Science.gov

Sample records for active infrared thermography

  1. Infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.C. Jr.

    1982-12-01

    Infrared thermography is a useful tool for the diagnosis of problems in building systems. In instances where a building owner has several large buildings, an investment in a typical $30,000 infrared system may be cost effective. In most instances, however, the rental of an infrared system or the hiring of an infrared consulting service is a cost effective alternative. As can be seen from the several applications presented here, any mechanical problem manifesting itself in an atypical temperature pattern can usually be detected. The two primary savings generated from infrared analysis of building systems are maintenance and energy.

  2. Infrared micro-thermography of an actively heated preconcentrator device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C. A.; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; Mott, David R.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2008-03-01

    We report infrared micro-thermography measurements and analysis of static and transient temperature maps of an actively heated micro-fabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a dual serpentine platinum heater trace deposited on a perforated polyimide membrane and suspended over a silicon frame. The sorbent coated perforated membrane is used to collect vapors and gases that flow through the preconcentrator. After heating, a concentrated pulse of analyte is released into the detector. Due to its small thermal mass, precise thermal management of the preconcentrator is critical to its performance. The sizes of features, the semi-transparent membrane, the need to flow air through the device, and changes in surface emissivity on a micron scale present many challenges for traditional infrared micro-thermography. We report an improved experimental test-bed. The hardware incorporates a custom-designed miniature calibration oven which, in conjunction with spatial filtering and a simple calibration algorithm, allows accurate temperature maps to be obtained. The test-bed incorporates a micro-bolometer array as the infrared imager. Instrumentation design, calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometers arrays can be used in certain radiometric applications. Heating profiles were examined with both uniform and non-uniform air flow through the device. The conclusions from this study provide critical information for optimal integration of the preconcentrator within a detection system, and in the design of the heater trace layout to achieve a more even temperature distribution across the device.

  3. Non-destructive Testing of Forged Metallic Materials by Active Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, S.; Cadith, J.; Bouteille, P.; Legros, G.; Bodnar, J. L.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Nowadays, infrared thermography is considered as the reference method in many applications such as safety, the inspection of electric installations, or the inspection of buildings' heat insulation. In recent years, the evolution of both material and data-processing tools also allows the development of thermography as a real non-destructive testing method. Thus, by subjecting the element to be inspected to an external excitation and by analyzing the propagation of heat in the examined zone, it is possible to highlight surface or subsurface defects such as cracks, delaminations, or corrosion. One speaks then about active infrared thermography. In this study, some results obtained during the collective studies carried out by CETIM and the University of Reims for the forging industry are presented. Various experimental possibilities offered by active thermography are presented and the interest in this method in comparison with the traditional non-destructive testing methods (penetrant testing and magnetic particle inspection) is discussed. For example, comparative results on a forged cracked hub, a steering joint, and a threaded rod are presented. They highlight the interest of infrared thermography stimulated by induction for forged parts.

  4. Passive and active infrared thermography: An overview of applications for the inspection of mosaic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakeas, P.; Cheilakou, E.; Ftikou, E.; Koui, M.

    2015-11-01

    Infrared Thermography is a non destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E) technique, which has been widely used for the investigation of cultural heritage and art objects. The main purpose of this study is to present the capabilities of both passive and active thermography for the inspection of mosaic structures, evaluating the performance of each testing approach through its application in representative mosaic structures. In situ passive thermography was applied on mosaic pavements in an attempt to acquire knowledge about their preservation state, while the active approach was used in order to study plastered mosaics and characterise the tesserae layer beneath the plaster. The results from this study revealed that passive approach can be efficiently applied as a moisture detection tool and a rapid monitoring technique of the mosaic condition, while the active thermographic investigation showed much more potentiality as quantitative information for the detected feature was further retrieved.

  5. Nondestructive test of brazed cooling tubes of prototype bolometer camera housing using active infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Tahiliani, Kumudni; Pandya, Santosh P; Pandya, Shwetang; Jha, Ratneshwar; Govindarajan, J

    2011-01-01

    The active infrared thermography technique is used for assessing the brazing quality of an actively cooled bolometer camera housing developed for steady state superconducting tokamak. The housing is a circular pipe, which has circular tubes vacuum brazed on the periphery. A unique method was adopted to monitor the temperature distribution on the internal surface of the pipe. A stainless steel mirror was placed inside the pipe and the reflected IR radiations were viewed using an IR camera. The heat stimulus was given by passing hot water through the tubes and the temperature distribution was monitored during the transient phase. The thermographs showed a significant nonuniformity in the brazing with a contact area of around 51%. The thermography results were compared with the x-ray radiographs and a good match between the two was observed. Benefits of thermography over x-ray radiography testing are emphasized. PMID:21280850

  6. Active and passive infrared thermography applied to the detection and characterization of hidden defects in structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Infrared thermography for Non Destructive Testing (NDT) has encountered a wide spreading this last 2 decades, in particular thanks to emergence on the market of low cost uncooled infrared camera. So, infrared thermography is not anymore a measurement technique limited to laboratory application. It has been more and more involved in civil engineering and cultural heritage applications, but also in many other domains, as indicated by numerous papers in the literature. Nevertheless, laboratory, measurements are done as much as possible in quite ideal conditions (good atmosphere conditions, known properties of materials, etc.), while measurement on real site requires to consider the influence of not controlled environmental parameters and additional unknown thermal properties. So, dedicated protocol and additional sensors are required for measurement data correction. Furthermore, thermal excitation is required to enhance the signature of defects in materials. Post-processing of data requires to take into account the protocol used for the thermal excitation and sometimes its nature to avoid false detection. This analysis step is based on signal and image processing tool and allows to carry out the detection. Characterization of anomalies detected at the previous step can be done by additional signal processing in particular for manufactured objects. The use of thermal modelling and inverse method allows to determine properties of the defective area. The present paper will first address a review of some protocols currently in use for field measurement with passive and/or active infrared measurements. Illustrations in various experiments carried out on civil engineering structure will be shown and discussed. In a second part, different post-processing approaches will be presented and discussed. In particular, a review of the most standard processing methods like Fast Fourier Analysis, Principal Components Analysis, Polynomial Decomposition, defect characterization using

  7. Non Destructive Testing by active infrared thermography coupled with shearography under same optical heat excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theroux, Louis-Daniel; Dumoulin, Jean; Maldague, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    As infrastructures are aging, the evaluation of their health is becoming crucial. To do so, numerous Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods are available. Among them, thermal shearography and active infrared thermography represent two full field and contactless methods for surface inspection. The synchronized use of both methods presents multiples advantages. Most importantly, both NDT are based on different material properties. Thermography depend on the thermal properties and shearography on the mechanical properties. The cross-correlation of both methods result in a more accurate and exact detection of the defects. For real site application, the simultaneous use of both methods is simplified due to the fact that the excitation method (thermal) is the same. Active infrared thermography is the measure of the temperature by an infrared camera of a surface subjected to heat flux. Observation of the variation of temperature in function of time reveal the presence of defects. On the other hand, shearography is a measure of out-of-plane surface displacement. This displacement is caused by the application of a strain on the surface which (in our case) take the form of a temperature gradient inducing a thermal stress To measure the resulting out-of-plane displacement, shearography exploit the relation between the phase difference and the optical path length. The phase difference is measured by the observation of the interference between two coherent light beam projected on the surface. This interference is due to change in optical path length as the surface is deformed [1]. A series of experimentation have been conducted in laboratory with various sample of concrete reinforced with CFRP materials. Results obtained reveal that with both methods it was possible to detect defects in the gluing. An infrared lamp radiating was used as the active heat source. This is necessary if measurements with shearography are to be made during the heating process. A heating lamp in the

  8. Techniques of infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Jatteau, M

    1975-01-01

    Considering the main objectives of thermographic techniques and the particular characteristics of passive infrared detection, the essential arguments in favor of single detector scanners have been pointed out after a brief discussion of the detection and image pickup methods when quantitative and precise (0.1 degrees C) information on the temperature distribution near ambient temperature must be obtained. Single detector scanners can have sufficiently good performance to reach the objectives of precise thermography, but their real technical limits must be well-known in practice; consequently, the thermograph performance must be clearly defined by means of the modulation transfer function, the intrinsic thermal resolution and the response uniformity, as we indicate in the second part of this paper. PMID:1180865

  9. Airborne infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Geoffrey M.

    2003-01-01

    To explore the feasibility of utilizing an IR imaging system to support flow visualization studies, an initial series of tests were conducted using an AN/AAS-38, NITE Hawk targeting pod. The targeting pod, installed on the left side of an F/A-18 aircraft provides a stabilized infrared imaging capability in the 8-12 micron spectral band. Initial data acquired with system indicated that IR thermography was a very promising tool for flow visualization. For the next phase of the investigation, an advanced version of the NITE Hawk targeting pod equipped with a staring 3-5 micron sensor was utilized. Experimental results obtained with this sensor indicated improved sensitivity and resolution. This method was limited to position the experiment and chase aircraft sufficiently close to each other and with the sightline angle required to acquire the region of interest. For the current phase of the investigation, the proven 3-5 micron staring sensor was deployed in an externally mounted podlet, located on the experimental aircraft with a fixed line of sight, centered on the region of interest. Based on initial data collection efforts, this approach appears to provide consistent high quality data for a wide range of flight conditions. To minimize the size of the podlet and resultant drag, the sensor was oriented parallel to the air flow. This also placed the line of sight parallel to the experiment. A fold mirror was incorporated in the design to fold the line of sight inboard and down to center on the region of interest. The experimental results obtained during the current test phase have provided consistently high quality images clearly mapping regions of laminar and turbulent flow. Several examples of these images and further details of the experimental approach are presented.

  10. Veterinary applications of infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Rekant, Steven I; Lyons, Mark A; Pacheco, Juan M; Arzt, Jonathan; Rodriguez, Luis L

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal body temperature is a major indicator of disease; infrared thermography (IRT) can assess changes in body surface temperature quickly and remotely. This technology can be applied to a myriad of diseases of various etiologies across a wide range of host species in veterinary medicine. It is used to monitor the physiologic status of individual animals, such as measuring feed efficiency or diagnosing pregnancy. Infrared thermography has applications in the assessment of animal welfare, and has been used to detect soring in horses and monitor stress responses. This review addresses the variety of uses for IRT in veterinary medicine, including disease detection, physiologic monitoring, welfare assessment, and potential future applications. PMID:26709943

  11. Pulsed thermography in multiple infrared spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzelmann, U.; Abuhamad, M.

    2010-03-01

    Spectrally resolved active thermography by flash pulse excitation was performed in four sub-bands of a mid-wave infrared camera using spectral filtering and in the full long-wave band of a second infrared camera. On zirconia thermal barrier coatings on steel and PVC blocks, spectrally dependent decay rates of the thermal contrast were found. The observed behaviour can be explained by the infrared spectra of the specimens.

  12. Detection and characterisation of delamination in PV modules by active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, A.; Sastry, O. S.; Gupta, R.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a fast and efficient method for the detection and characterisation of delamination in photovoltaic (PV) modules by using active infrared thermography approach. A discrete part of PV module was irradiated by step heating and its thermal image sequence was used to detect and analyse delamination. Different types of heating source for thermal excitation for this application have been studied. An electro-thermal model was developed to simulate the active thermography approach for the characterisation of delamination in PV module by equivalent resistance-capacitance (RC) network using a circuit simulator. This simulation approach was used to estimate the extent of delamination in the module and to determine the optimum parameters for the characterisation of delamination. Different applications based on front and backsides of heating the module were also proposed in this paper. The proposed method has the potential to be employed for the quality check of PV modules during inline production as well as for the predictive maintenance of outdoor PV plants.

  13. Veterinary applications of infrared thermography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abnormal temperature is a major indicator of disease; infrared thermography (IRT) can assess changes in surface temperature quickly and remotely. This technology can be applied to myriad diseases in veterinary medicine, ranging across host species and disease etiologies. It can also be used to deter...

  14. Aerodynamic applications of infrared thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.

    1989-01-01

    A series of wind tunnel experiments were conducted as part of a systematic study for evaluation of infrared thermography as a viable non-intrusive thermal measurement technique for aerodynamic applications. The experiments consisted of obtaining steady-state surface temperature and convective heat transfer rates for a uniformly heated cylinder in transverse flow with a Reynolds number range of 46,000 to 250,000. The calculated convective heat transfer rates were in general agreement with classical data. Furthermore, IR thermography provided valuable real-time fluid dynamic information such as visualization of flow separation, transition and vortices.

  15. Infrared Thermography And The Expert Witness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Charles C.

    1985-03-01

    With the continued growth of legal activities involving litigation, lawsuits involving technical matters may be very complex. Expert witnesses are often hired by both plaintiffs and defendants to help clarify and simplify technical merits of a case in order for the jury to make an educated decision. The usage of infrared thermography in legal matters has also been growing. This paper reviews several areas where infrared thermography has been utilized in legal matters. These include analysis of building defects, fire analysis and equipment failures. Expert witness qualifications, test procedures and analyses are discussed. The role of industry and governmental standards is reviewed. Opinions from the infrared thermographic expert should be unbiased, factual and within the area of qualification of the expert.

  16. The use of infrared thermography to detect the skin temperature response to physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanda, G.

    2015-11-01

    Physical activity has a noticeable effect on skin blood flow and temperature. The thermal regulatory and hemodynamic processes during physical activity are controlled by two conflicting mechanisms: the skin vasoconstriction induced by the blood flow demand to active muscles and the skin vasodilation required by thermoregulation to increase warm blood flow and heat conduction to the skin. The time-evolution of skin temperature during exercise can give useful information about the adaptation of the subject as a function of specific type, intensity and duration of exercise. In this paper, infrared thermography is used to investigate the thermal response of skin temperature during running exercise on treadmill for a group of seven healthy and trained runners. Two different treadmill exercises are considered: a graded load exercise and a constant load exercise; for both exercises the duration was 30 minutes. Within the limits due to the relatively small size of the sample group, results typically indicate a fall in skin temperature during the initial stage of running exercise. As the exercise progresses, the dynamics of the skin temperature response depends on the type of exercise (graded versus constant load) and probably on the level of training of the subject.

  17. Infrared Thermography For Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Lucky, Brian D.; Spiegel, Lyle B.; Hudyma, Russell M.

    1992-01-01

    Infrared imaging and image-data-processing system shows temperatures of joint during welding and provides data from which rates of heating and cooling determined. Information used to control welding parameters to ensure reliable joints, in materials which microstructures and associated metallurgical and mechanical properties depend strongly on rates of heating and cooling. Applicable to variety of processes, including tungsten/inert-gas welding; plasma, laser, and resistance welding; cutting; and brazing.

  18. Thermography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cage, Bob N.

    1984-01-01

    Thermography, a diagnostic tool that combines photography and infrared sensing, permits direct measurement of apparent surface temperatures. Building energy losses can be detected and correction measures planned. Criteria for the use of thermography are provided. (MLF)

  19. Crack detection by stimulated infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, Jean-Luc

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the potential of stimulated infrared thermography is studied for the detection of cracks located in metallic materials. To start with, the feasibility of the method is shown with the use of numerical simulations. Stimulated infrared thermography allows detecting emerging cracks in samples whether reflective or not as well as non-emerging cracks. In addition, crack detection is due to the radiative effects and/or the thermal effects induced by the defects. Then, the experimental device implemented for the study is detailed. Finally, experiments confirm that stimulated infrared thermography enables to detect microscopic cracks, whether emerging or non-emerging, in metal samples.

  20. Detection of seal contamination in heat-sealed food packaging based on active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'huys, Karlien; Saeys, Wouter; De Ketelaere, Bart

    2015-05-01

    In the food industry packaging is often applied to protect the product from the environment, assuring quality and safety throughout shelf life if properly performed. Packaging quality depends on the material used and the closure (seal). The material is selected based on the specific needs of the food product to be wrapped. However, proper closure of the package is often harder to achieve. One problem possibly jeopardizing seal quality is the presence of food particles between the seal. Seal contamination can cause a decreased seal strength and thus an increased packaging failure risk. It can also trigger the formation of microchannels through which air and microorganisms can enter and spoil the enclosed food. Therefore, early detection and removal of seal-contaminated packages from the production chain is essential. In this work, a pulsed-type active thermography method using the heat of the sealing bars as an excitation source was studied for detecting seal contamination. The cooling profile of contaminated seals was recorded. The detection performance of four processing methods (based on a single frame, a fit of the cooling profile, pulsed phase thermography and a matched filter) was compared. High resolution digital images served as a reference to quantify contamination. The lowest detection limit (equivalent diameter of 0.63 mm) and the lowest processing time (0.42 s per sample) were obtained for the method based on a single frame. Presumably, practical limitations in the recording stage prevented the added value of active thermography to be fully reflected in this application.

  1. Estimate of the diameter of surface defects on a pattern specimen made of Plexiglas through active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Barreto, M. H.; Giraldo, J. M.; Ramírez-Hurtado, A. L.; Llamosa, L.; Cruz, B.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years the use of Infrared Thermography (IRT) has reached a special importance in the industrial sector as a method of Non-Destructive Testing (NDT), for inspection of surface and subsurface defects of different types of materials. In order to determine the size of such defects by implementing the technique of Infrared Active Thermography, a Plexiglass sample (PMMA) with circular defects of different diameters and depths was designed and built. The sample was thermally stimulated by a continuous radiation from a halogen lamp, and subsequently the thermographic images were acquired by using the time-resolved infrared radiometry technique (TRIR). Images were obtained using Fluke TI-30 and TI-32 cameras, and a program was designed in Matlab for its further processing. Through a user interface, the program can display and filter the image; then it chooses a particular defect and calculates the diameter with their respective uncertainties. The best results for the calculated diameter were obtained with Ti-32 camera. The estimated uncertainties were below of 1.2mm, regard of defect diameter. Importantly, uncertainties grew when the diameter/depth ratio was 1 for depths of 4.0mm.

  2. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  3. Detection and Inspection of Steel Bars in Reinforced Concrete Structures Using Active Infrared Thermography with Microwave Excitation and Eddy Current Sensors.

    PubMed

    Szymanik, Barbara; Frankowski, Paweł Karol; Chady, Tomasz; John Chelliah, Cyril Robinson Azariah

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a multi-sensor approach to the detection and inspection of steel bars in reinforced concrete structures. In connection with our past experience related to non-destructive testing of different materials, we propose using two potentially effective methods: active infrared thermography with microwave excitation and the eddy current technique. In this article active infrared thermography with microwave excitation is analyzed both by numerical modeling and experiments. This method, based on thermal imaging, due to its characteriatics should be considered as a preliminary method for the assessment of relatively shallowly located steel bar reinforcements. The eddy current technique, on the other hand, allows for more detailed evaluation and detection of deeply located rebars. In this paper a series of measurement results, together with the initial identification of certain features of steel reinforcement bars will be presented. PMID:26891305

  4. Bridge concrete deteriorating diagnosis by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Hiroki; Fukuyama, Nobuhiro; Sakuma, Joji; Mochizuki, Jun; Kimura, Yukinori

    2006-04-01

    Bridge is indispensable as social overhead capital. In the past, concrete construction was believed to be semi-permanent. Actually, however, concrete is deteriorated by various factors including seawater damage, annual temperature change, etc. Therefore, it is now obvious that maintenance and management are essential to keep performance of the bridge. In Japan, we had many reports of using infrared thermography for diagnosis of building, mainly for delamination of tile and mortar used for surface of the building for more than 10 years. In recent years, infrared thermogrephy is more actively used for delamination of surface of the bridge. Passive method is usually used for open-air concrete structure diagnosis, which utilizes intraday environmental temperature change and/or radiation energy emitted from the sun which create delta-T of delamination portion of the concrete structure. It is very important to take thermal image at right conditions. Otherwise, you may easily fall onto false diagnosis. In our presentation, many case examples and study of thermal data will be shown, which are taken at the right condition.

  5. Infrared Thermography in the Architectural Field

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Infrared thermography is becoming ever more popular in civil engineering/architecture mainly due to its noncontact character which includes two great advantages. On one side, it prevents the object, under inspection, from any alteration and this is worthwhile especially in the presence of precious works of art. On the other side, the personnel operate in a remote manner far away from any hazard and this complies well with safety at work regulations. What is more, it offers the possibility to quickly inspect large surfaces such as the entire facade of a building. This paper would be an overview of the use of infrared thermography in the architectural and civil engineering field. First, some basic testing procedures are described, and then some key examples are presented owing to both laboratory tests and applications in situ spanning from civil habitations to works of art and archaeological sites. PMID:24319358

  6. Infrared thermography for CFRP inspection: computational model and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Henrique C.; Zhang, Hai; Morioka, Karen; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; López, Fernando; Maldague, Xavier P. V.; Tarpani, José R.

    2016-05-01

    Infrared Thermography (IRT) is a well-known Non-destructive Testing (NDT) technique. In the last decades, it has been widely applied in several fields including inspection of composite materials (CM), specially the fiber-reinforced polymer matrix ones. Consequently, it is important to develop and improve efficient NDT techniques to inspect and assess the quality of CM parts in order to warranty airworthiness and, at the same time, reduce costs of airline companies. In this paper, active IRT is used to inspect carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) at laminate with artificial inserts (built-in sample) placed on different layers prior to the manufacture. Two optical active IRT are used. The first is pulsed thermography (PT) which is the most widely utilized IRT technique. The second is a line-scan thermography (LST) technique: a dynamic technique, which can be employed for the inspection of materials by heating a component, line-by-line, while acquiring a series of thermograms with an infrared camera. It is especially suitable for inspection of large parts as well as complex shaped parts. A computational model developed using COMSOL Multiphysics® was used in order to simulate the inspections. Sequences obtained from PT and LST were processed using principal component thermography (PCT) for comparison. Results showed that it is possible to detect insertions of different sizes at different depths using both PT and LST IRT techniques.

  7. Shuttle Entry Imaging Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas; Berry, Scott; Alter, Stephen; Blanchard, Robert; Schwartz, Richard; Ross, Martin; Tack, Steve

    2007-01-01

    During the Columbia Accident Investigation, imaging teams supporting debris shedding analysis were hampered by poor entry image quality and the general lack of information on optical signatures associated with a nominal Shuttle entry. After the accident, recommendations were made to NASA management to develop and maintain a state-of-the-art imagery database for Shuttle engineering performance assessments and to improve entry imaging capability to support anomaly and contingency analysis during a mission. As a result, the Space Shuttle Program sponsored an observation campaign to qualitatively characterize a nominal Shuttle entry over the widest possible Mach number range. The initial objectives focused on an assessment of capability to identify/resolve debris liberated from the Shuttle during entry, characterization of potential anomalous events associated with RCS jet firings and unusual phenomenon associated with the plasma trail. The aeroheating technical community viewed the Space Shuttle Program sponsored activity as an opportunity to influence the observation objectives and incrementally demonstrate key elements of a quantitative spatially resolved temperature measurement capability over a series of flights. One long-term desire of the Shuttle engineering community is to calibrate boundary layer transition prediction methodologies that are presently part of the Shuttle damage assessment process using flight data provided by a controlled Shuttle flight experiment. Quantitative global imaging may offer a complementary method of data collection to more traditional methods such as surface thermocouples. This paper reviews the process used by the engineering community to influence data collection methods and analysis of global infrared images of the Shuttle obtained during hypersonic entry. Emphasis is placed upon airborne imaging assets sponsored by the Shuttle program during Return to Flight. Visual and IR entry imagery were obtained with available airborne

  8. Flash Infrared Thermography Contrast Data Analysis Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides information on an IR Contrast technique that involves extracting normalized contrast versus time evolutions from the flash thermography inspection infrared video data. The analysis calculates thermal measurement features from the contrast evolution. In addition, simulation of the contrast evolution is achieved through calibration on measured contrast evolutions from many flat-bottom holes in the subject material. The measurement features and the contrast simulation are used to evaluate flash thermography data in order to characterize delamination-like anomalies. The thermal measurement features relate to the anomaly characteristics. The contrast evolution simulation is matched to the measured contrast evolution over an anomaly to provide an assessment of the anomaly depth and width which correspond to the depth and diameter of the equivalent flat-bottom hole (EFBH) similar to that used as input to the simulation. A similar analysis, in terms of diameter and depth of an equivalent uniform gap (EUG) providing a best match with the measured contrast evolution, is also provided. An edge detection technique called the half-max is used to measure width and length of the anomaly. Results of the half-max width and the EFBH/EUG diameter are compared to evaluate the anomaly. The information provided here is geared towards explaining the IR Contrast technique. Results from a limited amount of validation data on reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) hardware are included in this paper.

  9. Infrared Thermography for Temperature Measurement and Non-Destructive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Usamentiaga, Rubèn; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed. PMID:25014096

  10. Subsurface defect detection in first layer of pavement structure and reinforced civil engineering structure by FRP bonding using active infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean; Ibos, Laurent

    2010-05-01

    In many countries road network ages while road traffic and maintenance costs increase. Nowadays, thousand and thousand kilometers of roads are each year submitted to surface distress survey. They generally lean on pavement surface imaging measurement techniques, mainly in the visible spectrum, coupled with visual inspection or image processing detection of emergent distresses. Nevertheless, optimisation of maintenance works and costs requires an early detection of defects within the pavement structure when they still are hidden from surface. Accordingly, alternative measurement techniques for pavement monitoring are currently under investigation (seismic methods, step frequency radar). On the other hand, strengthening or retrofitting of reinforced concrete structures by externally bonded Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) systems is now a commonly accepted and widespread technique. However, the use of bonding techniques always implies following rigorous installing procedures. To ensure the durability and long-term performance of the FRP reinforcements, conformance checking through an in situ auscultation of the bonded FRP systems is then highly suitable. The quality-control program should involve a set of adequate inspections and tests. Visual inspection and acoustic sounding (hammer tap) are commonly used to detect delaminations (disbonds) but are unable to provide sufficient information about the depth (in case of multilayered composite) and width of debonded areas. Consequently, rapid and efficient inspection methods are also required. Among the non destructive methods under study, active infrared thermography was investigated both for pavement and civil engineering structures through experiments in laboratory and numerical simulations, because of its ability to be also used on field. Pulse Thermography (PT), Pulse Phase Thermography (PPT) and Principal Component Thermography (PCT) approaches have been tested onto pavement samples and CFRP bonding on concrete

  11. INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY OF CUTANEOUS MELANOMA METASTASES

    PubMed Central

    Shada, Amber L.; Dengel, Lynn T.; Petroni, Gina R.; Smolkin, Mark E.; Acton, Scott; Slingluff, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Differentiating melanoma metastasis from benign cutaneous lesions currently requires biopsy or costly imaging, such as positron emission tomography scans. Melanoma metastases have been observed to be subjectively warmer than similarly appearing benign lesions. We hypothesized that infrared (IR) thermography would be sensitive and specific in differentiating palpable melanoma metastases from benign lesions. Materials and methods Seventy-four patients (36 females and 38 males) had 251 palpable lesions imaged for this pilot study. Diagnosis was determined using pathologic confirmation or clinical diagnosis. Lesions were divided into size strata for analysis: 0–5, >5–15, >15–30, and >30 mm. Images were scored on a scale from −1 (colder than the surrounding tissue) to +3 (significantly hotter than the surrounding tissue). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each stratum. Logistical challenges were scored. Results IR imaging was able to determine the malignancy of small (0–5 mm) lesions with a sensitivity of 39% and specificity of 100%. For lesions >5–15 mm, sensitivity was 58% and specificity 98%. For lesions >15–30 mm, sensitivity was 95% and specificity 100%, and for lesions >30 mm, sensitivity was 78% and specificity 89%. The positive predictive value was 88%–100% across all strata, and the negative predictive value was 95% for >15–30 mm lesions and 80% for >30 mm lesions. Conclusions Malignant lesions >15 mm were differentiated from benign lesions with excellent sensitivity and specificity. IR imaging was well tolerated and feasible in a clinic setting. This pilot study shows promise in the use of thermography for the diagnosis of malignant melanoma with further potential as a noninvasive tool to follow tumor responses to systemic therapies. PMID:23043862

  12. Medical applications of infrared thermography: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Jayakumar, T.; Philip, John

    2012-07-01

    Abnormal body temperature is a natural indicator of illness. Infrared thermography (IRT) is a fast, passive, non-contact and non-invasive alternative to conventional clinical thermometers for monitoring body temperature. Besides, IRT can also map body surface temperature remotely. Last five decades witnessed a steady increase in the utility of thermal imaging cameras to obtain correlations between the thermal physiology and skin temperature. IRT has been successfully used in diagnosis of breast cancer, diabetes neuropathy and peripheral vascular disorders. It has also been used to detect problems associated with gynecology, kidney transplantation, dermatology, heart, neonatal physiology, fever screening and brain imaging. With the advent of modern infrared cameras, data acquisition and processing techniques, it is now possible to have real time high resolution thermographic images, which is likely to surge further research in this field. The present efforts are focused on automatic analysis of temperature distribution of regions of interest and their statistical analysis for detection of abnormalities. This critical review focuses on advances in the area of medical IRT. The basics of IRT, essential theoretical background, the procedures adopted for various measurements and applications of IRT in various medical fields are discussed in this review. Besides background information is provided for beginners for better understanding of the subject.

  13. Infrared thermography for condition monitoring - A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagavathiappan, S.; Lahiri, B. B.; Saravanan, T.; Philip, John; Jayakumar, T.

    2013-09-01

    Temperature is one of the most common indicators of the structural health of equipment and components. Faulty machineries, corroded electrical connections, damaged material components, etc., can cause abnormal temperature distribution. By now, infrared thermography (IRT) has become a matured and widely accepted condition monitoring tool where the temperature is measured in real time in a non-contact manner. IRT enables early detection of equipment flaws and faulty industrial processes under operating condition thereby, reducing system down time, catastrophic breakdown and maintenance cost. Last three decades witnessed a steady growth in the use of IRT as a condition monitoring technique in civil structures, electrical installations, machineries and equipment, material deformation under various loading conditions, corrosion damages and welding processes. IRT has also found its application in nuclear, aerospace, food, paper, wood and plastic industries. With the advent of newer generations of infrared camera, IRT is becoming a more accurate, reliable and cost effective technique. This review focuses on the advances of IRT as a non-contact and non-invasive condition monitoring tool for machineries, equipment and processes. Various conditions monitoring applications are discussed in details, along with some basics of IRT, experimental procedures and data analysis techniques. Sufficient background information is also provided for the beginners and non-experts for easy understanding of the subject.

  14. Membrane fouling characterization by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndukaife, Kennethrex O.; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Agwu Nnanna, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    An infrared thermography (IRT) technique for characterization of fouling on flat sheet membrane surface has been developed. In this work, an IR camera was used to measure surface temperature and emissivity of foulant on a membrane surface. Different fouling experiments were performed using different feed concentrations of aluminum oxide nanoparticle mixed with deionized water so as to investigate the effect of feed concentration on the degree of fouling and on the emissivity values measured on the membrane surfaces. Our findings revealed that the emissivity of the fouled membrane surface is contingent on the surface roughness as well as the material composition of the foulant. The technique was utilized to distinguish between foulants made of metallic materials from those that are non-metallic. This approach, which is simple to use and nondestructive represents an important addition to the toolset of fouling analysis techniques and would benefit a wide range of applications from observation of foulant structure to qualitative assessment of composition of foulant material.

  15. Is It Possible to Detect Activated Brown Adipose Tissue in Humans Using Single-Time-Point Infrared Thermography under Thermoneutral Conditions? Impact of BMI and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Gatidis, Sergios; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina A.; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schick, Fritz; Schwenzer, Nina F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility to detect activated brown adipose tissue (BAT) using single-time-point infrared thermography of the supraclavicular skin region under thermoneutral conditions. To this end, infrared thermography was compared with 18-F-FDG PET, the current reference standard for the detection of activated BAT. Methods 120 patients were enrolled in this study. After exclusion of 18 patients, 102 patients (44 female, 58 male, mean age 58±17 years) were included for final analysis. All patients underwent a clinically indicated 18F-FDG-PET/CT examination. Immediately prior to tracer injection skin temperatures of the supraclavicular, presternal and jugular regions were measured using spatially resolved infrared thermography at room temperature. The presence of activated BAT was determined in PET by typical FDG uptake within the supraclavicular adipose tissue compartments. Local thickness of supraclavicular subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) was measured on CT. Measured skin temperatures were statistically correlated with the presence of activated BAT and anthropometric data. Results Activated BAT was detected in 9 of 102 patients (8.8%). Local skin temperature of the supraclavicular region was significantly higher in individuals with active BAT compared to individuals without active BAT. However, after statistical correction for the influence of BMI, no predictive value of activated BAT on skin temperature of the supraclavicular region could be observed. Supraclavicular skin temperature was significantly negatively correlated with supraclavicular SCAT thickness. Conclusion We conclude that supraclavicular SCAT thickness influences supraclavicular skin temperature and thus makes a specific detection of activated BAT using single-time-point thermography difficult. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the possibility of BAT detection using alternative thermographic methods, e.g. dynamic thermography or MR-based thermometry taking into account BMI

  16. Nondestructive evaluation technique using infrared thermography and terahertz imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Shiozawa, Daiki; Tamaki, Yoshitaka; Iwama, Tatsuya

    2016-05-01

    Nondestructive testing (NDT) techniques using pulse heating infrared thermography and terahertz (THz) imaging were developed for detecting deterioration of oil tank floor, such as blister and delamination of corrosion protection coating, or corrosion of the bottom steel plate under coating. Experimental studies were conducted to demonstrate the practicability of developed techniques. It was found that the pulse heating infrared thermography was utilized for effective screening inspection and THz-TDS imaging technique performed well for the detailed inspection of coating deterioration and steel corrosion.

  17. Detection of pathogenic gram negative bacteria using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Divya, M. P.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Thomas, Sabu; Philip, John

    2012-11-01

    Detection of viable bacteria is of prime importance in all fields of microbiology and biotechnology. Conventional methods of enumerating bacteria are often time consuming and labor-intensive. All living organisms generate heat due to metabolic activities and hence, measurement of heat energy is a viable tool for detection and quantification of bacteria. In this article, we employ a non-contact and real time method - infrared thermography (IRT) for measurement of temperature variations in four clinically significant gram negative pathogenic bacteria, viz. Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We observe that, the energy content, defined as the ratio of heat generated by bacterial metabolic activities to the heat lost from the liquid medium to the surrounding, vary linearly with the bacterial concentration in all the four pathogenic bacteria. The amount of energy content observed in different species is attributed to their metabolisms and morphologies that affect the convection velocity and hence heat transport in the medium.

  18. Open crack depth sizing by laser stimulated infrared lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedala, Y.; Streza, M.; Roger, J.-P.; Tessier, G.; Boué, C.

    2014-11-01

    Recent advances in infrared imaging have made active thermography an interesting non destructive technique for sub-surface defect detection. Here, we present a method for the estimation of the depth of open surface defects by infrared lock-in thermography, based on the relation between the crack depth and the Laplacian of the surface temperature distribution induced by a local heating using a laser. A comparison to numerical finite element modelling for different depths allows an accurate determination of fatigue crack depth in Inconel alloy test blocks.

  19. Using infrared thermography to study freezing in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Factors that determine when and to what extent a plant will freeze are complex. While thermocouples have served as the main method of monitoring the freezing process in plants, infrared thermography offers distinct advantages, and the use of this latter technology has provided new insights on the p...

  20. Infrared thermography to detect residual ceramic in gas turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meola, C.; Carlomagno, G. M.; di Foggia, M.; Natale, O.

    2008-06-01

    A serious problem in the production of gas turbine blades is the detection of residual ceramic cores inside the cooling passages; in fact, the presence of even small ceramic pieces affects turbine performance and may cause difficulties in successive manufacturing. Therefore, it is important to have a non-destructive technique that must be capable of detecting tiny ceramic fragments in a fast and easy way. In this perspective, the suitability of infrared thermography was investigated within cooperation between the University of Naples and the Europea Microfusioni Aerospaziali S.p.A. (EMA). Several blades of three different types were inspected revealing that in many cases infrared thermography can discover small ceramic fragments which were missed by X-ray inspection. In addition, infrared thermography allows gaining of information about other types of anomalies (e.g., surface defects) during the same testing step (by eventually changing the test parameters) and then saving time and money. The obtained results look promising in view of introducing infrared thermography among industrial instrumentation as an alternative to, or integrated with, the most currently utilized non-destructive techniques.

  1. Infrared thermography to evaluate lameness in pregnant sows

    PubMed Central

    Amezcua, Rocio; Walsh, Shannon; Luimes, Paul H.; Friendship, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of lameness in sows is important to reduce losses and improve animal welfare. Mild-to-moderate lameness is difficult to diagnose in sows. Infrared thermography (IRT) was evaluated as a method of detecting signs of inflammation in the lower limbs as an aid in lameness detection. PMID:24587511

  2. NASA MUST Paper: Infrared Thermography of Graphite/Epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comeaux, Kayla; Koshti, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this project is to use Infrared Thermography, a non-destructive test, to detect detrimental cracks and voids beneath the surface of materials used in the space program. This project will consist of developing a simulation model of the Infrared Thermography inspection of the Graphite/Epoxy specimen. The simulation entails finding the correct physical properties for this specimen as well as programming the model for thick voids or flat bottom holes. After the simulation is completed, an Infrared Thermography inspection of the actual specimen will be made. Upon acquiring the experimental test data, an analysis of the data for the actual experiment will occur, which includes analyzing images, graphical analysis, and analyzing numerical data received from the infrared camera. The simulation will then be corrected for any discrepancies between it and the actual experiment. The optimized simulation material property inputs can then be used for new simulation for thin voids. The comparison of the two simulations, the simulation for the thick void and the simulation for the thin void, provides a correlation between the peak contrast ratio and peak time ratio. This correlation is used in the evaluation of flash thermography data during the evaluation of delaminations.

  3. Heat flux sensors for infrared thermography in convective heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described. PMID:25386758

  4. Heat Flux Sensors for Infrared Thermography in Convective Heat Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; de Luca, Luigi; Cardone, Gennaro; Astarita, Tommaso

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the most dependable heat flux sensors, which can be used with InfraRed (IR) thermography to measure convective heat transfer coefficient distributions, and some of their applications performed by the authors' research group at the University of Naples Federico II. After recalling the basic principles that make IR thermography work, the various heat flux sensors to be used with it are presented and discussed, describing their capability to investigate complex thermo-fluid-dynamic flows. Several applications to streams, which range from natural convection to hypersonic flows, are also described. PMID:25386758

  5. Effects of moisture in infrared thermography of resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Kantsios, A. G.; Mcerlean, E. A.; Babcock, R. A.; Buckingham, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Several multiply graphite polyimide composite specimens were examined by real-time infrared thermography in order to study the effects of moisture on their thermograms. Heat was injected from one side and IR emission detected on the opposite side using AGA Thermovision System-680. No differences between the thermograms of dry and water containing specimens were detected for defect-free specimens. However, the presence of trapped water in defective specimens modified the thermographic contrast significantly. It is concluded that: (1) IR thermography can be used to detect moisture in defective composites, and (2) because of the possibility of moisture camouflaging defects, IR thermography for subsurface defect detection should be supplemented by other techniques - such as acoustical imaging and X-radiography.

  6. Investigation of honeycomb structure using pulse infrared thermography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijuan

    2010-11-01

    To reduce weight and improve strength in the aerospace industry, composite structure has gained popularity as a replacement for conventional materials and structures, such as adhesive bonding and honeycomb structure. Honeycomb structures composed by a honeycomb core between two facesheets are very common on aerospace parts. However, the adhesive bonding process is more susceptible to quality variations during manufacturing than traditional joining methods. With the large increase in the use of composite materials and honeycomb structures, the need for high speed, large area inspection for fracture critical, sub-surface defects in aircraft, missiles and marine composites led to broad acceptance of infrared based NDT methods. Infrared thermography is one of several non-destructive testing techniques which can be used for defect detection in aircraft materials. Infrared thermography can be potentially useful, as it is quick, real time, non-contact and can examine over a relatively large area in one inspection procedure. In this paper, two kinds of defects which are of various size, shape and location below the test surface are planted in the honeycomb structure, they are all tested by pulsed thermography, analyze the thermal sequence and intensity graph got by this methods, it shows that pulsed thermography is an effective nondestructive technique for inspecting disbonding defect, can distinguish the location and the dimension of the defect exactly.

  7. Visualization of In-Flight Flow Phenomena Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, D. W.; vanDam, C. P.; Shiu, H. J.; Miller, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Infrared thermography was used to obtain data on the state of the boundary layer of a natural laminar flow airfoil in supersonic flight. In addition to the laminar-to-turbulent transition boundary, the infrared camera was able to detect shock waves and present a time dependent view of the flow field. A time dependent heat transfer code was developed to predict temperature distributions on the test subject and any necessary surface treatment. A commercially available infrared camera was adapted for airborne use in this application. Readily available infrared technology has the capability to provide detailed visualization of various flow phenomena in subsonic to hypersonic flight regimes.

  8. Comparative defect evaluation of aircraft components by active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zauner, G.; Mayr, G.; Hendorfer, G.

    2009-02-01

    Active Thermography has become a powerful tool in the field of non-destructive testing (NDT) in recent years. This infrared thermal imaging technique is used for non-contact inspection of materials and components by visualizing thermal surface contrasts after a thermal excitation. The imaging modality combined with the possibility of detecting and characterizing flaws as well as determining material properties makes Active Thermography a fast and robust testing method even in industrial-/production environments. Nevertheless, depending on the kind of defect (thermal properties, size, depth) and sample material (CFRP carbon fiber reinforced plastics, metal, glass fiber) or sample structure (honeycomb, composite layers, foam), active thermography can sometimes produce equivocal results or completely fails in certain test situations. The aim of this paper is to present examples of results of Active Thermography methods conducted on aircraft components compared to various other (imaging) NDT techniques, namely digital shearography, industrial x-ray imaging and 3D-computed tomography. In particular we focus on detection limits of thermal methods compared to the above-mentioned NDT methods with regard to: porosity characterization in CFRP, detection of delamination, detection of inclusions and characterization of glass fiber distributions.

  9. On line sensing of weld penetration using infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Chin, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this research is to apply new sensing techniques, artificial intelligence, and robotics to improve the welding process through control of penetration depth and width parameters. By producing a constant depth and width of penetration through on line control, the quality and strength of welds may be improved to a new level of reliability previously unobtainable. Experimental data presented in this paper indicate that depth and width of penetration can be monitored by infrared thermography and hence controlled dynamically during the weld process. Infrared thermography is used to monitor surface temperature distributions in the vicinity of the molten metal pool. Characteristics of temperature distributions perpendicular to the direction of arc travel are analyzed and correlated with weld bead width and depth as measured by destructive examination after the weld production. The results show that there is a linear relationship between peak weld plate surface temperature and depth of penetration. Additionally, surface puddle width is found to be directly correlated to measured distance separating solidus temperatures of the molten metal as measured by infrared thermography.

  10. On Line Sensing Of Weld Penetration Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwen; Chin, B. A.

    1986-10-01

    The objective of this research is to apply new sensing techniques, artificial intelligence, and robotics to improve the welding process through control of penetration depth and width parameters. By producing a constant depth and width of penetration through on line control, the quality and strength of welds may be improved to a new level of reliability previously unobtainable. Experimental data presented in this paper indicate that depth and width of penetration can be monitored by infrared thermography and hence controlled dynamically during the weld process. Infrared thermography is used to monitor surface temperature distributions in the vicinity of the molten metal pool. Characteristics of temperature distributions perpendicular to the direction of arc travel are analyzed and correlated with weld bead width and depth as measured by destructive examination after the weld production. The results show that there is a linear relationship between peak weld plate surface temperature and depth of penetration. Additionally, surface puddle width is found to be directly correlated to measured distance separating solidus temperatures of the molten metal as measured by infrared thermography.

  11. Infrared Contrast Analysis Technique for Flash Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the infrared flash thermography inspection to detect and analyze delamination-like anomalies in nonmetallic materials. It provides information on an IR Contrast technique that involves extracting normalized contrast verses time evolutions from the flash thermography infrared video data. The paper provides the analytical model used in the simulation of infrared image contrast. The contrast evolution simulation is achieved through calibration on measured contrast evolutions from many flat bottom holes in the subject material. The paper also provides formulas to calculate values of the thermal measurement features from the measured contrast evolution curve. Many thermal measurement features of the contrast evolution that relate to the anomaly characteristics are calculated. The measurement features and the contrast simulation are used to evaluate flash thermography inspection data in order to characterize the delamination-like anomalies. In addition, the contrast evolution prediction is matched to the measured anomaly contrast evolution to provide an assessment of the anomaly depth and width in terms of depth and diameter of the corresponding equivalent flat-bottom hole (EFBH) or equivalent uniform gap (EUG). The paper provides anomaly edge detection technique called the half-max technique which is also used to estimate width of an indication. The EFBH/EUG and half-max width estimations are used to assess anomaly size. The paper also provides some information on the "IR Contrast" software application, half-max technique and IR Contrast feature imaging application, which are based on models provided in this paper.

  12. Applications of infrared thermography for petrochemical process heaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigle, Robert K.

    2005-03-01

    Process heaters are a critical component in the refining of crude oil. Traditional means of monitoring these high temperature vessels have frequently been more art than science, often relying on highly subjective analyses and/or frequently inaccurate thermocouple data. By utilizing an imaging radiometer specifically designed for heater inspections, valuable performance information can be obtained for operating heaters. In the hands of a knowledgeable engineering team, accurate infrared data can be utilized to significantly increase heater throughput while helping to ensure safe operation of the heater. This paper discusses the use of infrared thermography for online monitoring of operating crude heaters and the special challenges associated with this application.

  13. The use of infrared thermography for nondestructive evaluation of joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meola, Carosena; Carlomagno, Giovanni M.; Squillace, Antonino; Giorleo, Giuseppe

    2004-12-01

    A junction between two similar, or dissimilar, materials represents generally a weak structural point and so it requires accurate choice of the most adequate joining technique and nondestructive evaluation of joined parts whatever the joining technique. The attention of the present paper is focused on the aid provided by infrared thermography for nondestructive evaluation of three types of joints: aluminum adhesively bonded joints, stainless steel laser welded joints and Glare ® mechanical fastened joints. Both techniques, pulse and modulated thermography with optical stimulation, are used. The attention is particularly focused on the second method because phase images are practically not affected by local nonuniform heating and/or local variation of the emissivity coefficient as thermal images.

  14. Surface temperature measurement of insulating glass units using infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Elmahdy, H.

    1996-12-31

    Infrared (IR) thermography is a process to produce, by means of an infrared scanner, thermal images of surfaces by detecting the radiation emitted from the surfaces. The application of IR thermography as a diagnostic tool in building science assists in determining existing anomalies in the building envelope and other building components. In this paper, IR thermography is used to compare the glass surface temperatures of insulating glass (IG) units made with two types of spacer bar (metal and silicone foam) and different gap widths. The results from this research are compared with data obtained from another research laboratory using a different IR scanner and also with data from finite-element computer modeling. All the tests and simulations were performed on identical IG units. Tests performed on seven IG units indicated that IR thermography could be used to assess the edge-of-glass temperature of IG units for the prediction of condensation resistance of the units. The image processing and analysis depend on the knowledge of accurate emissivity of the surfaces under investigation as well as other variables that affect the final thermal image (e.g., ambient temperature, relative humidity of air in the optical path, and the optical path length). The IR scanner records all the radiation (both direct and reflected) it sees either from the intended target or from any other radiative surfaces in its field of view (FOV). The vertical temperature profiles of all the tested units showed considerable reduction of temperature at the bottom section of the IG unit. The degree of temperature reduction is affected by the type of spacer bar material and the gap thickness.

  15. In-Flight Flow Visualization Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanDam, C. P.; Shiu, H. J.; Banks D. W.

