disease at follow-up in CD (adjusted RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.11–2.68). CONCLUSIONS Regular (≥ 5 times/monthly) NSAID and acetaminophen use were associated with active CD, but not UC. Less frequent NSAID use was not associated with active CD or UC. These findings indicate that regular NSAID use may increase CD activity, or that NSAID use may be a marker of a less robust remission; thus reflecting subclinical disease activity. PMID:26485106

  12. Intravenous iron in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; García-Erce, José Antonio

    2009-10-07

    The prevalence of anemia across studies on patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is high (30%). Both iron deficiency (ID) and anemia of chronic disease contribute most to the development of anemia in IBD. The prevalence of ID is even higher (45%). Anemia and ID negatively impact the patient's quality of life. Therefore, together with an adequate control of disease activity, iron replacement therapy should start as soon as anemia or ID is detected to attain a normal hemoglobin (Hb) and iron status. Many patients will respond to oral iron, but compliance may be poor, whereas intravenous (i.v.) compounds are safe, provide a faster Hb increase and iron store repletion, and presents a lower rate of treatment discontinuation. Absolute indications for i.v. iron treatment should include severe anemia, intolerance or inappropriate response to oral iron, severe intestinal disease activity, or use of an erythropoietic stimulating agent. Four different products are principally used in clinical practice, which differ in their pharmacokinetic properties and safety profiles: iron gluconate and iron sucrose (lower single doses), and iron dextran and ferric carboxymaltose (higher single doses). After the initial resolution of anemia and the repletion of iron stores, the patient's hematological and iron parameters should be carefully and periodically monitored, and maintenance iron treatment should be provided as required. New i.v. preparations that allow for giving 1000-1500 mg in a single session, thus facilitating patient management, provide an excellent tool to prevent or treat anemia and ID in this patient population, which in turn avoids allogeneic blood transfusion and improves their quality of life.

  13. Tyrosine kinases in inflammatory dermatologic disease

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Ricardo T.; Fiorentino, David; Chung, Lorinda; Robinson, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases are enzymes that catalyze the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on protein substrates. They are key components of signaling pathways that drive an array of cellular responses including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. Specific tyrosine kinases have recently been identified as critical to the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors of tyrosine kinases are emerging as a novel class of therapy that may provide benefit in certain patient subsets. In this review, we highlight tyrosine kinase signaling implicated in inflammatory dermatologic diseases, evaluate strategies aimed at inhibiting these aberrant signaling pathways, and discuss prospects for future drug development. PMID:20584561

  14. Fecal biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Robert N; Leach, Steven T; Lemberg, Daniel A; Duvoisin, Gilles; Gearry, Richard B; Day, Andrew S

    2017-03-01

    Over the last two decades, knowledge on fecal biomarkers has substantially increased. Nowadays, these non-invasive markers of inflammation have significant clinical utility in the management of inflammatory bowel disease. Their use informs the decision to perform endoscopy before diagnosis is made right through to influencing therapeutic choices and the need for interval endoscopic assessment. In this review, the roles of two S100 proteins, calprotectin, and S100A12 are described along with that of lactoferrin, in the context of inflammatory bowel disease.

  15. Update on Janus Kinase Antagonists in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Brigid S.; Sandborn, William J.; Chang, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors have emerged as a novel orally administered small molecule therapy for the treatment of ulcerative colitis and possibly Crohn’s disease. These molecules are designed to selectively target the activity of specific JAKs and offer a targeted mechanism of action without risk of immunogenicity. Based on data from clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis and phase 2 studies in inflammatory bowel disease, tofacitinib and other JAK inhibitors are likely to become a new form of medical therapy for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25110261

  16. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... cdc.gov/std/stats15/appendixa.htm) for more information on other data sources and Table 44 (http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats15/tables/44.htm) . SOURCE: National Disease and Therapeutic Index, IMS Health, Integrated Promotional Services™, IMS Health Report, 1966–2014. The ...

  17. Endothelial Response to Glucocorticoids in Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zielińska, Karolina A.; Van Moortel, Laura; Opdenakker, Ghislain; De Bosscher, Karolien; Van den Steen, Philippe E.

    2016-01-01

    The endothelium plays a crucial role in inflammation. A balanced control of inflammation requires the action of glucocorticoids (GCs), steroidal hormones with potent cell-specific anti-inflammatory properties. Besides the classic anti-inflammatory effects of GCs on leukocytes, recent studies confirm that endothelial cells also represent an important target for GCs. GCs regulate different aspects of endothelial physiology including expression of adhesion molecules, production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and maintenance of endothelial barrier integrity. However, the regulation of endothelial GC sensitivity remains incompletely understood. In this review, we specifically examine the endothelial response to GCs in various inflammatory diseases ranging from multiple sclerosis, stroke, sepsis, and vasculitis to atherosclerosis. Shedding more light on the cross talk between GCs and endothelium will help to improve existing therapeutic strategies and develop new therapies better tailored to the needs of patients. PMID:28018358

  18. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Holder-Murray, Jennifer; Marsicovetere, Priscilla

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Surgical management of inflammatory bowel disease is a challenging endeavor given infectious and inflammatory complications, such as fistula, and abscess, complex often postoperative anatomy, including adhesive disease from previous open operations. Patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis also bring to the table the burden of their chronic illness with anemia, malnutrition, and immunosuppression, all common and contributing independently as risk factors for increased surgical morbidity in this high-risk population. However, to reduce the physical trauma of surgery, technologic advances and worldwide experience with minimally invasive surgery have allowed laparoscopic management of patients to become standard of care, with significant short- and long-term patient benefits compared with the open approach. In this review, we will describe the current state-of the-art for minimally invasive surgery for inflammatory bowel disease and the caveats inherent with this practice in this complex patient population. Also, we will review the applicability of current and future trends in minimally invasive surgical technique, such as laparoscopic “incisionless,” single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS), robotic-assisted, and other techniques for the patient with inflammatory bowel disease. There can be no doubt that minimally invasive surgery has been proven to decrease the short- and long-term burden of surgery of these chronic illnesses and represents high-value care for both patient and society. PMID:25989341

  19. Urinary Metabolic Phenotyping Reveals Differences in the Metabolic Status of Healthy and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Children in Relation to Growth and Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Francois-Pierre; Ezri, Jessica; Cominetti, Ornella; Da Silva, Laeticia; Kussmann, Martin; Godin, Jean-Philippe; Nydegger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Growth failure and delayed puberty are well known features of children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in addition to the chronic course of the disease. Urinary metabonomics was applied in order to better understand metabolic changes between healthy and IBD children. Methods: 21 Pediatric patients with IBD (mean age 14.8 years, 8 males) were enrolled from the Pediatric Gastroenterology Outpatient Clinic over two years. Clinical and biological data were collected at baseline, 6, and 12 months. 27 healthy children (mean age 12.9 years, 16 males) were assessed at baseline. Urine samples were collected at each visit and subjected to 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Results: Using 1H NMR metabonomics, we determined that urine metabolic profiles of IBD children differ significantly from healthy controls. Metabolic differences include central energy metabolism, amino acid, and gut microbial metabolic pathways. The analysis described that combined urinary urea and phenylacetylglutamine—two readouts of nitrogen metabolism—may be relevant to monitor metabolic status in the course of disease. Conclusion: Non-invasive sampling of urine followed by metabonomic profiling can elucidate and monitor the metabolic status of children in relation to disease status. Further developments of omic-approaches in pediatric research might deliver novel nutritional and metabolic hypotheses. PMID:27529220

  20. Scrotal inflammatory disease: color Doppler US findings.

    PubMed

    Horstman, W G; Middleton, W D; Melson, G L

    1991-04-01

    A study of 45 patients with 51 cases of hemiscrotal inflammatory disease was done to determine the color Doppler ultrasonographic appearance of scrotal inflammatory disorders. The diagnosis was ultimately established by means of appropriate response to antibiotic treatment (47 cases) or surgery (four cases). In all cases, there was evidence of hyperemia: an increased number and concentration of detectable vessels in the affected portion of the scrotum. In 17 cases, the gray scale images were normal, and the only evidence of inflammation was the presence of hypervascularity. Abnormally decreased epididymal vascular resistance was detected in 14 cases of epididymitis; abnormally decreased testicular vascular resistance was detected in six cases of orchitis. Spontaneous venous flow was present in 18 patients. The authors conclude that color Doppler can demonstrate the hyperemic response to scrotal inflammatory disease and that, in the proper clinical setting, it can supplement the gray scale findings and increase diagnostic confidence.

  1. Which sexually active young female students are most at risk of pelvic inflammatory disease? A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Phillip E; Kerry, Sarah R; Normansell, Rebecca; Horner, Paddy J; Reid, Fiona; Kerry, Sally M; Prime, Katia; Williams, Elizabeth; Simms, Ian; Aghaizu, Adamma; Jensen, Jorgen; Oakeshott, Pippa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in female students. Methods We performed a prospective study set in 11 universities and 9 further education colleges in London. In 2004–2006, 2529 sexually experienced, multiethnic, female students, mean age 20.8 years, provided self-taken vaginal samples and completed questionnaires at recruitment to the Prevention of Pelvic Infection chlamydia screening trial. After 12 months, they were followed up by questionnaire backed by medical record search and assessed for PID by blinded genitourinary medicine physicians. Results Of 2004 (79%) participants who reported numbers of sexual partners during follow-up, 32 (1.6%, 95% CI 1.1% to 2.2%) were diagnosed with PID. The strongest predictor of PID was baseline Chlamydia trachomatis (relative risk (RR) 5.7, 95% CI 2.6 to 15.6). After adjustment for baseline C. trachomatis, significant predictors of PID were ≥2 sexual partners or a new sexual partner during follow-up (RR 4.0, 95% CI 1.8 to 8.5; RR 2.8, 95% CI 1.3 to 6.3), age <20 years (RR 3.3, 95% CI 1.5 to 7.0), recruitment from a further education college rather than a university (RR 2.6,  95% CI 1.3 to 5.3) and history at baseline of vaginal discharge (RR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2 to 5.8) or pelvic pain (RR 4.1, 95% CI 2.0 to 8.3) in the previous six months. Bacterial vaginosis and Mycoplasma genitalium infection were no longer significantly associated with PID after adjustment for baseline C. trachomatis. Conclusions Multiple or new partners in the last 12 months, age <20 years and attending a further education college rather than a university were risk factors for PID after adjustment for baseline C. trachomatis infection. Sexual health education and screening programmes could be targeted at these high-risk groups. Trial registration number (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00115388). PMID:26082320

  2. Faecal calprotectin: Management in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Benítez, José Manuel; García-Sánchez, Valle

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic and relapsing disorder which leads to an inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. A tailored therapy to achieve mucosal healing with the less adverse events has become a key issue in the management of IBD. In the past, the clinical remission was the most important factor to consider for adapting diagnostic procedures and therapeutic strategies. However, there is no a good correlation between symptoms and intestinal lesions, so currently the goals of treatment are to achieve not only the control of symptoms, but deep remission, which is related with a favourable prognosis. Thus, the determination of biological markers or biomarkers of intestinal inflammation play a crucial role. Many biomarkers have been extensively evaluated in IBD showing significant correlation with endoscopic lesions, risk of recurrence and response to treatment. One of the most important markers is faecal calprotectin (FC). Despite calprotectin limitations, this biomarker represents a reliable and noninvasive alternative to reduce the need for endoscopic procedures. FC has demonstrated its performance for regular monitoring of IBD patients, not only to the diagnosis for discriminating IBD from non-IBD diagnosis, but for assessing disease activity, relapse prediction and response to therapy. Although, FC provides better results than other biomarkers such as C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, these surrogate markers of intestinal inflammation should not be used isolation but in combination with other clinical, endoscopic, radiological or/and histological parameters enabling a comprehensive assessment of IBD patients. PMID:26600978

  3. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Takeshi; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore important in the management of patients with IBD. However, relatively modest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by men with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatment on male fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a systematic search for published studies. A PubMed search were performed using the main search terms “IBD AND male infertility”, “Crohn’s disease AND male infertility”, “ulcerative colitis AND male infertility”. References in review articles were used if relevant. We noted that active inflammation, poor nutrition, alcohol use, smoking, medications, and surgery may cause infertility in men with IBD. In surgery such as proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, rectal incision seems to be associated with sexual dysfunction. Of the medications used for IBD, sulfasalazine reversibly reduces male fertility. No other medications appear to affect male fertility significantly, although small studies suggested some adverse effects. There are limited data on the effects of drugs for IBD on male fertility and pregnancy outcomes; however, patients should be informed of the possible effects of paternal drug exposure. This review provides information on fertility-related issues in men with IBD and discusses treatment options. PMID:27602237

  4. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Takeshi; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-08-06

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore important in the management of patients with IBD. However, relatively modest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by men with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatment on male fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a systematic search for published studies. A PubMed search were performed using the main search terms "IBD AND male infertility", "Crohn's disease AND male infertility", "ulcerative colitis AND male infertility". References in review articles were used if relevant. We noted that active inflammation, poor nutrition, alcohol use, smoking, medications, and surgery may cause infertility in men with IBD. In surgery such as proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, rectal incision seems to be associated with sexual dysfunction. Of the medications used for IBD, sulfasalazine reversibly reduces male fertility. No other medications appear to affect male fertility significantly, although small studies suggested some adverse effects. There are limited data on the effects of drugs for IBD on male fertility and pregnancy outcomes; however, patients should be informed of the possible effects of paternal drug exposure. This review provides information on fertility-related issues in men with IBD and discusses treatment options.

  5. Management of Musculoskeletal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Tejas; Pitchumoni, C. S.; Das, Kiron M.

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal manifestations are the most common extraintestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel diseases. Some appendicular manifestations are independent of gut inflammation and are treated with standard anti-inflammatory strategies. On the other hand, axial involvement is linked to gut inflammatory activity; hence, there is a considerable amount of treatment overlap. Biological therapies have revolutionized management of inflammatory bowel diseases as well as of associated articular manifestations. Newer mechanisms driving gut associated arthropathy have surfaced in the past decade and have enhanced our interests in novel treatment targets. Introduction of biosimilar molecules is expected in the US market in the near future and will provide an opportunity for considerable cost savings on healthcare. A multidisciplinary approach involving a gastroenterologist, rheumatologist, and physical therapist is ideal for these patients. PMID:26170832

  6. Intestinal microbiota, probiotics and prebiotics in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Orel, Rok; Kamhi Trop, Tina

    2014-09-07

    It has been presumed that aberrant immune response to intestinal microorganisms in genetically predisposed individuals may play a major role in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory bowel disease, and there is a good deal of evidence supporting this hypothesis. Commensal enteric bacteria probably play a central role in pathogenesis, providing continuous antigenic stimulation that causes chronic intestinal injury. A strong biologic rationale supports the use of probiotics and prebiotics for inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Many probiotic strains exhibit anti-inflammatory properties through their effects on different immune cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion depression, and the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines. There is very strong evidence supporting the use of multispecies probiotic VSL#3 for the prevention or recurrence of postoperative pouchitis in patients. For treatment of active ulcerative colitis, as well as for maintenance therapy, the clinical evidence of efficacy is strongest for VSL#3 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. Moreover, some prebiotics, such as germinated barley foodstuff, Psyllium or oligofructose-enriched inulin, might provide some benefit in patients with active ulcerative colitis or ulcerative colitis in remission. The results of clinical trials in the treatment of active Crohn's disease or the maintenance of its remission with probiotics and prebiotics are disappointing and do not support their use in this disease. The only exception is weak evidence of advantageous use of Saccharomyces boulardii concomitantly with medical therapy in maintenance treatment.

  7. Intestinal microbiota, probiotics and prebiotics in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Orel, Rok; Kamhi Trop, Tina

    2014-01-01

    It has been presumed that aberrant immune response to intestinal microorganisms in genetically predisposed individuals may play a major role in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory bowel disease, and there is a good deal of evidence supporting this hypothesis. Commensal enteric bacteria probably play a central role in pathogenesis, providing continuous antigenic stimulation that causes chronic intestinal injury. A strong biologic rationale supports the use of probiotics and prebiotics for inflammatory bowel disease therapy. Many probiotic strains exhibit anti-inflammatory properties through their effects on different immune cells, pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion depression, and the induction of anti-inflammatory cytokines. There is very strong evidence supporting the use of multispecies probiotic VSL#3 for the prevention or recurrence of postoperative pouchitis in patients. For treatment of active ulcerative colitis, as well as for maintenance therapy, the clinical evidence of efficacy is strongest for VSL#3 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. Moreover, some prebiotics, such as germinated barley foodstuff, Psyllium or oligofructose-enriched inulin, might provide some benefit in patients with active ulcerative colitis or ulcerative colitis in remission. The results of clinical trials in the treatment of active Crohn’s disease or the maintenance of its remission with probiotics and prebiotics are disappointing and do not support their use in this disease. The only exception is weak evidence of advantageous use of Saccharomyces boulardii concomitantly with medical therapy in maintenance treatment. PMID:25206258

  8. [Medical treatment of inflammatory intestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Järnerot, G

    1991-01-01

    What possible treatments are there for inflammatory intestinal diseases, and on what scientific grounds do we treat these patients? A survey shows that the considerable decline in mortality which has occurred as regards ulcerous colitis ensued rather via trial and error than as a result of regular clinical tests.

  9. Tight junctions in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landy, Jonathan; Ronde, Emma; English, Nick; Clark, Sue K; Hart, Ailsa L; Knight, Stella C; Ciclitira, Paul J; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterised by inflammation that compromises the integrity of the epithelial barrier. The intestinal epithelium is not only a static barrier but has evolved complex mechanisms to control and regulate bacterial interactions with the mucosal surface. Apical tight junction proteins are critical in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function and control of paracellular permeability. The characterisation of alterations in tight junction proteins as key players in epithelial barrier function in inflammatory bowel diseases is rapidly enhancing our understanding of critical mechanisms in disease pathogenesis as well as novel therapeutic opportunities. Here we give an overview of recent literature focusing on the role of tight junction proteins, in particular claudins, in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27003989

  10. [Assessment of disease severity and outcome of dietary, antibiotic, and immunosuppressive interventions by use of the canine IBD activity index in 21 dogs with chronic inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Münster, Michael; Hörauf, Angelika; Bilzer, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Recently, the canine IBD activity index (CIBDAI) was developed for evaluation of the severity of illness, therapeutic strategies, and efficacy of therapy. The aim of the present study was to assess the severity of illness and the therapeutic strategy in dogs with IBD by the use of CIBDAI, serum albumin concentration, and histologic score (HPEG). Furthermore the use of CIBDAI and the efficacy of therapy in a prospective study during a 3 month treatment period were evaluated. Twentyone dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis and enterocolitis) were examined in this study. In 11 dogs with IBD the severity of illness was assessed as low, according to CIBDAI and HPEG (CIBDAI score 4 or between 5 and 10 with HPEG score between 1 and 1.5). Six dogs were treated with hypoallergenic diet (Group D), five dogs were treated with hypoallergenic diet and metronidazole (15.6-22,3 mg/kg/day) (Group M). In 10 dogs with IBD the severity of illness was assessed as high (CIBDAI <10, or CIBDAI between 5 and 10 with HPEG score between 2 and 3 or hypoalbuminemia (< or = 2.5 g/dl)). This group (Group I) was treated with immunosuppressive therapy. Treatment consisted of prednisolone (n=10; 0.9-2 mg/kg/day), azathioprine (n=5; 0.9-2.3 mg/kg/day), sulfasalazine (n=4; 18.2-25 mg/kg/day) and hypoallergenic diet (n=10). Efficacy of therapy was evaluated prospectively 3 times in a 12 weeks treatment period. Remission (CIBDAI score < 4) indicated good therapeutic response, chronic or recurrent disease (CIBDAI score persistent or recurrent > or =4) indicated poor therapeutic response. Age, CIBDAI score and HPEG score were significantly different in IBD dogs with low severity of illness (age: median 60 months; CIBDAI score: median 5; HPEG score: median (1) and IBD dogs with high severity of illness (age: median 90 months; CIBDAI score: median 9.5; HPEG score: median 2.25) (p = 0.0101 and p = 0.0099, respectively). The presence of hypoalbuminemia was not significantly

  11. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  12. Interleukin-1 in the pathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    More than any other cytokine family, the IL-1 family of ligands and receptors is primarily associated with acute and chronic inflammation. The cytosolic segment of each IL-1 receptor family member contains the Toll-IL-1-receptor domain. This domain is also present in each Toll-like receptor, the receptors that respond to microbial products and viruses. Since Toll-IL-1-receptor domains are functional for both receptor families, responses to the IL-1 family are fundamental to innate immunity. Of the 11 members of the IL-1 family, IL-1β has emerged as a therapeutic target for an expanding number of systemic and local inflammatory conditions called autoinflammatory diseases. For these, neutralization of IL-1β results in a rapid and sustained reduction in disease severity. Treatment for autoimmune diseases often includes immunosuppressive drugs whereas neutralization of IL-1β is mostly anti-inflammatory. Although some autoinflammatory diseases are due to gain-of-function mutations for caspase-1 activity, common diseases such as gout, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, recurrent pericarditis, rheumatoid arthritis, and smoldering myeloma also are responsive to IL-1β neutralization. This review summarizes acute and chronic inflammatory diseases that are treated by reducing IL-1β activity and proposes that disease severity is affected by the anti-inflammatory members of the IL-1 family of ligands and receptors. PMID:21304099

  13. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammatory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Wang, Minge; Ribeiro, Denise; Cho, Hyong Jin; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Cole, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. This study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on activation of nuclear factor (NF) -κB, a transcription factor that serves a critical role in the inflammatory signaling cascade. Methods In 14 healthy adults (7 females; 7 males), peripheral blood mononuclear cell NF-κB was repeatedly assessed, along with enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations, in the morning after baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (awake from 23:00 h to 03:00 h), and recovery sleep. Results In the morning after a night of sleep loss, mononuclear cell NF-κB activation was significantly greater compared with morning levels following uninterrupted baseline or recovery sleep, in which the response was found in females but not in males. Conclusions These results identify NF-κB activation as a molecular pathway by which sleep disturbance may influence leukocyte inflammatory gene expression and the risk of inflammation-related disease. PMID:18561896

  14. Ultrasonographic imaging of inflammatory bowel disease in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, Liliana; Schreiber-Dietrich, Dagmar; Braden, Barbara; Cui, Xin-Wu; Buchhorn, Reiner; Chang, Jian-Min; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one of the most common chronic gastrointestinal diseases in pediatric patients. Choosing the optimal imaging modality for the assessment of gastrointestinal disease in pediatric patients can be challenging. The invasiveness and patient acceptance, the radiation exposure and the quality performance of the diagnostic test need to be considered. By reviewing the literature regarding imaging in inflammatory bowel disease the value of ultrasound in the clinical management of pediatric patients is highlighted. Transabdominal ultrasound is a useful, noninvasive method for the initial diagnosis of IBD in children; it also provides guidance for therapeutic decisions and helps to characterize and predict the course of the disease in individual patients. Ultrasound techniques including color Doppler imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound are promising imaging tools to determine disease activity and complications. Comparative studies between different imaging methods are needed. PMID:25954096

  15. Marine bioactives: pharmacological properties and potential applications against inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    D'Orazio, Nicolantonio; Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Gemello, Eugenio; De Girolamo, Massimo; Cusenza, Salvatore; Riccioni, Graziano

    2012-04-01

    Inflammation is a hot topic in medical research, because it plays a key role in inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other forms of arthritis, diabetes, heart diseases, irritable bowel syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, allergies, asthma, even cancer and many others. Over the past few decades, it was realized that the process of inflammation is virtually the same in different disorders, and a better understanding of inflammation may lead to better treatments for numerous diseases. Inflammation is the activation of the immune system in response to infection, irritation, or injury, with an influx of white blood cells, redness, heat, swelling, pain, and dysfunction of the organs involved. Although the pathophysiological basis of these conditions is not yet fully understood, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have often been implicated in their pathogenesis. In fact, in inflammatory diseases the antioxidant defense system is compromised, as evidenced by increased markers of oxidative stress, and decreased levels of protective antioxidant enzymes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). An enriched diet containing antioxidants, such as vitamin E, vitamin C, β-carotene and phenolic substances, has been suggested to improve symptoms by reducing disease-related oxidative stress. In this respect, the marine world represents a largely untapped reserve of bioactive ingredients, and considerable potential exists for exploitation of these bioactives as functional food ingredients. Substances such as n-3 oils, carotenoids, vitamins, minerals and peptides provide a myriad of health benefits, including reduction of cardiovascular diseases, anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory activities. New marine bioactives are recently gaining attention, since they could be helpful in combating chronic inflammatory degenerative conditions. The aim of this review is to examine the published studies concerning the potential pharmacological properties and

  16. Marine Bioactives: Pharmacological Properties and Potential Applications against Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    D’Orazio, Nicolantonio; Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Gemello, Eugenio; De Girolamo, Massimo; Cusenza, Salvatore; Riccioni, Graziano

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a hot topic in medical research, because it plays a key role in inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other forms of arthritis, diabetes, heart diseases, irritable bowel syndrome, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, allergies, asthma, even cancer and many others. Over the past few decades, it was realized that the process of inflammation is virtually the same in different disorders, and a better understanding of inflammation may lead to better treatments for numerous diseases. Inflammation is the activation of the immune system in response to infection, irritation, or injury, with an influx of white blood cells, redness, heat, swelling, pain, and dysfunction of the organs involved. Although the pathophysiological basis of these conditions is not yet fully understood, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have often been implicated in their pathogenesis. In fact, in inflammatory diseases the antioxidant defense system is compromised, as evidenced by increased markers of oxidative stress, and decreased levels of protective antioxidant enzymes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). An enriched diet containing antioxidants, such as vitamin E, vitamin C, β-carotene and phenolic substances, has been suggested to improve symptoms by reducing disease-related oxidative stress. In this respect, the marine world represents a largely untapped reserve of bioactive ingredients, and considerable potential exists for exploitation of these bioactives as functional food ingredients. Substances such as n-3 oils, carotenoids, vitamins, minerals and peptides provide a myriad of health benefits, including reduction of cardiovascular diseases, anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory activities. New marine bioactives are recently gaining attention, since they could be helpful in combating chronic inflammatory degenerative conditions. The aim of this review is to examine the published studies concerning the potential pharmacological properties and

  17. Polymicrobial synergy and dysbiosis in inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Richard J.; Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation of the periodontal area may arise when complex microbial communities transition from a commensal to a pathogenic entity. Communication among constituent species leads to polymicrobial synergy among metabolically compatible organisms that acquire functional specialization within the developing community. Keystone pathogens, even at low abundance, elevate community virulence and the resulting dysbiotic community targets specific aspects of host immunity to further disable immune surveillance while promoting an overall inflammatory response. Inflammophilic organisms benefit from proteinaceous substrates derived from inflammatory tissue breakdown. Inflammation and dysbiosis reinforce each other and the escalating environmental changes further select for a pathobiotic community. We have synthesized the polymicrobial synergy and dysbiotic components of the process into a new model for inflammatory diseases. PMID:25498392

  18. Polymicrobial synergy and dysbiosis in inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Richard J; Hajishengallis, George

    2015-03-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation of the periodontal area may arise when complex microbial communities transition from a commensal to a pathogenic entity. Communication among constituent species leads to polymicrobial synergy between metabolically compatible organisms that acquire functional specialization within the developing community. Keystone pathogens, even at low abundance, elevate community virulence, and the resulting dysbiotic community targets specific aspects of host immunity to further disable immune surveillance while promoting an overall inflammatory response. Inflammophilic organisms benefit from proteinaceous substrates derived from inflammatory tissue breakdown. Inflammation and dysbiosis reinforce each other, and the escalating environmental changes further select for a pathobiotic community. We have synthesized the polymicrobial synergy and dysbiotic components of the process into a new model for inflammatory diseases.

  19. Natural killer cells in inflammatory heart disease.

    PubMed

    Ong, SuFey; Rose, Noel R; Čiháková, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    Despite of a multitude of excellent studies, the regulatory role of natural killer (NK) cells in the pathogenesis of inflammatory cardiac disease is greatly underappreciated. Clinical abnormalities in the numbers and functions of NK cells are observed in myocarditis and inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMi) as well as in cardiac transplant rejection [1-6]. Because treatment of these disorders remains largely symptomatic in nature, patients have little options for targeted therapies [7,8]. However, blockade of NK cells and their receptors can protect against inflammation and damage in animal models of cardiac injury and inflammation. In these models, NK cells suppress the maturation and trafficking of inflammatory cells, alter the local cytokine and chemokine environments, and induce apoptosis in nearby resident and hematopoietic cells [1,9,10]. This review will dissect each protective mechanism employed by NK cells and explore how their properties might be exploited for their therapeutic potential.

  20. Inflammatory Signalings Involved in Airway and Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Ta; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2013-01-01

    In respiratory diseases, there is an increased expression of multiple inflammatory proteins in the respiratory tract, including cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. Chemokines have been shown to regulate inflammation and immune cell differentiation. Moreover, many of the known inflammatory target proteins, such as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), are associated with airway and lung inflammation in response to various stimuli. Injuriously environmental stimuli can access the lung through either the airways or the pulmonary and systemic circulations. The time course and intensity of responses by resident and circulating cells may be regulated by various inflammatory signalings, including Src family kinases (SFKs), protein kinase C (PKC), growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)/reactive oxygen species (ROS), PI3K/Akt, MAPKs, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), activator protein-1 (AP-1), and other signaling molecules. These signaling molecules regulate both key inflammatory signaling transduction pathways and target proteins involved in airway and lung inflammation. Here, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the expression of inflammatory target proteins associated with the respiratory diseases. Knowledge of the mechanisms of inflammation regulation could lead to the pharmacological manipulation of anti-inflammatory drugs in the respiratory diseases. PMID:23690670

  1. [Fecal calprotectin in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Lobatón, Triana; Rodríguez-Alonso, Lorena; Guardiola, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel diseases has classically been based on assessment of digestive symptoms. The development of these symptoms usually results in colonoscopy, which has a low diagnostic yield. Likewise, there is an increasing tendency to base treatment of inflammatory bowel disease on objective data, since the disappearance of signs of activity on colonoscopy (called « mucosal cure ») has been associated with sustained clinical remission and reduced rates of hospitalization and surgery. Consequently, there is a need for biomarkers that would aid the selection of those patients who would derive most benefit from an endoscopic examination. One substance that has been proposed as a biomarker of bowel inflammation is fecal calprotectin. This substance allows inflammatory bowel disease to be distinguished from irritable bowel syndrome and shows a better correlation with the degree of inflammation than clinical indicators and serological markers. In addition, it could also be useful to predict mucosal cure and the risk of recurrence.

  2. [The mediterranean diet model in inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Sales, C; Oliviero, F; Spinella, P

    2009-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet is based on a pattern of eating closely tied to the Mediterranean region, which includes Greece and southern Italy. Essentially, the traditional diet emphasizes foods from plant sources, limited meat consumption, small amounts of wine and olive oil as the main fat source. The beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet has been proven not only to cardiovascular diseases but also for diabetes, obesity, arthritis and cancer. Its anti-inflammatory and protective properties are linked to the large presence of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, but especially to the constituents of extra virgin olive oil: oleic acid, phenolic compounds olecanthal, a new recently discovered molecule, with natural anti-inflammatory properties. It has been shown that the Mediterranean diet can reduce disease activity, pain and stiffness in patients with inflammatory arthritis and may thus constitute a valuable support for patients suffering from these diseases.

  3. Predictors of Aggressive Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yarur, Andres J.; Strobel, Sebastian G.; Deshpande, Amar R.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease comprises a group of conditions characterized by idiopathic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The natural course of disease can range from an indolent course with prolonged periods of remission to aggressive, incapacitating disease. Predicting which patients are more susceptible to developing severe disease is important, especially when choosing therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. This paper reviews current evidence on the main demographic, clinical, endoscopic, histologic, serologic, and genetic markers that predict aggressive inflammatory bowel disease. In ulcerative colitis, we considered disease to be aggressive when patients had a high relapse rate, need for admission and/or surgery, development of colon cancer, or extraintestinal manifestations. We defined aggressive Crohn's disease as having a high relapse rate, development of penetrating disease, need for repeat surgery, or multiple admissions for flares. In Crohn's disease, involvement of the upper gastrointestinal tract and ileum, penetrating disease, early age at diagnosis, smoking, extensive ulceration of the mucosa, high titers of serum antibodies, and mutations of the NOD2 gene are markers of aggressive disease. In ulcerative colitis, patients with more extensive involvement of the colon (pancolitis) have more symptomatology and are at higher risk for needing a colectomy and developing colon cancer. Also, plasmocytic infiltration of the colonic mucosa and crypt atrophy predict treatment failure. As with diagnosis, no single method can predict disease aggressiveness. Multiple serologic and genetic tests are being developed to refine the accuracy of prediction. Endoscopic findings can also predict the future course of disease. At present, clinical manifestations are the most useful way to make therapeutic decisions. PMID:22298958

  4. (Auto)antibodies in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Severine; Vermeulen, Nathalie; Van Assche, Gert; Bossuyt, Xavier; Rutgeerts, Paul

    2008-06-01

    Patients who have inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) express strong antibody responses to a variety of epitopes. A number of (auto)antibodies have been described in patients who have Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. These markers reflect a loss of tolerance toward bacterial and fungal flora and have been studied for their clinical value in IBD patients. However, currently, they have no place in the diagnostic work up. Their real promise may lie in their use as surrogate markers of complicated aggressive disease as shown in various retrospective studies, but prospective data are lacking.

  5. Xanthine Oxidase Activity Is Associated with Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Inflammatory and Oxidative Status Markers in Metabolic Syndrome: Effects of a Single Exercise Session

    PubMed Central

    Feoli, Ana Maria Pandolfo; Macagnan, Fabrício Edler; Piovesan, Carla Haas; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in metabolic syndrome in subjects submitted to a single exercise session. We also investigated parameters of oxidative and inflammatory status. Materials/Methods. A case-control study (9 healthy and 8 MS volunteers) was performed to measure XO, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase activities, lipid peroxidation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) content, glucose levels, and lipid profile. Body mass indices, abdominal circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and TG levels were also determined. The exercise session consisted of 3 minutes of stretching, 3 minutes of warm-up, 30 minutes at a constant dynamic workload at a moderate intensity, and 3 minutes at a low speed. The blood samples were collected before and 15 minutes after the exercise session. Results. Serum XO activity was higher in MS group compared to control group. SOD activity was lower in MS subjects. XO activity was correlated with SOD, abdominal circumference, body mass indices, and hsCRP. The single exercise session reduced the SOD activity in the control group. Conclusions. Our data support the association between oxidative stress and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and suggest XO is present in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. PMID:24967004

  6. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ishfaq; Roy, Badal C.; Khan, Salman A.; Septer, Seth; Umar, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD) or Ulcerative Colitis (UC), two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis. PMID:27681914

  7. CT evaluation of the colon: inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Horton, K M; Corl, F M; Fishman, E K

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is valuable for detection and characterization of many inflammatory conditions of the colon. At CT, a dilated, thickened appendix is suggestive of appendicitis. A 1-4-cm, oval, fatty pericolic lesion with surrounding mesenteric inflammation is diagnostic of epiploic appendagitis. The key to distinguishing diverticulitis from other inflammatory conditions of the colon is the presence of diverticula in the involved segment. In typhlitis, CT demonstrates cecal distention and circumferential thickening of the cecal wall, which may have low attenuation secondary to edema. In radiation colitis, the clinical history is the key to suggesting the diagnosis because the CT findings can be nonspecific. The location of the involved segment and the extent and appearance of wall thickening may help distinguish Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. In ischemic colitis, CT typically demonstrates circumferential, symmetric wall thickening with fold enlargement. CT findings of graft-versus-host disease include small bowel and colonic wall thickening, which may result in luminal narrowing and separation of bowel loops. In infectious colitis, the site and thickness of colon affected may suggest a specific organism. The amount of wall thickening in pseudomembranous colitis is typically greater than in any other inflammatory disease of the colon except Crohn disease.

  8. Hydrogen Sulfide and Inflammatory Joint Diseases.

    PubMed

    Burguera, Elena Fernandez; Meijide-Failde, Rosa; Blanco, Francisco J

    2016-08-29

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) are widespread rheumatic diseases characterized by persistent inflammation and joint destruction. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gas with important physiologic functions in the brain, vasculature and other organs. Recent studies have found H2S to be a mediator in inflammatory joint diseases. H2S exhibited anti-inflammatory, anti-catabolic and/or anti-oxidant effects in rodent models of acute arthritis and in in vitro models using human synoviocytes and articular chondrocytes from RA and OA tissues. These findings suggest that exogenous supplementation of H2S may provide a viable therapeutic option for these diseases. The earliest studies used fast-dissolving salts, such as NaSH, but GYY4137, which produces H2S more physiologically, shortly appeared. More recently still, new H2S-forming compounds that target mitochondria have been synthesized. These compounds open exciting opportunities for investigating the role of H2S in cell bioenergetics, typically altered in arthritides. Positive results have been also obtained when H2S is administered as a sulphurous water bath, an option meriting further study. This review summarizes the recent literature concerning H2S and inflammatory joint diseases, highlighting relevant developments.

  9. [Inflammatory bowel diseases: an immunological approach].

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Sofía E; Beltrán, Caroll J; Peralta, Alexis; Rivas, Paola; Rojas, Néstor; Figueroa, Carolina; Quera, Rodrigo; Hermoso, Marcela A

    2008-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are inflammatory diseases with a multifactorial component that involve the intestinal tract. The two relevant IBD syndromes are Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). One factor involved in IBD development is a genetic predisposition, associated to NOD2/CARD15 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) polymorphisms that might favor infectious enterocolitis that is possibly associated to the development of IBD. The identification of specific immunologic alterations in IBD and their relationship to the etiology of the disease is a relevant research topic. The role of intra and extracellular molecules, such as transcription factors and cytokines that are involved in the inflammatory response, needs to be understood. The relevance of immunologic molecules that might drive the immune response to a T helper (Th) 1, Th 2 or the recently described Th 17 phenotype, has been demonstrated in animal models and clinical studies with IBD patients. CD and UC predominantly behave with a Th 1 and Th 2 immune phenotype, respectively. Recently, an association between CD and Th 17 has been reported. The knowledge acquired from immunologic and molecular research will help to develop accurate diagnostic methods and efficient therapies.

  10. Developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Liu, Han-Xiao; Yan, Hui-Yi; Wu, Dong-Mei; Ping, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental animal studies show that suboptimal environments in fetal and neonatal life exert a profound influence on physiological function and risk of diseases in adult life. The concepts of the 'developmental programming' and Developmental Origins of Health and Diseases (DOHaD) have become well accepted and have been applied across almost all fields of medicine. Adverse intrauterine environments may have programming effects on the crucial functions of the immune system during critical periods of fetal development, which can permanently alter the immune function of offspring. Immune dysfunction may in turn lead offspring to be susceptible to inflammatory and immune diseases in adulthood. These facts suggest that inflammatory and immune disorders might have developmental origins. In recent years, inflammatory and immune disorders have become a growing health problem worldwide. However, there is no systematic report in the literature on the developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases and the potential mechanisms involved. Here, we review the impacts of adverse intrauterine environments on the immune function in offspring. This review shows the results from human and different animal species and highlights the underlying mechanisms, including damaged development of cells in the thymus, helper T cell 1/helper T cell 2 balance disturbance, abnormal epigenetic modification, effects of maternal glucocorticoid overexposure on fetal lymphocytes and effects of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on the immune system. Although the phenomena have already been clearly implicated in epidemiologic and experimental studies, new studies investigating the mechanisms of these effects may provide new avenues for exploiting these pathways for disease prevention.

  11. Inflammatory oral cavity diseases of the cat.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, N C

    1992-11-01

    There is a great deal of frustration among veterinarians about the diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory diseases of the oral cavity of the cat. This frustration is due to both the high frequency of feline oral inflammatory lesions and our poor understanding of their causes. This poor understanding can be blamed on several things: (1) a rapidly emerging, but still relatively poor, understanding of feline diseases in general and nutrition in particular; (2) a tendency to lump rather than separate specific oral inflammations; (3) a tendency not to use a thorough and systematic approach to diagnosing oral cavity disease; and (4) the reluctance of veterinarians to apply what is already known about human oral cavity diseases to cats. When problems 2 through 4 are adequately addressed, it becomes apparent that we really know more about oral cavity disease in the cat than we thought we knew and that great progress has been made. The task ahead is to define, in precise medical terms, those remaining disease entities of the oral cavity that pose the greatest health risk to cats, to apply what has been already been discovered from human disease counterparts, and to study them systematically.