    1997-01-01

    The feasibility of remote infrared thermography of aircraft surfaces during flight to visualize the extent of laminar flow on a target aircraft has been examined. In general, it was determined that such thermograms can be taken successfully using an existing airplane/thermography system (NASA Dryden's F-18 with infrared imaging pod) and that the transition pattern and, thus, the extent of laminar flow can be extracted from these thermograms. Depending on the in-flight distance between the F-18 and the target aircraft, the thermograms can have a spatial resolution of as little as 0.1 inches. The field of view provided by the present remote system is superior to that of prior stationary infrared thermography systems mounted in the fuselage or vertical tail of a subject aircraft. An additional advantage of the present experimental technique is that the target aircraft requires no or minimal modifications. An image processing procedure was developed which improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the thermograms. Problems encountered during the analog recording of the thermograms (banding of video images) made it impossible to evaluate the adequacy of the present imaging system and image processing procedure to detect transition on untreated metal surfaces. The high reflectance, high thermal difussivity, and low emittance of metal surfaces tend to degrade the images to an extent that it is very difficult to extract transition information from them. The application of a thin (0.005 inches) self-adhesive insulating film to the surface is shown to solve this problem satisfactorily. In addition to the problem of infrared based transition detection on untreated metal surfaces, future flight tests will also concentrate on the visualization of other flow phenomena such as flow separation and reattachment.

  16. Mastitis detection in sheep by infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Martins, Rafhael Felipe Saraiva; do Prado Paim, Tiago; de Abreu Cardoso, Cyntia; Stéfano Lima Dallago, Bruno; de Melo, Cristiano Barros; Louvandini, Helder; McManus, Concepta

    2013-06-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of an infrared thermograph for mastitis diagnosis in sheep. Thirty-seven Santa Inês ewes were evaluated weekly through infrared images obtained with thermograph FLIR System Series-i®. Milk was collected for somatic cell count and milk compound level determination. The clinical mastitis group had the highest fat and protein level, as well as the lowest lactose level. The udder temperatures were higher for subclinical mastitis group. The udder temperature data was able to correctly classify the animals into the mastitis groups and the canonical analysis showed that these temperatures clearly differentiated the subclinical mastitis groups from the others. Therefore, this study showed that udder infrared temperatures can be used as diagnostic method to mastitis in sheep. PMID:23178047

  17. Study on detecting CFRP composites using pulsed infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Yan; Li, Hui-Juan; Zhao, Yue-Jin; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2011-08-01

    Composite sandwich structure has been widely used in aerospace due to its lightweight, high stiffness and strength. The quality of the structure is crucial to durability and structural integrity of the rehabilitated the structure, Delaminations, debonding and water ingressing to honeycomb are typical defects in the structure. Defects in the structure will influence the quality of product. Pulse thermography has been an effective NDE method in recent ten years. The technique uses pulse to excite the specimen, because the presence of subsurface defects reduce the diffusion rate, then temperature difference between defect area and sound area will be measured by an infrared camera. Subsurface defects become visible with time delays, it is a non-contact, quickly inspection method. Pulsed infrared thermography has been widely used in aerospace and mechanical manufacture industry because it can offer non-contact, quickly and visual examinations of defects. It is a meaningful research topic to study on quantitative testing with the structure rapidly and non-destructively. Sandwich composites with aluminum facesheet and aluminum honeycomb cores are chosen as study objectives. Some back-drilled holes with different sizes and depths in the specimen are used to simulate delaminations between plies in the strcuture .The paper presents a method for defining the boundaries, quantitatively estimating the sizes of the flaws in the CFRP using pulsed infrared thermography. Processing captured data using splinefitting, measuring the size of the defects by calculating the pixels numbers that exceed the detection threshold and computing areas of defects by binary image. Compared with the designed sizes and areas having defects, the results show that the method offers more than 90% accuracies with reference to the sizes of artificial flaws embedded in the CFRP sheet. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of using detection threshold to inspect the CFRP sheet. The curve of

  18. Infrared thermography monitoring of the NaCl crystallisation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Patricia; Thomachot-Schneider, Céline; Mouhoubi, Kamel; Fronteau, Gilles; Gommeaux, Maxime; Benavente, David; Barbin, Vincent; Bodnar, Jean-Luc

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we describe the growth of NaCl crystals by evaporating droplets of aqueous solution while monitoring them with infrared thermography. Over the course of the evaporation experiments, variations in the recorded signal were observed and interpreted as being the result of evaporation and crystallisation. In particular, we observed sharp and transient decreases in the thermosignal during the later stages of high-concentration drop evaporation. The number of such events per experiment, referred to as "pop-cold events", varied from 1 to over 100 and had durations from 1 to 15 s. These events are interpreted as a consequence from the top-supplied creeping (TSC) of the solution feeding the growth of efflorescence-like crystals. This phenomenon occurred when the solution was no longer macroscopically visible. In this case, efflorescence-like crystals with a spherulite shape grew around previously formed cubic crystals. Other crystal morphologies were also observed but were likely fed by mass diffusion or bottom-supplied creeping (BSC) and were not associated with "pop-cold events"; these morphologies included the cubic crystals at the centre, ring-shaped at the edge of droplets and fan-shaped crystals. After complete evaporation, an analysis of the numbers and sizes of the different types of crystals was performed using image processing. Clear differences in their sizes and distribution were observed in relation to the salt concentration. Infrared thermography permitted a level of quantification that previously was only possible using other techniques. As example, the intermittent efflorescence growth process was clearly observed and measured for the first time using infrared thermography.

  19. Detection of tanker defects with infrared thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantsios, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    Infrared scanning technique for finding defects in secondary barrier of liquid natural gas (LNG) tank has been successfully tested on ship under construction at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company. Technique determines defects with minimal expenditure of time and manpower. Tests could be repeated during life of tanker and make more complicated testing unnecessary. Tests also confirmed that tank did not have any major defects, and tank was certified.

  20. Infrared thermography ofArum lily inflorescences.

    PubMed

    Skubatz, H; Nelson, T A; Dong, A M; Meeuse, B J; Bendich, A J

    1990-10-01

    The infrared radiation emitted from the surface of inflorescences of 12 aroid species was monitored with an infrared camera, capable of 0.1°C resolution, and the data were converted to temperature values by means of temperature reference standards. Images representing surface temperatures were obtained forAmorphophallus bulbifer Blume,A. campanulatus Blume,A. forbesii Engl. et Gehrm.,A. rivieri Dur.,Philodendron selloum Koch,Monstera deliciosa Liebm.,Dracunculus vulgaris Schott,Arum italicum Mill.,A. dioscoridis Sibth.,A. creticum Boiss et Heldr.,Caladium sp., andRemusatia vivipara Schott. These images were different among species with respect to temperature, duration of detectable heat development, and organ type (male and female flowers, spathe and appendix) found to be thermogenic. All these species, however, exhibited three common characteristics: 1) production of heat by the male flowers; 2) pollen-shedding immediately after heat production had ceased; and 3) when male flowers were some distance away from female flowers along the spadix, heat was not detected in female flowers. Heat emission was associated with the alternative, cyanide-insensitive pathway that was fully operative. PMID:24197195

  1. Infrared thermography system on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, T.W. ); Hill, D.N.; Baptista, J.; Brown, M. )

    1990-10-01

    Six infrared cameras measure temperature changes on the protective graphite armor inside the DIII-D vacuum vessel. Simultaneous time dependent temperature measurements are made on armor tiles located on the centerpost and divertor regions, and on both outboard limiters. The nearly-complete poloidal coverage is useful in measuring both the plasma heat flux distributions inside the vessel and the plasma power balance. Spatial resolution of each camera system is {approx lt}1 cm, while the minimum resolvable time is 125 {mu}sec. Data from the IR TV systems is recorded on video tape, and is post-processed serially, using an image processor with an AT-compatible microcomputer. The processing system controls all VCRs, interprets DIII-D timing pulses, digitizes video data in the pre-determined regions of interest, averages digitized signals to reduce noise, and constructs data files which are then stored as part of the permanent shot record.

  2. Infrared thermography of dropwise evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Michael; di Marzo, Marino; Sirkis, James

    1992-01-01

    An infrared thermographic technique is developed to obtain the transient solid surface temperature distribution in the neighborhood of an evaporating droplet. This technique is nonintrusive and is not affected by the time response of the measuring device (i.e., thermocouple). The entire surface is monitored at any instant of time, and information on the area influenced by the evaporative cooling process is easily derived. A detailed description of the image processing based data reduction is provided. A water droplet in the range of 10-50 microliter is deposited on an opaque glasslike material that has an initial surface temperature between 100 and 165 deg C. The evaporative cooling process is fully documented, and these new findings are contrasted with the published literature to gain a better understanding of the phenomena involved.

  3. Robust remote monitoring of breathing function by using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carina B; Yu, Xinchi; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-08-01

    An abnormal breathing rate (BR) is one of the strongest markers of physiological distress. Moreover, it plays an important role in early detection of sudden infant death syndrome, as well as in the diagnosis of respiratory disorders. However, the current measuring modalities can cause discomfort to the patient, since attachment to the patient's body is required. This paper proposes a new approach based on infrared thermography to remotely monitor BR. This method allows to (1) detect automatically the nose, (2) track the associate region of interest (ROI), and (3) extract BR. To evaluate the performance of this method, thermal recording of 5 healthy subjects were acquired. Results were compared with BR obtained by capnography. The introduced approach demonstrated an excellent performance. ROIs were precisely segmented and tracked. Furthermore, a Bland-Altman diagram showed a good agreement between estimated BR and gold standard. The mean correlation and mean absolute BR error are 0.92 ± 0.07 and 0.53 bpm, respectively. In summary, infrared thermography seems to be a great, clinically relevant alternative to attached sensors, due to its outstanding characteristics and performance. PMID:26737233

  4. Noninvasive diagnosis of seed viability using infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    Kranner, Ilse; Kastberger, Gerald; Hartbauer, Manfred; Pritchard, Hugh W.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in the noninvasive analyses of plant metabolism include stress imaging techniques, mainly developed for vegetative tissues. We explored if infrared thermography can be used to predict whether a quiescent seed will germinate or die upon water uptake. Thermal profiles of viable, aged, and dead Pisum sativum seeds were recorded, and image analysis of 22,000 images per individual seed showed that infrared thermography can detect imbibition- and germination-associated biophysical and biochemical changes. These “thermal fingerprints” vary with viability in this species and in Triticum aestivum and Brassica napus seeds. Thermogenesis of the small individual B. napus seeds was at the limit of the technology. We developed a computer model of “virtual pea seeds,” that uses Monte Carlo simulation, based on the heat production of major seed storage compounds to unravel physico-chemical processes of thermogenesis. The simulation suggests that the cooling that dominates the early thermal profiles results from the dissolution of low molecular-weight carbohydrates. Moreover, the kinetics of the production of such “cooling” compounds over the following 100 h is dependent on seed viability. We also developed a deterministic tool that predicts in the first 3 hours of water uptake, when seeds can be redried and stored again, whether or not a pea seed will germinate. We believe that the early separation of individual, ungerminated seeds (live, aged, or dead) before destructive germination assessment creates unique opportunities for integrative studies on cell death, differentiation, and development. PMID:20133712

  5. Temperature maps measurements on 3D surfaces with infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardone, Gennaro; Ianiro, Andrea; Dello Ioio, Gennaro; Passaro, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    The use of the infrared camera as a temperature transducer in wind tunnel applications is convenient and widespread. Nevertheless, the infrared data are available in the form of 2D images while the observed surfaces are often not planar and the reconstruction of temperature maps over them is a critical task. In this work, after recalling the principles of IR thermography, a methodology to rebuild temperature maps on the surfaces of 3D object is proposed. In particular, an optical calibration is applied to the IR camera by means of a novel target plate with control points. The proposed procedure takes also into account the directional emissivity by estimating the viewing angle. All the needed steps are described and analyzed. The advantages given by the proposed method are shown with an experiment in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  6. Dual-band infrared thermography for quantitative nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, P.F.; Del Grande, N.K.; Dolan, K.W.; Perkins, D.E.; Shapiro, A.B.

    1993-04-01

    The authors have developed dual-band infrared (DBIR) thermography that is being applied to quantitative nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aging aircraft. The DBIR technique resolves 0.2 degrees C surface temperature differences for inspecting interior flaws in heated aircraft structures. It locates cracks, corrosion sites, disbonds or delaminations in metallic laps and composite patches. By removing clutter from surface roughness effects, the authors clarify interpretation of subsurface flaws. To accomplish this, the authors ratio images recorded at two infrared bands, centered near 5 microns and 10 microns. These image ratios are used to decouple temperature patterns associated with interior flaw sites from spatially varying surface emissivity noise. They also discuss three-dimensional (3D) dynamic thermal imaging of structural flaws using dual-band infrared (DBIR) computed tomography. Conventional thermography provides single-band infrared images which are difficult to interpret. Standard procedures yield imprecise (or qualitative) information about subsurface flaw sites which are typically masked by surface clutter. They use a DBIR imaging technique pioneered at LLNL to capture the time history of surface temperature difference patterns for flash-heated targets. They relate these patterns to the location, size, shape and depth of subsurface flaws. They have demonstrated temperature accuracies of 0.2{degree}C, timing synchronization of 3 ms (after onset of heat flash) and intervals of 42 ms, between images, during an 8 s cooling (and heating) interval characterizing the front (and back) surface temperature-time history of an epoxy-glue disbond site in a flash-heated aluminum lap joint.

  7. Infrared thermography inspection of glass reinforced plastic (GRP) wind turbine blades and the concept of an automated scanning device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdelidis, Nicolas P.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Maldague, X. P. V.

    2013-05-01

    Infrared thermography techniques have been used for many years in the non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT and E) of materials and structures. The main advantage of thermography over classical NDT techniques resides in the possibility of inspecting large areas in a fast and safe manner without needing to have access to both sides of the component. Nonetheless infrared thermography is limited to the detection of relatively shallow defects (a few millimetres under the surface), since it is affected by 3D heat diffusion. However, the most common types of anomalies found on composites, such as GRP wind turbine blades are delaminations, disbonds, water ingress, node failure and core crushing, and can be effectively detected and sometimes quantified using active thermographic techniques. This research work presents the use of infrared thermography on glass reinforced plastic (GRP) wind turbine blades assessment. Finally, the development of an autonomous, novel and lightweight multi-axis scanning system, as a concept, deploying in situ thermography NDT is also presented, with the intention of developing maximisation of the blade area coverage in a single run, at a known sensitivity, with the utilisation of the minimum number of system degrees of freedom and the maximum repeatability, as well as positional accuracy possible.

  8. A comparative investigation for the nondestructive testing of honeycomb structures by holographic interferometry and infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfarra, S.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Avdelidis, N. P.; Genest, M.; Bouchagier, L.; Kourousis, D.; Tsimogiannis, A.; Anastassopoulous, A.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.; Ambrosini, D.; Paoletti, D.

    2010-03-01

    The nondestructive testing (NDT) of honeycomb sandwich structures has been the subject of several studies. Classical techniques such as ultrasound testing and x-rays are commonly used to inspect these structures. Holographic interferometry (HI) and infrared thermography (IT) have shown to be interesting alternatives. Holography has been successfully used to detect debonding between the skin and the honeycomb core on honeycomb panels under a controlled environment. Active thermography has proven to effectively identify the most common types of defects (water ingress, debonding, crushed core, surface impacts) normally present in aeronautical honeycomb parts while inspecting large surfaces in a fast manner. This is very attractive for both the inspection during the manufacturing process and for in situ regular NDT assessment. A comparative experimental investigation is discussed herein to evaluate the performance of HI and IT for the NDT on a honeycomb panel with fabricated defects. The main advantages and limitations of both techniques are enumerated and discussed.

  9. Investigation of various essential factors for optimum infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Okada, Keiji; Takemura, Kei; Sato, Shigeru

    2013-10-01

    We investigated various essential factors for optimum infrared thermography for cattle clinics. The effect of various factors on the detection of surface temperature was investigated in an experimental room with a fixed ambient temperature using a square positioned on a wall. Various factors of animal objects were examined using cattle to determine the relationships among presence of hair, body surface temperature, surface temperature of the eyeball, the highest temperature of the eye circle, rectum temperature and ambient temperature. Also, the surface temperature of the flank at different time points after eating was examined. The best conditions of thermography for cattle clinics were determined and were as follows: (1) The distance between a thermal camera and an object should be fixed, and the camera should be set within a 45-degree angle with respect to the objects using the optimum focal length. (2) Factors that affect the camera temperature, such as extreme cold or heat, direct sunshine, high humidity and wind, should be avoided. (3) For the comparison of thermographs, imaging should be performed under identical conditions. If this is not achievable, hairless parts should be used. PMID:23759714

  10. Investigation of Various Essential Factors for Optimum Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    OKADA, Keiji; TAKEMURA, Kei; SATO, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated various essential factors for optimum infrared thermography for cattle clinics. The effect of various factors on the detection of surface temperature was investigated in an experimental room with a fixed ambient temperature using a square positioned on a wall. Various factors of animal objects were examined using cattle to determine the relationships among presence of hair, body surface temperature, surface temperature of the eyeball, the highest temperature of the eye circle, rectum temperature and ambient temperature. Also, the surface temperature of the flank at different time points after eating was examined. The best conditions of thermography for cattle clinics were determined and were as follows: (1) The distance between a thermal camera and an object should be fixed, and the camera should be set within a 45-degree angle with respect to the objects using the optimum focal length. (2) Factors that affect the camera temperature, such as extreme cold or heat, direct sunshine, high humidity and wind, should be avoided. (3) For the comparison of thermographs, imaging should be performed under identical conditions. If this is not achievable, hairless parts should be used. PMID:23759714

  11. Real time capable infrared thermography for ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sieglin, B. Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Brucker, B.; Eich, T.; Kammerloher, L.; Martinov, S.

    2015-11-15

    Infrared (IR) thermography is widely used in fusion research to study power exhaust and incident heat load onto the plasma facing components. Due to the short pulse duration of today’s fusion experiments, IR systems have mostly been designed for off-line data analysis. For future long pulse devices (e.g., Wendelstein 7-X, ITER), a real time evaluation of the target temperature and heat flux is mandatory. This paper shows the development of a real time capable IR system for ASDEX Upgrade. A compact IR camera has been designed incorporating the necessary magnetic and electric shielding for the detector, cooler assembly. The camera communication is based on the Camera Link industry standard. The data acquisition hardware is based on National Instruments hardware, consisting of a PXIe chassis inside and a fibre optical connected industry computer outside the torus hall. Image processing and data evaluation are performed using real time LabVIEW.

  12. High speed heterodyne infrared thermography applied to thermal diffusivity identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradere, C.; Clerjaud, L.; Batsale, J. C.; Dilhaire, S.

    2011-05-01

    We have combined InfraRed thermography and thermal wave techniques to perform microscale, ultrafast (microsecond) temperature field measurements. The method is based on an IR camera coupled to a microscope and synchronized to the heat source by means of phase locked function generators. The principle is based on electronic stroboscopic sampling where the low IR camera acquisition frequency facq (25 Hz) undersamples a high frequency thermal wave. This technique permits the measurement of the emissive thermal response at a (microsecond) short time scale (microsecond) with the full frame mode of the IR camera with a spatial thermal resolution of 7 μm. Then it becomes possible to study 3D transient heat transfer in heterogeneous and high thermal conductive thin layers. Thus it is possible for the first time in our knowledge to achieve temperature field measurements in heterogeneous media within a wide range of time domains. The IR camera is now a suitable instrument for multiscale thermal analysis.

  13. Infrared-thermography imaging system multiapplications for manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Sharon A.

    1990-03-01

    Imaging systems technology has been utilized traditionally for diagnosing structural envelope or insulation problems in the general thermographic comunity. Industrially, new applications for utilizing thermal imaging technology have been developed i n pred i cti ve/preventi ye mai ntenance and prod uct moni tori ng prociures at Eastman Kodak Company, the largest photographic manufacturering producer in the world. In the manufacturing processes used at Eastman Kodak Company, new applications for thermal imaging include: (1) Fluid transfer line insulation (2) Web coating drying uniformity (3) Web slitter knives (4) Heating/cooling coils (5) Overheated tail bearings, and (6) Electrical phase imbalance. The substantial cost benefits gained from these applications of infrared thermography substantiate the practicality of this approach and indicate the desirability of researching further appl i cati ons.

  14. Standing wave in evaporating meniscus detected by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffone, Cosimo; Sefiane, Khellil; Minetti, Christophe; Mamalis, Dimitrios

    2015-07-01

    A standing wave has been detected in the evaporating meniscus formed on an organic liquid (acetone) inside a horizontally positioned capillary tube of 1 mm internal diameter. The standing wave is believed to originate from the interaction between surface tension and gravitational forces. We found that the standing wave ensues only at the upper part of the meniscus interface where gravity and surface tension act in the opposite direction. This experimental observation is similar to standing waves observed in floating zones in microgravity but different from travelling waves reported recently in volatile drops; in both cases the waves are produced by temperature differences along a liquid-vapour interface. By employing InfraRed thermography, we recorded the temperature distribution of the meniscus interface, and we found that the first characteristic frequency of the standing wave is around 0.3 Hz.

  15. Localization of wood floor structure by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochior Plescanu, C.; Klein, M.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Bendada, A.; Maldague, X.

    2008-03-01

    One of our industrial partners, Assek Technologie, is interested in developing a technique that would improve the drying process of wood floor in basements after flooding. In order to optimize the procedure, the floor structure and the damaged (wet) area extent must first be determined with minimum intrusion (minimum or no dismantling). The present study presents the use of infrared thermography to reveal the structure of (flooded) wood floors. The procedure involves opening holes in the floor. Injecting some hot air through those holes reveals the framing structure even if the floor is covered by vinyl or ceramic tiles. This study indicates that thermal imaging can also be used as a tool to validate the decontamination process after drying. Thermal images were obtained on small-scale models and in a demonstration room.

  16. Advanced Image Processing for Defect Visualization in Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotnikov, Yuri A.; Winfree, William P.

    1997-01-01

    Results of a defect visualization process based on pulse infrared thermography are presented. Algorithms have been developed to reduce the amount of operator participation required in the process of interpreting thermographic images. The algorithms determine the defect's depth and size from the temporal and spatial thermal distributions that exist on the surface of the investigated object following thermal excitation. A comparison of the results from thermal contrast, time derivative, and phase analysis methods for defect visualization are presented. These comparisons are based on three dimensional simulations of a test case representing a plate with multiple delaminations. Comparisons are also based on experimental data obtained from a specimen with flat bottom holes and a composite panel with delaminations.

  17. Real time capable infrared thermography for ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Sieglin, B; Faitsch, M; Herrmann, A; Brucker, B; Eich, T; Kammerloher, L; Martinov, S

    2015-11-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography is widely used in fusion research to study power exhaust and incident heat load onto the plasma facing components. Due to the short pulse duration of today's fusion experiments, IR systems have mostly been designed for off-line data analysis. For future long pulse devices (e.g., Wendelstein 7-X, ITER), a real time evaluation of the target temperature and heat flux is mandatory. This paper shows the development of a real time capable IR system for ASDEX Upgrade. A compact IR camera has been designed incorporating the necessary magnetic and electric shielding for the detector, cooler assembly. The camera communication is based on the Camera Link industry standard. The data acquisition hardware is based on National Instruments hardware, consisting of a PXIe chassis inside and a fibre optical connected industry computer outside the torus hall. Image processing and data evaluation are performed using real time LabVIEW. PMID:26628130

  18. Real time capable infrared thermography for ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieglin, B.; Faitsch, M.; Herrmann, A.; Brucker, B.; Eich, T.; Kammerloher, L.; Martinov, S.

    2015-11-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography is widely used in fusion research to study power exhaust and incident heat load onto the plasma facing components. Due to the short pulse duration of today's fusion experiments, IR systems have mostly been designed for off-line data analysis. For future long pulse devices (e.g., Wendelstein 7-X, ITER), a real time evaluation of the target temperature and heat flux is mandatory. This paper shows the development of a real time capable IR system for ASDEX Upgrade. A compact IR camera has been designed incorporating the necessary magnetic and electric shielding for the detector, cooler assembly. The camera communication is based on the Camera Link industry standard. The data acquisition hardware is based on National Instruments hardware, consisting of a PXIe chassis inside and a fibre optical connected industry computer outside the torus hall. Image processing and data evaluation are performed using real time LabVIEW.

  19. Optimized laser application in dermatology using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Roderick A.; Donne, Kelvin E.; Clement, Marc; Kiernan, Michael N.

    2002-03-01

    Infrared thermography can be used to optimize the application of lasers in dermatology with particular reference to the treatment of certain skin disorders such as vascular lesions and depilation. The efficacy of treatment is dependent upon a number of factors including: Optimization and correct selection of laser parameters such as wavelength and spot size. Human factors, such as laser operator skill, patient's skin type and anatomical location. By observing the thermal effects of laser irradiation on the skins surface during treatment results in improved efficacy and minimizes the possible threshold to skin damage, reducing the possibility of burning and scarring. This is of particular significance for example, in the control of purpura for the treatment of vascular lesions. The optimization is validated with reference to a computer model that predicts various skin temperatures based on two different laser spot sizes.

  20. Use of modern infrared thermography for wildlife population surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Dale L.; Underwood, H. Brian; Porter, William F.

    1995-03-01

    A commercially available thermal-infrared scanning system was used to survey populations of several wildlife species. The system's ability to detect species of different sizes in varying habitats relative to conventional survey methods, to differentiate between species in the same habitat, and the influence of environtmental factors on operational aspects of employing this technology in the field were evaluated. Total costs for the surveys were approximately 0.36/ha. There were marked discrepancies in the counts of untrained observers and those from trained analysis. Computer-assisted analysis of infrared imagery recorded 52% fewer deer than were estimated from drive counts, and densities of moose were five times those estimated from conventional aerial methods. By flying concentric circles and using telephoto, detailed counts of turkeys and deer were possible. With the aid of computer-assisted analysis, infrared thermography may become a useful wildlife population survey tool. More research is needed to verify the actual efficiency of detection by combining aerial scans with ground truthing for a variely of species and habitals.

  1. Monitoring Sintering Burn-Through Point Using Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Usamentiaga, Rubén; Molleda, Julio; Garcia, Daniel F.; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2013-01-01

    Sintering is a complex industrial process that applies heat to fine particles of iron ore and other materials to produce sinter, a solidified porous material used in blast furnaces. The sintering process needs to be carefully adjusted, so that the combustion zone reaches the bottom of the material just before the discharge end. This is known as the burn-through point. Many different parameters need to be finely tuned, including the speed and the quantities of the materials mixed. However, in order to achieve good results, sintering control requires precise feedback to adjust these parameters. This work presents a sensor to monitor the sintering burn-through point based on infrared thermography. The proposed procedure is based on the acquisition of infrared images at the end of the sintering process. At this position, infrared images contain the cross-section temperatures of the mixture. The objective of this work is to process this information to extract relevant features about the sintering process. The proposed procedure is based on four steps: key frame detection, region of interest detection, segmentation and feature extraction. The results indicate that the proposed procedure is very robust and reliable, providing features that can be used effectively to control the sintering process. PMID:23939585

  2. Application of infrared thermography in computer aided diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Oliver; Rajendra Acharya, U.; Ng, E. Y. K.; Hong, Tan Jen; Yu, Wenwei

    2014-09-01

    The invention of thermography, in the 1950s, posed a formidable problem to the research community: What is the relationship between disease and heat radiation captured with Infrared (IR) cameras? The research community responded with a continuous effort to find this crucial relationship. This effort was aided by advances in processing techniques, improved sensitivity and spatial resolution of thermal sensors. However, despite this progress fundamental issues with this imaging modality still remain. The main problem is that the link between disease and heat radiation is complex and in many cases even non-linear. Furthermore, the change in heat radiation as well as the change in radiation pattern, which indicate disease, is minute. On a technical level, this poses high requirements on image capturing and processing. On a more abstract level, these problems lead to inter-observer variability and on an even more abstract level they lead to a lack of trust in this imaging modality. In this review, we adopt the position that these problems can only be solved through a strict application of scientific principles and objective performance assessment. Computing machinery is inherently objective; this helps us to apply scientific principles in a transparent way and to assess the performance results. As a consequence, we aim to promote thermography based Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems. Another benefit of CAD systems comes from the fact that the diagnostic accuracy is linked to the capability of the computing machinery and, in general, computers become ever more potent. We predict that a pervasive application of computers and networking technology in medicine will help us to overcome the shortcomings of any single imaging modality and this will pave the way for integrated health care systems which maximize the quality of patient care.

  3. Infrared thermography as a high-throughput tool in catalysis research.

    PubMed

    Loskyll, Jonas; Stoewe, Klaus; Maier, Wilhelm F

    2012-05-14

    The so-called "emissivity corrected infrared thermography" (ecIRT) has been successfully developed and used to great effect in the field of combinatorial high-throughput studies in catalysis. A short introduction to the basics of ecIRT and the description of a typical setup is given. Research efforts from 1998 until present are summarized and selected publications with IRT applications in catalysis are highlighted. The last section of the article covers potential problems, which the observant may misinterpret as activity of the materials. The effects are classified and it is explained why they occur and what can be done to bypass them. PMID:22432458

  4. Exit Presentation: Infrared Thermography on Graphite/Epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comeaux, Kayla

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reports on the internship project that was accomplished during the summer of 2010. The objectives of the project were to: (1) Simulate Flash Thermography on Graphite/Epoxy Flat Bottom hole Specimen and thin void specimens, (2) Obtain Flash Thermography data on Graphite/Epoxy flat bottom hole specimens, (3) Compare experimental results with simulation results, Compare Flat Bottom Hole Simulation with Thin Void Simulation to create a graph to determine size of IR Thermography detected defects

  5. Nde of Advanced Automotive Composite Materials that Apply Ultrasound Infrared Thermography Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Seung-Hyun; Park, Soo-Keun; Kim, Jae-Yeol

    The infrared thermographic nondestructive inspection technique is a quality inspection and stability assessment method used to diagnose the physical characteristics and defects by detecting the infrared ray radiated from the object without destructing it. Recently, the nondestructive inspection and assessment that use the ultrasound-infrared thermography technique are widely adopted in diverse areas. The ultrasound-infrared thermography technique uses the phenomenon that the ultrasound wave incidence to an object with cracks or defects on its mating surface generates local heat on the surface. The car industry increasingly uses composite materials for their lightweight, strength, and environmental resistance. In this study, the car piston passed through the ultrasound-infrared thermography technique for nondestructive testing, among the composite material car parts. This study also examined the effects of the frequency and power to optimize the nondestructive inspection.

  6. Infrared thermography based defect detection in ferromagnetic specimens using a low frequency alternating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Soumya, C.; Mahendran, V.; Pillai, V. P. M.; Philip, John; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-05-01

    A new active infrared thermography based technique is proposed for defect detection in ferromagnetic specimens using a low frequency alternating magnetic field induced heating. The test specimens (four mild steel specimens with artificial rectangular slots of 8.0, 5.0, 3.3 and 3.0 mm depths) are magnetized using a low frequency alternating magnetic field and by using an infrared camera, the surface temperature is remotely monitored in real time. An alternating magnetic field induces an eddy current in the specimen which increases the specimen temperature due to the Joule's heating. The experimental results show a thermal contrast in the defective region that decays exponentially with the defect depth. The observed thermal contrast is attributed to the reduction in induction heating due to the leakage of magnetic flux caused by magnetic permeability gradient in the defective region. The proposed technique is suitable for rapid non-contact wide area inspection of ferromagnetic materials and offers several advantages over the conventional active thermography techniques like fast direct heating, no frequency optimization, no dependence on the surface absorption coefficient and penetration depth.

  7. Automated diagnosis of dry eye using infrared thermography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, U. Rajendra; Tan, Jen Hong; Koh, Joel E. W.; Sudarshan, Vidya K.; Yeo, Sharon; Too, Cheah Loon; Chua, Chua Kuang; Ng, E. Y. K.; Tong, Louis

    2015-07-01

    Dry Eye (DE) is a condition of either decreased tear production or increased tear film evaporation. Prolonged DE damages the cornea causing the corneal scarring, thinning and perforation. There is no single uniform diagnosis test available to date; combinations of diagnostic tests are to be performed to diagnose DE. The current diagnostic methods available are subjective, uncomfortable and invasive. Hence in this paper, we have developed an efficient, fast and non-invasive technique for the automated identification of normal and DE classes using infrared thermography images. The features are extracted from nonlinear method called Higher Order Spectra (HOS). Features are ranked using t-test ranking strategy. These ranked features are fed to various classifiers namely, K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN), Nave Bayesian Classifier (NBC), Decision Tree (DT), Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN), and Support Vector Machine (SVM) to select the best classifier using minimum number of features. Our proposed system is able to identify the DE and normal classes automatically with classification accuracy of 99.8%, sensitivity of 99.8%, and specificity if 99.8% for left eye using PNN and KNN classifiers. And we have reported classification accuracy of 99.8%, sensitivity of 99.9%, and specificity if 99.4% for right eye using SVM classifier with polynomial order 2 kernel.

  8. International standards for pandemic screening using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, D. D.; Ring, E. F.; Mercer, J. B.; Snell, J.; Osborn, D.; Hedley-Whyte, J.

    2010-03-01

    The threat of a virulent strain of influenza, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), tuberculosis, H1N1/A virus (swine flu) and possible mutations are a constant threat to global health. Implementation of pandemic infrared thermographic screening is based on the detection of febrile temperatures (inner canthus of the eyes) that are correlated with an infectious disease. Previous attempts at pandemic thermal screening have experienced problems (e.g. SARS outbreak, Singapore 2003) associated with the deployment plan, implementation and operation of the screening thermograph. Since this outbreak, the International Electrotechnical Commission has developed international standards that set minimum requirements for thermographic system fever screening and procedures that insure reliable and reproducible measurements. These requirements are published in IEC 80601-2-59:2008, Medical electrical equipment - Part 2-59: Particular requirements for the basic safety and essential performance of screening thermographs for human febrile temperature screening. The International Organization for Standardization has developed ISO/TR 13154:2009, Medical Electrical Equipment - which provides deployment, implementation and operational guidelines for identifying febrile humans using a screening thermograph. These new standards includes recommendations for camera calibrations, use of black body radiators, view field, focus, pixels within measurement site, image positioning, and deployment locations. Many current uses of thermographic screening at airports do not take into account critical issues addressed in the new standard, and are operating below the necessary effectiveness and efficiency. These documents, related thermal research, implications for epidemiology screening, and the future impact on medical thermography are discussed.

  9. Measuring and Estimating Normalized Contrast in Infrared Flash Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared flash thermography (IRFT) is used to detect void-like flaws in a test object. The IRFT technique involves heating up the part surface using a flash of flash lamps. The post-flash evolution of the part surface temperature is sensed by an IR camera in terms of pixel intensity of image pixels. The IR technique involves recording of the IR video image data and analysis of the data using the normalized pixel intensity and temperature contrast analysis method for characterization of void-like flaws for depth and width. This work introduces a new definition of the normalized IR pixel intensity contrast and normalized surface temperature contrast. A procedure is provided to compute the pixel intensity contrast from the camera pixel intensity evolution data. The pixel intensity contrast and the corresponding surface temperature contrast differ but are related. This work provides a method to estimate the temperature evolution and the normalized temperature contrast from the measured pixel intensity evolution data and some additional measurements during data acquisition.

  10. Infrared thermography based studies on mobile phone induced heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Soumya, C.; Jayakumar, T.; Philip, John

    2015-07-01

    Here, we report the skin temperature rise due to the absorption of radio frequency (RF) energy from three handheld mobile phones using infrared thermography technique. Experiments are performed under two different conditions, viz. when the mobile phones are placed in soft touch with the skin surface and away from the skin surface. Additionally, the temperature rise of mobile phones during charging, operation and simultaneous charging and talking are monitored under different exposure conditions. It is observed that the temperature of the cheek and ear regions monotonically increased with time during the usage of mobile phones and the magnitude of the temperature rise is higher for the mobile phone with higher specific absorption rate. The increase in skin temperature is higher when the mobile phones are in contact with the skin surface due to the combined effect of absorption of RF electromagnetic power and conductive heat transfer. The increase in the skin temperature in non-contact mode is found to be within the safety limit of 1 °C. The measured temperature rise is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The empirical equation obtained from the temperature rise on the cheek region of the subjects correlates well with the specific absorption rate of the mobile phones. Our study suggests that the use of mobile phones in non-contact mode can significantly lower the skin temperature rise during its use and hence, is safer compared to the contact mode.

  11. Remote monitoring of breathing dynamics using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carina Barbosa; Yu, Xinchi; Czaplik, Michael; Rossaint, Rolf; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-11-01

    An atypical or irregular respiratory frequency is considered to be one of the earliest markers of physiological distress. In addition, monitoring of this vital parameter plays a major role in diagnosis of respiratory disorders, as well as in early detection of sudden infant death syndrome. Nevertheless, the current measurement modalities require attachment of sensors to the patient's body, leading to discomfort and stress. The current paper presents a new robust algorithm to remotely monitor breathing rate (BR) by using thermal imaging. This approach permits to detect and to track the region of interest (nose) as well as to estimate BR. In order to study the performance of the algorithm, and its robustness against motion and breathing disorders, three different thermal recordings of 11 healthy volunteers were acquired (sequence 1: normal breathing; sequence 2: normal breathing plus arbitrary head movements; and sequence 3: sequence of specific breathing patterns). Thoracic effort (piezoplethysmography) served as "gold standard" for validation of our results. An excellent agreement between estimated BR and ground truth was achieved. Whereas the mean correlation for sequence 1-3 were 0.968, 0.940 and 0.974, the mean absolute BR errors reached 0.33, 0.55 and 0.96 bpm (breaths per minute), respectively. In brief, this work demonstrates that infrared thermography is a promising, clinically relevant alternative for the currently available measuring modalities due to its performance and diverse remarkable advantages. PMID:26601003

  12. Remote monitoring of breathing dynamics using infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carina Barbosa; Yu, Xinchi; Czaplik, Michael; Rossaint, Rolf; Blazek, Vladimir; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    An atypical or irregular respiratory frequency is considered to be one of the earliest markers of physiological distress. In addition, monitoring of this vital parameter plays a major role in diagnosis of respiratory disorders, as well as in early detection of sudden infant death syndrome. Nevertheless, the current measurement modalities require attachment of sensors to the patient’s body, leading to discomfort and stress. The current paper presents a new robust algorithm to remotely monitor breathing rate (BR) by using thermal imaging. This approach permits to detect and to track the region of interest (nose) as well as to estimate BR. In order to study the performance of the algorithm, and its robustness against motion and breathing disorders, three different thermal recordings of 11 healthy volunteers were acquired (sequence 1: normal breathing; sequence 2: normal breathing plus arbitrary head movements; and sequence 3: sequence of specific breathing patterns). Thoracic effort (piezoplethysmography) served as “gold standard” for validation of our results. An excellent agreement between estimated BR and ground truth was achieved. Whereas the mean correlation for sequence 1–3 were 0.968, 0.940 and 0.974, the mean absolute BR errors reached 0.33, 0.55 and 0.96 bpm (breaths per minute), respectively. In brief, this work demonstrates that infrared thermography is a promising, clinically relevant alternative for the currently available measuring modalities due to its performance and diverse remarkable advantages. PMID:26601003

  13. Surface temperatures of insulated glazing units: Infrared thermography laboratory measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, B.T.; Tuerler, D.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-12-01

    Data are presented for the distribution of surface temperatures on the warm-side surface of seven different insulated glazing units. Surface temperatures are measured using infrared thermography and an external referencing technique. This technique allows detailed mapping of surface temperatures that is non-intrusive. The glazings were placed between warm and cold environmental chambers that were operated at conditions corresponding to standard design conditions for winter heating. The temperatures conditions are 2 1.1{degrees}C (70{degrees}F) and -17.8{degrees}C (0{degrees}F) on the warm and cold sides, respectively. Film coefficients varied somewhat with average conditions of about 7.6 W/m{sup 2}{circ}K (1.34 Btu/h-ft{sup 2}{circ}{degrees}F) for the warm-side and 28.9 W/m{sup 2}{circ}K (5.1 Btu/h{circ}ft{sup 2}{circ}{degrees}F) for the cold-side. Surface temperature data are plotted for the vertical distribution along the centerline of the IG and for the horizontal distribution along the centerline. This paper is part of larger collaborative effort that studied the same set of glazings.

  14. Low-velocity impact damage characterization of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yin; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Zheng-wei; Zhang, Jin-yu; Tao, Sheng-jie

    2016-05-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) after low-velocity impact is detected using infrared thermography, and different damages in the impacted composites are analyzed in the thermal maps. The thermal conductivity under pulse stimulation, frictional heating and thermal conductivity under ultrasonic stimulation of CFRP containing low-velocity impact damage are simulated using numerical simulation method. Then, the specimens successively exposed to the low-velocity impact are respectively detected using the pulse infrared thermography and ultrasonic infrared thermography. Through the numerical simulation and experimental investigation, the results obtained show that the combination of the above two detection methods can greatly improve the capability for detecting and evaluating the impact damage in CFRP. Different damages correspond to different infrared thermal images. The delamination damage, matrix cracking and fiber breakage are characterized as the block-shape hot spot, line-shape hot spot,

  15. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-18

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  16. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  17. Using aerial infrared thermography to detect utility theft of service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Gregory R.; Lucas, R. Gillem

    2012-06-01

    Natural gas and electric utility companies, public utility commissions, consumer advocacy groups, city governments, state governments and the federal government United States continue to turn a blind eye towards utility energy theft of service which we conservatively estimate is in excess of 10 billion a year. Why? Many in the United States have exhausted their unemployment benefits. The amounts for federal funding for low income heating assistance programs (LIHEAP) funds were cut by nearly 40% for 2012 to 3.02 billion. "At peak funding ($5.1 billion in 2009), the program was national in scale but still only had enough resources to support roughly 1/4 of the eligible households.i" Contributions to charities are down and the number of families below the poverty line who are unable to pay to heat their houses continues to rise. Many of the less fortunate in our society now consider theft and fraud to be an attractive option for their supply of natural gas and/or electricity. A record high mild winter in 2011-2012 coupled with 10-year low natural gas prices temporarily obscured the need for low income heating assistance programs (LIHEAPs) from the news and federal budgets, but cold winters will return. The proliferation of smart meters and automated meter infrastructures across our nation can do little to detect energy theft because the thieves can simply by-pass the meters, jumper around the meters and/or steal meters from abandoned houses and use them. Many utility systems were never set-up to stop these types of theft. Even with low-cost per identified thief method using aerial infrared thermography, utilities continue to ignore theft detection.

  18. Evaluation of paint coating thickness variations based on pulsed Infrared thermography laser technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezghani, S.; Perrin, E.; Vrabie, V.; Bodnar, J. L.; Marthe, J.; Cauwe, B.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a pulsed Infrared thermography technique using a homogeneous heat provided by a laser source is used for the non-destructive evaluation of paint coating thickness variations. Firstly, numerical simulations of the thermal response of a paint coated sample are performed. By analyzing the thermal responses as a function of thermal properties and thickness of both coating and substrate layers, optimal excitation parameters of the heating source are determined. Two characteristic parameters were studied with respect to the paint coating layer thickness variations. Results obtained using an experimental test bench based on the pulsed Infrared thermography laser technique are compared with those given by a classical Eddy current technique for paint coating variations from 5 to 130 μm. These results demonstrate the efficiency of this approach and suggest that the pulsed Infrared thermography technique presents good perspectives to characterize the heterogeneity of paint coating on large scale samples with other heating sources.

  19. Infrared thermography as a diagnostic tool to indicate sick-house-syndrome: a case-study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    1996-03-01

    Every third child and many adults in Sweden have allergic reactions caused by indoor environmental problems. A lot of buildings constructed during the building-boom period of 1950 - 1990 expose the sick-house-syndrome, due to built-in moisture problems and poor ventilation performance of the building. Leaky building construction, transport of humid air condensing on thermal bridges within the construction gives rise to a humid environment, and forms a base for a microbial deterioration process of organic materials, with emissions hazardous for human health. So far there are no universal and cost efficient techniques or methods developed which could be used to reveal the sick-house-syndrome. In this paper we present the results of a case-study of the sick-house-syndrome, and an investigation concept with a combination of different techniques and methods to detect and to map underlying factors that form the base for microbial activities. The concept includes mobile and indoor thermography, functional control of ventilation systems, tracer gas techniques for measurement of air flow exchange rate in different rooms, microbial investigation of emissions, field inspections within the building construction and the building envelope, and medical investigation of the health status of the people working in the building. Mobile thermography of the exterior facades has been performed with a longwave AGEMA THV 900, respectively THV 1000 infrared system, during the period December 1994 - June 1995, at different and similar weather and radiation conditions, and with the building pressurized at one accession. Indoor thermography has been performed with a shortwave AGEMA THV 470 system, for a selection of objects/surfaces with thermal deviations, indicated in thermograms from the different mobile thermographic surveys. Functional control was performed for the ventilation systems, and air flow rates were measured using tracer gas technique for a selection of rooms with different

  20. Characterization of an infrared detector for high frame rate thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruehmann, R. K.; Crump, D. A.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    The use of a commercially available photodetector based infrared thermography system, operating in the 2-5 µm range, for high frame rate imaging of temperature evolutions in solid materials is investigated. Infrared photodetectors provide a very fast and precise means of obtaining temperature evolutions over a wide range of science and engineering applications. A typical indium antimonide detector will have a thermal resolution of around 4 mK for room temperature measurements, with a noise threshold around 15 to 20 mK. However the precision of the measurement is dependent on the integration time (akin to exposure time in conventional photography). For temperature evolutions that occur at a moderate rate the integration time can be relatively long, enabling a large signal to noise ratio. A matter of increasing importance in engineering is the behaviour of materials at high strain rates, such as those experienced in impact, shock and ballistic loading. The rapid strain evolution in the material is usually accompanied by a temperature change. The temperature change will affect the material constitutive properties and hence it is important to capture both the temperature and the strain evolutions to provide a proper constitutive law for the material behaviour. The present paper concentrates on the capture of the temperature evolutions, which occur at such rates that rule out the use of contact sensors such as thermocouples and electrical resistance thermometers, as their response times are too slow. Furthermore it is desirable to have an indication of the temperature distribution over a test specimen, hence the full-field approach of IRT is investigated. The paper explores the many hitherto unaddressed challenges of IRT when employed at high speed. Firstly the images must be captured at high speeds, which means reduced integration times and hence a reduction in the signal to noise ratio. Furthermore, to achieve the high image capture rates the detector array must be

  1. Transient infrared thermography for damage evaluation in aerospace composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, S.; Peters, K.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of defect detection using long duration transient thermography for woven composite laminates subjected to low-velocity impacts. Two types of defects are studied: inclusions represented by foam tabs inserted into the laminate during fabrication and barely visible impact damage due to low-velocity impacts. These defects represent the expected damage states that are necessary for inspection during the service life of a woven composite aircraft component. The long duration transient thermography is demonstrated to successfully detect the embedded inclusions, with a dimension to depth ratio detection capability of approximately 3. It is also demonstrated that the detection of low velocity impact damage with the transient thermography is less successful due to uneven emissivity of the surface. Therefore, processing of the image using a self referencing algorithm is performed which improves the damage detection clarity.

  2. Calibration and Evaluation of Ultrasound Thermography Using Infrared Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Deng, Cheri X

    2016-02-01

    Real-time monitoring of the spatiotemporal evolution of tissue temperature is important to ensure safe and effective treatment in thermal therapies including hyperthermia and thermal ablation. Ultrasound thermography has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for temperature measurement, and accurate calibration of the temperature-dependent ultrasound signal changes against temperature is required. Here we report a method that uses infrared thermography for calibration and validation of ultrasound thermography. Using phantoms and cardiac tissue specimens subjected to high-intensity focused ultrasound heating, we simultaneously acquired ultrasound and infrared imaging data from the same surface plane of a sample. The commonly used echo time shift-based method was chosen to compute ultrasound thermometry. We first correlated the ultrasound echo time shifts with infrared-measured temperatures for material-dependent calibration and found that the calibration coefficient was positive for fat-mimicking phantom (1.49 ± 0.27) but negative for tissue-mimicking phantom (-0.59 ± 0.08) and cardiac tissue (-0.69 ± 0.18°C-mm/ns). We then obtained the estimation error of the ultrasound thermometry by comparing against the infrared-measured temperature and revealed that the error increased with decreased size of the heated region. Consistent with previous findings, the echo time shifts were no longer linearly dependent on temperature beyond 45°C-50°C in cardiac tissues. Unlike previous studies in which thermocouples or water bath techniques were used to evaluate the performance of ultrasound thermography, our results indicate that high-resolution infrared thermography is a useful tool that can be applied to evaluate and understand the limitations of ultrasound thermography methods. PMID:26547634

  3. Locating levels in tanks and silos using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snell, John R., Jr.; Schwoegler, Matt

    2004-04-01

    Thermography is a powerful tool for locating or verifying levels in tanks and silos. But one could ask "Why bother?" All too often existing level indication instruments are simply not reliable or positive verification of instrumentation readings is required. When properly used, thermography can reveal not only the liquid/gas interface, but also sludge buildup and floating materials such as waxes and foams. Similar techniques can be used to locate levels and bridging problems in silos containing fluidized solids. This paper discusses the parameters and limitations that must be addressed, shows techniques that can be employed, and illustrates the discussions with numerous thermal images.

  4. Infrared thermography at EDF: common technique for high-voltage lines but new in monitoring and diagnosis of PWR plant components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Daniel

    1996-03-01

    Infrared thermography is a remarkable aid in maintenance, and has been used for a number of years in testing high-voltage lines and transformer substations. Electricite de France (EDF) has developed a special infrared thermography system for this type of application. Until recently, use of IRT in both fossil and nuclear power plants was only sporadic and depended on the interest shown in the technique by individual maintenance managers. In power stations, it was primarily used for tests on switchyards, electrical control cabinets and insulation. The General Engineering Department of the EDF Generation and Transmission Division was responsible for assessing new equipment and studying special development requirements as they arose. Routine infrared thermography tests were performed by two teams from the Division, one handling northern France and the other southern France. Today, infrared thermography has become a fully-fledged monitoring and diagnosis tool in its own right, and related activities are being reorganized accordingly. Its recent success can be attributed to a number of factors: more high-powered IRT techniques, valuable feedback from American utility companies, and technical and economic assessments conducted by EDF over the last two years on equipment such as electrical and mechanical components, valves and insulation. EDF's reorganization of infrared thermography activities will begin with an overview of the resources now existing within the company. This inventory will be carried out by the General Engineering Department. At the same time, a report will be drawn up bearing on IRT testing over the last decade in conventional and nuclear power plants in France and the United States. Lastly, EDF will draw up a list of components to be monitored in this way, essentially on the basis of RCM studies. These measures will provide power plants with a catalogue of infrared thermography applications for specific component/failure combinations.

  5. Focal plane array based infrared thermography in fine physical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainer, Boris G.

    2008-03-01

    By two examples of dissimilar physical phenomena causing thermophysical effects, the unique capabilities of one of the up-to-date methods of experimental physics—focal plane array (FPA) based infrared (IR) thermography (IRT), are demonstrated distinctly. Experimenters inexperienced in IRT can grasp how this method provides a means for combining real-time visualization with quantitative analysis. A narrow-band short-wavelength IR camera was used in the experiments. It is discussed and stated that IRT is best matched and suited to the next two test conditions—when a heated specimen is thin and when heat is generated in the immediate region of a surface of a solid. The first prerequisite is realized in the search for directional patterns of combined low-power radiation sources with the use of the IRT-aided method. The second one is realized in studies of water vapour adsorption on uneven (irregular) surfaces of solid materials. With multiple swatches taken from a set of different fabrics and used as experimental samples, a sharp distinction between adsorptivities of their surfaces is strikingly illustrated by IRT time-domain measurements exhibiting the associated thermal effect ranging within an order of magnitude. It is justified that the described IRT-aided test can find practical implementation at least in the light industry. Emissivities of different fabrics are evaluated experimentally with the described reflection method based on the narrow spectral range of IRT. On the basis of direct IR observations, attention is paid to the need for close control over the surface temperature increase while the adsorption isotherms are being measured. Sensitivity of the FPA-based IRT method, as applied to examine the kinetics of initial stages of adsorption of gaseous molecules on the solid surface, is evaluated analytically and quantitatively. The relationship between the amount of adsorbate and the measurable excess of adsorbent temperature is found. It is discovered

  6. Photothermal and infrared thermography characterizations of thermal diffusion in hydroxyapatite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, J.; Conde-Contreras, M.; Trujillo, S.; Martinez-Torres, P.; Cruz-Jimenez, B.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2009-02-01

    Non destructive analysis of hydroxyapatite materials is an active research area mainly in the study of dental pieces and bones due to the importance these pieces have in medicine, archeology, dentistry, forensics and anthropology. Infrared thermography and photothermal techniques constitute highly valuable tools in those cases. In this work the quantitative analysis of thermal diffusion in bones is presented. The results obtained using thermographic images are compared with the ones obtained from the photothermal radiometry. Special emphasis is done in the analysis of samples with previous thermal damage. Our results show that the treatments induce changes in the physical properties of the samples. These results could be useful in the identification of the agents that induced modifications of unknown origin in hydroxyapatite structures.

  7. Infrared contrast data analysis method for quantitative measurement and monitoring in flash infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2015-04-01

    The paper provides information on a new infrared (IR) image contrast data post-processing method that involves converting raw data to normalized contrast versus time evolutions from the flash infrared thermography inspection video data. Thermal measurement features such as peak contrast, peak contrast time, persistence time, and persistence energy are calculated from the contrast evolutions. In addition, simulation of the contrast evolution is achieved through calibration on measured contrast evolutions from many flat bottom holes in a test plate of the subject material. The measurement features are used to monitor growth of anomalies and to characterize the void-like anomalies. The method was developed to monitor and analyze void-like anomalies in reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) materials used on the wing leading edge of the NASA Space Shuttle Orbiters, but the method is equally applicable to other materials. The thermal measurement features relate to the anomaly characteristics such as depth and size. Calibration of the contrast is used to provide an assessment of the anomaly depth and width which correspond to the depth and diameter of the equivalent flat bottom hole (EFBH) from the calibration data. An edge detection technique called the half-max is used to measure width and length of the anomaly. Results of the half-max width and the EFBH diameter are compared with actual widths to evaluate utility of IR Contrast method. Some thermal measurements relate to gap thickness of the delaminations. Results of IR Contrast method on RCC hardware are provided. Keywords: normalized contrast, flash infrared thermography.

  8. Using infrared thermography to evaluate the injuries of cold-stored guava.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Bárbara Jordana; Giarola, Tales Márcio de Oliveira; Pereira, Daniele Fernanda; Vilas Boas, Eduardo Valério de Barros; de Resende, Jaime Vilela

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to identify using the infrared (IR) thermography data the injuries of guavas during cooling and storage at different temperatures. Three experiments were performed at three different temperatures with one storage time. The first experiment was done with static air in a refrigerator at 5 °C, the second experiment was conducted in a tunnel with forced air at 10 °C, and the third experiment was conducted in an air conditioned environment at 20 °C. Mechanical injuries caused by the impact of a pendulum were induced on guava surfaces. The surface temperatures were obtained for bruised and sound tissues during cooling and storage using an Infrared (IR) camera. With thermography, it was possible to distinguish the injured tissues of the fruits that were unaffected at temperatures of 5, 10 and 20 °C in first hours of cooling. The results suggest that the storage of guava fruits at 5 °C in static air resulted in cold-induced injury, while storage at 20 °C resulted in an altered activity pattern. The stored guava fruits were analyzed for mass loss, firmness, color, total sugars, total pectin and solubility. The parameters values were lower during the forced-air cooling and storage at 5 and 10 °C. When stored at 20 °C, there was fruit maturation that caused tissue softening, which makes the fruits more susceptible to deterioration and thermographic readings showed opposite trends. PMID:27162386

  9. Characterization of uncertainties when measuring metal cutting temperatures using infrared radiation thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitenton, Eric P.

    2009-05-01

    There are many error sources when using infrared radiation thermography to measure the temperature distribution of the tool, workpiece, and chip during metal cutting. It is important to understand how these error sources affect the measurement uncertainty. Some are familiar to anyone performing thermography measurements, such as uncertainties in the basic camera calibration. However, metal cutting presents unique measurement challenges due to factors such as the high magnification required, high surface speeds, polarization effects, micro-blackbody effects, and changing emissivity as chips form. This paper presents highlights of the current state of efforts at NIST to catalog and characterize error sources and the resulting uncertainties.

  10. Non-destructive Testing by Infrared Thermography Under Random Excitation and ARMA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, J. L.; Nicolas, J. L.; Candoré, J. C.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    Photothermal thermography is a non-destructive testing (NDT) method, which has many applications in the field of control and characterization of thin materials. This technique is usually implemented under CW or flash excitation. Such excitations are not adapted for control of fragile materials or for multi-frequency analysis. To allow these analyses, in this article, the use of a new control mode is proposed: infrared thermography under random excitation and auto regressive moving average analysis. First, the principle of this NDT method is presented. Then, the method is shown to permit detection, with low energy constraints, of detachments situated in mural paintings.

  11. Developing written inspection procedures for thermal/infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, J.

    1996-12-31

    Written inspection procedures are essential to acquiring valid data on a repeatable basis. They are also vital to the safety of the thermographer, and may, for that reason alone, be required by a company. Many thermographers are working with no written procedures. To date only a few of the necessary procedures have been developed by recognized standards organizations. The lack of procedures is limiting the use of thermography. Where thermography is being used without them, results are often less than optimum. This paper will (1) survey existing procedures and standards; (2) discuss current efforts by standards organizations to develop standards and procedures; and (3) present a general methodology from which written inspection procedures can be developed for many thermographic inspections.

  12. Infrared thermography for true temperature measurement of the main board in personal computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Behnia, Masud; Morrison, Graham

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents a way to measure the true temperature of the electronic devices without disturbing their normal operating conditions, which involved with estimating target emissivity, background temperature correctly and choosing infrared transparent material and its transmission estimation. The temperature distributions of the main board in personal computer were measured by the method presented here with infrared thermography in several different running conditions. The measurement errors and their possible remedies are also discussed.

  13. Identification of age degradation in EPROM chips using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Lloyd G.

    1998-03-01

    In a recent upgrade of the digital flight control computer for the F-16, there was serious consternation expressed about the quality of the soldering repair process. Dozens of circuit cards failed to function after the upgrade, even though all of these cards operated correctly before the modifications. The shop called for the use of the IR camera to assist in diagnosing and repairing these cards. What the Neural Radiant Energy Detection found was faulty and marginal chips.Of particular interest was the presence of degraded EPROM chips on the Program Memory cards. While it is known that EPROMs have a limited life cycle, the failure has been further characterized. Thermography provides a quantification of the degradation in thermal performance as the EPROMs are reused. Pristine EPROM chips have a rise rate of about 0.008 degrees C/sec. When the heat rates exceed 0.021 degrees C/sec, the EPROM chips will not accept a program. Some of the chips exhibited heat rates exceeding 0.1 degrees C/sec. Some chips with degradation of 0.018 degrees C/sec would accept a program, but fail other functional tests. What is clear from these results is that IR thermography can be used to identify degrading EPROM chips for replacement before failures become immanent.

  14. Key technique study and application of infrared thermography in hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Ming; Yang, Yan-guang; Li, Zhi-hui; Zhu, Zhi-wei; Zhou, Jia-sui

    2014-11-01

    The solutions to some key techniques using infrared thermographic technique in hypersonic wind tunnel, such as temperature measurement under great measurement angle, the corresponding relation between model spatial coordinates and the ones in infrared map, the measurement uncertainty analysis of the test data etc., are studied. The typical results in the hypersonic wind tunnel test are presented, including the comparison of the transfer rates on a thin skin flat plate model with a wedge measured with infrared thermography and thermocouple, the experimental study heating effect on the flat plate model impinged by plume flow and the aerodynamic heating on the lift model.

  15. Modeling of the ITER-like wide-angle infrared thermography view of JET.

    PubMed

    Aumeunier, M-H; Firdaouss, M; Travère, J-M; Loarer, T; Gauthier, E; Martin, V; Chabaud, D; Humbert, E

    2012-10-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography systems are mandatory to ensure safe plasma operation in fusion devices. However, IR measurements are made much more complicated in metallic environment because of the spurious contributions of the reflected fluxes. This paper presents a full predictive photonic simulation able to assess accurately the surface temperature measurement with classical IR thermography from a given plasma scenario and by taking into account the optical properties of PFCs materials. This simulation has been carried out the ITER-like wide angle infrared camera view of JET in comparing with experimental data. The consequences and the effects of the low emissivity and the bidirectional reflectivity distribution function used in the model for the metallic PFCs on the contribution of the reflected flux in the analysis are discussed. PMID:23130792

  16. Modeling of the ITER-like wide-angle infrared thermography view of JET

    SciTech Connect

    Aumeunier, M.-H.; Firdaouss, M.; Travere, J.-M.; Loarer, T.; Gauthier, E.; Martin, V.; Chabaud, D.; Humbert, E.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-15

    Infrared (IR) thermography systems are mandatory to ensure safe plasma operation in fusion devices. However, IR measurements are made much more complicated in metallic environment because of the spurious contributions of the reflected fluxes. This paper presents a full predictive photonic simulation able to assess accurately the surface temperature measurement with classical IR thermography from a given plasma scenario and by taking into account the optical properties of PFCs materials. This simulation has been carried out the ITER-like wide angle infrared camera view of JET in comparing with experimental data. The consequences and the effects of the low emissivity and the bidirectional reflectivity distribution function used in the model for the metallic PFCs on the contribution of the reflected flux in the analysis are discussed.

  17. Modeling of the ITER-like wide-angle infrared thermography view of JETa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumeunier, M.-H.; Firdaouss, M.; Travère, J.-M.; Loarer, T.; Gauthier, E.; Martin, V.; Chabaud, D.; Humbert, E.; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2012-10-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography systems are mandatory to ensure safe plasma operation in fusion devices. However, IR measurements are made much more complicated in metallic environment because of the spurious contributions of the reflected fluxes. This paper presents a full predictive photonic simulation able to assess accurately the surface temperature measurement with classical IR thermography from a given plasma scenario and by taking into account the optical properties of PFCs materials. This simulation has been carried out the ITER-like wide angle infrared camera view of JET in comparing with experimental data. The consequences and the effects of the low emissivity and the bidirectional reflectivity distribution function used in the model for the metallic PFCs on the contribution of the reflected flux in the analysis are discussed.

  18. Field test of infrared thermography applied to biogas controlling in landfill sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madruga, Francisco J.; Muñoz, Jaime M.; González, Daniel A.; Tejero, Juan I.; Cobo, Adolfo; Gil, José L.; Conde, Olga M.; López-Higuera, Jose M.

    2007-04-01

    The gases accumulated inside the landfill as result of the fermentation of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) known as biogas, are taking into consideration all possible uses as direct transformation into electricity. The system for collecting, regulating and controlling the biogas must include all the necessary safety features where the biogas leakage presents a high impact. Infrared thermography can be use to detect gas leakages due to the differences in temperature between the gas and the immediate surroundings. This method is able to monitor a wide area of landfill sites, quickly. This technology will not be effective if the differences in temperature are not better than five degrees. This paper describes a field test conducted to study the limitations of the infrared thermography caused by weather conditions and the moment of day or/and season when the thermal images was captured. Pipelines, borders, cells, covers, slopes and leakage (hot spots) are studied and optimum conditions are defined.

  19. Cooling analysis of welded materials for crack detection using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Martin, M.; Lagüela, S.; González-Aguilera, D.; Arias, P.

    2014-11-01

    Infrared thermography offers a wide range of possibilities for the detection of flaws in welding, being the main difference among them the thermal excitation of the material. This paper analyzes the application of an inexpensive and versatile thermographic test to the detection of subsurface cracks in welding. The procedure begins with the thermal excitation of the material, following with the monitoring of the cooling process with IRT (InfraRed Thermography). The result is a sequence of frames that enables the extraction of thermal data, useful for the study of the cooling tendencies in the defect and the non-defect zone. Then, each image is subjected to a contour lines algorithm towards the definition of the morphology of the detected defects. This combination of data acquisition and processing allows the differentiation between two types of cracks: toe crack and subsuperficial crack, as defined in the quality standards.

  20. Quantitative detection of defects based on Markov-PCA-BP algorithm using pulsed infrared thermography technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qingju; Dai, Jingmin; Liu, Junyan; Liu, Chunsheng; Liu, Yuanlin; Ren, Chunping

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative detection of debonding defects' diameter and depth in TBCs has been carried out using pulsed infrared thermography technology. By combining principal component analysis with neural network theory, the Markov-PCA-BP algorithm was proposed. The principle and realization process of the proposed algorithm was described. In the prediction model, the principal components which can reflect most characteristics of the thermal wave signal were set as the input, and the defect depth and diameter was set as the output. The experimental data from pulsed infrared thermography tests of TBCs with flat bottom hole defects was selected as the training and testing sample. Markov-PCA-BP predictive system was arrived, based on which both the defect depth and diameter were identified accurately, which proved the effectiveness of the proposed method for quantitative detection of debonding defects in TBCs.

  1. Near-infrared thermography using a charge-coupled device camera: Application to microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssieux, D.; Thiery, L.; Cretin, B.

    2007-03-01

    Using near-infrared thermography microscopy and a low-cost charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, we have designed a system which is able to deliver quantitative submicronic thermal images. Using a theoretical model based on Planck's law and CCD sensor properties allowed us to determine a minimal theoretical detection temperature and an optimal temperature sensitivity of our system. In order to validate this method, we show a good relationship between a theoretical study and a thermal measurement of a microsample.

  2. Detection and Characterization of Boundary-Layer Transition in Flight at Supersonic Conditions Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared thermography is a powerful tool for investigating fluid mechanics on flight vehicles. (Can be used to visualize and characterize transition, shock impingement, separation etc.). Updated onboard F-15 based system was used to visualize supersonic boundary layer transition test article. (Tollmien-Schlichting and cross-flow dominant flow fields). Digital Recording improves image quality and analysis capability. (Allows accurate quantitative (temperature) measurements, Greater enhancement through image processing allows analysis of smaller scale phenomena).

  3. AN EVALUATION OF INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY FOR DETECTION OF BUMBLEFOOT (PODODERMATITIS) IN PENGUINS.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Ann E; Torgerson-White, Lauri L; Allard, Stephanie M; Schneider, Tom

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate infrared thermography as a noninvasive screening tool for detection of pododermatitis during the developing and active stages of disease in three species of penguins: king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) , macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus), and rockhopper penguin (Eudyptes chrysocome). In total, 67 penguins were examined every 3 mo over a 15-mo period. At each exam, bumblefoot lesions were characterized and measured, and a timed series of thermal images were collected over a 4-min period. Three different methods were compared for analysis of thermograms. Feet with active lesions that compromise the surface of the foot were compared to feet with inactive lesions and no lesions. The hypothesis was that feet with active lesions would have warmer surface temperatures than the other conditions. Analysis of the data showed that although feet with active bumblefoot lesions are warmer than feet with inactive or no lesions, the variability seen in each individual penguin from one exam day to the next and the overlap seen between temperatures from each condition made thermal imaging an unreliable tool for detection of bumblefoot in the species studied. PMID:27468019

  4. Application of Infrared Thermography as a Diagnostic Tool of Knee Osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaoui, Ahlem; Bouzid, Mohamed Amine; Pron, Hervé; Taiar, Redha; Polidori, Guillaume

    This paper aimed to study the feasibility of application of infrared thermography to detect osteoarthritis of the knee and to compare the distribution of skin temperature between participants with osteoarthritis and those without pathology. All tests were conducted at LACM (Laboratory of Mechanical Stresses Analysis) and the gymnasium of the University of Reims Champagne Ardennes. IR thermography was performed using an IR camera. Ten participants with knee osteoarthritis and 12 reference healthy participants without OA participated in this study. Questionnaires were also used. The participants with osteoarthritis of the knee were selected on clinical examination and a series of radiographs. The level of pain was recorded by using a simple verbal scale (0-4). Infrared thermography reveals relevant disease by highlighting asymmetrical behavior in thermal color maps of both knees. Moreover, a linear evolution of skin temperature in the knee area versus time has been found whatever the participant group is in the first stage following a given effort. Results clearly show that the temperature can be regarded as a key parameter for evaluating pain. Thermal images of the knee were taken with an infrared camera. The study shows that with the advantage of being noninvasive and easily repeatable, IRT appears to be a useful tool to detect quantifiable patterns of surface temperatures and predict the singular thermal behavior of this pathology. It also seems that this non-intrusive technique enables to detect the early clinical manifestations of knee OA.

  5. Infrared Thermography to Evaluate Heat Tolerance in Different Genetic Groups of Lambs

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Concepta; Bianchini, Eliandra; Paim, Tiago do Prado; de Lima, Flavia Gontijo; Braccini Neto, José; Castanheira, Marlos; Esteves, Geisa Isilda Ferreira; Cardoso, Caio Cesar; Dalcin, Vanessa Calderaro

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress is considered a limiting factor for sheep production. We used information from physiological characteristics linked to heat tolerance to determine whether infrared thermography temperatures were able to separate groups of animals and determine the most important variables in this differentiation. Forty-eight four-month-old male lambs from eight genetic groups were used. Physiological (rectal temperature–RT, heart rate–HR, respiratory rate–RR) and blood traits, infrared thermography temperatures, heat tolerance indices, body measurements, weight and carcass traits were measured. Statistical analyses included variance, correlations, factor, discrimination and regression. Observing the correlations between physiological characteristics (RT, RR and HR) with temperatures measured by infrared thermography, regions for further studies should include the mean temperature of flank, nose and rump. Results show that there are strong relationships between thermograph measurements and RR, RT and HR in lambs, which are suggested to be directly correlated with heat tolerance capacity of the different genetic groups evaluated in this study. The assessment of body surface temperature measured by the thermograph could be used as a noninvasive tool to assess heat tolerance of the animals. PMID:26193274

  6. Application of infrared lock-in thermography for the quantitative evaluation of bruises on pears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ghiseok; Kim, Geon-Hee; Park, Jongmin; Kim, Dae-Yong; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2014-03-01

    An infrared lock-in thermography technique was adjusted for the detection of early bruises on pears. This mechanical damage is usually difficult to detect in the early stage after harvested using conventional visual sorting or CCD sensor-based imaging processing methods. We measured the thermal emission signals from pears using a highly sensitive mid-infrared thermal camera. These images were post-processed using a lock-in method that utilized the periodic thermal energy input to the pear. By applying the lock-in method to infrared thermography, the detection sensitivity and signal to noise ratio were enhanced because of the phase-sensitive narrow-band filtering effect. It was also found that the phase information of thermal emission from pears provides good metrics with which to identify quantitative information about both damage size and damage depth for pears. Additionally, a photothermal model was implemented to investigate the behavior of thermal waves on pears under convective conditions. Theoretical results were compared to experimental results. These results suggested that the proposed lock-in thermography technique and resultant phase information can be used to detect mechanical damage to fruit, especially in the early stage of bruising.

  7. Neonatal infrared thermography imaging: Analysis of heat flux during different clinical scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Abbas K.; Heimann, Konrad; Blazek, Vladimir; Orlikowsky, Thorsten; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2012-11-01

    IntroductionAn accurate skin temperature measurement of Neonatal Infrared Thermography (NIRT) imaging requires an appropriate calibration process for compensation of external effects (e.g. variation of environmental temperature, variable air velocity or humidity). Although modern infrared cameras can perform such calibration, an additional compensation is required for highly accurate thermography. This compensation which corrects any temperature drift should occur during the NIRT imaging process. We introduce a compensation technique which is based on modeling the physical interactions within the measurement scene and derived the detected temperature signal of the object. Materials and methodsIn this work such compensation was performed for different NIRT imaging application in neonatology (e.g. convective incubators, kangaroo mother care (KMC), and an open radiant warmer). The spatially distributed temperatures of 12 preterm infants (average gestation age 31 weeks) were measured under these different infant care arrangements (i.e. closed care system like a convective incubator, and open care system like kangaroo mother care, and open radiant warmer). ResultsAs errors in measurement of temperature were anticipated, a novel compensation method derived from infrared thermography of the neonate's skin was developed. Moreover, the differences in temperature recording for the 12 preterm infants varied from subject to subject. This variation could be arising from individual experimental setting applied to the same region of interest over the neonate's body. The experimental results for the model-based corrections is verified over the selected patient group. ConclusionThe proposed technique relies on applying model-based correction to the measured temperature and reducing extraneous errors during NIRT. This application specific method is based on different heat flux compartments present in neonatal thermography scene. Furthermore, these results are considered to be

  8. The roles of vibration analysis and infrared thermography in monitoring air-handling equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurzbach, Richard N.

    2003-04-01

    Industrial and commercial building equipment maintenance has not historically been targeted for implementation of PdM programs. The focus instead has been on manufacturing, aerospace and energy industries where production interruption has significant cost implications. As cost-effectiveness becomes more pervasive in corporate culture, even office space and labor activities housed in large facilities are being scrutinized for cost-cutting measures. When the maintenance costs for these facilities are reviewed, PdM can be considered for improving the reliability of the building temperature regulation, and reduction of maintenance repair costs. An optimized program to direct maintenance resources toward a cost effective and pro-active management of the facility can result in reduced operating budgets, and greater occupant satisfaction. A large majority of the significant rotating machinery in a large building environment are belt-driven air handling units. These machines are often poorly designed or utilized within the facility. As a result, the maintenance staff typically find themselves scrambling to replace belts and bearings, going from one failure to another. Instead of the reactive-mode maintenance, some progressive and critical institutions are adopting predictive and proactive technologies of infrared thermography and vibration analysis. Together, these technologies can be used to identify design and installation problems, that when corrected, significantly reduce maintenance and increase reliability. For critical building use, such as laboratories, research facilities, and other high value non-industrial settings, the cost-benefits of more reliable machinery can contribute significantly to the operational success.

  9. Infrared thermography and ultrasonics to evaluate composite materials for aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardi, S.; Boffa, N. D.; Carlomagno, G. M.; Maio, L.; Meola, C.; Ricci, F.

    2015-11-01

    The attention of this paper is focused on the suitability of two techniques: infrared thermography and ultrasonics to evaluate impact damaged carbon/epoxy specimens. The obtained results are compared by highlighting advantages and disadvantages of each technique, as well their limits in view of an integrated use. In this context, a crucial task may be to assess the extension of delamination caused by an impact event, which may ask one to guess between sound and damaged materials at the edge of the instrument background noise. To help fixing this problem, results obtained with either lock-in thermography, or an ultrasonic phased array system, are analysed with the aid of thermographic data collected during impact tests.

  10. Assessment of anxiety in open field and elevated plus maze using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Lecorps, Benjamin; Rödel, Heiko G; Féron, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Due to their direct inaccessibility, affective states are classically assessed by gathering concomitant physiological and behavioral measures. Although such a dual approach to assess emotional states is frequently used in different species including humans, the invasiveness of procedures for physiological recordings particularly in smaller-sized animals strongly restricts their application. We used infrared thermography, a non-invasive method, to assess physiological arousal during open field and elevated plus maze tests in mice. By measuring changes in surface temperature indicative of the animals' emotional response, we aimed to improve the inherently limited and still controversial information provided by behavioral parameters commonly used in these tests. Our results showed significant and consistent thermal responses during both tests, in accordance with classical physiological responses occurring in stressful situations. Besides, we found correlations between these thermal responses and the occurrence of anxiety-related behaviors. Furthermore, initial temperatures measured at the start of each procedure (open field, elevated plus maze), which can be interpreted as a measure of the animals' initial physiological arousal, predicted the levels of activity and of anxiety-related behaviors displayed during the tests. Our results stress the strong link between physiological correlates of emotions and behaviors expressed during unconditioned fear tests. PMID:26884121

  11. Infrared dermal thermography on diabetic feet soles to predict ulcerations: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Klein, Marvin E.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Bus, Sicco A.; van Netten, Jaap J.

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication for patients with diabetes mellitus. If not adequately treated, these ulcers may lead to foot infection, and ultimately to lower extremity amputation, which imposes a major burden to society and great loss in health-related quality of life for patients. Early identification and subsequent preventive treatment have proven useful to limit the incidence of foot ulcers and lower extremity amputation. Thus, the development of new diagnosis tools has become an attractive option. The ultimate objective of our project is to develop an intelligent telemedicine monitoring system for frequent examination on patients' feet, to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration. Inflammation in diabetic feet can be an early and predictive warning sign for ulceration, and temperature has been proven to be a vicarious marker for inflammation. Studies have indicated that infrared dermal thermography of foot soles can be one of the important parameters for assessing the risk of diabetic foot ulceration. This paper covers the feasibility study of using an infrared camera, FLIR SC305, in our setup, to acquire the spatial thermal distribution on the feet soles. With the obtained thermal images, automated detection through image analysis was performed to identify the abnormal increased/decreased temperature and assess the risk for ulceration. The thermography for feet soles of patients with diagnosed diabetic foot complications were acquired before the ordinary foot examinations. Assessment from clinicians and thermography were compared and follow-up measurements were performed to investigate the prediction. A preliminary case study will be presented, indicating that dermal thermography in our proposed setup can be a screening modality to timely detect pre-signs of ulceration.

  12. Infrared thermography for detection of laminar-turbulent transition in low-speed wind tunnel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Liselle A.; Borgoltz, Aurelien; Devenport, William

    2016-05-01

    This work presents the details of a system for experimentally identifying laminar-to-turbulent transition using infrared thermography applied to large, metal models in low-speed wind tunnel tests. Key elements of the transition detection system include infrared cameras with sensitivity in the 7.5- to 14.0-µm spectral range and a thin, insulating coat for the model. The fidelity of the system was validated through experiments on two wind-turbine blade airfoil sections tested at Reynolds numbers between Re = 1.5 × 106 and 3 × 106. Results compare well with measurements from surface pressure distributions and stethoscope observations. However, the infrared-based system provides data over a much broader range of conditions and locations on the model. This paper chronicles the design, implementation and validation of the infrared transition detection system, a subject which has not been widely detailed in the literature to date.

  13. Uses of infrared thermography in the low-cost solar array program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazer, S. D.

    1982-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has used infrared thermography extensively in the Low-Cost Solar Array (LSA) photovoltaics program. A two-dimensional scanning infrared radiometer has been used to make field inspections of large free-standing photovoltaic arrays and smaller demonstration sites consisting of integrally mounted rooftop systems. These field inspections have proven especially valuable in the research and early development phases of the program, since certain types of module design flaws and environmental degradation manifest themselves in unique thermal patterns. The infrared camera was also used extensively in a series of laboratory tests on photovoltaic cells to obtain peak cell temperatures and thermal patterns during off-design operating conditions. The infrared field inspections and the laboratory experiments are discussed, and sample results are presented.

  14. Use Of Infrared Thermography For The Identification Of Design And Construction Faults In Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeber, Stephen A.

    1984-03-01

    Many design and construction details can affect building energy consumption in unex-pected ways. Further, design and construction errors can increase building energy consumption, result in discomfort to building occupants and cause structural damage to the building. Infrared inspections can easily evaluate the energy efficiency of various aspects of a building's design and identify flaws that might otherwise be detected as a result of occupants' complaints or damage to the building's mechanical or structural systems. Infrared thermography can be used by the architect to evaluate his designs and by the contractor to control the quality of construction. This paper discusses a number of issues that can help determine the effectiveness of infrared building surveys. Following this, three case stud-ies will be presented to illustrate design flaws that were detected through infrared build-ing surveys.

  15. Remote Infrared Thermography for In-Flight Flow Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiu, H. J.; vanDam, C. P.

    1999-01-01

    The feasibility of remote in-flight boundary layer visualization via infrared in incompressible flow was established in earlier flight experiments. The past year's efforts focused on refining and determining the extent and accuracy of this technique of remote in-flight flow visualization via infrared. Investigations were made into flow separation visualization, visualization at transonic conditions, shock visualization, post-processing to mitigate banding noise in the NITE Hawk's thermograms, and a numeric model to predict surface temperature distributions. Although further flight tests are recommended, this technique continues to be promising.

  16. Using infrared thermography for the creation of a window surface temperature database to validate computer heat transfer models

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, F.A.; Griffith, B.T.; Tuerler, D.; Arasteh, D.

    1995-04-01

    IR thermography is well suited for resolving small differences in the thermal performance of highly insulating window systems. Infrared thermographic measurements made in conjunction with reference emitter techniques in a controlled and characterized laboratory setting can have an absolute accuracy of {plus_minus}0.5{degree}C. Quantitative infrared thermography requires that a number of sources of error related to measurement accuracy and test environmental conditions be quantified and minimized to the extent possible. Laboratory-based infrared thermography can be used to generate window surface temperature profile databases which can be used to direct the development of 2-D and 3-D finite element and finite difference method fenestration heat transfer simulation codes, identify their strengths and weaknesses, set research priorities, and validate finished modeling tools. Development of such a database is under way at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and will be made available for public use.

  17. A protocol for analysing thermal stress in insects using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Belén; Verdú, José R; Carrascal, Luis M; Lobo, Jorge M

    2016-02-01

    The study of insect responses to thermal stress has involved a variety of protocols and methodologies that hamper the ability to compare results between studies. For that reason, the development of a protocol to standardize thermal assays is necessary. In this sense, infrared thermography solves some of the problems allowing us to take continuous temperature measurements without handling the individuals, an important fact in cold-blooded organisms like insects. Here, we present a working protocol based on infrared thermography to estimate both cold and heat thermal stress in insects. We analyse both the change in the body temperature of individuals and their behavioural response. In addition, we used partial least squares regression for the statistical analysis of our data, a technique that solves the problem of having a large number of variables and few individuals, allowing us to work with rare or endemic species. To test our protocol, we chose two species of congeneric, narrowly distributed dung beetles that are endemic to the southeastern part of the Iberian Peninsula. With our protocol we have obtained five variables in the response to cold and twelve in the response to heat. With this methodology we discriminate between the two flightless species of Jekelius through their thermal response. In response to cold, Jekelius hernandezi showed a higher rate of cooling and reached higher temperatures of stupor and haemolymph freezing than Jekelius punctatolineatus. Both species displayed similar thermoregulation ranges before reaching lethal body temperature with heat stress. Overall, we have demonstrated that infrared thermography is a suitable method to assess insect thermal responses with a high degree of sensitivity, allowing for the discrimination between closely related species. PMID:26857985

  18. Infrared-thermography-based pipeline leak detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Gary J.; Graf, Richard J.

    1991-03-01

    Computerized Infrared Thermographic pipeline inspection is now a refined and accurate process having been thoroughly proven to be an accurate, cost effective, and efficient technology during a 10 year development and testing process. The process has been used to test pipelines in chemical plants, water supply systems, steam lines, natural gas pipelines and sewer systems. Its non-contact, nondestructive ability to inspect large areas from above ground with 100% coverage and to locate subsurface leaks as well as the additional capability to locate voids and erosion surrounding pipelines make its testing capabilities unique. This paper will detail the development of computerized infrared thermographic pipeline testing along with case histories illustrating its implementation problems and successes and innovations anticipated for the future.

  19. Regional Skin Temperature Response to Moderate Aerobic Exercise Measured by Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Alex de Andrade; Amorim, Paulo Roberto dos Santos; Brito, Ciro José; Sillero-Quintana, Manuel; Bouzas Marins, João Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infrared thermography (IRT) does not require contact with the skin, and it is a convenient, reliable and non-invasive technique that can be used for monitoring the skin temperature (TSK). Objectives: The aim of this study was to monitor the variations in the regional TSK during exercise on 28 regions of interest (ROIs) (forehead, face, chest, abdomen, back, lumbar, anterior and posterior neck, and posterior and anterior views of the right and left hands, forearms, upper arms, thighs, and legs) with IRT. Patients and Methods: 12 physically active young males were monitored with IRT during the following three phases: a) 30 minutes before exercise b) while performing one hour of moderate intensity exercise on a treadmill at 60% of the VO2max, and c) 60 minutes after exercise. Results: During pre-exercise, all TSK reached a steady-state (P ≤ 0.05), which ensured adequate thermal stabilisation. At the beginning of exercise, there was a significant reduction in the TSK in most ROIs after 10 minutes of activity, except for the lower limbs (legs and thighs). After one hour of recovery, in the anterior view of the hands and thighs and in the posterior view of the legs, there were significant increases in the TSK compared to pre-exercise. Conclusions: There were significant distinctions in the skin temperature distribution during exercise according to the activity of the area under consideration during exercise, which may be important in the development of physiological models and heat flux analyses for different purposes. PMID:27217931

  20. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow

    PubMed Central

    Sou, In Mei; Layman, Christopher N.; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2013-01-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  1. Near-infrared thermography using a charge-coupled device camera: application to microsystems.

    PubMed

    Teyssieux, D; Thiery, L; Cretin, B

    2007-03-01

    Using near-infrared thermography microscopy and a low-cost charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, we have designed a system which is able to deliver quantitative submicronic thermal images. Using a theoretical model based on Planck's law and CCD sensor properties allowed us to determine a minimal theoretical detection temperature and an optimal temperature sensitivity of our system. In order to validate this method, we show a good relationship between a theoretical study and a thermal measurement of a microsample. PMID:17411208

  2. Using infrared thermography for the study of heat transfer through building envelope components

    SciTech Connect

    Arasteh, D.; Beck, F.; Griffith, B.; Acevedo-Ruiz, M. ); Byars, N. . Dept. of Engineering Technology)

    1991-11-01

    Heat transfer through building envelope components is typically characterized by one number, the conductance. Such a characterization is best suited for homogeneous samples since it does not quantify or illustrate spatial variations within a sample. However, the growing use of advanced wall and window insulations with existing framing materials has increased the importance of understanding spatial heat transfer effects within building envelope components. An infrared thermography laboratory has been established to provide detailed quantitative and qualitative information on the spatial heat transfer effects of building envelope materials. The use of this facility for more effective product development and more accurate product development and more accurate product characterization is discussed.

  3. Outdoor thermal monitoring of large scale structures by infrared thermography integrated in an ICT based architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean; Crinière, Antoine; Averty, Rodolphe

    2015-04-01

    An infrared system has been developed to monitor transport infrastructures in a standalone configuration. Results obtained on bridges open to traffic allows to retrieve the inner structure of the decks. To complete this study, experiments were carried out over several months to monitor two reinforced concrete beams of 16 m long and 21 T each. Detection of a damaged area over one of the two beams was made by Pulse Phase Thermography approach. Measurements carried out over several months. Finally, conclusion on the robustness of the system is proposed and perspectives are presented.

  4. Mapping Soil Surface Macropores Using Infrared Thermography: An Exploratory Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, João L. M. P.; Abrantes, João R. C. B.; Silva, Valdemir P.; de Lima, M. Isabel P.; Montenegro, Abelardo A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Macropores and water flow in soils and substrates are complex and are related to topics like preferential flow, nonequilibrium flow, and dual-continuum. Hence, the quantification of the number of macropores and the determination of their geometry are expected to provide a better understanding on the effects of pores on the soil's physical and hydraulic properties. This exploratory study aimed at evaluating the potential of using infrared thermography for mapping macroporosity at the soil surface and estimating the number and size of such macropores. The presented technique was applied to a small scale study (laboratory soil flume). PMID:25371915

  5. Correlation Study Of Diffenrential Skin Temperatures (DST) For Ovulation Detection Using Infra-Red Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. H. S.; Shah, A. v.; Ruedi, B.

    1982-11-01

    The importance of ovulation time detection in the Practice of Natural Birth Control (NBC) as a contraceptive tool, and for natural/artificial insemination among women having the problem of in-fertility, is well known. The simple Basal Body Temperature (BBT) method of ovulation detection is so far unreliable. A newly proposed Differential Skin Temperature (DST) method may help minimize disturbing physiological effects and improve reliability. This paper explains preliminary results of a detailed correlative study on the DST method, using Infra-Red Thermography (IRT) imaging, and computer analysis techniques. Results obtained with five healthy, normally menstruating women volunteers will be given.

  6. An Overview of Recent Application of Medical Infrared Thermography in Sports Medicine in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Carolin; Raschner, Christian; Ammer, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Medical infrared thermography (MIT) is used for analyzing physiological functions related to skin temperature. Technological advances have made MIT a reliable medical measurement tool. This paper provides an overview of MIT’s technical requirements and usefulness in sports medicine, with a special focus on overuse and traumatic knee injuries. Case studies are used to illustrate the clinical applicability and limitations of MIT. It is concluded that MIT is a non-invasive, non-radiating, low cost detection tool which should be applied for pre-scanning athletes in sports medicine. PMID:22399901

  7. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to an acoustic streaming flow.

    PubMed

    Sou, In Mei; Allen, John S; Layman, Christopher N; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2011-11-01

    Subsurface coherent structures and surface temperatures are investigated using simultaneous measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and infrared (IR) thermography. Results for coherent structures from acoustic streaming and associated heating transfer in a rectangular tank with an acoustic horn mounted horizontally at the sidewall are presented. An observed vortex pair develops and propagates in the direction along the centerline of the horn. From the PIV velocity field data, distinct kinematic regions are found with the Lagrangian coherent structure (LCS) method. The implications of this analysis with respect to heat transfer and related sonochemical applications are discussed. PMID:24347810

  8. Characterization of acoustic streaming and heating using synchronized infrared thermography and particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Layman, Christopher N; Sou, In Mei; Bartak, Rico; Ray, Chittaranjan; Allen, John S

    2011-09-01

    Real-time measurements of acoustic streaming velocities and surface temperature fields using synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography are reported. Measurements were conducted using a 20 kHz Langevin type acoustic horn mounted vertically in a model sonochemical reactor of either degassed water or a glycerin-water mixture. These dissipative phenomena are found to be sensitive to small variations in the medium viscosity, and a correlation between the heat flux and vorticity was determined for unsteady convective heat transfer. PMID:21514205

  9. Clinical applications of dynamic infrared thermography in plastic surgery: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    John, Hannah Eliza; Niumsawatt, Vachara; Whitaker, Iain S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Infrared thermography (IRT) has become an increasingly utilized adjunct to more expensive and/or invasive investigations in a range of surgical fields, no more so than in plastic surgery. The combination of functional assessment, flow characteristics and anatomical localization has led to increasing applications of this technology. This article aims to perform a systematic review of the clinical applications of IRT in plastic surgery. Methods A systematic literature search using the keywords ‘IRT’ and ‘dynamic infrared thermography (DIRT)’ has been accomplished. A total of 147 papers were extracted from various medical databases, of which 34 articles were subjected to a full read by two independent reviewers, to ensure the papers satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Studies focusing on the use of IRT in breast cancer diagnosis were excluded. Results A systematic review of 29 publications demonstrated the clinical applications of IRT in plastic surgery today. They include preoperative planning of perforators for free flaps, post operative monitoring of free flaps, use of IRT as an adjunct in burns depth analysis, in assessment of response to treatment in hemangioma and as a diagnostic test for cutaneous melanoma and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Conclusions Modern infrared imaging technology with improved standardization protocols is now a credible, useful non-invasive tool in clinical practice. PMID:27047781

  10. Application of infrared thermography for the analysis of rewarming in patients with cold intolerance.

    PubMed

    Ruijs, Aleid C J; Jaquet, Jean-Bart; Brandsma, Martine; Daanen, Hein A M; Hovius, Steven E R

    2008-01-01

    Cold intolerance is a serious long-term problem after injury to the ulnar and median nerves, and its pathophysiology is unclear. We investigated the use of infrared thermography for the analysis of thermoregulation after injury to peripheral nerves. Four patients with injuries to the ulnar nerve and four with injuries to the median nerve (4-12 years after injury) immersed their hands in water at 15 degrees C for 5 minutes, after which infrared pictures were taken at intervals of 2-4 minutes. The areas supplied by the injured nerves could be identified easily in the patients with symptoms of cold intolerance. At baseline temperature distribution of the hand was symmetrical, but after testing the injured side warmed up much slower. We concluded that the infrared profile of the temperature of the hand after immersion in cold water is helpful to assess thermoregulation after injury to peripheral nerves. PMID:18763198

  11. Statistical Analysis of an Infrared Thermography Inspection of Reinforced Carbon-Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comeaux, Kayla

    2011-01-01

    Each piece of flight hardware being used on the shuttle must be analyzed and pass NASA requirements before the shuttle is ready for launch. One tool used to detect cracks that lie within flight hardware is Infrared Flash Thermography. This is a non-destructive testing technique which uses an intense flash of light to heat up the surface of a material after which an Infrared camera is used to record the cooling of the material. Since cracks within the material obstruct the natural heat flow through the material, they are visible when viewing the data from the Infrared camera. We used Ecotherm, a software program, to collect data pertaining to the delaminations and analyzed the data using Ecotherm and University of Dayton Log Logistic Probability of Detection (POD) Software. The goal was to reproduce the statistical analysis produced by the University of Dayton software, by using scatter plots, log transforms, and residuals to test the assumption of normality for the residuals.

  12. Integration of ground-penetrating radar, ultrasonic tests and infrared thermography for the analysis of a precious medieval rose window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuzzo, L.; Calia, A.; Liberatore, D.; Masini, N.; Rizzo, E.

    2010-04-01

    The integration of high-resolution, non-invasive geophysical techniques (such as ground-penetrating radar or GPR) with emerging sensing techniques (acoustics, thermography) can complement limited destructive tests to provide a suitable methodology for a multi-scale assessment of the state of preservation, material and construction components of monuments. This paper presents the results of the application of GPR, infrared thermography (IRT) and ultrasonic tests to the 13th century rose window of Troia Cathedral (Apulia, Italy), affected by widespread decay and instability problems caused by the 1731 earthquake and reactivated by recent seismic activity. This integrated approach provided a wide amount of complementary information at different scales, ranging from the sub-centimetre size of the metallic joints between the various architectural elements, narrow fractures and thin mortar fillings, up to the sub-metre scale of the internal masonry structure of the circular ashlar curb linking the rose window to the façade, which was essential to understand the original building technique and to design an effective restoration strategy.

  13. The Role of Infrared Thermography as a Non-Invasive Tool for the Detection of Lameness in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Alsaaod, Maher; Schaefer, Allan L.; Büscher, Wolfgang; Steiner, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The use of infrared thermography for the identification of lameness in cattle has increased in recent years largely because of its non-invasive properties, ease of automation and continued cost reductions. Thermography can be used to identify and determine thermal abnormalities in animals by characterizing an increase or decrease in the surface temperature of their skin. The variation in superficial thermal patterns resulting from changes in blood flow in particular can be used to detect inflammation or injury associated with conditions such as foot lesions. Thermography has been used not only as a diagnostic tool, but also to evaluate routine farm management. Since 2000, 14 peer reviewed papers which discuss the assessment of thermography to identify and manage lameness in cattle have been published. There was a large difference in thermography performance in these reported studies. However, thermography was demonstrated to have utility for the detection of contralateral temperature difference and maximum foot temperature on areas of interest. Also apparent in these publications was that a controlled environment is an important issue that should be considered before image scanning. PMID:26094632

  14. Measurement of transient surface temperatures during rubbing using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Tau; Yu, Jianwei; Yu, Xiaofen

    2013-10-01

    Infrared thermometer could provide IR radiance information to get the corresponding temperature as the machine is working. But the emissivity coefficient, which converts IR radiance to temperature, would vary with change of surface properties during rubbing, and this would bring dynamic error in measurement. In this study, we introduced a special tester, in the side of which compact IR thermometer are mounted. The thermometer enables us to measure contact surface temperature directly during tests of a rotating ring and a flat block which had a laser diode fixed under its contact surface. Based on Kirchhoff theory, the calculate model of the spectral emissivity is constructed. The normal emissivity at target region are measured through trigonometric ray consisted of InGaAsP laser source, PbSe detector and objective surface. So the temperature value from the IR thermometer could be corrected dynamically according to the real-time emissivity. The structure and the principle of the apparatus are described. The key technologies and the corresponding solution methods are briefly discussed. The error due to the rapid variations of emissivity value with change in contact conditions was shown, and it must be taken into consideration in radiometric temperature measurement in rubbing and could be especially useful in the verification of friction surface temperature predictions.