  12. Accuracy of 99mTc (V)-Dimercaptosuccinic Acid Scintigraphy and Fecal Calprotectin Compared with Colonoscopy in Localizing Active Lesions in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Basirat, Vahid; Azizi, Zahra; Javid Anbardan, Sanam; Taghizadeh Asl, Mina; Farbod, Yasaman; Teimouri, Azam; Ebrahimi Daryani, Nasser

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Due to limitation of colonoscopy in assessing the entire bowel and patients’ intolerance in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in the current study, we aimed to prospectively compare the accuracy of 99mTc(V)-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and fecal calprotectin with ileocolonoscopy as new methods for localizing inflammations. METHODS Current prospective study conducted between 2012 and 2014 on 30 patients with IBD attending Gastroenterology Clinic of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Fecal calprotectin and disease activity were measured for all participants and all of them underwent 99mTc (V)-DMSA scintigraphy and colonoscopy. The accuracy of 99mTc (V)-DMSA scintigraphy and calprotectin in localizing bowel lesions were calculated. RESULTS A total of 22 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 8 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) were evaluated in our study. Sensitivity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), and positive predictive value (PPV) of scintigraphy and calprotectin over colonoscopy in localization of UC lesions were 86.36%, 0.86%, 100.00% and 90.91%, 0.91, and 100.00%, respectively. Meanwhile, it showed 66.67% sensitivity and 81.25% specificity with PLR=3.56, negative likelihood ratio (NLR)=0.41, PPV=84.21%, and negative predictive value (NPV)= 61.90% in localizing lesions in patients with CD. The calprotectin level had sensitivity, PLR, and PPV of 90.00%, 0.90, and 100.00% in detecting active disease over colonoscopy, respectively. CONCLUSION The 99mTc (V)-DMSA scintigraphy would be an accurate method for detecting active inflammation in follow-up of patients with IBD and assessing response to treatment as a non-invasive and complementary method beside colonoscopy for more accurate diagnosis of CD or UC. PMID:27698971

  13. Surgical strategies in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Colin T; Smith, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises two distinct but related chronic relapsing inflammatory conditions affecting different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Crohn’s disease is characterised by a patchy transmural inflammation affecting both small and large bowel segments with several distinct phenotypic presentations. Ulcerative colitis classically presents as mucosal inflammation of the rectosigmoid (distal colitis), variably extending in a contiguous manner more proximally through the colon but not beyond the caecum (pancolitis). This article highlights aspects of the presentation, diagnosis, and management of IBD that have relevance for paediatric practice with particular emphasis on surgical considerations. Since 25% of IBD cases present in childhood or teenage years, the unique considerations and challenges of paediatric management should be widely appreciated. Conversely, we argue that the organizational separation of the paediatric and adult healthcare worlds has often resulted in late adoption of new approaches particularly in paediatric surgical practice. PMID:26034347

  14. Extraluminal factors contributing to inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Arvind; Stroh, Thorsten; Siegmund, Britta

    2011-01-01

    Many identified and yet unknown factors contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The genome-wide association studies clearly support the earlier developed concept that IBD occurs in genetically predisposed individuals who are exposed to distinct environmental factors, which together result in dysregulation of the mucosal immune system. Thus, the majority of previous studies have focused on the immune response within the intestinal wall. The present review aims to emphasize the contribution of three extraluminal structures to this inflammatory process, namely the mesenteric fat tissue, the lymphatics and the microvasculature. Broadening our view across the intestinal wall will not only facilitate our understanding of the disease, but will also us to identify future therapeutic targets. PMID:21350706

  15. Role of Diet in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Ruemmele, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is steadily in the rise in Western as well as in developing countries paralleling the increase of westernized diets, characterized by high protein and fat as well as excessive sugar intake, with less vegetables and fiber. An interesting hypothesis is that environmental (food-) triggered changes of the intestinal microbiome might cause a proinflammatory state preceding the development of IBD. Indeed, an intact intestinal epithelial barrier assuring a normal bacterial clearance of the intestinal surface is crucial to guarantee intestinal homeostasis. Any factors affecting the epithelial barrier function directly or indirectly may impact on this homeostasis, as well as any changes of the intestinal microbial composition. It is intriguing to learn that some frequently used food components impact on the quality of the intestinal barrier, as well as on the composition of the intestinal microbiome. This highlights the close interaction between living conditions, hygiene, food habits and food quality with the bacterial composition of the intestinal microbiome and the activation status of the intestinal immune system. There is clear evidence that nutritional therapy is highly successful in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD). Exclusive enteral nutrition is well established as induction therapy of CD. New diets, such as a CD exclusion diet or defined diets (specific carbohydrate diets, FODMAP diet, Paleolithic diet) are being discussed as treatment options for IBD. Well-designed clinical trials in IBD are urgently required to define the precise role of each of these diets in the prevention or management of IBD. Up to now, the role of diet in IBD is highly undermined by lay and anecdotal reports without sufficient scientific proof.

  16. Systemic complications of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Baillie, J; Soltis, R D

    1985-02-01

    Radiologic assessment of the sacroiliac joints should be part of every inflammatory bowel disease patient's workup; ankylosing spondylitis is 10 to 20 times more common in ulcerative colitis patients than in normal persons. Iritis, which occurs in 10 to 20% of ulcerative colitis patients, often precedes bowel symptoms. It may be necessary to use long-term, low-dose steroid therapy to control frequently recurring iritis.

  17. [Histopathological differential diagnosis in inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Fociani, P; Carsana, L; Zerbi, P; Ferri, A; Sampietro, G M; Vago, G

    2003-01-01

    In front of the suspicious diagnosis of an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the pathologist must have adequate and complete clinical, anamnestic, instrumental informations and, if possible, the previous histopathologic examinations. This is necessary because: the diagnosis of IBD is made with exclusion criteria, different pathologic entities may have similar macroscopic and microscopic findings and the characteristic lesions are often present in little number. The authors consider in this paper the problem of the differential diagnosis of IBD.

  18. Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Agozzino, M; Gonzalez, S; Ardigò, M

    2016-10-01

    In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a relatively novel non-invasive tool for microscopic evaluation of the skin used prevalently for diagnosis and management of skin tumour. Its axial resolution, its non-invasive and easy clinical application represents the goals for a large diffusion of this technique. During the last 15 years, RCM has been demonstrated to be able to increase the sensibility and sensitivity of dermoscopy in the diagnosis of skin tumours integrating in real time clinic, dermoscopic and microscopic information useful for the definition of malignancy. Despite to date, no large comparative studies on inflammatory skin diseases has been published in the literature, several papers already showed that RCM has a potential for the evaluation of the descriptive features of the most common inflammatory skin diseases as psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, contact dermatitis and others. The aim of the application of this technique in non-neoplastic skin diseases has been prevalently focused on the possibility of clinical diagnosis confirmation, as well as therapeutic management. Moreover, the use of RCM as driver for an optimised skin biopsy has been also followed in order to reduce the number of unsuccessful histopathological examination. In this review article we describe the confocal features of the major groups of inflammatory skin disorders focusing on psoriasiform dermatitis, interface dermatitis and spongiotic dermatitis.

  19. The Changing Phenotype of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Donal; Shanahan, Fergus

    2016-01-01

    It is widely known that there have been improvements in patient care and an increased incidence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) worldwide in recent decades. However, less well known are the phenotypic changes that have occurred; these are discussed in this review. Namely, we discuss the emergence of obesity in patients with IBD, elderly onset disease, mortality rates, colorectal cancer risk, the burden of medications and comorbidities, and the improvement in surgical treatment with a decrease in surgical rates in recent decades. PMID:28050166

  20. Trefoil factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Aamann, Luise; Vestergaard, Else Marie; Grønbæk, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which comprises ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, is characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The trefoil factors 1, 2, and 3 (TFF1-3) are a family of peptides that play important roles in the protection and repair of epithelial surfaces, including the gastrointestinal tract. TFFs may be involved in IBD pathogenesis and are a potential treatment option. In the present review, we describe the TFF family and their potential role in IBD by summarizing the current knowledge of their expression, possible function and pharmacological role in IBD. PMID:24696606

  1. Preventive health measures in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Abegunde, Ayokunle T; Muhammad, Bashir H; Ali, Tauseef

    2016-01-01

    We aim to review the literature and provide guidance on preventive health measures in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Structured searches were performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Library from January 1976 to June 2016 using the following keywords: (inflammatory bowel disease OR Crohn’s disease OR ulcerative colitis) AND (health maintenance OR preventive health OR health promotion). Abstracts of the articles selected from each of these multiple searches were reviewed, and those meeting the inclusion criteria (that is, providing data regarding preventive health or health maintenance in IBD patients) were recorded. Reference lists from the selected articles were manually reviewed to identify further relevant studies. Patients with IBD are at increased risk of developing adverse events related to the disease course, therapeutic interventions, or non-adherence to medication. Recent studies have suggested that IBD patients do not receive preventive services with the same thoroughness as patients with other chronic diseases. Preventive health measures can avert morbidity and improve the quality of life of patients with IBD. Gastroenterologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) should have an up to date working knowledge of preventive health measures for IBD patients. A holistic approach and better communication between gastroenterologists and PCPs with explicit clarification of roles will prevent duplication of services and streamline care. PMID:27678347

  2. Molecular diagnosis of orbital inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, James T; Choi, Dongseok; Wilson, David J; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Sibley, Cailin H; Harrington, Christina A; Planck, Stephen R

    2015-04-01

    Orbital inflammatory diseases include thyroid eye disease (TED), granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), sarcoidosis, and nonspecific orbital inflammation (NSOI). Histopathological diagnosis usually relies on the clinical context and is not always definitive. Gene expression profiling provides diagnostic and therapeutic information in several malignancies, but its role in evaluating nonmalignant disease is relatively untested. We hypothesized that gene expression profiling could provide diagnostic information for NSOI. We collected formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded orbital biopsies from 10 institutions and 83 subjects including 25 with thyroid eye disease, 25 nonspecific orbital inflammation, 20 healthy controls, 6 with granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and 7 with sarcoidosis. Tissues were divided into discovery and validation sets. Gene expression was quantified using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. A random forest statistical algorithm based on data from 39 probe sets identified controls, GPA, or TED with an average accuracy of 76% (p=0.02). Random forest analysis indicated that 52% of tissues from patients with nonspecific inflammation were consistent with a diagnosis of GPA. Molecular diagnosis by gene expression profiling will augment clinical data and histopathology in differentiating forms of orbital inflammatory disease.

  3. [Inflammatory bowel diseases--imaging diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Gil, Jerzy; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Stec-Michalska, Krystyna; Chojnacki, Cezary

    2004-01-01

    The basic diagnostic procedure in ulcerative colitis is an endoscopy of gastrointestinal tract. It allows the macroscopic evaluation as well as the specimen taking for histological assessment what is the basis for ultimate diagnosis. In case of Crohn's disease the radiological diagnostics is of equal importance as endoscope evaluation. The imaging of inflammatory changes in Crohn's disease still poses some difficulties, especially, that located in the small intestine. Lately, the range of accessible examinations has been wider. We have in disposal the ultrasonography, the computed tomography, the magnetic resonance imaging and the capsular endoscopy. All of them are of great use in the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. In case of microscopic colitis all the imaging diagnostics has no use. The only one mean to establish the diagnosis is a histological assessment. What is more, in the period of remission the colon tissue could be normal. In this paper we discussed the traditional and contemporary intestine imaging methods in inflammatory bowel diseases. The conclusion is that the further progress in science offers a better imaging and, what is even more important, the more efficient diagnostics and treatment of these diseases.

  4. Preventive health measures in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Abegunde, Ayokunle T; Muhammad, Bashir H; Ali, Tauseef

    2016-09-14

    We aim to review the literature and provide guidance on preventive health measures in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Structured searches were performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Library from January 1976 to June 2016 using the following keywords: (inflammatory bowel disease OR Crohn's disease OR ulcerative colitis) AND (health maintenance OR preventive health OR health promotion). Abstracts of the articles selected from each of these multiple searches were reviewed, and those meeting the inclusion criteria (that is, providing data regarding preventive health or health maintenance in IBD patients) were recorded. Reference lists from the selected articles were manually reviewed to identify further relevant studies. Patients with IBD are at increased risk of developing adverse events related to the disease course, therapeutic interventions, or non-adherence to medication. Recent studies have suggested that IBD patients do not receive preventive services with the same thoroughness as patients with other chronic diseases. Preventive health measures can avert morbidity and improve the quality of life of patients with IBD. Gastroenterologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) should have an up to date working knowledge of preventive health measures for IBD patients. A holistic approach and better communication between gastroenterologists and PCPs with explicit clarification of roles will prevent duplication of services and streamline care.

  5. Inflammatory bowel diseases: a burden in pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Mărginean, Cristina Oana; Meliţ, Lorena Elena; Mocanu, Simona; Mărginean, Maria Oana

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract, comprising mainly Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Both of them are frequently encountered in children, being multifactorial conditions, with an unclear etiology. Patients concerns: We present 4 cases of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children in order to underline the variable evolution depending on the patient's particularities. Diagnosis, interventions and outcomes: The first case, a 13-year-old male patient, with a history of Henoch–Schonlein purpura, was admitted for rectal bleeding and weight loss, with normal laboratory parameters. The colonoscopy and the histopathological examination established the diagnosis of UC. The evolution was initially favorable under corticosteroids and sulfasalazine, but with 3 relapses in 2 years. The second case, a 16-year-old male patient, with a history of lactose intolerance and constipation, was admitted for bloody, diarrheic stools, the laboratory tests pointing out only leukocytosis with neutrophilia. The colonoscopy and histopathological examination established the diagnosis of UC. The patient's evolution was slowly favorable. The third case, a 9-year old male patient, with emotional disorders and babbling, admitted for semiconsistent, bloody stools, with increased inflammatory tests, whose colonoscopy pointed out diffuse edema and hemorrhages, the histopathological examination establishing the diagnosis of CD. The evolution was initially favorable, but with 5 relapses in 3 years. The last case, a 12-year-old male patient, was admitted with diarrheic, bloody stools, refractory to antibiotics, and weight loss, with increased inflammatory tests. The colonoscopy pointed out ulcerations, hemorrhages, and disseminated puss deposits. The histopathological examination established the diagnosis of CD. The patient's evolution was favorable, with only 1 relapse in 3 years. Conclusions: The adequate

  6. Matrix Metalloproteinases in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Update

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Shane; Gilmer, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are known to be upregulated in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and other inflammatory conditions, but while their involvement is clear, their role in many settings has yet to be determined. Studies of the involvement of MMPs in IBD since 2006 have revealed an array of immune and stromal cells which release the proteases in response to inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. Through digestion of the extracellular matrix and cleavage of bioactive proteins, a huge diversity of roles have been revealed for the MMPs in IBD, where they have been shown to regulate epithelial barrier function, immune response, angiogenesis, fibrosis, and wound healing. For this reason, MMPs have been recognised as potential biomarkers for disease activity in IBD and inhibition remains a huge area of interest. This review describes new roles of MMPs in the pathophysiology of IBD and suggests future directions for the development of treatment strategies in this condition. PMID:25948887

  7. Inflammatory Mechanisms Linking Periodontal Diseases to Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schenkein, Harvey A.; Loos, Bruno G.

    2015-01-01

    Aims In this paper, inflammatory mechanisms that link periodontal diseases to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are reviewed. Materials and Methods and Results This paper is a literature review. Studies in the literature implicate a number of possible mechanisms that could be responsible for increased inflammatory responses in atheromatous lesions due to periodontal infections. These include increased systemic levels of inflammatory mediators stimulated by bacteria and their products at sites distant from the oral cavity, elevated thrombotic and hemostatic markers that promote a prothrombotic state and inflammation, cross-reactive systemic antibodies that promote inflammation and interact with the atheroma, promotion of dyslipidemia with consequent increases in proinflammatory lipid classes and subclasses, and common genetic susceptibility factors present in both disease leading to increased inflammatory responses. Conclusions Such mechanisms may be thought to act in concert to increase systemic inflammation in periodontal disease and to promote or exacerbate atherogenesis. However, proof that the increase in systemic inflammation attributable to periodontitis impacts inflammatory responses during atheroma development, thrombotic events, or myocardial infarction or stroke is lacking. PMID:23627334

  8. Therapeutic effects of date fruits (Phoenix dactylifera) in the prevention of diseases via modulation of anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-tumour activity

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Arshad H; Aly, Salah M; Ali, Habeeb; Babiker, Ali Y; Srikar, Sauda; khan, Amjad A

    2014-01-01

    The current mode of treatment of various diseases based on synthetic drugs is expensive, alters genetic and metabolic pathways and also shows adverse side effects. Thus, safe and effective approach is needed to prevent the diseases development and progression. In this vista, Natural products are good remedy in the treatment/management of diseases and they are affordable and effective without any adverse effects. Dates are main fruit in the Arabian Peninsula and are considered to be one of the most significant commercial crops and also have been documented in Holy Quran and modern scientific literatures. Earlier studies have shown that constituents of dates act as potent antioxidant, anti-tumour as well as anti-inflammatory, provide a suitable alternative therapy in various diseases cure. In this review, dates fruits has medicinal value are summarized in terms of therapeutic implications in the diseases control through anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumour and ant-diabetic effect. PMID:24753740

  9. Human malarial disease: a consequence of inflammatory cytokine release

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Ian A; Budd, Alison C; Alleva, Lisa M; Cowden, William B

    2006-01-01

    Malaria causes an acute systemic human disease that bears many similarities, both clinically and mechanistically, to those caused by bacteria, rickettsia, and viruses. Over the past few decades, a literature has emerged that argues for most of the pathology seen in all of these infectious diseases being explained by activation of the inflammatory system, with the balance between the pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines being tipped towards the onset of systemic inflammation. Although not often expressed in energy terms, there is, when reduced to biochemical essentials, wide agreement that infection with falciparum malaria is often fatal because mitochondria are unable to generate enough ATP to maintain normal cellular function. Most, however, would contend that this largely occurs because sequestered parasitized red cells prevent sufficient oxygen getting to where it is needed. This review considers the evidence that an equally or more important way ATP deficency arises in malaria, as well as these other infectious diseases, is an inability of mitochondria, through the effects of inflammatory cytokines on their function, to utilise available oxygen. This activity of these cytokines, plus their capacity to control the pathways through which oxygen supply to mitochondria are restricted (particularly through directing sequestration and driving anaemia), combine to make falciparum malaria primarily an inflammatory cytokine-driven disease. PMID:17029647

  10. Pancreatic function in chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Angelini, G; Cavallini, G; Bovo, P; Brocco, G; Castagnini, A; Lavarini, E; Merigo, F; Tallon, N; Scuro, L A

    1988-03-01

    This study was prospectively carried out to evaluate the frequency and clinical significance of pancreatic impairment in the course of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (CIBD). Twenty-seven patients affected by ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease were submitted to a secretin-cerulein test, oral glucose test (OGT) and to indirect immunofluorescence (IFL) for detection of autoantibodies against exocrine and endocrine tissue. A bicarbonate plus enzyme or only an enzyme insufficiency was found in 11/27 patients, whereas isolated lipase decrease was observed in 18 subjects. In the results of the OGT and the indirect IFL test there was no difference between patients and controls. These data demonstrate that pancreatic impairment is a far more frequent occurrence than generally recognized in clinical practice. The decrease of lipase secretion could worsen the consequences of malabsorption in Crohn's disease of the small intestine. Therefore we think that a pancreatic assessment is advisable, at least in Crohn's disease patients with steatorrhea.

  11. Pulmonary manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary signs and symptoms are examples of variable extraintestinal manifestations of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These complications of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) seem to be underrecognized by both pulmonary physicians and gastroenterologists. The objective of the present review was to gather and summarize information on this particular matter, on the basis of available up-to-date literature. Tracheobronchial involvement is the most prevalent respiratory presentation, whereas IBD-related interstitial lung disease is less frequent. Latent and asymptomatic pulmonary involvement is not unusual. Differential diagnosis should always consider infections (mainly tuberculosis) and drug-induced lung pathology. The common link between intestinal disease and lung pathology is unknown, but many hypotheses have been proposed. It is speculated that environmental pollution, common immunological mechanisms and predisposing genetic factors may play a role. PMID:26788078

  12. Role of antibiotics for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Peretz, Avi; Saliba, Walid

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be caused by an aberrant immune response to gut bacteria in a genetically susceptible host. The gut microbiota plays an important role in the pathogenesis and complications of the two main inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. Alterations in gut microbiota, and specifically reduced intestinal microbial diversity, have been found to be associated with chronic gut inflammation in these disorders. Specific bacterial pathogens, such as virulent Escherichia coli strains, Bacteroides spp, and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, have been linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Antibiotics may influence the course of these diseases by decreasing concentrations of bacteria in the gut lumen and altering the composition of intestinal microbiota. Different antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, the combination of both, rifaximin, and anti-tuberculous regimens have been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. For the treatment of active luminal CD, antibiotics may have a modest effect in decreasing disease activity and achieving remission, and are more effective in patients with disease involving the colon. Rifamixin, a non absorbable rifamycin has shown promising results. Treatment of suppurative complications of CD such as abscesses and fistulas, includes drainage and antibiotic therapy, most often ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, or a combination of both. Antibiotics might also play a role in maintenance of remission and prevention of post operative recurrence of CD. Data is more sparse for ulcerative colitis, and mostly consists of small trials evaluating ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and rifaximin. Most trials did not show a benefit for the treatment of active ulcerative colitis with antibiotics, though 2 meta-analyses concluded that antibiotic therapy is associated with a modest improvement in clinical symptoms

  13. Role of antibiotics for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Peretz, Avi; Saliba, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be caused by an aberrant immune response to gut bacteria in a genetically susceptible host. The gut microbiota plays an important role in the pathogenesis and complications of the two main inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. Alterations in gut microbiota, and specifically reduced intestinal microbial diversity, have been found to be associated with chronic gut inflammation in these disorders. Specific bacterial pathogens, such as virulent Escherichia coli strains, Bacteroides spp, and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, have been linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Antibiotics may influence the course of these diseases by decreasing concentrations of bacteria in the gut lumen and altering the composition of intestinal microbiota. Different antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, the combination of both, rifaximin, and anti-tuberculous regimens have been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. For the treatment of active luminal CD, antibiotics may have a modest effect in decreasing disease activity and achieving remission, and are more effective in patients with disease involving the colon. Rifamixin, a non absorbable rifamycin has shown promising results. Treatment of suppurative complications of CD such as abscesses and fistulas, includes drainage and antibiotic therapy, most often ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, or a combination of both. Antibiotics might also play a role in maintenance of remission and prevention of post operative recurrence of CD. Data is more sparse for ulcerative colitis, and mostly consists of small trials evaluating ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and rifaximin. Most trials did not show a benefit for the treatment of active ulcerative colitis with antibiotics, though 2 meta-analyses concluded that antibiotic therapy is associated with a modest improvement in clinical symptoms

  14. Lymphatic vessels: new targets for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Lothar C; Seidel, Catharina D; Detmar, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in the physiological control of the tissue fluid balance and in the initiation of immune responses. Recent studies have shown that lymphangiogenesis, the growth of new lymphatic vessels and/or the expansion of existing lymphatic vessels, is a characteristic feature of acute inflammatory reactions and of chronic inflammatory diseases. In these conditions, lymphatic vessel expansion occurs at the tissue level but also within the draining lymph nodes. Surprisingly, activation of lymphatic vessel function by delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor-C exerts anti-inflammatory effects in several models of cutaneous and joint inflammation. These effects are likely mediated by enhanced drainage of extravasated fluid and inflammatory cells, but also by lymphatic vessel-mediated modulation of immune responses. Although some of the underlying mechanisms are just beginning to be identified, lymphatic vessels have emerged as important targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory conditions. In this context, it is of great interest that some of the currently used anti-inflammatory drugs also potently activate lymphatic vessels.

  15. Oral pathology in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Tomac-Stojmenović, Marija; Mijandrušić-Sinčić, Brankica

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) - has been increasing on a global scale, and progressively, more gastroenterologists will be included in the diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Although IBD primarily affects the intestinal tract, extraintestinal manifestations of the disease are often apparent, including in the oral cavity, especially in CD. Specific oral manifestations in patients with CD are as follows: indurate mucosal tags, cobblestoning and mucogingivitis, deep linear ulcerations and lip swelling with vertical fissures. The most common non-specific manifestations, such as aphthous stomatitis and angular cheilitis, occur in both diseases, while pyostomatitis vegetans is more pronounced in patients with UC. Non-specific lesions in the oral cavity can also be the result of malnutrition and drugs. Malnutrition, followed by anemia and mineral and vitamin deficiency, affects the oral cavity and teeth. Furthermore, all of the drug classes that are applied to the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases can lead to alterations in the oral cavity due to the direct toxic effects of the drugs on oral tissues, as well as indirect immunosuppressive effects with a risk of developing opportunistic infections or bone marrow suppression. There is a higher occurrence of malignant diseases in patients with IBD, which is related to the disease itself and to the IBD-related therapy with a possible oral pathology. Treatment of oral lesions includes treatment of the alterations in the oral cavity according to the etiology together with treatment of the primary intestinal disease, which requires adequate knowledge and a strong cooperation between gastroenterologists and specialists in oral medicine. PMID:27433081

  16. Can Probiotics Cure Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

    PubMed

    Korada, Siva Kumar; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Bishayee, Anupam; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Aruna Lakshmi, K; Arunasree, M K; Dananajaya, B L; Mishra, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, especially microbial dysbiosis play role in several GI ailments such as irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Role of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial as it involves loss of maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier integrity, increased release of pro-inflammatory molecules, and microbial dysbiosis in gut microflora. Some specific pathogens also play a key role in the IBD development. The origin and causation are still in unfathomable condition and the exact root cause is unknown. Recently probiotic studies have been gaining importance because of their positive responses in their IBD experimental results. According to joint Food and Agricultural Organisation/World Health Organisation working group, probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amount confer health benefit on the host. These live beneficial microorganisms are considered helpful in improving gut colonization and perseverance thereby improves prophylactic effect. In the direction of IBD research, a number of studies are needed to standardize its methodology and its applicability on human usage. The particular review presents an overview of gut microflora and its impact on host health, types of IBD and existing therapies to treat this disorder, mechanism of several probiotic actions, role of probiotics in IBD prevention with their supporting evidences.

  17. Role of smoking in inflammatory bowel disease: implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G A; Rhodes, J; Green, J T; Richardson, C

    2000-05-01

    The relationship between smoking and inflammatory bowel disease is now firmly established but remains a source of confusion among both patients and doctors. It is negatively associated with ulcerative colitis but positively associated with Crohn's disease. In addition, it has opposite influences on the clinical course of the two conditions with benefit in ulcerative colitis but a detrimental effect in Crohn's disease. These differences have been the subject of much interest and scrutiny with the hope that they may offer some insight into the pathogenesis of the two conditions and possibly lead to alternative therapeutic options. Nicotine is probably the principal active ingredient in smoking responsible for the association; trials have shown it to be of some benefit in ulcerative colitis, but further research is required to establish its therapeutic role, and the relevant mechanisms responsible for its action. In this article, we review the role of smoking in inflammatory bowel disease and its implication for therapy.

  18. Oral manifestation in inflammatory bowel disease: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lankarani, Kamran B; Sivandzadeh, Gholam Reza; Hassanpour, Shima

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis, not only affect the intestinal tract but also have an extraintestinal involvement within the oral cavity. These oral manifestations may assist in the diagnosis and the monitoring of disease activity, whilst ignoring them may lead to an inaccurate diagnosis and useless and expensive workups. Indurated tag-like lesions, cobblestoning, and mucogingivitis are the most common specific oral findings encountered in CD cases. Aphthous stomatitis and pyostomatitis vegetans are among non-specific oral manifestations of IBD. In differential diagnosis, side effects of drugs, infections, nutritional deficiencies, and other inflammatory conditions should also be considered. Treatment usually involves managing the underlying intestinal disease. In severe cases with local symptoms, topical and/or systemic steroids and immunosuppressive drugs might be used. PMID:24379574

  19. The role of substance P in inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Terence M; O'Connell, Joseph; O'Brien, Darren I; Goode, Triona; Bredin, Charles P; Shanahan, Fergus

    2004-11-01

    The diffuse neuroendocrine system consists of specialised endocrine cells and peptidergic nerves and is present in all organs of the body. Substance P (SP) is secreted by nerves and inflammatory cells such as macrophages, eosinophils, lymphocytes, and dendritic cells and acts by binding to the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). SP has proinflammatory effects in immune and epithelial cells and participates in inflammatory diseases of the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and musculoskeletal systems. Many substances induce neuropeptide release from sensory nerves in the lung, including allergen, histamine, prostaglandins, and leukotrienes. Patients with asthma are hyperresponsive to SP and NK-1R expression is increased in their bronchi. Neurogenic inflammation also participates in virus-associated respiratory infection, non-productive cough, allergic rhinitis, and sarcoidosis. SP regulates smooth muscle contractility, epithelial ion transport, vascular permeability, and immune function in the gastrointestinal tract. Elevated levels of SP and upregulated NK-1R expression have been reported in the rectum and colon of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and correlate with disease activity. Increased levels of SP are found in the synovial fluid and serum of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and NK-1R mRNA is upregulated in RA synoviocytes. Glucocorticoids may attenuate neurogenic inflammation by decreasing NK-1R expression in epithelial and inflammatory cells and increasing production of neutral endopeptidase (NEP), an enzyme that degrades SP. Preventing the proinflammatory effects of SP using tachykinin receptor antagonists may have therapeutic potential in inflammatory diseases such as asthma, sarcoidosis, chronic bronchitis, IBD, and RA. In this paper, we review the role that SP plays in inflammatory disease.

  20. Inflammatory bowel disease imaging: Current practice and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kilcoyne, Aoife; Kaplan, Jess L; Gee, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the role of imaging in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including detection of extraluminal complications and extraintestinal manifestations of IBD, assessment of disease activity and treatment response, and discrimination of inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. IBD is a chronic idiopathic disease affecting the gastrointestinal tract that is comprised of two separate, but related intestinal disorders; Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The paper discusses, in detail the pros and cons of the different IBD imaging modalities that need to be considered in order to optimize the imaging and clinical evaluation of patients with IBD. Historically, IBD evaluation of the bowel has included imaging to assess the portions of the small bowel that are inaccessible to optical endoscopic visualization. This traditionally was performed using barium fluoroscopic techniques; however, cross-sectional imaging techniques (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) are being increasingly utilized for IBD evaluation because they can simultaneously assess mural and extramural IBD manifestations. Recent advances in imaging technology, that continue to improve the ability of imaging to noninvasively follow disease activity and treatment response, are also discussed. This review article summarizes the current imaging approach in inflammatory bowel disease as well as the role of emerging imaging modalities. PMID:26811637

  1. Inflammatory Muscle Disease: A New Landscape.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Alain; Lannes, Béatrice; Goetz, Joëlle; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Lipsker, Dan; Arnaud, Laurent; Martin, Thierry; Gottenberg, Jacques Eric; Geny, Bernard; Sibilia, Jean

    2017-03-22

    Greater accuracy in clinical descriptions combined with advances in muscle histology and immunology have established that inflammatory muscle diseases (IMDs) resemble inflammatory joint diseases in that they constitute a highly heterogeneous group of conditions. The topographic distribution, severity, and tempo of onset vary widely, and the histological findings distinguish at least five different profiles, which may reflect different pathophysiological processes. Most IMDs are connective tissue diseases that can affect multiple organs, among which the most common targets are the skin, joints, and lungs. The extramuscular manifestations may antedate the muscular involvement and should therefore suggest a diagnosis of IMD even in the absence of obvious muscle disease. About 20 different autoantibodies have been identified in patients with IMD. Some are mutually exclusive and associated with specific combinations of clinical manifestations. Following the model of antisynthetase syndrome, about 10 syndromes associated with autoantibodies specific of IMD have been identified. Thus, polymyositis is now emerging as a rare entity that is often mistaken for more recently described patterns of IMD. No consensus exists to date about the classification of IMDs. Nevertheless, the clinical manifestations, autoantibody profile, and muscle histology can be used to distinguish patient subgroups with fairly homogeneous patterns of complications, treatment responses, and outcomes. These subgroups are also characterized by specific genetic and environmental factors. The advances made in the nosology of IMDs have benefited the diagnosis, personalization of treatment strategies, and understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms. They can be expected to assist in the development of specific treatments.

  2. Myeloid hypoxia-inducible factors in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Aragonés, Julian; Elorza, Ainara; Acosta-Iborra, Barbara; Landázuri, Manuel O

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIF1 and HIF2) have emerged as central regulators of the activity of myeloid cells at inflammatory sites where O(2) is frequently limited. Novel insights in the field have revealed that the expression of HIFs by myeloid cells is not exclusively induced by hypoxia but also in response to central inflammatory mediators independently of O(2) shortage. This has substantially elevated the biological significance of HIFs in the context of inflammatory diseases. As a consequence, the loss of HIF1 or HIF2 in myeloid cells specifically compro-mises some of the processes driven by myeloid cells, such as bactericidal activity and myeloid invasion, as well as inflammation-associated detrimental consequences.

  3. Obesity as a Risk and Severity Factor in Rheumatic Diseases (Autoimmune Chronic Inflammatory Diseases)

    PubMed Central

    Gremese, Elisa; Tolusso, Barbara; Gigante, Maria Rita; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco

    2014-01-01

    The growing body of evidence recognizing the adipose tissue (AT) as an active endocrine organ secreting bioactive mediators involved in metabolic and inflammatory disorders, together with the global epidemic of overweight and obesity, rise obesity as a hot topic of current research. The chronic state of low-grade inflammation present in the obese condition and the multiple pleiotropic effects of adipokines on the immune system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory conditions including rheumatic autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. We will discuss the main relevant evidences on the role of the AT on immune and inflammatory networks and the more recent evidences regarding the effects of obesity on the incidence and outcomes of the major autoimmune chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25426122

  4. Extraintestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Danese, Silvio; Semeraro, Stefano; Papa, Alfredo; Roberto, Italia; Scaldaferri, Franco; Fedeli, Giuseppe; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) can be really considered to be systemic diseases since they are often associated with extraintestinal manifestations, complications, and other autoimmune disorders. Indeed, physicians who care for patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, the two major forms of IBD, face a new clinical challenge every day, worsened by the very frequent rate of extraintestinal complications. The goal of this review is to provide an overview and an update on the extraintestinal complications occurring in IBD. Indeed, this paper highlights how virtually almost every organ system can be involved, principally eyes, skin, joints, kidneys, liver and biliary tracts, and vasculature (or vascular system) are the most common sites of systemic IBD and their involvement is dependent on different mechanisms. PMID:16437620

  5. Newer treatments for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Stotland, B R; Lichtenstein, G R

    1998-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease represents chronic idiopathic disorders which involve either the colon exclusively (ulcerative colitis) of any part of the gastrointestinal tract (Crohn's disease). The course of these entities is typified by periods of symptomatic exacerbation interspersed with clinical remissions. Management is based upon regimens which decrease mucosal inflammation. Colonic disease distal to the splenic flexure may be treated with topical therapy, but other regions generally necessitate oral therapy. Currently used medications include the aminosalicylates, glucocorticoids, antibiotics and immunomodulators. The immunomodulator class of medications includes azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Newer agents include short-chain fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids and antibodies directed to tumor necrosis factor. Medical management also occasionally involves optimizing nutritional status with the addition of elemental diets or total parenteral nutrition. Management of specific clinical presentations is discussed.

  6. [Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in patients with inflammatory joint diseases treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2006-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology (SPR) and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology (SPP) have developed guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (AT) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD), namely rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, treated with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) antagonists. Due to the high risk of tuberculosis (TB) in patients with IJD, LTBI and AT screening should be performed as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis. Even if TB screening was performed at the beginning of the disease, the evaluation should be repeated before starting anti-TNF-alpha therapy. When TB (LTBI orAT) treatment is indicated, it should be performed before the beginning of anti-TNF-alpha therapy. If the IJD activity requires urgent anti-TNF-alpha therapy, these drugs can be started after two months of antituberculosis therapy in AT cases, or after one month in LTBI cases. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If abnormal, e.g. Gohn complex, the patient should be treated as LTBI; residual lesions require the exclusion of AT and patients with history of untreated or incomplete TB treatment should be treated as LTBI. In cases of suspected active lesions, AT diagnosis should be confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test (TST), with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If induration is less than 5 mm, the test should be repeated after 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and should be considered negative if the result is again inferior to 5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment. IfTST is performed in immunosupressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy, even in the presence of a negative test.

  7. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography in Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus–Associated Multicentric Castleman Disease: Correlation With Activity, Severity, Inflammatory and Virologic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Polizzotto, Mark N.; Millo, Corina; Uldrick, Thomas S.; Aleman, Karen; Whatley, Millie; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; O'Mahony, Deirdre; Marshall, Vickie; Whitby, Denise; Maass-Moreno, Roberto; Steinberg, Seth M.; Little, Richard F.; Yarchoan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background. Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV)-associated multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a lymphoproliferative inflammatory disorder commonly associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Its presentation may be difficult to distinguish from HIV and its complications, including lymphoma. Novel imaging strategies could address these problems. Methods. We prospectively characterized 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) findings in 27 patients with KSHV-MCD. Patients were imaged with disease activity and at remission with scans evaluated blind to clinical status. Symptoms, C-reactive protein level, and HIV and KSHV loads were assessed in relation to imaging findings. Results. KSHV-MCD activity was associated with hypermetabolic symmetric lymphadenopathy (median maximal standardized uptake value [SUVmax], 6.0; range, 2.0–8.0) and splenomegaly (3.4; 1.2–11.0), with increased metabolism also noted in the marrow (2.1; range, 1.0–3.5) and salivary glands (3.0; range, 2.0–6.0). The 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET abnormalities improved at remission, with significant SUVmax decreases in the lymph nodes (P = .004), spleen (P = .008), marrow (P = .004), and salivary glands (P = .004). Nodal SUVmax correlated with symptom severity (P = .005), C-reactive protein level (R = 0.62; P = .004), and KSHV load (R = 0.54; P = .02) but not HIV load (P = .52). Conclusions. KSHV-MCD activity is associated with 18F-FDG PET abnormalities of the lymph nodes, spleen, marrow, and salivary glands. These findings have clinical implications for the diagnosis and monitoring of KSHV-MCD and shed light on its pathobiologic mechanism. PMID:25828248

  8. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mechanisms, Redox Considerations, and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Biasi, Fiorella; Leonarduzzi, Gabriella; Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress is thought to play a key role in the development of intestinal damage in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), because of its primary involvement in intestinal cells' aberrant immune and inflammatory responses to dietary antigens and to the commensal bacteria. During the active disease phase, activated leukocytes generate not only a wide spectrum of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but also excess oxidative reactions, which markedly alter the redox equilibrium within the gut mucosa, and maintain inflammation by inducing redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Moreover, several inflammatory molecules generate further oxidation products, leading to a self-sustaining and auto-amplifying vicious circle, which eventually impairs the gut barrier. The current treatment of IBD consists of long-term conventional anti-inflammatory therapy and often leads to drug refractoriness or intolerance, limiting patients' quality of life. Immune modulators or anti-tumor necrosis factor α antibodies have recently been used, but all carry the risk of significant side effects and a poor treatment response. Recent developments in molecular medicine point to the possibility of treating the oxidative stress associated with IBD, by designing a proper supplementation of specific lipids to induce local production of anti-inflammatory derivatives, as well as by developing biological therapies that target selective molecules (i.e., nuclear factor-κB, NADPH oxidase, prohibitins, or inflammasomes) involved in redox signaling. The clinical significance of oxidative stress in IBD is now becoming clear, and may soon lead to important new therapeutic options to lessen intestinal damage in this disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1711–1747. PMID:23305298

  9. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The gut bacterial microbiome, particularly its role in disease and inflammation, has gained international attention with the successful use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. This success has led to studies exploring the role of FMT in other conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal system that have multifactorial etiologies. A shift in gut microbial composition in genetically susceptible individuals, an altered immune system, and environmental factors are all hypothesized to have a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. While numerous case reports and cohort studies have described the use of FMT in patients with IBD over the last 2 decades, the development of new sequencing techniques and results from 2 recent randomized, controlled trials have allowed for a better understanding of the relationship between the microbiome and the human host. However, despite these efforts, knowledge remains limited and the role of FMT in the management of IBD remains uncertain. Further investigation is necessary before FMT joins the current armamentarium of treatment options in clinical practice. PMID:27493597

  10. Osteoporosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Compston, J E; Judd, D; Crawley, E O; Evans, W D; Evans, C; Church, H A; Reid, E M; Rhodes, J

    1987-01-01

    Bone mineral content in spinal trabecular and peripheral cortical bone was measured in 75 unselected patients with small and/or large intestinal inflammatory bowel disease. Osteoporosis, defined as a bone mineral content greater than 2 SD below the age and sex matched normal mean value was present in 23 patients (30.6%). Three amenorrhoeic females aged 34, 38, and 42 years had severe clinical osteoporosis and a further three patients had one or more vertebral crush fractures. Eighteen of the 23 patients with osteoporosis had small intestinal disease with one or more resections and the mean lifetime steroid dose in those with osteoporosis was significantly higher than in those with normal bone mineral content. Bone mineral content in spinal trabecular bone showed significant negative correlations with lifetime steroid dose and serum alkaline phosphatase and a significant positive correlation with serum albumin. Peripheral cortical bone mineral content was positively correlated with body weight, height and body mass index. We conclude that the prevalence of osteoporosis is increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, severe clinical osteoporosis developing in some relatively young patients. The pathogenesis of this bone loss is probably multifactorial; steroid therapy is likely to be an important contributory factor. PMID:3583068

  11. Nutrition and chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Semerano, Luca; Julia, Chantal; Aitisha, Ouidade; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2016-11-30

    Nutrition is a major environmental influence on human health. Epidemiological and interventional studies suggest a pathophysiological or therapeutic role, respectively, for nutrition in inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRDs). Nevertheless, the associations between nutrition and IRDs are often weak and inconsistent, and the available clinical trials on nutrition are methodologically flawed. Experimental evidence is accumulating that micronutrients in the diet may influence intestinal and systemic immune responses via complex interactions involving the gut microbiota. Micronutrients may, therefore, contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. No interventions targeting these interactions for diagnostic, prophylactic, or therapeutic purposes have been developed to date. Moreover, the relevance to human disease of experimental results obtained in animals or in vitro is unclear. Novel high-throughput technologies (-omics) may prove useful for a systems biology approach to these results that takes the complexity of the interactions into account. Concomitant cohort studies combining clinical and laboratory data collected over time may provide new impetus to research into the connections between nutrition and IRDs.