  15. When it's too hot to touch use infrared thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Linnander, B. )

    1993-07-01

    Infrared imaging is an invaluable technique for the non-destructive temperature measurement of PCB's and other electronic components, whose contact with the measurement device would be impractical or would seriously alter the test results. Care must be taken, however, in the selection of the IR instrument, the methodology used to compensate for the characteristics of the component under study, and the effects of ambient radiation. In general, cameras operating at 3 to 5 microns are less affected by those component characteristics and irrelevant radiation than ones operating in the 8 to 12 micron range. The varying emissivities of the materials of the components under study must be determined and provided to the system if correct temperature measurements are to be obtained. In order to measure the temperature of small objects accurately, the imager used should have a high slit response function of modulations up to 100 percent. This capability is greatly enhanced if the imager has a field stop in the detector image plane to avoid stray radiation. Some cameras incorporate a software implemented model of the measurement situation that will compensate for the effects of emissivity, atmosphere, and radiation reflected in the component from its surroundings. The camera should have a good temperature drift compensation system, capable of eliminating both gain and offset drift to reduce the influence of the temperature of the thermal imager itself.

  16. Mechanical and Infrared Thermography Analysis of Shape Memory Polyurethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieczyska, Elzbieta Alicja; Maj, Michal; Kowalczyk-Gajewska, Katarzyna; Staszczak, Maria; Urbanski, Leszek; Tobushi, Hisaaki; Hayashi, Shunichi; Cristea, Mariana

    2014-07-01

    Multifunctional new material—polyurethane shape memory polymer (PU-SMP)—was subjected to tension carried out at room temperature at various strain rates. The influence of effects of thermomechanical couplings on the SMP mechanical properties was studied, based on the sample temperature changes, measured by a fast and sensitive infrared camera. It was found that the polymer deformation process strongly depends on the strain rate applied. The initial reversible strain is accompanied by a small drop in temperature, called thermoelastic effect. Its maximal value is related to the SMP yield point and increases upon increase of the strain rate. At higher strains, the stress and temperature significantly increase, caused by reorientation of the polymer molecular chains, followed by the stress drop and its subsequent increase accompanying the sample rupture. The higher strain rate, the higher stress, and temperature changes were obtained, since the deformation process was more dynamic and has occurred in almost adiabatic conditions. The constitutive model of SMP valid in finite strain regime was developed. In the proposed approach, SMP is described as a two-phase material composed of hyperelastic rubbery phase and elastic-viscoplastic glassy phase, while the volume content of phases is specified by the current temperature.

  17. Modeling and experimental implementation of infrared thermography on concrete masonry structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Fuad; Bolhassani, Mohammad; Kontsos, Antonios; Hamid, Ahmad; Bartoli, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    This paper is a combined numerical and experimental study which aims to demonstrate the implementation of the infrared thermography (IRT) method for the non-destructive evaluation of concrete masonry structural components. Specifically, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) analysis is formulated and implemented to predict both steady state and transient heat transfer in masonry specimens. A micro-element approach is followed to build the FE model geometry of the masonry walls. The model provides surface temperature contours which are the prime interest of infrared thermography. Three different scaled masonry specimens with identical thermal properties are considered for this study. The FE simulation results of heat diffusion are initially compared with finite difference method predictions for one specimen. Subsequently, the FE results are validated by implementing experimentally the IRT method on the other two specimens. The numerically predicted temperature values agree well with the actual measured values which validate the use of the IRT method for the nondestructive evaluation of concrete masonry components.

  18. Thermography of target plates with near-infrared optical fibres at Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichle, R.; Basiuk, V.; Bergeaud, V.; Cambe, A.; Chantant, M.; Delchambre, E.; Druetta, M.; Gauthier, E.; Hess, W.; Pocheau, C.

    2001-03-01

    First spectroscopic near-infrared thermography measurements in the range 0.9-1.95 μm performed with optical fibres are reported. Two set-ups served as test-beds for physical and technical questions for a security system based on fibre optical thermography. It was found that for the interesting temperature range above 600°C atomic and molecular line emission is negligible in comparison with thermal radiation. The observed near-infrared spectra are however different from simple blackbody radiation curves. They are explained by the coverage of the surface with dust and flakes. The dust particles are identified by their spectral emissivity falling off with the square of the wavelength. On one set-up, flakes were identifiable by fast cool-down times and confirmed by post-experiment inspection. In the absence of flakes, surface temperatures on a ripple protection plate were measured, that allowed to determine the mean energy of ripple trapped ions to be 200-300 keV.

  19. Irradiance-based emissivity correction in infrared thermography for electronic applications.

    PubMed

    Vellvehi, M; Perpiñà, X; Lauro, G L; Perillo, F; Jordà, X

    2011-11-01

    This work analyzes, discusses, and proposes a solution to the problem of the emissivity correction present in infrared thermography when coatings with known emissivity cannot be deposited on the inspected surface. It is shown that the conventional technique based on two reference thermal images and the linearization of the blackbody radiation dependence on temperature is not a reliable and accurate solution when compared with the coating procedure. In this scenario, a new approach based on the direct processing of the output signal of the infrared camera (which is proportional to the detected irradiance) is proposed to obtain an accurate emissivity and surrounding reflections map, perfectly compensating the thermal maps. The results obtained have been validated using a module as a test vehicle containing two thermal test chips which incorporate embedded temperature sensors. PMID:22128998

  20. Irradiance-based emissivity correction in infrared thermography for electronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellvehi, M.; Perpiñà, X.; Lauro, G. L.; Perillo, F.; Jordà, X.

    2011-11-01

    This work analyzes, discusses, and proposes a solution to the problem of the emissivity correction present in infrared thermography when coatings with known emissivity cannot be deposited on the inspected surface. It is shown that the conventional technique based on two reference thermal images and the linearization of the blackbody radiation dependence on temperature is not a reliable and accurate solution when compared with the coating procedure. In this scenario, a new approach based on the direct processing of the output signal of the infrared camera (which is proportional to the detected irradiance) is proposed to obtain an accurate emissivity and surrounding reflections map, perfectly compensating the thermal maps. The results obtained have been validated using a module as a test vehicle containing two thermal test chips which incorporate embedded temperature sensors.

  1. Inverse Temperature Mapping of Re-Entry Vehicle Control Surfaces Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, C.; Hirtz, B.; Vuilleumier, A.; Roesgen, T.; Vos, J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of an optical system to deliver rear face temperatures thermal maps of an EXPERT vehicle flap using near infrared thermography. The optical system consists of a wide angle lens assembly placed behind the flap, a fiber optic cable and a high rate near infrared camera. The camera transfers images to an autonomous data handling unit located on a colder area of the vehicle. After flight the temperature on the flap windward face is computed using the stored thermal maps as input to a coupled fluid dynamics-heat transfer calculation. The system has been successfully qualified for the EXPERT mission and the inverse temperature reconstruction will be tested in the Scirocco Plasma Wind tunnel. A further evolution of this system allowing simultaneous measurement of temperature and emissivity is planned for the IXV vehicle

  2. Stimulated infrared thermography applied to differentiate scar tissue from peri-scar tissue: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Riquet, Damien; Houel, Nicolas; Bodnar, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    Every human injury leads to a scar formation. The healing process leads to the formation of new tissue: the scar, which is different from the original tissue. This process is influenced by mechanical strength and the local vasculature is modified. The purpose of this study is to show that there are various temperatures between the scar and the peri-scar area associated with the healing process that can be estimated using the thermal infrared camera. In the study, 12 scars were stimulated by cold. Several changes of temperature were observed between scar and peri-scar area for 10 min. Scars appeared significantly colder with a Wilcoxon test (p = 0.01). Results showed that stimulated infrared thermography can be used to monitor the temperature difference between the scar and peri-scar tissue. PMID:27270169

  3. Contribution to the improvement of heritage mural painting non-destructive testing by stimulated infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, Jean-Luc; Mouhoubi, Kamel; Di Pallo, Luigi; Detalle, Vincent; Vallet, Jean-Marc; Duvaut, Thierry

    2013-10-01

    Non-destructive testing of heritage mural paintings by means of stimulated infrared thermography has now become rather efficient [1-14]. However, pigments, which form a pictorial layer, have contrasting radiative properties possibly leading to artifact detection. In this paper, attempts to alleviate this difficulty are presented. Based on the spectroscopic study of different paint layers, one can argue that, in the medium infrared field, this radiative disparity decreases significantly. Then, with similar settings, it can be shown that ceramic radiative sources allow reaching this wavelength band. Finally, on the basis of a study carried out on an academic sample and a partial copy of a fresco from the cathedral of Angers, combining ceramic heat sources with a laboratory SAMMTHIR experimental setup enables to make real headway in terms of defects' detection.

  4. Body Functions and Structures Pertinent to Infrared Thermography-Based Access for Clients with Severe Motor Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Memarian, Negar; Venetsanopoulos, Anastasios N.; Chau, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Infrared thermography has been recently proposed as an access technology for individuals with disabilities, but body functions and structures pertinent to its use have not been documented. Seven clients (2 adults, 5 youth) with severe disabilities and their primary caregivers participated in this study. All clients had a Gross Motor Functional…

  5. A numerical study of the inverse problem of breast infrared thermography modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray H.

    2010-03-01

    Infrared thermography has been shown to be a useful adjunctive tool for breast cancer detection. Previous thermography modeling techniques generally dealt with the "forward problem", i.e., to estimate the breast thermogram from known properties of breast tissues. The present study aims to deal with the so-called "inverse problem", namely to estimate the thermal properties of the breast tissues from the observed surface temperature distribution. By comparison, the inverse problem is a more direct way of interpreting a breast thermogram for specific physiological and/or pathological information. In tumor detection, for example, it is particularly important to estimate the tumor-induced thermal contrast, even though the corresponding non-tumor thermal background usually is unknown due to the difficulty of measuring the individual thermal properties. Inverse problem solving is technically challenging due to its ill-posed nature, which is evident primarily by its sensitivity to imaging noise. Taking advantage of our previously developed forward-problemsolving techniques with comprehensive thermal-elastic modeling, we examine here the feasibility of solving the inverse problem of the breast thermography. The approach is based on a presumed spatial constraint applied to three major thermal properties, i.e., thermal conductivity, blood perfusion, and metabolic heat generation, for each breast tissue type. Our results indicate that the proposed inverse-problem-solving scheme can be numerically stable under imaging noise of SNR ranging 32 ~ 40 dB, and that the proposed techniques can be effectively used to improve the estimation to the tumor-induced thermal contrast, especially for smaller and deeper tumors.

  6. Scrotal infrared digital thermography as a predictor of seasonal effects on sperm traits in Braford bulls.

    PubMed

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Barcellos, Júlio Otavio Jardim; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Koetz, Celso; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Peripolli, Vanessa; McManus, Concepta; Canozzi, Maria Eugênia Andrighetto; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the seasonal effects of the environment on semen quality in bulls, using infrared thermography. Sperm motility (M), mass motion (MM), and vigor (VIG) were evaluated in sperm samples from 17 Bradford bulls aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Infrared thermography images and data were collected using an infrared FLIR T 300 camera and Quick Report 1.2 SP2 software to determine the temperature of the proximal and distal poles of the testis and to assess the testicular temperature gradient. The seasonal effects on physiological, seminal, and climatic variables were analyzed by the GLM ANOVA and CORR procedures using SAS®. The microclimatic factors were recorded in hourly intervals, and the daily mean temperature and mean relative humidity were calculated to determine the daily temperature-humidity index (THI) every day for 1 year. The temperature gradient (TG) variations of the testes were significantly higher in the autumn (4.5 °C), winter (4.0 °C), and spring (2.9 °C) compared to summer (0.9 °C) (P < 0.05). Ocular globe temperatures were lower in the winter (27.6 °C) and autumn (26.8 °C) compared to summer (33.9 °C) and spring (31.1 °C) (P < 0.05). The average MM (2.58), M (52.64), and VIG (2.70) of the semen decreased in the summer compared to other seasons (P < 0.01). The TG was negatively correlated with THI (-0.44; P < 0.05). For the seminal variables, MaD (-0.45; P < 0.05) and TD (-0.50; P < 0.01) presented a negative correlation with TG. The TG had a positive correlation between M and VIG, which had values of 0.36 and 0.35, respectively (P < 0.05). We have concluded that infrared thermography can be used to assess the testicular temperature gradient and its consequences on physical and quantitative aspects of sperm. PMID:24848445

  7. Scrotal infrared digital thermography as a predictor of seasonal effects on sperm traits in Braford bulls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Barcellos, Júlio Otavio Jardim; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Koetz, Celso; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Peripolli, Vanessa; McManus, Concepta; Canozzi, Maria Eugênia Andrighetto; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the seasonal effects of the environment on semen quality in bulls, using infrared thermography. Sperm motility (M), mass motion (MM), and vigor (VIG) were evaluated in sperm samples from 17 Bradford bulls aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Infrared thermography images and data were collected using an infrared FLIR T 300 camera and Quick Report 1.2 SP2 software to determine the temperature of the proximal and distal poles of the testis and to assess the testicular temperature gradient. The seasonal effects on physiological, seminal, and climatic variables were analyzed by the GLM ANOVA and CORR procedures using SAS®. The microclimatic factors were recorded in hourly intervals, and the daily mean temperature and mean relative humidity were calculated to determine the daily temperature-humidity index (THI) every day for 1 year. The temperature gradient (TG) variations of the testes were significantly higher in the autumn (4.5 °C), winter (4.0 °C), and spring (2.9 °C) compared to summer (0.9 °C) ( P < 0.05). Ocular globe temperatures were lower in the winter (27.6 °C) and autumn (26.8 °C) compared to summer (33.9 °C) and spring (31.1 °C) ( P < 0.05). The average MM (2.58), M (52.64), and VIG (2.70) of the semen decreased in the summer compared to other seasons ( P < 0.01). The TG was negatively correlated with THI (-0.44; P < 0.05). For the seminal variables, MaD (-0.45; P < 0.05) and TD (-0.50; P < 0.01) presented a negative correlation with TG. The TG had a positive correlation between M and VIG, which had values of 0.36 and 0.35, respectively ( P < 0.05). We have concluded that infrared thermography can be used to assess the testicular temperature gradient and its consequences on physical and quantitative aspects of sperm.

  8. An active thermography approach for thermal and electrical characterization of thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streza, M.; Longuemart, S.; Guilmeau, E.; Strzalkowski, K.; Touati, K.; Depriester, M.; Maignan, A.; Sahraoui, A. Hadj

    2016-07-01

    The enhancement of figure of merit (ZT) of thermoelectrics is becoming extremely important for an efficient conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy. In this respect, reliable measurements of thermal and electrical parameters are of paramount importance in order to characterize thermoelectric materials in terms of their efficiency. In this work, a combined theoretical-experimental active thermography approach is presented. The method consists of selecting the right sequential interdependence between the excitation frequency and the sampling rate of the infrared camera, by computing a temporal Fourier analysis of each pixel of the recorded IR image. The method is validated by using a reference sample which is then applied to a recent synthesized titanium trisulphide thermoelectric material (TiS3). By combining AC and steady-state experiments, one can obtain information on both thermal and electrical parameters of TE materials (namely thermal diffusivity, Seebeck coefficient). The thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of TiS3 are also measured using photothermal radiometry technique (PTR) and the resulting values of these parameters are α  =  9.7*10‑7 m2 s‑1 and k  =  2.2 W m‑1 K, respectively. The results obtained with the two techniques are in good agreement. In the case of TE materials, the main benefit of the proposed method is related to its non-contact nature and the possibility of obtaining the electric potential and temperature at the same probes. The Seebeck coefficient obtained by active IR thermography (S  =  ‑554 μV K‑1) is consistent with the one obtained using an ULVAC-ZEM3 system (S  =  ‑570 μV K‑1). For a large number of users of thermographic cameras, which are not equipped with a lock-in thermography module, the present approach provides an affordable and cheaper solution.

  9. Active thermography and post-processing image enhancement for recovering of abraded and paint-covered alphanumeric identification marks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, R.; Quattrocchi, A.; Piccolo, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    Alphanumeric marking is a common technique employed in industrial applications for identification of products. However, the realised mark can undergo deterioration, either by extensive use or voluntary deletion (e.g. removal of identification numbers of weapons or vehicles). For recovery of the lost data many destructive or non-destructive techniques have been endeavoured so far, which however present several restrictions. In this paper, active infrared thermography has been exploited for the first time in order to assess its effectiveness in restoring paint covered and abraded labels made by means of different manufacturing processes (laser, dot peen, impact, cold press and scribe). Optical excitation of the target surface has been achieved using pulse (PT), lock-in (LT) and step heating (SHT) thermography. Raw infrared images were analysed with a dedicated image processing software originally developed in Matlab™, exploiting several methods, which include thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR), guided filtering (GF), block guided filtering (BGF) and logarithmic transformation (LN). Proper image processing of the raw infrared images resulted in superior contrast and enhanced readability. In particular, for deeply abraded marks, good outcomes have been obtained by application of logarithmic transformation to raw PT images and block guided filtering to raw phase LT images. With PT and LT it was relatively easy to recover labels covered by paint, with the latter one providing better thermal contrast for all the examined targets. Step heating thermography never led to adequate label identification instead.

  10. Energetic costs of mange in wolves estimated from infrared thermography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Paul C.; Almberg, Emily S.; Haase, Catherine G; Hudson, Peter J.; Maloney, Shane K; Metz, Matthew C; Munn, Adam J; Nugent, Paul; Putzeys, Olivier; Stahler, Daniel R.; Stewart, Anya C; Smith, Doug W.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites, by definition, extract energy from their hosts and thus affect trophic and food web dynamics even when the parasite may have limited effects on host population size. We studied the energetic costs of mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) in wolves (Canis lupus) using thermal cameras to estimate heat losses associated with compromised insulation during the winter. We combined the field data of known, naturally infected wolves with data set on captive wolves with shaved patches of fur as a positive control to simulate mange-induced hair loss. We predict that during the winter in Montana, more severe mange infection increases heat loss by around 5.2 to 12 MJ per night (1240 to 2850 kcal, or a 65% to 78% increase) for small and large wolves, respectively accounting for wind effects. To maintain body temperature would require a significant proportion of a healthy wolf's total daily energy demands (18-22 MJ/day). We also predict how these thermal costs may increase in colder climates by comparing our predictions in Bozeman, Montana to those from a place with lower ambient temperatures (Fairbanks, Alaska). Contrary to our expectations, the 14°C differential between these regions was not as important as the potential differences in wind speed. These large increases in energetic demands can be mitigated by either increasing consumption rates or decreasing other energy demands. Data from GPS-collared wolves indicated that healthy wolves move, on average, 17 km per day, which was reduced by 1.5, 1.8 and 6.5 km for light, medium, and severe hair loss. In addition, the wolf with the most hair loss was less active at night and more active during the day, which is the converse of the movement patterns of healthy wolves. At the individual level mange infections create significant energy demands and altered behavioral patterns, this may have cascading effects on prey consumption rates, food web dynamics, predator-prey interactions, and scavenger communities.

  11. Infrared thermography investigation of an evaporating sessile water droplet on heated substrates.

    PubMed

    Girard, Fabien; Antoni, Mickaël; Sefiane, Khellil

    2010-04-01

    The present study is an experimental investigation of the thermal evolution of millimeter-sized sessile water droplets deposited on heated substrates. Infrared thermography is used to record temperature profiles on the droplet interface in time as evaporation takes place. The local measurements of the interface temperature allowed us to deduce the local evaporation rate and its evolution in time. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such measurements have been performed. The deduced evaporation rate using thermography data has been validated with optical measurements. Temperature evolution is used to reveal the contact line location and transient temperature fields. Temperature differences between the apex of the droplet and the contact line are shown to decrease in time. The rate of local temperature increase at the interface is found to behave linearly with time. The slope of this linear increase turns out to be more pronounced as the substrate temperature is increased. A generalized linear trend, using dimensionless properties for the interface temperature rise, is deduced from the measurements. PMID:20199075

  12. Handy method to estimate uncertainty of temperature measurement by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniz, Pablo Rodrigues; de Araújo Kalid, Ricardo; Cani, Shirley P. N.; da Silva Magalhães, Robson

    2014-07-01

    Temperature measurement by infrared thermography is a technique that is widely used in predictive maintenance to detect faults. The uncertainty involved in measuring temperature by thermography is not only due to the imager, but also due to the measurements and estimates made by the user: emissivity of the inspected object, distance, temperature, and relative humidity of the propagation medium, temperature of objects located in the ambient, and the imager itself. This measurement uncertainty should be available for the thermographer to be able to make a more accurate diagnosis. The methods available in the literature to estimate the uncertainty of measured temperature usually require information nonaccessible to the regular thermographer. This paper proposes a method for calculating the uncertainty of temperature that requires only data available to the thermographer. This method is useful under usual conditions in predictive maintenance-short distance (7.5 to 14 μm) thermal imagers, no fog or rain, among others. It provides results similar to methods that use models that are not available or reserved by the manufacturers of imagers. The results indicate that not all sources of uncertainty are relevant in measurement uncertainty. However, the total uncertainty can be so high that it may lead to misdiagnosis.

  13. Technical note: Relationship between infrared thermography and heat production in young bulls.

    PubMed

    Gomes, R A; Busato, K C; Ladeira, M M; Johnson, K A; Galvão, M C; Rodrigues, A C; Lourençoni, D; Chizzotti, M L

    2016-03-01

    The traditional techniques to measure heat production (HP) are calorimetry (direct and indirect) and comparative slaughter. Both methods are expensive and require extensive amounts of time and infrastructure. Infrared thermography (IRT) could be a faster and less expensive alternative to estimate cattle HP. The objective of this project was to evaluate the use of the IRT technique as an indicator of HP in cattle. A total of 24 bulls (12 Nellore and 12 Black Angus) with initial BW of 380 ± 7 kg were used. Initially, 4 animals of each breed were harvested (baseline animals) and simple regressions were developed for each breed from these baseline animals to estimate the initial chemical composition of the remaining bulls. Eight animals of each breed were fed a silage/concentrate diet for ad libitum intake in individual stalls. On the 25th, 50th, and 75th experimental day, infrared thermal images (Fluke Ti 55ft; Fluke Corporation) were taken of each animal's face to access skin and ocular surface temperatures. A metabolism trial was conducted to estimate the ME intake (MEI). After 84 experimental days, the cattle were harvested and retained energy (RE) and HP were calculated. The data were analyzed using the MIXED and REG procedures of SAS adopting a significance level of 0.05. Angus cattle had a greater daily MEI, HP, and skin and eye temperatures than Nellore. We found significant correlations ( ≤ 0.005) between daily HP and maximum ( = 0.65) and average skin temperatures ( = 0.65) and maximum ( = 0.65) and average ocular surface ( = 0.69) temperatures recorded on d 50. Infrared thermography has potential to be used to evaluate HP in cattle. PMID:27065272

  14. Active Thermography for the Detection of Defects in Powder Metallurgy Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerrouk, Souheil; Ludwig, Reinhold; Apelian, Diran

    2007-03-01

    Active thermography is an established NDE technique that has become the method of choice in many industrial applications which require non-contact access to the parts under test. Unfortunately, when conducting on-line infrared (IR) inspection of powder metallic compacts, complications can arise due the generally low emissivity of metals and the thermally noisy environment typically encountered in manufacturing plants. In this paper we present results of an investigation that explores the suitability of active IR imaging of powder metallurgy compacts for the detection of surface and sub-surface defects in the pre-sinter state and in an on-line manufacturing setting to ensure complete quality assurance. Additional off-line tests can be carried out for statistical quality analyses. In this research, the IR imaging of sub-surface defects is based on a transient instrumentation approach that relies on an electric control system which synchronizes and monitors the thermal response due to an electrically generated heat source. Preliminary testing reveals that this newly developed pulsed thermography system can be employed for the detection of subsurface defects in green-state parts. Practical measurements agree well with theoretical predictions. The inspection approach being developed can be used for the testing of green-state compacts as they exit the compaction press at speeds of up to 1,000 parts per hour.

  15. Non-destructive testing of composite materials by means of active thermography-based tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizaranzu, Miguel; Lario, Alberto; Chiminelli, Agustín; Amenabar, Ibán

    2015-07-01

    Infrared analysis tools are nowadays widely used for the non-destructive testing of components made up in composite materials, belonging to many different industrial sectors. Being a non-contact method, its capability for the inspection of large areas in short periods of time justifies the great number of works and technical studies that can be found in this field. The growing interest in the technique is also supported by the development, during recent years, of increasingly powerful equipment and data analysis tools. In order to establish a base of knowledge to assist defect identification in real components inspections, the design and manufacturing of inspection samples including controlled defects, is a frequently used strategy. This paper deals with the analysis, by means of transient active thermography, of a set of inspection patterns made out of different composite materials and configurations that can be found in the wind turbine blade manufacturing industry. The design and manufacturing of these patterns are described, including different types of representative defects, stack configurations and composite manufacturing techniques. Reference samples are then inspected by means of active thermography analysis tools and the results obtained are discussed.

  16. Active Thermography for the Detection of Defects in Powder Metallurgy Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Benzerrouk, Souheil; Ludwig, Reinhold; Apelian, Diran

    2007-03-21

    Active thermography is an established NDE technique that has become the method of choice in many industrial applications which require non-contact access to the parts under test. Unfortunately, when conducting on-line infrared (IR) inspection of powder metallic compacts, complications can arise due the generally low emissivity of metals and the thermally noisy environment typically encountered in manufacturing plants. In this paper we present results of an investigation that explores the suitability of active IR imaging of powder metallurgy compacts for the detection of surface and sub-surface defects in the pre-sinter state and in an on-line manufacturing setting to ensure complete quality assurance. Additional off-line tests can be carried out for statistical quality analyses. In this research, the IR imaging of sub-surface defects is based on a transient instrumentation approach that relies on an electric control system which synchronizes and monitors the thermal response due to an electrically generated heat source. Preliminary testing reveals that this newly developed pulsed thermography system can be employed for the detection of subsurface defects in green-state parts. Practical measurements agree well with theoretical predictions. The inspection approach being developed can be used for the testing of green-state compacts as they exit the compaction press at speeds of up to 1,000 parts per hour.

  17. Association of digital cushion thickness with sole temperature measured with the use of infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, G; Trojacanec, P; Ganda, E K; Bicalho, M L S; Bicalho, R C

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the association between digital cushion thickness and sole temperature measured by infrared thermography. Data were collected from 216 lactating Holstein cows at 4 to 10d in milk (DIM). Cows were locomotion scored and sole temperature was measured after claw trimming (a minimum delay of 3 min was allowed for the hoof to cool) using an infrared thermography camera. Temperature was measured at the typical ulcer site of the lateral digit of the left hind foot. Immediately after the thermographic image was obtained, the thickness of the digital cushion was measured by ultrasonography. Rumen fluid samples were collected with a stomach tube and sample pH was measured immediately after collection. Additionally, a blood sample was obtained and used for measurements of serum concentrations of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and haptoglobin. To evaluate the associations of digital cushion thickness with sole temperature, a linear regression model was built using the GLIMMIX procedure in SAS software (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). Sole temperature was the response variable, and digital cushion thickness quartiles, locomotion score group, rumen fluid pH, rumen fluid sample volume, environmental temperature, age in days, and serum levels of NEFA, BHBA, and haptoglobin were fitted in the model. Only significant variables were retained in the final model. Simple linear regression scatter plots were used to illustrate associations between sole temperature (measured by infrared thermography at the typical ulcer site) and environmental temperature and between NEFA and BHBA serum levels and haptoglobin. One-way ANOVA was used to compare rumen fluid pH for different locomotion score groups and for different digital cushion quartiles. Results from the multivariable linear regression model showed that sole temperature increased as locomotion scores increased and decreased as digital cushion thickness

  18. Study on the heat flux reconstruction with the infrared thermography for the divertor target plates in the KSTAR tokamak.

    PubMed

    Kang, C S; Lee, H H; Oh, S; Lee, S G; Wi, H M; Kim, Y S; Kim, H S

    2016-08-01

    An infrared (IR) thermography is the preferred diagnostic that can quantify heat flux by measuring the surface temperature distributions of the divertor plates. The IR thermography is successfully instrumented on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). In this study, finite volume method is considered to solve the heat conduction equations. 1D-, 2D-, and 3D models are developed and compared with various calculation algorithms, such as Duhamel's theorem and THEODOR. These comparisons show good agreement. In order to acquire more efficient and reliable calculation results, we consider two numerical analysis schemes, influence of temperature on thermal properties and image stabilization. Recently, this reconstruction code is successfully applied to the KSTAR IR thermography. PMID:27587124

  19. Infrared thermography fails to visualize stimulation-induced meridian-like structures

    PubMed Central

    Litscher, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    Background According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) the vital energy flows through a system of channels also called meridians. Generally accepted proof for meridians cannot be considered as being given. Goal of this study was to examine whether possible stimulation-induced meridian-like structures, as recently described by other authors, can be visualized and objectified simultaneously at different infrared wavelength ranges. Methods The study analyses evidence for the existence of acupuncture-specific, meridian-like artifacts in 6 healthy volunteers (mean age ± SD 28.7 ± 3.7 years; range 25 – 35 years). Two infrared cameras at different wavelength ranges were used for thermographic control of possible stimulation effects (moxibustion-cigar, infrared warmth stimulation, needle and laserneedle stimulation). In addition to thermography, temperature and microcirculatory parameters were registered at a selected point using laser-Doppler flowmetry. Results and Conclusion After moxibustion (or infrared light stimulation) of the body at 2 – 5 μm and 7.5 – 13 μm ranges, different structures appear on thermographic images of the human body which are technical artifacts and which are not identical to what are known as meridians in all textbooks of TCM. Further scientific studies are required regarding the possible visualization of meridians. PMID:15958163

  20. LATERAL HEAT FLOW INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY FOR THICKNESS INDEPENDENT DETERMINATION OF THERMAL DIFFUSIVITY IN CFRP

    SciTech Connect

    Tralshawala, Nilesh; Howard, Don; Knight, Bryon; Plotnikov, Yuri; Ringermacher, Harry

    2008-02-28

    In conventional infrared thermography, determination of thermal diffusivity requires thickness information. Recently GE has been experimenting with the use of lateral heat flow to determine thermal diffusivity without thickness information. This work builds on previous work at NASA Langley and Wayne State University but we incorporate thermal time of flight (tof) analysis rather than curve fitting to obtain quantitative information. We have developed appropriate theoretical models and a tof based data analysis framework to experimentally determine all components of thermal diffusivity from the time-temperature measurements. Initial validation was carried out using finite difference simulations. Experimental validation was done using anisotropic carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. We found that in the CFRP samples used, the in-plane component of diffusivity is about eight times larger than the through-thickness component.

  1. Lateral Heat Flow Infrared Thermography for Thickness Independent Determination of Thermal Diffusivity in CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tralshawala, Nilesh; Howard, Don; Knight, Bryon; Plotnikov, Yuri; Ringermacher, Harry

    2008-02-01

    In conventional infrared thermography, determination of thermal diffusivity requires thickness information. Recently GE has been experimenting with the use of lateral heat flow to determine thermal diffusivity without thickness information. This work builds on previous work at NASA Langley and Wayne State University but we incorporate thermal time of flight (tof) analysis rather than curve fitting to obtain quantitative information. We have developed appropriate theoretical models and a tof based data analysis framework to experimentally determine all components of thermal diffusivity from the time-temperature measurements. Initial validation was carried out using finite difference simulations. Experimental validation was done using anisotropic carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites. We found that in the CFRP samples used, the in-plane component of diffusivity is about eight times larger than the through-thickness component.

  2. Evaluation of thermal load during laser corneal refractive surgery using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsmann, U.; Sauer, U.; Arba-Mosquera, S.; Magnago, T.; Triefenbach, N.

    2010-09-01

    Infrared thermography is used for evaluation of the mean temperature as a measure of thermal load during corneal refractive surgery. An experimental method to determine emissivity and to calibrate the thermografic system is presented. In a case study on the porcine eye two dimensional temperature distributions with lateral resolution of 170 μm and line scans with temporal resolution of 13 μs are discussed with respect to the meaning of mean temperature. Using the newest generation of surgery equipment it is shown, that the mean temperature rise can be kept below 5 °C during myopic laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) treatments corresponding to an aberration-free correction of -2.75 diopter.

  3. An infrared thermography imaging system for convective heat transfer measurements in complex flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, S. R.; Hedlund, C. R.; Ligrani, P. M.

    1998-12-01

    An infrared thermography imaging system is described for spatially resolved convective heat transfer measurements when used in conjunction with thermocouples, energy balances, digital image processing, zinc-selenide windows, and unique in situ calibration procedures. The usefulness of the system and the techniques developed are demonstrated by measurements made in two different environments with complex, three-dimensional flow features. First, spatial variations of surface Nusselt numbers are measured along the concave surfaces of a swirl chamber whose geometry models an internal passage used to cool the leading edge of a turbine blade. Second, spatially resolved distributions of the adiabatic film-cooling effectiveness are measured downstream of film-cooling holes on a symmetric turbine blade in transonic flow.

  4. Characterization of defects situated in a fresco by stimulated infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candoré, J. C.; Bodnar, J. L.; Detalle, V.; Grossel, P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to approach the possibilities of stimulated infrared thermography in dimensional characterization of defects situated in mural paintings. Towards this end, we have proceeded in two stages. Initially, we have developed, with the help of a point source photothermal analysis, an in situ measurement of the longitudinal thermal diffusivity parameter. Then, we have proceeded to the characterization of the depth of the studied defect, by means of a wide photothermal analysis and of a confrontation between theory and experiment. In this article, we present these two measurement techniques and show that the approach allows a good estimation of the depth of an inclusion of plastazote in a copy of the "Saint Christophe" of the "Campana" collection of the "Louvre Museum".

  5. Non-destructive testing of works of art by stimulated infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candoré, J. C.; Bodnar, J. L.; Detalle, V.; Grossel, P.

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we present various examples of assistance to the restoration of works of art by stimulated infrared thermography. We show initially that the method allows the detection of delamination located in mural paintings, such as in the "Saint Christophe" of the Campana collection of the Louvre French museum. We show then that it also makes it possible to detect delaminations or galleries of worms in marquetries. We show in a third stage that it provides for the detection of detachment of grayness in stained glasses. We show in a fourth stage that it allows the visualization of shards or metal inserts located in a Greek "panathénaque" amphora of the French National museum of the Ceramics of Sevres. We show finally, that the method permits the detection of a crack located in an ovoid vase of the same French National museum of the Ceramics of Sevres.

  6. Low-Altitude and Land-Based Infrared Thermography to Identify Types of Groundwater Discharge in NWT Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conant, B.; Mochnacz, N. J.

    2009-05-01

    In tributaries of the Mackenzie River in the Northwest Territories (NWT), Canada, groundwater discharge provides critical fish habitat for Dolly Varden and bull trout populations by maintaining base flows, creating thermal refugia in winter, and providing stable riverbed temperatures for spawning. Where temperature contrasts exist between surface water and groundwater, infrared thermography can use heat as a tracer to locate groundwater discharge areas. Thermal images acquired from satellites and high altitude airplanes tend to be expensive, lack the resolution necessary to identify small discharge locations, and do not allow real time decisions to investigate and ground truth identified temperature anomalies. Therefore, a system was developed using a handheld FLIR ThermaCam P25 infrared camera, visual video camera, infrared video capture system, and GPS in a low flying helicopter and on the ground. The advantage of the system was its ability to inexpensively and efficiently characterize several kilometer long reaches of river and identify springs and seeps on a sub-meter scale and in real time. The different types of groundwater discharge that can occur in these streams include: deep geothermally heated groundwater; shallow groundwater; and active zone water, but differentiating them can be difficult because observed thermal anomalies can be non-unique functions of the initial groundwater temperature, magnitude of discharge, air and surface water temperatures, and temporal variations. Work performed in March and September easily detected spring and seeps of deep groundwater (8 to 13 ° C) at Smith Creek, Gibson Creek, Gayna River, and Little Fish Creek. Shallow groundwater discharge was detected (1 to 3 ° C) at White Sand Creek, Canyon Creek, and Fish Creek, but was more difficult to identify. Subtle variations from surrounding temperatures (<1 ° C) at some sites suggested seeps from the hyporheic zone or possibly the active zone. The limitations of infrared

  7. Neonatal non-contact respiratory monitoring based on real-time infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Monitoring of vital parameters is an important topic in neonatal daily care. Progress in computational intelligence and medical sensors has facilitated the development of smart bedside monitors that can integrate multiple parameters into a single monitoring system. This paper describes non-contact monitoring of neonatal vital signals based on infrared thermography as a new biomedical engineering application. One signal of clinical interest is the spontaneous respiration rate of the neonate. It will be shown that the respiration rate of neonates can be monitored based on analysis of the anterior naris (nostrils) temperature profile associated with the inspiration and expiration phases successively. Objective The aim of this study is to develop and investigate a new non-contact respiration monitoring modality for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) using infrared thermography imaging. This development includes subsequent image processing (region of interest (ROI) detection) and optimization. Moreover, it includes further optimization of this non-contact respiration monitoring to be considered as physiological measurement inside NICU wards. Results Continuous wavelet transformation based on Debauches wavelet function was applied to detect the breathing signal within an image stream. Respiration was successfully monitored based on a 0.3°C to 0.5°C temperature difference between the inspiration and expiration phases. Conclusions Although this method has been applied to adults before, this is the first time it was used in a newborn infant population inside the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The promising results suggest to include this technology into advanced NICU monitors. PMID:22243660

  8. Infrared thermography sensing for mapping open fractures in deep-seated rockslides and unstable cliffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroň, Ivo; Bečkovský, David; Míča, Lumír

    2013-04-01

    The contribution presents in detail the new approach of infrared thermography (IRT) mapping open cracks, tension fractures and pseudo-karst caves within rock slope instabilities presented by Baroň et al. (2012). The method consists in high-resolution ground-based and airborne IRT sensing and it is restricted to cold seasons. Its utility is demonstrated through case studies from the Flysch Belt of the Outer West Carpathians (rockslides at Kopce Hill, Mt. Kněhyně, Křížový Hill, Smrdutá Hill, Pustevny Rockslide and Záryje Rockslide in E Czech Republic) and from the Northern Calcareous Alps (deep-seated gravitational slope deformations in Gschliefgraben / Mt. Traunstein in Austria). The approach is based on a contrast between temperatures deep within the rock, which at a depth of several meters represent local mean annual values, and winter-time temperatures of the ground surface. In winter, warmer, buoyant air from depth rises to the ground surface through open cracks and joints, and the temperature contrast can be detected by IRT. For temperature sensing, we used a Flir B360 thermal camera. Our test survey was conducted in February and December 2012, in order to achieve the best contrast between temperatures around open tension cracks and the adjacent ground surfaces. IRT results conclusively revealed the presence of open cracks, loosened rock zones, and pseudo-karst caves over a distance sometimes greater than 1 km. The IRT approach proved to be useful for rapidly assessing the distribution of open cracks and tension fractures, which is key information required for assessing rockfall and rockslide hazard. Baroň I., Bečkovský D. & Míča L. (2012): Application of infrared thermography for mapping open fractures in deep-seated rockslides and unstable cliffs. - Landslides, Springer Verlag. On-line First. DOI 10.1007/s10346-012-0367-z

  9. Concentration of mycotoxins and chemical composition of corn silage: a farm survey using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, P; Novinski, C O; Junges, D; Almeida, R; de Souza, C M

    2015-09-01

    This work evaluated the chemical composition and mycotoxin incidence in corn silage from 5 Brazilian dairy-producing regions: Castro, in central-eastern Paraná State (n=32); Toledo, in southwestern Paraná (n=20); southeastern Goiás (n=14); southern Minas Gerais (n=23); and western Santa Catarina (n=20). On each dairy farm, an infrared thermography camera was used to identify 3 sampling sites that exhibited the highest temperature, a moderate temperature, and the lowest temperature on the silo face, and 1 sample was collected from each site. The chemical composition and concentrations of mycotoxins were evaluated, including the levels of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2; zearalenone; ochratoxin A; deoxynivalenol; and fumonisins B1 and B2. The corn silage showed a highly variable chemical composition, containing, on average, 7.1±1.1%, 52.5±5.4%, and 65.2±3.6% crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and total digestible nutrients, respectively. Mycotoxins were found in more than 91% of the samples, with zearalenone being the most prevalent (72.8%). All samples from the Castro region contained zearalenone at a high average concentration (334±374µg/kg), even in well-preserved silage. The incidence of aflatoxin B1 was low (0.92%). Silage temperature and the presence of mycotoxins were not correlated; similarly, differences were not observed in the concentration or incidence of mycotoxins across silage locations with different temperatures. Infrared thermography is an accurate tool for identifying heat sites, but temperature cannot be used to predict the chemical composition or the incidence of mycotoxins that have been analyzed, within the silage. The pre-harvest phase of the ensiling process is most likely the main source of mycotoxins in silage. PMID:26162792

  10. The uses of infrared thermography to evaluate the effects of climatic variables in bull's reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Koetz, Celso; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli; Bremm, Carolina; Pimentel, Concepta; Lopes, Rubia Branco; da Rocha, Marcela Kuczynski; Carvalho, Helena Robattini; Barcellos, Júlio Otavio Jardim

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the seasonal effects of the environment on sperm quality in subtropical region determined by temperature and humidity index (THI). We used 20 Brangus bulls (5/8 Angus × 3/8 Nellore) aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Semen evaluations were performed twice per season during 1 year. Climate THI data were collected from an automatic weather station from the National Institute of Meteorology. Infrared thermography images were used to determine the temperature of the proximal and distal poles of the testis to assess the testicular temperature gradient (TG). The seasonal effects on seminal and climatic variables were analyzed with ANOVA using MIXED procedure of SAS. Sperm motility in spring (60.1 %), summer (57.6 %), and autumn (64.5 %) showed difference compared to winter (73.0 %; P < 0.01). TG was negatively correlated with THI at 18 days (spermiogenesis) (-0.76; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (epididymal transit) (-0.85; P < 0.01). Ocular temperature (OcT) had a positive correlation with THI at 18 days (0.78; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (0.84; P < 0.01). Motility showed a negative correlation with THI only at 18 days (-0.79; P < 0.05). During spermiogenesis, the TG had higher negative correlation compared to OcT (-0.97; P < 0.01) and rectal temperature (-0.72; P < 0.05). Spermatozoa with distal midpiece reflex were correlated with THI during transit epididymis (0.72; P < 0.05). Seminal parameters are not affected when THI reaches 93.0 (spermiogenesis) and 88.0 (epididymal transit). We concluded that infrared thermography can be adopted as an indirect method in order to assess the effect of environmental changes in TG and OcT of Brangus bulls.

  11. Low-temperature infiltration identified using infrared thermography in patients with subcutaneous edema revealed ultrasonographically: A case report.

    PubMed

    Oya, Maiko; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Tanabe, Hidenori; Oe, Makoto; Murayama, Ryoko; Yabunaka, Koichi; Matsui, Yuko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Infiltration is a frequent complication of infusion therapy. We previously demonstrated the usefulness of infrared thermography as an objective method of detecting infiltration in healthy people. However, whether thermography can detect infiltration in clinical settings remains unknown. Therefore, we report two cases where thermography was useful in detecting infiltration at puncture sites. In both cases, tissue changes were verified ultrasonographically. The patients were a 56-year-old male with cholangitis and a 76-year-old female with hepatoma. In both cases, infiltration symptoms such as swelling and erythema occurred one day after the insertion of a peripheral intravenous catheter. Thermographic images from both patients revealed low-temperature areas spreading from the puncture sites; however, these changes were not observed in other patients. The temperature difference between the low-temperature areas and their surrounding skin surface exceeded 1.0°C. Concurrently, ultrasound images revealed that tissues surrounding the vein had a cobblestone appearance, indicating edema. In both patients, subcutaneous tissue changes suggested infiltration and both had low-temperature areas spreading from the puncture sites. Thus, subcutaneous edema may indicate infusion leakage, resulting in a decrease in the temperature of the associated skin surface. These cases suggest that infrared thermography is an effective method of objectively and noninvasively detecting infiltration. PMID:27210893

  12. A novel intelligent fault diagnosis method for electrical equipment using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hui; Huang, Fuzhen

    2015-11-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) has taken a very important role in monitoring and inspecting thermal defects of electrical equipment without shutting down, which has important significance for the stability of power systems. It has many advantages such as non-contact detection, freedom from electromagnetic interference, safety, reliability and providing large inspection coverage. Manual analysis of infrared images for detecting defects and classifying the status of equipment may take a lot of time and efforts, and may also lead to incorrect diagnosis results. To avoid the lack of manual analysis of infrared images, many intelligent fault diagnosis methods for electrical equipment are proposed, but there are two difficulties when using these methods: one is to find the region of interest, another is to extract features which can represent the condition of electrical equipment, as it is difficult to segment infrared images due to their over-centralized distributions and low intensity contrasts, which are quite different from those in visual light images. In this paper, a new intelligent diagnosis method for classification different conditions of electrical equipment using data obtained from infrared images is presented. In the first stage of our method, an infrared image of electrical equipment is clustered using K-means algorithm, then statistical characteristics containing temperature and area information are extracted in each region. In the second stage, in order to select the salient features which can better represent the condition of electrical equipment, some or all statistical characteristics from each region are combined as input data for support vector machine (SVM) classifier. To improve the classification performance of SVM, a coarse-to-fine parameter optimization approach is adopted. The performance of SVM is compared with that of back propagation neural network. The comparison results show that our method can achieve a better performance with accuracy 97.8495%.

  13. Use of infrared thermography in children with shock: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Dosal, Alejandra; Rivera-Vega, Rosalina; Simón, Jorge; González, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Shock is a complex clinical syndrome caused by an acute failure of circulatory function resulting in inadequate tissue and organ perfusion. Digital infrared thermal imaging is a non-invasive technique that can detect changes in blood perfusion by detecting small changes in the temperature of the skin. In this preliminary study, eight pediatric patients (five boys, three girls), ages ranging from 6 to 14 years (average: 9.8 years), were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit at “Dr. Ignacio Morones Prieto” Central Hospital; here, the patients were examined using digital infrared thermal imaging. Patients in shock showed a significant decrease in distal temperature (at least 7°), compared to critically ill patients without shock. The latter group presented a skin temperature pattern very similar to the one previously reported for healthy children. The results show that infrared thermography can be used as a non-invasive method for monitoring the temperature in pediatric patients in intensive care units in order to detect shock in its early stages. PMID:27489669

  14. Application of on-line infrared thermography in steel making industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viale, M.; Martin, O.; Muratori, F.; Bertezzolo, U.; Perez, J.; Usart, J.

    2007-04-01

    This work is about three real applications in the steel industry where the infrared technology is used to control the process and to increase safety. All the applications where developed by Ternium-Siderar automation group. The main objectives are to use the infrared thermography in steel plant are to reduce production costs and to prevent mayor damages. The first work is about automatic slag detection during the tapping operation of the Blast Oxygen Furnace (BOF) converters by thermographical image processing. The benefit is to reduce fluxes due to less slag carryover and also to eliminate the ladle recirculation for excessive slag. Additionally, the steel shop process engineers are using the camera information to estimate some other process variables. There is a project to make all the BOF tapping fully automatic, using the camera information. The second work is about on-line ladle hot spot detection. A failure of the ladle refractory bricks may cause damages in the ladle car, mechanical equipment, and cabling in the ladle furnace. To detect these failures, a system of four infrared cameras with an image processing software was developed. Also in future applications, the thermal information is going to be used for data correlation with other process variables. The third one is in the sinter plant, where the camera temperature information is used to optimize the process control. Before the system installation, there was no available information about the sinter material temperature. Nowadays there is an on-line information that is used to close the control loop.

  15. Using lock-in infrared thermography for the visualization of the hand vascular tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzida, Nabila; Bendada, Abdel Hakim; Piau, Jean-Marc; Akhloufi, Moulay; Maldague, Xavier; Raymond, Mathieu

    2008-03-01

    An imaging technique of the hand vein tree is presented in this paper. Using the natural human circulatory system and a controlled armband pressure around the arm, a lock-in thermography technique with an internal excitation is carried out. Since the stimulation frequency is inversely proportional to the inspection depth, the subcutaneous layer requires the use of a very slow frequency. Thus, a sawtooth waveform is preferred to minimize the duration of the pressure applied to the armband during the experiment. A frequency of approximately 0.03 Hz and a pressure range between 100 and 140 mmHg, according to the diastolic and systolic blood pressure, are used as stimulation. Then, dorsal hand amplitude and phase images are obtained with IR_view (Klein, 1999), a tool specifically designed to analyze infrared images. The hand vein structure is thermally mapped by an infrared camera operating in the middle wavelength infrared range (MWIR) at room temperature. Parasitic frequencies are avoided by keeping the hand fixed. The resulting images show a gradient of temperature between surrounding tissues and the back-of-hand veins. The vascular signature segmentation is extracted from the amplitude and phase images by using a Fast Fourier Transform image processing technique. This work could be used for vein localization for perfusion or for the early diagnosis of vein diseases such as primitive varicose and deep vein thrombosis (DVT). A hand vein signature database for identification purposes is also possible.

  16. Real Time Detection of Defects in GFRP Bridge Decks Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkhachorn, P.; Lonkar, G. M.; Halabe, Udaya B.; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    2006-03-01

    This work is aimed at building a real time system to detect subsurface defects in GFRP bridge decks using infrared thermography. The issues addressed are: (a) development of a real time defect detection system, and (b) image mosaicking to build a composite image map. In the tests conducted, a turn key system was built in Matlab environment using the FLIR SDK to acquire image from the ThermaCAM S60 infrared camera. The images were then analyzed by defect detection algorithms. Efforts were made to minimize the time to detect defects in a captured image. In the second phase, image mosaicking was used to build a "composite image" that combines all the infrared images to form a single image. The location of defects in the "composite image" leads to a system that will be able to point out defects in the bridge as a whole. The study creates a base that can be used for real time defect detection in GFRP bridge decks.

  17. Appreciation of the traffic effects on the RST by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Abderrahmen; Marchetti, Mario; Buès, Michel

    2014-09-01

    Road surface temperature forecast is a key component of winter maintenance strategy in many developed countries. Numerical tools exist to help road managers to organize services and consequently to trigger de-icing operations. Forecasting strategies have been commonplace since the 1980s, and often based on numerical models. Traffic is one of the influencing parameters, specifically in urban areas. This work was undertaken to evaluate to which extent an accurate description of traffic might improve numerical model dedicated to road surface temperature forecasting. Two sets of experiments were run to detect and to quantify traffic effects on RST. First one consisted in driving above an infrared radiometer, a pyrgeometer and other atmospheric probes to measure the radiative contribution of a passing vehicle at various speeds. In the second set, an infrared camera was installed on a vehicle in an urban traffic flow. This camera was mounted on the roof and focused the pavement right behind the vehicle ahead, both circulating at the same speed. Infrared thermography indicated a fleeting contribution of traffic to RST. The temperature increase in circulated areas, with respect to uncirculated ones, does not last according to collected measurements. Measurements with atmospheric and radiometric probes provided elements to properly take into account traffic in a numerical model and to appreciate its contribution.

  18. Precise Temperature Mapping of GaN-Based LEDs by Quantitative Infrared Micro-Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ki Soo; Yang, Sun Choel; Kim, Jae-Young; Kook, Myung Ho; Ryu, Seon Young; Choi, Hae Young; Kim, Geon Hee

    2012-01-01

    A method of measuring the precise temperature distribution of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by quantitative infrared micro-thermography is reported. To reduce the calibration error, the same measuring conditions were used for both calibration and thermal imaging; calibration was conducted on a highly emissive black-painted area on a dummy sapphire wafer loaded near the LED wafer on a thermoelectric cooler mount. We used infrared thermal radiation images of the black-painted area on the dummy wafer and an unbiased LED wafer at two different temperatures to determine the factors that degrade the accuracy of temperature measurement, i.e., the non-uniform response of the instrument, superimposed offset radiation, reflected radiation, and emissivity map of the LED surface. By correcting these factors from the measured infrared thermal radiation images of biased LEDs, we determined a precise absolute temperature image. Consequently, we could observe from where the local self-heat emerges and how it distributes on the emitting area of the LEDs. The experimental results demonstrated that highly localized self-heating and a remarkable temperature gradient, which are detrimental to LED performance and reliability, arise near the p-contact edge of the LED surface at high injection levels owing to the current crowding effect. PMID:22666050

  19. Precise temperature mapping of GaN-based LEDs by quantitative infrared micro-thermography.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ki Soo; Yang, Sun Choel; Kim, Jae-Young; Kook, Myung Ho; Ryu, Seon Young; Choi, Hae Young; Kim, Geon Hee

    2012-01-01

    A method of measuring the precise temperature distribution of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by quantitative infrared micro-thermography is reported. To reduce the calibration error, the same measuring conditions were used for both calibration and thermal imaging; calibration was conducted on a highly emissive black-painted area on a dummy sapphire wafer loaded near the LED wafer on a thermoelectric cooler mount. We used infrared thermal radiation images of the black-painted area on the dummy wafer and an unbiased LED wafer at two different temperatures to determine the factors that degrade the accuracy of temperature measurement, i.e., the non-uniform response of the instrument, superimposed offset radiation, reflected radiation, and emissivity map of the LED surface. By correcting these factors from the measured infrared thermal radiation images of biased LEDs, we determined a precise absolute temperature image. Consequently, we could observe from where the local self-heat emerges and how it distributes on the emitting area of the LEDs. The experimental results demonstrated that highly localized self-heating and a remarkable temperature gradient, which are detrimental to LED performance and reliability, arise near the p-contact edge of the LED surface at high injection levels owing to the current crowding effect. PMID:22666050

  20. Acquisition of the spatial temperature distribution of rock faces by using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beham, Michael; Rode, Matthias; Schnepfleitner, Harald; Sass, Oliver

    2013-04-01

    Rock temperature plays a central role for weathering and therefore influences the risk potential originating from rockfall processes. So far, for the acquisition of temperature mainly point-based measuring methods have been used and accordingly, two-dimensional temperature data is rare. To overcome this limitation, an infrared camera was used to collect and analyse data on the spatial temperature distribution on 10 x 10 m sections of rock faces in the Gesäuse (900m a.s.l.) and in the Dachsteingebirge (2700m a.s.l.) within the framework of the research project ROCKING ALPS (FWF-P24244). The advantage of infrared thermography to capture area-wide temperatures has hardly ever been used in this context. In order to investigate the differences between north-facing and south-facing rock faces at about the same period of time it was necessary to move the camera between the sites. The resulting offset of the time lapse infrared images made it necessary to develop a sophisticated methodology to rectify the captured images in order to create matching datasets for future analysis. With the relatively simple camera used, one of the main challenges was to find a way to convert the colour-scale or grey-scale values of the rectified image back to temperature values after the rectification process. The processing steps were mainly carried out with MATLAB. South-facing rock faces generally experienced higher temperatures and amplitudes compared to the north facing ones. In view of the spatial temperature distribution, the temperatures of shady areas were clearly below those of sunny ones, with the latter also showing the highest amplitudes. Joints and sun-shaded areas were characterised by attenuated diurnal temperature fluctuations closely paralleled to the air temperature. The temperature of protruding rock parts and of loose debris responded very quick to changes in radiation and air temperatures while massive rock reacted more slowly. The potential effects of temperature on

  1. Use of infrared thermography for the diagnosis and grading of sprained ankle injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, João; Vardasca, Ricardo; Pimenta, Madalena; Gabriel, Joaquim; Torres, João

    2016-05-01

    Ankle joint sprains are a common medical condition estimated to be responsible for 15-25% of all musculoskeletal injuries worldwide. The pathophysiology of the lesion can represent considerable time lost to injury, as well as long-term disability in up to 60% of patients. A percentage between 10% and 20% may complicate with chronic instability of the ankle joint and disability in walking, contributing to morbidity and poor life quality. Ankle sprains can be classified as grade I, II, or III, based on the extent of damage and number of ligaments affected. The diagnostic grading is important for setting further treatment and rehabilitation, since more severe injuries carries risk of recurrence, added morbidity and decrease in life quality. The aim of this work was to evaluate the adequacy of infrared thermography as a potential complimentary diagnostic tool of the distinct lesions grades. Evaluation of different thermographic values of the ankle region (in both affected and non-affected foot) was conducted for this purpose. The principal results to be highlighted are that some of the regions, namely anterior view for non defined time after injury analysis, and anterior, frontal, posterior and anterior talofibular ligament regions and proximal calcaneofibular ligament regions in acute lesions (herein defined as less than 6 h post-traumatic event) presented consistent profiles of variation. The analyses were performed considering affected and non-affected ankles results on plotted graphics representing termographic evaluation and grading of these lesions performed using ultrasound by experimented medical radiologists. An increase in temperature values was observed when progressing from mild to severe ankle sprain injuries, with these regions presenting lower values for the affected ankle when compared to the non-affected ankle in all the analysis performed. The remaining analysed regions did not present the same variations. Statistical analysis using Kruskal

  2. Computerized tomography technique for reconstruction of obstructed temperature field in infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, F. C.; Huang, Y. H.; Liu, L.; Chen, Y. S.; Hung, Y. Y.; Lo, T. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Infrared thermography is a rapid, non-invasive and full-field technique for non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E). With all the achievements on IR instrumentation and image processing techniques attained, it has been extended far beyond simple hot-spot detection and becomes one of the most promising NDT&E techniques in the last decades. It has achieved increasing acceptance in different sectors include medical imaging, manufacturing component fault detection and buildings diagnostic. However, one limitation of IR thermography is that the testing results are greatly affected by object surface emissivity. Surface with various emissivities may lead to difficult discrimination between area of defect and area with different emissivity. Therefore, many studies have been carried out on eliminating emissivity, for example, the time derivative approach, lock-in processing and differential contrast measurements. In these methods, sequence of themo-data/images are recorded and being processed in order to eliminate differences of emissivity. Another problem of IR thermography is that any obstruction may limit stimulations and imaging which leads to the observation of unclear defect image. To solve this problem, this paper proposes an algorithm based on the principle of computerized tomography which permits the reconstruction of unavailable/partially available temperature distribution of the affected area using the measured surrounding temperature field. In the process, a set of imaginary rays are projected from many different directions across the area. For each ray, integration of the temperature derivatives along the ray is equals to the temperature difference between the boundary points intercepted by the ray. Therefore, a set of linear equations can be established by considering the multiple rays. Each equation expresses the unknown temperature derivatives in the affected area in terms of the measured boundary temperature data. Solution of the set of simultaneous

  3. Diagnosis of response and non-response to dry eye treatment using infrared thermography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, U. Rajendra; Tan, Jen Hong; Vidya, S.; Yeo, Sharon; Too, Cheah Loon; Lim, Wei Jie Eugene; Chua, Kuang Chua; Tong, Louis

    2014-11-01

    The dry eye treatment outcome depends on the assessment of clinical relevance of the treatment effect. The potential approach to assess the clinical relevance of the treatment is to identify the symptoms responders and non-responders to the given treatments using the responder analysis. In our work, we have performed the responder analysis to assess the clinical relevance effect of the dry eye treatments namely, hot towel, EyeGiene®, and Blephasteam® twice daily and 12 min session of Lipiflow®. Thermography is performed at week 0 (baseline), at weeks 4 and 12 after treatment. The clinical parameters such as, change in the clinical irritations scores, tear break up time (TBUT), corneal staining and Schirmer's symptoms tests values are used to obtain the responders and non-responders groups. We have obtained the infrared thermography images of dry eye symptoms responders and non-responders to the three types of warming treatments. The energy, kurtosis, skewness, mean, standard deviation, and various entropies namely Shannon, Renyi and Kapoor are extracted from responders and non-responders thermograms. The extracted features are ranked based on t-values. These ranked features are fed to the various classifiers to get the highest performance using minimum features. We have used decision tree (DT), K nearest neighbour (KNN), Naves Bayesian (NB) and support vector machine (SVM) to classify the features into responder and non-responder classes. We have obtained an average accuracy of 99.88%, sensitivity of 99.7% and specificity of 100% using KNN classifier using ten-fold cross validation.

  4. Emissivity calibration for temperature measurement using infrared thermography in orthogonal cutting of 316L and 100Cr6 grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiorgue, Frédéric; Brosse, Alexandre; Rech, Joël; Hamdi, Hédi; Bergheau, Jean Michel

    2011-01-01

    Material removal operations such as turning or grinding are prone to generate very high temperatures at the tool/chip and tool/workpiece interfaces. These phenomena are involved in studies concerning tools or workpieces, and their estimation is a key point for predicting damages. Temperature elevation is the main cause in workpieces worsening because it generates residual stresses and metallurgical modifications. It is also linked to the tools wear because of the thermal fatigue phenomena and the thermally activated diffusion process. In this paper, a first attempt to measure the temperature fields during 316L orthogonal cutting and 100Cr6 grinding is presented and can be divided in three parts. In the first part the physics of temperature measurement using infrared thermography are presented. Then, the calibration of the infrared camera is realized and allows to obtain of the emissivity curves of 316L and 100Cr6 steels. To do so, an experimental device has been set up to reproduce the luminance recording conditions encountered during the machining operations. The last step is the computation of all the experimental data to obtain the temperature fields from the recorded luminance and the 316L and 100Cr6 emissivity curve. At last, temperature level measured is compared to those presented in the bibliography.

  5. Classification of factors influencing the use of infrared thermography in humans: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Cuevas, Ismael; Bouzas Marins, Joao Carlos; Arnáiz Lastras, Javier; Gómez Carmona, Pedro María; Piñonosa Cano, Sergio; García-Concepción, Miguel Ángel; Sillero-Quintana, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    Body temperature is one of the most commonly used indicators of health status in humans. Infrared thermography (IRT) is a safe, non-invasive and low-cost technique that allows for the rapid and non-invasive recording of radiating energy that is released from the body. IRT measures this radiation, directly related to skin temperature (Tsk) and has been widely used since the early 1960s in different areas. Recent technical advances in infrared cameras have made new human applications of IRT (beyond diagnostic techniques) possible. This review focuses on the lack of comprehensive information about the factors influencing the use of IRT in humans, and proposes a comprehensive classification in three primary groups: environmental, individual and technical factors. We aim: to propose a common framework for further investigations; to reinforce the accuracy of human IRT; to summarise and discuss the results from the studies carried out on each factor and to identify areas requiring further research to determine their effects on human IRT.

  6. The uses of infrared thermography to evaluate the effects of climatic variables in bull's reproduction.

    PubMed

    Menegassi, Silvio Renato Oliveira; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Dias, Eduardo Antunes; Koetz, Celso; Lopes, Flávio Guiselli; Bremm, Carolina; Pimentel, Concepta; Lopes, Rubia Branco; da Rocha, Marcela Kuczynski; Carvalho, Helena Robattini; Barcellos, Júlio Otavio Jardim

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the seasonal effects of the environment on sperm quality in subtropical region determined by temperature and humidity index (THI). We used 20 Brangus bulls (5/8 Angus × 3/8 Nellore) aged approximately 24 months at the beginning of the study. Semen evaluations were performed twice per season during 1 year. Climate THI data were collected from an automatic weather station from the National Institute of Meteorology. Infrared thermography images were used to determine the temperature of the proximal and distal poles of the testis to assess the testicular temperature gradient (TG). The seasonal effects on seminal and climatic variables were analyzed with ANOVA using MIXED procedure of SAS. Sperm motility in spring (60.1%), summer (57.6%), and autumn (64.5%) showed difference compared to winter (73.0%; P < 0.01). TG was negatively correlated with THI at 18 days (spermiogenesis) (-0.76; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (epididymal transit) (-0.85; P < 0.01). Ocular temperature (OcT) had a positive correlation with THI at 18 days (0.78; P < 0.05) and at 12 days (0.84; P < 0.01). Motility showed a negative correlation with THI only at 18 days (-0.79; P < 0.05). During spermiogenesis, the TG had higher negative correlation compared to OcT (-0.97; P < 0.01) and rectal temperature (-0.72; P < 0.05). Spermatozoa with distal midpiece reflex were correlated with THI during transit epididymis (0.72; P < 0.05). Seminal parameters are not affected when THI reaches 93.0 (spermiogenesis) and 88.0 (epididymal transit). We concluded that infrared thermography can be adopted as an indirect method in order to assess the effect of environmental changes in TG and OcT of Brangus bulls. PMID:26049285

  7. Infrared thermography detects febrile and behavioural responses to vaccination of weaned piglets.

    PubMed

    Cook, N J; Chabot, B; Lui, T; Bench, C J; Schaefer, A L

    2015-02-01

    An automated, non-invasive system for monitoring of thermoregulation has the potential to mitigate swine diseases through earlier detection. Measurement of radiated temperature of groups of animals by infrared thermography (IRT) is an essential component of such a system. This study reports on the feasibility of monitoring the radiated temperature of groups of animals as a biomarker of immune response using vaccination as a model for febrile disease. In Study A, weaned pigs were either treated with an intramuscular vaccine (FarrowSure Gold), a sham injection of 0.9% saline or left as untreated controls. An infrared thermal camera (FLIR A320) was fixed to the ceiling directly above the pen of animals, and recorded infrared images of the treatment groups at 5 min intervals. The effect on temperature of the spatial distribution of pigs within the pen was significant, with higher temperatures recorded when pigs were grouped together into a single cluster. A higher frequency of clustering behaviour was observed in vaccinated animals compared with controls during a period of the afternoon ~4 to 7 h post-vaccination. The daily mean of the maximum image temperature was significantly higher in vaccinated animals compared with control and sham-treated animals. In the vaccination treated group, the 24 h mean of the maximum temperature was significantly higher during the post-vaccination period compared with the 24 h period before vaccination. Increased temperature in the vaccinated animals occurred from ~3 h, peaked at ~10 h, and remained elevated for up to 20 h post-vaccination. In Study B, the effect of prevalence was tested in terms of the difference in maximum temperature between control and vaccination days. A thermal response to vaccination was detected in a pen of 24 to 26 animals when <10% of the animals were vaccinated. The results support the concept of radiated temperature measurements of groups of animals by IRT as a screening tool for febrile diseases in pig

  8. Infrared thermography of transition due to isolated roughness elements in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avallone, F.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; Cardone, G.

    2016-02-01

    Boundary layer transition in high-speed flows is a phenomenon that despite extensive research over the years is still extremely hard to predict. The presence of protrusions or gaps can lead to an accelerated laminar-to-turbulent transition enhancing the thermal loads and the skin friction coefficient. In the current investigation, inverse heat transfer measurements using infrared thermography are performed on the flow past different roughness geometries in the form of cylinders and diamond at free stream Mach number equal to 7.5, h/δ ranging between 0.5 and 0.9 (where h is the roughness height and δ is the boundary layer thickness), and Reθ ranging between 1305 and 2450. The roughness elements are positioned on a 5° ramp placed at zero angle of attack. The measurements indicate that the roughness geometry influences the transitional pattern while the frontal area influences both the transition location and the maximum value of the Stanton number along the centreline. Moreover, there is a strong connection between the streamwise centreline Stanton number and the spreading of the wake width. In particular, the transition process is characterized by an approximately constant wake width. Differently, the wake width spreads at the location where the streamwise centreline Stanton number reaches the turbulent level. This point corresponds to a local maximum of the wake amplitude defined as one half of the maximum spanwise variation of the Stanton number.

  9. Frescoes diagnostic using laser Doppler vibrometry and infrared thermography: experimental and numerical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnani, Alexia; De Andrade, Roberto M.; Esposito, Enrico; Feligiotti, Mara; Tavares, Sinthya G.

    2006-06-01

    In this work laser Doppler vibrometry has been used for damage detection in frescoes. Results were compared with the ones obtained through infrared thermography, and, for both techniques, mathematical models were implemented to simulate the physical domains and conditions of the employed test sample. The limitations of each methodology are also discussed. The numerical model of the vibrometric investigations has been constructed using Finite Elements Method modeling. A new procedure based on the observation of Rayleigh waves propagation velocities allowed to acquire sample mechanical parameters. Comparison of experimental and simulated data and independent defect diameter measurement by echographic equipment, allowed to establish the confidence level and the discrepancies in the developed model. Also operational limits of the vibrometric technique have been studied by acquisition of Signal-to-Noise ratio on different areas of a sample. The Fourier equation has been used for the mathematical model employed for the numerical simulation of the thermographic investigations. Numerical technique with formularization in finite volumes has been employed and a FORTRAN code has been developed to solve the thermal problem.

  10. Automatic detection of diabetic foot complications with infrared thermography by asymmetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chanjuan; van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Bus, Sicco A.; van der Heijden, Ferdi

    2015-02-01

    Early identification of diabetic foot complications and their precursors is essential in preventing their devastating consequences, such as foot infection and amputation. Frequent, automatic risk assessment by an intelligent telemedicine system might be feasible and cost effective. Infrared thermography is a promising modality for such a system. The temperature differences between corresponding areas on contralateral feet are the clinically significant parameters. This asymmetric analysis is hindered by (1) foot segmentation errors, especially when the foot temperature and the ambient temperature are comparable, and by (2) different shapes and sizes between contralateral feet due to deformities or minor amputations. To circumvent the first problem, we used a color image and a thermal image acquired synchronously. Foot regions, detected in the color image, were rigidly registered to the thermal image. This resulted in 97.8%±1.1% sensitivity and 98.4%±0.5% specificity over 76 high-risk diabetic patients with manual annotation as a reference. Nonrigid landmark-based registration with B-splines solved the second problem. Corresponding points in the two feet could be found regardless of the shapes and sizes of the feet. With that, the temperature difference of the left and right feet could be obtained.

  11. Uncertainty of temperature measurements by infrared thermography for metal cutting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, B.; Whitenton, E.; Madhavan, V.; Donmez, A.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the uncertainty in the measurement of the peak temperature on the side face of a cutting tool, during the metal cutting process, by infrared thermography. The analysis considers the use of a commercial off-the-shelf camera and optics, typical of what is used in metal cutting research. A physics-based temperature measurement equation is considered and an analytical method is used to propagate the uncertainties associated with measurement variables to determine the overall temperature measurement uncertainty. A Monte Carlo simulation is used to expand on the analytical method by incorporating additional sources of uncertainty such as a point spread function (PSF) of the optics, difference in emissivity of the chip and tool, and motion blur. Further discussion is provided regarding the effect of sub-scenel averaging and magnification on the measured temperature values. It is shown that a typical maximum cutting tool temperature measurement results in an expanded uncertainty of U = 50.1 °C (k = 2). The most significant contributors to this uncertainty are found to be uncertainties in cutting tool emissivity and PSF of the imaging system.

  12. Service and maintenance damage assessment of composite structures using various modes of infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammatikos, S. A.; Kordatos, E. Z.; Matikas, T. E.; Paipetis, A. S.

    2015-02-01

    Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRPs) have been widely used recently in aerospace technology as primary materials. During aircraft operation the combination of thermo-mechanical loads, gradually degrades the material properties. Therefore, the development of reliable and cost effective damage inspection protocols throughout the service life of these structures is of primary importance for their safe function. Within the scope of this study, Infrared Thermography (IrT) was employed with the aim of assessing the structural integrity of composite aero-structures in both maintenance (off-line) and service (on-line) conditions. In the maintenance concept, IrT was employed in Lock-in mode to evaluate artificially induced damage in bonded repaired materials. For this purpose, various configurations of damage were investigated. In the service concept, IrT was employed for the continuous monitoring of loaded repaired structures in order to assess in real-time any progressive evolution of de-bonding which could lead to failure of the bonded patch repair. The experimental results provided evidence that IrT is capable of qualitative and quantitative field assessment of aero-structures.

  13. Infrared thermography of evaporative fluxes and dynamics of salt deposition on heterogeneous porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachshon, Uri; Shahraeeni, Ebrahim; Or, Dani; Dragila, Maria; Weisbrod, Noam

    2011-12-01

    Evaporation of saline solutions from porous media, common in arid areas, involves complex interactions between mass transport, energy exchange and phase transitions. We quantified evaporation of saline solutions from heterogeneous sand columns under constant hydraulic boundary conditions to focus on effects of salt precipitation on evaporation dynamics. Mass loss measurements and infrared thermography were used to quantify evaporation rates. The latter method enables quantification of spatial and temporal variability of salt precipitation to identify its dynamic effects on evaporation. Evaporation from columns filled with texturally-contrasting sand using different salt solutions revealed preferential salt precipitation within the fine textured domains. Salt precipitation reduced evaporation rates from the fine textured regions by nearly an order of magnitude. In contrast, low evaporation rates from coarse-textured regions (due to low capillary drive) exhibited less salt precipitation and consequently less evaporation rate suppression. Experiments provided insights into two new phenomena: (1) a distinct increase in evaporation rate at the onset of evaporation; and (2) a vapor pumping mechanism related to the presence of a salt crust over semidry media. Both phenomena are related to local vapor pressure gradients established between pore water and the surface salt crust. Comparison of two salts: NaCl and NaI, which tend to precipitate above the matrix surface and within matrix pores, respectively, shows a much stronger influence of NaCl on evaporation rate suppression. This disparity reflects the limited effect of NaI precipitation on matrix resistivity for solution and vapor flows.

  14. Infra-red Thermography for High Throughput Field Phenotyping in Solanum tuberosum

    PubMed Central

    Prashar, Ankush; Yildiz, Jane; McNicol, James W.; Bryan, Glenn J.; Jones, Hamlyn G.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development of genomic technology has made high throughput genotyping widely accessible but the associated high throughput phenotyping is now the major limiting factor in genetic analysis of traits. This paper evaluates the use of thermal imaging for the high throughput field phenotyping of Solanum tuberosum for differences in stomatal behaviour. A large multi-replicated trial of a potato mapping population was used to investigate the consistency in genotypic rankings across different trials and across measurements made at different times of day and on different days. The results confirmed a high degree of consistency between the genotypic rankings based on relative canopy temperature on different occasions. Genotype discrimination was enhanced both through normalising data by expressing genotype temperatures as differences from image means and through the enhanced replication obtained by using overlapping images. A Monte Carlo simulation approach was used to confirm the magnitude of genotypic differences that it is possible to discriminate. The results showed a clear negative association between canopy temperature and final tuber yield for this population, when grown under ample moisture supply. We have therefore established infrared thermography as an easy, rapid and non-destructive screening method for evaluating large population trials for genetic analysis. We also envisage this approach as having great potential for evaluating plant response to stress under field conditions. PMID:23762433

  15. The Use of Infrared Thermography for Porosity Assessment of Intact Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineo, S.; Pappalardo, G.

    2016-08-01

    Preliminary results on a new test for the indirect assessment of porosity through infrared thermography are presented. The study of the cooling behavior of rock samples in laboratory, through the analysis of thermograms, proved an innovative tool for the estimation of such an important property, which is one of the main features affecting the mechanical behavior of rocks. A detailed experimentation was performed on artificially heated volcanic rock samples characterized by different porosity values. The cooling trend was described both graphically and numerically, with the help of cooling curves and Cooling Rate Index. The latter, which proved strictly linked to porosity, was employed to find reliable equations for its indirect estimation. Simple and multiple regression analyses returned satisfactory outcomes, highlighting the great match between predicted and measured porosity values, thus confirming the goodness of the proposed model. This study brings a novelty in rock mechanics, laying the foundation for future researches aimed at refining achieved results for the validation of the model in a larger scale.

  16. Classification of electrical problems detected by infrared thermography using a risk assessment process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Gregory B.; Huff, Roy

    2016-05-01

    For more than 40 years thermography has been used for electrical problem detection. In addition, since radiometric infrared cameras can establish apparent surface temperature of the problem, a classification system is often utilized based upon surface temperature, or temperature rise above normal operating temperature or ambient air temperature. This however can be an extremely unreliable classification method for a number of reasons including: emissivity and background energy; a lack of regard for failure modes and stressors; surface temperature variability with load and ambient conditions; temperature gradient from internal source to surface; and the presence of convection, just to name a few. Standards, such as NFPA 70B, try to address some of these issues by having very low threshold temperature limits, but this as well has issues including identifying an over-abundance of non-critical problems for immediate repair. This paper will present a risk assessment process and matrix which classifies electrical problems based upon a variety of factors affecting both probability and consequence of electrical component failure. Inherent in this process will be a discussion of understanding and analysing electrical connection failure modes and failure stressors, as well as consideration of both heat energy flow and stored energy rather than only considering surface temperature as a single point predictor of catastrophic failure.

  17. Theoretical framework for quantitatively estimating ultrasound beam intensities using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Myers, Matthew R; Giridhar, Dushyanth

    2011-06-01

    In the characterization of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) systems, it is desirable to know the intensity field within a tissue phantom. Infrared (IR) thermography is a potentially useful method for inferring this intensity field from the heating pattern within the phantom. However, IR measurements require an air layer between the phantom and the camera, making inferences about the thermal field in the absence of the air complicated. For example, convection currents can arise in the air layer and distort the measurements relative to the phantom-only situation. Quantitative predictions of intensity fields based upon IR temperature data are also complicated by axial and radial diffusion of heat. In this paper, mathematical expressions are derived for use with IR temperature data acquired at times long enough that noise is a relatively small fraction of the temperature trace, but small enough that convection currents have not yet developed. The relations were applied to simulated IR data sets derived from computed pressure and temperature fields. The simulation was performed in a finite-element geometry involving a HIFU transducer sonicating upward in a phantom toward an air interface, with an IR camera mounted atop an air layer, looking down at the heated interface. It was found that, when compared to the intensity field determined directly from acoustic propagation simulations, intensity profiles could be obtained from the simulated IR temperature data with an accuracy of better than 10%, at pre-focal, focal, and post-focal locations. PMID:21682428

  18. Quantitative estimation of ultrasound beam intensities using infrared thermography-Experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Giridhar, Dushyanth; Robinson, Ronald A; Liu, Yunbo; Sliwa, Jack; Zderic, Vesna; Myers, Matthew R

    2012-06-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography is a technique that has the potential to rapidly and noninvasively determine the intensity fields of ultrasound transducers. In the work described here, IR temperature measurements were made in a tissue phantom sonicated with a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer, and the intensity fields were determined using a previously published mathematical formulation relating intensity to temperature rise at a tissue/air interface. Intensity fields determined from the IR technique were compared with those derived from hydrophone measurements. Focal intensities and beam widths determined via the IR approach agreed with values derived from hydrophone measurements to within a relative difference of less than 10%, for a transducer with a gain of 30, and about 13% for a transducer with a gain of 60. At axial locations roughly 1 cm in front (pre-focal) and behind (post-focal) the focus, the agreement with hydrophones for the lower-gain transducer remained comparable to that in the focal plane. For the higher-gain transducer, the agreement with hydrophones at the pre-focal and post-focal locations was around 40%. PMID:22712903

  19. Suitable features selection for monitoring thermal condition of electrical equipment using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, A. S. N.; Taib, S.

    2013-11-01

    Monitoring the thermal condition of electrical equipment is necessary for maintaining the reliability of electrical system. The degradation of electrical equipment can cause excessive overheating, which can lead to the eventual failure of the equipment. Additionally, failure of equipment requires a lot of maintenance cost, manpower and can also be catastrophic- causing injuries or even deaths. Therefore, the recognition processof equipment conditions as normal and defective is an essential step towards maintaining reliability and stability of the system. The study introduces infrared thermography based condition monitoring of electrical equipment. Manual analysis of thermal image for detecting defects and classifying the status of equipment take a lot of time, efforts and can also lead to incorrect diagnosis results. An intelligent system that can separate the equipment automatically could help to overcome these problems. This paper discusses an intelligent classification system for the conditions of equipment using neural networks. Three sets of features namely first order histogram based statistical, grey level co-occurrence matrix and component based intensity features are extracted by image analysis, which are used as input data for the neural networks. The multilayered perceptron networks are trained using four different training algorithms namely Resilient back propagation, Bayesian Regulazation, Levenberg-Marquardt and Scale conjugate gradient. The experimental results show that the component based intensity features perform better compared to other two sets of features. Finally, after selecting the best features, multilayered perceptron network trained using Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm achieved the best results to classify the conditions of electrical equipment.

  20. Real-time quantification of viable bacteria in liquid medium using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaimeh, Ahmad A.; Campion, Jeffrey J.; Gharaibeh, Belal Y.; Evans, Martin E.; Saito, Kozo

    2011-11-01

    Quantifying viable bacteria in liquids is important in environmental, food processing, manufacturing, and medical applications. Since vegetative bacteria generate heat as a result of biochemical reactions associated with cellular functions, thermal sensing techniques, including infrared thermography (IRT), have been used to detect viable cells in biologic samples. We developed a novel method that extends the dynamic range and improves the sensitivity of bacterial quantification by IRT. The approach uses IRT video, thermodynamics laws, and heat transfer mechanisms to directly measure, in real-time, the amount of energy lost as heat from the surface of a liquid sample containing bacteria when the specimen cools to a lower temperature over 2 min. We show that the Energy Content ( EC) of liquid media containing as few as 120 colony-forming units (CFU) of Escherichia coli per ml was significantly higher than that of sterile media ( P < 0.0001), and that EC and viable counts were strongly positively correlated ( r = 0.986) over a range of 120 to approximately 5 × 10 8 CFU/ml. Our IRT approach is a unique non-contact method that provides real-time bacterial enumeration over a wide dynamic range without the need for sample concentration, modification, or destruction. The approach could be adapted to quantify other living cells in a liquid milieu and has the potential for automation and high throughput.

  1. Toward quantitative aerial thermal infrared thermography for energy conservation in the built environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allinson, David; Medjdoub, Benachir; Wilson, Robin

    2005-03-01

    The UK Home Energy Conservation Act puts a duty on local authorities to develop strategies to improve energy efficiency in all public and private sector housing in order to tackle fuel poverty and reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The City of Nottingham, UK turned to aerial Thermal InfraRed Thermography (TIRT) to try and identify households where energy savings can be made. In this paper, existing literature is reviewed to explain the limitations of aerial TIRT for energy conservation in the built environment and define the techniques required to overcome them. This includes the range of suitable meteorological conditions at the time of the survey, the use of ground truth data, the need to account for all radiation paths and losses when calculating roof surface temperature and the assumptions that must be made when calculating insulation levels. Atmospheric calibration, roof surface emissivity and sky view factor must also be determined by some means and approaches to these problems are reviewed from the wider literature. Error analysis and benchmarking are important if the technique is to be validated and these are discussed with reference to the literature. A methodology for determining the thickness of loft insulation for residential buildings in the city of Nottingham, UK using aerial TIRT data within a GIS software environment is proposed.

  2. Particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography in a levitated droplet with nanosilica suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-03-01

    Preferential accumulation and agglomeration kinetics of nanoparticles suspended in an acoustically levitated water droplet under radiative heating has been studied. Particle image velocimetry performed to map the internal flow field shows a single cell recirculation with increasing strength for decreasing viscosities. Infrared thermography and high speed imaging show details of the heating process for various concentrations of nanosilica droplets. Initial stage of heating is marked by fast vaporization of liquid and sharp temperature rise. Following this stage, aggregation of nanoparticles is seen resulting in various structure formations. At low concentrations, a bowl structure of the droplet is dominant, maintained at a constant temperature. At high concentrations, viscosity of the solution increases, leading to rotation about the levitator axis due to the dominance of centrifugal motion. Such complex fluid motion inside the droplet due to acoustic streaming eventually results in the formation of a ring structure. This horizontal ring eventually reorients itself due to an imbalance of acoustic forces on the ring, exposing larger area for laser absorption and subsequent sharp temperature rise.

  3. Involuntary motion tracking for medical dynamic infrared thermography using a template-based algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Cila

    2013-01-01

    In medical applications, Dynamic Infrared (IR) Thermography is used to detect the temporal variation of the skin temperature. Dynamic Infrared Imaging first introduces a thermal challenge such as cooling on the human skin, and then a sequence of hundreds of consecutive frames is acquired after the removal of the thermal challenge. As a result, by analyzing the temporal variation of the skin temperature over the image sequence, the thermal signature of skin abnormality can be examined. However, during the acquisition of dynamic IR imaging, the involuntary movements of patients are unavoidable, and such movements will undermine the accuracy of diagnosis. In this study, based on the template-based algorithm, a tracking approach is proposed to compensate the motion artifact. The affine warping model is adopted to estimate the motion parameter of the image template, and then the Lucas-Kanade algorithm is applied to search for the optimized parameters of the warping function. In addition, the weighting mask is also incorporated in the computation to ensure the robustness of the algorithm. To evaluate the performance of the approach, two sets of IR image sequences of a subject’s hand are analyzed: the steady-state image sequence, in which the skin temperature is in equilibrium with the environment, and the thermal recovery image sequence, which is acquired after cooling is applied on the skin for 60 seconds. By selecting the target region in the first frame as the template, satisfactory tracking results were obtained in both experimental trials, and the robustness of the approach can be effectively ensured in the recovery trial. PMID:24392205

  4. Detection and Characterization of Package Defects and Integrity Failure using Dynamic Scanning Infrared Thermography (DSIRT).

    PubMed

    Morris, Scott A

    2016-02-01

    A dynamic scanning infrared thermography (DSIRT) system developed at the Univ. of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) Packaging Lab relies on variation in transient thermal artifacts to indicate defects, and offers the possibility of characterization of many types of materials and structures. These include newer polymer and laminate-based structures for shelf-stable foods that lack a reliable, nondestructive method for inspection, which is a continuing safety issue. Preliminary trials were conducted on a polyester/aluminum foil/polypropylene retort pouch laminate containing artificially-induced failed seal and insulating inclusion defects ranging from 1 to 10 mm wide in the plane of the seal. The samples were placed in relative motion to a laterally positioned infrared laser, inducing heating through the plane of the seal. The emergent thermal artifact on the obverse side was sensed using either a bolometer camera or a thermopile sensor, with thermal anomalies indicating potential defects and the results of each sensors were compared. The bolometer camera detected defects to the limit of its measured optical resolution-approximately 1 mm at 20 cm-although the lower-resolution thermopile sensors were only capable of detecting 5 mm defects even at closer distances of approximately 5 mm. In addition, a supplementary magnification system was fitted to the bolometer camera which increased resolution but reduced field of view and would require a much higher frame rate to be useful. Automatic processing of the image data rapidly detected the model defects and can lead to development of an automated inspection system.  Much higher material throughput speeds are feasible using faster instruments, and the system is scalable. PMID:26720916

  5. Diverging Drought Resistance of Scots Pine Provenances Revealed by Infrared Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Hannes; Schunk, Christian; Matiu, Michael; Menzel, Annette

    2016-01-01

    With recent climate changes, Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) forests have been affected by die-off events. Assisted migration of adapted provenances mitigates drought impacts and promotes forest regeneration. Although suitable provenances are difficult to identify by traditional ecophysiological techniques, which are time consuming and invasive, plant water status can be easily assessed by infrared thermography. Thus, we examined the stress responses of 2-year-old potted Scots pine seedlings from six provenances (Bulgaria, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, and Spain) based on two thermal indices (crop water stress index and stomatal conductance index). Both indices were derived from infrared images during a 6-week drought/control treatment in a greenhouse in the summer of 2013. The pines were monitored during the stress and subsequent recovery period. After controlling for fluctuating environmental conditions, soil moisture or treatment-specific water supply was the most important driver of drought stress. The stress magnitude and response to soil water deficit depended on provenance. Under moderate drought conditions, pines from western and eastern Mediterranean provenances (Bulgaria, France, and Spain) expressed lower stress levels than those from both continental provenances (Germany and Poland). Moreover, pines from continental provenances were less resilient (showed less recovery after the stress period) than Mediterranean pines. Under extreme drought, all provenances were equally stressed with almost no significant differences in their thermal indices. Provenance-specific differences in drought resistance, which are associated with factors such as summer precipitation at the origin of Scots pine seedlings, may offer promising tracks of adaptation to future drought risks.

  6. Short communication: early detection of mastitis using infrared thermography in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Colak, A; Polat, B; Okumus, Z; Kaya, M; Yanmaz, L E; Hayirli, A

    2008-11-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) absorbs infrared radiation and generates images based on the amount of heat generated. It has been used in human medicine for diagnosis of various cancers. This experiment was conducted to determine if IRT had merit for early detection of subclinical mastitis in dairy cows. Milk sample and skin surface temperature (SST) were simultaneously evaluated using the California Mastitis Test (CMT) and IRT for each quarter in 94 dairy cows (49 Brown Swiss and 45 Holstein). Average days in milk (DIM) and milk production were 93 +/- 37 d and 16 +/- 2.2 kg (mean +/- SD) and their ages ranged from 4 to 8 yr. There was a strong correlation between SST and CMT score (r = 0.92). Average SST was 33.19, 34.08, 34.99, and 36.15 degrees C for quarters with the CMT score of 0 (n = 156), +1 (n = 116), +2 (n = 80), and +3 (n = 24), respectively. This association was best described by a linear model as follows: y = 0.94x + 33.17, R(2) = 0.85, where y = SST and x = CMT score. Changes in rectal temperature (RT) due to the CMT score were minor (y = 0.09x + 38.39, R(2) = 0.07, where y = RT and x = average CMT score). In conclusion, RT may not confirm mastitis. However, IRT is sensitive enough to perceive changes in SST in response to varying degrees of severity of the mammary gland infection as reflected by the CMT score, suggesting that as a noninvasive tool, IRT can be employed for screening dairy cows for mastitis. PMID:18946129

  7. Non-destructive inspection of drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels using active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usamentiaga, R.; Venegas, P.; Guerediaga, J.; Vega, L.; López, I.

    2012-11-01

    The aerospace industry is in constant need of ever-more efficient inspection methods for quality control. Product inspection is also essential to maintain the safe operation of aircraft components designed to perform for decades. This paper proposes a method for non-destructive inspection of drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels. Honeycomb sandwich panels are extensively employed in the aerospace industry due to their high strength and stiffness to weight ratios. In order to attach additional structures to them, panels are reinforced by filling honeycomb cells and drilling holes into the reinforced areas. The proposed procedure is designed to detect the position of the holes within the reinforced area and to provide a robust measurement of the distance between each hole and the boundary of the reinforced area. The result is a fast, safe and clean inspection method for drilled holes in reinforced honeycomb sandwich panels that can be used to robustly assess a possible displacement of the hole from the center of the reinforced area, which could have serious consequences. The proposed method is based on active infrared thermography, and uses state of the art methods for infrared image processing, including signal-to-nose ratio enhancement, hole detection and segmentation. Tests and comparison with X-ray inspections indicate that the proposed system meets production needs.

  8. Comparative study on submillimeter flaws in stitched T-joint carbon fiber reinforced polymer by infrared thermography, microcomputed tomography, ultrasonic c-scan and microscopic inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Hassler, Ulf; Genest, Marc; Fernandes, Henrique; Robitaille, Francois; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Joncas, Simon; Maldague, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Stitching is used to reduce dry-core (incomplete infusion of T-joint core) and reinforce T-joint structure. However, it may cause new types of flaws, especially submillimeter flaws. Microscopic inspection, ultrasonic c-scan, pulsed thermography, vibrothermography, and laser spot thermography are used to investigate the internal flaws in a stitched T-joint carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) matrix composites. Then, a new microlaser line thermography is proposed. Microcomputed tomography (microCT) is used to validate the infrared results. A comparison between microlaser line thermography and microCT is performed. It was concluded that microlaser line thermography can detect the internal submillimeter defects. However, the depth and size of the defects can affect the detection results. The microporosities with a diameter of less than 54 μm are not detected in the microlaser line thermography results. Microlaser line thermography can detect the microporosity (a diameter of 0.162 mm) from a depth of 90 μm. However, it cannot detect the internal microporosity (a diameter of 0.216 mm) from a depth of 0.18 mm. The potential causes are given. Finally, a comparative study is conducted.

  9. FPA-based infrared thermography as applied to the study of cutaneous perspiration and stimulated vascular response in humans.

    PubMed

    Vainer, Boris G

    2005-12-01

    This review gives an overview of focal plane array (FPA)-based infrared (IR) thermography as a powerful research method in the field of physiology and medicine. Comparison of the gained results with the data previously obtained by other authors with other research tools is given. Outer thermoregulatory manifestations displayed by the human organism subjected to whole-body heating (sauna bath) and physical loads (exercise bicycling) are quantitatively analysed. Some details of human body emotional sweating (psycho-physiological effect) are reported. Particular attention is paid to studying active sweat glands as individual objects. All experimental data were obtained with the help of a high-sensitivity (0.03 degrees C) fast 128 x 128 InAs IR detector-based thermal imaging system operating in the short-wave spectral region (2.5 to 3 microm) and perfectly suiting medical purposes. It is shown that IR thermography makes it possible to overcome limitations inherent to contact measuring means that were traditionally used before in thermal studies. It is also shown that heterogeneous thermograms displayed by organisms with disturbed inner equilibrium can be quantitatively analysed in terms of statistical parameters of related surface-temperature histograms, such as the mean temperature and the standard deviation of temperature (SDT). The increase and the decrease in SDT turned out to be typical of prolonged physical load and subsequent relaxation, and of external whole-body heating, respectively. Explanation of this result based on a hypothesis advanced within the context of the doctrine of human-organism evolution is given. Skin-temperature distribution function accompanying the relaxed organism in normality was found to closely resemble normal-distribution function. Symmetry break down and variation of the shape of this characteristic may serve as an indicator of homeostasis shift and can be used as a quantitative criterion for the latter. A new phenomenon, stable

  10. Development of an interatmospheric window wavelength (5-9 μm) infrared thermography with an advanced image processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Daisuke; Komiyama, Tatsuhito; Sakagami, Takahide; Kubo, Shiro

    2006-04-01

    Recently, deterioration of concrete structures before their design life has become a serious social problem in Japan. Nondestructive inspection techniques are required, for detecting defects and damages in concrete structures, such as subsurface void or delamination. As one of these techniques, the thermographic NDT can be applied as an effective NDT technique to inspect large area of the objective structure from distant place. In addition, it does not require any chemicals and application of physical excitation for inspection. However, the thermographic NDT has a shortcoming that the measurement results are affected by the reflection of atmospheric radiation due to the sunlight, sky or surrounding materials. Since most of the buildings in Japan are covered with luster materials with low emissivity, such as tile or mortal, infrared reflection on the surface is difficult to be neglected. To reduce the influence of these reflection noises, the infrared thermography with detectable wavelength from 5 to 8 μm, which coincides with absorption range of moisture, is utilized. In this research, a new infrared thermography with 5 to 8 μm wavelength range by applying a band pass filter and an uncooled microbolometer infrared array detector. Further, a new signal to noise (S/N) ratio improvement technique has been developed in order to compensate a deterioration of sensitivity due to the band pass filter.