  12. The aged gut in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Ardesia, M; Villanacci, V; Fries, W

    2015-12-01

    Senescence is accompanied by various anatomical and functional alterations starting from mastication and deglutition and consequent modifications of nutrition. In addition, the widespread use of proton pump inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in aged subjects weakens the gastric barrier, thus contributing to easier entry of microbes into the gastrointestinal tract. The microbiota of the elderly is less stable than that of younger adults, therefore, gut dysbiosis is more frequent. Dysbiosis represents a key factor for infections, e.g. Clostridium difficile, especially after antibiotic treatment, but also represents an important step for the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). IBD onset in the elderly needs careful evaluation in order to distinguish this entity from other pathologies that may affect the gut in senescence. Colitis associated with diverticula, drug-induced, ischemic, and microscopic colitides are among the possible diseases and, therefore, a careful macroscopic and histologic evaluation is mandatory. Finally, late onset IBD represents an important challenge for physicians since it occurs in subjects with frequent comorbidities and relative concomitant treatments. Although there is some evidence that disease course of elderly-onset IBD follows a milder course, overall morbidity, hospitalization rates and even mortality, the latter mostly due to comorbidities, are increased, especially in emergency settings.

  13. Gut Microbiota in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The gut mucosal barrier plays an important role in maintaining a delicate immune homeostasis. The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is considered to involve a defective mucosal immunity along with a genetic predisposition. Recent views have suggested an excessive response to components of the gut microbiota in IBD. A condition of "dysbiosis", with alterations of the gut microbial composition, has been observed in patients with IBD. In this article, the author review recent studies of gut microbiota in IBD, particularly the importance of the gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of pediatric IBD. PMID:24010101

  14. Spontaneous and transgenic rodent models of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Jurjus, Abdo

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder with many different putative influences mediating disease onset, severity, progression and diminution. Spontaneous natural IBD is classically expressed as Crohn's Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC) commonly found in primates; lymphoplasmocytic enteritis, eosinophilic gastritis and colitis, and ulcerative colitis with neuronal hyperplasia in dogs; and colitis in horses. Spontaneous inflammatory bowel disease has been noted in a number of rodent models which differ in genetic strain background, induced mutation, microbiota influences and immunopathogenic pathways. Histological lesions in Crohn's Disease feature noncaseating granulomatous inflammation while UC lesions typically exhibit ulceration, lamina propria inflammatory infiltrates and lack of granuloma development. Intestinal inflammation caused by CD and UC is also associated with increased incidence of intestinal neoplasia. Transgenic murine models have determined underlying etiological influences and appropriate therapeutic targets in IBD. This literature review will discuss current opinion and findings in spontaneous IBD, highlight selected transgenic rodent models of IBD and discuss their respective pathogenic mechanisms. It is very important to provide accommodation of induced putative deficits in activities of daily living and to assess discomfort and pain levels in the face of significant morbidity and/or mortality in these models. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis, and evaluating ways in which they influence disease expression represent potential investigative approaches with the greatest potential for new discoveries. PMID:26155200

  15. Proper Use of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Drugs during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kanis, S.L.; van der Woude, C.J.

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, referred to as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic, relapsing conditions. Patients are often diagnosed at a reproductive age, and therefore questions about fertility and reproductions often arise. Preconceptional counseling is the most important aspect in the management of IBD patients with a pregnancy wish. Patients should be counseled on the influence of IBD and IBD drugs on pregnancy. Most drugs are not related to adverse outcome while used during pregnancy. Active disease is related to adverse outcomes; therefore, it is of utmost importance to strive for remission before conception and during pregnancy. PMID:27548630

  16. MR Enterography of Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Endoscopic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Pankaj; Somwaru, Alexander S; Charabaty, Aline; Levy, Angela D

    2017-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the two main forms of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). CD is a transmural chronic inflammatory disorder that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract in a discontinuous distribution. UC is a mucosal and submucosal chronic inflammatory disease that typically originates in the rectum and may extend proximally in a continuous manner. In treating patients with CD and UC, clinicians rely heavily on accurate diagnoses and disease staging. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography used in conjunction with endoscopy and histopathologic analysis can help accurately diagnose and manage disease in the majority of patients. Endoscopy is more sensitive for detection of the early-manifesting mucosal abnormalities seen with IBD and enables histopathologic sampling. MR enterography yields more insightful information about the pathologic changes seen deep to the mucosal layer of the gastrointestinal tract wall and to those portions of the small bowel that are not accessible endoscopically. CD can be classified into active inflammatory, fistulizing and perforating, fibrostenotic, and reparative and regenerative phases of disease. Although CD has a progressive course, there is no stepwise progression between these disease phases, and various phases may exist at the same time. The endoscopic and MR enterographic features of UC can be broadly divided into two categories: acute phase and subacute-chronic phase. Understanding the endoscopic features of IBD and the pathologic processes that cause the MR enterographic findings of IBD can help improve the accuracy of disease characterization and thus optimize the medication and surgical therapies for these patients. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  17. Quantification of inflammatory activity in patients with Crohn's disease using diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) in MR enteroclysis and MR enterography.

    PubMed

    Stanescu-Siegmund, Nora; Nimsch, Yessica; Wunderlich, Arthur P; Wagner, Martin; Meier, Reinhard; Juchems, Markus S; Beer, Meinrad; Schmidt, Stefan A

    2017-03-01

    Background Individual studies have demonstrated the potential of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI-MRI) for identifying inflamed bowel segments. However, these studies were conducted with rather small patient cohorts and in most cases by means of MR enterography only. Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of detecting inflamed bowel segments in a large collective of patients with Crohn's disease using DWI in MR enteroclysis and MR enterography and to compare the results of both techniques, also considering clinical parameters by means of the Harvey-Bradshaw Index (HBI). Material and Methods Ninety-six patients underwent MRI enteroclysis and 35 patients MR enterography, both with additional DWI. The HBI as well as apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) in areas of inflamed and normal bowel wall were determined. Thus resulting in 208 bowel segments that were visualized and subsequently statistically analyzed. Results There were no significant differences in ADC values in MR enteroclysis and MR enterography ( P = 0.383 in inflammation, P = 0.223 in normal wall). Areas of inflammation showed statistically highly significant lower ADC values than areas of normal bowel wall ( P < 0.001). An ADC threshold of 1.56 × 10(-3 )mm(2)/s can distinguish between normal and inflamed bowel segments with a sensitivity of 97.4% and a specificity of 99.2%. A highly significant correlation could be shown between ADC and HBI values ( P = 0.001). Conclusion DWI-MRI facilitates recognition of inflamed bowel segments in patients with Crohn's disease and the ADC values show an excellent correlation to the HBI. There were no significant differences in ADC values in MR enteroclysis and MR enterography. An ADC threshold of 1.56 × 10(-3 )mm(2)/s differentiates between normal and inflamed bowel wall.

  18. Primary Immunodeficiencies and Inflammatory Disease: A Growing Genetic Intersection

    PubMed Central

    Fodil, Nassima; Langlais, David; Gros, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genome analysis have provided important insights into the genetic architecture of infectious and inflammatory diseases. The combined analysis of loci detected by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 22 inflammatory diseases has revealed a shared genetic core and associated biochemical pathways that play a central role in pathological inflammation. Parallel whole exome sequencing studies have identified 265 genes mutated in primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Here we examine the overlap between these two datasets, and find that it consists of genes essential for protection against infections and in which persistent activation causes pathological inflammation. Based on this intersection, we propose that although strong or inactivating mutations (rare variants) in these genes may cause severe disease (PIDs), their more subtle modulation potentially by common regulatory/coding variants may contribute to chronic inflammation. PMID:26791050

  19. Endoscopic scoring systems for inflammatory bowel disease: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Bisschops, Raf; Neumann, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    Endoscopy plays a pivotal role for diagnosis and assessment of disease activity and extent in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. International guidelines recommend the use of endoscopic scoring systems for evaluation of the prognosis and efficacy of medical treatments. Ideal scoring systems are easy to use, reproducible, reliable, responsive to changes, and validated in different clinical settings in order to guide therapeutic strategies. However, currently available endoscopic scoring systems often appear as complex for routine endoscopy and suffer from insufficient interobserver agreement and lack of formal validation which often limit their use in clinical trials. Here, we describe the role of endoscopic scoring systems in inflammatory bowel diseases focusing on pros and cons in the era of advanced endoscopic imaging and mucosal healing.

  20. The clinical implications of thalidomide in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Diamanti, Antonella; Capriati, Teresa; Papadatou, Bronislava; Knafelz, Daniela; Bracci, Fiammetta; Corsetti, Tiziana; Elia, Domenica; Torre, Giuliano

    2015-06-01

    Thalidomide has anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenetic activity that makes it suitable for treating inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The recent guidelines from the European Crohn's and Colitis Organization/European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition conclude that thalidomide cannot be recommended in refractory pediatric Crohn's disease but that it may be considered in selected cohorts of patients who are not anti-TNFα agent responders. The main adverse effect is the potential teratogenicity that renders the long-term use of thalidomide problematic in young adults due to the strict need for contraceptive use. In short-term use it is relatively safe; the most likely adverse effect is the neuropathy, which is highly reversible in children. So far the use of thalidomide is reported in 223 adult and pediatric IBD patients (206 with Crohn's disease). In the following sections, the authors will discuss efficacy and safety of thalidomide, in the short-term treatment of IBD.

  1. Is CD69 an effective brake to control inflammatory diseases?

    PubMed Central

    González-Amaro, Roberto; Cortés, Jose R.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Martín, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Early studies described CD69 as a leukocyte activation marker, and suggested its involvement in the activation of different leukocyte subsets as well as in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation. However, recent investigations have showed that CD69 knockout mice exhibit an enhanced susceptibility to different inflammatory diseases, mainly those mediated by Th17 lymphocytes. The recent discovery of a ligand for CD69 expressed on Dendritic cells, Galectin-1, has confirmed the immunoregulatory role of CD69 mainly by the inhibition of Th17 differentiation and function in mice and humans. In this regard, the expression of CD69, both in Th17 lymphocytes and by a subset of regulatory T cells, has an important role in the control of the immune response and the inflammatory phenomenon. Therefore, different evidences indicate that CD69 exerts a complex immuno-regulatory role in humans, and that it could be considered as target molecule for the therapy of immune-mediated diseases. PMID:23954168

  2. Proteomics and metabolomics in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Yau, Yunki; Leong, Rupert W; Zeng, Ming; Wasinger, Valerie C

    2013-07-01

    Genome-wide studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have allowed us to understand Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis as forms of related autoinflammatory disorders that arise from a multitude of pathogenic origins. Proteomics and metabolomics are the offspring of genomics that possess unprecedented possibilities to characterize unknown pathogenic pathways. It has been about a decade since proteomics was first applied to IBD, and 5 years for metabolomics. These techniques have yielded novel and potentially important findings, but turning these results into beneficial patient outcomes remains challenging. This review recounts the history and context of clinical IBD developments before and after proteomics and metabolomics IBD in this field, discusses the challenges in consolidating high complexity data with physiological understanding, and provides an outlook on the emerging principles that will help interface the bioanalytical laboratory with IBD prognosis.

  3. Vaccinating Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Jason; Wasan, Sharmeel

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not vaccinated at the same rate as general medical patients. IBD places patients at increased risk for developing vaccine-preventable illnesses, and this risk is further exacerbated by immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, gastroenterologists should familiarize themselves with health maintenance measures pertaining to patients with IBD. This article highlights the vaccinations required for patients with IBD, especially those who are immunosuppressed: influenza; pneumococcal pneumonia; hepatitis A and B viruses; human papilloma virus; meningococcal disease; tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis; measles, mumps, and rubella; varicella zoster; and herpes zoster. This article also discusses issues regarding patients with IBD who travel outside of the United States, as well as highlights and provides suggestions for areas of quality improvement that are needed in the field. PMID:27917091

  4. Management of inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M A; Sanderson, J D

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects body image, relationships, family planning, fertility and pregnancy outcomes. However, the common misconception that IBD is a contraindication, or serious concern, in pregnancy is essentially a myth. Most patients with IBD can expect to have uneventful pregnancies. We present an overview of the management of IBD during pregnancy, including management in those planning pregnancy, the suitability of relevant medication during pregnancy and breast feeding, investigation and monitoring of IBD during pregnancy, surgical management and considerations relating to delivery. While there are some definite alterations required in the management of IBD during pregnancy, management is essentially unchanged. With close attention to aspects such as nutrition and smoking cessation, and optimal disease control in the run-up to and during pregnancy, we have an opportunity to help our patients with IBD achieve good pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27582844

  5. GENETICS AND PATHOGENESIS OF INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ta-Chiang; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2016-01-01

    We are currently in an exciting time where our understanding of genetic underpinnings of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has undergone a revolution, based in large part by novel genotyping and sequencing technologies. With >160 susceptible loci identified for IBD, the goals now are to understand at a fundamental level, the function of these susceptibility alleles. Clinical relevance of how these susceptible genes shape the development of IBD is also a high priority. The main challenge is to understand how the environment and microbiome play a role in triggering disease in genetically susceptible individual, as the interactions may be complex. To advance the field, novel in vitro and mouse models that are designed to interrogate complex genetics and be able to functionally test hypotheses are needed. Ultimately, the goal of genetics studies will be to translate genetics to the patients with IBD and improve their care. PMID:26907531

  6. [Nutritional therapy in inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Piquet, Marie-Astrid; Gloro, Romain; Justum, Anne-Marie; Reimund, Jean-Marie

    2006-02-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition and specific nutrient deficiencies are common in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), more particularly in Crohn's disease. In adults, the use of artificial nutrition is indicated in the event of malnutrition, short bowel syndrome, or IBD refractory to all other treatments. In children, enteral nutrition has a place as first-line treatment to avoid side effects of corticosteroids on growth. The use, as a therapeutic tool, of specific nutrients (n-3 fatty acids, glutamine, antioxydant vitamins and minerals, TGF-beta, probiotics...) seems interesting at the pathophysiological level. Nevertheless, these nutrients are still under evaluation and there are not enough available studies to recommend them in clinical routine. A very promising solution is the use of probiotics for the treatment of refractory pouchitis.

  7. Hormonal contraception and pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Henry-Suchet, J

    1997-12-01

    Estrogen-progestogen contraception (OC) is significantly associated with a high prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis in the lower genital tracts of young women. In contrast, pelvic inflammatory disease is less frequent and is associated with milder pelvic lesions in OC users than in non-users. A recent study suggests that OC use can be associated with silent endometritis and salpingitis. The usual clinical, biological and laparoscopic signs of acute and chronic pelvic inflammatory disease are described. As shown tby several cost-benefit analyses, C. trachomatis detection in family planning centers is cost-effective and the eradication of bacteria is obtained in 90% of cases by a new treatment: azithromycin (1 g for 1 day). Although the data clearly show that C. trachomatis screening is cost-effective, selection of the diagnostic laboratory tests used in such screening programs should be carefully evaluated relative to cost, feasibility, specificity and sensitivity, and should be adapted to the presumed prevalence in screened populations. A systematic screening is indicated in populations susceptible to a prevalence of 5% or more.

  8. Biologic Agents in Inflammatory Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Posarelli, Chiara; Arapi, Ilir; Figus, Michele; Neri, Piergiorgio

    2011-01-01

    Non-infectious uveitis is a potentially sight threatening disease. Along the years, several therapeutic strategies have been proposed as a means to its treatment, including local and systemic steroids, immunosuppressives and more recently, biologic agents. The introduction of biologics can be defined as a new era: biologic therapies provide new options for patients with refractory and sight threatening inflammatory disorders. The availability of such novel treatment modalities has markedly improved the therapy of uveitis and considerably increased the possibility of long-term remissions. This article provides a review of current literature on biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor blockers, anti-interleukins and other related biologics, such as interferon alpha, for the treatment of uveitis. Several reports describe the efficacy of biologics in controlling a large number of refractory uveitides, suggesting a central role in managing ocular inflammatory diseases. However, there is still lack of randomized controlled trials to validate most of their applications. Biologics are promising drugs for the treatment of uveitis, showing a favorable safety and efficacy profile. On the other hand, lack of evidence from randomized controlled studies limits our understanding as to when commence treatment, which agent to choose, and how long to continue therapy. In addition, high cost and the potential for serious and unpredictable complications have very often limited their use in uveitis refractory to traditional immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:22454752

  9. Biologic agents in inflammatory eye disease.

    PubMed

    Posarelli, Chiara; Arapi, Ilir; Figus, Michele; Neri, Piergiorgio

    2011-10-01

    Non-infectious uveitis is a potentially sight threatening disease. Along the years, several therapeutic strategies have been proposed as a means to its treatment, including local and systemic steroids, immunosuppressives and more recently, biologic agents. The introduction of biologics can be defined as a new era: biologic therapies provide new options for patients with refractory and sight threatening inflammatory disorders. The availability of such novel treatment modalities has markedly improved the therapy of uveitis and considerably increased the possibility of long-term remissions. This article provides a review of current literature on biologic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor blockers, anti-interleukins and other related biologics, such as interferon alpha, for the treatment of uveitis. Several reports describe the efficacy of biologics in controlling a large number of refractory uveitides, suggesting a central role in managing ocular inflammatory diseases. However, there is still lack of randomized controlled trials to validate most of their applications. Biologics are promising drugs for the treatment of uveitis, showing a favorable safety and efficacy profile. On the other hand, lack of evidence from randomized controlled studies limits our understanding as to when commence treatment, which agent to choose, and how long to continue therapy. In addition, high cost and the potential for serious and unpredictable complications have very often limited their use in uveitis refractory to traditional immunosuppressive therapy.

  10. Epithelial Transport in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ghishan, Fayez K.; Kiela, Pawel R.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract is one of the most versatile tissues in the organism, responsible for providing a tight barrier between dietary and bacterial antigens and the mucosal and systemic immune system, while maintaining efficient digestive and absorptive processes to ensure adequate nutrient and energy supply. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD; Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis) are associated with a breakdown of both functions, which in some cases are clearly interrelated. In this updated literature review, we focus on the effects of intestinal inflammation and the associated immune mediators on selected aspects of the transepithelial transport of macro- and micronutrients. The mechanisms responsible for nutritional deficiencies are not always clear and could be related to decreased intake, malabsorption and excess losses. We summarize the known causes of nutrient deficiencies and the mechanism of IBD-associated diarrhea. We also overview the consequences of impaired epithelial transport, which infrequently transcend its primary purpose to affect the gut microbial ecology and epithelial integrity. While some of those regulatory mechanisms are relatively well established, more work needs to be done to determine how inflammatory cytokines can alter the transport process of nutrients across the gastrointestinal and renal epithelia. PMID:24691115

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Elizabeth A.; Mollen, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) represents a group of idiopathic disorders characterized by chronic or recurring inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. While the exact etiology of disease is unknown, IBD is recognized to be a complex, multifactorial disease that results from an intricate interplay of genetic predisposition, an altered immune response, changes in the intestinal microbiota, and environmental factors. Together, these contribute to a destruction of the intestinal epithelial barrier, increased gut permeability, and an influx of immune cells. Given that most cellular functions as well as maintenance of the epithelial barrier is energy-dependent, it is logical to assume that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a key role in both the onset and recurrence of disease. Indeed several studies have demonstrated evidence of mitochondrial stress and alterations in mitochondrial function within the intestinal epithelium of patients with IBD and mice undergoing experimental colitis. Although the hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, including oxidative stress and impaired ATP production are known to be evident in the intestines of patients with IBD, it is as yet unclear whether these processes occur as a cause of consequence of disease. We provide a current review of mitochondrial function in the setting of intestinal inflammation during IBD. PMID:26484345

  12. Non-Inflammatory Destructive Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    José Ricardo Kina; Yumi Umeda Suzuki, Thaís; Fumico Umeda Kina, Eunice; Kina, Juliana; Kina, Mônica

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-Inflammatory Destructive Periodontal Disease (NIDPD), is a severe destructive periodontal disease, that is characterized by the attachment loss and alveolar bone loss, without signs of the gingival inflammation, and the periodontal pocket development. Objective: Despite the fact that various cases of NIDPD have been reported; their etiology and disease evolution is still indefinite, and therefore, are open for discussion. Method: An NIDPD case was studied in order to demonstrate features of the disease, and discuss the possible etiology and treatment. Results: In this clinical case, the etiology of NIDPD seems to be an association of endogenous opportunist bacteria with anatomical aspects, occlusion pattern, emotional stress and mouth breathing condition. Conclusion: In spite of all cases described in the literature are comparable and may have similar etiology as related in this clinical case, additional research is needed to identify and clarify the role of the etiologic factors which determine the disease. PMID:27053968

  13. Soluble biglycan as a biomarker of inflammatory renal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Louise Tzung-Harn; Nastase, Madalina-Viviana; Zeng-Brouwers, Jinyang; Iozzo, Renato V.; Schaefer, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Chronic renal inflammation is often associated with a progressive accumulation of various extracellular matrix constituents, including several members of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) gene family. It is becoming increasingly evident that the matrix-unbound SLRPs strongly regulate the progression of inflammation and fibrosis. Soluble SLRPs are generated either via partial proteolytic processing of collagenous matrices or by de novo synthesis evoked by stress or injury. Liberated SLRPs can then bind to and activate Toll-like receptors, thus modulating downstream inflammatory signaling. Preclinical animal models and human studies have recently identified soluble biglycan as a key initiator and regulator of various inflammatory renal diseases. Biglycan, generated by activated macrophages, can enter the circulation and its elevated levels in plasma and renal parenchyma correlate with unfavorable renal function and outcome. In this review, we will focus on the critical role of soluble biglycan in inflammatory signaling in various renal disorders. Moreover, we will provide new data implicating proinflammatory effects of soluble decorin in unilateral ureteral obstruction. Finally, we will critically evaluate the potential application of soluble biglycan vis-à-vis other SLRPs (decorin, lumican and fibromodulin) as a promising target and novel biomarker of inflammatory renal diseases. PMID:25091702

  14. Inflammatory glycoproteins in cardiometabolic disorders, autoimmune diseases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Margery A; Gruppen, Eke G; Otvos, James D; Dullaart, Robin P F

    2016-08-01

    The physiological function initially attributed to the oligosaccharide moieties or glycans on inflammatory glycoproteins was to improve protein stability. However, it is now clear that glycans play a prominent role in glycoprotein structure and function and in some cases contribute to disease states. In fact, glycan processing contributes to pathogenicity not only in autoimmune disorders but also in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes and malignancy. While most clinical laboratory tests measure circulating levels of inflammatory proteins, newly developed diagnostic and prognostic tests are harvesting the information that can be gleaned by measuring the amount or structure of the attached glycans, which may be unique to individuals as well as various diseases. As such, these newer glycan-based tests may provide future means for more personalized approaches to patient stratification and improved patient care. Here we will discuss recent progress in high-throughput laboratory methods for glycomics (i.e. the study of glycan structures) and glycoprotein quantification by methods such as mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We will also review the clinical utility of glycoprotein and glycan measurements in the prediction of common low-grade inflammatory disorders including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer, as well as for monitoring autoimmune disease activity.

  15. Role of indium-111 white blood cells in inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, J.W.; Field, S.A.

    1988-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease in patients may be difficult to diagnose because of the complex problems associated with this disease. Radionuclides are able to provide a rapid and effective method of imaging the bowel in patients with active inflammatory bowel disease. In the past, clinical work-ups have included barium x-ray studies and endoscopy. Scarring and fistula formation have made it difficult to determine between the active disease and abscesses that may occur. Gallium-67 (67Ga) has been very useful in imaging patients with inflammatory bowel disease, but the multiple-day imaging procedure has been a limitation for the clinicians when achieving a diagnosis. Recent results with Indium-111 (111In)--labeled WBCs have provided excellent correlation between clinical symptoms and colonoscopy findings in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. This technique has also allowed the differentiation between reoccurring inflammatory bowel disease and abscesses that accompany the disease within a 24-hour time period. The use of intravenous (IV) glucagon has increased the clarity of the images in the small bowel. Technetium 99m (99mTc) diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) has been used in patients with inflammatory bowel disease demonstrating promising results. Investigators feel labelling 99mTc with WBCs will be improved, therefore yielding a greater efficiency, which will have a major impact on imaging patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Imaging patients with inflammatory bowel disease using radionuclides has yielded promising results. This is a significant advancement over barium radiography and endoscopy exams.24 references.

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity of Taraxacum officinale.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hye-Jin; Kang, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Hyun-Joo; Kang, Young-Sook; Lim, Chang-Jin; Kim, Young-Myeong; Park, Eun-Hee

    2008-01-04

    Taraxacum officinale has been widely used as a folkloric medicine for the treatment of diverse diseases. The dried plant was extracted with 70% ethanol to generate its ethanol extract (TEE). For some experiments, ethyl acetate (EA), n-butanol (BuOH) and aqueous (Aq) fractions were prepared in succession from TEE. TEE showed a scavenging activity in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, a diminishing effect on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, and an anti-angiogenic activity in the chicken chorioallantoic (CAM) assay. In the carrageenan-induced air pouch model, TEE inhibited production of exudate, and significantly diminished nitric oxide (NO) and leukocyte levels in the exudate. It also possessed an inhibitory effect on acetic acid-induced vascular permeability and caused a dose-dependent inhibition on acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing in mice. Suppressive effects of TEE on the production of NO and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages were also assessed. Among the fractions, the n-butanol fraction (BuOH) was identified to be most effective in the CAM assay. Collectively, Taraxacum officinale contains anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities through its inhibition of NO production and COX-2 expression and/or its antioxidative activity.

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity of natural dietary flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min-Hsiung; Lai, Ching-Shu; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2010-10-01

    Over the past few decades, inflammation has been recognized as a major risk factor for various human diseases. Acute inflammation is short-term, self-limiting and it's easy for host defenses to return the body to homeostasis. Chronic inflammatory responses are predispose to a pathological progression of chronic illnesses characterized by infiltration of inflammatory cells, excessive production of cytokines, dysregulation of cellular signaling and loss of barrier function. Targeting reduction of chronic inflammation is a beneficial strategy to combat several human diseases. Flavonoids are widely present in the average diet in such foods as fruits and vegetables, and have been demonstrated to exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities for human health including an anti-inflammatory property. Numerous studies have proposed that flavonoids act through a variety mechanisms to prevent and attenuate inflammatory responses and serve as possible cardioprotective, neuroprotective and chemopreventive agents. In this review, we summarize current knowledge and underlying mechanisms on anti-inflammatory activities of flavonoids and their implicated effects in the development of various chronic inflammatory diseases.

  18. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors: March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFalpha therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFalpha therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn s complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNFalpha therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk/benefit assessment.

  19. Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis in inflammatory joint diseases candidates for therapy with tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors - March 2008 update.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, João Eurico; Lucas, Helena; Canhão, Helena; Duarte, Raquel; Santos, Maria José; Villar, Miguel; Faustino, Augusto; Raymundo, Elena

    2008-01-01

    The Portuguese Society of Rheumatology and the Portuguese Society of Pulmonology have updated the guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and active tuberculosis (ATB) in patients with inflammatory joint diseases (IJD) that are candidates to therapy with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) antagonists. In order to reduce the risk of tuberculosis (TB) reactivation and the incidence of new infections, TB screening is recommended to be done as soon as possible, ideally at the moment of IJD diagnosis, and patient assessment repeated before starting anti-TNFα therapy. Treatment for ATB and LTBI must be done under the care of a TB specialist. When TB treatment is indicated, it should be completed prior to starting anti-TNFα therapy. If the IJD activity justifies the need for immediate treatment, anti-TNFα therapy can be started two months after antituberculous therapy has been initiated, in the case of ATB, and one month after in the case of LTBI. Chest X-ray is mandatory for all patients. If Gohn's complex is present, the patient should be treated for LTBI; healed lesions require the exclusion of ATB. In cases of suspected active lesions, ATB should be excluded/confirmed and adequate therapy initiated. Tuberculin skin test, with two units of RT23, should be performed in all patients. If the induration is <5 mm, the test should be repeated within 1 to 2 weeks, on the opposite forearm, and will be considered negative only if the result is again <5 mm. Positive TST implicates LTBI treatment, unless previous proper treatment was provided. If TST is performed in immunossuppressed IJD patients, LTBI treatment should be offered to the patient before starting anti-TNF-α therapy, even in the presence of a negative test, after risk / benefit assessment. Rev Port Pneumol 2007; XIV (2): 271-283.

  20. NS6180, a new KCa3.1 channel inhibitor prevents T-cell activation and inflammation in a rat model of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Strøbæk, D; Brown, DT; Jenkins, DP; Chen, Y-J; Coleman, N; Ando, Y; Chiu, P; Jørgensen, S; Demnitz, J; Wulff, H; Christophersen, P

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The KCa3.1 channel is a potential target for therapy of immune disease. We identified a compound from a new chemical class of KCa3.1 inhibitors and assessed in vitro and in vivo inhibition of immune responses. Experimental Approach We characterized the benzothiazinone NS6180 (4-[[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methyl]-2H-1,4-benzothiazin-3(4H)-one) with respect to potency and molecular site of action on KCa3.1 channels, selectivity towards other targets, effects on T-cell activation as well as pharmacokinetics and inflammation control in colitis induced by 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, a rat model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Key Results NS6180 inhibited cloned human KCa3.1 channels (IC50 = 9 nM) via T250 and V275, the same amino acid residues conferring sensitivity to triarylmethanes such as like TRAM-34. NS6180 inhibited endogenously expressed KCa3.1 channels in human, mouse and rat erythrocytes, with similar potencies (15–20 nM). NS6180 suppressed rat and mouse splenocyte proliferation at submicrolar concentrations and potently inhibited IL-2 and IFN-γ production, while exerting smaller effects on IL-4 and TNF-α and no effect on IL-17 production. Antibody staining showed KCa3.1 channels in healthy colon and strong up-regulation in association with infiltrating immune cells after induction of colitis. Despite poor plasma exposure, NS6180 (3 and 10 mg·kg−1 b.i.d.) dampened colon inflammation and improved body weight gain as effectively as the standard IBD drug sulfasalazine (300 mg·kg−1 q.d.). Conclusions and Implications NS6180 represents a novel class of KCa3.1 channel inhibitors which inhibited experimental colitis, suggesting KCa3.1 channels as targets for pharmacological control of intestinal inflammation. PMID:22891655

  1. Preventing infective complications in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Mill, Justine; Lawrance, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a dramatic change in the treatment of patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which comprise the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). This is due to the increasing use of immunosuppressives and in particular the biological agents, which are being used earlier in the course of disease, and for longer durations, as these therapies result in better clinical outcomes for patients. This, however, has the potential to increase the risk of opportunistic and serious infections in these patients, most of which are preventable. Much like the risk for potential malignancy resulting from the use of these therapies long-term, a balance needs to be struck between medication use to control the disease with minimization of the risk of an opportunistic infection. This outcome is achieved by the physician’s tailored use of justified therapies, and the patients’ education and actions to minimize infection risk. The purpose of this review is to explore the evidence and guidelines available to all physicians managing patients with IBD using immunomodulating agents and to aid in the prevention of opportunistic infections. PMID:25110408

  2. Preventing infective complications in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mill, Justine; Lawrance, Ian C

    2014-08-07

    Over the past decade there has been a dramatic change in the treatment of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which comprise the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). This is due to the increasing use of immunosuppressives and in particular the biological agents, which are being used earlier in the course of disease, and for longer durations, as these therapies result in better clinical outcomes for patients. This, however, has the potential to increase the risk of opportunistic and serious infections in these patients, most of which are preventable. Much like the risk for potential malignancy resulting from the use of these therapies long-term, a balance needs to be struck between medication use to control the disease with minimization of the risk of an opportunistic infection. This outcome is achieved by the physician's tailored use of justified therapies, and the patients' education and actions to minimize infection risk. The purpose of this review is to explore the evidence and guidelines available to all physicians managing patients with IBD using immunomodulating agents and to aid in the prevention of opportunistic infections.

  3. Diagnostic difficulties in inflammatory bowel disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Yantiss, R K; Odze, R D

    2006-01-01

    This review summarizes some of the common diagnostic problems encountered by pathologists when evaluating patients with chronic colitis and in whom inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is either suspected or within the differential diagnosis. Both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) show characteristic, but non-specific, pathological features that may overlap and result in a diagnosis of 'indeterminate colitis' (IC). However, other reasons why pathologists may entertain a diagnosis of IC include failure to recognize or accept certain 'hardcore' histological features as indicative of CD, an attempt to classify cases of chronic colitis based on mucosal biopsy material or in the absence of adequate clinical and radiographic information, and the presence of other disease processes that mask, or mimic, IBD. In addition, some cases of UC may show unusual CD-like features, such as discontinuous or patchy disease, ileal inflammation, extracolonic inflammation, granulomatous inflammation in response to ruptured crypts, aphthous ulcers, or transmural inflammation. Furthermore, other forms of colitis, such as microscopic colitis, diverticulitis and diversion colitis may, on occasion, also show IBD-like changes. The clinical and pathological features that aid in the distinction between these entities, and others, are covered in detail in this review.

  4. The Effect of Inflammatory Cytokines in Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kawaratani, Hideto; Tsujimoto, Tatsuhiro; Douhara, Akitoshi; Takaya, Hiroaki; Moriya, Kei; Namisaki, Tadashi; Noguchi, Ryuichi; Yoshiji, Hitoshi; Fujimoto, Masao; Fukui, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol is the most common cause of liver disease in the world. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to hepatocellular injury and liver inflammation. Inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IFN-γ, induce liver injury in the rat model of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Hepatoprotective cytokines, such as IL-6, and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10, are also associated with ALD. IL-6 improves ALD via activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and the subsequent induction of a variety of hepatoprotective genes in hepatocytes. IL-10 inhibits alcoholic liver inflammation via activation of STAT3 in Kupffer cells and the subsequent inhibition of liver inflammation. Alcohol consumption promotes liver inflammation by increasing translocation of gut-derived endotoxins to the portal circulation and activating Kupffer cells through the LPS/Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 pathways. Oxidative stress and microflora products are also associated with ALD. Interactions between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and other cytokines and chemokines are likely to play important roles in the development of ALD. The present study aims to conduct a systemic review of ALD from the aspect of inflammation. PMID:24385684

  5. The nervous system of airways and its remodeling in inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Audrit, Katrin Julia; Delventhal, Lucas; Aydin, Öznur; Nassenstein, Christina

    2017-03-01

    Inflammatory lung diseases are associated with bronchospasm, cough, dyspnea and airway hyperreactivity. The majority of these symptoms cannot be primarily explained by immune cell infiltration. Evidence has been provided that vagal efferent and afferent neurons play a pivotal role in this regard. Their functions can be altered by inflammatory mediators that induce long-lasting changes in vagal nerve activity and gene expression in both peripheral and central neurons, providing new targets for treatment of pulmonary inflammatory diseases.

  6. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana Sofía; Martínez-Reyes, Cynthia; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús Kazúo

    2009-11-28

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways, frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune pathogenic mechanisms shared by IBD and spondyloarthropathies include genetic susceptibility to abnormal antigen presentation, aberrant recognition of self, the presence of autoantibodies against specific antigens shared by the colon and other extra-colonic tissues, and increased intestinal permeability. The response against microorganisms may have an important role through molecular mimicry and other mechanisms. Rheumatic manifestations of IBD have been divided into peripheral arthritis, and axial involvement, including sacroiliitis, with or without spondylitis, similar to idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis. Other periarticular features can occur, including enthesopathy, tendonitis, clubbing, periostitis, and granulomatous lesions of joints and bones. Osteoporosis and osteomalacia secondary to IBD and iatrogenic complications can also occur. The management of the rheumatic manifestations of IBD consists of physical therapy in combination with local injection of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; caution is in order however, because of their possible harmful effects on intestinal integrity, permeability, and even on gut inflammation. Sulfasalazine, methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporine and leflunomide should be used for selected indications. In some cases, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blocking agents should be considered as first-line therapy.

  7. The role of antimicrobial peptides in chronic inflammatory skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present an activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as some fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. Several inflammatory skin diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, acne vulgaris and rosacea are characterized by a dysregulated expression of AMPs. Antimicrobial peptides are excessively produced in lesional psoriatic scales or rosacea in contrast to the atopic skin that shows lower AMP levels when compared with psoriasis. The importance of the AMPs contribution to host immunity is indisputable as alterations in the antimicrobial peptide expression have been associated with various pathologic processes. This review discusses the biology and clinical relevance of antimicrobial peptides expressed in the skin and their role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:26985172

  8. The Inflammatory Actions of Coagulant and Fibrinolytic Proteases in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schuliga, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aside from their role in hemostasis, coagulant and fibrinolytic proteases are important mediators of inflammation in diseases such as asthma, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and cancer. The blood circulating zymogens of these proteases enter damaged tissue as a consequence of vascular leak or rupture to become activated and contribute to extravascular coagulation or fibrinolysis. The coagulants, factor Xa (FXa), factor VIIa (FVIIa), tissue factor, and thrombin, also evoke cell-mediated actions on structural cells (e.g., fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) or inflammatory cells (e.g., macrophages) via the proteolytic activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs). Plasmin, the principle enzymatic mediator of fibrinolysis, also forms toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) activating fibrin degradation products (FDPs) and can release latent-matrix bound growth factors such as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). Furthermore, the proteases that convert plasminogen into plasmin (e.g., urokinase plasminogen activator) evoke plasmin-independent proinflammatory actions involving coreceptor activation. Selectively targeting the receptor-mediated actions of hemostatic proteases is a strategy that may be used to treat inflammatory disease without the bleeding complications of conventional anticoagulant therapies. The mechanisms by which proteases of the coagulant and fibrinolytic systems contribute to extravascular inflammation in disease will be considered in this review. PMID:25878399

  9. Light and sound - emerging imaging techniques for inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Knieling, Ferdinand; Waldner, Maximilian J

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease are known to have a high demand of recurrent evaluation for therapy and disease activity. Further, the risk of developing cancer during the disease progression is increasing from year to year. New, mostly non-radiant, quick to perform and quantitative methods are challenging, conventional endoscopy with biopsy as gold standard. Especially, new physical imaging approaches utilizing light and sound waves have facilitated the development of advanced functional and molecular modalities. Besides these advantages they hold the promise to predict personalized therapeutic responses and to spare frequent invasive procedures. Within this article we highlight their potential for initial diagnosis, assessment of disease activity and surveillance of cancer development in established techniques and recent advances such as wide-view full-spectrum endoscopy, chromoendoscopy, autofluorescence endoscopy, endocytoscopy, confocal laser endoscopy, multiphoton endoscopy, molecular imaging endoscopy, B-mode and Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, ultrasound molecular imaging, and elastography. PMID:27433080

  10. Glycosaminoglycan sulodexide modulates inflammatory pathways in chronic venous disease.

    PubMed

    Mannello, F; Ligi, D; Raffetto, J D

    2014-06-01

    Inflammation represents an important epiphenomenon in the etiopathogenesis of chronic venous disease, a worldwide debilitating condition affecting millions of subjects. The pathophysiology of chronic venous disease (CVD) is based on the hemodynamic abnormalities in conjunction to alterations in cellular and extracellular matrix biocompounds. The endothelial dysfunction results from early perturbation in the endothelium linked to glycocalyx injury and promoted by inflammatory cells and mediators (such as matrix metalloproteinases and interleukins), which lead to progressive dilation of the vein resulting in chronic venous insufficiency. Activated leukocytes during the inflammatory process release enzymes, free radicals, chemokines and inflammatory cytokines in the vessel microenvironment, which are responsible for the changes of the venous wall and venous valve, reflux and venous hypertension, and the development/progression of tissue destruction and skin changes. Sulodexide, a highly purified mixture of glycosaminoglycans composed by 80% fast moving heparin and 20% of dermatan sulphate, exhibits anti-thrombotic and profibrinolytic properties, restoring also the essential endothelial glycocalyx. Glycosaminoglycan sulodexide has been also characterized to reduce the release of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and to inhibit the matrix metalloproteinases-related proteolytic cascades, counteracting endothelial dysfunctions. The pleiotropic effects of sulodexide set the basis for a very promising agent in treating the spectrum of CVD.

  11. Chlamydia trachomatis in pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Shrikhande, S N; Joshi, S G; Zodpey, S P; Saoji, A M

    1995-04-01

    The prevalence of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection and some epidemiologic factors associated with it were studied in 273 pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) patients attending Gynaecologic clinic, Government Medical College, Nagpur. For detection of chlamydial antigen Pharmacia Diagnostics Chlamydia EIA test was used. This study revealed an overall positivity rate of 33% for C. trachomatis infection in PID patients. Of the hypothesised risk factors low socioeconomic status, history of sexual contacts with multiple partners and use of intrauterine devices (IUD) were significantly associated with C. trachomatis infections. However, use of oral contraceptives, barrier contraceptives and increasing age were found to be protective factors for C. trachomatis infection. Thus considering the significant contribution of C. trachomatis in etiology of PID and its independent association with some epidemiologic risk factors, extensive epidemiologic measures are recommended for prevention of these infections.

  12. [Enteric microflora in inflammatory bowel disease patients].

    PubMed

    Rahmouni, Oumaira; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Neut, Christel

    2016-11-01

    During the last years, the importance of a well equilibrated intestinal microbiota (eubiosis) has become more and more obvious in human health. Dysbiosis is now a well-recognized feature associated with IBD (inflammatory bowel disease). Rupture of the normal microbiota can occur through different mechanisms: (1) by a typical Western diet rich in fat and low in fiber, (2) by an acute disruption of the microbiota (by an acute gastroenteritis or by intake of antibiotics) or (3) by a combination of event in early childhood avoiding the establishment of eubiosis (the hygiene hypothesis). Risk factors for IBD are stated for each disruption mechanism. Dysbiosis can also induce colonization by several pathobionts able to aggravate inflammation. Among the potential candidates in IBD, most attention has been paid on AIEC during the last years.