  11. Integration of infrared thermography and high-frequency electromagnetic methods in archaeological surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Maio, Rosa; Meola, Carosena; Fedi, Maurizio; Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria

    2010-05-01

    An integration of high-resolution non-destructive techniques is presented for the inspection and evaluation of ancient architectonic structures. Infrared thermography (IRT) represents a valuable tool for nondestructive evaluation of architectonic structures and artworks because it is capable of giving indications about most of the degradation sources of artworks and buildings of both historical interest and civil use. In particular, it is possible to detect cracks, disbondings, alteration of material consistency, etc. Indeed, by choosing the most adequate thermographic technique, it is possible to monitor the conservation state of artworks in time and to detect the presence of many types of defects (e.g., voids, cracks, disbondings, etc.) in different types of materials (e.g., concrete, masonry structures, bronze, etc.). The main advantages of infrared thermography when dealing with precious artworks may be summarized with three words: non-contact, non-invasive, and two-dimensionality. It is possible to inspect either a large surface such as the facade of a palace, or a very small surface of only few square millimetres. Conversely, the inspection depth is quite small; generally, of the order of centimetres. However, as demonstrated in previous work, IRT well matches with electric-and electromagnetic-type geophysical methods to characterize the overlapping zone from low-to-high depth in masonry structures. In particular, the use of high-frequency electromagnetic techniques, such as the ground penetrating radar (GPR), permits to reach investigation depths of some ten of centimetres by choosing appropriate frequencies of the transmitted electromagnetic signal. In the last decade a large utilisation of the GPR methodology to non-destructive analysis of engineering and architectural materials and structures has been experienced. This includes diverse features, such as definition of layer thickness, characterisation of different constructive materials, identification of

  12. Long Hole Film Cooling Dataset for CFD Development . Part 1; Infrared Thermography and Thermocouple Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Thurman, Douglas; Poinsatte, Phillip; Ameri, Ali; Eichele, Peter; Knight, James

    2013-01-01

    An experiment investigating flow and heat transfer of long (length to diameter ratio of 18) cylindrical film cooling holes has been completed. In this paper, the thermal field in the flow and on the surface of the film cooled flat plate is presented for nominal freestream turbulence intensities of 1.5 and 8 percent. The holes are inclined at 30deg above the downstream direction, injecting chilled air of density ratio 1.0 onto the surface of a flat plate. The diameter of the hole is 0.75 in. (0.01905 m) with center to center spacing (pitch) of 3 hole diameters. Coolant was injected into the mainstream flow at nominal blowing ratios of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0. The Reynolds number of the freestream was approximately 11,000 based on hole diameter. Thermocouple surveys were used to characterize the thermal field. Infrared thermography was used to determine the adiabatic film effectiveness on the plate. Hotwire anemometry was used to provide flowfield physics and turbulence measurements. The results are compared to existing data in the literature. The aim of this work is to produce a benchmark dataset for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) development to eliminate the effects of hole length to diameter ratio and to improve resolution in the near-hole region. In this report, a Time-Filtered Navier Stokes (TFNS), also known as Partially Resolved Navier Stokes (PRNS), method that was implemented in the Glenn-HT code is used to model coolant-mainstream interaction. This method is a high fidelity unsteady method that aims to represent large scale flow features and mixing more accurately.

  13. Infrared thermography analysis of thermal diffusion induced by RF magnetic field on agar phantoms loaded with magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bante-Guerra, Jose; Macías, J. D.; Caballero-Aguilar, L.; Vales-Pinzón, C.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, several treatments for fighting malignant tumors have been designed. However these procedures have well known inconveniences, depending on their applicability, tumor size and side effects, among others. Magnetic hyperthermia is a safe, non-invasive method for cancer therapy. This treatment is applied via elevation of target tissue temperature by dissipation of heat from Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNPs), previously located within the tumor. The induction of heat causes cell death and therefore the removal of the tumor. In this work the thermal diffusion in phantoms of agar loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is studied using the infrared thermography technique, which is widely used in biology/medicine (e.g. skin temperature mapping). Agar is one of the materials used to simulate different types of body tissues, these samples are known as "phantoms". Agar is of natural origin, low cost and high degree of biocompatibility. In this work the agar gel was embedded with MNPs by coprecipitation and placed in an alternating magnetic field radiation. As a consequence, the energy from the radiation source is dissipated as heat and then transferred from the MNP to the gel, increasing its temperature. For the temperature analysis, the samples of agar gel were stimulated by RF magnetic field generated by coils. Heating was measured with infrared thermography using a Thermovision A20M infrared camera. Thermographic images allowed obtaining the dependence of thermal diffusion in the phantom as a function of the magnitude of the applied RF magnetic field and the load of magnetic particles.

  14. Defects inspection of the solder bumps using self reference technology in active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiangning; Shi, Tielin; Han, Jiguang; Liao, Guanglan; Su, Lei; Wang, Suya

    2014-03-01

    With the decrease of solder bumps in dimension and pitch, defects inspection of the solder bumps become more difficult. A nondestructive detection system based on the active thermography has been developed for solder bumps inspection. However, heating non-uniformities and emissivity differences may impede the defects recognition. In this paper, we propose a method using a self reference technology based on a source distribution image (SDI) to eliminate the influence of unevenness in emissivity values and heating power distribution. Three thermograms captured right after the heat pulse are averaged to create the SDI. Then the SDI is subtracted from the original thermograms, and we get the thermal contrast images, in which eight points on the edge of each hot spot are selected as the feature points for the corresponding bump. Thermal difference between the feature points and the central point are adopted to quantify the thermal behaviors of the solder bumps, by which the missing bump is distinguished from the reference bumps. The results show that it is effective using the method to eliminate the impacts of emissivity unevenness and heating non-uniformities on defects identification in the active infrared test.

  15. Automatic detection of impact damage in carbon fiber composites using active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usamentiaga, R.; Venegas, P.; Guerediaga, J.; Vega, L.; López, I.

    2013-05-01

    Accidental impacts can severely reduce the structural strength and stability of composite materials, which can lead to severe consequences due to the degradation of the mechanical properties of components designed to perform for decades. Because accidental impacts are difficult to avoid, robust and reliable inspection methods to detect impact damage are required. Many methods have been proposed recently. However, most of them require an experienced technician to analyze the data, which leads to a significant decrease in manufacturing productivity. This work proposes a method to automatically detect impact damage in carbon fiber composites using active thermography. The proposed system detects defects caused by impact damage in the infrared images without human intervention. Impact damage detection is performed using a robust method based on an active thermographic inspection. Thermographic data is preprocessed to improve signal-to-noise ratio and to remove non-uniform background caused by non-uniform heating. Then, peaks and edges are identified and clustered, and regions corresponding to impact damage are detected. The proposed procedure has been applied to three specimens that contain 6 and 12 plies, different types of cores, and damage caused by energies from 6 J to 50 J. All defects are detected correctly.

  16. Induction and Conduction Thermography: Optimizing the Electromagnetic Excitation Towards Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrana, J.; Goldammer, M.; Bailey, K.; Rothenfusser, M.; Arnold, W.

    2009-03-01

    Active thermography, using electromagnetic excitation, allows detecting defects like cracks which distort the flow of current in the component under examination. Like other thermography techniques it is rapid and reliably utilizing infrared imaging. Electric current can be used in two ways for thermography: In induction thermography a current is coupled to the component by passing an AC current through a coil which is in close proximity to the component inspected, while in conduction thermography the current is coupled directly into the component. In this paper, the specific advantages of both coupling methods are discussed, including the efficiency of the coupling and optimization strategies for testing and also the necessary algorithms required to analyze the data. Taking these considerations into account a number of different systems for laboratory and practical application were developed.

  17. Use of infra-red thermography for automotive climate control analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, S.D.; Hassani, V.; Penney, T.R.

    1994-03-01

    In this paper, several automotive climate control applications for IR thermography are described. Some of these applications can be performed using conventional IR techniques. Others, such as visualizing the air temperature distribution within the cabin, at duct exits, and at heater and evaporator faces, require new experimental methods. In order to capture the temperature distribution within an airstream, a 0.25-mm-thick (0.01 inch) fiberglass screen is used. This screen can be positioned perpendicular or parallel to the flow to obtain three-dimensional spatial measurements. In many cases, the air flow pattern can be inferred from the resulting temperature distribution, allowing improved air distribution designs. In all cases, significant improvement in the speed, ease, and quantity of temperature distribution information can be realized with thermography as compared to conventional thermocouple array techniques. Comparisons are presented between IR thermography images and both thermocouple measurements and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions.

  18. Relationship of scrotal surface temperature measured by infrared thermography to subcutaneous and deep testicular temperature in the ram.

    PubMed

    Coulter, G H; Senger, P L; Bailey, D R

    1988-11-01

    The right testis of 9 anaesthetized rams was removed from the parietal tunica vaginalis and replaced by a surrogate testis (water-filled balloon) through which water of known temperature was circulated. Thermistors were inserted in the surrogate testis, between the scrotal skin and parietal tunica vaginalis on the right side, and deep within the intact left testis. Scrotal surface temperatures over the surrogate and intact testes were measured by infrared thermography. Scrotal surface temperature was correlated (P less than 0.01) with both subcutaneous (r = 0.95) and surrogate (r = 0.91) testicular temperature. The temperature differential between scrotal surface (30.1 +/- 0.1 degrees C) and deep testicular temperature over the intact side (34.9 +/- 0.09 degrees C) was 4.8 degrees C at an ambient temperature between 24.0 and 26.6 degrees C. Contact with the scrotal skin is not required to measure scrotal surface temperature by infrared thermography. This, coupled with the close association between scrotal surface temperature and that of underlying structures, will enhance our ability to understand better testicular temperature regulation and scrotal/testicular function. PMID:3199358

  19. Infrared thermography based studies on the effect of age on localized cold stress induced thermoregulation in human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Nishanthi, K.; Mohanalakshmi, K.; Veni, L.; Saumya; Yacin, S. M.; Philip, John

    2016-05-01

    Thermoregulatory control of blood flow plays an important role in maintaining the human body temperature and it provides physiological resistance against extreme environmental thermal stresses. To understand the role of age on thermal signals from veins and the thermoregulatory mechanism, the dynamic variation of the vein temperature on the hands of 17 human subjects, under a localized cold stress, was studied using infrared thermography. It was observed that the vein temperature of the stimulated hand initially decreased with time up to a time interval (called 'inversion time'), which was attributed to the localized cutaneous vasoconstriction. Beyond inversion time, a rise in the vein temperature of the stimulated hand was observed. A shift in the inversion time to higher values was observed for the older subjects, which was attributed to the reduced efficiency and responsiveness of the cutaneous vasoconstriction mechanism in these subjects. Our studies indicated that the inversion time increased linearly with subject age with strong positive Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.94. It was also observed that the contralateral symmetry in vasoconstriction was much lower in older subjects than the younger subjects. The absolute difference between the left and right inversion time varied between 11-118 s and 5-28 s for the older and younger subjects, respectively. Our study clearly demonstrated that infrared thermography is one of the most effective experimental tool for studying dynamic variation in vein pixel temperature under localized thermal stresses.

  20. Infrared thermography in the detection of brown adipose tissue in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Christina; Jalapu, Sandya; Thuzar, Moe; Law, Phillip W; Jeavons, Susanne; Barclay, Johanna L.; Ho, Ken K.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract PET‐CT using 18F‐FDG is employed for detecting brown adipose tissue (BAT) in humans. Alternative methods are needed because of the radiation and cost of PET‐CT imaging. The aim was to evaluate the accuracy of infrared thermography (IRT) in detecting human BAT benchmarked to PET‐CT imaging. Seventeen individuals underwent a total of 29 PET‐CT scans, 12 of whom were studied twice, after 2 h of cold stimulation at 19°C, in parallel with measurement of skin temperatures overlying the supraclavicular (SCV) fossa and the lateral upper chest (control), before and after cold stimulation. Of the 29 scans, 20 were BAT positive after cold stimulation. The mean left SCV temperature tended to be higher in the BAT‐positive group before and during cooling. It was significantly higher (P =0.04) than the temperature of the control area, which fell significantly during cooling in the BAT‐positive (−1.2 ± 0.3°C, P =0.002) but not in the negative (−0.2 ± 0.4°C) group. The temperature difference (Δtemp) between left SCV and chest increased during cooling in the BAT‐positive (1.2 ± 0.2 to 2.0 ± 0.3°C, P <0.002) but not in the negative group (0.6 ± 0.1 to 0.7 ± 0.1°C). A Δtemp of 0.9°C conferred a positive predictive value of 85% for SCV BAT, superior to that of SCV temperature. The findings were similar on the right. In conclusion, the Δtemp is significantly and consistently greater in BAT‐positive subjects. The Δtemp quantified by IRT after 2‐h cooling shows promise as a noninvasive convenient technique for studying SCV BAT function. PMID:25413316

  1. Practical identification of moisture sources in building assemblies using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Gregory B.; Colantonio, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Water, in its various phases, in any environment other than desert (hot or cold) conditions, is the single most destructive element that causes deterioration of materials and failure of building assemblies. It is the key element present in the formation of mold and fungi that lead to indoor air quality problems. Water is the primary element that needs to be managed in buildings to ensure human comfort, health and safety. Under the right thermodynamic conditions the detection of moisture in its various states is possible through the use of infrared thermography for a large variety of building assemblies and materials. The difficulty is that moisture is transient and mobile from one environment to another via air movement, vapor pressure or phase change. Building materials and enclosures provide both repositories and barriers to this moisture movement. In real life steady state conditions do not exist for moisture within building materials and enclosures. Thus the detection of moisture is in a constant state of transition. Sometimes you will see it and sometimes you will not. Understanding the limitations at the time of inspection will go a long way to mitigating unsatisfied clients or difficult litigation. Moisture detection can be observed by IRT via three physical mechanisms; latent heat absorption or release during phase change; a change in conductive heat transfer; and a change in thermal capacitance. Complicating the three methodologies is the factor of variable temperature differentials and variable mass air flow on, through and around surfaces being inspected. Building enclosures come in variable assembly types and are designed to perform differently in different environmental regions. Sources for moisture accumulation will vary for different environmental conditions. Detection methodologies will change for each assembly type in different ambient environments. This paper will look at the issue of the methodologies for detection of the presence of moisture and

  2. Diverging drought resistance of Scots pine provenances revealed by infrared thermography and mortality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Hannes; Schunk, Christian; Matiu, Michael; Menzel, Annette

    2016-04-01

    Climate warming and more frequent and severe drought events will alter the adaptedness and fitness of tree species. Especially, Scots pine forests have been affected above average by die-off events during the last decades. Assisted migration of adapted provenances might help alleviating impacts by recent climate change and successfully regenerating forests. However, the identification of suitable provenances based on established ecophysiological methods is time consuming, sometimes invasive, and data on provenance-specific mortality are lacking. We studied the performance, stress and survival of potted Scots pine seedlings from 12 European provenances grown in a greenhouse experiment with multiple drought and warming treatments. In this paper, we will present results of drought stress impacts monitored with four different thermal indices derived from infrared thermography imaging as well as an ample mortality study. Percent soil water deficit (PSWD) was shown to be the main driver of drought stress response in all thermal indices. In spite of wet and dry reference surfaces, however, fluctuating environmental conditions, mainly in terms of air temperature and humidity, altered the measured stress response. In linear mixed-effects models, besides PSWD and meteorological covariates, the factors provenance and provenance - PSWD interactions were included. The explanatory power of the models (R2) ranged between 0.51 to 0.83 and thus, provenance-specific responses to strong and moderate drought and subsequent recovery were revealed. However, obvious differences in the response magnitude of provenances to drought were difficult to explicitly link to general features such Mediterranean - continental type or climate at the provenances' origin. We conclude that seedlings' drought resistance may be linked to summer precipitation and their experienced stress levels are a.o. dependent on their above ground dimensions under given water supply. In respect to mortality, previous

  3. Sensitivity and specificity of infrared thermography in detection of subclinical mastitis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Polat, B; Colak, A; Cengiz, M; Yanmaz, L E; Oral, H; Bastan, A; Kaya, S; Hayirli, A

    2010-08-01

    The objectives of this experiment were to determine interrelationships among mastitis indicators and evaluate the subclinical mastitis detection ability of infrared thermography (IRT) in comparison with the California Mastitis Test (CMT). Somatic cell count (SCC), CMT, and udder skin surface temperature (USST) data were compiled from 62 Brown Swiss dairy cows (days in milk=117+/-51, milk yield=14.7+/-5.2 kg; mean +/- SD). The CORR, REG, and NLIN procedures of Statistical Analysis System (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) were employed to attain interrelationships among mastitis indicators. The diagnostic merit of IRT as an indirect measure of subclinical mastitis was compared with CMT using the receiver operating characteristics curves. The udder skin surface temperature was positively correlated with the CMT score (r=0.86) and SCC (r=0.73). There was an exponential increase in SCC (SCC, x10(3) cells/mL=22.35 x e(1.31 x CMT score); R(2)=0.98) and a linear increase in USST (USST, degrees C=33.45+1.08 x CMT score; R(2)=0.75) as the CMT score increased. As SCC increased, USST increased logarithmically [USST, degrees C=28.72+0.49 x ln(SCC, x10(3) cells/mL); R(2)=0.72]. The USST for healthy quarters (SCC 400,000 cells/mL; n=135) (mean +/- SE; 33.45+/-0.09 vs. 35.80+/-0.08 degrees C). The sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 95.6, 93.6, 14.97, 0.05, 95.0, and 93.6, respectively, for IRT and 88.9, 98.9, 83.56, 0.11, 99.2, and 86.1, respectively, for CMT. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for IRT and CMT was not different. In conclusion, as a noninvasive and quick tool, IRT can be employed for screening subclinical mastitis via measuring USST, with a high predictive diagnostic ability similar to CMT when microbiological culturing is unavailable. However, the

  4. Bridge deck surface temperature monitoring by infrared thermography and inner structure identification using PPT and PCT analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-04-01

    One of the objectives of ISTIMES project was to evaluate the potentialities offered by the integration of different electromagnetic techniques able to perform non-invasive diagnostics for surveillance and monitoring of transport infrastructures. Among the EM methods investigated, we focused our research and development efforts on uncooled infrared camera techniques due to their promising potential level of dissemination linked to their relative low cost on the market. On the other hand, works were also carried out to identify well adapted implementation protocols and key limits of Pulse Phase Thermography (PPT) and Principal Component Thermography (PCT) processing methods to analyse thermal image sequence and retrieve information about the inner structure. So the first part of this research works addresses infrared thermography measurement when it is used in quantitative mode (not in laboratory conditions) and not in qualitative mode (vision applied to survey). In such context, it requires to process in real time thermal radiative corrections on raw data acquired to take into account influences of natural environment evolution with time, thanks to additional measurements. But, camera sensor has to be enough smart to apply in real time calibration law and radiometric corrections in a varying atmosphere. So, a complete measurement system was studied and developed [1] with low cost infrared cameras available on the market. In the system developed, infrared camera is coupled with other sensors to feed simplified radiative models running, in real time, on GPU available on small PC. The whole measurement system was implemented on the "Musmeci" bridge located in Potenza (Italy). No traffic interruption was required during the mounting of our measurement system. The infrared camera was fixed on top of a mast at 6 m elevation from the surface of the bridge deck. A small weather station was added on the same mast at 1 m under the camera. A GPS antenna was also fixed at the

  5. The effect of instrument attachment on the surface temperature of juvenile grey seals ( Halichoerus grypus) as measured by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCafferty, Dominic J.; Currie, John; Sparling, Carol E.

    2007-02-01

    Previous research has highlighted the importance of minimising hydrodynamic drag from biologging instruments fitted to marine mammals. However, there is a need to investigate other possible impacts of instruments on animals. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of deploying instruments on the surface temperature distribution of grey seals ( Halichoerus grypus). Infrared (IR) thermography was used to record the surface temperature of two juveniles that had been fitted with heart rate recorders and mounting straps for the attachment of a time depth recorder. When animals were fully wet and inactive, the surface temperature pattern was unaffected by instruments. However, as animals dried out regions of high temperature were recorded around the edges of attachment sites compared to surrounding fur. This appeared to be due to heat leakage around the sides of instruments and mounting straps that provided an additional layer of insulation. There were no obvious changes in the surface temperature distribution around instruments associated with duration of deployment. This work shows that attachment of relatively small biologging instruments will produce localised effects on heat transfer in air but will not significantly change the total heat exchange of grey seals on land or at sea. IR thermography was also shown to be a useful method of detecting surface temperature patterns associated with epidural anaesthesia and blubber biopsy.

  6. Assessing honeybee and wasp thermoregulation and energetics—New insights by combination of flow-through respirometry with infrared thermography

    PubMed Central

    Stabentheiner, Anton; Kovac, Helmut; Hetz, Stefan K.; Käfer, Helmut; Stabentheiner, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Endothermic insects like honeybees and some wasps have to cope with an enormous heat loss during foraging because of their small body size in comparison to endotherms like mammals and birds. The enormous costs of thermoregulation call for optimisation. Honeybees and wasps differ in their critical thermal maximum, which enables the bees to kill the wasps by heat. We here demonstrate the benefits of a combined use of body temperature measurement with infrared thermography, and respiratory measurements of energy turnover (O2 consumption or CO2 production via flow-through respirometry) to answer questions of insect ecophysiological research, and we describe calibrations to receive accurate results. To assess the question of what foraging honeybees optimise, their body temperature was compared with their energy turnover. Honeybees foraging from an artificial flower with unlimited sucrose flow increased body surface temperature and energy turnover with profitability of foraging (sucrose content of the food; 0.5 or 1.5 mol/L). Costs of thermoregulation, however, were rather independent of ambient temperature (13–30 °C). External heat gain by solar radiation was used to increase body temperature. This optimised foraging energetics by increasing suction speed. In determinations of insect respiratory critical thermal limits, the combined use of respiratory measurements and thermography made possible a more conclusive interpretation of respiratory traces. PMID:22723718

  7. IR Thermography NDE of ISS Radiator Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay; Winfree, William; Morton, Richard; Wilson, Walter; Reynolds, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The presentation covers an active and a passive infrared (IR) thermography for detection of delaminations in the radiator panels used for the International Space Station (ISS) program. The passive radiator IR data was taken by a NASA astronaut in an extravehicular activity (EVA) using a modified FLIR EVA hand-held camera. The IR data could be successfully analyzed to detect gross facesheet disbonds. The technique used the internal hot fluid tube as the heat source in analyzing the IR data. Some non-flight ISS radiators were inspected using an active technique of IR flash thermography to detect disbond of face sheet with honeycomb core, and debonds in facesheet overlap areas. The surface temperature and radiated heat emission from flight radiators is stable during acquisition of the IR video data. This data was analyzed to detect locations of unexpected surface temperature gradients. The flash thermography data was analyzed using derivative analysis and contrast evolutions. Results of the inspection are provided.

  8. Infrared thermography and ultrasound C-scan for non-destructive evaluation of 3D carbon fiber materials: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Genest, Marc; Robitaille, Francois; Maldague, Xavier; West, Lucas; Joncas, Simon; Leduc, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    3D Carbon fiber polymer matrix composites (3D CF PMCs) are increasingly used for aircraft construction due to their exceptional stiffness and strength-to-mass ratios. However, defects are common in the 3D combining areas and are challenging to inspect. In this paper, Stitching is used to decrease these defects, but causes some new types of defects. Infrared NDT (non-destructive testing) and ultrasound NDT are used. In particular, a micro-laser line thermography technique (micro-LLT) and a micro-laser spot thermography (micro-LST) with locked-in technique are used to detect the micro-defects. In addition, a comparative study is conducted by using pulsed thermography (PT), vibrothermography (VT). In order to confirm the types of the defects, microscopic inspection is carried out before NDT work, after sectioning and polishing a small part of the sample..

  9. Identification of thermal properties distribution in building wall using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouns, Jordan; Dumoulin, Jean

    2016-04-01

    [1] L. Ibos, J-P. Monchau, V. Feuillet, Y. Candau, A comparative study of in-situ measurement methods of a building wall thermal resistance using infrared thermography, in Proc. SPIE 9534, Twelfth International Conference on Quality Control by Artificial Vision 2015, 95341I (April 30, 2015); doi:10.1117/12.2185126 [2] Nassiopoulos, A., Bourquin, F., On-site building walls characterization, Numerical Heat Transfer, Part A : Applications, 63(3) :179 :200, 2013 [3] J. Brouns, Développement d'outils numériques pour l'audit énergétique des bâtiments, PhD thesis, Université Paris-Est, SIE, 2014 [4] J.-L. Lions, Contrôle optimal de systèmes gouvernés par des équations aux dérivées partielles. Book, Dunod editor, 1968.

  10. A synchronized particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography technique applied to convective mass transfer in champagne glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Fabien; Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bailly, Yannick; Polidori, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    In champagne glasses, it was recently suggested that ascending bubble-driven flow patterns should be involved in the release of gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2) and volatile organic compounds. A key assumption was that the higher the velocity of the upward bubble-driven flow patterns in the liquid phase, the higher the volume fluxes of gaseous CO2 desorbing from the supersaturated liquid phase. In the present work, simultaneous monitoring of bubble-driven flow patterns within champagne glasses and gaseous CO2 escaping above the champagne surface was performed, through particle image velocimetry and infrared thermography techniques. Two quite emblematic types of champagne drinking vessels were investigated, namely a long-stemmed flute and a wide coupe. The synchronized use of both techniques proved that the cloud of gaseous CO2 escaping above champagne glasses strongly depends on the mixing flow patterns found in the liquid phase below.

  11. Experimental study using infrared thermography on the convective heat transfer of a TGV brake disc in the actual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siroux, Monica; Harmand, Souad; Desmet, Bernard

    2001-03-01

    Local and mean convective heat transfer from a rotating TGV brake disc model in the actual environment and submitted to an air flow parallel to the disc surface is studied experimentally in this paper. The experimental technique is based on the use of a heated thermally thick disc combined with the technique of temperature measurement by infrared thermography. The local convective heat transfer coefficient from the disc surface is identified by solving the steady state heat equation by finite difference method using the experimental temperature distribution as boundary conditions. These tests were carried out for rotational speed (omega) between 325 and 2000 rpm (rotational Reynolds number Re between 88500 and 545000) so as to obtain laminar and turbulent flow on the disc, and for air flow velocity U ranging between 0 and 12 m s-1 (air flow Reynolds number Re0 between 0 and 153000).

  12. In situ assessment of structural timber elements of a historic building by infrared thermography and ultrasonic velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir-Yucel, A.; Tavukcuoglu, A.; Caner-Saltik, E. N.

    2007-01-01

    The infrared thermography (IRT) and the ultrasonic velocity measurements (UVM) promise to be particularly important to assess the state of deterioration and the adequacy of the boundary and microclimatic conditions for timber elements. These non-destructive methods supported by laboratory analyses of timber samples were conducted on a 13th century monument, Aslanhane Mosque in Ankara, Turkey. The combined interpretation of the results was done to assess the condition of structural timber elements in terms of their state of preservation, the dampness problems and the recent incompatible repairs affecting them. Results indicated that moist areas in the structure were associated with roof drainage problems and the repairs undertaken with cement-based mortars and plasters and oil-based paints. Juxtaposition of the IRT and UVM together with laboratory analyses was found to be useful to assess the soundness of timber, enhanced the accuracy and effectiveness of the survey and facilitated to build up the urgent and long-term conservation programs.

  13. Detection by infrared thermography and modelling of an icecapped geothermal system in Kerguelen archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestracci, Regis; Nougier, Jacques

    1984-03-01

    In order to investigate the geothermal fields in the volcanic islands of Kerguelen (South Indian Ocean), and taking account of the difficult field and meteorological conditions, an infrared survey was conducted by a helicopter-borne thermocamera on the slopes of the recent volcano of the Rallier du Baty peninsula where fumaroles were previously found. Four active zones were observed. Fumaroles and hot water springs are located near the limits of the icecap which covers all the upper part of the peninsula. Joint infrared and normal TV imageries have been largely sufficient to obtain detailed surveys of these active zones. A tentative model of the icecapped geothermal system has been drawn, the main feature being that the supply of convective heat from the recent and still warm magmatic chamber is too low and local for melting all the icecap but remains high enough to insure its slow fusion and the discharge of steam and hot water at its periphery.

  14. Water ingress detection in honeycomb sandwich panels by passive infrared thermography using a high-resolution thermal imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Brault, L.; Marcotte, F.; Genest, M.; Farley, V.; Maldague, X.

    2012-06-01

    Water ingress in honeycomb structures is of great concern for the civil and military aerospace industries. Pressure and temperature variations during take-off and landing produce considerable stress on aircraft structures, promoting moisture ingress (by diffusion through fibers or by direct ingress through voids, cracks or unsealed joints) into the core. The presence of water (or other fluids such as kerosene, hydraulic fluid and de-icing agents) in any of its forms (gas vapor, liquid or ice) promotes corrosion, cell breakage, and induce composite layer delaminations and skin disbonds. In this study, testing specimens were produced from unserviceable parts from military aircraft. In order to simulate atmospheric conditions during landing, selected core areas were filled with measured quantities of water and then frozen in a cold chamber. The specimens were then removed from the chamber and monitored for over 20 minutes as they warm up using a cooled high-resolution infrared camera. Results have shown that detection and quantification of water ingress on honeycomb sandwich structures by passive infrared thermography is possible using a HD mid-wave infrared cameras for volumes of water as low as 0.2 ml and from a distance as far as 20 m from the target.

  15. Dynamic Infrared Thermography Study of Blood Flow Relative to Lower Limp Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stathopoulos, I.; Skouroliakou, K.; Michail, C.; Valais, I.

    2015-09-01

    Thermography is an established method for studying skin temperature distribution. Temperature distribution on body surface is influenced by a variety of physiological mechanisms and has been proven a reliable indicator of various physiological disorders. Blood flow is an important factor that influences body heat diffusion and skin temperature. In an attempt to validate and further elucidate thermal models characterizing the human skin, dynamic thermography of the lower limp in horizontal and vertical position was performed, using a FLIR T460 thermographic camera. Temporal variation of temperature was recorded on five distinct points of the limp. Specific points were initially cooled by the means of an ice cube and measurements of the skin temperature were obtained every 30 seconds as the skin temperature was locally reduced and afterwards restored at its initial value. The return to thermal balance followed roughly the same pattern for all points of measurement, although the heating rate was faster when the foot was in horizontal position. Thermal balance was achieved faster at the spots that were positioned on a vein passage. Our results confirm the influence of blood flow on the thermal regulation of the skin. Spots located over veins exhibit different thermal behaviour due to thermal convection through blood flow. Changing the position of the foot from vertical to horizontal, effectively affects blood perfusion as in the vertical position blood circulation is opposed by gravity.

  16. Prospects and limitations of digital Shearography and Active Thermography in finding and rating flaws in CFRP sandwich parts with honeycomb core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, J.; Mayr, G.; Hendorfer, G.

    2012-05-01

    This work shows the prospects and limitations of the non-destructive testing methods Digital Shearography and Active Thermography when applied to CFRP sandwich parts with honeycomb cores. Two specimens with different core materials (aluminum, NOMEX) and artificial flaws such as delaminations, disbonds and inclusions of foreign material, are tested with Digital Shearography and Pulse Thermography including Pulse Phase Thermography. Both methods provide a good ability for finding and rating the flaws.

  17. Thermography Applied During Exercises With or Without Infrared Light-Emitting Diode Irradiation: Individual and Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lins, Emery C.; Corazza, Adalberto Vieira; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate the cutaneous temperature during an exercise on a treadmill with or without infrared light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation in postmenopausal women. Background data: Thermography is an imaging technique in which radiation emitted by a body in the middle and far infrared spectrum is detected and associated with the temperature of the body's surface. Materials and methods: Eighteen postmenopausal women were randomly divided into two groups: (1) the LED group, which performed the exercises on a treadmill associated with phototherapy (n=9) and; (2) the exercise group, which performed the exercises on a treadmill without additional phototherapy (n=9). The irradiation parameters for each women's thigh were: array of 2000 infrared LEDs (850 nm) with an area of 1,110 cm2, 100 mW, 39 mW/cm2, and 108 J/cm2 for 45 min. The submaximal constant-speed exercise on the treadmill at intensities between 85% and 90% maximal heart rate (HRmax) with or without phototherapy were performed during 45 min, to perform the thermographic analysis. Thermography images were captured before the exercise (t=0), after 10, 35, and 45 min of exercising (t=10, t=35, and t=45) and at 5 min post-exercising (t=50). Results: The LED group showed an increased cutaneous thigh temperature during the exercise (from 33.5±0.8°C to 34.6±0.9°C, p=0.03), whereas the exercise group showed a reduced cutaneous temperature (from 33.5±0.6 to 32.7±0.7°C, p=0.02). The difference between the groups was significant (p<0.05) at t=35, t=45, and t=50. Conclusions: These data indicate an improved microcirculation, and can explain one possible mechanism of action of phototherapy associated with physical exercises. PMID:23819505

  18. Medical thermography (digital infrared thermal imaging - DITI) in paediatric forearm fractures - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ćurković, S; Antabak, A; Halužan, D; Luetić, T; Prlić, I; Šiško, J

    2015-11-01

    Trauma is the most common cause of hospitalisation in children, and forearm fractures comprise 35% of all paediatric fractures. One-third of forearm fractures are distal forearm fractures, which are the most common fractures in the paediatric population. This type of fracture represents an everyday problem for the paediatric surgeon. The three phases of fracture healing in paediatric trauma are associated with skin temperature changes that can be measured and then compared with standard plain radiographs of visible callus formation, and eventually these methods can be used in everyday practice. Thermographic assessment of temperature distribution within the examined tissues enables a quick, non-contact, non-invasive measurement of their temperature. Medical thermography is used as a screening method in other parts of medicine, but the use of this method in traumatology has still not been researched. PMID:26603613

  19. Infrared thermography and acupuncture of the lobe of the outer ear in patients with facial pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Ricardo; Lluesma, Eliseo G.

    2001-03-01

    We have assessed the thermal camera to complement the clinical odontology with the clinical assistance of acupuncture. Relevant cases of study were those of patients with facial pain. This work has registered the temperatures of the microsystem of the lobe of the outer ear. The recordings were made before, during and after removing the needles. Measurements of patients' temperatures were made very two minutes for 20 minutes, and a gradual increase of temperature was observed. The thermal camera allowed to register maps (thermography) that show an area affected with pain. After thermograms were performed to odontology patients treated with acupuncture, we were able to compare the temperature distribution maps and we found that they were quasi repetitive in the same zones in several patients for a specific illness. We made this technique available to different patients with lack of good irrigation on face and neck with the aim to establish patterns.

  20. Facial thermography is a sensitive tool to determine antihistaminic activity: comparison of levocetirizine and fexofenadine

    PubMed Central

    Larbig, Michael; Burtin, Bernard; Martin, Laurent; Stamm, Holger; Luettig, Birgit; Hohlfeld, Jens M; Krug, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Aims To assess the antihistaminic activity of levocetirizine and fexofenadine 2 h and 24 h after drug administration using facial thermography and to compare the results with those using well-established parameters of antihistaminic activity in the nose and skin. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, three-treatment, three-period, single-dose, cross-over study in healthy males taking levocetirizine 5 mg, fexofenadine 120 mg or placebo. The primary endpoint was nasal skin temperature after nasal histamine challenge recorded for 20 min at 2 and 24 h after drug intake. The secondary endpoints were nasal symptoms and a histamine skin prick test. Results Thirty subjects were randomized. At 2 h after drug intake the inhibition of the nasal temperature increase from baseline was not significantly different between levocetirizine and fexofenadine. At 24 h it was significantly more pronounced after levocetirizine than fexofenadine (difference: least-squares mean: −0.13 °C; P ≤ 0.024, 95% CI −0.24, −0.02). Both drugs significantly reduced (P≤ 0.001) the mean temperature increase from baseline compared with placebo at 2 and 24 h (least-squares mean increase and (95% CI): levocetirizine, −0.28 °C (−0.42, −0.14) and −0.32 °C (−0.43, −0.21); fexofenadine −0.35 °C (−0.49, −0.21) and −0.19 °C (−0.30, −0.08), respectively). Results of nasal symptom score and wheal and flare were consistent with the thermography results. Conclusions Facial thermography is an objective, non-invasive and sensitive method to study antihistaminic activity at the nose level. Levocetirizine and fexofenadine demonstrate the same activity at 2 h after drug intake, but levocetirizine has a more sustained activity at 24 h. PMID:16842390

  1. Aerial thermography for energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal infrared scanning from an aircraft is a convenient and commercially available means for determining relative rates of energy loss from building roofs. The need to conserve energy as fuel costs makes the mass survey capability of aerial thermography an attractive adjunct to community energy awareness programs. Background information on principles of aerial thermography is presented. Thermal infrared scanning systems, flight and environmental requirements for data acquisition, preparation of thermographs for display, major users and suppliers of thermography, and suggested specifications for obtaining aerial scanning services were reviewed.

  2. Characterization of pores in high pressure die cast aluminum using active thermography and computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maierhofer, Christiane; Myrach, Philipp; Röllig, Mathias; Jonietz, Florian; Illerhaus, Bernhard; Meinel, Dietmar; Richter, Uwe; Miksche, Ronald

    2016-02-01

    Larger high pressure die castings (HPDC) and decreasing wall thicknesses are raising the issue of casting defects like pores in aluminum structures. Properties of components are often strongly influenced by inner porosity. As these products are being established more and more in lightweight construction (e.g. automotive and other transport areas), non-destructive testing methods, which can be applied fast and on-site, are required for quality assurance. In this contribution, the application of active thermography for the direct detection of larger pores is demonstrated. The analysis of limits and accuracy of the method are completed by numerical simulation and the method is validated using computed tomography.

  3. Applications of infrared thermography for nondestructive testing of fatigue cracks in steel bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Izumi, Yui; Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Mizokami, Yoshiaki; Kawabata, Sunao

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, fatigue crack propagations in aged steel bridge which may lead to catastrophic structural failures have become a serious problem. For large-scale steel structures such as orthotropic steel decks in highway bridges, nondestructive inspection of deteriorations and fatigue damages are indispensable for securing their safety and for estimating their remaining strength. As conventional NDT techniques for steel bridges, visual testing, magnetic particle testing and ultrasonic testing have been commonly employed. However, these techniques are time- and labor- consuming techniques, because special equipment is required for inspection, such as scaffolding or a truck mount aerial work platform. In this paper, a new thermography NDT technique, which is based on temperature gap appeared on the surface of structural members due to thermal insulation effect of the crack, is developed for detection of fatigue cracks. The practicability of the developed technique is demonstrated by the field experiments for highway steel bridges in service. Detectable crack size and factors such as measurement time, season or spatial resolution which influence crack detectability are investigated.

  4. Infrared thermography of fan and compressor systems in a predictive maintenance program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurzbach, Richard N.

    1998-03-01

    Predictive Maintenance programs have been shown to be an effective and efficient approach to managing facilities maintenance. Cost savings through the reduction of time- based preventive tasks, and the reduction of unanticipated failures can be significant. Several inspection techniques have become standard, and are applicable to a broad range of equipment types and inspection scenarios. IR thermography of fan and compressor equipment presents a significant opportunity for cost saving applications in may facilities. Ventilation systems supply air to and remove air from working spaces, and mitigate environmental conditions for a number or purposes. Removal of hazardous pairs or gases, positive pressure atmosphere, or negative pressure atmosphere are a few examples. Vaneaxial fans are a common equipment type used to achieve this purpose. Both direct drive and belt driven fans are common for these systems. Belt drives present some unique imaging applications, where sheave and belt surface scan be observed. Compressor equipment has normally high operating temperatures, relative to other rotating equipment. The compression of gases is exothermic, and as a result, most compressors rely on an integral cooling process to function properly. Uniformity of temperature distribution on equipment surfaces, function of cooling systems, and verification of proper operation of loading and relief valves provide an overall illustration of equipment health.

  5. Cloud2IR: Infrared thermography and environmental sensors integrated in an autonomoussystem for long term monitoring of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crinière, Antoine; Dumoulin, Jean; Mevel, Laurent; Andrade-Barroso, Guillermo

    2016-04-01

    acquisition scenario the local storage management and the network management through SFTP or SOAP for the OGC frame. The data side only need an XML configuration file and if a configuration change occurs in time the system is automatically restarted with the new value. Cloud2IR has been deployed on field since several Monthat the SenseCity outdoor test bed in Marne La Vallée (France)[4]. The next step will be the full standardisation of the system and possibly the full separation between the sensor side and the data side which can be seen at term as an external framework. References: [1] A Crinière, J Dumoulin, L Mevel, G Andrade-Barosso, M Simonin. The Cloud2SM Project.European Geosciences Union General Assembly (EGU2015), Apr 2015, Vienne, Austria. 2015. [2] J Dumoulin, A Criniere, and R Averty. The detection and thermal characterization of the inner structure of the 'musmeci' bridge deck by infrared thermography monitoring. Journal Of Geophysics And Engineering doi:10.1088/1742-2132/10/6/064003, Vol 10, 2013. [3] J Dumoulin, R Averty. Development of an infrared system coupled with a weather station for real time atmospheric corrections using GPU computing: Application to bridge monitoring, in Proc of 11 th International Conference on Quantitative InfraRed Thermography, Naples Italy, 2012. [4] F Derkx, B Lebental, T Bourouina, Frédéric B, C Cojocaru, and al..The Sense-City project.XVIIIth Symposium on Vibrations, Shocks and Noise, Jul 2012, France. 9p, 2012.

  6. Evaluation of equivalent defect heat generation in carbon epoxy composite under powerful ultrasonic stimulation by using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derusova, D. A.; Vavilov, V. P.; Pawar, S. S.

    2015-04-01

    Low velocity impact is a frequently observed event during the operation of an aircraft composite structure. This type of damage is aptly called as “blind-side impact damage” as it is barely visible as a dent on the impacted surface, but may produce extended delaminations closer to the rear surface. One-sided thermal nondestructive testing is considered as a promising technique for detecting impact damage but because of diffusive nature of optical thermal signals there is drop in detectability of deeper subsurface defects. Ultrasonic Infrared thermography is a potentially attractive nondestructive evaluation technique used to detect the defects through observation of vibration-induced heat generation. Evaluation of the energy released by such defects is a challenging task. In this study, the thin delaminations caused by impact damage in composites and which are subjected to ultrasonic excitation are considered as local heat sources. The actual impact damage in a carbon epoxy composite which was detected by applying a magnetostrictive ultrasonic device is then modeled as a pyramid-like defect with a set of delaminations acting as an air-filled heat sources. The temperature rise expected on the surface of the specimen was achieved by varying energy contribution from each delamination through trial and error. Finally, by comparing the experimental temperature elevations in defective area with the results of temperature simulations, we estimated the energy generated by each defect and defect power of impact damage as a whole. The results show good correlation between simulations and measurements, thus validating the simulation approach.

  7. Experimental study using infrared thermography on the convective heat transfer of a TGV brake disc in the actual environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siroux, Monica; Harmand, Souad; Desmet, Bernard

    2002-07-01

    We present an experimental identification of the local and mean Nusselt number from a rotating TGV brake disk model in the actual environment and exposed to an air flow parallel to the disk surface. This method is based on the use of a heated thermally thick disk combined with the technique of temperature measurement by infrared thermography. The local and mean convective heat transfer coefficient from the disk surface is identified by solving the steady state heat equation by a finite difference method using the experimental temperature distribution as boundary conditions. The experimental setup is constituted of a model disk with all the representative parts of the actual TGV brake system. The disk and its actual environment are inside a wind tunnel test section, so that the rotational disk speed and the air flow velocity can be varied. Tests were carried out for rotational speeds w between 325 and 2000 rpm (rotational Reynolds number Re between 88,500 and 545,000), and for an air flow velocity U ranging between 0 and 12 m(DOT)s-1 (air flow Reynolds number Re0 between 0 and 153,000).

  8. Infrared thermography of the pig thorax: an assessment of selected regions of interest by computed tomographical and anatomical parameters.

    PubMed

    Menzel, A; Siewert, C; Gasse, H; Seifert, H; Hoeltig, D; Hennig-Pauka, I

    2015-04-01

    Current methods of diagnosis of respiratory diseases in swine are invasive, time-consuming and expensive. Infrared thermography (IRT) of the thorax might provide a new method of high specificity to select swine affected with lung alterations for further diagnostics. In this study, layer thickness of different tissues was determined in frozen thorax slices (FTS) by computed tomography (CT) and then related to skin temperatures measured by IRT in healthy pigs. The aim was to determine appropriate regions of interest (ROI) for evaluation of IRT images. Organ layer thicknesses measured in CT images correspond to those measured in FTS. Temperature differences between lung ROIs and abdomen ROIs were positively correlated with lung layer thickness at certain localizations, and negatively correlated with the thickness of the thorax wall and of inner organ layers. Reference values of differences between skin temperatures were established for two ROIs on the thorax with potential practical use for lung health status determination. Respective ROIs were located on vertical lines crossing the 7th (right) and the 10th (left) thoracic vertebrae. The presence of ribs affected skin temperature significantly. PMID:24712373

  9. The effect of L mode filaments on divertor heat flux profiles as measured by infrared thermography on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, A. J.; Fishpool, G.; Kirk, A.; the MAST Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2015-11-01

    Filamentary transport across the scrape off layer is a key issue for the design and operation of future devices, such as ITER, DEMO and MAST-U, as it sets the power loadings to the divertor and first wall of the machine. Analysis has been performed on L mode filaments in MAST in order to gain an understanding of the spatial structure and attempt to reconcile the different scales of the filament width and the power fall off length ({λq} ). The L mode filament heat flux arriving at the divertor has been measured using high spatial resolution (1.5 mm) infrared (IR) thermography. The filaments form discrete spiral patterns at the divertor which can be seen as bands of increased heat flux in the IR measurements. Analysis of the width and spacing of these bands at the divertor has allowed the toroidal mode number of the filaments to be determined (7≤slant n≤slant 22 ). The size of the filaments at the midplane has been determined using the target filament radial width and the magnetic field geometry. The filament width perpendicular to the magnetic field at the midplane has been found to be between 3 and 5 cm. Direct calculation of the filament width from midplane visible imaging gives a range of 4-6 cm which agrees well with the IR data.

  10. How good is this food? A study on dogs' emotional responses to a potentially pleasant event using infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Travain, Tiziano; Colombo, Elisa Silvia; Grandi, Laura Clara; Heinzl, Eugenio; Pelosi, Annalisa; Prato Previde, Emanuela; Valsecchi, Paola

    2016-05-15

    Understanding how animals express positive emotions is becoming an interesting and promising area of research in the study of animal emotions and affective experiences. In the present study, we used infrared thermography in combination with behavioral measures, heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV), to investigate dogs' emotional responses to a potentially pleasant event: receiving palatable food from the owner. Nineteen adult pet dogs, 8 females and 11 males, were tested and their eye temperature, HR, HRV and behavior were recorded during a 30-minutestestconsisting of three 10-minute consecutive phases: Baseline (Phase 1), positive stimulation through the administration of palatable treats (Feeding, Phase 2) and Post-feeding condition following the positive stimulation (Phase 3). Dogs' eye temperature and mean HR significantly increased during the positive stimulation phase compared with both Baseline and Post-feeding phases. During the positive stimulation with food (Phase 2), dogs engaged in behaviors indicating a positive emotional state and a high arousal, being focused on food treats and increasing tail wagging. However, there was no evidence of an increase in HRV during Phase 2 compared to the Phase 1, with SDNN significantly increasing only in Phase 3, after the positive stimulation occurred. Overall results point out that IRT may be a useful tool in assessing emotional states in dogs in terms of arousal but fails to discriminate emotional valence, whose interpretation cannot disregard behavioral indexes. PMID:26996276

  11. IRTROCK: A MATLAB toolbox for contactless recognition of surface and shallow weakness of a rock cliff by infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teza, Giordano; Marcato, Gianluca; Castelli, Eugenio; Galgaro, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT) can be used in remote recognition of potential weakening features of a rock cliff like shallow holes, high fracturing, moisture or material inhomogeneities, providing useful information for the corresponding rock mass geo-engineering characterization. A method aimed at such a recognition is proposed here together with its MATLAB implementation (IRTROCK package). It is based on the acquisition of a series of IRT images during the night-time cooling of a rock mass and on the search for possible anomalous thermal transients. The IRT alone is unable to completely characterize a rock mass; a meaningful interpretation of the results requires a geological on-contact survey or other on-contact or contactless techniques. Nevertheless, the results obtained in a portion of the cliff, where a detailed study with other techniques has been carried out, can be advantageously extended to the whole cliff. Moreover, the IRT measurements can be easily and safety repeated over time to evaluate possible changes that affect the studied rock mass. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been verified in two test sites.

  12. Development of a New Crack Identification Technique Based on Near-Tip Singular Electrothermal Field Measured by Lock-in Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, Takahide; Kubo, Shiro

    A new thermographic NDT technique was proposed, in which singular electrothermal field near crack tips under the application of periodically modulated electric current was measured using an infrared thermography combined with lock-in data processing technique. Experimental investigations were made on the resolution and the applicability in the identification of through-thickness artificial cracks and fatigue cracks embedded in steel and aluminum alloy plate samples. Modulated electric current was applied to the cracked sample by an induction coli. Lock-in thermal images synchronized to the reference current modulation signal were taken by the lock-in thermography. Significant singular electrothermal field was observed at the crack tip in the lock-in thermal image. The fatigue cracks as well as artificial cracks were found to be sensitively identified by the proposed technique in good resolution compared with the singular method using a conventional thermographic temperature measurement.

  13. A study of active thermography approaches for the non-destructive testing and evaluation of aerospace structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdelidis, Nicolas P.; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Marioli-Riga, Zaira P.; Bendada, Abdelhakim; Maldague, Xavier P. V.

    2008-03-01

    The prerequisite for more competent and cost effective aircraft has led to the evolution of innovative testing and evaluation procedures. Non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT & E) techniques for assessing the integrity of an aircraft structure are essential to both reduce manufacturing costs and out of service time of aircraft due to maintenance. Nowadays, active - transient thermal NDT & E (i.e. thermography) is commonly used for assessing aircraft composites. This research work evaluates the potential of pulsed thermography (PT) and/or pulsed phase thermography (PPT) for assessing defects (i.e. impact damage and inclusions for delaminations) on GLARE and GLARE type composites. Finally, in the case of the detection of inserts - delaminations C-Scan ultrasonic testing was also used with the intention of providing supplementary results.

  14. Nondestructive testing with thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Tarpani, José Ricardo; Maldague, Xavier P. V.

    2013-11-01

    Thermography is a nondestructive testing (NDT) technique based on the principle that two dissimilar materials, i.e., possessing different thermo-physical properties, would produce two distinctive thermal signatures that can be revealed by an infrared sensor, such as a thermal camera. The fields of NDT applications are expanding from classical building or electronic components monitoring to more recent ones such as inspection of artworks or composite materials. Furthermore, thermography can be conveniently used as a didactic tool for physics education in universities given that it provides the possibility of visualizing fundamental principles, such as thermal physics and mechanics among others.

  15. Department of National Defence's use of thermography for facilities maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittson, John E.

    1990-03-01

    Since the late seventies DND through the Director General Works has been actively encouraging the use of thermography as an efficient and effective technique for supporting preventive maintenance quality assurance and energy conservation programs at Canadian Forces Bases (CFBs). This paper will provide an overview of DND''s experiences in the utilization of thermography for facilities maintenance applications. 1. HISTORICAL MILESTONES The following are milestones of DND''s use of thermography: a. Purchase of Infrared Equipment In 1976/77 DND purchased five AGA 750 Infrared Thermovision Systems which were distributed to commands. In 1980/81/82 six AGA liOs five AGA TPT8Os two AGA 782s and one AGA 720 were acquired. Finally DND also purchased seven AGEMA 870 systems during 1987/88. b. First and Second Interdepartaental Building Thermography Courses In 1978 and 1980 DND hosted two building thermography courses that were conducted by Public Works Canada. c. CE Thermographer Specialist Training Courses DND developed a training standard in 1983 for Construction Engineering (CE) Thermographer qualification which included all CE applications of thermography. The first annual inhouse training course was conducted at CFB Borden Ontario in 1984. These are now being conducted at the CFB Chilliwack Detachment in Vernon British Columbia. 2 . MARKETING FACILITIES MAINTENANCE IR Of paramount importance for successfully developing DND appreciation for thermography was providing familiarization training to CE staff at commands and bases. These threeday presentations emphasized motivational factors conducting thermographic surveys and utilizing infrared data of roofs electrical/mechanical systems heating plants steam distribution and building enclosures. These factors consisted mainly of the following objectives: a. preventive maintenance by locating deficiencies to be repaired b. quality assurance by verification of workmanship materials and design c. energy conservation by locating

  16. Remote sensing in environmental police investigations: aerial platforms and an innovative application of thermography to detect several illegal activities.

    PubMed

    Lega, M; Ferrara, C; Persechino, G; Bishop, P

    2014-12-01

    Being able to identify the environmental crimes and the guilty parties is central to police investigations, and new technologies enable the authorities to do this faster and more accurately than ever before. In recent years, our research team has introduced the use of a range of aerial platforms and an innovative application of thermography to detect several illegal activities; for example, illegal sanitary sewer and storm-drain connections, illicit wastewater discharges, and other "anomalies" on surface waters can be easily identified using their thermal infrared signatures. It can also be used to detect illegal solid/liquid waste dumps or illicit air discharges. This paper introduces first results of a Thermal Pattern and Thermal Tracking approach that can be used to identify different phenomena and several pollutants. The aims of this paper were to introduce a fingerprint paradigm for environmental police investigations, defining several specific signatures (patterns) that permit the identification of an illicit/anomalous activity, and establish a procedure to use this information to find the correlation (tracking) between the crime and the culprit or the source and the target. PMID:25154683

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: FPA-based infrared thermography as applied to the study of cutaneous perspiration and stimulated vascular response in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainer, Boris G.

    2005-12-01

    This review gives an overview of focal plane array (FPA)-based infrared (IR) thermography as a powerful research method in the field of physiology and medicine. Comparison of the gained results with the data previously obtained by other authors with other research tools is given. Outer thermoregulatory manifestations displayed by the human organism subjected to whole-body heating (sauna bath) and physical loads (exercise bicycling) are quantitatively analysed. Some details of human body emotional sweating (psycho-physiological effect) are reported. Particular attention is paid to studying active sweat glands as individual objects. All experimental data were obtained with the help of a high-sensitivity (0.03 °C) fast 128 × 128 InAs IR detector-based thermal imaging system operating in the short-wave spectral region (2.5 to 3 µm) and perfectly suiting medical purposes. It is shown that IR thermography makes it possible to overcome limitations inherent to contact measuring means that were traditionally used before in thermal studies. It is also shown that heterogeneous thermograms displayed by organisms with disturbed inner equilibrium can be quantitatively analysed in terms of statistical parameters of related surface-temperature histograms, such as the mean temperature and the standard deviation of temperature (SDT). The increase and the decrease in SDT turned out to be typical of prolonged physical load and subsequent relaxation, and of external whole-body heating, respectively. Explanation of this result based on a hypothesis advanced within the context of the doctrine of human-organism evolution is given. Skin-temperature distribution function accompanying the relaxed organism in normality was found to closely resemble normal-distribution function. Symmetry break down and variation of the shape of this characteristic may serve as an indicator of homeostasis shift and can be used as a quantitative criterion for the latter. A new phenomenon, stable punctate

  18. Thermal monitoring of transport infrastructures by infrared thermography coupled with inline local atmospheric conditions survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, J.

    2013-09-01

    An infrared system architecture (software and hardware) has been studied and developed to allow long term monitoring of transport infrastructures in a standalone configuration. It is based on the implementation of low cost infrared thermal cameras (equipped with uncooled microbolometer focal plane array) available on the market coupled with other measurement systems. All data collected feed simplified radiative models running on GPU available on small PC to produce corrected thermal map of the surveyed structure at selected time step. Furthermore, added Web-enabled capabilities of this new infrared measurement system are also presented and discussed. A prototype of this system was tested and evaluated on real infrastructure opened to traffic. Results obtained by image and signal processing are presented. Finally, conclusions and perspectives for new implementation and new functionalities are presented and discussed.

  19. Detection of internal defects in a liquid natural gas tank by use of infrared thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantsios, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The use of an infrared scanning technique to detect defects in the secondary barrier of a liquid natural gas tank is described. The method works by detecting leak-caused temperature differences as low as 0.2 K, but can provide only an approximate idea of the extent of the defect. The nondestructive method was tested in a study of a LNG tank already at its location in a ship; the secondary barrier was located inside the tank wall. Defective areas indicated by the infrared radiometric measurements were confirmed by other probe techniques and by physical examination.

  20. Cost-effective infrared thermography protocol for 40 μm spatial resolution quantitative microelectronic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boué, Christine; Fournier, Danièle

    2006-06-01

    In this article, we will show that the absolute temperature of electrical components under test can be measured with an infrared camera. An easy and cost-effective modification of the optical set-up and a software correction of the artefacts induced by the modification of the aperture of the objective allow to improve the spatial resolution. Calibrations with a Peltier system allow to obtain quantitative measurements. Consequently, it becomes easy to obtain a mapping of the absolute temperature of the surface of an integrated circuit from its infrared radiation, independently of its surface emissivity with a spatial resolution better than 40 μm.

  1. Assessment of Pregnancy in the Late Gestation Mare Using Digital Infrared Thermography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to investigate use of digital infrared thermal imaging (DITI) to determine whether surface temperature gradient differences exist between pregnant and nonpregnant mares as a noncontact method to determine pregnancy status. On the day measurements were collected, each ...

  2. Infrared Thermography as Applied to Thermal Testing of Power Systems Circuit Boards.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jonathan James

    All operational electronic equipment dissipates some amount of energy in the form of infrared radiation. Faulty electronic components on a printed circuit board can be categorized as hard (functional) or soft (latent functional). Hard faults are those which are detected during a conventional manufacturing electronic test process. Soft failures, in contrast, are those which are undetectable through conventional testing, but which manifest themselves after a product has been placed into service. Such field defective modules ultimately result in operational failure and subsequently enter a manufacturer's costly repair process. While thermal imaging systems are being used increasingly in the electronic equipment industry as a product-testing tool, applications have primarily been limited to product design or repair processes, with minimal use in a volume manufacturing environment. Use of thermal imaging systems in such an environment has mostly been limited to low-volume products or random screening of high-volume products. Thermal measurements taken in a manufacturing environment are often taken manually, thus defeating their capability of rapid data acquisition and constraining their full potential in a high-volume manufacturing process. Integration of a thermal measurement system with automated testing equipment is essential for optimal use of expensive infrared measurement tools in a high-volume manufacturing environment. However, such a marriage presents problems with respect to both existing manufacturing test processes and infrared measurement techniques. Methods are presented in this dissertation to test automatically for latent faults, those which elude detection during conventional electronic testing, on printed circuit boards. These methods are intended for implementation in a volume manufacturing environment and involve the application of infrared imaging tools. Successful incorporation of infrared testing into existing test processes requires that: PASS

  3. Close infrared thermography using an intensified CCD camera: application in nondestructive high resolution evaluation of electrothermally actuated MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serio, B.; Hunsinger, J. J.; Conseil, F.; Derderian, P.; Collard, D.; Buchaillot, L.; Ravat, M. F.

    2005-06-01

    This communication proposes the description of an optical method for thermal characterization of MEMS devices. The method is based on the use of an intensified CCD camera to record the thermal radiation emitted by the studied device in the spectral domain from 600 nm to about 850 nm. The camera consists of an intensifier associated to a CCD sensor. The intensification allows for very low signal levels to be amplified and detected. We used a standard optical microscope to image the device with sub-micron resolution. Since, in close infrared, at very small scale and low temperature, typically 250°C for thermal MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems), the thermal radiation is very weak, we used image integration in order to increase the signal to noise ratio. Knowing the imaged materials emissivity, the temperature is given by using Planck"s law. In order to evaluate the system performances we have made micro-thermographies of a micro-relay thermal actuator. This device is an "U-shape" Al/SiO2 bimorph cantilever micro-relay with a gold-to-gold electrical contact, designed for secured harsh environment applications. The initial beam curvature resulting from residual stresses ensures a large gap between the contacts of the micro-relay. The current flow through the metallic layer heats the bimorph by Joule effect, and the differential expansion provides the vertical displacement for contact. The experimental results are confronted to FEM and analytical simulations. A good agreement was obtained between experimental results and simulations.

  4. Infrared thermography for noninvasive real-time monitoring of HIFU ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Yi-Sing; Kumon, Ronald E.; Deng, Cheri X.

    2012-10-01

    Infrared imaging for spatiotemporal temperature measurements was explored in this study for non-contact monitoring of temperature increases generated by HIFU ablation. Using ex vivo cardiac tissue specimens, we investigated the correlations between the occurrence of events during HIFU ablation (e.g., lesion formation, cavity formation) and the 2D spatiotemporal temperature of the tissue surface measured during HIFU ablation from an infrared camera. An increase in the rate of temperature rise was observed when lesions formed at or slightly beneath the tissue surface. Spatial shifts in the maximum temperature location away from the HIFU focus were often observed with continuing HIFU exposure after lesion formation, suggesting tissue dehydration and cavitation formation during ablation with excessive heating.

  5. Emissivity measurements on historic building materials using dual-wavelength infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moropoulou, Antonia; Avdelidis, Nicolas P.

    2001-03-01

    The most reliable method to obtain correct emissivity values for the infrared thermographic systems and applications is to determine the emissivity of the targets to be tested. Although this approach is not possible during in situ applications, samples of the targets can be collected and measured, as in this work, in the laboratory. In the present work, the emissivity values of selected historic building materials were measured at a variety of temperatures, in the 3-5.4 micrometers and 8-12 micrometers regions of the infrared spectrum. Porous stones from the Mediterranean area and marbles, used as historic building materials, were investigated. The examined materials presented different emissivity values, caused by their surface state and microstructure. In addition, the effect of temperature and wavelength on the emissivity values of such historic building materials was also considered.

  6. Dynamic and static thermal study of micromachined heaters: the advantages of visible and near-infrared thermography compared to classical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssieux, D.; Briand, D.; Charnay, J.; de Rooij, N. F.; Cretin, B.

    2008-06-01

    We report on the dynamic and static thermal characterization of microsystems using a visible and near-infrared (NIR) thermography system based on a low-cost standard CCD sensor. The interest of this method is that it is possible to obtain a true spatial resolution better than 500 nm, which is necessary in high spatial resolution applications (microsystem applications). Another interesting point of this optical method is that the temperature error versus the emissivity error is always very low (compared to infrared thermography). We show, in this study, that this behavior originates in the high sensitivity of Planck's law in this wavelength range (compared to infrared range). Thus, we demonstrate the principal advantages of this method for micromachined heater application. Thermal measurements (in dynamic and static modes) were performed on micro-heaters commonly used in microsystems, platinum- and silicon-based micromachined heaters. The results show the capability of the method in terms of the thermal resolution and spatial resolution as well as the capacity to quickly obtain static and dynamic thermal images of the studied sample.

  7. Two-stage neural algorithm for defect detection and characterization uses an active thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudzik, Sebastian

    2015-07-01

    In the paper a two-stage neural algorithm for defect detection and characterization is presented. In order to estimate the defect depth two neural networks trained on data obtained using an active thermography were employed. The first stage of the algorithm is developed to detect the defect by a classification neural network. Then the defects depth is estimated using a regressive neural network. In this work the results of experimental investigations and simulations are shown. Further, the sensitivity analysis of the presented algorithm was conducted and the impacts of emissivity error and the ambient temperature error on the depth estimation errors were studied. The results were obtained using a test sample made of material with a low thermal diffusivity.

  8. Recognition of wall materials through active thermography coupled with numerical simulations.

    PubMed

    Pietrarca, Francesca; Mameli, Mauro; Filippeschi, Sauro; Fantozzi, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of historical buildings, wall thickness as well as wall constituents are not often known a priori, and active IR thermography can be exploited as a nonintrusive method for detecting what kind of material lies beneath the external plaster layer. In the present work, the wall of a historical building is subjected to a heating stimulus, and the surface temperature temporal trend is recorded by an IR camera. A hybrid numerical model is developed in order to simulate the transient thermal response of a wall made of different known materials underneath the plaster layer. When the numerical thermal contrast and the appearance time match with the experimental thermal images, the material underneath the plaster can be qualitatively identified. PMID:27607254

  9. Non destructive testing in situ, of works of art by stimulated infra-red thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candoré, Jean Charles; Bodnar, J. L.; Detalle, Vincent; Grossel, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents various examples of assistance to the restoration of mural paintings by infra-red photothermal radiometry. First, we present the experimental device implemented for the study. Then, we show the possibility to detect separation or air voids by this technique in various works of art as the Saint Christopher of the Campanna collection of Louvre, in the painted ceilings of the abbey of Savin Saint sur Gartempe (classified with the world heritage of UNESCO) and finally in the Cocteau frescoes of the vault Saint Pierre of Villefranche sur mer.

  10. Examination of the Early Diagnostic Applicability of Active Dynamic Thermography for Burn Wound Depth Assessment and Concept Analysis.

    PubMed

    Prindeze, Nicholas J; Fathi, Payam; Mino, Matthew J; Mauskar, Neil A; Travis, Taryn E; Paul, Dereck W; Moffatt, Lauren T; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in perfusion imaging, burn wound imaging technology continues to lag behind that of other fields. Quantification of blood flow is able to predict time for healing, but clear assessment of burn depth is still questionable. Active dynamic thermography (ADT) is a noncontact imaging modality capable of distinguishing tissue of different thermal conductivities. Utilizing the abnormal heat transfer properties of the burn zones, we examined whether ADT was useful in the determination of burn depth in a model of early burn wound evaluation. Duroc pigs (castrated male; n = 3) were anesthetized, and two burns were created with an aluminum billet at 3 and 12 seconds. These contact times resulted in superficial partial and deep partial thickness burn wounds, respectively. ADT and laser Doppler imaging (LDI) imaging were performed every 30 minutes postburn for a total of five imaging sessions ending 150 minutes postburn. For ADT, imaging excitation was performed for 42-120 seconds with dual quartz-infrared lamps, and subsequent infrared image capture was performed for 300 seconds. MATLAB-assisted image analysis was performed to determine burn zone region of interest thermal relaxation and characteristic patterns. LDI was performed with a moorLDI system, and biopsies were captured for histology following the 150-minute imaging session. Both ADT and LDI imaging modalities are able to detect different physical properties at 30, 60, 90 120, and 150 minutes postburn with statistical significance (P < 0.05). Resultant ADT cooling curves characterize greater differences with greater stimulation and a potentially more identifiable differential cooling characteristic. Histological analysis confirmed burn depth. This preliminary work confirms that ADT can measure burn depth and is deserving of further research either as a stand-alone imaging technology or in combination with a device to assess perfusion. PMID:25412050

  11. A nondestructive method for diagnostic of insulated building walls using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larbi Youcef, Mohamed H. A.; Mazioud, Atef; Bremond, Pierre; Ibos, Laurent; Candau, Yves; Piro, Michel; Filloux, Alain

    2007-04-01

    This work deals with the development of an experimental protocol for the diagnostic of multi-layered insulated building walls. First, a test bench is set up in order to measure front and back sides temperatures of standard panels. The panels considered have insulation thicknesses of 2, 6 and 10cm. The front side is heated by two halogen lamps of 500W. A CEDIP Jade Long wave infrared camera and thermocouples are used to carry out temperature measurements. In a second time, a one dimensional model based on thermal quadruples and Laplace transforms was developped under Matlab environment. Also, we developped a three dimensional model based on finite volumes using Fluent computational code. Finally, a method of identification of physical parameters is implemented by performing least square minimization based on Levenberg-Marquardt method. The experimental measurements are compared to theoretical results and by minimization we obtain thermal conductivity and diffusivity as well as thickness of the two layers.

  12. Using infrared thermography to study hydrostatic stress networks in granular materials.

    PubMed

    Jongchansitto, Pawarut; Balandraud, Xavier; Grédiac, Michel; Beitone, Clément; Preechawuttipong, Itthichai

    2014-11-21

    The macroscopic mechanical behaviour of granular materials is governed by microscopic features at the particle scale. Photoelasticimetry is a powerful method for measuring shear stresses in particles made from birefringent materials. As a complementary method, we here identify the hydrostatic stress networks through thermoelastic stress analysis using infrared thermographic measurements. Experiments are performed on two-dimensional cohesionless monodisperse granular materials composed of about 1200 cylinders comprising two constitutive materials. We show that the experimental hydrostatic stress distributions follow statistical laws which are in agreement with simulations performed using molecular dynamics, except in one case exhibiting piecewise periodic stacking. Polydisperse cases are then processed. The measurement of hydrostatic stress networks using this technique opens new prospects for the analysis of granular materials. PMID:25249195

  13. Skin temperature evaluation by infrared thermography: Comparison of image analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, N.; Formenti, D.; Gargano, M.; Alberti, G.

    2014-01-01

    Body temperature in medicine is a parameter indicating abnormal activity of human tissues; it is used to diagnose specific pathologies or as an indicator of the muscle activity during physical exercise.

  14. Non-destructive Measurement of Total Carotenoid Content in Processed Tomato Products: Infrared Lock-In Thermography, Near-Infrared Spectroscopy/Chemometrics, and Condensed Phase Laser-Based Photoacoustics—Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicanic, D.; Streza, M.; Dóka, O.; Valinger, D.; Luterotti, S.; Ajtony, Zs.; Kurtanjek, Z.; Dadarlat, D.

    2015-09-01

    Carotenes found in a diversity of fruits and vegetables are among important natural antioxidants. In a study described in this paper, the total carotenoid content (TCC) in seven different products derived from thermally processed tomatoes was determined using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS), infrared lock-in thermography (IRLIT), and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with chemometrics. Results were verified versus data obtained by traditional VIS spectrophotometry (SP) that served as a reference technique. Unlike SP, the IRLIT, NIRS, and LPAS require a minimum of sample preparation which enables practically direct quantification of the TCC.

  15. Combination of infrared thermography and reflectance spectroscopy for precise classification of hair follicle stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianru; Guan, Yue; Liu, Caihua; Zhu, Dan

    2015-03-01

    Hair follicles enjoy continual cycle of anagen, catagen and telogen all life. They not only provide a unique opportunity to study the physiological mechanism of organ regeneration, but also benefit to guide the treatment of organ repair in regenerative medicine. Usually, the histological examination as a gold standard has been applied to determine the stage of hair follicle cycle, but noninvasive classification of hair cycle in vivo remains unsolved. In this study, the thermal infrared imager was applied to measure the temperature change of mouse dorsal skin with hair follicle cycle, and the change of diffuse reflectance was monitored by the optical fiber spectrometer. Histological examination was used to verify the hair follicle stages. The results indicated that the skin temperature increased at the beginning of anagen. After having stayed a high value for several days, the temperature began to decrease. At the same time, the skin diffuse reflectance decreased until the end of this period. Then the temperature increased gradually after slightly decreased when the hair follicle entered into catagen stage, and the diffuse reflectance increased at this time. In telogen, both the temperature and the diffuse reflectance went back to a steady state all the time. Sub-stages of hair follicle cycle could be distinguished based on the joint curves. This study provided a new method to noninvasively recognize the hair follicle stage, and should be valuable for the basic and therapeutic investigations on hair regeneration.

  16. Whole body vibration at different exposure frequencies: infrared thermography and physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Sonza, Anelise; Robinson, Caroline C; Achaval, Matilde; Zaro, Milton A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of whole body vibration (WBV) on physiological parameters, cutaneous temperature, tactile sensitivity, and balance. Twenty-four healthy adults (25.3 ± 2.6 years) participated in four WBV sessions. They spent 15 minutes on a vibration platform in the vertical mode at four different frequencies (31, 35, 40, and 44 Hz) with 1 mm of amplitude. All variables were measured before and after WBV exposure. Pressure sensation in five anatomical regions and both feet was determined using Von Frey monofilaments. Postural sway was measured using a force plate. Cutaneous temperature was obtained with an infrared camera. WBV influences the discharge of the skin touch-pressure receptors, decreasing sensitivity at all measured frequencies and foot regions (P ≤ 0.05). Regarding balance, no differences were found after 20 minutes of WBV at frequencies of 31 and 35 Hz. At 40 and 44 Hz, participants showed higher anterior-posterior center of pressure (COP) velocity and length. The cutaneous temperature of the lower limbs decreased during and 10 minutes after WBV. WBV decreases touch-pressure sensitivity at all measured frequencies 10 min after exposure. This may be related to the impaired balance at higher frequencies since these variables have a role in maintaining postural stability. Vasoconstriction might explain the decreased lower limb temperature. PMID:25664338

  17. Whole Body Vibration at Different Exposure Frequencies: Infrared Thermography and Physiological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sonza, Anelise; Robinson, Caroline C.; Achaval, Matilde; Zaro, Milton A.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of whole body vibration (WBV) on physiological parameters, cutaneous temperature, tactile sensitivity, and balance. Twenty-four healthy adults (25.3 ± 2.6 years) participated in four WBV sessions. They spent 15 minutes on a vibration platform in the vertical mode at four different frequencies (31, 35, 40, and 44 Hz) with 1 mm of amplitude. All variables were measured before and after WBV exposure. Pressure sensation in five anatomical regions and both feet was determined using Von Frey monofilaments. Postural sway was measured using a force plate. Cutaneous temperature was obtained with an infrared camera. WBV influences the discharge of the skin touch-pressure receptors, decreasing sensitivity at all measured frequencies and foot regions (P ≤ 0.05). Regarding balance, no differences were found after 20 minutes of WBV at frequencies of 31 and 35 Hz. At 40 and 44 Hz, participants showed higher anterior-posterior center of pressure (COP) velocity and length. The cutaneous temperature of the lower limbs decreased during and 10 minutes after WBV. WBV decreases touch-pressure sensitivity at all measured frequencies 10 min after exposure. This may be related to the impaired balance at higher frequencies since these variables have a role in maintaining postural stability. Vasoconstriction might explain the decreased lower limb temperature. PMID:25664338

  18. Infrared thermography for monitoring of freeze-drying processes: instrumental developments and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Emteborg, Håkan; Zeleny, Reinhard; Charoud-Got, Jean; Martos, Gustavo; Lüddeke, Jörg; Schellin, Holger; Teipel, Katharina

    2014-07-01

    Coupling an infrared (IR) camera to a freeze dryer for on-line monitoring of freeze-drying cycles is described for the first time. Normally, product temperature is measured using a few invasive Pt-100 probes, resulting in poor spatial resolution. To overcome this, an IR camera was placed on a process-scale freeze dryer. Imaging took place every 120 s through a Germanium window comprising 30,000 measurement points obtained contact-free from -40 °C to 25 °C. Results are presented for an empty system, bulk drying of cheese slurry, and drying of 1 mL human serum in 150 vials. During freezing of the empty system, differences of more than 5 °C were measured on the shelf. Adding a tray to the empty system, a difference of more than 8 °C was observed. These temperature differences probably cause different ice structures affecting the drying speed during sublimation. A temperature difference of maximum 13 °C was observed in bulk mode during sublimation. When drying in vials, differences of more than 10 °C were observed. Gradually, the large temperature differences disappeared during secondary drying and products were transformed into uniformly dry cakes. The experimental data show that the IR camera is a highly versatile on-line monitoring tool for different kinds of freeze-drying processes. PMID:24902839

  19. Demonstration of near-infrared thermography with silicon image sensor cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotrou, Yann; Sentenac, Thierry; Le Maoult, Yannick; Magnan, Pierre; Farre, Jean A.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents a thermal measurement system based on a Silicon image sensor camera operating in the Near Infrared spectral band (0.7-1.1 μm). The goal of the study is to develop a low-cost imaging system which provides an accurate measurement of temperature. A radiometric model is proposed to characterize the camera response by using physical parameters considering the specific spectral band used. After a calibration procedure of the model, measurements of black body temperatures ranging from 300 to 1000°C has been performed. The Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) is lower than +/- 0.18°C at a black body temperature of 600°C. Accurate measurements are provided over the whole temperature range by introducing an automatic exposure time control. The exposure time is adjusted for each frame along the evolution of temperature in order to optimize the temperature sensitivity and the signal-to-noise ratio. The paper also describes the conversion process of the apparent black body temperature to the real temperature of the observed object using its emissivity and surface geometry. The overall method is depicted and the influence of each parameter is analyzed by computing the resulting temperature uncertainty. Finally, preliminary experimental results are presented for monitoring real temperature of moulds in a Super Forming Process (SPF).

  20. Infrared Thermography for Monitoring of Freeze-Drying Processes: Instrumental Developments and Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Emteborg, Håkan; Zeleny, Reinhard; Charoud-Got, Jean; Martos, Gustavo; Lüddeke, Jörg; Schellin, Holger; Teipel, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    Coupling an infrared (IR) camera to a freeze dryer for on-line monitoring of freeze-drying cycles is described for the first time. Normally, product temperature is measured using a few invasive Pt-100 probes, resulting in poor spatial resolution. To overcome this, an IR camera was placed on a process-scale freeze dryer. Imaging took place every 120 s through a Germanium window comprising 30,000 measurement points obtained contact-free from −40°C to 25°C. Results are presented for an empty system, bulk drying of cheese slurry, and drying of 1 mL human serum in 150 vials. During freezing of the empty system, differences of more than 5°C were measured on the shelf. Adding a tray to the empty system, a difference of more than 8°C was observed. These temperature differences probably cause different ice structures affecting the drying speed during sublimation. A temperature difference of maximum 13°C was observed in bulk mode during sublimation. When drying in vials, differences of more than 10°C were observed. Gradually, the large temperature differences disappeared during secondary drying and products were transformed into uniformly dry cakes. The experimental data show that the IR camera is a highly versatile on-line monitoring tool for different kinds of freeze-drying processes. © 2014 European Union 103:2088–2097, 2014 PMID:24902839

  1. Issues associated with the use of infrared thermography for experimental testing of insulated systems

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, B.; Beck, F.; Arasteh, D.; Tuerler, D.

    1995-12-01

    Infrared scanning radiometers are used to generate temperature maps of building envelope components (windows, insulation), which may assist in evaluating their thermal performance. Accuracy of an IR scanner for laboratory-based surface temperature measurements was evaluated and details for achieving max accuracy identified. Minimum uncertainty in IR temperature measurement is {+-}0.5 C. Using an external reference emitter to scale the absolute value of IR scanner temperature measurements can improve the accuracy from 2 C to as low as 0.5 C for a 5 C span, which is comparable to accuracy of type T thermocouples. Operational procedures can easily increase errors; actual accuracy of an IR measurement will vary with test speciment geometry, temperature gradients, and scanner settings (emissivity, etc.). Future efforts for standard IR thermographic test procedures that should address standardization of various items are outlined. A database of temperature maps for a range of window systems is being created; representative data are presented for two insulated glazing units with different spacer systems.

  2. Seeing the unseen: An investigation of heat transfer using infrared thermography and LabVIEW(TM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dexter, Amy

    In this thesis work, the capacity of the infrared (IR) camera as a potential tool for creating excitement and engagement among students in the investigation of heat transfer concepts in the classroom is evaluated. Thermal videos of various heat transfer mechanisms captured with an IR camera help students visualize the abstract and invisible heat transfer processes. An interactive program was developed in LabVIEW(TM) that displays thermal videos captured by an IR camera and allows students to record thermal videos of experiments, plot temperature changes of any point on the thermal video and save their graphical results. To gain insight into the toolkit's ability to generate enthusiasm and engagement among students, preliminary usability testing of the toolkit was conducted with twelve middle school students. Based on oral and written feedback and observed interactions, the toolkit was successful in creating excitement and engagement towards heat transfer among the students. The IR camera, the interactive program and its use by students with emphasis on the advantages of these tools and some of the challenges for their integration in a classroom are discussed.

  3. Thermography in Neurologic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Eduardo Borba; Vilaça-Alves, José; Rosa, Claudio; Reis, Victor Machado

    2015-01-01

    One kind of medical images that has been developed in the last decades is thermal images. These images are assessed by infrared cameras and have shown an exponential development in recent years. In this sense, the aim of this study was to describe possibilities of thermography usage in the neurologic practice. It was performed a systematic review in Web of Knowledge (Thompson Reuters), set in all databases which used two combination of keywords as “topic”: “thermography” and “neurology”; and “thermography” and “neurologic”. The chronological period was defined from 2000 to 2014 (the least 15 years). Among the studies included in this review, only seven were with experimental design. It is few to bring thermography as a daily tool in clinical practice. However, these studies have suggested good results. The studies of review and an analyzed patent showed that the authors consider the thermography as a diagnostic tool and they recommend its usage. It can be concluded that thermography is already used as a diagnostic and monitoring tool of patients with neuropathies, particularly in complex regional pain syndrome, and stroke. And yet, this tool has great potential for future research about its application in diagnosis of other diseases of neurological origin. PMID:26191090

  4. [The instrument for thermography].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Shinsuke

    2014-07-01

    Thermography is an imaging method using the instrument to detect infrared rays emitted from the body surface, and to plot them as a distribution diagram of the temperature information. Therefore, a thermographic instrument can be assumed to measure the skin temperature of the diseased region. Such an instrument is a useful device for noninvasive and objective assessment of various diseases. Examination using a thermographic instrument can assess the autonomic dysfunction by measuring the skin blood flow involved with the sympathetic innervation. Thermography is useful in assisting the determination of the therapeutic effect. However, autonomic dysfunction should be confirmed correctly with the assessment of thermatome that shows abnormal thermal distribution in the region of the disease. Thermography should make noticeable the difference between the body temperature of abnormal and normal sites, and show the alteration of temperature. Monitoring using thermography is useful to determine the effect of sympathetic nerve block. If a thermographic instrument is used, it is important that examiners should understand the function of the instrument, as well as its advantages and disadvantages. PMID:25098130

  5. Evaluation of infrared thermography body temperature and collar-mounted accelerometer and acoustic technology for predicting time of ovulation of cows in a pasture-based system.

    PubMed

    Talukder, S; Thomson, P C; Kerrisk, K L; Clark, C E F; Celi, P

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that the specificity of infrared thermography (IRT) in detecting cows about to ovulate could be improved using different body parts that are less likely to be contaminated by fecal matter. In addition, the combined activity and rumination data captured by accelerometers were evaluated to provide a more accurate indication of ovulation than the activity and rumination data alone. Thermal images of 30 cows were captured for different body areas (eye, ear, muzzle, and vulva) twice daily after AM and PM milking sessions during the entire experimental period. Milk progesterone data and insemination records were used to determine the date of ovulation. Cows were fitted with SCR heat and rumination long-distance tags (SCR HR LD) for 1 month. Activity- and rumination-based estrus alerts were initially identified using default threshold values set by the manufacturer; however, a range of thresholds was also created and tested for both activity and rumination to determine the potential for higher levels of accuracy of ovulation detection. Visual assessment of mounting indicators resulted in 75% sensitivity (Se), 100% specificity (Sp), and 100% positive predictive value (PPV). Overall, IRT showed poor performance for detecting cows about to ovulate. Vulval temperature resulted in the greatest (80%) Sp but the poorest (21%) Se compared with the IRT temperatures of other body areas. The SCR HR LD tags default threshold value resulted in 78% Se, 57% Sp, and 70% PPV. Lowering the activity threshold from the default value improved the sensitivity but created a large number of false positives, which resulted in a decrease in specificity. Lowering the activity threshold to 20 resulted in a detection performance of 80% Se, 94% Sp, and 67% PPV, whereas the rumination levels achieved 35% Se, 69% Sp, and 14% PPV. The area under the curve for the activity level, rumination level, and the combined measures of activity and rumination levels

  6. Analysis of the accuracy of a neural algorithm for defect depth estimation using PCA processing from active thermography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudzik, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the paper a neural algorithm, which uses an active thermography for defect depth estimation, is presented. Simulations of the algorithm, for three datasets representing different phases of the heat transfer process developing in the test sample were performed. The influence of the emissivity error of the test sample surface on the accuracy of defect depth estimation is discussed. The investigations were performed for test sample made of the material with low thermal diffusivity.

  7. Determining directional emissivity: Numerical estimation and experimental validation by using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, J.; Ribbens, B.; Dirckx, J. J. J.; Steenackers, G.

    2016-07-01

    Little research has examined that inaccurate estimations of directional emissivity form a major challenge during both passive and active thermographic measurements. Especially with the increasing use of complex curved shapes and the growing precision of thermal cameras, these errors limit the accuracy of the thermal measurements. In this work we developed a technique to estimate the directional emissivity using updated numerical simulations. The reradiation on concave surfaces is examined by thermal imaging of a homogeneous heated curved metal and nylon test sample. We used finite element modelling to predict the reradiation of concave structures in order to calculate the parameters of an approximating formula for the emissivity dependent on the angle to the normal vector on each element. The differences between experimental and numerical results of the steel test sample are explained using electron microscopy imaging and the validation on different materials. The results suggest that it is possible to determine the errors of thermal imaging testing of complex shapes using a numerical model.

  8. A novel image enhancement algorithm based on stationary wavelet transform for infrared thermography to the de-bonding defect in solid rocket motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Wei; Yan, Shaoze

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a multi-scale image enhancement algorithm based on low-passing filtering and nonlinear transformation is proposed for infrared testing image of the de-bonding defect in solid propellant rocket motors. Infrared testing images with high-level noise and low contrast are foundations for identifying defects and calculating the defects size. In order to improve quality of the infrared image, according to distribution properties of the detection image, within framework of stationary wavelet transform, the approximation coefficients at suitable decomposition level is processed by index low-passing filtering by using Fourier transform, after that, the nonlinear transformation is applied to further process the figure to improve the picture contrast. To verify validity of the algorithm, the image enhancement algorithm is applied to infrared testing pictures of two specimens with de-bonding defect. Therein, one specimen is made of a type of high-strength steel, and the other is a type of carbon fiber composite. As the result shown, in the images processed by the image enhancement algorithm presented in the paper, most of noises are eliminated, and contrast between defect areas and normal area is improved greatly; in addition, by using the binary picture of the processed figure, the continuous defect edges can be extracted, all of which show the validity of the algorithm. The paper provides a well-performing image enhancement algorithm for the infrared thermography.

  9. Application of infrared thermography for online monitoring of wall temperatures in inductively coupled plasma torches with conventional and low-flow gas consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhard, Carsten; Scheffer, Andy; Maue, Thomas; Hieftje, Gary M.; Buscher, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) sources typically used for trace elemental determination and speciation were investigated with infrared (IR) thermography to obtain spatially resolved torch temperature distributions. Infrared thermographic imaging is an excellent tool for the monitoring of temperatures in a fast and non-destructive way. This paper presents the first application of IR thermography to inductively coupled plasma torches and the possibility to investigate temperatures and thermal patterns while the ICP is operating and despite background emission from the plasma itself. A fast and easy method is presented for the determination of temperature distributions and stress features within ICP torches. Two different ICP operating torches were studied: a commercially available Fassel-type ICP unit with 14 L min - 1 total Ar consumption and a SHIP torch with the unusually low Ar flow of 0.6 L min - 1 . Spatially resolved infrared images of both torches were obtained and laterally resolved temperature profiles were extracted. After temperature-resolved calibration of the emissivity (between 0.5 and 0.35 at 873-1323 K) and transmission (20% between 3.75 and 4.02 μm) of the fused quartz used in the torch construction, an image correction was applied. Inhomogeneous temperature distributions with locally defined stress areas in the conventional Fassel-type torch were revealed. As a general trend, it was found that the SHIP torch exhibited higher temperatures ( Tmax = 1580 K) than the conventional torch ( Tmax = 730 K). In the former case, torch sites with efficient and inefficient cooling were discovered and the external flow of cooling air (24-48 m s - 1 ) was identified as the limiting factor.

  10. Study of a brittle and precious medieval rose-window by means of the integration of GPR, stress wave tests and infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuzzo, L.; Masini, N.; Rizzo, E.

    2009-04-01

    The correct management and restoration of architectural monuments of high cultural interest requires a comprehensive understanding of their status of preservation, the detection of the building features, the localization of damages and possibly the identification of their causes, nature and extent. To this aim, in recent times there is a growing interest on non-destructive and non-invasive geophysical methods as an invaluable tool for correlating spatially the information gained through destructive tests, which are restricted to a few locations of the investigated structure, and to optimize the choice of their position in order to minimize their impact on the monument structural stability. Moreover, the integration of the classical geophysical techniques with emerging surface and subsurface sensing techniques (acoustics, thermography) provides a suitable methodology for a multi-scale assessment of the monument state of preservation and its material and building components, which is vital for addressing maintenance and restoration issues. The present case study focuses on the application of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), infrared thermography (IRT), sonic and ultrasonic tests to analyze a 13th century precious rose window in Southern Italy, affected by widespread decay and instability problems. The Cathedral of Troia (Apulia, Italy) is the masterpiece of the Apulian Romanesque architecture. Its façade is adorned with an astonishing 6 m diameter rose window consisting of 11 twin columns, in various stone and reused marbles, connected to a central oculus and to a ring of trapezoidal elements decorated with arched ribworks. Between the twin columns there are 11 triangular carved panels with different and strongly symbolic geometrical patterns. According to visual inspection, mineralogical and petrographic studies, different materials have been used for the different architectural elements: fine grained limestone for the central oculus, medium-fine grained calcarenite

  11. Infrared Thermography Flight Experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, Robert C.; Carter, Matthew L.; Kirsch, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Analysis was done on IR data collected by DFRC on May 8, 2002. This includes the generation of a movie to initially examine the IR flight data. The production of the movie was challenged by the volume of data that needed to be processed, namely 40,500 images with each image (256 x 252) containing over 264 million points (pixel depth 4096). It was also observed during the initial analysis that the RTD surface coating has a different emissivity than the surroundings. This fact added unexpected complexity in obtaining a correlation between RTD data and IR data. A scheme was devised to generate IR data near the RTD location which is not affected by the surface coating This scheme is valid as long as the surface temperature as measured does not change too much over a few pixel distances from the RTD location. After obtaining IR data near the RTD location, it is possible to make a direct comparison with the temperature as measured during the flight after adjusting for the camera s auto scaling. The IR data seems to correlate well to the flight temperature data at three of the four RID locations. The maximum count intensity occurs closely to the maximum temperature as measured during flight. At one location (RTD #3), there is poor correlation and this must be investigated before any further progress is possible. However, with successful comparisons at three locations, it seems there is great potential to be able to find a calibration curve for the data. Moreover, as such it will be possible to measure temperature directly from the IR data in the near future.

  12. Applying Infrared Thermography as a Quality-Control Tool for the Rapid Detection of Proton-Electrolyte-Membrane-Fuel-Cell Catalyst-Layer-Thickness Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Aieta, N. V.; Das, P. K.; Perdue, A.; Bender, G.; Herring, A. M.; Weber, A. Z.; Ulsh, M. J.

    2012-08-01

    As fuel cells become more prominent, new manufacturing and production methods are needed to enable increased volumes with high quality. One necessary component of this industrial growth will be the accurate measurement of the variability of a wide range of material properties during the manufacturing process. In this study, a method to detect defects in fuel cell catalyst layers is investigated through experiment and mathematical simulation. The method uses infrared thermography and direct-current electronic-excitation methods to detect variations in platinum-containing catalyst-layer thickness with high spatial and temporal resolution. Data analysis, operating-condition impacts, and detection limits are explored, showing the measurement of defects on the millimeter length scale. Overall, the experimental and modeling results demonstrate great potential of this technique as a nondestructive method to measure defects that is amenable to use on roll-to-roll manufacturing lines.

  13. A comparative study of in-situ measurement methods of a building wall thermal resistance using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibos, Laurent; Monchau, Jean-Pierre; Feuillet, Vincent; Candau, Yves

    2015-04-01

    This study concerns the in-situ determination of the thermal resistance of a building wall. Measurements were performed in the PANISSE platform, which is a residential building with two floors located in the town of Villemomble, at about ten kilometers in the east of Paris. During a renovation, a 6cm-thick external insulating layer was fixed onto the cellular concrete walls of the house. Three methods using IR thermography were used to estimate the thermal resistance of the insulated walls. Results are compared to a standardized method (ISO 9869-1) that uses contact sensors. The comparison is made considering estimated thermal resistance values, measurement uncertainties and measurement duration.

  14. Evaluation of the variable depth resolution of active dynamic thermography on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prindeze, Nicholas J.; Hoffman, Hilary A.; Carney, Bonnie C.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Loew, Murray H.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.

    2015-06-01

    Active dynamic thermography (ADT) is an imaging technique capable of characterizing the non-homogenous thermal conductance of damaged tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine optimal stimulation parameters and quantify the optical resolution of ADT through various depths of human skin. Excised tissue from plastic surgery operations was collected immediately following excision. A total of 12 thin to thick split-thickness grafts were harvested from 3 patients. Grafts were placed on top of a 3D printed resolution chart and thermal stimulation was applied from a 300W halogen lamp array for between 0.5-10 seconds to determine optimal parameters. Video was captured with a thermal camera, and analysis was performed by reconstructing an image from thermal gradients. In this study ADT resolved 0.445+/-0 lp/mm at a depth of 0.010", 0.356+/-0.048 lp/mm at a depth of 0.015", 0.334+/-0.027 lp/mm at a depth of 0.020" and 0.265+/-0.022 lp/mm at a depth of 0.025". The stimulus energy required for maximum resolution at each depth was 3- 4s, 8s, 12s and 12s respectively. ADT is a sensitive technique for imaging dermal structure, capable of resolving detail as fine as 1124 μm, 1427 μm, 1502 μm and 1893 μm in thin to thick split-thickness skin grafts respectively. This study has characterized a correlation between stimulus input and maximal resolution at differing depths of skin. It has also defined the functional imaging depth of ADT to below the sub-cutis, well below conventional spectrophotometric techniques.

  15. Active Pyroelectric Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Mina, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noncontact pyroelectric infrared detector is described. A pyroelectric film that also has piezoelectric properties is held in place so that it is free to vibrate. It is electrically stimulated to vibrate at a resonance frequency. The vibrating film forms part of a balanced bridge circuit. As thermal radiation impinges on the film the pyroelectric effect causes the resonance frequency to change, thereby unbalancing the bridge circuit. A differential amplifier tracks the change in voltage across the bridge. The resulting voltage signal is further processed by a bandpass filter and a precision rectifier. The device allows for DC or static temperature measurements without the use of a mechanical chopping device.

  16. Transfer of infrared thermography predictive maintenance technologies to Soviet-designed nuclear power plants: experience at Chernobyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, Ray; Huff, Roy

    1999-03-01

    The importance of infrared (IR) technology and analysis in today's world of predictive maintenance and reliability- centered maintenance cannot be understated. The use of infrared is especially important in facilities that are required to maintain a high degree of equipment reliability because of plant or public safety concerns. As with all maintenance tools, particularly those used in predictive maintenance approaches, training plays a key role in their effectiveness and the benefit gained from their use. This paper details an effort to transfer IR technology to Soviet- designed nuclear power plants in Russia, Ukraine, and Lithuania. Delivery of this technology and post-delivery training activities have been completed recently at the Chornobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine. Many interesting challenges were encountered during this effort. Hardware procurement and delivery of IR technology to a sensitive country were complicated by United States regulations. Freight and shipping infrastructure and host-country customs policies complicated hardware transport. Training activities were complicated by special hardware, software and training material translation needs, limited communication opportunities, and site logistical concerns. These challenges and others encountered while supplying the Chornobyl plant with state-of-the-art IR technology are described in this paper.

  17. Thermography to Inspect Insulation of Large Cryogenic Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen; Youngquist, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Thermography has been used in the past to monitor active, large, cryogenic storage tanks. This approach proposes to use thermography to monitor new or refurbished tanks, prior to filling with cryogenic liquid, to look for insulation voids. Thermography may provide significant cost and schedule savings if voids can be detected early before a tank is returned to service.

  18. Buying Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madding, Robert P.

    1981-01-01

    The cost of thermographic information obtained by contracting for a service is compared to that of buying equipment and doing the work in-house. A breakeven analysis method is used to find the number of days per year an instrument must be used to justify buying it. Life-cycle costing techniques are used to find the equivalent annual cost of various classes of thermographic instruments. Results indicate that a full-time person earning 20,000 annually must use a 30,000 instrument at least 73 days per year if thermography can otherwise be contracted for $675 per day. By devoting a person to thermography part-time, the number of inspection days for this case can be reduced to about 28. Further in-house advantage can be gained by considering investment tax credits, salvage value and, to some extent, accelerated depreciation. Techniques for finding the breakeven number of inspection days for other costs are developed. A nomogram is included for rapid comparisons.