  13. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vezza, Teresa; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Algieri, Francesca; Utrilla, Maria Pilar; Rodriguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients’ life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects. PMID:27070642

  14. Neurological disorders and inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Pastorelli, Luca; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Spina, Luisa; Baldini, Vittorio; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur in about one-third of patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and may precede the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms by many years. Neurologic disorders associated with IBD are not frequent, being reported in 3% of patients, but they often represent an important cause of morbidity and a relevant diagnostic issue. In addition, the increasing use of immunosuppressant and biological therapies for IBD may also play a pivotal role in the development of neurological disorders of different type and pathogenesis. Hence, we provide a complete and profound review of the main features of neurological complications associated with IBD, with particular reference to those related to drugs and with a specific focus on their clinical presentation and possible pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25083051

  15. Does bacterial vaginosis cause pelvic inflammatory disease?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Brandie DePaoli; Darville, Toni; Haggerty, Catherine L

    2013-02-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), the infection and inflammation of the female genital tract, results in serious reproductive morbidity including infertility and ectopic pregnancy. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a complex alteration of the vaginal flora that has been implicated in PID. The role of BV in the etiology and pathogenesis of PID has not been studied extensively. Our objective was to extensively review data related to the relationship between BV and PID (n = 19 studies). Several studies found a link between BV and cervicitis, endometritis, and salpingitis. Furthermore, it seems that some BV-associated organisms are associated with PID, whereas others are not. However, studies demonstrating an independent association between BV-associated organisms and PID are sparse. In addition, a causal association between BV and PID has not been established. Prospective studies are needed to further delineate the role of BV in PID, with particular focus on individual BV-associated organisms.

  16. Nutritional considerations in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Conklin, Laurie S; Oliva-Hemker, Maria

    2010-06-01

    Nutrition is a critical part of the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children and adults. Malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies are common at the time of diagnosis and may persist throughout the course of the disease. There are a number of similarities with regards to the nutritional complications and the approach to nutritional management in IBD in both children and adults, but there are also important differences. Growth failure, pubertal delay and the need for corticosteroid-sparing regimens are of higher importance in pediatrics. In the pediatric population, exclusive enteral nutrition may be equivalent to corticosteroids in inducing remission in acute Crohn's disease, and may have benefits over corticosteroids in children. Adherence with exclusive enteral nutrition is better in children than in adults. Iron deficiency anemia is an important problem for adults and children with IBD. Intravenous iron administration may be superior to oral iron supplementation. Ensuring adequate bone health is another critical component of nutritional management in IBD, but guidelines for screening and therapeutic interventions for low bone mineral density are lacking in children.

  17. α-Linolenic acid (ALA) is an anti-inflammatory agent in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Reifen, Ram; Karlinsky, Anna; Stark, Aliza H; Berkovich, Zipi; Nyska, Abraham

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest that consumption of omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) plays a protective role in inflammatory bowel disease; however, the use of plant-derived oils rich in α-linolenic acid (ALA) has not been widely investigated. The aims of this study were to test the effects of two different sources of (n-3) PUFA, fish and plant-derived oils, in two animal models of experimental colitis and to determine whether the (n-3) PUFA-enriched diets could ameliorate the inflammatory status. Rats were fed diets rich in corn, fish or sage oil with or without vitamin A supplementation for 3weeks then colitis was induced by adding dextran sodium sulfate to the drinking water or by injecting 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. We show that colitic rats fed the sage oil diets had a lower inflammatory response, improved histological repair and had less necrotic damage in the mucosa when compared to the corn and fish oil groups. Colonic damage and myeloperoxidase activity were significantly lower. Colonic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory genes including interleukin IL-6, cyclooxygenase 2 and tumor necrosis factor α were markedly down-regulated in rats fed fish and sage oils compared to control. These results were supported by experiments in the human colonic epithelial cell line Caco-2, where ALA supplementation was shown to be effective in inhibiting inflammation induced by IL-1β by down-regulating mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory genes including IL-8, COX2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Taken together, these results suggest that plant-derived oil rich in ALA could ameliorate the inflammatory damage in colitis.

  18. Inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system in dogs.

    PubMed

    Thomas, W B

    1998-08-01

    Inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) are important causes of seizures in dogs. Specific diseases include canine distemper, rabies, cryptococcosis, coccidioidomycosis, toxoplasmosis, neosporosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis, and pug dog encephalitis. Inflammatory disorders should be considered when a dog with seizures has persistent neurological deficits, suffers an onset of seizures at less than 1 or greater than 5 years of age, or exhibits signs of systemic illness. A thorough history, examination, and analysis of cerebrospinal fluid are important in the diagnosis of inflammatory diseases. However, even with extensive diagnostic testing, a specific etiology is identified in less than two thirds of dogs with inflammatory diseases of the CNS.

  19. Novel methylxanthine derivative-mediated anti-inflammatory effects in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Ah; Kamba, Alan; Low, Daren; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2014-01-01

    Family 18 chitinases have a binding capacity with chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine. Recent studies strongly suggested that chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1, also known as YKL-40) and acidic mammalian chitinase, the two major members of family 18 chitinases, play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), bronchial asthma and several other inflammatory disorders. Based on the data from high-throughput screening, it has been found that three methylxanthine derivatives, caffeine, theophylline, and pentoxifylline, have competitive inhibitory effects against a fungal family 18 chitinase by specifically interacting with conserved tryptophans in the active site of this protein. Methylxanthine derivatives are also known as adenosine receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase inhibitors and histone deacetylase inducers. Anti-inflammatory effects of methylxanthine derivatives have been well-documented in the literature. For example, a beneficial link between coffee or caffeine consumption and type 2 diabetes as well as liver cirrhosis has been reported. Furthermore, theophylline has a long history of being used as a bronchodilator in asthma therapy, and pentoxifylline has an immuno-modulating effect for peripheral vascular disease. However, it is still largely unknown whether these methylxanthine derivative-mediated anti-inflammatory effects are associated with the inhibition of CHI3L1-induced cytoplasmic signaling cascades in epithelial cells. In this review article we will examine the above possibility and summarize the biological significance of methylxanthine derivatives in intestinal epithelial cells. We hope that this study will provide a rationale for the development of methylxanthine derivatives, in particular caffeine, -based anti-inflammatory therapeutics in the field of IBD and IBD-associated carcinogenesis. PMID:24574789

  20. Atherosclerosis: a chronic inflammatory disease mediated by mast cells.

    PubMed

    Conti, Pio; Shaik-Dasthagirisaeb, Yazdami

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a process that plays an important role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and immune disease, involving multiple cell types, including macrophages, T-lymphocytes, endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mast cells. The fundamental damage of atherosclerosis is the atheromatous or fibro-fatty plaque which is a lesion that causes several diseases. In atherosclerosis the innate immune response, which involves macrophages, is initiated by the arterial endothelial cells which respond to modified lipoproteins and lead to Th1 cell subset activation and generation of inflammatory cytokines and chemoattractant chemokines. Other immune cells, such as CD4+ T inflammatory cells, which play a critical role in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, and regulatory T cells [Treg], which have a protective effect on the development of atherosclerosis are involved. Considerable evidence indicates that mast cells and their products play a key role in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Activated mast cells can have detrimental effects, provoking matrix degradation, apoptosis, and enhancement as well as recruitment of inflammatory cells, which actively contributes to atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Here we discuss the relationship between atherosclerosis, inflammation and mast cells.

  1. Inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease: overlaps and differences.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Virginia; Dieli-Crimi, Romina; López-Palacios, Natalia; Bodas, Andrés; Medrano, Luz María; Núñez, Concepción

    2014-05-07

    Recent findings demonstrate the common genetic basis for many immune-mediated diseases, and consequently, the partially shared pathogenesis. We collected these findings and reviewed the extension of these overlaps to other disease characteristics. Two autoimmune diseases were selected that also share the specific target organ, the bowel. The etiology and immunopathogenesis of both conditions characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and celiac disease (CeD), are not completely understood. Both are complex diseases with genetics and environment contributing to dysregulation of innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to chronic inflammation and disease. CeD constitutes a particular disease because the main environmental and genetic triggers are largely known. IBD comprises two main clinical forms, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which most likely involve a complex interplay between some components of the commensal microbiota and other environmental factors in their origin. These multifactorial diseases encompass a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes and ages of onset, although the clinical presentation often differs depending on childhood or adult onset, with greater heterogeneity commonly observed in adults.

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease: Overlaps and differences

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Virginia; Dieli-Crimi, Romina; López-Palacios, Natalia; Bodas, Andrés; Medrano, Luz María; Núñez, Concepción

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings demonstrate the common genetic basis for many immune-mediated diseases, and consequently, the partially shared pathogenesis. We collected these findings and reviewed the extension of these overlaps to other disease characteristics. Two autoimmune diseases were selected that also share the specific target organ, the bowel. The etiology and immunopathogenesis of both conditions characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and celiac disease (CeD), are not completely understood. Both are complex diseases with genetics and environment contributing to dysregulation of innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to chronic inflammation and disease. CeD constitutes a particular disease because the main environmental and genetic triggers are largely known. IBD comprises two main clinical forms, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which most likely involve a complex interplay between some components of the commensal microbiota and other environmental factors in their origin. These multifactorial diseases encompass a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes and ages of onset, although the clinical presentation often differs depending on childhood or adult onset, with greater heterogeneity commonly observed in adults. PMID:24803796

  3. Solid Organ Transplantation in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD): Analysis of Transplantation Outcome and IBD Activity in a Large Single Center Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzler, Fabian; Friedrich, Matthias; Stallhofer, Johannes; Schönermarck, Ulf; Fischereder, Michael; Habicht, Antje; Karbalai, Nazanin; Wolf, Christiane; Angelberger, Marianne; Olszak, Torsten; Beigel, Florian; Tillack, Cornelia; Göke, Burkhard; Zachoval, Reinhart; Denk, Gerald; Guba, Markus; Rust, Christian; Grüner, Norbert; Brand, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, limited data of the outcome of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients after solid organ transplantation (SOT) are available. We aimed to analyze effects of SOT on the IBD course in a large IBD patient cohort. Methods Clinical data from 1537 IBD patients were analyzed for patients who underwent SOT (n = 31) between July 2002 and May 2014. Sub-analyses included SOT outcome parameters, IBD activity before and after SOT, and efficacy of IBD treatment. Results 4.74% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 0.84% of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) underwent SOT (p = 2.69 x 10−6, UC vs. CD). 77.4% of patients with SOT underwent liver transplantation (LTx) with tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive therapy after SOT. All LTx were due to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) or PSC overlap syndromes. Six patients (19.4%) required renal transplantation and one patient (3.2%) heart transplantation. A survival rate of 83.9% after a median follow-up period of 103 months was observed. Before SOT, 65.0% of patients were in clinical remission and 5 patients received immunosuppressive therapy (16.1%). After SOT, 61.0% of patients were in remission (p = 1.00 vs. before SOT) and 29.0% required IBD-specific immunosuppressive or anti-TNF therapy (p = 0.54 vs. before SOT). 42.9% of patients with worsening of IBD after SOT were at higher risk of needing steroid therapy for increased IBD activity (p = 0.03; relative risk (RR): 10.29; 95% CI 1.26–84.06). Four patients (13.0%) needed anti-TNF therapy after SOT (response rate 75%). Conclusions SOT was more common in UC patients due to the higher prevalence of PSC-related liver cirrhosis in UC. Despite mainly tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive regimens, outcome of SOT and IBD was excellent in this cohort. In this SOT cohort, concomitant immunosuppressive therapy due to IBD was well tolerated. PMID:26288187

  4. Genetics of Crohn disease, an archetypal inflammatory barrier disease.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip; Albrecht, Mario; Hampe, Jochen; Krawczak, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory disorders such as Crohn disease, atopic eczema, asthma and psoriasis are triggered by hitherto unknown environmental factors that function on the background of some polygenic susceptibility. Recent technological advances have allowed us to unravel the genetic aetiology of these and other complex diseases. Using Crohn disease as an example, we show how the discovery of susceptibility genes furthers our understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms and how it will, ultimately, give rise to new therapeutic developments. The long-term goal of such endeavours is to develop targeted prophylactic strategies. These will probably target the molecular interaction on the mucosal surface between the products of the genome and the microbial metagenome of a patient.

  5. Association between 25(OH)D Level, Ultraviolet Exposure, Geographical Location, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chao; Yang, Jun; Yu, Weilai; Li, Dejian; Xiang, Zun; Lin, Yiming; Yu, Chaohui

    2015-01-01

    Background There is no consensus on the vitamin D levels and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Aim To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to analyze the relationship between IBD and 25(OH)D, sun exposure, and latitude, and to determine whether vitamin D deficiency affects the severity of IBD. Methods We searched the PubMed, EBSCO, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases to identify all studies that assessed the association between 25(OH)D, sun exposure, latitude, and IBD through November 1, 2014, without language restrictions. Studies that compared 25(OH)D levels between IBD patients and controls were selected for inclusion in the meta-analysis. We calculated pooled standardized mean differences (SMDs) and odds ratios (ORs). Results Thirteen case-control studies investigating CD and 25(OH)D levels were included, and eight studies part of above studies also investigated the relationship between UC and 25(OH)D. Both CD patients (SMD: 0.26 nmol/L, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.09–0.42 nmol/L) and UC patients (SMD: 0.5 nmol/L, 95% CI: 0.15–0.85 nmol/L) had lower levels of 25(OH)D than controls. In addition, CD patients and UC patients were 1.95 times (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.48–2.57) and 2.02 times (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.13–3.60) more likely to be 25(OH)D deficient than controls. We also included 10 studies investigating the relationship between CD activity and vitamin D. Results showed that patients with active CD (CD Activity Index≥150) were more likely to have low vitamin D levels. In addition, whether low sun exposure and high latitude were related to a high morbidity of CD need to be provided more evidence. Conclusion Our study shows that IBD patients have lower vitamin D levels. For active CD patients, vitamin D levels were low. These findings suggest that vitamin D may play an important role in the development of IBD, although a direct association could not be determined in our study. PMID:26172950

  6. Transition of Care in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Bincy P

    2014-01-01

    The management of patients with chronic conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), requires specific attention and careful planning during the transition from pediatric to adult care. Early education about the transition process and the acquisition of self-management skills are crucial to fostering independent adolescents and young adults who have the knowledge and tools to manage life with a chronic disease. A growing body of literature describes the challenges and barriers to providing adolescent and transition care. Potential barriers to effective transition include the following: differences between adult- and pediatric-onset IBD; patients’ lack of developmental maturity and readiness, self-efficacy, and knowledge of the disease; poor adherence to therapy; adolescent anxiety and depression; differences between pediatric and adult IBD care; and parental and provider reluctance to transition. Despite our ability to identify barriers and challenges, there remain significant gaps in our knowledge about how they should be addressed. Outcomes data on adolescents with IBD are limited, and there are even fewer data on how the transition of care affects long-term treatment and outcomes. More research is needed to truly understand the best way to facilitate care during transition and improve outcomes. Current research and transition guidelines acknowledge that providing support and guidance to patients and their families and establishing clear goals can ultimately equip patients with the skills needed to cope with a chronic disease as adults and can improve their long-term care. This paper provides an overview of the transition from pediatric to adult IBD care, a discussion of challenges and barriers, and recommendations and resources that can help patients, parents, and providers navigate this important process. PMID:27540335

  7. Influence of Insulin Resistance and TNF-α on the Inflammatory Process, Oxidative Stress, and Disease Activity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Delongui, Francieli; Alfieri, Daniela Frizon; Lozovoy, Marcell Alysson Batisti; Amin, Ricardo Braga; Dichi, Isaias; Simão, Andréa Name Colado

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the involvement of TNF-α and insulin resistance (IR) in the inflammatory process, oxidative stress, and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This cross-sectional study included 270 subjects (control group, n = 97) and RA patients (n = 173). RA patients were divided into four groups: the first group without IR and not using antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF−) (G1, IR− TNF−); the second group without IR and using anti-TNF-α (G2, IR− TNF+); the third group with IR and not using anti-TNF-α (G3, IR+ TNF−); and the fourth group with IR and using anti-TNF-α (G4, IR+ TNF+). G3 and G4 had higher (p < 0.05) advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) and oxidative stress index (OSI) compared to G1. G4 group presented higher (p < 0.05) AOPPs and OSI than G2. TRAP was significantly lower in G3 compared to G1. Plasma TNF-α levels were significantly higher in G4 and G2 compared to G1 (p < 0.0001) and G3 (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.01, resp.). The presence of insulin resistance was robustly associated with both oxidative stress and TNF-α levels. More studies are warranted to verify if IR can be involved in therapeutic failure with TNF-α inhibitors. This trial is registered with Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry Register number RBR-2jvj92. PMID:27340510

  8. Disruption of inflammatory signals by cytokine-targeted therapies for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, Flavio; Caruso, Roberta; Sarra, Massimiliano; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Gut inflammation occurring in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) is associated with an excessive immune response that is directed against constituents of the normal bacterial flora and results in the production of large amounts of inflammatory cytokines. Anti-cytokine compounds, such as the neutralizing TNF antibodies, have been employed with clinical success in patients with IBD. However, nearly half of IBD patients are refractory to such treatments, response can wane with time, and anti-TNF treatment can associate with severe side effects and/or development/exacerbation of extra-intestinal immune-mediated pathologies. These observations, and the demonstration that, in IBD, the pathological process is also characterized by defects in the production and/or activity of counter-regulatory cytokines, have boosted further studies aimed at delineating novel strategies to combat the IBD-associated tissue-damaging immune response. PMID:21806600

  9. Irritable bowel syndrome in quiescent inflammatory bowel disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Burgell, R E; Asthana, A K; Gibson, P R

    2015-12-01

    Ongoing troublesome bowel symptoms despite quiescent inflammatory disease are a frequent management challenge when caring for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Even when active disease has been excluded the prevalence of residual gastrointestinal symptoms is surprisingly high and the cause often obscure. The presence of a concurrent functional disorder such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with worse quality of life, worse physical functioning, higher prevalence of anxiety and greater health care utilization. Potential etiological mechanisms leading to the development of IBS like symptoms include the development of visceral hypersensitivity following the original inflammatory insult, alteration in cortical processing, dysbiosis and residual subacute inflammation. Therapeutic options for managing IBS in patients with IBD include dietary modification, interventions targeted at correction of visceral sensory dysfunction or cortical processing and modulation of the gut microbiota. As there are few studies specifically examining the treatment of IBS in patients with IBD, the majority of therapeutic interventions are extrapolated from the IBS literature. Given the frequency of residual functional symptoms in IBS, significantly more research is warranted in this field.

  10. Inflammatory lung disease in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Claudio; Rossi, Marcello; Leoncini, Silvia; Chisci, Glauco; Signorini, Cinzia; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Vannuccini, Laura; Spina, Donatella; Ginori, Alessandro; Iacona, Ingrid; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Ciccoli, Lucia; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly linked to mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Respiratory dysfunction, historically credited to brainstem immaturity, represents a major challenge in RTT. Our aim was to characterize the relationships between pulmonary gas exchange abnormality (GEA), upper airway obstruction, and redox status in patients with typical RTT (n = 228) and to examine lung histology in a Mecp2-null mouse model of the disease. GEA was detectable in ~80% (184/228) of patients versus ~18% of healthy controls, with "high" (39.8%) and "low" (34.8%) patterns dominating over "mixed" (19.6%) and "simple mismatch" (5.9%) types. Increased plasma levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), intraerythrocyte NPBI (IE-NPBI), and reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH and GSSG) were evidenced in RTT with consequently decreased GSH/GSSG ratios. Apnea frequency/severity was positively correlated with IE-NPBI, F2-IsoPs, and GSSG and negatively with GSH/GSSG ratio. A diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of the terminal bronchioles and alveoli was evidenced in half of the examined Mecp2-mutant mice, well fitting with the radiological findings previously observed in RTT patients. Our findings indicate that GEA is a key feature of RTT and that terminal bronchioles are a likely major target of the disease.

  11. Transitional Care in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Transitional care is an organized effort to provide pediatric patients with the tools and resources they need to assume personal responsibility for their medical care while facilitating their transfer from a pediatrician to an adult practitioner. Since inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is usually chronic and up to 25% of IBD patients are diagnosed before the age of 18 years, transitional care is an important consideration for adolescent and young adult patients. The importance of transitional care for chronic diseases that begin in childhood has been recognized in a number of published recommendations. However, most of these recommendations arise from intuitive reasoning, as physicians lack information regarding the need for transitional care, optimal delivery protocols, and the efficacy of transition programs. Even fewer studies have been published regarding transitional care in IBD. Current guidelines stress the importance of providing patients with educational resources to help them develop the skills they need to manage their care as independent adults, introducing the concept of transfer to adult care in advance of the actual transfer, and developing routes of communication to facilitate the transfer from pediatric to adult care providers. Future studies should aim to elucidate which programs are effective and how they should be implemented. PMID:21346849

  12. Home hyperalimentation for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Bodzin, J H

    1992-04-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) has become a useful tool in the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the past, it was felt that TPN would have a therapeutic role in IBD, but experience has shown that it functions more as an adjunct to other therapeutic interventions. The specific roles of TPN in IBD include: (1) nutritional maintenance in the short bowel syndrome, (2) TPN as adjunctive therapy in jejunoileitis of Crohn's disease, (3) home TPN (HTPN) in Crohn's colitis, and (4) preoperative repletion of significantly depleted patients going to surgery. The adaptation of hospital techniques to the home situation has allowed patients to carry out long-term TPN therapy at home. Patients with IBD on HTPN are subject to the same mechanical and metabolic problems as are other patients on HTPN and, in addition, have a higher infection rate. When carried out appropriately, however, HTPN is a valuable technique in the management of patients with IBD and may provide an improved quality of life.

  13. Inflammatory Lung Disease in Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Claudio; Rossi, Marcello; Chisci, Glauco; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Vannuccini, Laura; Spina, Donatella; Iacona, Ingrid; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Ciccoli, Lucia; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Hayek, Joussef

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder mainly linked to mutations in the gene encoding the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Respiratory dysfunction, historically credited to brainstem immaturity, represents a major challenge in RTT. Our aim was to characterize the relationships between pulmonary gas exchange abnormality (GEA), upper airway obstruction, and redox status in patients with typical RTT (n = 228) and to examine lung histology in a Mecp2-null mouse model of the disease. GEA was detectable in ~80% (184/228) of patients versus ~18% of healthy controls, with “high” (39.8%) and “low” (34.8%) patterns dominating over “mixed” (19.6%) and “simple mismatch” (5.9%) types. Increased plasma levels of non-protein-bound iron (NPBI), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), intraerythrocyte NPBI (IE-NPBI), and reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH and GSSG) were evidenced in RTT with consequently decreased GSH/GSSG ratios. Apnea frequency/severity was positively correlated with IE-NPBI, F2-IsoPs, and GSSG and negatively with GSH/GSSG ratio. A diffuse inflammatory infiltrate of the terminal bronchioles and alveoli was evidenced in half of the examined Mecp2-mutant mice, well fitting with the radiological findings previously observed in RTT patients. Our findings indicate that GEA is a key feature of RTT and that terminal bronchioles are a likely major target of the disease. PMID:24757286

  14. Oral Inflammatory Diseases and Systemic Inflammation: Role of the Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Hasturk, Hatice; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex reaction to injurious agents and includes vascular responses, migration, and activation of leukocytes. Inflammation starts with an acute reaction, which evolves into a chronic phase if allowed to persist unresolved. Acute inflammation is a rapid process characterized by fluid exudation and emigration of leukocytes, primarily neutrophils, whereas chronic inflammation extends over a longer time and is associated with lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, blood vessel proliferation, and fibrosis. Inflammation is terminated when the invader is eliminated, and the secreted mediators are removed; however, many factors modify the course and morphologic appearance as well as the termination pattern and duration of inflammation. Chronic inflammatory illnesses such as diabetes, arthritis, and heart disease are now seen as problems that might have an impact on the periodontium. Reciprocal effects of periodontal diseases are potential factors modifying severity in the progression of systemic inflammatory diseases. Macrophages are key cells for the inflammatory processes as regulators directing inflammation to chronic pathological changes or resolution with no damage or scar tissue formation. As such, macrophages are involved in a remarkably diverse array of homeostatic processes of vital importance to the host. In addition to their critical role in immunity, macrophages are also widely recognized as ubiquitous mediators of cellular turnover and maintenance of extracellular matrix homeostasis. In this review, our objective is to identify macrophage-mediated events central to the inflammatory basis of chronic diseases, with an emphasis on how control of macrophage function can be used to prevent or treat harmful outcomes linked to uncontrolled inflammation. PMID:22623923

  15. Chemokine and cytokine levels in inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Udai P; Singh, Narendra P; Murphy, E Angela; Price, Robert L; Fayad, Raja; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), two forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic, relapsing, and tissue destructive lesions that are accompanied by the uncontrolled activation of effector immune cells in the mucosa. Recent estimates indicate that there are 1.3 million annual cases of IBD in the United States, 50% of which consists of CD and 50% of UC. Chemokines and cytokines play a pivotal role in the regulation of mucosal inflammation by promoting leukocyte migration to sites of inflammation ultimately leading to tissue damage and destruction. In recent years, experimental studies in rodents have led to a better understanding of the role played by these inflammatory mediators in the development and progression of colitis. However, the clinical literature on IBD remains limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate systemic concentrations of key chemokines and cytokines in forty-two IBD patients with a range of disease activity compared to levels found in ten healthy donors. We found a significant increase in an array of chemokines including macrophage migration factor (MIF), CCL25, CCL23, CXCL5, CXCL13, CXCL10, CXCL11, MCP1, and CCL21 in IBD patients as compared to normal healthy donors (P<0.05). Further, we also report increases in the inflammatory cytokines IL-16, IFN-γ, IL-1β and TNF-α in IBD patients when compared to healthy donors (P<0.05). These data clearly indicate an increase in circulating levels of specific chemokines and cytokines that are known to modulate systemic level through immune cells results in affecting local intestinal inflammation and tissue damage in IBD patients. Blockade of these inflammatory mediators should be explored as a mechanism to alleviate or even reverse symptoms of IBD.

  16. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF DODONAEA VISCOSE

    PubMed Central

    Mahadevan, N.; Venkatesh, Sama; Suresh, B.

    1998-01-01

    Dodonaea viscose, Linn is a widely grown plant of Nilgiris district of Tamil and is commonly used by the tribals of Nilgiris as a traditional medicine for done fracture and joint sprains. Since it is generally believed tat fractures are accompanied by either some degree of injury or inflammations, it was felt desirable to carry our anti inflammatory activity of Dodonaea viscose. Anti-inflammatory activity of the plant was carried out by carrageenin induced paw edema method in Wister albino rats. PMID:22556883

  17. NF-kappaB Signaling in Chronic Inflammatory Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schuliga, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are obstructive airway disorders which differ in their underlying causes and phenotypes but overlap in patterns of pharmacological treatments. In both asthma and COPD, oxidative stress contributes to airway inflammation by inducing inflammatory gene expression. The redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB (NF-κB), is an important participant in a broad spectrum of inflammatory networks that regulate cytokine activity in airway pathology. The anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids (GCs), a mainstay treatment for asthma, involve inhibition of NF-κB induced gene transcription. Ligand bound GC receptors (GRs) bind NF-κB to suppress the transcription of NF-κB responsive genes (i.e., transrepression). However, in severe asthma and COPD, the transrepression of NF-κB by GCs is negated as a consequence of post-translational changes to GR and histones involved in chromatin remodeling. Therapeutics which target NF-κB activation, including inhibitors of IκB kinases (IKKs) are potential treatments for asthma and COPD. Furthermore, reversing GR/histone acetylation shows promise as a strategy to treat steroid refractory airway disease by augmenting NF-κB transrepression. This review examines NF-κB signaling in airway inflammation and its potential as target for treatment of asthma and COPD. PMID:26131974

  18. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Historical Perspective, Epidemiology, and Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Malik, Talha A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) describes a group of closely related yet heterogeneous predominantly intestinal disease processes that are a result of an uncontrolled immune mediated inflammatory response. It is estimated that approximately one and a half million persons in North America have IBD. Pathogenesis of IBD involves an uncontrolled immune mediated inflammatory response in genetically predisposed individuals to a still unknown environmental trigger that interacts with the intestinal flora. There continues to be an enormous amount of information emanating from epidemiological studies providing expanded insight into the occurrence, distribution, determinants, and mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease.

  19. Inflammatory pouch disease: The spectrum of pouchitis

    PubMed Central

    Zezos, Petros; Saibil, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal-pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA) is the operation of choice for medically refractory ulcerative colitis (UC), for UC with dysplasia, and for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). IPAA can be a treatment option for selected patients with Crohn’s colitis without perianal and/or small bowel disease. The term “pouchitis” refers to nonspecific inflammation of the pouch and is a common complication in patients with IPAA; it occurs more often in UC patients than in FAP patients. This suggests that the pathogenetic background of UC may contribute significantly to the development of pouchitis. The symptoms of pouchitis are many, and can include increased bowel frequency, urgency, tenesmus, incontinence, nocturnal seepage, rectal bleeding, abdominal cramps, and pelvic discomfort. The diagnosis of pouchitis is based on the presence of symptoms together with endoscopic and histological evidence of inflammation of the pouch. However, “pouchitis” is a general term representing a wide spectrum of diseases and conditions, which can emerge in the pouch. Based on the etiology we can sub-divide pouchitis into 2 groups: idiopathic and secondary. In idiopathic pouchitis the etiology and pathogenesis are still unclear, while in secondary pouchitis there is an association with a specific causative or pathogenetic factor. Secondary pouchitis can occur in up to 30% of cases and can be classified as infectious, ischemic, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced, collagenous, autoimmune-associated, or Crohn’s disease. Sometimes, cuffitis or irritable pouch syndrome can be misdiagnosed as pouchitis. Furthermore, idiopathic pouchitis itself can be sub-classified into types based on the clinical pattern, presentation, and responsiveness to antibiotic treatment. Treatment differs among the various forms of pouchitis. Therefore, it is important to establish the correct diagnosis in order to select the appropriate treatment and further

  20. Thrombophilic Risk Factors in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Ayten; Senturk, Omer; Aygun, Cem; Celebi, Altay; Caglayan, Cigdem; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an increased risk for thromboembolism. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of thrombophilic risk factors in IBD patients and to assess the associations of these factors with disease activity. Methods Forty-eight patients with IBD (24 ulcerative colitis, 24 Crohn’s disease) and 40 matched healthy control individuals were enrolled. In addition to routine biochemical analysis, fasting blood samples were studied for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen, protein-C, protein-S, antithrombin III, factor VII, factor VIII, D-dimer, vitamin B12, folic acid and homocysteine. Results Levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, D-dimer and the number of platelets were significantly higher in patients with IBD. When compared to control group, in patients with Crohn’s disease serum homocystein levels were significantly higher (p = 0.025) while serum folic acid levels were significantly lower (p < 0.019). Levels of fibrinogen, D-dimer, protein C, factor VIII, total homocystein and the number of platelets were found to be significantly higher in Crohn’s disease patients who were in active period of the disease. Conclusions Thrombophilic defects are multifactorial and might be frequently seen in IBD patients. They might contribute to thrombotic complications of this disease. PMID:27942288

  1. MPNs as Inflammatory Diseases: The Evidence, Consequences, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Bjørn, Mads Emil

    2015-01-01

    In recent years the evidence is increasing that chronic inflammation may be an important driving force for clonal evolution and disease progression in the Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV), and myelofibrosis (MF). Abnormal expression and activity of a number of proinflammatory cytokines are associated with MPNs, in particular MF, in which immune dysregulation is pronounced as evidenced by dysregulation of several immune and inflammation genes. In addition, chronic inflammation has been suggested to contribute to the development of premature atherosclerosis and may drive the development of other cancers in MPNs, both nonhematologic and hematologic. The MPN population has a substantial inflammation-mediated comorbidity burden. This review describes the evidence for considering the MPNs as inflammatory diseases, A Human Inflammation Model of Cancer Development, and the role of cytokines in disease initiation and progression. The consequences of this model are discussed, including the increased risk of second cancers and other inflammation-mediated diseases, emphasizing the urgent need for rethinking our therapeutic approach. Early intervention with interferon-alpha2, which as monotherapy has been shown to be able to induce minimal residual disease, in combination with potent anti-inflammatory agents such as JAK-inhibitors is foreseen as the most promising new treatment modality in the years to come. PMID:26604428

  2. Prediction of disease course in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2010-06-07

    Clinical presentation at diagnosis and disease course of both Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis are heterogeneous and variable over time. Since most patients have a relapsing course and most CD patients develop complications (e.g. stricture and/or perforation), much emphasis has been placed in the recent years on the determination of important predictive factors. The identification of these factors may eventually lead to a more personalized, tailored therapy. In this TOPIC HIGHLIGHT series, we provide an update on the available literature regarding important clinical, endoscopic, fecal, serological/routine laboratory and genetic factors. Our aim is to assist clinicians in the everyday practical decision-making when choosing the treatment strategy for their patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases.

  3. Nanocarriers in therapy of infectious and inflammatory diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikoba, Ufuoma; Peng, Haisheng; Li, Haichun; Miller, Cathy; Yu, Chenxu; Wang, Qun

    2015-02-01

    Nanotechnology is a growing science that has applications in various areas of medicine. The composition of nanocarriers for drug delivery is critical to guarantee high therapeutic performance when targeting specific host sites. Applications of nanotechnology are prevalent in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious and inflammatory diseases. This review summarizes recent advancements in the application of nanotechnology to the therapy of infectious and inflammatory diseases. The major focus is on the design and fabrication of various nanomaterials, characteristics and physicochemical properties of drug-loaded nanocarriers, and the use of these nanoscale drug delivery systems in treating infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as AIDS, hepatitis, tuberculosis, melanoma, and representative inflammatory diseases. Clinical trials and future perspective of the use of nanocarriers are also discussed in detail. We hope that such a review will be valuable to researchers who are exploring nanoscale drug delivery systems for the treatment of specific infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  4. The use of ultrasound in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzik, Torsten; Kannengiesser, Klaus; Petersen, Frauke

    2017-01-01

    Imaging in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) plays a pivotal role in the primary diagnosis, as well as during the management of patients with known IBD. The evolution of ultrasound equipment and the growing expertise of examiners have both enhanced the role of intestinal ultrasound in the assessment of the gastrointestinal tract in IBD patients. Intestinal ultrasound has been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity, as well as high positive and negative predictive value, in the detection or exclusion of intestinal inflammatory activity in IBD. The obvious advantages of intestinal ultrasound over other imaging modalities include non-invasiveness, rapid availability and low costs. This review summarizes the current developments in the use of intestinal ultrasound for the detection of IBD and its complications, and discusses its use in the management of patients with IBD. Indications for the use of intestinal ultrasound in daily practice are presented, expanded by new developments such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and elastography. PMID:28243033

  5. Neuroendocrine host factors and inflammatory disease susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Ligier, S; Sternberg, E M

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial, resulting from a combination of genetically predetermined host characteristics and environmental exposures. As the term autoimmune implies, immune dysfunction and dysregulated self-tolerance are key elements in the pathophysiology of all these diseases. The neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous systems are increasingly recognized as modulators of the immune response at the levels of both early inflammation and specific immunity. As such, alterations in their response represent a potential mechanism by which pathologic autoimmunity may develop. Animal models of autoimmune diseases show pre-existing changes in neuroendocrine responses to a variety of stimuli, and both animal and human studies have shown altered stress responses in the setting of active immune activation. The potential role of the neuroendocrine system in linking environmental exposures and autoimmune diseases is 2-fold. First, it may represent a direct target for toxic compounds. Second, its inadequate function may result in the inappropriate response of the immune system to an environmental agent with immunogenic properties. This article reviews the relationship between autoimmune diseases and the neuroendocrine system and discusses the difficulties and pitfalls of investigating a physiologic response that is sensitive to such a multiplicity of environmental exposures. PMID:10502534

  6. [Role of cytokines and their blocking in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Matikainen, Sampsa; Jokiranta, Sakari; Eklund, Kari K

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases and psoriasis are examples of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. They involve activation of a partly similar cytokine network that has an essential role in the disease pathogenesis. Biological drugs have been developed for the inhibition of single cytokines, and good therapeutic responses have been achieved by using them. For instance, TNF blockers are used in the treatment of several inflammatory diseases. The use of the blockers of certain other cytokines is more limited. Other important target molecules include certain interleukins. New bispecific antibodies enabling inhibition of the action of two distinct cytokines are currently undergoing clinical studies.

  7. Exploitation of the nicotinic anti-inflammatory pathway for the treatment of epithelial inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Scott, David A; Martin, Michael

    2006-12-14

    Discoveries in the first few years of the 21st century have led to an understanding of important interactions between the nervous system and the inflammatory response at the molecular level, most notably the acetylcholine (ACh)-triggered, alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (alpha7nAChR)-dependent nicotinic anti-inflammatory pathway. Studies using the alpha7nAChR agonist, nicotine, for the treatment of mucosal inflammation have been undertaken but the efficacy of nicotine as a treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases remains debatable. Further understanding of the nicotinic anti-inflammatory pathway and other endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanisms is required in order to develop refined and specific therapeutic strategies for the treatment of a number of inflammatory diseases and conditions, including periodontitis, psoriasis, sarcoidosis, and ulcerative colitis.

  8. [Metabolic syndrome in inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Malesci, D; Valentini, G; La Montagna, G

    2006-01-01

    Toward the end of the last century a better knowledge of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and their associations led investigators to propose the existence of a unique pathophysiological condition called "metabolic" or "insulin resistance syndrome". Among all, insulin-resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia are considered its most important treatment targets. Different definitions have been provided by World Health Organization (WHO) and by The Third Report of The National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III). In particular, abdominal obesity, hypertension, low HDL cholesterol and hyperglicemia are the most common items used for its definition. The presence of MetS is effective in predicting the future risk of diabetes and coronaropathies. The evidence of a higher CV risk rate among different rheumatic inflammatory diseases has recently been associated with high prevalence of MetS in some cases. Rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis have the large series among arthritis, whereas systemic lupus erythematosus among connective tissue disorders. This review analyses all most important studies about the evidence of MetS in rheumatic patients and the main clinical and prognostic significance of this relation.

  9. [Management of uncomplicated pelvic inflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Bourret, A; Fauconnier, A; Brun, J-L

    2012-12-01

    Since the 1993 French consensus conference on uncomplicated pelvic inflammatory diseases (uPID), new antibiotics appeared and bacterial resistances did evoluate. This methodic analysis of the literature updates different aspects of its treatment. Antibiotherapy must be established early (EL3). Inpatient and intravenous treatment is not superior to outpatient and oral treatment (EL1). Ofloxacine+metronidazole association can be proposed in first intention (EL1). If case of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection, one ceftriaxone injection must be associated (EL4). All the other antibiotics associations have shown to be efficient except the metronidazole+doxycycline association, which is not indicated (EL2). Two weeks treatment seems to be a sufficient duration. Laparoscopic treatment in first intention is not justified except for diagnostic doubts or unfavorable evolution of the medical treatment (EL4). Neither non-steroidic antiinflamatorries, nor corticosteroids, have been proved to be efficient to decrease the adherence risk in uPID (EL3). Early extraction of an intra uterine device (IUD) allows symptomatologic improvement (EL2). Partners treatment with azithromycin improves the 4 months bacteriologic results (EL2). HIV positive patients do not need specific treatment (EL3).

  10. Elderly patients and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nimmons, Danielle; Limdi, Jimmy K

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally. Coupled with an ageing population, the number of older patients with IBD is set to increase. The clinical features and therapeutic options in young and elderly patients are comparable but there are some significant differences. The wide differential diagnosis of IBD in elderly patients may result in a delay in diagnosis. The relative dearth of data specific to elderly IBD patients often resulting from their exclusion from pivotal clinical trials and the lack of consensus guidelines have made clinical decisions somewhat challenging. In addition, age specific concerns such as co-morbidity; loco-motor and cognitive function, poly-pharmacy and its consequences need to be taken into account. In applying modern treatment paradigms to the elderly, the clinician must consider the potential for more pronounced adverse effects in this vulnerable group and set appropriate boundaries maximising benefit and minimising harm. Meanwhile, clinicians need to make personalised decisions but as evidence based as possible in the holistic, considered and optimal management of IBD in elderly patients. In this review we will cover the clinical features and therapeutic options of IBD in the elderly; as well as addressing common questions and challenges posed by its management. PMID:26855812

  11. Mouth cancer in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Giagkou, E; Christodoulou, D K; Katsanos, K H

    2016-05-01

    Mouth cancer is a major health problem. Multiple risk factors for developing mouth cancer have been studied and include history of tobacco and alcohol abuse, age over 40, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, human papilloma virus infection (HPV), nutritional deficiencies, chronic irritation, and existence or oral potentially malignant lesions such as leukoplakia and lichen planus. An important risk factor for mouth cancer is chronic immunosuppression and has been extensively reported after solid organ transplantation as well as HIV-infected patients. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not yet considered as a risk factor for oral cancer development. However, a significant number of patients with IBD are receiving immunosuppressants and biological therapies which could represent potential oral oncogenic factors either by direct oncogenic effect or by continuous immunosuppression favoring carcinogenesis, especially in patients with HPV(+) IBD. Education on modifiable risk behaviors in patients with IBD is the cornerstone of prevention of mouth cancer. Oral screening should be performed for all patients with IBD, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or a biologic.

  12. Pelvic inflammatory disease and oral contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Feldblum, P J; Burton, N; Rosenberg, M J

    1986-10-01

    Oral contraceptive use has been shown to protect against gonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), but the effect on chlamydial PID is uncertain. Chlamydia infection is rising in incidence and has become the major cause of PID in many areas. PID may cause infertility, impairing the future reproduction of women. Previous studies on oral contraceptives and PID relied on hospitalized women, which may have biased the sample to include mainly gonococcal PID. Several studies show increased risk of endocervical chlamydia infection in users of oral contraceptives. The postulated mechanism is cervical ectopy, exposing more squamous epithelium to the organisms. Nevertheless, there is evidence indicating that despite the increased incidence of endocervical infection, oral contraceptives may inhibit the organisms from ascending, thus still offering a protective affect against both gonococcal and chlamydial PID. Future research must focus on the prevalence of chlamydia infection in Africa, and the natural history of the illness. The effect of different types of oral contraceptives on chlamydia infection must be evaluated.

  13. Inflammatory Bowel Disease in Children of Middle Eastern Descent

    PubMed Central

    Naidoo, Christina Mai Ying; Leach, Steven T.; Day, Andrew S.; Lemberg, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing rates of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are now seen in populations where it was once uncommon. The pattern of IBD in children of Middle Eastern descent in Australia has never been reported. This study aimed to investigate the burden of IBD in children of Middle Eastern descent at the Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick (SCHR). The SCHR IBD database was used to identify patients of self-reported Middle Eastern ethnicity diagnosed between 1987 and 2011. Demographic, diagnosis, and management data was collected for all Middle Eastern children and an age and gender matched non-Middle Eastern IBD control group. Twenty-four patients of Middle Eastern descent were identified. Middle Eastern Crohn's disease patients had higher disease activity at diagnosis, higher use of thiopurines, and less restricted colonic disease than controls. Although there were limitations with this dataset, we estimated a higher prevalence of IBD in Middle Eastern children and they had a different disease phenotype and behavior compared to the control group, with less disease restricted to the colon and likely a more active disease course. PMID:24987422

  14. Advances in nutritional therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases: Review

    PubMed Central

    Wędrychowicz, Andrzej; Zając, Andrzej; Tomasik, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are chronic, life-long, and relapsing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Currently, there are no complete cure possibilities, but combined pharmacological and nutritional therapy may induce remission of the disease. Malnutrition and specific nutritional deficiencies are frequent among IBD patients, so the majority of them need nutritional treatment, which not only improves the state of nutrition of the patients but has strong anti-inflammatory activity as well. Moreover, some nutrients, from early stages of life are suspected as triggering factors in the etiopathogenesis of IBD. Both parenteral and enteral nutrition is used in IBD therapy, but their practical utility in different populations and in different countries is not clearly established, and there are sometimes conflicting theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD. This review presents the actual data from research studies on the influence of nutrition on the etiopathogenesis of IBD and the latest findings regarding its mechanisms of action. The use of both parenteral and enteral nutrition as therapeutic methods in induction and maintenance therapy in IBD treatment is also extensively discussed. Comparison of the latest research data, scientific theories concerning the role of nutrition in IBD, and different opinions about them are also presented and discussed. Additionally, some potential future perspectives for nutritional therapy are highlighted. PMID:26811646

  15. Fecal Myeloperoxidase as a Biomarker for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hansberry, David R; Shah, Kush; Agarwal, Nitin

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic condition involving the inflammation of the colon and small intestine. IBD affects as many as 1.4 million people in the U.S. alone and costs the health care industry over $1.7 billion annually. Managing IBD normally requires invasive and often discomforting diagnostic tests. In an effort to alleviate the painful and costly nature of traditional diagnosis, there has been increasing research initiative focused on noninvasive biomarkers. PubMed, provided by the United States National Library of Medicine (NLM) at the National Institutes of Health, was utilized with the following search terms: 1) myeloperoxidase (MPO) 2), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and 3) neutrophils. The following terms were used interchangeably with search terms 1-3: 4) costs, 5) biomarkers, 6) review, and 7) etiology. In the context of IBD, myeloperoxidase (MPO), a lysosomal protein found in neutrophils, may serve as a viable biomarker for assessing disease status. Several studies demonstrated increased levels of neutrophils in patients with active IBD. Furthermore, studies have found significantly higher levels of MPO in patients with active IBD compared to patients without IBD as well as patients with inactive IBD. MPO is also expressed in higher concentrations in patients with more severe forms of IBD. When measuring treatment efficacy, MPO levels are indicative of the quality of response. MPO may serve as an important diagnostic and prognostic tool in assessing IBD status.  PMID:28286723

  16. Endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease when and why

    PubMed Central

    Rameshshanker, Rajaratnam; Arebi, Naila

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopy plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is useful to exclude other aetiologies, differentiate between ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD), and define the extent and activity of inflammation. Ileocolonoscopy is used for monitoring of the disease, which in turn helps to optimize the management. It plays a key role in the surveillance of UC for dysplasia or neoplasia and assessment of post operative CD. Capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy are increasingly used in patients with CD. Therapeutic applications relate to stricture dilatation and dysplasia resection. The endoscopist’s role is vital in the overall management of IBD. PMID:22720120

  17. [Biological treatment of rare inflammatory rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Baslund, Bo

    2008-06-09

    The current status of the use of biological medicine in the treatment of adult onset morbus still, Wegeners granulomatosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reviewed. The need for controlled trials is emphasized. Anti-CD20 treatment for SLE patients with kidney involvement and patients with Wegeners granulomatosis seems promising. Anti-TNF and IL1 receptor antagonist can control disease activity in most patients with adult morbus still.

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: interrelated diseases?

    PubMed

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2005-01-01

    In the past inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were regarded as completely separate disorders. Now, with the description of inflammation, albeit low-grade, in IBS, and of symptom overlap between IBS and celiac disease, this contention has come under question. Is there true overlap between these disorders? Despite the limitations of available data one cannot but be struck by some areas of apparent convergence: IBD and celiac disease in remission, lymphocytic colitis and microscopic inflammation in IBS, in general, and, especially, in the post-infectious IBS category. The convergence between latent celiac disease and sub-clinical IBD, on the one hand, and IBS, on the other, appears, based on available evidence, to be somewhat spurious and may largely relate to misdiagnosis, a phenomenon which may also explain the apparent evolution of IBS into IBD in some studies. Similarities between IBS and lymphocytic colitis are more striking and less readily dismissed; as for IBS, well documented instances of progression of lymphocytic colitis to full-blown IBD are infrequent, suggesting a true separation between this disorder and classical IBD. Do IBS and lymphocytic colitis represent different responses to similar triggers? Will some of the 'inflamed' IBS subgroup be reclassified as part of the spectrum of lymphocytic colitis in the future? Will inflammation emerge as a common underlying factor in the pathogenesis of IBS? The answer to these and many questions must await further study of this fascinating area.

  19. New endoscopic imaging techniques in surveillance of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Gabbani, Tommaso; Manetti, Natalia; Bonanomi, Andrea Giovanni; Annese, Antonio Luca; Annese, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy plays a crucial role in the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Advances imaging techniques allow visualization of mucosal details, tissue characteristics and cellular alteration. In particular chromoendoscopy, magnification endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy and endocytoscopy seem to have the possibility to radically modify the approach to surveillance and decision making. Dye-based chromoendoscopy (DBC) and magnification chromoendoscopy improve detection of dysplasia, and evaluation of inflammatory activity and extension of ulcerative colitis and are thus considered the standard of care. Dye-less chromoendoscopy could probably replace conventional DBC for surveillance. Narrow band imaging and i-scan have shown to improve activity and extent assessment in comparison to white-light endoscopy. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) can detect more dysplastic lesions in surveillance colonoscopy and predict neoplastic and inflammatory changes with high accuracy compared to histology. This technology is best used in conjunction with chromoendoscopy, narrow-band imaging, or autofluorescence because of its minute scanning area. This combination is useful for appropriate tissue classification of mucosal lesions already detected by standard or optically enhanced endoscopy. The best combination for IBD surveillance appear to be chromoendoscopy for identification of areas of suspicion, with further examination with CLE to detect intraepithelial neoplasia. However cost, availability, and experience are still an issue. PMID:25789093

  20. Predicting Outcomes to Optimize Disease Management in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Joana; Caprioli, Flavio; Katsanos, Konstantinos H.; Lobatón, Triana; Micic, Dejan; Zerôncio, Marco; Van Assche, Gert; Lee, James C.; Lindsay, James O.; Rubin, David T.; Panaccione, Remo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Efforts to slow or prevent the progressive course of inflammatory bowel diseases [IBD] include early and intensive monitoring and treatment of patients at higher risk for complications. It is therefore essential to identify high-risk patients – both at diagnosis and throughout disease course. Methods: As a part of an IBD Ahead initiative, we conducted a comprehensive literature review to identify predictors of long-term IBD prognosis and generate draft expert summary statements. Statements were refined at national meetings of IBD experts in 32 countries and were finalized at an international meeting in November 2014. Results: Patients with Crohn’s disease presenting at a young age or with extensive anatomical involvement, deep ulcerations, ileal/ileocolonic involvement, perianal and/or severe rectal disease or penetrating/stenosing behaviour should be regarded as high risk for complications. Patients with ulcerative colitis presenting at young age, with extensive colitis and frequent flare-ups needing steroids or hospitalization present increased risk for colectomy or future hospitalization. Smoking status, concurrent primary sclerosing cholangitis and concurrent infections may impact the course of disease. Current genetic and serological markers lack accuracy for clinical use. Conclusions: Simple demographic and clinical features can guide the clinician in identifying patients at higher risk for disease complications at diagnosis and throughout disease course. However, many of these risk factors have been identified retrospectively and lack validation. Appropriately powered prospective studies are required to inform algorithms that can truly predict the risk for disease progression in the individual patient. PMID:27282402

  1. Nephrolithiasis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease in the community

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Dídia Bismara; Moss, Alan C; Schor, Nestor

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been associated with renal stone formation. The objective of this study was to determine prospectively the prevalence of nephrolithiasis in a community-based population of patients with IBD and to analyze factors associated with renal calculus formation. Methods Screening renal ultrasound was performed in a well characterized cohort of patients seen between 2009 and 2012 at an IBD clinic. We enrolled 168 patients, including 93 with Crohn’s disease and 75 with ulcerative colitis. Clinical and phenotypic variables associated with asymptomatic nephrolithiasis were determined. Results Nephrolithiasis was detected in 36 patients with Crohn’s disease and in 28 patients with ulcerative colitis (38% for both). Although none of the patients had been previously hospitalized for symptomatic nephrolithiasis, nine with Crohn’s disease and five with ulcerative colitis had recurrent urinary tract infections or hydronephrosis. In patients with Crohn’s disease, ileocolonic (L3) disease was associated with a greater risk of nephrolithiasis than was ileal (L1) or colonic (L2) disease (odds ratio [OR] 2.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8–7). Active ulcerative colitis (regardless of severity) represented a significant risk factor for formation of renal calculi (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.1–15, P = 0.02). Conclusion In surgery-naïve patients with IBD in the community, asymptomatic nephrolithiasis is common and should be considered when renal dysfunction or infection is detected. PMID:23935383

  2. [Update on the use of PET radiopharmaceuticals in inflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Rodríguez, I; Carril, J M

    2013-01-01

    The use of molecular imaging with PET/CT technology using different radiotracers, especially the (18)F-FDG is currently spreading beyond the area of oncology, the most interest being placed on inflammatory and infectious diseases. This article presents a review of its contribution in different inflammatory conditions in the context of structural and conventional nuclear medicine imaging. Special emphasis is placed on the more significant diseases such as large-vessel vasculitis, sarcoidosis, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease and the study of the atheroma plaque.

  3. Benznidazole, the trypanocidal drug used for Chagas disease, induces hepatic NRF2 activation and attenuates the inflammatory response in a murine model of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lambertucci, Flavia; Motiño, Omar; Villar, Silvina; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; de Luján Alvarez, María; Catania, Viviana A; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Carnovale, Cristina Ester; Quiroga, Ariel Darío; Francés, Daniel Eleazar; Ronco, María Teresa

    2017-01-15

    Molecular mechanisms on sepsis progression are linked to the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cellular antioxidant capacity. Previous studies demonstrated that benznidazole (BZL), known for its antiparasitic action on Trypanosoma cruzi, has immunomodulatory effects, increasing survival in C57BL/6 mice in a model of polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The mechanism by which BZL inhibits inflammatory response in sepsis is poorly understood. Also, our group recently reported that BZL is able to activate the nuclear factor erytroide-derived 2-Like 2 (NRF2) in vitro. The aim of the present work was to delineate the beneficial role of BZL during sepsis, analyzing its effects on the cellular redox status and the possible link to the innate immunity receptor TLR4. Specifically, we analyzed the effect of BZL on Nrf2 regulation and TLR4 expression in liver of mice 24hours post-CLP. BZL was able to induce NRF2 nuclear protein localization in CLP mice. Also, we found that protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in the NRF2 nuclear accumulation and induction of its target genes. In addition, BZL prompted a reduction in hepatic CLP-induced TLR4 protein membrane localization, evidencing its immunomodulatory effects. Together, our results demonstrate that BZL induces hepatic NRF2 activation with the concomitant increase in the antioxidant defenses, and the attenuation of inflammatory response, in part, by inhibiting TLR4 expression in a murine model of sepsis.

  4. Venous thrombosis and prothrombotic factors in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Magro, Fernando; Soares, João-Bruno; Fernandes, Dália

    2014-05-07

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may have an increased risk of venous thrombosis (VTE). PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge and Scopus were searched to identify studies investigating the risk of VTE and the prevalence of acquired and genetic VTE risk factors and prothrombotic abnormalities in IBD. Overall, IBD patients have a two- to fourfold increased risk of VTE compared with healthy controls, with an overall incidence rate of 1%-8%. The majority of studies did not show significant differences in the risk of VTE between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Several acquired factors are responsible for the increased risk of VTE in IBD: inflammatory activity, hospitalisation, surgery, pregnancy, disease phenotype (e.g., fistulising disease, colonic involvement and extensive involvement) and drug therapy (mainly steroids). There is also convincing evidence from basic science and from clinical and epidemiological studies that IBD is associated with several prothrombotic abnormalities, including initiation of the coagulation system, downregulation of natural anticoagulant mechanisms, impairment of fibrinolysis, increased platelet count and reactivity and dysfunction of the endothelium. Classical genetic alterations are not generally found more often in IBD patients than in non-IBD patients, suggesting that genetics does not explain the greater risk of VTE in these patients. IBD VTE may have clinical specificities, namely an earlier first episode of VTE in life, high recurrence rate, decreased efficacy of some drugs in preventing further episodes and poor prognosis. Clinicians should be aware of these risks, and adequate prophylactic actions should be taken in patients who have disease activity, are hospitalised, are submitted to surgery or are undergoing treatment.

  5. Venous thrombosis and prothrombotic factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Fernando; Soares, João-Bruno; Fernandes, Dália

    2014-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may have an increased risk of venous thrombosis (VTE). PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge and Scopus were searched to identify studies investigating the risk of VTE and the prevalence of acquired and genetic VTE risk factors and prothrombotic abnormalities in IBD. Overall, IBD patients have a two- to fourfold increased risk of VTE compared with healthy controls, with an overall incidence rate of 1%-8%. The majority of studies did not show significant differences in the risk of VTE between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Several acquired factors are responsible for the increased risk of VTE in IBD: inflammatory activity, hospitalisation, surgery, pregnancy, disease phenotype (e.g., fistulising disease, colonic involvement and extensive involvement) and drug therapy (mainly steroids). There is also convincing evidence from basic science and from clinical and epidemiological studies that IBD is associated with several prothrombotic abnormalities, including initiation of the coagulation system, downregulation of natural anticoagulant mechanisms, impairment of fibrinolysis, increased platelet count and reactivity and dysfunction of the endothelium. Classical genetic alterations are not generally found more often in IBD patients than in non-IBD patients, suggesting that genetics does not explain the greater risk of VTE in these patients. IBD VTE may have clinical specificities, namely an earlier first episode of VTE in life, high recurrence rate, decreased efficacy of some drugs in preventing further episodes and poor prognosis. Clinicians should be aware of these risks, and adequate prophylactic actions should be taken in patients who have disease activity, are hospitalised, are submitted to surgery or are undergoing treatment. PMID:24803797

  6. Aedes aegypti salivary gland extract ameliorates experimental inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Sales-Campos, Helioswilton; de Souza, Patricia Reis; Basso, Paulo José; Ramos, Anderson Daniel; Nardini, Viviani; Chica, Javier Emílio Lazo; Capurro, Margareth Lara; Sá-Nunes, Anderson; de Barros Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro

    2015-05-01

    Current therapies for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not totally effective, resulting in persistent and recurrent disease for many patients. Mosquito saliva contains immunomodulatory molecules and therein could represent a novel therapy for IBD. Here, we demonstrated the therapeutic activity of salivary gland extract (SGE) of Aedes aegypti on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. For this purpose, C57BL/6 male mice were exposed to 3% DSS in drinking water and treated with SGE at early (days 3-5) or late (days 5-8) time points, followed by euthanasia on days 6 and 9, respectively, for sample collection. The results showed an improvement in clinical disease outcome and postmortem scores after SGE treatment, accompanied by the systemic reduction in peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no impact on bone marrow and mesenteric lymph nodes cellularity or macrophages toxicity. Moreover, a local diminishment of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-5 cytokines together with a reduction in the inflammatory area were observed in the colon of SGE-treated mice. Strikingly, early treatment with SGE led to mice protection from a late DSS re-challenging, as observed by decreased clinical and postmortem scores, besides reduced circulating lymphocytes, indicating that the mosquito saliva may present components able to prevent disease relapse. Indeed, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) experiments pointed to a major SGE pool fraction (F3) able to ameliorate disease signs. In conclusion, SGE and its components might represent a source of important immunomodulatory molecules with promising therapeutic activity for IBD.

  7. Distinct inflammatory properties of late-activated macrophages in inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Rostasy, KM; Schmidt, J; Bahn, E; Pfander, T; Piepkorn, M; Wilichowski, E; Schulz-Schaeffer, J

    2008-01-01

    Summary Distinct mechanisms such as humeral immunity in dermatomyositis (DM) and T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity in polymyositis (PM) contribute to the pathology of inflammatory myopathies. In addition, different subsets of macrophages are present in both diseases. Herein, the characteristics of 25F9-positive macrophages in skeletal muscle inflammation are outlined. Muscle biopsies of subjects with DM and PM were studied by immunohistochemical multi-labelling using the late-activation marker 25F9, together with markers characterizing macrophage function including IFN-γ, iNOS, and TGF-β. In PM, a robust expression of IFN-γ, iNOS, and TGF-β was observed in inflammatory cells. Double- and serial-labelling revealed that a subset of 25F9-positive macrophages in the vicinity of injured muscle fibres expressed iNOS and TGF-β, but not IFN-γ. In DM, IFN-γ, iNOS and TGF-β were also expressed in inflammatory cells in the endomysium. Double- and serial-labelling studies in DM indicated that 25F9-positive macrophages expressed TGF-β and to a lesser degree iNOS, but not IFN-γ. In conclusion, our data suggest that late-activated macrophages contribute to the pathology of inflammatory myopathies. PMID:19364061

  8. Distinct inflammatory properties of late-activated macrophages in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, K M; Schmidt, J; Bahn, E; Pfander, T; Piepkorn, M; Wilichowski, E; Schulz-Schaeffer, J

    2008-10-01

    Distinct mechanisms such as humeral immunity in dermatomyositis (DM) and T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity in polymyositis (PM) contribute to the pathology of inflammatory myopathies. In addition, different subsets of macrophages are present in both diseases. Herein, the characteristics of 25F9-positive macrophages in skeletal muscle inflammation are outlined. Muscle biopsies of subjects with DM and PM were studied by immunohistochemical multi-labelling using the late-activation marker 25F9, together with markers characterizing macrophage function including IFN-gamma, iNOS, and TGF-beta. In PM, a robust expression of IFN-gamma, iNOS, and TGF-beta was observed in inflammatory cells. Double- and serial-labelling revealed that a subset of 25F9-positive macrophages in the vicinity of injured muscle fibres expressed iNOS and TGF-beta, but not IFN-gamma. In DM, IFN-gamma, iNOS and TGF-beta were also expressed in inflammatory cells in the endomysium. Double- and serial-labelling studies in DM indicated that 25F9-positive macrophages expressed TGF-beta and to a lesser degree iNOS, but not IFN-gamma. In conclusion, our data suggest that late-activated macrophages contribute to the pathology of inflammatory myopathies.

  9. Changes in leukocyte population after ozonated autohemoadministration in cows with inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Hiromichi; Ogata, Atsuya; Terasaki, Nobuhiro; Koiwa, Masateru; Kawamura, Seiichi

    2006-02-01

    In this study, we investigated whether ozonated autohemoadministration (OAHA) influences leukocyte populations in cows with clinical inflammatory disease. Eleven cows with inflammatory disease (Inflammatory Group) and three healthy cows (Control Group) were used for this study. The CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio in the Inflammatory Group increased significantly compared to that in the Control Group 3 to 4 days after OAHA treatment. In the Inflammatory Group, the number of CD14(+) cells decreased gradually after OAHA, but CD14(+) levels remained stable in the Control Group. The number of MHC class-II(+) cells decreased gradually in the Inflammatory Group, but increased gradually in the Control Group, and the difference between the groups was significant on day 14 after OAHA. These findings suggest a possible difference in the activation of immune response after OAHA in infected cows compared to healthy cows.

  10. Linking Vitamin D Deficiency to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Matthew T.; Weaver, Casey T.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with industrialization, and its incidence has increased markedly over time. The prospect of reversing these trends motivates the search for the agent(s) involved. Modernity entails several physical and behavioral modifications that compromise both the photosynthesis of cholecalciferol in the skin, and of its bioavailability. Although deficiency in this “vitamin” has therefore emerged as a leading candidate, and despite the publication of a randomized control trial that showed a trend towards statistically significant benefit in Crohn’s disease, its causal agency has yet to be demonstrated by an adequately powered study. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the case being made by epidemiologists, geneticists, clinicians and basic researchers, and consolidate their findings into a model that provides mechanistic plausibility to the claim. Specifically, converging data sets suggest that local activation of vitamin D coordinates the activity of the innate and adaptive arms of immunity, and of the intestinal epithelium, in a manner that promotes barrier integrity, facilitates the clearance of translocated flora and diverts CD4 T cell development away from inflammatory phenotypes. Since smoking is an important risk-altering exposure, we also discuss its newly established melanizing effect, as well as other emerging evidence linking tobacco use to immune function through vitamin D pathways. PMID:23591600

  11. Fertility and Contraception in Women With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jason; Kane, Sunanda V.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) carries a high burden in women during their reproductive years, and family planning issues are often a significant cause of concern. Fertility is normal in women with nonsurgically treated ulcerative colitis and similar or slightly reduced in women with Crohn’s disease. Women who undergo ileal pouch anastomosis have reduced fertility. Fertility is likely worsened by disease activity but unaffected by medications used to treat IBD. Infertile patients with IBD respond as well as non-IBD patients to in vitro fertilization (IVF). Despite normal fertility, patients with IBD have fewer children due to concerns regarding infertility, disease inheritance, congenital abnormalities, and disease-related sexual dysfunction. Patients rarely discuss these issues with a physician. When discussion does occur, it may lead to changes in decision-making. Contraceptives are an important part of family planning, particularly during times of high disease activity. All forms of contraceptives are acceptable in patients with IBD, although there are specific considerations. The risks of combined oral contraceptives outweigh the benefits in patients with active disease and patients with prior or high risk for thromboembolism. Oral contraceptives and IBD are independently associated with an increased risk for thromboembolism, although it is not known whether this effect is compounding. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injection should be avoided in patients with or at risk for osteopenia. Intrauterine devices and implants are the most effective form of contraception and should be a first-line recommendation. The use of oral contraceptives is associated with the development of IBD, although there is no increased risk of disease relapse with the use of any form of contraceptive. PMID:27182211

  12. Therapeutic potential of traditional chinese medicine on inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Hsin; Yang, Chih-Ching; Li, Ping-Chia; Chen, Wang-Chuan; Chien, Chiang-Ting

    2013-07-01

    Increased oxidative stress induces inflammation to several tissues/organs leading to cell death and long-term injury. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and autophagic regulatory functions has been widely used as preventive or therapeutic strategy in modern medicine. Oxidative stress and inflammation have been widely reported to contribute to cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation, hepatotoxicity, or sympathetic activation-induced liver inflammation, lipopolysaccharide-induced renal inflammation, and substance P-mediated neurogenic hyperactive bladder based on clinical findings. In this review, we introduce several evidences for TCM treatment including Monascus adlay (MA) produced by inoculating adlay (Cois lachrymal-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) with Monascus purpureus on lung injury, Amla (Emblica officinalis Gaertn. of Euphorbiaceae family) on hepatotoxin-induced liver inflammation, Virgate Wormwood Decoction (Yīn Chén Hāo tāng) and its active component genipin on sympathetic activation-induced liver inflammation, and green tea extract and its active components, catechins, or a modified TCM formula Five Stranguries Powder (Wǔ Lén Sǎn) plus Crataegi Fructus (Shān Zhā) on hyperactive bladder. The pathophysiologic and molecular mechanisms of TCM on ameliorating inflammatory diseases are discussed in the review.

  13. Managing inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Matthew; Lummis, Katie; Selinger, Christian P

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects many women of childbearing age. The course of IBD is closely related to pregnancy outcomes with poorly controlled IBD increasing the risk of prematurity, low weight for gestation, and fetal loss. As such, women with IBD face complex decision making weighing the risks of active disease versus those of medical treatments. This review summarizes the current evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of IBD treatments during pregnancy and lactation aiming to provide up-to-date guidance for clinicians. Over 50% of women have poor IBD- and pregnancy-related knowledge, which is associated with views contrary to medical evidence and voluntary childlessness. This review highlights the effects of poor patient knowledge and critically evaluates interventions for improving patient knowledge and outcomes. PMID:27789969

  14. [Fecal microbiota transplantation in treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Privalov, M A; Sizenko, A K

    2014-11-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic, recurrent disease associated with significant morbidity and disability rates and marked reduction of quality of life. The exact aetiology of these conditions is unknown, however, there is increasing data supporting the influence of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBD. Despite of large number of actively exploring approaches to IBD treatment, some patients remain refractory to standard management or have significant adverse side effects. Given the probably role of the gastrointestinal microbiotain development of IBD, treatments that manipulate the microbiota have been investigated with varying degree of efficacy. Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) can be considered as alternative regimen for IBD management, but there is currently a lack of evidence supporting this approach in similar conditions. The comprehensive data are necessary to provide understandable and clear conclusion to guide current practice and future research.

  15. The Dual Role of Neutrophils in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wéra, Odile; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Oury, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, are characterised by aberrant immunological responses leading to chronic inflammation without tissue regeneration. These two diseases are considered distinct entities, and there is some evidence that neutrophil behaviour, above all other aspects of immunity, clearly separate them. Neutrophils are the first immune cells recruited to the site of inflammation, and their action is crucial to limit invasion by microorganisms. Furthermore, they play an essential role in proper resolution of inflammation. When these processes are not tightly regulated, they can trigger positive feedback amplification loops that promote neutrophil activation, leading to significant tissue damage and evolution toward chronic disease. Defective chemotaxis, as observed in Crohn’s disease, can also contribute to the disease through impaired microbe elimination. In addition, through NET production, neutrophils may be involved in thrombo-embolic events frequently observed in IBD patients. While the role of neutrophils has been studied in different animal models of IBD for many years, their contribution to the pathogenesis of IBD remains poorly understood, and no molecules targeting neutrophils are used and validated for the treatment of these pathologies. Therefore, it is crucial to improve our understanding of their mode of action in these particular conditions in order to provide new therapeutic avenues for IBD. PMID:27999328

  16. Nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases on children and adolescents☆

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Gilton Marques; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues; Santana, Genoile Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a sistematiy review of the literature about the nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCES: A systematic review was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO databases, with inclusion of articles in Portuguese and in English with original data, that analyzed nutritional aspects of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents. The initial search used the terms "inflammatory bowel diseases" and "children" or "adolescents" and "nutritional evaluation" or "nutrition deficiency". The selection of studies was initially performed by reading the titles and abstracts. Review studies and those withouth data for pediatric patients were excluded. Subsequently, the full reading of the articles considered relevant was performed. RESULTS: 237 studies were identified, and 12 of them were selected according to the inclusion criteria. None of them was performed in South America. During the analysis of the studies, it was observed that nutritional characteristics of patients with inflammatory bowel disease may be altered; the main reports were related to malnutrition, growth stunting, delayed puberty and vitamin D deficiency. CONCLUSION: There are nutritional consequences of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents, mainly growth stunting, slower pubertal development, underweight and vitamin deficiencies. Nutritional impairments were more significant in patients with Crohn's disease; overweight and obesity were more common in patients with ulcerative rectocolitis. A detailed nutritional assessment should be performed periodically in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25511006

  17. Molecular probing of TNF: From identification of therapeutic target to guidance of therapy in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cong-Qiu

    2016-09-12

    Therapy by blocking tumor necrosis factor (TNF) activity is highly efficacious and profoundly changed the paradigm of several inflammatory diseases. However, a significant proportion of patients with inflammatory diseases do not respond to TNF inhibitors (TNFi). Prediction of therapeutic response is required for TNFi therapy. Isotope labeled anti-TNF antibodies or TNF receptor have been investigated to localize TNF production at inflammatory tissue in animal models and in patients with inflammatory diseases. The in vivo detection of TNF has been associated with treatment response. Recently, fluorophore labeled anti-TNF antibody in combination with confocal laser endomicroscopy in patients with Crohn's disease yielded more accurate and quantitative in vivo detection of TNF in the diseased mucosa. More importantly, this method demonstrated high therapeutic predication value. Fluorophore labeled TNF binding aptamers in combination with modern imaging technology offers additional tools for in vivo TNF probing.

  18. Resolvins and omega three polyunsaturated fatty acids: Clinical implications in inflammatory diseases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Moro, Kazuki; Nagahashi, Masayuki; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Takabe, Kazuaki; Wakai, Toshifumi

    2016-07-16

    Inflammation is a central process in several disorders and contributes to cancer progression. Inflammation involves a complex cascade of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory signaling events with protein and lipid mediators. Recent advances in lipid detection have revealed the importance of lipid mediators in inflammation. Omega three polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) are found naturally in fish oil and have been extensively studied in multiple inflammatory diseases with improved outcomes. Resolvins are thought to be the active metabolites of ω-3 PUFA, and are responsible for facilitating the resolving phase of acute inflammation. Clinically, resolvins have been associated with resolution of acute kidney injury and acute lung injury, micro and macro vascular response to injury, and inhibition of microglia-activated inflammation in neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to inflammatory diseases, ω-3 PUFA and resolvins appear to modulate cancer progression. ω-3 PUFA intake has been associated with reduced inflammation in colorectal cancer, and favorable phenotype in breast cancer. Resolvins offer promising therapeutic potential as they may modulate inflammation with minimal side-effects, in contrast to currently available anti-inflammatory medications. This review describes the roles of ω-3 PUFA and resolvins in the inflammatory cascade, various inflammatory diseases, and specific cancers. Additionally, it will discuss the clinical therapeutic potential of resolvins as targets in inflammatory diseases and cancers.

  19. A novel inflammatory role for platelets in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Davila, Jennifer; Manwani, Deepa; Vasovic, Ljiljana; Avanzi, Mauro; Uehlinger, Joan; Ireland, Karen; Mitchell, W Beau

    2015-01-01

    The severe pain, ischemia and organ damage that characterizes sickle cell disease (SCD) is caused by vaso-occlusion, which is the blockage of blood vessels by heterotypic aggregates of sickled erythrocytes and other cells. Vaso-occlusion is also a vasculopathy involving endothelial cell dysfunction, leukocyte activation, platelet activation and chronic inflammation resulting in the multiple adhesive interactions between cellular elements. Since platelets mediate inflammation as well as thrombosis via release of pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules, we hypothesized that platelets may play an active inflammatory role in SCD by secreting increased amounts of cytokines. Since platelets have been shown to contain mRNA and actively produce proteins, we also hypothesized that SCD platelets may contain increased cytokine mRNA. In this cross-sectional study, we sought to compare both the quantity of cytokines secreted and the cytokine mRNA content, between SCD and control platelets. We measured the secretion of Th1, Th2, and Th17-related cytokines from platelets in a cohort of SCD patients. We simultaneously measured platelet mRNA levels of those cytokines. Platelets from SCD patients secreted increased quantities of IL-1β, sCD40L, and IL-6 compared to controls. Secretion was increased in patients with alloantibodies. Additionally, mRNA of those cytokines was increased in SCD platelets. Platelets from sickle cell patients secrete increased amounts of inflammatory cytokines, and contain increased cytokine mRNA. These findings suggest a novel immunological role for platelets in SCD vasculopathy, in addition to their thrombotic role, and strengthen the rationale for the use of anti-platelet therapy in SCD.

  20. IL-1 family cytokines trigger sterile inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Lukens, John R.; Gross, Jordan M.; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation plays vital roles in protective responses against pathogens and tissue repair, however, improper resolution of inflammatory networks is centrally involved in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic diseases. Extensive advances have been made in recent years to define the inflammatory processes that are required for pathogen clearance, however, in comparison, less is known about the regulation of inflammation in sterile settings. Over the past decade non-communicable chronic diseases that are potentiated by sterile inflammation have replaced infectious diseases as the major threat to global human health. Thus, improved understanding of the sterile inflammatory process has emerged as one of the most important areas of biomedical investigation during our time. In this review we highlight the central role that interleukin-1 family cytokines play in sterile inflammatory diseases. PMID:23087690

  1. [Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Cossermelli, W; Pastor, E H

    1995-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) comprise an important class of medicaments that reduced the symptoms of inflamation in rheumatic disease. This article emphasizes similarities and class characteristics of the NSAID, mechanisms of action, and drug-interactions.

  2. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic inflammatory joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Agca, R; Heslinga, S C; van Halm, V P; Nurmohamed, M T

    2016-05-15

    Inflammatory joint disorders (IJD), including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (ASp) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), are prevalent conditions worldwide with a considerable burden on healthcare systems. IJD are associated with increased cardiovascular (CV) disease-related morbidity and mortality. In this review, we present an overview of the literature. Standardised mortality ratios are increased in IJD compared with the general population, that is, RA 1.3-2.3, ASp 1.6-1.9 and PsA 0.8-1.6. This premature mortality is mainly caused by atherosclerotic events. In RA, this CV risk is comparable to that in type 2 diabetes. Traditional CV risk factors are more often present and partially a consequence of changes in physical function related to the underlying IJD. Also, chronic systemic inflammation itself is an independent CV risk factor. Optimal control of disease activity with conventional synthetic, targeted synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs decreases this excess risk. High-grade inflammation as well as anti-inflammatory treatment alter traditional CV risk factors, such as lipids. In view of the above-mentioned CV burden in patients with IJD, CV risk management is necessary. Presently, this CV risk management is still lacking in usual care. Patients, general practitioners, cardiologists, internists and rheumatologists need to be aware of the substantially increased CV risk in IJD and should make a combined effort to timely initiate CV risk management in accordance with prevailing guidelines together with optimal control of rheumatic disease activity. CV screening and treatment strategies need to be implemented in usual care.

  3. Self-Care Among Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yngman-Uhlin, Pia; Hjortswang, Henrik; Riegel, Barbara; Stjernman, Henrik; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology. The disease occurs early in life and the burden of symptoms is significant. Patients need to perform self-care to handle their symptoms, but knowledge about what kind of self-care patients do is limited and these individuals need to learn how to manage the symptoms that arise. The aim of this study was to explore self-care among patients with IBD. Twenty adult patients with IBD, 25–66 years of age, were interviewed. Data were analyzed by performing a qualitative content analysis. Four categories with 10 subcategories emerged from the analysis of the interviews. The self-care patients perform consists of symptom recognition (subcategories: physiological sensations and psychological sensations), handling of symptoms (subcategories: adapting the diet, using medical treatment, stress management, and using complementary alternative medicine), planning life (subcategories: planning for when to do activities and when to refrain from activities), and seeking new options (subcategories: seeking knowledge and personal contacts). Self-care consists of symptom recognition, handling life through planning, and accommodating the existing situation with the ultimate goal of maintaining well-being. Being one step ahead facilitates living with IBD. A decision to actively participate in care of a chronic illness is a prerequisite for self-care. Healthcare professionals must consider patients' potential for and desire for self-care when giving advice on self-care activities. Doing so may help people better cope with IBD. PMID:26166423

  4. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of Ficus carica Linn. leaves.

    PubMed

    Ali, B; Mujeeb, M; Aeri, V; Mir, S R; Faiyazuddin, M; Shakeel, F

    2012-01-01

    Ficus carica Linn. (Moraceae) is commonly known as edible fig. The leaves, roots, fruits and latex of the plant are medicinally used in different diseases. The leaves are claimed to be effective in various inflammatory conditions like painful or swollen piles, insect sting and bites. However, there has been no report on anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of F. carica leaves. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of F. carica leaves. Our study validated the traditional claim with pharmacological data. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of the drug could be due to the presence of steroids and flavanoids, respectively, which are reported to be present in the drug. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory activity of the drug could be due to its free radical scavenging activity. Further work is also required to isolate and characterise the active constituents responsible for the anti-inflammatory activities.

  5. Parkinson’s disease and enhanced inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovska, Iva; Wagner, Brandon M

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the first and second most prevalent motor and neurodegenerative disease, respectively. The clinical symptoms of PD result from a loss of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. However, the molecular cause of DA neuron loss remains elusive. Mounting evidence implicates enhanced inflammatory response in the development and progression of PD pathology. This review examines current research connecting PD and inflammatory response. PMID:25769314

  6. Therapeutic Potential of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Hsin; Yang, Chih-Ching; Li, Ping-Chia; Chen, Wang-Chuan; Chien, Chiang-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress induces inflammation to several tissues/organs leading to cell death and long-term injury. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and autophagic regulatory functions has been widely used as preventive or therapeutic strategy in modern medicine. Oxidative stress and inflammation have been widely reported to contribute to cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation, hepatotoxicity, or sympathetic activation-induced liver inflammation, lipopolysaccharide-induced renal inflammation, and substance P-mediated neurogenic hyperactive bladder based on clinical findings. In this review, we introduce several evidences for TCM treatment including Monascus adlay (MA) produced by inoculating adlay (Cois lachrymal-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) with Monascus purpureus on lung injury, Amla (Emblica officinalis Gaertn. of Euphorbiaceae family) on hepatotoxin-induced liver inflammation, Virgate Wormwood Decoction (Yīn Chén Hāo tāng) and its active component genipin on sympathetic activation–induced liver inflammation, and green tea extract and its active components, catechins, or a modified TCM formula Five Stranguries Powder (Wǔ Lén Sǎn) plus Crataegi Fructus (Shān Zhā) on hyperactive bladder. The pathophysiologic and molecular mechanisms of TCM on ameliorating inflammatory diseases are discussed in the review. PMID:24716170

  7. Bacterial Intestinal Superinfections in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Beyond Clostridum difficile.

    PubMed

    Lobatón, Triana; Domènech, Eugeni

    2016-07-01

    Besides genetics and environmental factors, intestinal microbiota seem to play a major role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. For many decades, it has been said that some enteropathogens may even trigger both inflammatory bowel disease development and disease flares. For this reason, stool testing had been performed in inflammatory bowel disease flares but current guidelines only recommend to rule out Clostridium difficile infection and there is no clear advice for other enteropathogens given that the scarce available evidence points at a low prevalence of this sort of intestinal superinfections with no clear impact on disease course. The present article reviews the current knowledge about the role of bacterial enteropathogens on disease pathogenesis and flares beyond C. difficile.

  8. Immunopathophysiology of pediatric CNS inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit; Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Rostasy, Kevin; Brück, Wolfgang; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-08-30

    Elucidating pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the spectrum of pediatric-onset CNS demyelinating diseases, particularly those that may distinguish multiple sclerosis (MS) from other entities, promises to both improve diagnostics and guide more-informed therapeutic decisions. Observations that pediatric- and adult-onset MS share the same genetic and environmental risk factors support the view that these conditions represent essentially the same illness manifesting at different ages. Nonetheless, special consideration must be given when CNS inflammation manifests in early life, at a time when multiple organs (including immune and nervous systems) are actively maturing. CSF analysis in pediatric-onset MS points to chronic CNS inflammation, supported by observations from limited pathologic material available for study. Emerging results implicate abnormalities in both effector and regulatory T cell subsets, and potentially immune senescence, in children with MS. Although CNS-directed antibodies (including antibodies recognizing myelin antigens; Kir4.1) can be documented in pediatric-onset MS, their pathophysiologic significance (as in adults) remains unclear. This is in contrast to the presence of serum and/or CSF antibodies recognizing aquaporin-4, which, when measured using validated cell-based assays, supports the diagnosis of a neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, distinct from MS. Presence of anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies documented with similar cell-based assays may also be associated with pathophysiologically distinct disease phenotypes in children. The substantial impact of pediatric-onset MS on normal brain development and function underscores the importance of elucidating both the immunobiology and neurobiology of disease. Ongoing efforts are aimed at developing and validating biological measures that define pathophysiologically distinct monophasic and chronic forms of pediatric CNS demyelination.

  9. Role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Iida, Tomoya; Onodera, Kei; Nakase, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) results from a complex series of interactions between susceptibility genes, the environment, and the immune system. Recently, some studies provided strong evidence that the process of autophagy affects several aspects of mucosal immune responses. Autophagy is a cellular stress response that plays key roles in physiological processes, such as innate and adaptive immunity, adaptation to starvation, degradation of aberrant proteins or organelles, antimicrobial defense, and protein secretion. Dysfunctional autophagy is recognized as a contributing factor in many chronic inflammatory diseases, including IBD. Autophagy plays multiple roles in IBD pathogenesis by altering processes that include intracellular bacterial killing, antimicrobial peptide secretion by Paneth cells, goblet cell function, proinflammatory cytokine production by macrophages, antigen presentation by dendritic cells, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response in enterocytes. Recent studies have identified susceptibility genes involved in autophagy, such as NOD2, ATG16L1, and IRGM, and active research is ongoing all over the world. The aim of this review is a systematic appraisal of the current literature to provide a better understanding of the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of IBD. Understanding these mechanisms will bring about new strategies for the treatment and prevention of IBD. PMID:28373760

  10. Characterization of inflammatory cell infiltration in feline allergic skin disease.

    PubMed

    Taglinger, K; Day, M J; Foster, A P

    2007-11-01

    Sixteen cats with allergic dermatitis and six control cats with no skin disease were examined. Lymphoid and histiocytic cells in skin sections were examined immunohistochemically and mast cells were identified by toluidine blue staining. The 16 allergic cats showed one or more of several features (alopecia, eosinophilic plaques or granulomas, papulocrusting lesions), and histopathological findings were diverse. In control cats there were no cells that expressed IgM or MAC387, a few that were immunolabelled for IgG, IgA or CD3, and moderate numbers of mast cells. In allergic cats, positively labelled inflammatory cells were generally more numerous in lesional than in non-lesional skin sections, and were particularly associated with the superficial dermis and perifollicular areas. There were low numbers of plasma cells expressing cytoplasmic immunoglobulin; moderate numbers of MHC II-, MAC387- and CD3-positive cells; and moderate to numerous mast cells. MHC class II expression was associated with inflammatory cells morphologically consistent with dermal dendritic cells and macrophages, and epidermal Langerhans cells. Dendritic cells expressing MHC class II were usually associated with an infiltrate of CD3 lymphocytes, suggesting that these cells participate in maintenance of the local immune response by presenting antigen to T lymphocytes. These findings confirm that feline allergic skin disease is characterized by infiltration of activated antigen-presenting cells and T lymphocytes in addition to increased numbers of dermal mast cells. This pattern mimics the dermal inflammation that occurs in the chronic phase of both canine and human atopic dermatitis.

  11. Cryotherapy in inflammatory rheumatic diseases: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Xavier; Tordi, Nicolas; Mourot, Laurent; Demougeot, Céline; Dugué, Benoît; Prati, Clément; Wendling, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this article was to review current evidence about cryotherapy in inflammatory rheumatic diseases (therapeutic and biological effects). For therapeutic effects, we performed a systematic review (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, LILACS databases, unpublished data) and selected studies including non-operated and non-infected arthritic patients treated with local cryotherapy or whole-body cryotherapy. By pooling 6 studies including 257 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, we showed a significant decrease in pain visual analogic scale (mm) and 28-joint disease activity score after chronic cryotherapy in RA patients. For molecular pathways, local cryotherapy induces an intrajoint temperature decrease, which might downregulate several mediators involved in joint inflammation and destruction (cytokines, cartilage-degrading enzymes, proangiogenic factors), but studies in RA are rare. Cryotherapy should be included in RA therapeutic strategies as an adjunct therapy, with potential corticosteroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug dose-sparing effects. However, techniques and protocols should be more precisely defined in randomized controlled trials with stronger methodology.

  12. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: a review of medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Kozuch, Patricia L; Hanauer, Stephen B

    2008-01-21

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. While a cure remains elusive, both can be treated with medications that induce and maintain remission. With the recent advent of therapies that inhibit tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha the overlap in medical therapies for UC and CD has become greater. Although 5-ASA agents have been a mainstay in the treatment of both CD and UC, the data for their efficacy in patients with CD, particularly as maintenance therapy, are equivocal. Antibiotics may have a limited role in the treatment of colonic CD. Steroids continue to be the first choice to treat active disease not responsive to other more conservative therapy; non-systemic steroids such as oral and rectal budesonide for ileal and right-sided CD and distal UC respectively are also effective in mild-moderate disease. 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and its prodrug azathioprine are steroid-sparing immunomodulators effective in the maintenance of remission of both CD and UC, while methotrexate may be used in both induction and maintenance of CD. Infliximab and adalimumab are anti-TNF agents approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of Crohn's disease, and infliximab is also approved for the treatment of UC.

  13. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: A review of medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kozuch, Patricia L; Hanauer, Stephen B

    2008-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. While a cure remains elusive, both can be treated with medications that induce and maintain remission. With the recent advent of therapies that inhibit tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha the overlap in medical therapies for UC and CD has become greater. Although 5-ASA agents have been a mainstay in the treatment of both CD and UC, the data for their efficacy in patients with CD, particularly as maintenance therapy, are equivocal. Antibiotics may have a limited role in the treatment of colonic CD. Steroids continue to be the first choice to treat active disease not responsive to other more conservative therapy; non-systemic steroids such as oral and rectal budesonide for ileal and right-sided CD and distal UC respectively are also effective in mild-moderate disease. 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and its prodrug azathioprine are steroid-sparing immunomodulators effective in the maintenance of remission of both CD and UC, while methotrexate may be used in both induction and maintenance of CD. Infliximab and adalimumab are anti-TNF agents approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of Crohn's disease, and infliximab is also approved for the treatment of UC. PMID:18200659

  14. Inulin and oligofructose in chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Leenen, Celine H M; Dieleman, Levinus A

    2007-11-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, also called chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), affect up to 500 per 100,000 persons in the Western world. Recent studies in the etiology of IBD suggest that these diseases are caused by a combination of genetic, environmental, and immunological factors. Results from humans and especially animal models of colitis reported by our group and others have indicated that these diseases result from a lack of tolerance to resident intestinal bacteria in genetically susceptible hosts. Probiotic bacteria have health-promoting effects for the host when ingested and have also shown efficacy in ulcerative colitis and refractory pouchitis. In light of the efficacy of providing probiotic bacteria to patients with IBD, there has been interest in the prophylactic and therapeutic potential of inulin, oligofructose, and other prebiotics for patients with or at risk of IBD. Prebiotics are nondigestible dietary oligosaccharides that affect the host by selectively stimulating growth, activity, or both of selective intestinal (probiotic) bacteria. Prebiotics are easy to administer and, in contrast to probiotic therapy, do not require administration of large amounts of (live) bacteria and are therefore easier to administer. Studies using prebiotics, especially beta-fructan oligosaccharides, for the treatment of chronic intestinal inflammation have shown benefit in animal models of colitis. Studies using these prebiotics alone or in combination with probiotics are emerging and have shown promise. These dietary therapies could lead to novel treatments for these chronic debilitating diseases.

  15. Serological markers in inflammatory bowel disease: the pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Aaron; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2002-02-01

    Accurate serological assays are desirable for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. Among several serological markers anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannan antibodies and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies are highly disease specific for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, respectively. Combining the two improves their specificity. Sensitivity, however, is still low. Due to lack of standardization and vast interobserver variability, they cannot be used as the only diagnostic criteria but can assist clinicians in diagnosing and categorizing patients with inflammatory bowel disease as well as in helping them to take therapeutic decisions.

  16. Therapeutic antibodies that target inflammatory cytokines in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yuping; Dong, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are key regulators of immune responses. Persistent and excessive production of inflammatory cytokines underscores the development of autoimmune diseases. Therefore, neutralizing inflammatory cytokines or antagonizing their receptor function is considered as a useful therapeutic strategy to treat autoimmune diseases. To achieve the success of such a strategy, understanding of the complex actions of these cytokines and cytokine networks is required. In this review we focus on four inflammatory cytokines--tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-23 and IL-17--and dissect how the dysregulation of these cytokines regulates autoimmune diseases. On the basis of pre-clinical and clinical data, we specifically discuss the therapeutic rationale for targeting these cytokines and describe the potential adverse effects.

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of CT Enterography for Active Inflammatory Terminal Ileal Crohn Disease: Comparison of Full-Dose and Half-Dose Images Reconstructed with FBP and Half-Dose Images with SAFIRE.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Namita S; Baker, Mark E; Goenka, Ajit H; Bullen, Jennifer A; Obuchowski, Nancy A; Remer, Erick M; Coppa, Christopher P; Einstein, David; Feldman, Myra K; Kanmaniraja, Devaraju; Purysko, Andrei S; Vahdat, Noushin; Primak, Andrew N; Karim, Wadih; Herts, Brian R

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy and image quality of computed tomographic (CT) enterographic images obtained at half dose and reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) with those of full-dose CT enterographic images reconstructed with FBP for active inflammatory terminal or neoterminal ileal Crohn disease. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was compliant with HIPAA and approved by the institutional review board. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. Ninety subjects (45 with active terminal ileal Crohn disease and 45 without Crohn disease) underwent CT enterography with a dual-source CT unit. The reference standard for confirmation of active Crohn disease was active terminal ileal Crohn disease based on ileocolonoscopy or established Crohn disease and imaging features of active terminal ileal Crohn disease. Data from both tubes were reconstructed with FBP (100% exposure); data from the primary tube (50% exposure) were reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE strengths 3 and 4, yielding four datasets per CT enterographic examination. The mean volume CT dose index (CTDIvol) and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) at full dose were 13.1 mGy (median, 7.36 mGy) and 15.9 mGy (median, 13.06 mGy), respectively, and those at half dose were 6.55 mGy (median, 3.68 mGy) and 7.95 mGy (median, 6.5 mGy). Images were subjectively evaluated by eight radiologists for quality and diagnostic confidence for Crohn disease. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were estimated, and the multireader, multicase analysis of variance method was used to compare reconstruction methods on the basis of a noninferiority margin of 0.05. Results The mean AUCs with half-dose scans (FBP, 0.908; SAFIRE 3, 0.935; SAFIRE 4, 0.924) were noninferior to the mean AUC with full-dose FBP scans (0.908; P < .003). The proportion of images with inferior quality was significantly higher with all

  18. In vitro effects of oxpentifylline on inflammatory cytokine release in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Reimund, J M; Dumont, S; Muller, C D; Kenney, J S; Kedinger, M; Baumann, R; Poindron, P; Duclos, B

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin (IL)-1 beta, have been implicated as primary mediators of intestinal inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. AIM: To investigate the in vitro effects of oxpentifylline (pentoxifylline; PTX; a phosphodiesterase inhibitor) on inflammatory cytokine production (1) by peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and (2) by inflamed intestinal mucosa cultures from patients with Crohn's disease and patients with ulcerative colitis. METHODS: PBMCs and mucosal biopsy specimens were cultured for 24 hours in the absence or presence of PTX (up to 100 micrograms/ml), and the secretion of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6, and IL-8 determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). RESULTS: PTX inhibited the release of TNF-alpha by PBMCs from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and the secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta by organ cultures of inflamed mucosa from the same patients. Secretion of TNF-alpha by PBMCs was inhibited by about 50% at a PTX concentration of 25 micrograms/ml (IC50). PTX was equally potent in cultures from controls, patients with Crohn's disease, and those with ulcerative colitis. The concentrations of IL-6 and IL-8 were not significantly modified in PBMCs, but IL-6 increased slightly in organ culture supernatants. CONCLUSIONS: PTX or more potent related compounds may represent a new family of cytokine inhibitors, potentially interesting for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:9176074

  19. [Chorioamnionitis and inflammatory disease in the premature newborn infant].

    PubMed

    Vedovato, S; Zanardo, V

    2010-06-01

    Preterm births occurs in 6-12% of all pregnancies, accounts for 75% of neonatal death and causes significant neonatal morbidity. A large number of preterm birth is associated with infection (30%), because of the release of many cytokines. In fact acute chorioamnionitis represents the inflammatory response to extracellular microorganisms that gain access to the gestational sac. Clinical signs of infection compare in the 12% of cases, while the prevalence of positive amniotic fluid cultures is approximately 50% in patients with preterm PROM. Despite the recent studies about the dosage of inflammatory biomarkers in the amniotic fluid or in fetal and maternal blood, placenta histology remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of chorioamnionitis. Histological chorioamnionitis describes the progression of the inflammatory process. Organisms first colonise the chorioamnionic surface. Then, the neutrophils migrates to the chorion (chorionitis) and to the amnion (chorioamnionitis) and, in the last stage, amnionic epithelial cells undergo necrosis (necrotising chorioamnionitis). It represents the mother inflammatory response and it differs from the fetal inflammatory response (funisitis). Funisitis first appears in vessels of the chorionic plate (chorionic vasculitis) or in the umbilical vein (umbilical phlebitis), then in the umbilical artery (umbilical arteritis), and in the Wharton's jelly (umbilical perivasculitis). The fetal inflammatory response has been associated with inflammatory diseases of preterm infants, increasing the risk of neonatal sepsis and meningitis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia and cerebral palsy. We present our experience on the relationship between histological chorioamnionitis, preterm birth and inflammatory diseases of VLBW infants.

  20. Diabetic Retinopathy: Vascular and Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Semeraro, F.; Cancarini, A.; dell'Omo, R.; Rezzola, S.; Romano, M. R.; Costagliola, C.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of visual impairment in the working-age population of the Western world. The pathogenesis of DR is complex and several vascular, inflammatory, and neuronal mechanisms are involved. Inflammation mediates structural and molecular alterations associated with DR. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways associated with DR are not completely characterized. Previous studies indicate that tissue hypoxia and dysregulation of immune responses associated with diabetes mellitus can induce increased expression of numerous vitreous mediators responsible for DR development. Thus, analysis of vitreous humor obtained from diabetic patients has made it possible to identify some of the mediators (cytokines, chemokines, and other factors) responsible for DR pathogenesis. Further studies are needed to better understand the relationship between inflammation and DR. Herein the main vitreous-related factors triggering the occurrence of retinal complication in diabetes are highlighted. PMID:26137497

  1. Drug-disease interactions: reduced β-adrenergic and potassium channel antagonist activities of sotalol in the presence of acute and chronic inflammatory conditions in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kulmatycki, Kenneth M; Abouchehade, Kassem; Sattari, Saeed; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2001-01-01

    Inflammation may influence response to pharmacotherapy. We investigated the effect of inflammation on response to sotalol, a β-adrenergic receptor and potassium channel antagonist. Racemic sotalol (40 mg kg−1) was administered to healthy, acutely (interferonα 2a-induced) and chronically (Mycobacterium butyricum-induced adjuvant arthritis) inflamed male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=4 – 6/group). Another group of interferon-treated rats received 3 mg kg−1 of anti-TNF antibody infliximab. Electrocardiogram (ECG) recorded and plasma sotalol concentration monitored for 6 h. The study was repeated in acutely inflamed rats following administration of stereochemically pure individual sotalol enantiomers [40 mg kg−1 S (potassium channel blocker) or 20 mg kg−1 R (β-adrenergic/potassium channel blocker)]. Chronic arthritis was readily evident. Acute arthritis was associated with elevated segmented neutrophils and increased plasma nitrite and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) concentrations. Sotalol affected ECG in all rats. In both inflamed groups, however, response to sotalol in prolongation of QT interval (potassium channel sensitivity) was reduced. The effect of PR interval (β-adrenergic activity) was also reduced following administration of the racemate and R-enantiomer. No significant differences in pharmacokinetics were observed between control and inflamed rats. Infliximab reduced nitrite and TNF concentrations and reversed the effect of acute inflammation on both PR and QT intervals. The reduced electrocardiographic responses to sotalol is likely due to the influence of inflammation on the action of the drug on both β-adrenergic and potassium channel receptors secondary to over-expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and/or nitric oxide. Our observation may have therapeutic consequences in all conditions where inflammatory mediators are increased. PMID:11350865

  2. Mechanisms of action of intravenous immunoglobulin in inflammatory muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Quick, Adam; Tandan, Rup

    2011-06-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is a unique immune-modulating therapy that has a wide range of effects on the immune system at multiple levels. This allows it to be used successfully in a variety of immune-mediated, systemic, and neurological disorders, including the inflammatory myopathies. It is likely that the specific action of IVIG varies depending on the underlying pathogenesis of a given disease. In dermatomyositis (DM), IVIG has been shown to diminish the activity of complement and deposition of membrane attack complex on capillaries and muscle fibers, the expression of adhesion molecules, and cytokine production. IVIG also appears to modify gene expression in the muscle of DM patients. The mechanism by which IVIG affects muscle in polymyositis and inclusion body myositis has not been well-studied. However, it may work via suppression of T-cell activation (including cytotoxic T cells) and migration into muscle tissue and alterations in cytokine production. IVIG generally yields the greatest therapeutic benefit in DM and is often of marginal utility in inclusion body myositis. It is generally considered as second-line or adjunctive therapy in the inflammatory myopathies.

  3. Use of allopurinol with low-dose 6-mercaptopurine in inflammatory bowel disease to achieve optimal active metabolite levels: A review of four cases and the literature

    PubMed Central

    Witte, Todd N; Ginsberg, Allen L

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: At least one-third of patients with inflammatory bowel disease do not respond or are intolerant to therapy with 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP). A subgroup fails to attain optimal levels of 6-thioguanine nucleotide (6-TGN) and instead shunts to 6-methylmercaptopurine nucleotide (6-MMPN). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted, and four patients are described who had been previously unable to achieve optimal 6-TGN metabolite levels until allopurinol was added to their treatment. RESULTS: All four patients achieved optimal 6-TGN levels and undetectable 6-MMPN with a mean 6-MP dose of 0.49 mg/kg. Three achieved steroid-free clinical remission. Two of those three patients had normalization of liver enzymes; one patient had baseline normal liver enzymes despite an initial 6-MMPN level of 27,369 pmol/8×108 red blood cells. Two patients experienced reversible leukopenia. CONCLUSIONS: Combination allopurinol and low-dose 6-MP is an effective means to achieve optimal metabolite levels and steroid-free clinical remission in previously refractory patients. Caution is advised. PMID:18299738

  4. Flavone deglycosylation increases their anti-inflammatory activity and absorption

    PubMed Central

    Hostetler, Gregory; Riedl, Ken; Cardenas, Horacio; Diosa-Toro, Mayra; Arango, Daniel; Schwartz, Steven; Doseff, Andrea I.

    2014-01-01

    Scope Flavones have reported anti-inflammatory activities, but the ability of flavone-rich foods to reduce inflammation is unclear. Here, we report the effect of flavone glycosylation in the regulation of inflammatory mediators in vitro and the absorption of dietary flavones in vivo. Methods and results The anti-inflammatory activities of celery extracts, some rich in flavone aglycones and others rich in flavone glycosides, were tested on the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. Pure flavone aglycones and aglycone-rich extracts effectively reduced TNF-α production and inhibited the transcriptional activity of NF-κB, while glycoside-rich extracts showed no significant effects. Deglycosylation of flavones increased cellular uptake and cytoplasmic localization as shown by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and microscopy using the flavonoid fluorescent dye diphenyl-boric acid 2-aminoethyl ester (DPBA). Celery diets with different glycoside or aglycone contents were formulated and absorption was evaluated in mice fed with 5 or 10% celery diets. Relative absorption in vivo was significantly higher in mice fed with aglycone-rich diets as determined by HPLC-MS/MS (where MS/MS is tandem mass spectrometry). Conclusion These results demonstrate that deglycosylation increases absorption of dietary flavones in vivo and modulates inflammation by reducing TNF-α and NF-κB, suggesting the potential use of functional foods rich in flavones for the treatment and prevention of inflammatory diseases. PMID:22351119

  5. Cell Death and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Apoptosis, Necrosis, and Autophagy in the Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cell death mechanisms have been associated with the development of inflammatory bowel diseases in humans and mice. Recent studies suggested that a complex crosstalk between autophagy/apoptosis, microbe sensing, and enhanced endoplasmic reticulum stress in the epithelium could play a critical role in these diseases. In addition, necroptosis, a relatively novel programmed necrosis-like pathway associated with TNF receptor activation, seems to be also present in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease and in specific animal models for intestinal inflammation. This review attempts to cover new data related to cell death mechanisms and inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25126549

  6. The design of novel classes of macrolides for neutrophil-dominated inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Eraković Haber, Vesna; Bosnar, Martina; Kragol, Goran

    2014-04-01

    Neutrophil-dominated inflammatory diseases, like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, bronchiolitis obliteras syndrome and non-eosinophilic asthma, present a significant medical problem lacking adequate therapy. Macrolide antibiotics have been reported to be effective in the treatment of the aforementioned diseases, for reasons unrelated to their antibacterial action. This has resulted in research activities aimed at gaining a better understanding of the immunomodulatory actions of macrolides and the synthesis of various novel anti-inflammatory macrolides without antimicrobial activity. Despite the difficult chemistry and lack of an extensive knowledge for their mechanism of action, several interesting molecules from this class, including potential clinical candidates, are on the horizon.

  7. Work in inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Gobelet, C; Luthi, F; Al-Khodairy, A T; Chamberlain, M A

    2007-09-15

    This article focuses on work disability and sick leave and their cost; it also discusses the value of vocational rehabilitation programmes in rheumatic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, hip and knee osteoarthritis. It acknowledges the importance of work not only for the worker who has one of these diseases but also for the public purse. Much can be done to improve the health of the persons and reduce their disability and its impact in the workplace which will have an important effect on their and their family's quality of life. It is important that neither rehabilitation nor vocational rehabilitation are regarded as bolt-on activities after drug treatment but are seen as an integral part of effective management. Publications dealing with return to work are relatively common in rheumatoid arthritis, less common in ankylosing spondylitis and relatively rare in osteoarthritis. Vocational rehabilitation programmes should aim to facilitate job retention or, failing that, to improve the ability to return to work. The process must be started with in the health arena and it has to be recognised that slow or poor practice in the health service can jeopardise the patient's work potential.

  8. Vaccinations in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rahier, Jean-François; Moutschen, Michel; Van Gompel, Alfons; Van Ranst, Marc; Louis, Edouard; Segaert, Siegfried; Masson, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID) such as RA, IBD or psoriasis, are at increased risk of infection, partially because of the disease itself, but mostly because of treatment with immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive drugs. In spite of their elevated risk for vaccine-preventable disease, vaccination coverage in IMID patients is surprisingly low. This review summarizes current literature data on vaccine safety and efficacy in IMID patients treated with immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory drugs and formulates best-practice recommendations on vaccination in this population. Especially in the current era of biological therapies, including TNF-blocking agents, special consideration should be given to vaccination strategies in IMID patients. Clinical evidence indicates that immunization of IMID patients does not increase clinical or laboratory parameters of disease activity. Live vaccines are contraindicated in immunocompromized individuals, but non-live vaccines can safely be given. Although the reduced quality of the immune response in patients under immunotherapy may have a negative impact on vaccination efficacy in this population, adequate humoral response to vaccination in IMID patients has been demonstrated for hepatitis B, influenza and pneumococcal vaccination. Vaccination status is best checked and updated before the start of immunomodulatory therapy: live vaccines are not contraindicated at that time and inactivated vaccines elicit an optimal immune response in immunocompetent individuals. PMID:20591834

  9. Autophagy, NLRP3 inflammasome and auto-inflammatory/immune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhenyu; Sanchez-Lopez, Elsa; Karin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Loss of homeostasis, as a result of pathogen invasion or self imbalance, causes tissue damage and inflammation. In addition to its well-established role in promoting clearance of pathogens or cell corpses, inflammation is also key to drive tissue repair and regeneration. Conserved from flies to humans, a transient, well-balanced inflammatory response is critical for restoration of tissue homeostasis after damage. The absence of such a response can result in failure of tissue repair, leading to the development of devastating immunopathologies and degenerative diseases. Studies in the past decade collectively suggest that a malfunction of NLRP3 inflammasome, a key tissue damage sensor, is a dominant driver of various autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases, including gout, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus. It is therefore crucial to understand the biology and regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome and determine its affect in the context of various diseases. Of note, various studies suggest that autophagy, a cellular waste removal and rejuvenation process, serves an important role as a macrophage-intrinsic negative regulator of NLRP3 inflammasome. Here, we review recent advances in understanding how autophagy regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activity and discuss the implications of this regulation on the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  10. Inflammatory bowel disease: An increased risk factor for neurologic complications

    PubMed Central

    Morís, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Only a very few systematic studies have investigated the frequency of neurologic disorders in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), which are the two main types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results have been inconsistent and variable, owing to differences in case-finding methods and evaluated outcomes in different studies. The most frequent neurologic manifestations reported in CD and UC populations are cerebrovascular disease (with either arterial or venous events), demyelinating central nervous system disease, and peripheral neuropathy (whether axonal or demyelinating); however, the literature describes numerous nervous system disorders as being associated with IBD. The pathogenesis of nervous system tissue involvement in IBD has yet to be elucidated, although it seems to be related to immune mechanisms or prothrombotic states. The recently-introduced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors have proven successful in controlling moderate to severe IBD activity. However, severe neurologic disorders associated with TNF inhibitors have been reported, which therefore raises concerns regarding the effect of anti-TNF-α antibodies on the nervous system. Although neurological involvement associated with IBD is rarely reported, gastroenterologists should be aware of the neurologic manifestations of IBD in order to provide early treatment, which is crucial for preventing major neurologic morbidity. PMID:24574797

  11. Molecular mechanism of glucocorticoid resistance in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    De Iudicibus, Sara; Franca, Raffaella; Martelossi, Stefano; Ventura, Alessandro; Decorti, Giuliana

    2011-01-01

    Natural and synthetic glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely employed in a number of inflammatory, autoimmune and neoplastic diseases, and, despite the introduction of novel therapies, remain the first-line treatment for inducing remission in moderate to severe active Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Despite their extensive therapeutic use and the proven effectiveness, considerable clinical evidence of wide inter-individual differences in GC efficacy among patients has been reported, in particular when these agents are used in inflammatory diseases. In recent years, a detailed knowledge of the GC mechanism of action and of the genetic variants affecting GC activity at the molecular level has arisen from several studies. GCs interact with their cytoplasmic receptor, and are able to repress inflammatory gene expression through several distinct mechanisms. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is therefore crucial for the effects of these agents: mutations in the GR gene (NR3C1, nuclear receptor subfamily 3, group C, member 1) are the primary cause of a rare, inherited form of GC resistance; in addition, several polymorphisms of this gene have been described and associated with GC response and toxicity. However, the GR is not self-standing in the cell and the receptor-mediated functions are the result of a complex interplay of GR and many other cellular partners. The latter comprise several chaperonins of the large cooperative hetero-oligomeric complex that binds the hormone-free GR in the cytosol, and several factors involved in the transcriptional machinery and chromatin remodeling, that are critical for the hormonal control of target genes transcription in the nucleus. Furthermore, variants in the principal effectors of GCs (e.g. cytokines and their regulators) have also to be taken into account for a comprehensive evaluation of the variability in GC response. Polymorphisms in genes involved in the transport and/or metabolism of these hormones have also been

  12. Inflammatory bowel disease of the lung: The role of infliximab?

    PubMed

    Hayek, Adam J; Pfanner, Timothy P; White, Heath D

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary extra-intestinal manifestations (EIM) of inflammatory bowel disease are well described with a variable incidence. We present a case of Crohn's disease with pulmonary EIM including chronic bronchitis with non-resolving bilateral cavitary pulmonary nodules and mediastinal lymphadenopathy successfully treated with infliximab. Additionally, we present a case summary from a literature review on pulmonary EIM successfully treated with infliximab. Current treatment recommendations include an inhaled and/or systemic corticosteroid regimen which is largely based on case reports and expert opinion. We offer infliximab as an adjunctive therapy or alternative to corticosteroids for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease related pulmonary EIM.

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease related innate immunity and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan; Chen, Zhonge

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic nonspecific intestinal inflammatory disease, including ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). Its pathogenesis remains not yet clear. Current researchers believe that after environmental factors act on individuals with genetic susceptibility, an abnormal intestinal immune response is launched under stimulation of intestinal flora. However, previous studies only focused on adaptive immunity in the pathogenesis of IBD. Currently, roles of innate immune response in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation have also drawn much attention. In this study, IBD related innate immunity and adaptive immunity were explained, especially the immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of IBD.

  14. Vaccines and recommendations for their use in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Tembleque, María Dolores; Corella, Carmen; Pérez-Calle, Jose L

    2013-01-01

    The patient with inflammatory bowel disease will be predisposed to numerous infections due their immune status. It is therefore important to understand the immune and serologic status at diagnosis and to put the patient into an adapted vaccination program. This program would be applied differently according to two patient groups: the immunocompromised and the non-immunocom-promised. In general, the first group would avoid the use of live-virus vaccines, and in all cases, inflammatory bowel disease treatment would take precedence over vaccine risk. It is important to individualize vaccination schedules according to the type of patient, the treatment used and the disease pattern.In addition, patient with inflammatory bowel disease should be considered for the following vaccines: varicella vaccine, human papilloma virus, influenza, pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and hepatitis B vaccine. PMID:23538680

  15. Control of inflammatory heart disease by CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Barin, Jobert G; Čiháková, Daniela

    2013-05-01

    This review focuses on autoimmune myocarditis and its sequela, inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMI), and the inflammatory and immune mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these diseases. Several mouse models of myocarditis and DCMI have improved our knowledge of the pathogenesis of these diseases, informing more general problems of cardiac remodeling and heart failure. CD4(+) T cells are critical in driving the pathogenesis of myocarditis. We discuss in detail the role of T helper cell subtypes in the pathogenesis of myocarditis, the biology of T cell-derived effector cytokines, and the participation of other leukocytic effectors in mediating disease pathophysiology. We discuss interactions between these subsets in both suppressive and collaborative fashions. These findings indicate that cardiac inflammatory disease, and autoimmunity in general, may be more diverse in divergent effector mechanisms than has previously been appreciated.

  16. Extraintestinal manifestations and complications in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rothfuss, Katja S; Stange, Eduard F; Herrlinger, Klaus R

    2006-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) that often involve organs other than those of the gastrointestinal tract. These nonintestinal affections are termed extraintestinal symptoms. Differentiating the true extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel diseases from secondary extraintestinal complications, caused by malnutrition, chronic inflammation or side effects of therapy, may be difficult. This review concentrates on frequency, clinical presentation and therapeutic implications of extraintestinal symptoms in inflammatory bowel diseases. If possible, extraintestinal manifestations are differentiated from extraintestinal complications. Special attention is given to the more recently described sites of involvement; i.e. thromboembolic events, osteoporosis, pulmonary involvement and affection of the central nervous system. PMID:16937463

  17. Endoscopic Diagnosis and Differentiation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Min; Lee, Kang-Moon

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have significantly increased in recent decades in Korea. Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and intestinal Behcet’s disease (BD), which should be differentiated from Crohn’s disease (CD), are more frequent in Korea than in the West. Thus, the accurate diagnosis of these inflammatory diseases is problematic in Korea and clinicians should fully understand their clinical and endoscopic characteristics. Ulcerative colitis mostly presents with rectal inflammation and continuous lesions, while CD presents with discontinuous inflammatory lesions and frequently involves the ileocecal area. Involvement of fewer than four segments, a patulous ileocecal valve, transverse ulcers, and scars or pseudopolyps are more frequently seen in ITB than in CD. A few ulcers with discrete margins are a typical endoscopic finding of intestinal BD. However, the differential diagnosis is difficult in many clinical situations because typical endoscopic findings are not always observed. Therefore, clinicians should also consider symptoms and laboratory, pathological, and radiological findings, in addition to endoscopic findings. PMID:27484813

  18. [Inflammatory spinal diseases: axial spondyloarthritis : Central importance of imaging].

    PubMed

    Baraliakos, X; Fruth, M; Kiltz, U; Braun, J

    2017-03-01

    The diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) includes classical ankylosing spondylitis (AS) as well as earlier stages and abortive courses of the disease, in which structural alterations have not yet occurred. These are classified as non-radiographic axSpA (nr-axSpa). Inflammatory changes in the entire axial skeleton are characteristic for axSpA and can be visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), while in most patients structural alterations, such as new bone formation with syndesmophytes and ankylosis develop in the later course of the disease. These bony alterations can best be visualized by conventional radiography and by computed tomography. Certain MRI sequences are nowadays considered as the standard method for depiction of inflammatory changes in axSpA. The introduction of MRI has led to a paradigm shift for this disease because the inflammatory lesions characteristic for the disease can be visualized at an early stage using appropriate MRI sequences.

  19. Primary Histoplasma capsulatum Enterocolitis Mimicking Peptic and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakshabendi, Rahman; Torres-Miranda, Daisy; LaBarbera, Francis Daniel; Nakshabandi, Ahmad; Nakshabendi, Imad

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients, histoplasmosis may present as disseminated disease. We present a 52-year-old Caucasian male with symptoms of dyspepsia, postprandial epigastric pain, nausea, and nonbloody diarrhea. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopies were suspicious for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, biopsies were consistent with histoplasmosis, specifically in the duodenum. PMID:27812393

  20. S1PR1 expression correlates with inflammatory responses to Newcastle disease virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaling; Xie, Peng; Sun, Minhua; Xiang, Bin; Kang, Yinfeng; Gao, Pei; Zhu, Wenxian; Ning, Zhangyong; Ren, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is the causative agent of Newcastle disease, which is characterized by inflammatory pathological changes in the organs of chickens. The inflammatory response to this disease has not been well characterized. Previous reports showed that the sphingosine-1-phosphate-1 receptor (S1PR1), a G protein-coupled receptor, is important to the activation of inflammatory responses. To understand better the viral pathogenesis and host inflammatory response, we analyzed S1PR1 expression during NDV infection. We observed a direct correlation between chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cellular inflammatory responses and S1PR1 expression. Virulent NDV-infected CEF cells also had elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-18). When S1PR1 was inhibited by using the specific antagonist W146, pro-inflammatory cytokine production declined. Overexpression of S1PR1 resulted in increased virus-induced IL-1β production. S1PR1 expression levels did not impact significantly NDV replication. These findings highlight the important role of S1PR1 in inflammatory responses in NDV infection.

  1. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-κB-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-κ B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-κB activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-κB activation. PMID:26330757

  2. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF MIRABILIS JALAPA LINN. LEAVES

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Lekshmi. R.; Manjunath, K. P.; Savadi, R. V.; Akki, K. S.

    2010-01-01

    Mirabilis Jalapa Linn. is a widely used traditional medicine in many parts of the world for the treatment of various diseases viz. virus inhibitory activity, anti tumour activity. It is claimed in traditional medicine that the leaves of the plant are used in the treatment of inflammation. In the present study, the total alcoholic extract and successive petroleum ether fractions of leaves of Mirabilis Jalapa Linn were screened for its anti-inflammatory activity using carageenan induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet induced granuloma models. The total alcoholic extract at the dose of 300 mg/kg p.o and successive petroleum ether fraction at the dose of 200 mg/kg exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced paw edema model (p<0.01). In cotton pellet granuloma model, the total alcoholic extract at the dose of 300 mg/kg and successive petroleum ether fraction at the dose of 200 mg/kg inhibited granuloma formation significantly (p<0.05) indicating that both test samples inhibit the increase in number of fibroblasts and synthesis of collagen and mucopolysaccharides during granuloma tissue formation during the chronic inflammation. These experimental results have established a pharmacological evidence for the folklore claim of the drug to be used as an anti inflammatory agent. PMID:24825972

  3. Exploring inflammatory disease drug effects on neutrophil function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojie; Kim, Donghyuk; Young, Ashlyn T; Haynes, Christy L

    2014-08-21

    Neutrophils are critical inflammatory cells; thus, it is important to characterize the effects of drugs on neutrophil function in the context of inflammatory diseases. Herein, chemically guided neutrophil migration, known as chemotaxis, is studied in the context of drug treatment at the single cell level using a microfluidic platform, complemented by cell viability assays and calcium imaging. Three representative drugs known to inhibit surface receptor expression, signaling enzyme activity, and the elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) levels, each playing a significant role in neutrophil chemotactic pathways, are used to examine the in vitro drug effects on cellular behaviors. The microfluidic device establishes a stable concentration gradient of chemokines across a cell culture chamber so that neutrophil migration can be monitored under various drug-exposure conditions. Different time- and concentration-dependent regulatory effects were observed by comparing the motility, polarization, and effectiveness of neutrophil chemotaxis in response to the three drugs. Viability assays revealed distinct drug capabilities in reducing neutrophil viability while calcium imaging clarified the role of Ca(2+) in the neutrophil chemotaxis. This study provides mechanistic insight into the drug effects on neutrophil function, facilitating comparison of current and potential pharmaceutical approaches.

  4. Reactive Oxygen Species, Apoptosis, Antimicrobial Peptides and Human Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oyinloye, Babatunji Emmanuel; Adenowo, Abiola Fatimah; Kappo, Abidemi Paul

    2015-01-01

    Excessive free radical generation, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress in the biological system, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and pathological conditions associated with diverse human inflammatory diseases (HIDs). Although inflammation which is considered advantageous is a defensive mechanism in response to xenobiotics and foreign pathogen; as a result of cellular damage arising from oxidative stress, if uncontrolled, it may degenerate to chronic inflammation when the ROS levels exceed the antioxidant capacity. Therefore, in the normal resolution of inflammatory reactions, apoptosis is acknowledged to play a crucial role, while on the other hand, dysregulation in the induction of apoptosis by enhanced ROS production could also result in excessive apoptosis identified in the pathogenesis of HIDs. Apparently, a careful balance must be maintained in this complex environment. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed in this review as an excellent candidate capable of playing prominent roles in maintaining this balance. Consequently, in novel drug design for the treatment and management of HIDs, AMPs are promising candidates owing to their size and multidimensional properties as well as their wide spectrum of activities and indications of reduced rate of resistance. PMID:25850012

  5. Prediction of iron deficiency in chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease anaemia.

    PubMed

    Baumann Kurer, S; Seifert, B; Michel, B; Ruegg, R; Fehr, J

    1995-12-01

    We prospectively studied 45 anaemic patients (37 women, 8 men) with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The combination of serum ferritin and CRP (as well as ESR) in its predictive capacity for bone marrow iron stores was examined. The relationship between other iron-related measurements (transferrin, transferrin saturation, soluble transferrin receptor, erythrocyte porphyrins and percentage of hypochromic/microcytic erythrocytes) and bone marrow iron stores was also investigated. Stainable bone marrow iron was taken as the most suitable standard to separate iron-deficient from iron-replete patients. 14 patients (31%) were lacking bone marrow iron. Regression analysis showed a good correlation between ferritin and bone marrow iron (adjusted R2 = 0.721, P < 0.0001). The combination of ferritin and CRP (ESR) did not improve the predictive power for bone marrow iron (adjusted R2 = 0.715) in this cohort of patients with low systemic inflammatory activity. With respect to the bone marrow iron content the best predictive cut-off value of ferritin was 30 micrograms/l (86% sensitivity, 90% specificity). The other iron-related parameters both individually and when combined were less powerful in predicting bone marrow iron than ferritin alone. Only zinc bound erythrocyte protoporphyrin in combination with ferritin slightly improved prediction (adjusted R2 = 0.731). A cut-off point of 11% hypochromic erythrocytes reached a high specificity (90%), but was less sensitive (77%).

  6. The inflammatory role of phagocyte apoptotic pathways in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cuda, Carla M.; Pope, Richard M.; Perlman, Harris

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis affects nearly 1% of the world's population and is a debilitating autoimmune condition that can result in joint destruction. During the past decade, inflammatory functions have been described for signalling molecules classically involved in apoptotic and non-apoptotic death pathways, including but not limited to toll-like receptor signalling, inflammasome activation, cytokine production, macrophage polarization and antigen citrullination. In light of these remarkable advances in the understanding of inflammatory mechanisms of the death machinery, this review provides a snapshot of the available evidence implicating death pathways, especially within the phagocyte populations of the innate immune system, in the perpetuation of rheumatoid arthritis. Elevated levels of signalling mediators of both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic as well as the autophagy death pathways are observed in the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Furthermore, in rheumatoid arthritis patients, risk polymorphisms are present in signalling molecules of the extrinsic apoptotic and autophagy death pathways. Although research into the mechanisms underlying these death pathways has made considerable progress, this review highlights areas where further investigation is particularly needed. This exploration is critical, as new discoveries in this field could lead to the development of novel therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis and other rheumatic diseases. PMID:27549026

  7. Monogenic diseases associated with intestinal inflammation: implications for the understanding of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Holm H

    2013-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), encompassing Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, has multifactorial aetiology with complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Over 150 genetic loci are associated with IBD. The genetic contribution of the majority of those loci towards explained heritability is low. Recent studies have reported an increasing spectrum of human monogenic diseases that can present with IBD-like intestinal inflammation. A substantial proportion of patients with those genetic defects present with very early onset of intestinal inflammation. The 40 monogenic defects with IBD-like pathology selected in this review can be grouped into defects in intestinal epithelial barrier and stress response, immunodeficiencies affecting granulocyte and phagocyte activity, hyper- and autoinflammatory disorders as well as defects with disturbed T and B lymphocyte selection and activation. In addition, there are defects in immune regulation affecting regulatory T cell activity and interleukin (IL)-10 signalling. Related to the variable penetrance of the IBD-like phenotype, there is a likely role for modifier genes and gene-environment interactions. Treatment options in this heterogeneous group of disorders range from anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive therapy to blockade of tumour necrosis factor α and IL-1β, surgery, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation or gene therapy. Understanding of prototypic monogenic 'orphan' diseases cannot only provide treatment options for the affected patients but also inform on immunological mechanisms and complement the functional understanding of the pathogenesis of IBD.

  8. Flavonoids as anti-inflammatory agents: implications in cancer and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    García-Lafuente, Ana; Guillamón, Eva; Villares, Ana; Rostagno, Mauricio A; Martínez, José Alfredo

    2009-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is being shown to be increasingly involved in the onset and development of several pathological disturbances such as arteriosclerosis, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases and even cancer. Treatment for chronic inflammatory disorders has not been solved, and there is an urgent need to find new and safe anti-inflammatory compounds. Flavonoids belong to a group of natural substances occurring normally in the diet that exhibit a variety of beneficial effects on health. The anti-inflammatory properties of flavonoids have been studied recently, in order to establish and characterize their potential utility as therapeutic agents in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Several mechanisms of action have been proposed to explain in vivo flavonoid anti-inflammatory actions, such as antioxidant activity, inhibition of eicosanoid generating enzymes or the modulation of the production of proinflammatory molecules. Recent studies have also shown that some flavonoids are modulators of proinflammatory gene expression, thus leading to the attenuation of the inflammatory response. However, much work remains to be done in order to achieve definitive conclusions about their potential usefulness. This review summarizes the known mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of flavonoids and the implications of these effects on the protection against cancer and cardiovascular disease.

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease as a model for translating the microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Huttenhower, Curtis; Kostic, Aleksandar D.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are among the most closely studied chronic inflammatory disorders that involve environmental, host genetic, and commensal microbial factors. This combination of features has made IBD both an appropriate and a high-priority platform for translatable research in host-microbiome interactions. Decades of epidemiology have identified environmental risk factors, although most mechanisms of action remain unexplained. The genetic architecture of IBD has been carefully dissected in multiple large populations, identifying several responsible host epithelial and immune pathways but without yet a complete systems-level explanation. Most recently, the commensal gut microbiota have been found to be both ecologically and functionally perturbed during the disease, but with as-yet-unexplained heterogeneity among IBD subtypes and individual patients. IBD thus represents perhaps the most comprehensive current model for understanding the human microbiome’s role in complex inflammatory disease. Here, we review the influences of the microbiota on IBD and its potential for translational medicine. PMID:24950204

  10. Interleukin-23: as a drug target for autoimmune inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chunlei; Chen, Shu; Qian, Hai; Huang, Wenlong

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-23 (IL-23) is a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines with pro-inflammatory properties. Its ability to potently enhance the expansion of T helper type 17 (Th17) cells indicates the responsibility for many of the inflammatory autoimmune responses. Emerging data demonstrate that IL-23 is a key participant in central regulation of the cellular mechanisms involved in inflammation. Both IL-23 and IL-17 form a new axis through Th17 cells, which has evolved in response to human diseases associated with immunoactivation and immunopathogeny, including bacterial or viral infections and chronic inflammation. Targeting of IL-23 or the IL-23 receptor or IL-23 axis is a potential therapeutic approach for autoimmune diseases including psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. The current review focuses on the immunobiology of IL-23 and summarizes the most recent findings on the role of IL-23 in the pre-clinical and ongoing clinical studies. PMID:22044352

  11. Herbal and plant therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Xanthos, Theodoros; Papalois, Apostolos; Triantafillidis, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in IBD patients. Studies on herbal therapy for IBD published in Medline and Embase were reviewed, and response to treatment and remission rates were recorded. Although the number of the relevant clinical studies is relatively small, it can be assumed that the efficacy of herbal therapies in IBD is promising. The most important clinical trials conducted so far refer to the use of mastic gum, tormentil extracts, wormwood herb, aloe vera, triticum aestivum, germinated barley foodstuff, and boswellia serrata. In ulcerative colitis, aloe vera gel, triticum aestivum, andrographis paniculata extract and topical Xilei-san were superior to placebo in inducing remission or clinical response, and curcumin was superior to placebo in maintaining remission; boswellia serrata gum resin and plantago ovata seeds were as effective as mesalazine, whereas oenothera biennis had similar relapse rates as ω-3 fatty acids in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. In Crohn’s disease, mastic gum, Artemisia absinthium, and Tripterygium wilfordii were superior to placebo in inducing remission and preventing clinical postoperative recurrence, respectively. Herbal therapies exert their therapeutic benefit by different mechanisms including immune regulation, antioxidant activity, inhibition of leukotriene B4 and nuclear factor-kappa B, and antiplatelet activity. Large, double-blind clinical studies assessing the most commonly used natural substances should urgently be conducted. PMID:25830661

  12. Herbal and plant therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllidi, Aikaterini; Xanthos, Theodoros; Papalois, Apostolos; Triantafillidis, John K

    2015-01-01

    The use of herbal therapy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the efficacy of herbal therapy in IBD patients. Studies on herbal therapy for IBD published in Medline and Embase were reviewed, and response to treatment and remission rates were recorded. Although the number of the relevant clinical studies is relatively small, it can be assumed that the efficacy of herbal therapies in IBD is promising. The most important clinical trials conducted so far refer to the use of mastic gum, tormentil extracts, wormwood herb, aloe vera, triticum aestivum, germinated barley foodstuff, and boswellia serrata. In ulcerative colitis, aloe vera gel, triticum aestivum, andrographis paniculata extract and topical Xilei-san were superior to placebo in inducing remission or clinical response, and curcumin was superior to placebo in maintaining remission; boswellia serrata gum resin and plantago ovata seeds were as effective as mesalazine, whereas oenothera biennis had similar relapse rates as ω-3 fatty acids in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. In Crohn's disease, mastic gum, Artemisia absinthium, and Tripterygium wilfordii were superior to placebo in inducing remission and preventing clinical postoperative recurrence, respectively. Herbal therapies exert their therapeutic benefit by different mechanisms including immune regulation, antioxidant activity, inhibition of leukotriene B4 and nuclear factor-kappa B, and antiplatelet activity. Large, double-blind clinical studies assessing the most commonly used natural substances should urgently be conducted.

  13. Toll-like receptors in skin infections and inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yuping; Gallo, Richard L

    2008-09-01

    The skin is the ultimate example of the function of innate immunity, it alerts the host of danger by many systems including sensing pathogen-associated molecule patterns (PAMPs) through Toll-like receptors and other pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), yet normally provides defense without inflammation. The skin responds rapidly to invading microbes by producing antimicrobial peptides or other antimicrobial intermediates before cytokine release results in inflammation. To achieve maximal immune responses for clearing invading microbes, the activation of select PRRs in skin then initiates and shapes adaptive immune responses through the activation of dendritic cells and recruitment of T cell subsets. Importantly, cross-talk between TLRs can influence this system in several ways including augmenting or suppressing the immune response. As a consequence of their pivotal role, TLR responses need to be tightly controlled by associated negative regulators or negative feedback loops to prevent detrimental effects from TLRs overactivation. This review focuses on describing the involvement of TLRs in the development of skin infections and inflammatory diseases, and highlights the potential application of TLR agonists or antagonists in these skin diseases.

  14. Commensal Gut-Derived Anaerobes as Novel Therapy for Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    have shown that it possesses anti-inflammatory activity. We propose that gut microbiota can influence peripheral immune response and may modulate... Gut -Derived Anaerobes as Novel Therapy for Inflammatory Autoimmune Diseases Ashutosh Mangalam Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN 55905...human gut have the potential to be used as a therapeutic agent. We have used collagen induced arthritis (CIA) in HLA-DR4DQ8 mice and PLP91-110 induced

  15. Serum antibodies to cow's milk proteins in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: Crohn's disease vs. ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, A; Rossi, T M; Park, B; Albini, B; Lebenthal, E

    1989-01-01

    Serum antibodies to five cow's milk proteins, alpha-casein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), beta-lactoglobulin A and B (BLG-a, BLG-b) and alpha-lactalbumin (ALA) were investigated in young patients with inflammatory bowel disease, 56 with Crohn's disease (CD), 24 with ulcerative colitis (UC). IgG antibodies against BSA and BLG-a and -b were higher in Crohn's disease patients as compared to those with ulcerative colitis and controls. The IgG anti-BSA were higher in the group of CD patients with higher score of disease activity. Additionally, IgA antibodies to alpha-casein were higher in CD and UC compared to control. These findings may be due to increased uptake of dietary antigens or enhanced immunological response occurring in CD patients.

  16. Investigating the role of proinflammatory CD16+ monocytes in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Koch, S; Kucharzik, T; Heidemann, J; Nusrat, A; Luegering, A

    2010-08-01

    Infiltrating monocytes and macrophages contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of mucosal inflammation characteristic for human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Peripheral blood monocytes expressing the low-affinity Fcgamma receptor CD16 have been identified previously as a major proinflammatory cell population, based on their unique cytokine secretion profile. However, the contribution of these cells to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease remains to be elucidated. Thus, in this study we investigated whether the peripheral CD16(+) monocyte count correlates with common IBD disease parameters, and whether these cells infiltrate the intestinal mucosa under inflammatory conditions. We observed that CD16(+) peripheral blood monocytes are increased significantly in active Crohn's disease, particularly in patients with high Crohn's disease activity index and colonic involvement. Furthermore, we found that CD16(+) cells are a major contributor to the inflammatory infiltrate in Crohn's disease mucosa, although their spontaneous migration through primary human intestinal endothelial cells is limited. Our data suggest that lamina propria, but not peripheral blood, CD16(+) monocytes are a crucial proinflammatory cell population in IBD, and a potential target for anti-inflammatory therapy.

  17. Associations between periodontitis and systemic inflammatory diseases: response to treatment.

    PubMed

    El-Shinnawi, Una; Soory, Mena

    2013-09-01

    There is a significant prevalence of subjects with periodontitis presenting with other inflammatory conditions such as coronary heart disease, insulin resistance and arthritis. This pattern of disease presentation underscores the importance of inflammatory loading from chronic diseases, in driving their pathogeneses in a multidirectional manner. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and other agents play an important role in this process; for example, a single nucleotide polymorphism of the TNF-α gene is associated with significant periodontal attachment loss in patients with coronary heart disease. Changes in gene expression associated with inflammation and lipid metabolism in response to oral infection with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) have been demonstrated in mouse models, independent of the demonstration of atherosclerotic lesions. Insulin resistance is considered to be a chronic low-grade inflammatory condition, associated with altered glucose tolerance, hypertriglyceridemia, central obesity and coronary heart disease. It is accompanied by elevated levels of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α also relevant to the progression of periodontitis. There is evidence that uncontrolled periodontal disease contributes to maintenance of systemic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with increased risk of periodontitis in subjects with RA. The periodontal pathogen Pg is significant in contributing to citrullination of proteins resulting in immune dysregulation and autoimmune responses, seen in RA. However, they are both multifactorial chronic diseases with complex etiopathogeneses that affect their presentation. Consistent but weak associations are seen for surrogate markers of periodontitis such as tooth loss, with multiple systemic conditions. Effective treatment of periodontitis would be important in reducing systemic inflammatory loading from chronic local inflammation and in achieving systemic health. Lack of a consistent cause and effect relationship

  18. Anti-inflammatory activity of mycelial extracts from medicinal mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yan; Zhu, Shuiling; Lu, Zhenming; Xu, Hongyu; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms have been essential components of traditional Chinese herbal medicines for thousands of years, and they protect against diverse health-related conditions. The components responsible for their anti-inflammatory activity have yet to be fully studied. This study investigates the anti-inflammatory activity of n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of mycelia in submerged culture from 5 commercially available medicinal mushrooms, namely Cephalosporium sinensis, Cordyceps mortierella, Hericium erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, and Armillaria mellea. MTT colorimetric assay was applied to measure the cytotoxic effects of different extracts. Their anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated via inhibition against production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) in murine macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Of the 20 extracts, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts from C. sinensis, C. mortierella, and G. lucidum; chloroform extracts from H. erinaceus and A. mellea; and ethyl acetate extracts from A. mellea at nontoxic concentrations (<300 μg/mL) dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced NO production. Among them, the chloroform extract from G. lucidum was the most effective inhibitor, with the lowest half maximal inhibitory concentration (64.09 ± 6.29 μg/mL) of the LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate that extracts from medicinal mushrooms exhibited anti-inflammatory activity that might be attributable to the inhibition of NO generation and can therefore be considered a useful therapeutic and preventive approach to various inflammation-related diseases.

  19. Imaging of inflammatory bowel disease: CT and MR.

    PubMed

    Zalis, Michael; Singh, Ajay K

    2004-01-01

    Cross-sectional imaging has come to play a central role in the imaging of the abdomen. Concurrent to this, the role of CT and MRI in the imaging of inflammatory bowel disease has also increased in importance. These modalities offer numerous advantages over more traditional methods of radiologic diagnosis, and provide essential information not only for initial diagnosis, but for management, follow-up and detection of potential complications. On the horizon are several derivative techniques involving CT and MRI, potentially in combination with PET imaging; these may further improve the specificity and sensitivity of imaging modalities for diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease.

  20. Current stage in inflammatory bowel disease: What is next?

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gómez, Gonzalo Jesús; Masedo, Ángeles; Yela, Carmen; Martínez-Montiel, Maria del Pilar; Casís, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been on the rise, extending to countries where it was infrequent in the past. As a result, the gap between high and low incidence countries is decreasing. The disease, therefore, has an important economic impact on the healthcare system. Advances in recent years in pharmacogenetics and clinical pharmacology have allowed for the development of treatment strategies adjusted to the patient profile. Concurrently, new drugs aimed at inflammatory targets have been developed that may expand future treatment options. This review examines advances in the optimization of existing drug treatments and the development of novel treatment options for IBD. PMID:26525013

  1. New anti-inflammatory targets for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2013-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with chronic inflammation of the peripheral airways and lung parenchyma, which leads to progressive obstruction of the airways. Current management with long-acting bronchodilators does not reduce disease progression, and there are no treatments that effectively suppress chronic inflammation in COPD. An increased understanding of the inflammatory processes that are involved in the pathophysiology of COPD has identified several new therapeutic targets. This Review discusses some of the most promising of these targets, including new antioxidants, kinase inhibitors and drugs that target cellular senescence, microbial colonization, epigenetic regulation of inflammatory gene expression and corticosteroid resistance.

  2. Lymphocyte homing antagonists in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Saruta, Masayuki; Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2014-09-01

    Lymphocyte homing antagonists represent promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Several critical molecules involved in the recruitment of inflammatory cells in the intestine, including integrins and chemokine receptors, have been successfully targeted for the treatment of IBD. These agents have shown great promise for the induction and maintenance of remission for both Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. This article discusses currently approved prototypic agents for the treatment of IBD (natalizumab, anti-α4 integrin; vedolizumab, anti-α4β7 integrin), and several other agents in the same class currently under development.

  3. Increased matriptase zymogen activation in inflammatory skin disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Jueng; Wu, Bai-Yao; Tsao, Pai-In; Chen, Chi-Yung; Wu, Mei-Hsuan; Chan, Yee Lam E.; Lee, Herng-Sheng; Johnson, Michael D.; Eckert, Richard L.; Chen, Ya-Wen; Chou, Fengpai; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2011-01-01

    Matriptase, a type 2 transmembrane serine protease, and its inhibitor hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 are required for normal epidermal barrier function, and matriptase activity is tightly regulated during this process. We therefore hypothesized that this protease system might be deregulated in skin disease. To test this, we examined the level and activation state of matriptase in examples of 23 human skin disorders. We first examined matriptase and HAI-1 protein distribution in normal epidermis. Matriptase was detected at high levels at cell-cell junctions in the basal layer and spinous layers but was present at minimal levels in the granular layer. HAI-1 was distributed in a similar pattern, except that high-level expression was retained in the granular layer. This pattern of expression was retained in most skin disorders. We next examined the distribution of activated matriptase. Although activated matriptase is not detected in normal epidermis, a dramatic increase is seen in keratinocytes at the site of inflammation in 16 different skin diseases. To gain further evidence that activation is associated with inflammatory stimuli, we challenged HaCaT cells with acidic pH or H2O2 and observed matriptase activation. These findings suggest that inflammation-associated reactive oxygen species and tissue acidity may enhance matriptase activation in some skin diseases. PMID:21123732

  4. Phenomics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-12

    Healthy Volunteer; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus/Antiphospholipid Syndrome; FMF; Cryopyrin-Associated Periodic Syndromes /TNF-receptor Associated Periodic Syndrome; Vasculitis; Uveitis; Myositis; Crohn's Disease; Ulcerative Rectocolitis; Type 1 Diabetes; Unclassified IAD Knee and/or Hip Arthritis, Muscular Dystrophy

  5. Nutrition in Pelvic Radiation Disease and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Due to the intestinal inflammation, tissue damage, and painful abdominal symptoms restricting dietary intake associated with both diseases, patients with intestinal pelvic radiation disease (PRD) or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk to develop protein calorie malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. In the current paper, we review the nutritional management of both diseases, listing the similar approaches of nutritional management and the nutritional implications of intestinal dysfunction of both diseases. Malnutrition is prevalent in patients with either disease and nutritional risk screening and assessment of nutritional status are required for designing the proper nutritional intervention plan. This plan may include dietary management, oral nutritional supplementation, and enteral and/or parenteral nutrition. In addition to managing malnutrition, nutrients exert immune modulating effects during periods of intestinal inflammation and can play a role in mitigating the risks associated with the disease activity. Consistently, exclusive enteral feeding is recommended for inducing remission in pediatric patients with active Crohn's disease, with less clear guidelines on use in patients with ulcerative colitis. The field of immune modulating nutrition is an evolving science that takes into consideration the specific mechanism of action of nutrients, nutrient-nutrient interaction, and preexisting nutritional status of the patients. PMID:24982906

  6. [Thermography in inflammatory and neoplastic diseases of the testis].

    PubMed

    Gotsadze, D T; Sepiashvili, A O; Daneliia, E V

    1990-01-01

    Thermographic examination of the scrotum was performed in 55 healthy males, 64 patients with nonspecific inflammatory lesions of the testicles and 44 cases of testicular tumor. In thermograms of the normal scrotum, cold zones provided the background for homogeneous isothermic images corresponding to the testicles. Inflammatory lesions showed atypical diffuse zones of increased thermogenic activity which were in some cases associated with hyperthermic stem foci in the inguinal-scrotal area. Tumors presented with atypical well-defined hot or cold zones. Values of temperature indexes for normal testicles, inflammatory and tumor lesions of the organ are given.

  7. Can IgG4 Levels Identify the Ulcerative Colitis Subtype of Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Ricardo Jacaranda; Clemente, Cintia Mendes; Carneiro, Fabiana P.; Santos-Neto, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatitis and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency may occur as extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease. Recently, autoimmune pancreatitis and colitis have been described as presentations of IgG4-related disease. IgG4+ plasma cells have been identified in colon tissue from patients with refractory forms of inflammatory bowel disease. The presence of elevated serum/tissue levels of IgG4 and the frequency of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in inflammatory bowel disease are still a source of controversy. Our aim was to investigate the meaning of elevated IgG4 levels in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Methods A cross-sectional study analyzed 56 patients with a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease recruited by convenience sampling from two tertiary centers in Midwestern Brazil. All patients underwent fecal pancreatic elastase testing for detection of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and serum IgG4 measurement. Findings were correlated with clinical and epidemiological data and disease activity. Results Elevated serum IgG4 levels were found in 10 patients, and were most frequent in ulcerative colitis (nine cases), with a prevalence ratio of 16.42 (95% CI: 3.32 - 79.58). Ten patients (10 of 56, 17.8%) were diagnosed with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, which did not correlate with disease activity, and serum IgG4 levels. Conclusion Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is prevalent in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, but it is not associated with elevated serum IgG4 levels. The high prevalence of elevated serum IgG4 in ulcerative colitis suggests that this parameter has potential for use as a diagnostic biomarker. PMID:27785293

  8. Metabolomics to identify biomarkers and as a predictive tool in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Jutley, Gurpreet Singh; Young, Stephen P

    2015-12-01

    There is an overwhelming need for a simple, reliable tool that aids clinicians in diagnosing, assessing disease activity and treating rheumatic conditions. Identification of biomarkers in partially understood inflammatory disorders has long been sought after as the Holy Grail of Rheumatology. Given the complex nature of inflammatory conditions, it has been difficult to earmark the potential biomarkers. Metabolomics, however, is promising in providing new insights into inflammatory conditions and also identifying such biomarkers. Metabolomic studies have generally revealed increased energy requirements for by-products of a hypoxic environment, leading to a characteristic metabolic fingerprint. Here, we discuss the significance of such studies and their potential as a biomarker.

  9. Effect of hydroxychloroquine treatment on pro-inflammatory cytokines and disease activity in SLE patients: data from LUMINA (LXXV), a multiethnic US cohort

    PubMed Central

    Willis, R; Seif, AM; McGwin, G; Martinez-Martinez, LA; González, EB; Dang, N; Papalardo, E; Liu, J; Vilá, LM; Reveille, JD; Alarcón, GS; Pierangeli, SS

    2013-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine the effect of hydroxychloroquine therapy on the levels proinflammatory/prothrombotic markers and disease activity scores in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a multiethnic, multi-center cohort (LUMINA). Methods Plasma/serum samples from SLE patients (n=35) were evaluated at baseline and after hydroxychloroquine treatment. Disease activity was assessed using SLAM-R scores. Interferon (IFN)-α2, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, inducible protein (IP)-10, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) levels were determined by a multiplex immunoassay. Anticardiolipin antibodies were evaluated using ELISA assays. Thirty-two frequency-matched plasma/serum samples from healthy donors were used as controls. Results Levels of IL-6, IP-10, sCD40L, IFN-α and TNF-α were significantly elevated in SLE patients versus controls. There was a positive but moderate correlation between SLAM-R scores at baseline and levels of IFN-α (p=0.0546). Hydroxychloroquine therapy resulted in a significant decrease in SLAM-R scores (p=0.0157), and the decrease in SLAM-R after hydroxychloroquine therapy strongly correlated with decreases in IFN-α (p=0.0087). Conclusions Hydroxychloroquine therapy resulted in significant clinical improvement in SLE patients, which strongly correlated with reductions in IFN-α levels. This indicates an important role for the inhibition of endogenous TLR activation in the action of hydroxychloroquine in SLE and provides additional evidence for the importance of type I interferons in the pathogenesis of SLE. This study underscores the use of hydroxychloroquine in the treatment of SLE. PMID:22343096

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination.

  11. The bacterial microbiota in inflammatory lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Huffnagle, Gary B; Dickson, Robert P

    2015-08-01

    Numerous lines of evidence, ranging from recent studies back to those in the 1920s, have demonstrated that the lungs are NOT bacteria-free during health. We have recently proposed that the entire respiratory tract should be considered a single ecosystem extending from the nasal and oral cavities to the alveoli, which includes gradients and niches that modulate microbiome dispersion, retention, survival and proliferation. Bacterial exposure and colonization of the lungs during health is most likely constant and transient, respectively. Host microanatomy, cell biology and innate defenses are altered during chronic lung disease, which in turn, alters the dynamics of bacterial turnover in the lungs and can lead to longer term bacterial colonization, as well as blooms of well-recognized respiratory bacterial pathogens. A few new respiratory colonizers have been identified by culture-independent methods, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens; however, the role of these bacteria in respiratory disease remains to be determined.

  12. [Relationship between grade I and II inflammatory foci and certain inflammatory ophthalmic diseases].

    PubMed

    Ilewicz, L; Ciechocińska, J; Chruściel, H

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of the study was demonstration of relations between grade I and II inflammatory foci in the oral cavity and certain inflammatory diseases of the eyes. Forty-three patients of either sex were studied. They were aged 19 to 78 years and were referred with the diagnosis of optic neuritis (intraocular and retrobulbar), iritis, retinitis and keratitis. Apart from routine clinical and radiological investigations the electrocutaneous test, the test for pulp viability with faradic current, and Schüller's iodine test were done. In 31 patients the electrocutaneous test was positive.

  13. Pregnancy and the Patient with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Fertility, Treatment, Delivery, and Complications.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Ryan A; Mahadevan, Uma

    2016-06-01

    For many women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the illness coincides with their childbearing years. IBD increases the risk of pregnancy complications and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The multidisciplinary care team should emphasize the importance of medication adherence to achieve preconception disease control and maintain corticosteroid-free remission throughout pregnancy. Medication adjustments to reduce fetal exposure may be considered on an individualized basis in quiescent disease; however, any benefits of such adjustments remain theoretic and there is risk of worsening disease activity. Mode of delivery is determined by obstetric indications, except for women with active perianal disease who should consider cesarean delivery.

  14. [Chronic inflammatory bowel disease--pathogenic concepts and therapeutic perspectives].

    PubMed

    Madsen, J R

    2000-03-06

    Chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is considered to be a consequence of inappropriate upregulation of immune reactions evoked by the colonic microflora. Abnormalities observed in IBD may be explained, at least in part, by an unfavourable balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Conventional drug treatment of IBD may soon be replaced by more selective inhibitors that act centrally in the inflammatory process. Immunoneutralisation with chimeric anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) antibodies reduces treatment refractory IBD, including fistular Chrons' disease, but recombinant human TNF alpha-receptor fusion proteins may be equally effective with potentially fewer side effects. This view also applies to chimeric antibodies directed against cytokines or adhesion molecules. Potentially more promising are antisense oligonucleotides and matrix-metalloproteinase inhibitors. Whether sustained remission can be achieved probably depends on successful unravelling of the aetiology of IBD.

  15. Characterisation and therapeutic manipulation of the gut microbiome in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Schulberg, J; De Cruz, P

    2016-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are thought to develop as a result of dysregulation of the relationship that exists between the gut microbiota, host genetics and the immune system. The advent of culture-independent techniques has revolutionised the ability to characterise the role of the gut microbiota in health and disease based on the microbiota's genetic make-up. Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterised by dysbiosis which is an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory bacteria and a reduction in bacterial diversity. Emerging data suggest that it is not only the presence of the gut microbiota but the functional activity of the microbiota that appears to play an important role in health and disease. Current strategies to manipulate therapeutically the gut microbiota using dietary modification, prebiotics, probiotics, antibiotics and faecal microbiota transplantation aim to restore the balance to a state of normobiosis. However, the ability of such strategies to correct dysbiosis and thereby achieve therapeutic benefit is yet to be fully characterised.

  16. Fecal calprotectin use in inflammatory bowel disease and beyond: A mini-review

    PubMed Central

    Alibrahim, Bashaar; Aljasser, Mohammed I; Salh, Baljinder

    2015-01-01

    Given the number of inflammatory disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract directly and indirectly, coupled with the considerable overlap with functional disorders, it is evident that more useful noninvasive diagnostic tests are required to aid with diagnosis. If these tests can also have some utility for individual patient follow-up in terms of disease activity and response to treatment, as well as providing forewarning of disease relapse, it would be extremely useful information for the clinician. One recently described test that may fulfill several of these attributes is based on leakage of a mononuclear cell cytoplasmic protein, calprotectin, along the intestinal tract, which can then be quantified in feces. This has been used to distinguish patients exhibiting symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome from patients with inflammatory bowel disease, with a measure of success greater than with currently used techniques. The present article summarizes the experience with this test used in inflammatory bowel disease, as well as a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:25855880

  17. Multipotent role of platelets in inflammatory bowel diseases: A clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Voudoukis, Evangelos; Karmiris, Konstantinos; Koutroubakis, Ioannis E

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence that inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) combine both inflammation and coagulation in their pathogenesis and clinical manifestations. Although platelets (PLT) are well known for their role in hemostasis, there are a rising number of studies supporting their considerable role as inflammatory amplifiers in chronic inflammatory conditions. IBD are associated with several alterations of PLT, including number, shape, and function, and these abnormalities are mainly attributed to the highly activated state of circulating PLT in IBD patients. When PLT activate, they increase in size, release a great variety of bio-active inflammatory and procoagulant molecules/particles, and express a variety of inflammatory receptors. These inflammatory products may represent a part of the missing link between coagulation and inflammation, and can be considered as possible IBD pathogenesis instigators. In clinical practice, thrombocytosis is associated both with disease activity and iron deficiency anemia. Controlling inflammation and iron replacement in anemic patients usually leads to a normalization of PLT count. The aim of this review is to update the role of PLT in IBD and present recent data revealing the possible therapeutic implications of anti-PLT agents in future IBD remedies. PMID:24696603

  18. Antimicrobial Proteins in Intestine and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal surface of the intestinal tract is continuously exposed to a large number of microorganisms. To manage the substantial microbial exposure, epithelial surfaces produce a diverse arsenal of antimicrobial proteins (AMPs) that directly kill or inhibit the growth of microorganisms. Thus, AMPs are important components of innate immunity in the gut mucosa. They are frequently expressed in response to colonic inflammation and infection. Expression of many AMPs, including human β-defensin 2-4 and cathelicidin, is induced in response to invasion of pathogens or enteric microbiota into the mucosal barrier. In contrast, some AMPs, including human α-defensin 5-6 and human β-defensin 1, are constitutively expressed without microbial contact or invasion. In addition, specific AMPs are reported to be associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) due to altered expression of AMPs or development of autoantibodies against AMPs. The advanced knowledge for AMPs expression in IBD can lead to its potential use as biomarkers for disease activity. Although the administration of exogenous AMPs as therapeutic strategies against IBD is still at an early stage of development, augmented induction of endogenous AMPs may be another interesting future research direction for the protective and therapeutic purposes. This review discusses new advances in our understanding of how intestinal AMPs protect against pathogens and contribute to pathophysiology of IBD. PMID:25349560

  19. Virus Infections on Prion Diseased Mice Exacerbate Inflammatory Microglial Response

    PubMed Central

    Lins, Nara; Mourão, Luiz; Trévia, Nonata; Passos, Aline; Farias, José Augusto; Assunção, Jarila; Bento-Torres, João; Consentino Kronka Sosthenes, Marcia; Diniz, José Antonio Picanço; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa

    2016-01-01

    We investigated possible interaction between an arbovirus infection and the ME7 induced mice prion disease. C57BL/6, females, 6-week-old, were submitted to a bilateral intrahippocampal injection of ME7 prion strain (ME7) or normal brain homogenate (NBH). After injections, animals were organized into two groups: NBH (n = 26) and ME7 (n = 29). At 15th week after injections (wpi), animals were challenged intranasally with a suspension of Piry arbovirus 0.001% or with NBH. Behavioral changes in ME7 animals appeared in burrowing activity at 14 wpi. Hyperactivity on open field test, errors on rod bridge, and time reduction in inverted screen were detected at 15th, 19th, and 20th wpi respectively. Burrowing was more sensitive to earlier hippocampus dysfunction. However, Piry-infection did not significantly affect the already ongoing burrowing decline in the ME7-treated mice. After behavioral tests, brains were processed for IBA1, protease-resistant form of PrP, and Piry virus antigens. Although virus infection in isolation did not change the number of microglia in CA1, virus infection in prion diseased mice (at 17th wpi) induced changes in number and morphology of microglia in a laminar-dependent way. We suggest that virus infection exacerbates microglial inflammatory response to a greater degree in prion-infected mice, and this is not necessarily correlated with hippocampal-dependent behavioral deficits. PMID:28003864

  20. [Incidence of acute pancreatitis in children with inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Stawarski, Andrzej; Iwańczak, Franciszek

    2004-07-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate the frequency of acute pancreatitis and the frequency of increased activity of pancreatic enzymes in serum of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Analysis comprises 101 children aged from 3 to 18-years treated because of IBD in the period of 1998-2002: 79 children with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 22 children Crohn's disease (CD). The authors analyzed together 191 admissions because of UC and 51 because of CD. Acute pancreatitis was observed in 4.5% of children with CD and in 5.1% of children with UC. Significantly more often acute pancreatitis was recognized in children with moderate and severe stage of UC. Hyperamylasemia was observed in 27.3% of children with CD and in 12.7% of children with UC. Hyperlipasemia was observed only in children with UC (3.8%), elevated urinary amylase was observed in 4.5% of children with CD and in 8.86% children with UC. No correlations between the frequency of acute pancreatitis and medication were observed.

  1. The mechanisms of action of nicotinamide and zinc in inflammatory skin disease.

    PubMed

    Fivenson, David P

    2006-01-01

    Nicotinamide (niacinamide), a physiologically active form of niacin (nicotinic acid), in combination with zinc is being assessed in clinical studies for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases such as acne vulgaris and bullous pemphigoid. The basis for these investigations is the variety of potential mechanisms of action of nicotinamide and zinc, including an anti-inflammatory effect via inhibition of leukocyte chemotaxis, lysosomal enzyme release, lymphocytic transformation, mast cell degranulation, bacteriostatic effect against Propionibacterium acnes, inhibition of vasoactive amines, preservation of intracellular coenzyme homeostasis, and decreased sebum production. Other possible mechanisms involve suppression of vascular permeability and inflammatory cell accumulation, as well as protection against DNA damage. The goal of this paper is to review the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases and discuss the role, mechanisms of action, and safety of nicotinamide and zinc as therapeutic options for these disorders.

  2. Perceptions of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases on Biobanking

    PubMed Central

    Long, Millie D.; Cadigan, R. Jean; Cook, Suzanne F.; Haldeman, Kaaren; Kuczynski, Kriste; Sandler, Robert S.; Martin, Christopher F.; Chen, Wenli; Kappelman, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Little is known about beliefs, understanding and perceptions of biobanking among patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We aimed to further understand perceptions of biobanking in the IBD community. Methods Subjects were recruited to participate in a 1:1 telephone interview on their perceptions of the risks and benefits of contributing specimens for research. These interviews informed a survey instrument evaluating perceptions of biobanking within CCFA Partners cohort. We used descriptive statistics to summarize participant responses, and bivariate statistics to compare willingness to participate in biobanking by disease and demographic factors. Results A total of 26 interviews were conducted. Various themes emerged from the interviews and aided in the development of the survey instrument. Concerns focused upon storage, loss of confidentiality, outside uses and life insurance discrimination. A total of 1007 individuals completed the survey. In all, 397 (39.4%) reported they would definitely donate samples, 568 (56.4%) would probably donate, 36 (3.6%) probably not, and 6 (0.6%) would definitely not donate. No significant differences in willingness to donate samples were seen for Crohn’s disease (CD) versus ulcerative colitis (UC) (p=0.25) or for remission versus active disease (p=0.14). For sample-type preference, 956 (89.6%) would donate blood, 997 (93.5 %) saliva and 822 (77.1%) stool. Conclusions Large majorities of patients with IBD demonstrated a willingness to donate specimens for biobanking, albeit with concerns. Addressing these concerns will enhance participation and engagement and create greater alignment between the desires of research participants and the governance structure and operating policies of biobanks. PMID:25489961

  3. Focally enhanced gastritis in newly diagnosed pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ushiku, Tetsuo; Moran, Christopher J; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2013-12-01

    Although the significance of focally enhanced gastritis (FEG) as a marker of Crohn disease (CD) in adults has been contested, several studies suggest that it may be more specific of CD in pediatric patients. This study describes the detailed histologic features of FEG in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and clarifies its association with CD. A series of 119 consecutive newly diagnosed IBD patients (62 CD cases, 57 ulcerative colitis [UC] cases) with upper and lower gastrointestinal biopsies were evaluated. The histology of the gastric biopsies was reviewed blinded to final diagnoses and compared with age-matched healthy controls (n=66). FEG was present in 43% of IBD patients (CD 55% vs. UC 30%, P=0.0092) and in 5% of controls. Among CD patients, FEG was more common in younger patients (73% in children aged 10 y and below, 43% in children above 10 y of age, P=0.0358), with the peak in the 5- to 10-year age group (80%). The total number of glands involved in each FEG focus was higher in UC (6.4±5.1 glands) than in CD (4.0±3.0 glands, P=0.0409). Amongst the CD cohort, patients with FEG were more likely than those without FEG to have active ileitis (79% vs. 40%, P=0.0128) and granulomas elsewhere in the gastrointestinal tract (82% vs. 43%, P=0.0016). There was no correlation between FEG and other gastrointestinal findings of UC. We demonstrate that differences in FEG seen in pediatric CD and UC relate to not only their frequencies but also the morphology and relationship with other gastrointestinal lesions. Further, FEG is associated with disease activity and the presence of granulomas in pediatric CD.

  4. C - Reactive Protein, Inflammatory Conditions and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Dhingra, Ravi; Gona, Philimon; Nam, Byung-Ho; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Wilson, Peter W. F.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Background It is uncertain to what extent high C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations reflect the presence of inflammatory conditions in the community. Methods We evaluated 3782 Framingham participants (mean age 55 years; 52% women) free of baseline cardiovascular disease. Logistic regression models examined the prevalence of common inflammatory conditions by CRP categories whereas a separate matched case-referent analysis evaluated the prevalence of uncommon inflammatory conditions. Cox models were used to assess the influence of common inflammatory conditions on relations between CRP and incident cardiovascular disease. Results Common inflammatory conditions were reported by nearly half of the participants; these individuals were more likely to have markedly-high CRP concentrations (>10mg/L, P for trend=0.001). In multivariable models, there were increased odds of having at least one common inflammatory condition with CRP concentrations of 1–3.0, 3.01–10, and >10mg/L, compared to the referent category (<1mg/L); the respective odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were 1.41 (1.07–1.86), 1.45 (1.07–2.98) and 1.64 (1.09–2.47) in men, and 1.08 (0.82–1.43), 1.07 (0.80–1.44) and 1.38 (0.97–1.96) in women. In case-referent analyses, uncommon inflammatory conditions were more common in individuals with CRP >10mg/L compared to those with CRP <1mg/L (12.1% versus 6.6%; P=0.0001). In multivariable models, higher CRP categories were not associated with incident cardiovascular disease, and with additional adjustment for inflammatory conditions, results remained unchanged. Conclusion There is high prevalence of common and uncommon inflammatory conditions in individuals with high CRP concentrations. Higher CRP concentrations should be interpreted with caution in cardiovascular disease risk assessment. PMID:18060926

  5. [Changes in the epidemiology of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2007-02-04

    Significant changes have been observed in the epidemiology of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in the last two decades. Traditionally, the incidence of IBD was higher in the developed, industrialized countries, in contrast, nowadays it became more prevalent in the previously low incidence areas. In particular, the incidence of ulcerative colitis (UC) is similar to that observed in North America and Western Europe, while the incidence of Crohn's disease (CD) in developing countries is still low, suggesting that the environmental factors may act faster or differently in UC than in CD. In Europe, the North to South gradient disappeared, and also the West to East gradient is diminishing. Smoking and appendectomy may be considered as important environmental factors in both UC and CD, however, with opposite effects. In addition, the use of oral contraceptives is associated to disease susceptibility in both diseases. The role of diet, perinatal events, stress and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in the pathogenesis is still controversial.

  6. Smoking in inflammatory bowel diseases: good, bad or ugly?

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo; Szamosi, Tamas; Lakatos, Laszlo

    2007-12-14

    Smoking is an important environmental factor in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), having different effects in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). A recent meta-analysis partially confirmed previous findings that smoking was found to be protective against ulcerative colitis and, after onset of the disease, might improve its course, decreasing the need for colectomy. However, smoking increases the risk of developing CD and worsens its course, increasing the need for steroids, immunosuppressants and re-operations. Smoking cessation aggravates ulcerative colitis and improves CD. Data are however, largely conflictive as well as the potential mechanisms involved in this dual relationship are still unknown. In this review article, the authors review the role of smoking in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory rheumatoid diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mróz, Joanna; Ostrowska, Monika; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is used more and more frequently to diagnose changes in the musculoskeletal system in the course of rheumatic diseases, at their initial assessment, for treatment monitoring and for identification of complications. The article presents the history of magnetic resonance imaging, the basic principles underlying its operation as well as types of magnets, coils and MRI protocols used in the diagnostic process of rheumatic diseases. It enumerates advantages and disadvantages of individual MRI scanners. The principles of MRI coil operation are explained, and the sequences used for MR image analysis are described, particularly in terms of their application in rheumatology, including T1-, T2-, PD-weighted, STIR/TIRM and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Furthermore, views on the need to use contrast agents to optimise diagnosis, particularly in synovitis-like changes, are presented. Finally, methods for the assessment of MR images are listed, including the semi-quantitative method by RAMRIS and quantitative dynamic examination. PMID:27826171

  8. Develop Anti-Inflammatory Nanotherapies to Treat Cardiovascular Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jun

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of disease-related death in the world, accounting for 30 % global mortality. The majority of CVD is caused by atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of major arteries featured by the deposition of lipids and cholesterol. Inflammation of atherosclerosis is mainly promoted by the pathological macrophages and monocytes, and modulating their functions has been proposed as a promising therapeutic target. This dissertation first presents the development of a novel simvastatin-loaded high-density lipoprotein (HDL) based nanoparticle ([S]-rHDL), which was able to deliver anti-inflammatory simvastatin preferentially to inflammatory monocytes in the blood and to macrophages in advanced atherosclerotic plaques, leading to the reduced inflammation in the tissue. Second, extensive in vivo characterization of [S]-rHDL in a mouse atherosclerosis model revealed that the anti-inflammatory capability of [S]-rHDL derived from its effects on blood monocytes, endothelial layer, monocyte recruitment, and plaque macrophage function. Third, a translational study that integrated the use of [S]-rHDL into oral statin treatment demonstrated a great potential for this nanomedicine as an attractive addition to the current high-dose oral statin standard-of-care for acute coronary syndrome. Finally, preliminary results suggested potential applications of the rHDL platform to other macrophage-implicated diseases.

  9. Integrative Therapies and Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: The Current Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Sanghamitra M.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) primarily describes two distinct chronic conditions with unknown etiology, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD). UC is limited to the colon, while CD may involve any portion of the gastrointestinal tract from mouth to anus. These diseases exhibit a pattern of relapse and remission, and the disease processes are often painful and debilitating. Due to the chronic nature of IBD and the negative side effects of many of the conventional therapies, many patients and their families turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for symptom relief. This article focuses on the current available evidence behind CAM/integrative therapies for IBD. PMID:27417473

  10. Koch's postulates, microbial dysbiosis and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, V P; Proctor, S D; Willing, B P

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, a growing amount of evidence supports the role of microbes and an imbalanced microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). While many reviews have been written on the microbiota in IBD, few have considered how they fulfil the Koch's postulates. In this review, we consider how the Koch's postulates might be modified so that they can be fulfilled for polymicrobial diseases, and we discuss the progress made to date in fulfilling them.

  11. FoxP3+ Regulatory T Cells Determine Disease Severity in Rodent Models of Inflammatory Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Meyer zu Hörste, Gerd; Cordes, Steffen; Mausberg, Anne K.; Zozulya, Alla L.; Wessig, Carsten; Sparwasser, Tim; Mathys, Christian; Wiendl, Heinz; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory neuropathies represent disabling human autoimmune disorders with considerable disease variability. Animal models provide insights into defined aspects of their disease pathogenesis. Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ regulatory T lymphocytes (Treg) are anti-inflammatory cells that maintain immune tolerance and counteract tissue damage in a variety of immune-mediated disorders. Dysfunction or a reduced frequency of Tregs have been associated with different human autoimmune disorders. We here analyzed the functional relevance of Tregs in determining disease manifestation and severity in murine models of autoimmune neuropathies. We took advantage of the DEREG mouse system allowing depletion of Treg with high specificity as well as anti-CD25 directed antibodies to deplete Tregs in mice in actively induced experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN). Furthermore antibody-depletion was performed in an adoptive transfer model of chronic neuritis. Early Treg depletion increased clinical EAN severity both in active and adoptive transfer chronic neuritis. This was accompanied by increased proliferation of myelin specific T cells and histological signs of peripheral nerve inflammation. Late stage Treg depletion after initial disease manifestation however did not exacerbate inflammatory neuropathy symptoms further. We conclude that Tregs determine disease severity in experimental autoimmune neuropathies during the initial priming phase, but have no major disease modifying function after disease manifestation. Potential future therapeutic approaches targeting Tregs should thus be performed early in inflammatory neuropathies. PMID:25286182

  12. Relationship between methylation and colonic inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Lobatón, Triana; Azuara, Daniel; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Loayza, Carolina; Sanjuan, Xavier; de Oca, Javier; Fernández-Robles, Ana; Guardiola, Jordi; Capellá, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between the methylation status in the SLIT2 and TGFB2 promoters and colonic inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease patients. METHODS: We evaluated the methylation status of 2 genes (SLIT2 and TGFB2) in 226 biopsies taken from 62 colonoscopies of 38 patients (29 ulcerative colitis and 9 Crohn’s colitis) using methylation-specific melting curve analysis. The relationships between methylation status and clinical, biological, endoscopic and histological activities were evaluated. Twenty-three of the 38 patients had a second colonoscopy and were included in a longitudinal analysis. Numerical results were given as the means ± SD of the sample and range, except when specified. Student t analysis, U Mann Whitney and ANOVA factor were used to compare the means. Qualitative results were based on the χ2 test. RESULTS: SLIT2 methylation was more frequent in samples with endoscopic activity than with endoscopic remission (55% vs 18%, P < 0.001). SLIT2 methylation was also higher in samples with acute inflammation (56.5%) than in samples with chronic (24%) or absent inflammation (15%) (P < 0.001). For TGFB2 methylation, the correlation was only significant with endoscopic activity. Methylation was higher in the distal colon for both genes (P < 0.001 for SLIT2 and P = 0.022 for TGFB2). In the multivariate analysis, only inflammation status (and not disease duration or extension) was independently associated with SLIT2 methylation [OR = 6.6 (95%CI: 1.65-27.36), P = 0.009]. In the longitudinal analysis, the maintenance of endoscopic remission was protective for methylation. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic and histological inflammation are predictive for SLIT2 methylation. PMID:25132780

  13. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Sanghuangporus sanghuang Mycelium

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wang-Ching; Deng, Jeng-Shyan; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Chen, Chin-Chu; Lin, Wan-Rong; Lin, Hui-Yi; Huang, Guan-Jhong

    2017-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by inflammation of the lung tissue and oxidative injury caused by excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Studies have suggested that anti-inflammatory or antioxidant agents could be used for the treatment of ALI with a good outcome. Therefore, our study aimed to test whether the mycelium extract of Sanghuangporus sanghuang (SS-1), believed to exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, could be used against the excessive inflammatory response associated with lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced ALI in mice and to investigate its possible mechanism of action. The experimental results showed that the administration of SS-1 could inhibit LPS-induced inflammation. SS-1 could reduce the number of inflammatory cells, inhibit myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, regulate the TLR4/PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and the signal transduction of NF-κB and MAPK pathways in the lung tissue, and inhibit high mobility group box-1 protein 1 (HNGB1) activity in BALF. In addition, SS-1 could affect the synthesis of antioxidant enzymes Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and Thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) in the lung tissue and regulate signal transduction in the KRAB-associated protein-1 (KAP1)/nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor Nrf2/Kelch Like ECH associated Protein 1 (Keap1) pathway. Histological results showed that administration of SS-1 prior to induction could inhibit the large-scale LPS-induced neutrophil infiltration of the lung tissue. Therefore, based on all experimental results, we propose that SS-1 exhibits a protective effect against LPS-induced ALI in mice. The mycelium of S. sanghuang can potentially be used for the treatment or prevention of inflammation-related diseases. PMID:28178212

  14. Disease impact on the quality of life of children with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Chouliaras, Giorgos; Margoni, Daphne; Dimakou, Konstantina; Fessatou, Smaragdi; Panayiotou, Ioanna; Roma-Giannikou, Eleftheria

    2017-01-01

    AIM To assess the impact of disease characteristics on the quality of life (QOL) in children with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). METHODS This was a cross-sectional study conducted at the First Department of Pediatrics of the University of Athens at the “Aghia Sophia” Children’s Hospital. Children diagnosed with Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC), who were followed as outpatients or during a hospitalization, participated, after informed consent was obtained from their legal representative. QOL was assessed by the IMPACT-III questionnaire. Demographic data and disease characteristics were also collected. Statistical analyses included parametric (Student’s t-test and Pearson’s r) and non-parametric (Mann-Whitney test, Fisher’s test and Spearman’s rho) procedures. RESULTS Ninety-nine patients (UC: 37, 73.0% females, CD: 62, 51.6% females), aged 12.8 ± 2.6 years were included. Overall, as well as, sub-domain scores did not differ between UC and CD (overall score: 73.9 ± 13.3 vs 77.5 ± 11.2, respectively, P = 0.16). In the entire sample, total score was related to physician’s global assessment (PGA, patients classified as “mild/moderate” active disease had, on average, 14.8 ± 2.7 points lower total scores compared to those “in remission”, P < 0.001) and age at IMPACT completion (Pearson’s r = 0.29, P = 0.05). Disease activity assessed by the indices Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis activity index, Pediatric Crohn’s disease activity index or PGA was significantly associated with all subdomains scores. Presence of extraintestinal manifestations had a negative impact on emotional and social functioning domains. CONCLUSION Disease activity is the main correlate of QOL in children with IBD, underlining the importance of achieving and sustaining clinical remission PMID:28246481

  15. Repositioning drugs for inflammatory disease – fishing for new anti-inflammatory agents

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Christopher J.; Wicker, Sophie M.; Chien, An-Tzu; Tromp, Alisha; Lawrence, Lisa M.; Sun, Xueying; Krissansen, Geoffrey W.; Crosier, Kathryn E.; Crosier, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is an important and appropriate host response to infection or injury. However, dysregulation of this response, with resulting persistent or inappropriate inflammation, underlies a broad range of pathological processes, from inflammatory dermatoses to type 2 diabetes and cancer. As such, identifying new drugs to suppress inflammation is an area of intense interest. Despite notable successes, there still exists an unmet need for new effective therapeutic approaches to treat inflammation. Traditional drug discovery, including structure-based drug design, have largely fallen short of satisfying this unmet need. With faster development times and reduced safety and pharmacokinetic uncertainty, drug repositioning – the process of finding new uses for existing drugs – is emerging as an alternative strategy to traditional drug design that promises an improved risk-reward trade-off. Using a zebrafish in vivo neutrophil migration assay, we undertook a drug repositioning screen to identify unknown anti-inflammatory activities for known drugs. By interrogating a library of 1280 approved drugs for their ability to suppress the recruitment of neutrophils to tail fin injury, we identified a number of drugs with significant anti-inflammatory activity that have not previously been characterized as general anti-inflammatories. Importantly, we reveal that the ten most potent repositioned drugs from our zebrafish screen displayed conserved anti-inflammatory activity in a mouse model of skin inflammation (atopic dermatitis). This study provides compelling evidence that exploiting the zebrafish as an in vivo drug repositioning platform holds promise as a strategy to reveal new anti-inflammatory activities for existing drugs. PMID:25038060

  16. Immunopathology of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Moos, Verena; Feurle, Gerhard E; Schinnerling, Katina; Geelhaar, Anika; Friebel, Julian; Allers, Kristina; Moter, Annette; Kikhney, Judith; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Kühl, Anja A; Erben, Ulrike; Fenollar, Florence; Raoult, Didier; Schneider, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    During antimicrobial treatment of classic Whipple's disease (CWD), the chronic systemic infection with Tropheryma whipplei, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), is a serious complication. The aim of our study was to characterize the immunological processes underlying IRIS in CWD. Following the definition of IRIS, we describe histological features of IRIS and immunological parameters of 24 CWD IRIS patients, 189 CWD patients without IRIS, and 89 healthy individuals. T cell reconstitution, Th1 reactivity, and the phenotype of T cells were described in the peripheral blood, and infiltration of CD4(+) T cells and regulatory T cells in the duodenal mucosa was determined. During IRIS, tissues were heavily infiltrated by CD3(+), predominantly CD45RO(+)CD4(+) T cells. In the periphery, initial reduction of CD4(+) cell counts and their reconstitution on treatment was more pronounced in CWD patients with IRIS than in those without IRIS. The ratio of activated and regulatory CD4(+) T cells, nonspecific Th1 reactivity, and the proportion of naive among CD4(+) T cells was high, whereas serum IL-10 was low during IRIS. T. whipplei-specific Th1 reactivity remained suppressed before and after emergence of IRIS. The findings that IRIS in CWD mainly are mediated by nonspecific activation of CD4(+) T cells and that it is not sufficiently counterbalanced by regulatory T cells indicate that flare-up of pathogen-specific immunoreactivity is not instrumental in the pathogenesis of IRIS in CWD.

  17. Comparative topical anti-inflammatory activity of cannabinoids and cannabivarins.

    PubMed

    Tubaro, Aurelia; Giangaspero, Anna; Sosa, Silvio; Negri, Roberto; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Casano, Salvatore; Della Loggia, Roberto; Appendino, Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    A selection of seven phytocannabinoids representative of the major structural types of classic cannabinoids and their corresponding cannabivarins was investigated for in vivo topical anti-inflammatory activity in the Croton oil mouse ear dermatitis assay. Differences in the terpenoid moiety were far more important for anti-inflammatory activity than those at the C-3 alkyl residue, suggesting the involvement not only of cannabinoid receptors, but also of other inflammatory end-points targeted by phytocannabinoids.

  18. [Artificial nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Ansaldo, G L; Varaldo, E; Assalino, M; Borgonovo, G

    2004-01-01

    Malnutrition is often a major clinical problem in patients affected by IBD. Assessment of nutritional status should be routinely carried out in these patients and, in case of severe malnutrition, artificial nutrition should be used. In ulcerative colitis and in Crohn disease localized to colonic segments both Parenteral Nutrition (PN) and Enteral Nutrition (EN) have similar results as support treatments but they have no primary therapeutic effects and then they are indicated only in case of severe malnutrition and/or when a surgical procedure is planned. Some theoretical advantages derived from supplementation of short chain fatty acids and omega3-series is still debated. More evident are the advantages of nutritional support in Crohn enteritis. Both PN and EN have a role as a primary therapy capable to induce remission although these results are not prolonged in time when nutrition is not associated with pharmacological treatments. Experiments of pharmaco-nutrition with glutamine and fish fatty acid have to be validated in the clinical practice. In case of integrity of the small bowel and tolerance of the patient, EN is preferable to PN for its lower costs and reduced related complications. PN is still indicated in more severe cases or in acute phase when the need of restoring rapidly the hydroelectrolitic and nitrogen/caloric balance prevails.

  19. Small bowel imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Casciani, Emanuele; Vincentiis, Chiara De; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    The study of the small bowel (SB) has always been challenging both for clinicians and radiologist. It is a long and tortuous tube that can be affected by various pathologies whose signs and symptoms are usually non specific and can mimic other acute abdominal disorders. For these reasons, imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of the different pathological conditions that can occur. They are important also in the management and follow up of chronic diseases. We expose and evaluate all the radiological methods that are now available for the study of the SB with particular emphasis on the technological improvement of cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These techniques have, infact, highly improved in terms of execution times (fast acquisitions images), patients discomfort and radiation dose, for CT, with consequent reduced biological risks. Moreover, the new post-processing options with multiplanar reconstruction and isotropic images have made significant changes in the evaluation of the exams. Especially MRI scans have been improved by the advent of new sequences, such as diffusion weighted imaging and cine-MRI, parallel imaging and breath-hold sequences and can provide excellent soft-tissue contrast without the use of ionizing radiations. PMID:26339463

  20. The multifunctional anti-inflammatory drugs used in the therapy of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shi, S; Wang, Z; Qiao, Z

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation has recently been implicated as a critical mechanism in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Microglia are the resident immune cells in the central nervous system (CNS), and they mediate the inflammatory response in the AD brain. Thus, suppression of microglial activation and subsequent neuroinflammation may be a potential therapeutic approach against AD. In the following review, we briefly discuss the limitations and advantages of current drug targets for AD and then summarize several anti-inflammatory drugs in trial, including natural nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), polyphenols and new drugs synthesized based on multi-target directed ligand (MTDL) design. In addition to their anti-inflammatory effects, these drugs can act as anti-oxidants and reduce microglial activation or amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques. Thus, the studies focused on multiple factors in AD processes might reveal the best potential treatment strategy for the future.

  1. The Search for Causative Environmental Factors in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Rogler, Gerhard; Zeitz, Jonas; Biedermann, Luc

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has become a 'prototype disease' for chronic auto-inflammatory disorders with a polygenic background and important multifaceted environmental trigger components. The environmental factors contribute both to pathogenesis and disease flares. Thus, IBD is a disease par excellence to study the interactions between host genetics, environmental factors (such as infections or smoking) and 'in-vironmental' factors - for example, our intestinal microbiota. Longitudinal intercurrent events, including the impact of long-term medication on disease progression or stabilization, can exemplarily be studied in this disease group. Whilst alterations in the human genome coding relevant variant protein products have most likely not emerged significantly over the last 50 years, the incidence of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis has dramatically increased in Western countries and more recently in the Asia Pacific area. An interesting concept indicates that 'Western lifestyle factors' trigger chronic intestinal inflammation or disease flares in a genetically susceptible host. To understand the disease pathogenesis as well as triggers for flares or determinants of disease courses, we must further investigate potential en(in)vironmental factors. As environmental conditions, in contrast to genetic risk factors, can be influenced, knowledge on those risk factors becomes crucial to modulate disease incidence, disease course or clinical presentation. It is obvious that prevention of environmentally triggered disease flares would be a goal most relevant for IBD patients. An increased prevalence of IBD in urban environment has been documented in Switzerland by the Swiss IBD cohort study. Several studies have attempted to identify such factors; however, only a few have been validated. The best investigated environmental factor identified in IBD cohort analyses is smoking. Other environmental factors that have been associated with clinical presentation or

  2. Cocoa Polyphenols and Inflammatory Markers of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nasiruddin; Khymenets, Olha; Urpí-Sardà, Mireia; Tulipani, Sara; Garcia-Aloy, Mar; Monagas, María; Mora-Cubillos, Ximena; Llorach, Rafael; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of plant-derived food intake in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The potential bioactivity of cocoa and its polyphenolic components in modulating cardiovascular health is now being studied worldwide and continues to grow at a rapid pace. In fact, the high polyphenol content of cocoa is of particular interest from the nutritional and pharmacological viewpoints. Cocoa polyphenols are shown to possess a range of cardiovascular-protective properties, and can play a meaningful role through modulating different inflammatory markers involved in atherosclerosis. Accumulated evidence on related anti-inflammatory effects of cocoa polyphenols is summarized in the present review. PMID:24566441

  3. Kynurenines in CNS disease: regulation by inflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Brian M.; Charych, Erik; Lee, Anna W.; Möller, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway (KP) metabolizes the essential amino acid tryptophan and generates a number of neuroactive metabolites collectively called the kynurenines. Segregated into at least two distinct branches, often termed the “neurotoxic” and “neuroprotective” arms of the KP, they are regulated by the two enzymes kynurenine 3-monooxygenase and kynurenine aminotransferase, respectively. Interestingly, several enzymes in the pathway are under tight control of inflammatory mediators. Recent years have seen a tremendous increase in our understanding of neuroinflammation in CNS disease. This review will focus on the regulation of the KP by inflammatory mediators as it pertains to neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. PMID:24567701

  4. Ischaemic stroke: a thrombo-inflammatory disease?

    PubMed Central

    Nieswandt, Bernhard; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Stoll, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Ischaemic stroke is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The complex cellular interactions leading from thromboembolic vessel occlusion to infarct development within the brain parenchyma in acute stroke are poorly understood, which translates into only one approved effective treatment, thrombolysis. Importantly, however, patients can develop progressive stroke despite reperfusion of previously occluded major intracranial arteries, a process referred to as ‘reperfusion injury’ which can be reproduced in the mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Although pathological platelet and coagulant activity have long been recognized to be involved in the initiation of ischaemic stroke, their contribution to infarct maturation remained elusive. Experimental evidence now suggests that early platelet adhesion/activation mechanisms involving the von Willebrand factor (vWF) receptor glycoprotein (GP) Ib, its ligand vWF, and the collagen receptor GPVI are critical pathogenic factors in infarct development following tMCAO, whereas platelet aggregation through GPIIb/IIIa is not. Further experimental work indicates that these pathways in conjunction with coagulation factor XII (FXII)-driven processes orchestrate a ‘thrombo-inflammatory’ cascade in acute stroke that results in infarct growth. This review summarizes these recent developments and briefly discusses their potential clinical impact. PMID:21768262

  5. Concomitant Thyroid Disorders and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this report was to review and summarize the literature on cases of concomitant inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and thyroid diseases. We included the following previous case reports of concomitant IBD and thyroid diseases: 16 cases of ulcerative colitis (UC) and Graves' disease (GD), 3 cases of Crohn's disease (CD) and GD, 10 cases of CD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), 4 cases of IBD and subacute thyroiditis (SAT) or SAT-like symptoms, and 13 cases of IBD (12/13 cases were CD) and amyloid goiter. There might be no obvious differences of prevalence of thyroid dysfunction (hyper- or hypothyroidism), GD, and thyroid cancer between IBD patients and general populations. However, concomitant UC and HT might be relatively common in patients with multiple autoimmune disorders, and AG is one of the complications with CD patients. There might be no obvious differences of fatal prognoses between IBD patients with thyroid diseases and patients with thyroid diseases without IBD. PMID:27042663

  6. Grapefruit-Derived Nanovectors Use an Activated Leukocyte Trafficking Pathway to Deliver Therapeutic Agents to Inflammatory Tumor Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qilong; Ren, Yi; Mu, Jingyao; Egilmez, Nejat K; Zhuang, Xiaoyin; Deng, Zhongbin; Zhang, Lifeng; Yan, Jun; Miller, Donald; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2015-06-15

    Inflammation is a hallmark of cancer. Activated immune cells are intrinsically capable of homing to inflammatory sites. Using three inflammatory-driven disease mouse models, we show that grapefruit-derived nanovectors (GNV) coated with inflammatory-related receptor enriched membranes of activated leukocytes (IGNVs) are enhanced for homing to inflammatory tumor tissues. Blocking LFA-1 or CXCR1 and CXCR2 on the IGNVs significantly inhibits IGNV homing to the inflammatory tissue. The therapeutic potential of IGNVs was further demonstrated by enhancing the chemotherapeutic effect as shown by inhibition of tumor growth in two tumor models and inhibiting the inflammatory effects of dextran sulfate sodium-induced mouse colitis. The fact that IGNVs are capable of homing to inflammatory tissue and that chemokines are overexpressed in diseased human tissue provides the rationale for using IGNVs to more directly deliver therapeutic agents to inflammatory tumor sites and the rationale for the use of IGNVs as treatment for certain cancers in personalized medicine.

  7. Grapefruit-derived nanovectors use an activated leukocyte trafficking pathway to deliver therapeutic agents to inflammatory tumor sites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qilong; Ren, Yi; Mu, Jingyao; Egilmez, Nejat; Zhuang, Xiaoyin; Deng, Zhongbin; Zhang, Lifeng; Yan, Jun; Miller, Donald; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of cancer. Activated immune cells are intrinsically capable of homing to inflammatory sites. Using three inflammatory driven disease mouse models, we show that grapefruit-derived nanovectors (GNVs) coated with inflammatory related receptor enriched membranes of activated leukocytes (IGNVs) are enhanced for homing to inflammatory tumor tissues. Blocking LFA-1 or CXCR1 and CXCR2 on the IGNVs significantly inhibits IGNV homing to the inflammatory tissue. The therapeutic potential of IGNVs was further demonstrated by enhancing the chemotherapeutic effect as shown by inhibition of tumor growth in two tumor models and inhibiting the inflammatory effects of DSS induced mouse colitis. The fact that IGNVs are capable of homing to inflammatory tissue and that there is an overexpression of chemokines in diseased human tissue provides the rationale for using IGNVs to more directed delivery of therapeutic agents to inflammatory tumor sites and the use of IGNVs as personalized medicine for treatment of certain cancers. PMID:25883092

  8. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  9. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Joint Management in Gastroenterology and Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, M A; Garcia-Planella, E; Laiz, A; Puig, L

    2017-04-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex entity that includes Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis. It is characterized by a chronic proinflammatory state of varying intensity that often leads to considerable morbidity. In the last decade, several therapeutic targets have been identified that are susceptible to the use of biological agents, including anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibodies, which are associated with paradoxical psoriasiform reactions in 5% of patients. Decision-making in the management of these cases requires close collaboration between the dermatologist and gastroenterologist. Inflammatory bowel disease is also associated with various other dermatologic and rheumatologic manifestations, and presents a genetic and pathogenic association with psoriasis that justifies both the interdisciplinary approach to these patients and the present review.

  10. Involvement of Reduced Microbial Diversity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiaojie; Wang, Lili; Yu, Xinjuan

    2016-01-01

    A considerable number of studies have been conducted to study the microbial profiles in inflammatory conditions. A common phenomenon in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the reduction of the diversity of microbiota, which demonstrates that microbial diversity negatively correlates with disease severity in IBD. Increased microbial diversity is known to occur in disease remission. Species diversity plays an important role in maintaining the stability of the intestinal ecosystem as well as normal ecological function. A reduction in microbial diversity corresponds to a decrease in the stability of the ecosystem and can impair ecological function. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), probiotics, and prebiotics, which aim to modulate the microbiota and restore its normal diversity, have been shown to be clinically efficacious. In this study, we hypothesized that a reduction in microbial diversity could play a role in the development of IBD. PMID:28074093

  11. The epidemiology and risk factors of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yulan; Pang, Zhi; Chen, Weichang; Ju, Songwen; Zhou, Chunli

    2015-01-01

    This review aimed to summarize the epidemiology (incidence, prevalence and morality) and risk factors of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is a chronic, relapsing, inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract and includes Crohn’s Disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). IBD has increasing incidence and prevalence in most of countries and becomes a global emerging disease. A westernized lifestyle or habits and some environmental factors have been found to contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD. The relevant risk factors include Smoking, hygiene hypothesis, microorganisms, appendectomy, medication, nutrition, and stress have all been found to be associated with the modality of IBD, but results are inconsistent on this issue in available studies. Therefore, more studies are required to identify and understand the environmental determinants of IBD. PMID:26885239

  12. Mind-Body Interventions for Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Ann Ming; Wren, Anava; Golianu, Brenda

    2017-04-03

    Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is an autoimmune disease that causes chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal mucosa. There is emerging evidence that the brain-gut connection affects inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients more than previously thought. This is evidenced by comorbid mood disorders, irritable bowel symptoms concurrent with quiescent IBD, and the potential of psychosocial stressors to trigger IBD flares. Mind-body interventions such as psychotherapy, relaxation, mindfulness, biofeedback, yoga, and clinical hypnosis offer an adjunct to standard medical treatment for IBD. We will review the current evidence base for these mind- body interventions in the treatment of pediatric IBD, illustrate a case study, and offer suggestions for future research for this promising field.

  13. Osteoporosis in chronic inflammatory disease: the role of malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Montalcini, Tiziana; Romeo, Stefano; Ferro, Yvelise; Migliaccio, Valeria; Gazzaruso, Carmine; Pujia, Arturo

    2013-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disorder affecting million of people worldwide. Increased understanding of bone disease has led to a greater recognition of factors affecting bones, and consequently many secondary causes of osteoporosis were demonstrated. In this study, we aim to explore possible causes of bone loss and fractures in subjects affected by chronic inflammatory disease and to suggest new targets for intervention. In fact several studies, evaluated to perform this study, suggest that the patients with chronic inflammatory disease could be at high risk for fractures due to bone loss as consequence of malnutrition, caused by inflammation and hormonal change. Consequently, some actions could derive from the considerations of these mechanisms: a change in actual approach of chronic patients, that may include the investigation on the possible presence of osteoporosis, as well as further research on this topic to find a better therapy to prevent osteoporosis considering all the mechanisms described.

  14. Blood dendritic cells: “canary in the coal mine” to predict chronic inflammatory disease?

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Brodie; Abdel-Ghaffar, Khaled A.; Gamal, Ahmed Y.; Baban, Babak; Cutler, Christopher W.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of risk factors for chronic inflammatory diseases are unknown. This makes personalized medicine for assessment, prognosis, and choice of therapy very difficult. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that low-grade subclinical infections may be an underlying cause of many chronic inflammatory diseases and thus may contribute to secondary outcomes (e.g., cancer). Many diseases are now categorized as inflammatory-mediated diseases that stem from a dysregulation in host immunity. There is a growing need to study the links between low-grade infections, the immune responses they elicit, and how this impacts overall health. One such link explored in detail here is the extreme sensitivity of myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) in peripheral blood to chronic low-grade infections and the role that these mDCs play in arbitrating the resulting immune responses. We find that emerging evidence supports a role for pathogen-induced mDCs in chronic inflammation leading to increased risk of secondary clinical disease. The mDCs that are elevated in the blood as a result of low-grade bacteremia often do not trigger a productive immune response, but can disseminate the pathogen throughout the host. This aberrant trafficking of mDCs can accelerate systemic inflammatory disease progression. Conversely, restoration of dendritic cell homeostasis may aid in pathogen elimination and minimize dissemination. Thus it would seem prudent when assessing chronic inflammatory disease risk to consider blood mDC numbers, and the microbial content (microbiome) and activation state of these mDCs. These may provide important clues (“the canary in the coal mine”) of high inflammatory disease risk. This will facilitate development of novel immunotherapies to eliminate such smoldering infections in atherosclerosis, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and pre-eclampsia. PMID:24478766

  15. Fostering Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Sphingolipid Strategies to Join Forces

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Hadi, Loubna; Di Vito, Clara; Riboni, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Complex sphingolipids are essential structural components of intestinal membranes, providing protection and integrity to the intestinal mucosa and regulating intestinal absorption processes. The role of sphingolipid signaling has been established in numerous cellular events, including intestinal cell survival, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. A significant body of knowledge demonstrates that intestinal sphingolipids play a crucial role, as such and through their signaling pathways, in immunity and inflammatory disorders. In this review, we report on and discuss the current knowledge on the metabolism, signaling, and functional implications of sphingolipids in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), focusing on the different aspects of sphingolipid actions on inflammatory responses and on the potential of sphingolipid-targeted molecules as anti-IBD therapeutic agents. PMID:26880864

  16. Fostering Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Sphingolipid Strategies to Join Forces.

    PubMed

    Abdel Hadi, Loubna; Di Vito, Clara; Riboni, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Complex sphingolipids are essential structural components of intestinal membranes, providing protection and integrity to the intestinal mucosa and regulating intestinal absorption processes. The role of sphingolipid signaling has been established in numerous cellular events, including intestinal cell survival, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. A significant body of knowledge demonstrates that intestinal sphingolipids play a crucial role, as such and through their signaling pathways, in immunity and inflammatory disorders. In this review, we report on and discuss the current knowledge on the metabolism, signaling, and functional implications of sphingolipids in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), focusing on the different aspects of sphingolipid actions on inflammatory responses and on the potential of sphingolipid-targeted molecules as anti-IBD therapeutic agents.

  17. Power Doppler ultrasonographic assessment of the ankle in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takeshi

    2014-11-18

    Ankle involvement is frequent in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, but accurate evaluation by physical examination is often difficult because of the complex anatomical structures of the ankle. Over the last decade, ultrasound (US) has become a practical imaging tool for the assessment of articular and periarticular pathologies, including joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, and enthesitis in rheumatic diseases. Progress in power Doppler (PD) technology has enabled evaluation of the strength of ongoing inflammation. PDUS is very useful for identifying the location and kind of pathologies in rheumatic ankles as well as for distinguishing between inflammatory processes and degenerative changes or between active inflammation and residual damage. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the US assessment of ankle lesions in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus, focusing on the utility of PDUS.

  18. Inter- and intraobserver agreement in computed tomography enterography in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Horvat, Natally; Tavares, Camila Carlos; Andrade, Adriana Ribas; Cabral, Julia Campos Simões; Leao-Filho, Hilton Muniz; Caiado, Angela Hissae Motoyama; Ueda, Serli Kiyomi Nakao; Leite, André Zonetti Arruda; Sipahi, Aytan Miranda; Rocha, Manoel Souza

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate intra- and interobserver agreement in imaging features in inflammatory bowel disease and comparison with fecal calprotectin (FC) levels. METHODS Our institutional computed tomography enterography (CTE) database was retrospectively queried to identify patients who underwent CTE from January 2014 to June 2015. Patient inclusion criteria were confirmed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and FC collected < 4 mo after CTE without any change in clinical treatment or surgical treatment during this interval. The exclusion criterion was poor image quality. Two blinded abdominal radiologists, with 12 and 3 years of experience analyzed the CTE regarding localization (small bowel, colonic, both, or no disease detected); type of IBD (inflammatory, stenosing, fistulizing, > 1 pattern, or normal); and signs of active disease (present or absent). In 42 of 44 patients evaluated, routine CTE reports were made by one of the readers who re-evaluated the CTEs ≥ 6 mo later, to determine the intraobserver agreement. FC was considered a sign of disease activity when it was higher than 250 μg/g. RESULTS Forty-four patients with IBD (38 with Crohn’s disease and 6 with ulcerative colitis) were included. There was a moderate interobserver agreement regarding localization of IBD (κ = 0.540), type of disease (κ = 0.410) and the presence of active signs in CTE (κ = 0.419). There was almost perfect intraobserver agreement regarding localization, type and signs of active disease in IBD. The κ values were 0.902, 0.937 and 0.830, respectively. After a consensus between both radiologists regarding inflammatory activity in CTE, we found that 24 (85.7%) of 28 patients who were classified with active disease had elevated FC, and six (37.5%) of 16 patients without inflammatory activity in CTE had elevated FC (P = 0.003). The correlation between elevated FC and the presence of active disease in CTE was significant (κ = 0.495, P = 0.001). CONCLUSION We found almost perfect

  19. Nocardia infections among immunomodulated inflammatory bowel disease patients: A review

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Cândida; Rocha-Pereira, Nuno; Sarmento, António; Magro, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Human nocardiosis, caused by Nocardia spp., an ubiquitous soil-borne bacteria, is a rare granulomatous disease close related to immune dysfunctions. Clinically can occur as an acute life-threatening disease, with lung, brain and skin being commonly affected. The infection was classically diagnosed in HIV infected persons, organ transplanted recipients and long term corticosteroid treated patients. Currently the widespread use of immunomodulators and immunossupressors in the treatment of inflammatory diseases changed this scenario. Our purpose is to review all published cases of nocardiosis in immunomodulated patients due to inflammatory diseases and describe clinical and laboratory findings. We reviewed the literature concerning human cases of nocardiosis published between 1980 and 2014 in peer reviewed journals. Eleven cases of nocardiosis associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) prescription (9 related with infliximab and 2 with adalimumab) were identified; 7 patients had inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), 4 had rheumatological conditions; nocardia infection presented as cutaneous involvement in 3 patients, lung disease in 4 patients, hepatic in one and disseminated disease in 3 patients. From the 10 cases described in IBD patients 7 were associated with anti-TNF and 3 with steroids and azathioprine. In conclusion, nocardiosis requires high levels of clinical suspicion and experience of laboratory staff, in order to establish a timely diagnosis and by doing so avoid worst outcomes. Treatment for long periods tailored by the susceptibility of the isolated species whenever possible is essential. The safety of restarting immunomodulators or anti-TNF after the disease or the value of prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole is still debated. PMID:26074688

  20. STING manifests self DNA-dependent inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jeonghyun; Gutman, Delia; Saijo, Shinobu; Barber, Glen N

    2012-11-20

    Inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and polyarthritis are characterized by chronic cytokine overproduction, suggesting that the stimulation of host innate immune responses, speculatively by persistent infection or self nucleic acids, plays a role in the manifestation of these disorders. Mice lacking DNase II die during embryonic development through comparable inflammatory disease because phagocytosed DNA from apoptotic cells cannot be adequately digested and intracellular host DNA sensor pathways are engaged, resulting in the production of a variety of cytokines including type I IFN. The cellular sensor pathway(s) responsible for triggering DNA-mediated inflammation aggravated autoimmune disease remains to be determined. However, we report here that Stimulator of IFN Genes (STING) is responsible for inflammation-related embryonic death in DNase II defective mice initiated by self DNA. DNase II-dependent embryonic lethality was rescued by loss of STING function, and polyarthritis completely prevented because cytosolic DNA failed to robustly trigger cytokine production through STING-controlled signaling pathways. Our data provides significant molecular insight into the causes of DNA-mediated inflammatory disorders and affords a target that could plausibly be therapeutically controlled to help prevent such diseases.

  1. The Gut Microbiota in Immune-Mediated Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Jessica D.; Van Domselaar, Gary; Bernstein, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    The collection of microbes and their genes that exist within and on the human body, collectively known as the microbiome has emerged as a principal factor in human health and disease. Humans and microbes have established a symbiotic association over time, and perturbations in this association have been linked to several immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID) including inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. IMID is a term used to describe a group of chronic, highly disabling diseases that affect different organ systems. Though a cornerstone commonality between IMID is the idiopathic nature of disease, a considerable portion of their pathobiology overlaps including epidemiological co-occurrence, genetic susceptibility loci and environmental risk factors. At present, it is clear that persons with an IMID are at an increased risk for developing comorbidities, including additional IMID. Advancements in sequencing technologies and a parallel explosion of 16S rDNA and metagenomics community profiling studies have allowed for the characterization of microbiomes throughout the human body including the gut, in a myriad of human diseases and in health. The main challenge now is to determine if alterations of gut flora are common between IMID or, if particular changes in the gut community are in fact specific to a single disease. Herein, we review and discuss the relationships between the gut microbiota and IMID. PMID:27462309

  2. Gastrointestinal parasites: potential therapy for refractory inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Moreels, Tom G; Pelckmans, Paul A

    2005-02-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic relapsing inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Different pharmacological agents are currently used in several combinations to control the inflammatory process. Recently, antibodies against the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha appeared to be very effective in treating patients with Crohn's disease. However, due to the fact that the pathogen causing IBD is still unknown, no causative treatment is currently available that is able to make the disease disappear. Recently, the hygiene hypothesis of the development of immunological diseases was proposed, stating that raising children in extremely hygienic environments with less exposure to parasite infections may negatively affect the development of the immune system, predisposing them to immunologic diseases such as IBD. This hypothesis is supported by experimental data showing that helminthic parasites protect against T helper (TH) type 1 cell-mediated gastrointestinal inflammations like Crohn's disease. Both TH-2 cells and regulatory T cells may be involved in this immunomodulatory mechanism. Here, we review the experimental and clinical studies in favor of the hygiene hypothesis, opening perspectives on new therapies for IBD.

  3. Osteoarthritis as an inflammatory disease (osteoarthritis is not osteoarthrosis!).

    PubMed

    Berenbaum, F

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has long been considered a "wear and tear" disease leading to loss of cartilage. OA used to be considered the sole consequence of any process leading to increased pressure on one particular joint or fragility of cartilage matrix. Progress in molecular biology in the 1990s has profoundly modified this paradigm. The discovery that many soluble mediators such as cytokines or prostaglandins can increase the production of matrix metalloproteinases by chondrocytes led to the first steps of an "inflammatory" theory. However, it took a decade before synovitis was accepted as a critical feature of OA, and some studies are now opening the way to consider the condition a driver of the OA process. Recent experimental data have shown that subchondral bone may have a substantial role in the OA process, as a mechanical damper, as well as a source of inflammatory mediators implicated in the OA pain process and in the degradation of the deep layer of cartilage. Thus, initially considered cartilage driven, OA is a much more complex disease with inflammatory mediators released by cartilage, bone and synovium. Low-grade inflammation induced by the metabolic syndrome, innate immunity and inflammaging are some of the more recent arguments in favor of the inflammatory theory of OA and highlighted in this review.

  4. Antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies against bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, R S; Zhao, M H; Hamilton, M I; Brownlee, A; Chapman, P; Pounder, R E; Wakefield, A J; Lockwood, C M

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), a constituent of primary neutrophil granules, is a potent natural antibiotic and an antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA) antigen in cases of vasculitis in which the target antigen is neither myeloperoxidase (MPO) nor proteinase-3 (PR3). AIM: To investigate BPI as a possible target antigen for ANCAs in inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: ANCAs were detected by routine immunofluorescence (IIF) and solid phase enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) performed for antibodies to the purified neutrophil granule proteins; MPO, PR3, cathepsin-G, lactoferrin, and BPI in serum samples from 88 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (36 with Crohn's disease, 52 with ulcerative colitis). Thirty patients with bacterial enteritis acted as controls. RESULTS: Significantly more patients with ulcerative colitis were ANCA positive by IIF (60%) than patients with Crohn's disease (28%) or infectious enteritis (23%) (p < 0.001). IgG anti-BPI antibodies were present in 29% of patients with ulcerative colitis, 14% of patients with Crohn's disease, and 23% of patients with infectious enteritis, occurring in 44% of those patients with inflammatory bowel disease who were ANCA positive by IIF. Antibodies to other ANCA antigens were rare. The presence of ANCAs was not related to either disease activity or extent; presence of anti-BPI antibodies was significantly related to both a lower serum albumin concentration (p = 0.001) and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p = 0.02) in patients with ulcerative colitis, and to colonic involvement in patients with Crohn's disease (p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: BPI is a significant minority target antigen for ANCAs in inflammatory bowel disease that seems related to colonic Crohn's disease and disease activity in ulcerative colitis. Anti-BPI antibodies occur in infectious enteritis. PMID:9155585

  5. An (Anti)-Inflammatory Microbiota: Defining the Role in Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

    PubMed

    Burman, S; Hoedt, E C; Pottenger, S; Mohd-Najman, N-S; Ó Cuív, P; Morrison, Mark

    2016-01-01

    While it is now accepted that the gut microbiota contribute to the genotype-environment-lifestyle interactions triggering inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) episodes, efforts to identify the pathogen(s) that cause these diseases have met with limited success. The advent of culture-independent techniques for characterizing the structure and/or function of microbial communities (hereafter referred to as metagenomics) has provided new insights into the events associated with the onset, remission and recurrence of IBD. A large number of observational and/or case-control studies of IBD patients have confirmed substantive changes in gut bacterial profiles (dysbiosis) associated with disease. These types of studies have been augmented by new profiling approaches that support the identification of more 'colitogenic' bacteria from numerically predominant taxa. Evidence of alterations in lesser abundant taxa such as the methanogenic archaea, to favor types that are more immunogenic, has also been forthcoming. Several recent longitudinal studies of patients with Crohn's disease have produced additional insights, including evidence for the role of 'anti-inflammatory' microbiota in providing a protective effect and/or promoting remission. In summation, the implications of dysbiosis and restoration of a 'healthy microbiota' in IBD patients requires definition beyond a taxonomic assessment of the changes in the gut microbiota during disease course. The available evidence does suggest that specific members of the gut microbiota can contribute either pro- or anti-inflammatory effects, and their ecological fitness in the large bowel affects the onset and recurrence of IBD. While metagenomics and related approaches offer the potential to provide novel and important insights into these microbiota and thereby the pathophysiology of IBD, we also need to better understand factors affecting the ecological fitness of these microbes, if new treatment of IBD patients are to be delivered.

  6. Regulatory B cells in human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases: from mouse models to clinical research.

    PubMed

    Miyagaki, Tomomitsu; Fujimoto, Manabu; Sato, Shinichi

    2015-10-01

    B cells have been generally considered to be positive regulators of immune responses because of their ability to produce antigen-specific antibodies and to activate T cells through antigen presentation. Impairment of B cell development and function may cause inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Recently, specific B cell subsets that can negatively regulate immune responses have been described in mouse models of a wide variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The concept of those B cells, termed regulatory B cells, is now recognized as important in the murine immune system. Among several regulatory B cell subsets, IL-10-producing regulatory B cells are the most widely investigated. On the basis of discoveries from studies of such mice, human regulatory B cells that produce IL-10 in most cases are becoming an active area of research. There have been emerging data suggesting the importance of human regulatory B cells in various diseases. Revealing the immune regulation mechanisms of human regulatory B cells in human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases could lead to the development of novel B cell targeted therapies. This review highlights the current knowledge on regulatory B cells, mainly IL-10-producing regulatory B cells, in animal models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and in clinical research using human samples.

  7. Review article: nutrition and adult inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Goh, J; O'Morain, C A

    2003-02-01

    Major advances in the understanding of the aetio-pathogenesis and genetics of inflammatory bowel disease have been accompanied by an escalation in the sophistication of immunomodulatory inflammatory bowel disease therapeutics. However, the basic 'triple' therapy (5-aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, azathioprine) and nutrition have maintained their central role in the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease over recent decades. This review provides an overview of the supportive and therapeutic perspectives of nutrition in adult inflammatory bowel disease. The objective of supportive nutrition is to correct malnutrition in terms of calorie intake or specific macro- or micronutrients. Of particular clinical relevance is deficiency in calcium, vitamin D, folate, vitamin B12 and zinc. There is justifiably a growing sense of unease amongst clinicians and patients with regard to the long-term use of corticosteroids in inflammatory bowel disease. This, rather than arguments about efficacy, should be the catalyst for revisiting the use of enteral nutrition as primary treatment in Crohn's disease. Treatment failure is usually related to a failure to comply with enteral nutrition. Potential factors that militate against successful completion of enteral nutrition are feed palatability, inability to stay on a solid-free diet for weeks, social inconvenience and transient feed-related adverse reactions. Actions that can be taken to improve treatment outcome include the provision of good support from dietitians and clinicians for the duration of treatment and the subsequent 'weaning' period. There is evidence to support a gradual return to a normal diet through exclusion-re-introduction or other dietary regimen following the completion of enteral nutrition to increase remission rates. We also review the evidence for emerging therapies, such as glutamine, growth factors and short-chain fatty acids. The future may see the evolution of enteral nutrition into an