  19. Study of a brittle and precious medieval rose-window by means of the integration of GPR, stress wave tests and infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuzzo, L.; Masini, N.; Rizzo, E.

    2009-04-01

    The correct management and restoration of architectural monuments of high cultural interest requires a comprehensive understanding of their status of preservation, the detection of the building features, the localization of damages and possibly the identification of their causes, nature and extent. To this aim, in recent times there is a growing interest on non-destructive and non-invasive geophysical methods as an invaluable tool for correlating spatially the information gained through destructive tests, which are restricted to a few locations of the investigated structure, and to optimize the choice of their position in order to minimize their impact on the monument structural stability. Moreover, the integration of the classical geophysical techniques with emerging surface and subsurface sensing techniques (acoustics, thermography) provides a suitable methodology for a multi-scale assessment of the monument state of preservation and its material and building components, which is vital for addressing maintenance and restoration issues. The present case study focuses on the application of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), infrared thermography (IRT), sonic and ultrasonic tests to analyze a 13th century precious rose window in Southern Italy, affected by widespread decay and instability problems. The Cathedral of Troia (Apulia, Italy) is the masterpiece of the Apulian Romanesque architecture. Its façade is adorned with an astonishing 6 m diameter rose window consisting of 11 twin columns, in various stone and reused marbles, connected to a central oculus and to a ring of trapezoidal elements decorated with arched ribworks. Between the twin columns there are 11 triangular carved panels with different and strongly symbolic geometrical patterns. According to visual inspection, mineralogical and petrographic studies, different materials have been used for the different architectural elements: fine grained limestone for the central oculus, medium-fine grained calcarenite

  20. Thermography inspection for detection and tracking of composite cylinder damage during load testing

    SciTech Connect

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Johnston, P. H.; Seebo, J. P.

    2011-06-23

    Two thermography techniques, passive and active, are used to detect damage initiation and progression in a cyclically loaded composite cylinder. The passive thermography tracks damage progression in real time during cyclic loading. Active flash thermography, using a flash tube enclosed within the cylinder, images delaminations. A differential thermography processing technique eliminates normal material variations and improves sensitivity to and sizing of delaminations. The thermography results were compared to non-immersion ultrasonic results.

  1. Thermography Inspection for Detection and Tracking of Composite Cylinder Damage During Load Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Seebo, J. P.; Johnston, P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Two thermography techniques, passive and active, are used to detect damage initiation and progression in a cyclically loaded composite cylinder. The passive thermography tracks damage progression in real time during cyclic loading. Active flash thermography, using a flash tube enclosed within the cylinder, images delaminations in a cylinder under different loads. A differential thermography processing technique eliminates normal material variations and improves sensitivity to and sizing of delaminations. The thermography results were compared to nonimmersion ultrasonic results.

  2. Surface thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrickson, M.

    1986-05-01

    The temperature sensitivity of many plasma materials interactions in both fusion plasmas and process plasmas requires the determination of the surface temperature of the material in contact with the plasma. The determination of the surface temperature is made difficult by the presence of the plasma, the large electrical potentials that may be present, and the need to not contaminate the surface. Radiation thermography permits determination of the surface temperature while overcoming the difficulties listed above. This paper briefly discusses thermal radiation, Planck's Law, and the selection of the best wavelength band for a given temperature range. Both one and two color pyrometry are discussed. Several considerations that are necessary for practical applications are discussed. Some examples of the use of radiation thermometry in fusion applications between 350 and 3000 /sup 0/C are presented. Surface heat flux has also been determined from the time variation of the surface temperature.

  3. The evaluation of evaporation by infrared thermography: A critical analysis of the measurements on the Crau test site. [France

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seguin, B.; Petit, V.; Devillard, R.; Reich, P.; Thouy, G. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Evapotranspiration was calculated for both the dry and irrigated zone by four methods which were compared with the energy balance method serving as a reference. Two methods did not involve the surface temperature. They are ETR(n) = R(n), liable to be valid under wet conditions and ET(eq) = (delta/delta + gamma) R(n) i.e, the first term of Penman's equation, adapted to moderately dry conditions. The methods using surface temperature were the combined energy balance aerodynamic approach and a simplified approach proposed by Jackson et al. Tests show the surface temperature methods give relatively satisfactory results both in the dry and wet zone, with a precision of 10% to 15% compared with the reference method. As was to be expected, ET(eq) gave satisfactory results only in the dry zone and ET(Rn) in the irrigated zone. Thermography increased the precision in the estimate of ET relative to the most suitable classical method by 5% to 8% and is equally suitable for both dry and wet conditions. The Jackson method does not require extensive ground measurements and the evaluation of the surface roughness.

  4. Infrared thermography as a tool to evaluate body surface temperature and its relationship with feed efficiency in Bos indicus cattle in tropical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martello, Luciane Silva; da Luz e Silva, Saulo; da Costa Gomes, Rodrigo; da Silva Corte, Rosana Ruegger Pereira; Leme, Paulo Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the use of infrared thermography (IRT) images as a tool for monitoring body surface temperature and to study its relationship with residual feed intake (RFI) in Nellore cattle. We also evaluated IRT as an indicator of feed efficiency in Bos indicus cattle. In this study, 144 Nellore steers were fed high-concentrate diets for 70 days to evaluate feedlot performance. We examined nine animals classified as high RFI and nine animals classified as low RFI by measuring rectal temperature (RT), respiratory frequency (RF), and IRT in the front, eye, ocular area, cheek, flank, ribs, rump, and front feet. The measurements were taken at 0700, 1200, and 1600 hours. The IRT temperatures measured at the eye, cheek, flank, ribs, rump, and front feet were positively associated with RF and RT. These results indicate that increases in the temperatures are associated with increased RF and RT. There was an effect in the RFI group in the front region where IRT correlates with RT. The front IRT for high-RFI cattle was lower ( P < 0.01) than that for low-RFI cattle. The higher skin temperature measured by IRT for animals in the RFI group may be related to improved efficiency of thermoregulatory mechanisms because the RT remained lower in the low-RFI group. IRT can be used in the head for studies related to RFI in beef cattle.

  5. Infrared thermography as a tool to evaluate body surface temperature and its relationship with feed efficiency in Bos indicus cattle in tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Martello, Luciane Silva; da Luz E Silva, Saulo; da Costa Gomes, Rodrigo; da Silva Corte, Rosana Ruegger Pereira; Leme, Paulo Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the use of infrared thermography (IRT) images as a tool for monitoring body surface temperature and to study its relationship with residual feed intake (RFI) in Nellore cattle. We also evaluated IRT as an indicator of feed efficiency in Bos indicus cattle. In this study, 144 Nellore steers were fed high-concentrate diets for 70 days to evaluate feedlot performance. We examined nine animals classified as high RFI and nine animals classified as low RFI by measuring rectal temperature (RT), respiratory frequency (RF), and IRT in the front, eye, ocular area, cheek, flank, ribs, rump, and front feet. The measurements were taken at 0700, 1200, and 1600 hours. The IRT temperatures measured at the eye, cheek, flank, ribs, rump, and front feet were positively associated with RF and RT. These results indicate that increases in the temperatures are associated with increased RF and RT. There was an effect in the RFI group in the front region where IRT correlates with RT. The front IRT for high-RFI cattle was lower (P < 0.01) than that for low-RFI cattle. The higher skin temperature measured by IRT for animals in the RFI group may be related to improved efficiency of thermoregulatory mechanisms because the RT remained lower in the low-RFI group. IRT can be used in the head for studies related to RFI in beef cattle. PMID:26070369

  6. Spatial Structure of Turbulent Heat Exchange at the Snow-Atmosphere Interface Inferred from Time-sequential Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, A.; Oldroyd, H. J.; Diebold, M.; Huwald, H.; Parlange, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    Land surfaces with a low thermal admittance, such as snow, experience fluctuations in their surface temperature (Ts) not only due to the diurnal course of the energy balance, but also on much shorter time-scales as the consequence of turbulent heat exchange between the surface and the atmospheric surface layer. High-frequency fluctuations in Ts, as reported for selected land-surfaces in the literature, are the imprint of coherent turbulent structures transporting heat away or towards the surface in the atmospheric surface layer. Our hypothesis is that spatially coherent perturbations in Ts on a snowpack can be mapped using time-sequential thermography (TST) - time series of thermal images sampled using state-of-the-art thermal cameras. The low thermal admittance of fresh snow implies that snow should respond with higher amplitudes in Ts to atmospheric forcing than many other land-surfaces, where fluctuations in Ts can be below the radiometric resolution of common thermal camera systems. On February 13 and 14, 2013 we operated an uncooled thermal camera (A320, FLIR, Wilsonville, OR, USA) over a snow covered glacier (';Glacier de la Plaine Morte', 46°22'37"N, 7°29'16" E, 2720 m a.s.l.). The thermal camera was mounted on a short 3 m mast to provide an oblique view of a uniform and flat part of the glacier upstream of the tower, with a filed of view (FOV) of 25 x 19° at 320 x 240 pixel resolution. Thermal images of the apparent surface temperature were acquired with ~5Hz and complemented by 20 Hz measurements of the atmospheric flow with three ultrasonic anemometer-thermometers (CSAT-3, CSI, Logan, UT, USA), of which one was installed in the FOV of the thermal camera. During the measurement campaign, the atmospheric surface layer was stably stratified (clear skies, air temperatures -15 to -10°C), and Ts ranged between -21 and -10°C. The snow-surface exhibited quite large fluctuations in Ts up to ×3 K over short time (within ~10-30 seconds). The extracted spatio

  7. Variations in the vulvar temperature of sows during proestrus and estrus as determined by infrared thermography and its relation to ovulation.

    PubMed

    Simões, Vasco G; Lyazrhi, Faouzi; Picard-Hagen, Nicole; Gayrard, Véronique; Martineau, Guy-Pierre; Waret-Szkuta, Agnès

    2014-11-01

    The prediction of ovulation time is one of the most important and yet difficult processes in pig production, and it has a considerable impact on the fertility of the herd and litter size. The objective of this study was to assess the vulvar skin temperature of sows during proestrus and estrus using infrared thermography and to establish a possible relationship between the variations in vulvar temperature and ovulation. The experimental group comprised 36 crossbred Large White × Landrace females, of which 6 were gilts and 30 were multiparous sows. Estrus was detected twice daily and the temperature was obtained every 6 hours from the vulvar area and from two control points in the gluteal area (Gluteal skin temperature [GST]). A third variable, vulvar-gluteal temperature (VGT) was obtained from the difference between the vulvar skin temperature and the GST values. The animals were divided into two subgroups: group A consisting of 11 animals with estrus detected at 6:00 AM, Day 4 postweaning, and group B comprising seven animals with estrus detected at 6:00 AM, Day 5 post-weaning. Both groups showed a similar trend in the VGT. The VGT increased during the proestrus, reaching a peak 24 hours before estrus in group A and 48 hours before estrus in group B. The VGT then decreased markedly reaching the lowest value in groups A and B, respectively, 12 and 6 hours after estrus. Although the time of ovulation was only estimated on the basis of a literature review, the matching between the temporal variations of the VGT values and the predicted time of the peak of estradiol secretion that ultimately leads to the ovulation processes suggests that the VGT values represent a potential predictive marker of the ovulatory events. PMID:25159660

  8. Infrared thermography system for transport infrastructures survey with inline local atmospheric parameter measurements and offline model for radiation attenuation evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean; Boucher, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    An infrared system has been developed to monitor transport infrastructures in a standalone configuration. It is based on low cost infrared thermal cameras linked with a calculation unit in order to produce a corrected thermal map of the surveyed structure at a selected time step. With the inline version, the data collected feed simplified radiative models running a GPU. With the offline version, the thermal map can be corrected when data are collected under different atmospheric conditions up to foggy night conditions. A model for radiative transmission prediction is proposed and limitations are addressed. Furthermore, the results obtained by image and signal processing methods with data acquired on the transport infrastructure opened to traffic are presented. Finally, conclusions and perspectives for new implementation and new functionalities are presented and discussed.

  9. Optically and non-optically excited thermography for composites: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruizhen; He, Yunze

    2016-03-01

    Composites, such as glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) and carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), and adhesive bonding are being increasingly used in fields of aerospace, renewable energy, civil and architecture, and other industries. Flaws and damages are inevitable during either fabrication or lifetime of composites structures or components. Thus, nondestructive testing (NDT) are extremely required to prevent failures and to increase reliability of composite structures or components in both manufacture and in-service inspection. Infrared thermography techniques including pulsed thermography, pulsed phase thermography, and lock-in thermography have shown the great potential and advantages. Besides conventional optical thermography, other sources such as laser, eddy current, microwave, and ultrasound excited thermography are drawing increasingly attentions for composites. In this work, a fully, in-depth and comprehensive review of thermography NDT techniques for composites inspection was conducted based on an orderly and concise literature survey and detailed analysis. Firstly, basic concepts for thermography NDT were defined and introduced, such as volume heating thermography. Next, the developments of conventional optic, laser, eddy current, microwave, and ultrasound thermography for composite inspection were reviewed. Then, some case studies for scanning thermography were also reviewed. After that, the strengths and limitations of thermography techniques were concluded through comparison studies. At last, some research trends were predicted. This work containing critical overview, detailed comparison and extensive list of references will disseminates knowledge between users, manufacturers, designers and researchers involved in composite structures or components inspection by means of thermography NDT techniques.

  10. Dynamic thermography in diagnostics of onychomycosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryca, Jaroslaw; Nowakowski, Antoni; Urbanowski, Slawomir

    2004-07-01

    The paper shows the results of the research on the active dynamic thermography used for diagnostics of onychomycosis and progress of the healing process. It seems that the most essential factor affecting the development of mycosis in nails is the microcirculation in the tissue close to the nail. Active dynamic thermography may prove to be a new diagnostic method and a sufficient tool for measurements of this parameter.

  11. IrLaW an OGC compliant infrared thermography measurement system developed on mini PC with real time computing capabilities for long term monitoring of transport infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, J.; Averty, R.

    2012-04-01

    One of the objectives of ISTIMES project is to evaluate the potentialities offered by the integration of different electromagnetic techniques able to perform non-invasive diagnostics for surveillance and monitoring of transport infrastructures. Among the EM methods investigated, uncooled infrared camera is a promising technique due to its dissemination potential according to its relative low cost on the market. Infrared thermography, when it is used in quantitative mode (not in laboratory conditions) and not in qualitative mode (vision applied to survey), requires to process in real time thermal radiative corrections on raw data acquired to take into account influences of natural environment evolution with time. But, camera sensor has to be enough smart to apply in real time calibration law and radiometric corrections in a varying atmosphere. So, a complete measurement system was studied and developed with low cost infrared cameras available on the market. In the system developed, infrared camera is coupled with other sensors to feed simplified radiative models running, in real time, on GPU available on small PC. The system studied and developed uses a fast Ethernet camera FLIR A320 [1] coupled with a VAISALA WXT520 [2] weather station and a light GPS unit [3] for positioning and dating. It can be used with other Ethernet infrared cameras (i.e. visible ones) but requires to be able to access measured data at raw level. In the present study, it has been made possible thanks to a specific agreement signed with FLIR Company. The prototype system studied and developed is implemented on low cost small computer that integrates a GPU card to allow real time parallel computing [4] of simplified radiometric [5] heat balance using information measured with the weather station. An HMI was developed under Linux using OpenSource and complementary pieces of software developed at IFSTTAR. This new HMI called "IrLaW" has various functionalities that let it compliant to be use in

  12. Recovery of normal testicular temperature after scrotal heat stress in rams assessed by infrared thermography and its effects on seminal characteristics and testosterone blood serum concentration.

    PubMed

    Alves, Maíra Bianchi Rodrigues; Andrade, André Furugen Cesar de; Arruda, Rubens Paes de; Batissaco, Leonardo; Florez-Rodriguez, Shirley Andrea; Oliveira, Bruna Marcele Martins de; Torres, Mariana Andrade; Lançoni, Renata; Ravagnani, Gisele Mouro; Prado Filho, Roberto Romano do; Vellone, Vinícius Silva; Losano, João Diego de Agostini; Franci, Celso Rodrigues; Nichi, Marcílio; Celeghini, Eneiva Carla Carvalho

    2016-08-01

    thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs; P = 0.05), and DNA integrity (P = 0.0004). These semen characteristics were negatively affected 21 days after IN, and excluding induced TBARSs and abnormalities, recovered 35 days afterward; induced TBARSs just were affected after 49 days of IN; sperm abnormalities just recovered after 63 days. Testosterone blood serum concentration was lesser in insulated rams (P = 0.03). Thus, the difference of 1.12 °C between RT and testicular temperature impacts semen quality and testosterone blood serum concentration. Moreover, this study shows that rams can recover testes temperature efficiently toward IN and that infrared thermography is an efficient tool to identify differences on SSMT. PMID:27045627

  13. Defect characterization by inductive heated thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noethen, Matthias; Meyendorf, Norbert

    2012-05-01

    During inductive-thermographic inspection, an eddy current of high intensity is induced into the inspected material and the thermal response is detected by an infrared camera. Anomalies in the surface temperature during and after inductive heating correspond to inhomogeneities in the material. A finite element simulation of the surface crack detection process using active thermography with inductive heating has been developed. The simulation model is based on the finite element software ANSYS. The simulation tool was tested and used for investigations on steel components with different longitudinal orientated cracks, varying in shape, width and height. This paper focuses on surface connected longitudinal orientated cracks in austenitic steel. The results show that depending on the excitation frequency the temperature distribution of the material under test are different and a possible way to measure the depth of the crack will be discussed.

  14. Using Noncontact Infrared Thermography for Long-term Monitoring of Foot Temperatures in a Patient with Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Staffa, Erik; Bernard, Vladan; Kubíček, Luboš; Vlachovský, Robert; Vlk, Daniel; Mornstein, Vojtěch; Staffa, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Foot complications in persons with diabetes mellitus (DM) are associated with substantial costs and loss of quality of life. Increasing evidence suggests changes in skin temperature, measured using an infrared thermographic system (IRT), may be a predictor of foot ulcer development in patients with DM. The purpose of this case study is to describe the long-term IRT findings and overall clinical outcomes of a patient with DM and peripheral vascular disease. Foot temperature measurements using IRT were obtained slightly more than 1 year before and immediately following endovascular treatment of a 76-year-old man, a nonsmoker with type 2 DM, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease with cardiac arrhythmia. Although he was otherwise asymptomatic, the infrared measurement showed an average temperature difference of 2.3˚ C between the left and right foot until he developed a small, trauma-induced wound on the left foot, at which time left foot temperature increased. He was diagnosed with rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma, underwent surgery and chemotherapy, and subsequently was evaluated for peripheral vascular disease. Before undergoing peripheral angiography and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, IRT evaluation showed a hot spot on the left heel. Immediately following endovascular treatment, the mean temperature difference between the right and left foot was low (0.2˚ C), but a Stage I pressure ulcer was visible on the left heel. Skin breakdown in that area was observed 2 months later, and the wound continued to increase in size and depth. The patient died shortly thereafter due to complications of cancer. In this case study, a series of infrared images of foot skin temperatures appeared to show a relationship with blood circulation and wound/ulcer development and presentation. IRT has the ability to instantaneously measure the absolute temperature of the skin surface over a large area without direct skin contact. However, the devices are very sensitive and prospective

  15. On the Use of Infrared Thermography for Analysis of Fatigue Damage in Ti6Al4V-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Zhang, Jian-Xun

    2014-08-01

    The present work is aimed at comparatively studying fatigue damage evolution of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam-welded (LBW) joint and the base metal (BM) of Ti6Al4V alloy subjected to cyclic loading. To reveal crack nucleation and propagation during the fatigue process, in situ fatigue was generated using infrared measurement methods. The results indicate that the rate of damage accumulated in the LBW joint was higher than in the BM specimens during a fatigue test, which decreased the fatigue life of the LBW joint. This observation is attributable to the LBW joint fusion zone microstructure, which has a higher void nucleation and growth rate compared with the BM microstructure.

  16. Infrared thermography videos of the elastocaloric effect for shape memory alloys NiTi and Ni2FeGa

    PubMed Central

    Pataky, Garrett J.; Ertekin, Elif; Sehitoglu, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Infrared thermogrpahy was utilized to record the temperature change during tensile loading cycles of two shape memory alloy single crystals with pseudoelastic behavior. During unloading, a giant temperature drop was measured in the gage section due to the elastocaloric effect. This data article provides a video of a [001] oriented Ni2FeGa single crystal, including the corresponding stress–strain curve, shows the temperature drop over one cycle. The second video of a [148] oriented NiTi single crystal depicts the repeatability of the elastocaloric effect by showing two consecutive cycles. The videos are supplied in this paper. For further analysis and enhanced discussion of large temperature change in shape memory alloys, see Pataky et al. [1] PMID:26380838

  17. Infrared thermography videos of the elastocaloric effect for shape memory alloys NiTi and Ni2FeGa.

    PubMed

    Pataky, Garrett J; Ertekin, Elif; Sehitoglu, Huseyin

    2015-12-01

    Infrared thermogrpahy was utilized to record the temperature change during tensile loading cycles of two shape memory alloy single crystals with pseudoelastic behavior. During unloading, a giant temperature drop was measured in the gage section due to the elastocaloric effect. This data article provides a video of a [001] oriented Ni2FeGa single crystal, including the corresponding stress-strain curve, shows the temperature drop over one cycle. The second video of a [148] oriented NiTi single crystal depicts the repeatability of the elastocaloric effect by showing two consecutive cycles. The videos are supplied in this paper. For further analysis and enhanced discussion of large temperature change in shape memory alloys, see Pataky et al. [1]. PMID:26380838

  18. A Case Study Of Applying Infrared Thermography To Identify A Coolant Leak In A Municipal Ice Skating Rink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Jay R.

    1989-03-01

    This paper deals with the application of infrared imaging radiometry as a diagnostic inspection tool for locating a concealed leak in the refrigeration system supplying glycol coolant to the arena floor of an ice skating rink in a municipal coliseum facility. Scanning approximately 10 miles of black iron tubing embedded in the arena floor resulted in locating a leak within the supply/return side of the system. A secondary disclosure was a restriction to normal coolant flow in some delivery loops caused by sludge build-up. Specific inspection procedures were established to enhance temperature differentials suitable for good thermal imaging. One procedure utilized the temperature and pressure of the city water supply; a second the availability of 130F hot water from the facility's boiler system; and a third the building's own internal ambient temperature. Destructive testing and other data collection equipment confirmed the thermographic findings revealing a section of corrosion damaged pipe. Repair and flushing of the system was quickly completed with a minimum of construction costs and inconvenience. No financial losses were incurred due to the interruption of scheduled revenue events. Probable cause for the shutdown condition was attributed to a flawed installation decision made 15 years earlier during the initial construction stage.

  19. In vitro infrared thermography assessment of temperature peaks during the intra-oral welding of titanium abutments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degidi, Marco; Nardi, Diego; Sighinolfi, Gianluca; Merla, Arcangelo; Piattelli, Adriano

    2012-07-01

    Control of heat dissipation and transmission to the peri-implant area during intra-oral welding is very important to limit potential damage to the surrounding tissue. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess, by means of thermal infrared imaging, the tissue temperature peaks associated with the thermal propagation pathway through the implants, the abutments and the walls of the slot of the scaffold, generated during the welding process, in three different implant systems. An in vitro polyurethane mandible model was prepared with a 7.0 mm v-shape slot. Effects on the maximum temperature by a single welding procedure were studied using different power supplies and abutments. A total of 36 welding procedures were tested on three different implant systems. The lowest peak temperature along the walls of the 7.0 mm v-shaped groove (31.6 ± 2 °C) was assessed in the specimens irrigated with sterile saline solution. The highest peak temperature (42.8 ± 2 °C) was assessed in the samples with a contemporaneous power overflow and premature pincers removal. The results of our study suggest that the procedures used until now appear to be effective to avoid thermal bone injuries. The peak tissue temperature of the in vitro model did not surpass the threshold limits above which tissue injury could occur.

  20. The use of high-resolution infrared thermography (HRIT) for the study of ice nucleation and ice propagation in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freezing events that occur when plants are actively growing can be a lethal event particularly if the plant has no freezing tolerance. Such frost events often have devastating effects on agricultural production and can also play an important role in shaping community structure in natural population...

  1. Mid-infrared thermal imaging for an effective mapping of surface materials and sub-surface detachments in mural paintings: integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daffara, C.; Parisotto, S.; Mariotti, P. I.

    2015-06-01

    Cultural Heritage is discovering how precious is thermal analysis as a tool to improve the restoration, thanks to its ability to inspect hidden details. In this work a novel dual mode imaging approach, based on the integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography (TQR) in the mid-IR is demonstrated for an effective mapping of surface materials and of sub-surface detachments in mural painting. The tool was validated through a unique application: the "Monocromo" by Leonardo da Vinci in Italy. The dual mode acquisition provided two spatially aligned dataset: the TQR image and the thermal sequence. Main steps of the workflow included: 1) TQR analysis to map surface features and 2) to estimate the emissivity; 3) projection of the TQR frame on reference orthophoto and TQR mosaicking; 4) thermography analysis to map detachments; 5) use TQR to solve spatial referencing and mosaicking for the thermal-processed frames. Referencing of thermal images in the visible is a difficult aspect of the thermography technique that the dual mode approach allows to solve in effective way. We finally obtained the TQR and the thermal maps spatially referenced to the mural painting, thus providing the restorer a valuable tool for the restoration of the detachments.

  2. Electro-thermography technique for nondestructive testing (NDT) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. S.; Hung, Y. Y.; Liu, L.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, Electro-Thermography is introduced in nondestructive testing applications. Electro-Thermography is one of the novel active thermography techniques for nondestructive testing. It gains the advantages from the optical and electromagnetic properties in full-field, non-contact, high inspection speed, and sensitivity in geometry variation. It is mostly applicable to all kind of ferrous-metal, some composites materials. A fundamental difference among electro-thermography and other active thermography techniques are the excitation mechanism. Electro-Thermography is a combination of the electromagnetic induction and surface thermal radiation measuring technique; it used the induction method to excite the object, and then it used the radiation properties to measure the distribution of surface temperature of the object. It detects flaws by the flaw's anomalous heating and heat transfer response. The method of excitation is also different from others irradiation excitation. Electro-Thermography needs an electromagnetic coil to generate eddy current through induction to change the surface and subsurface temperature. Electro-Thermography can detect surface and sub-surface flaws, unless the flaw is too remote and tiny from the surface. Some experiments in flaw detections and other types of inspections are demonstrated.

  3. Air-coupled acoustic thermography for in-situ evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Winfree, William P. (Inventor); Yost, William T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Acoustic thermography uses a housing configured for thermal, acoustic and infrared radiation shielding. For in-situ applications, the housing has an open side adapted to be sealingly coupled to a surface region of a structure such that an enclosed chamber filled with air is defined. One or more acoustic sources are positioned to direct acoustic waves through the air in the enclosed chamber and towards the surface region. To activate and control each acoustic source, a pulsed signal is applied thereto. An infrared imager focused on the surface region detects a thermal image of the surface region. A data capture device records the thermal image in synchronicity with each pulse of the pulsed signal such that a time series of thermal images is generated. For enhanced sensitivity and/or repeatability, sound and/or vibrations at the surface region can be used in feedback control of the pulsed signal applied to the acoustic sources.

  4. Crack depth determination with inductive thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald-Tranta, B.; Schmidt, R.

    2015-05-01

    Castings, forgings and other steel products are nowadays usually tested with magnetic particle inspection, in order to detect surface cracks. An alternative method is active thermography with inductive heating, which is quicker, it can be well automated and as in this paper presented, even the depth of a crack can be estimated. The induced eddy current, due to its very small penetration depth in ferro-magnetic materials, flows around a surface crack, heating this selectively. The surface temperature is recorded during and after the short inductive heating pulse with an infrared camera. Using Fourier transformation the whole IR image sequence is evaluated and the phase image is processed to detect surface cracks. The level and the local distribution of the phase around a crack correspond to its depth. Analytical calculations were used to model the signal distribution around cracks with different depth and a relationship has been derived between the depth of a crack and its phase value. Additionally, also the influence of the heating pulse duration has been investigated. Samples with artificial and with natural cracks have been tested. Results are presented comparing the calculated and measured phase values depending on the crack depth. Keywords: inductive heating, eddy current, infrared

  5. Automated Induction Thermography of Generator Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldammer, M.; Mooshofer, H.; Rothenfusser, M.; Bass, J.; Vrana, J.

    2010-02-01

    Using Active Thermography defects such as cracks can be detected fast and reliably. Choosing from a wide range of excitation techniques the method can be adapted to a number of tasks in non-destructive evaluation. Induction thermography is ideally suited for testing metallic components for cracks at or close to the surface. In power generation a number of components are subjected to high loads and stresses—therefore defect detection is crucial for a safe operation of the engines. Apart from combustion turbines this also applies to generators: At regular inspection intervals even small cracks have to be detected to avoid crack growth and consequently failure of the component. As an imaging technique thermography allows for a fast 100% testing of the complete surface of all relevant parts. An automated setup increases the cost effectiveness of induction thermography significantly. Time needed to test a single part is reduced, the number of tested parts per shift is increased, and cost for testing is reduced significantly. In addition, automation guarantees a reliable testing procedure which detects all critical defects. We present how non-destructive testing can be automated using as an example an industrial application at the Siemens sector Energy, and a new induction thermography setup for generator components.

  6. NDT of railway components using induction thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netzelmann, U.; Walle, G.; Ehlen, A.; Lugin, S.; Finckbohner, M.; Bessert, S.

    2016-02-01

    Induction or eddy current thermography is used to detect surface cracks in ferritic steel. The technique is applied to detect surface cracks in rails from a moving test car. Cracks were detected at a train speed between 2 and 15 km/h. An automated demonstrator system for testing railway wheels after production is described. While the wheel is rotated, a robot guides the detection unit consisting of inductor and infrared camera over the surface.

  7. Airborne thermography of temperature patterns in sugar beet piles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D. G.; Bichsel, S.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the use of thermography for locating spoilage areas (chimneys) within storage piles and to subsequently use the information for the scheduling of their processing. Thermal-infrared quantitative scanner data were acquired initially on January 16, 1975, over the storage piles at Moorhead, Minnesota, both during the day and predawn. Photographic data were acquired during the day mission to evaluate the effect of uneven snow cover on the thermal emittance, and the predawn thermography was used to locate potential chimneys. The piles were examined the day prior for indications of spoilage areas, and the ground crew indicated that no spoilage areas were located using their existing methods. Nine spoilage areas were interpreted from the thermography. The piles were rechecked by ground methods three days following the flights. Six of the nine areas delineated by thermography were actual spoilage areas.

  8. Development of a Rapid Soil Water Content Detection Technique Using Active Infrared Thermal Methods for In-Field Applications

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Francesca; Pallottino, Federico; Costa, Corrado; Rimatori, Valentina; Giorgi, Stefano; Papetti, Patrizia; Menesatti, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of active infrared thermography and thermometry in combination with multivariate statistical partial least squares analysis as rapid soil water content detection techniques both in the laboratory and the field. Such techniques allow fast soil water content measurements helpful in both agricultural and environmental fields. These techniques, based on the theory of heat dissipation, were tested by directly measuring temperature dynamic variation of samples after heating. For the assessment of temperature dynamic variations data were collected during three intervals (3, 6 and 10 s). To account for the presence of specific heats differences between water and soil, the analyses were regulated using slopes to linearly describe their trends. For all analyses, the best model was achieved for a 10 s slope. Three different approaches were considered, two in the laboratory and one in the field. The first laboratory-based one was centred on active infrared thermography, considered measurement of temperature variation as independent variable and reported r = 0.74. The second laboratory–based one was focused on active infrared thermometry, added irradiation as independent variable and reported r = 0.76. The in-field experiment was performed by active infrared thermometry, heating bare soil by solar irradiance after exposure due to primary tillage. Some meteorological parameters were inserted as independent variables in the prediction model, which presented r = 0.61. In order to obtain more general and wide estimations in-field a Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis on three classes of percentage of soil water content was performed obtaining a high correct classification in the test (88.89%). The prediction error values were lower in the field with respect to laboratory analyses. Both techniques could be used in conjunction with a Geographic Information System for obtaining detailed information on soil

  9. Development of a rapid soil water content detection technique using active infrared thermal methods for in-field applications.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Francesca; Pallottino, Federico; Costa, Corrado; Rimatori, Valentina; Giorgi, Stefano; Papetti, Patrizia; Menesatti, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of active infrared thermography and thermometry in combination with multivariate statistical partial least squares analysis as rapid soil water content detection techniques both in the laboratory and the field. Such techniques allow fast soil water content measurements helpful in both agricultural and environmental fields. These techniques, based on the theory of heat dissipation, were tested by directly measuring temperature dynamic variation of samples after heating. For the assessment of temperature dynamic variations data were collected during three intervals (3, 6 and 10 s). To account for the presence of specific heats differences between water and soil, the analyses were regulated using slopes to linearly describe their trends. For all analyses, the best model was achieved for a 10 s slope. Three different approaches were considered, two in the laboratory and one in the field. The first laboratory-based one was centred on active infrared thermography, considered measurement of temperature variation as independent variable and reported r = 0.74. The second laboratory-based one was focused on active infrared thermometry, added irradiation as independent variable and reported r = 0.76. The in-field experiment was performed by active infrared thermometry, heating bare soil by solar irradiance after exposure due to primary tillage. Some meteorological parameters were inserted as independent variables in the prediction model, which presented r = 0.61. In order to obtain more general and wide estimations in-field a Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis on three classes of percentage of soil water content was performed obtaining a high correct classification in the test (88.89%). The prediction error values were lower in the field with respect to laboratory analyses. Both techniques could be used in conjunction with a Geographic Information System for obtaining detailed information on soil heterogeneity

  10. Wavelet-based subsurface defect characterization in pulsed phase thermography for non-destructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zauner, G.; Mayr, G.; Hendorfer, G.

    2009-02-01

    Active infrared thermography is a method for non-destructive testing (NDT) of materials and components. In pulsed thermography (PT), a brief and high intensity flash is used to heat the sample. The decay of the sample surface temperature is detected and recorded by an infrared camera. Any subsurface anomaly (e.g. inclusion, delamination, etc.) gives rise to a local temperature increase (thermal contrast) on the sample surface. Conventionally, in Pulsed Phase Thermography (PPT) the analysis of PT time series is done by means of Discrete Fourier Transform producing phase images which can suppress unwanted physical effects (due to surface emissivity variations or non-uniform heating). The drawback of the Fourier-based approach is the loss of temporal information, making quantitative inversion procedures tricky (e.g. defect depth measurements). In this paper the complex Morlet-Wavelet transform is used to preserve the time information of the signal and thus provides information about the depth of a subsurface defect. Additionally, we propose to use the according phase contrast value to derive supplementary information about the thermal reflection properties at the defect interface. This provides additional information (e.g. about the thermal mismatch factor between the specimen and the defect) making interpretation of PPT results easier and perhaps unequivocal.

  11. Clinical applications of computerized thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Computerized or digital, thermography is a rapidly growing diagnostic imaging modality. It has superseded contact thermography and analog imaging thermography which do not allow effective quantization. Medical applications of digital thermography can be classified in two groups: static and dynamic imaging. They can also be classified into macro thermography (resolution greater than 1 mm) and micro thermography (resolution less than 100 microns). Both modalities allow a thermal resolution of 0.1 C. The diagnostic power of images produced by any of these modalities can be augmented by the use of digital image enhancement and image recognition procedures. Computerized thermography has been applied in neurology, cardiovascular and plastic surgery, rehabilitation and sports medicine, psychiatry, dermatology and ophthalmology. Examples of these applications are shown and their scope and limitations are discussed.

  12. Thermography in undescended testes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berghoff, Ruben; Sarti, Fernando; Urrutia, Azucena; Renee, Marcela; Lluesma, Eliseo G.

    2001-03-01

    Are one of the pathologies more frequent in infant surgery - intra-abdominal, inguinal or ectopic. With actual methods of diagnosis some inguinal and none of the abdominal are detectable. Change of temperature is one of the elements to explain the detection in the maturity and development of the testes. Hormonal stimuli are used to obtain the increase in the development and descent of the testis. In this research we will test if thermography can be an effective technology for the diagnosis in the localization and morphology testicular. Another important feature will be to test if thermography may detect some of the stimulus testis with induction hormonal.

  13. 3D thermography imaging standardization technique for inflammation diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Xiangyang; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Siebert, J. Paul

    2005-01-01

    We develop a 3D thermography imaging standardization technique to allow quantitative data analysis. Medical Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging is very sensitive and reliable mean of graphically mapping and display skin surface temperature. It allows doctors to visualise in colour and quantify temperature changes in skin surface. The spectrum of colours indicates both hot and cold responses which may co-exist if the pain associate with an inflammatory focus excites an increase in sympathetic activity. However, due to thermograph provides only qualitative diagnosis information, it has not gained acceptance in the medical and veterinary communities as a necessary or effective tool in inflammation and tumor detection. Here, our technique is based on the combination of visual 3D imaging technique and thermal imaging technique, which maps the 2D thermography images on to 3D anatomical model. Then we rectify the 3D thermogram into a view independent thermogram and conform it a standard shape template. The combination of these imaging facilities allows the generation of combined 3D and thermal data from which thermal signatures can be quantified.

  14. CFRP sandwiched facesheets inspected by pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijuan; Huo, Yan; Cai, Liangxu; Huang, Zhenhua

    2010-10-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) has been always used in aerospace, Sandwiched structures composed by a honeycomb core between two multi-layer CFRP facesheets are very common on aerospace parts. As to the application of the CFRP sandwiched facesheets is extended, The demand for quality control of CFRP sandwiched composites is increasing, Infrared thermography is one of several non-destructive testing techniques which can be used for defect detection in aircraft materials such as carbon-fibre-reinforced composites. Infrared thermography can be potentially useful, as it is quick, real time, non-contact and can examine over a relatively large area in one inspection procedure. The technique is based on heating the sample surface with different heat sources and monitoring the surface temperature of the sample with an IR camera, any abnormal behavior of the surface temperature distribution indicates the subsurface defect. This kind of structure is normally affected by anomalies such as delaminations, disbonding, water ingressing to the core. in this paper, several different kinds of defects which are of various size and depth below the test surface are planted in the CFRP composites, the Teflon inserts between the plies in the facesheet represents the delaminations, the Teflon inserts between the inner facesheet and adhensive or between adhensive and core are simulated disbonding in the composites, they are all tested by pulsed thermography, meanwhile, these samples are also inspected by ultrasonic testing, compare with each characteristic and the results got by these two different methods, it shows that pulsed thermography is an effective nondestructive technique for inspecting CFRP composites.

  15. Applying Active Thermography in the Non-Destructive Investigation of Historical Objects/ Zastosowanie Termowizji Aktywnej Do Badań Nieniszczących Obiektów Zabytkowych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Henryk; Noszczyk, Paweł

    2015-06-01

    The paper pertains to the problem of historic building envelope investigation with the use of active thermography. Mainly emphasized is its application in the detection of different material inclusions in historic walls. Examples of active thermography in the reflective mode application and a description of the experimental investigation has been shown on a wall model with the inclusion of materials with significantly different thermal conductivity and heat capacity, i.e. styrofoam, steel and granite. Thermograms received for every kind of envelope are compared and analyzed. Finally, the summary and conclusion is shown along with the prospects of development and practical application of this kind of investigation in historic construction. Artykuł porusza zagadnienie wykorzystania termografii aktywnej w nieniszczących badaniach przegród budowlanych w obiektach zabytkowych. Opisane zostały potencjalne możliwości stosowania badań, takie jak: lokalizacja rodzaju zbrojenia w elementach żelbetowych, detekcja pustek powietrznych i przemurowań w przegrodach, określanie rodzaju struktury materiałowej zabytkowej przegrody lub identyfikacja ukrytych pod wartwą tynku lub farby malowideł ściennych. W pracy opisano przebieg doświadczenia z wykorzystaniem termografii aktywnej w trybie odbiciowym. W badanych modelach przegród, wewnętrzne wtrącenia materiałowe zostały wykonane ze styropianu XPS, stali oraz granitu. Otrzymane wyniki opisano za pomocą kontrastów temperaturowych (absolutny i standardowy) oraz zinterptretowano otrzymane termogramy. W podsumowaniu przedstawiono wnioski z przeprowadzonego doświadczenia. W artykule potwierdzono przydatność nieniszczących badań za pomocą termowizji aktywnej do detekcji przypowierzchniowych wtrąceń materiałowych.

  16. Laser lock-in thermography for fatigue crack detection in an uncoated metallic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yun-Kyu; Kim, Ji Min; Sohn, Hoon

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a noncontact laser lock-in thermography (LLT) technique for surface-breaking fatigue crack detection. LLT utilizes a modulated continuous wave (CW) laser as a heat source for lock-in thermography instead of commonly used flash and halogen lamps. LLT has following merits compared to conventional active thermography techniques: (1) the laser heat source can be precisely positioned at a long distance from a target structure thank to its directionality and low energy loss, (2) a large target structure can be inspected using a scanning laser heat source, (3) no special surface treatment is necessary to measure thermal wavefields and (4) background noises reflected from arbitrary surrounding heat sources can be eliminated. The LLT system is developed by integrating and synchronizing a modulated CW laser, galvanometer and infrared camera. Then, a holder exponent filter is proposed for crack identification, localization and quantification. Test results confirm that a surface-breaking fatigue crack on a steel plate is successfully evaluated using the proposed technique without any special surface treatment.

  17. Defect Detection in Composite Coatings by Computational Simulation Aided Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, R. M.; Souza, M. P. V.; Rebello, J. M. A.

    2010-02-01

    Thermography is based on the measurement of superficial temperature distribution of an object inspected subjected to tension, normally thermal heat. This measurement is performed with a thermographic camera that detects the infrared radiation emitted by every object. In this work thermograph was simulated by COMSOL software for optimize experimental parameters in composite material coatings inspection.

  18. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  19. Monolithic Active-Pixel Infrared Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fossum, Eric R.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Krabach, Timothy N.; Staller, Craig O.

    1995-01-01

    Monolithic arrays of active-pixel junction field-effect (JFET) devices made from InGaAs proposed for use as imaging sensors sensitive to light in visible and short-wavelength infrared parts of electromagnetic spectrum. Each pixel of such array comprises photodetector monolithically integrated with JFET output-amplifier circuit of source-follower type - structure similar to charge-coupled device (CCD). Sizes of instruments reduced because large cooling systems not needed.

  20. Computer Assisted Thermography And Its Application In Ovulation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. H.; Shah, A. V.

    1984-08-01

    Hardware and software of a computer-assisted image analyzing system used for infrared images in medical applications are discussed. The application of computer-assisted thermography (CAT) as a complementary diagnostic tool in centralized diagnostic management is proposed. The authors adopted 'Computer Assisted Thermography' to study physiological changes in the breasts related to the hormones characterizing the menstrual cycle of a woman. Based on clinical experi-ments followed by thermal image analysis, they suggest that 'differential skin temperature (DST)1 be measured to detect the fertility interval in the menstrual cycle of a woman.

  1. Breast cancer detection in rotational thermography images using texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Sheeja V.; Sasikala, M.; Bhavani Bharathi, G.; Jaipurkar, Sandeep D.

    2014-11-01

    Breast cancer is a major cause of mortality in young women in the developing countries. Early diagnosis is the key to improve survival rate in cancer patients. Breast thermography is a diagnostic procedure that non-invasively images the infrared emissions from breast surface to aid in the early detection of breast cancer. Due to limitations in imaging protocol, abnormality detection by conventional breast thermography, is often a challenging task. Rotational thermography is a novel technique developed in order to overcome the limitations of conventional breast thermography. This paper evaluates this technique's potential for automatic detection of breast abnormality, from the perspective of cold challenge. Texture features are extracted in the spatial domain, from rotational thermogram series, prior to and post the application of cold challenge. These features are fed to a support vector machine for automatic classification of normal and malignant breasts, resulting in a classification accuracy of 83.3%. Feature reduction has been performed by principal component analysis. As a novel attempt, the ability of this technique to locate the abnormality has been studied. The results of the study indicate that rotational thermography holds great potential as a screening tool for breast cancer detection.

  2. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process. PMID:27271632

  3. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-01-01

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process. PMID:27271632

  4. Investigation on choosing technical parameters for pulse thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huijuan

    2015-04-01

    Composite material connected by glue has gained popularity as a replacement for conventional materials and structures to reduce weight and improve strength in the aerospace industry, with the development of material science and structural mechanics. However, the adhesive bonding process is more susceptible to quality variations during manufacturing than traditional joining methods. The integrality, strength and rigidity of product would be broken by disbonding. Infrared thermography is one of several non-destructive testing techniques which can be used for defect detection in aircraft materials. Pulsed infrared thermography has been widely used in aerospace and mechanical manufacture industry because it can offer noncontact, quickly and visual examinations of disbonding defects. However the parameter choosing method is difficult to decide. Investigate the choosing technical parameters for pulse thermograpghy is more important to ensure the product quality and testing efficiency. In this paper, two kinds of defects which are of various size, shape and location below the test surface are planted in the honeycomb structure, they are all tested by pulsed thermography. This paper presents a study of single factor experimental research on damage sample in simulation was carried out. The impact of the power of light source, detection distance, and the wave band of thermography camera on detecting effect is studied. The select principle of technique is made, the principle supplied basis for selection of detecting parameters in real part testing.

  5. The Use of Infrared Thermography as a Rapid, Quantitative, and Noninvasive Method for Evaluation of Inflammation Response in Different Anatomical Regions of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Całkosiński, Ireneusz; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Rosińczuk, Joanna; Dudek, Krzysztof; Chrószcz, Aleksander; Fita, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Thermographic assessment of temperature distribution within the examined tissues allows a quick, noncontact, noninvasive measurement of their temperature. The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of digital infrared imaging in monitoring experimental inflammation of pleura (PL), lower lip (LL), and left paw (LP) and right paw (RP) of lower limbs in rats. Materials and Methods. The inflammatory reaction was induced by injection of 1% carrageenin solution into pleural cavity, lip, or paws. With the use of digital infrared imaging temperature measurement was conducted at 0 to 72 hours of the inflammatory reaction. Results. The temperature decrease was observed at the site of injection directly afterwards. Next, it was gradually increasing and it reached the maximum on the third day of the inflammatory reaction. Statistically significant changes were observed after 48-hour period in PL and LL regions, as well as after 72-hour period in LP and RP regions (P < 0.005). Conclusion. It was found that thermographic examination allows for indicating the presence of inflammatory reaction within examined tissues and determining the dynamics of this process. This method could be used as alternative procedure that allows using fewer animals for experiments. PMID:25834830

  6. Skin vasomotor hemiparesis followed by overactivity: characteristic thermography findings in a patient with Horner syndrome due to spinal cord infarction.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    We present a 21-year-old female with Horner syndrome due to spinal cord infarction. In this patient, infrared thermography revealed a hemibody skin temperature increase followed by excessive focal decreases, indicating skin vasomotor hemiparesis and overactivity. PMID:26811085

  7. High-resolution survey of buildings by lock-in IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolin, A.; Cadelano, G.; Ferrarini, G.; Bison, P.; Peron, F.; Maldague, X.

    2013-05-01

    Applications of Infrared Thermography in buildings surveys are not limited to the identification of the temperature distribution and heat losses on building envelopes. As it is well known from NDT testing in industrial applications, active IR thermographic methods such as heating-up/cooling-down or lock-in thermography improve the results in many investigations. In civil engineering these techniques have not been used widely. Mostly, thermography is used in a quasistatic manner. This paper illustrates a new approach to achieve, by the lock-in technique, an in depth view of the structure of the wall evidencing the presence of buried elements, interfaces and cracks. The idea is to take advantage of the periodic heating and cooling of earth surface due to the alternating of day and night. The corresponding thermal wave has a period equal to 24 hours that can probe the walls of buildings with a penetration depth of the order of some centimeters. The periodic temperature signal is analysed to extract amplitude and phase. It is expected that the phase image gives the indication of inhomogeneity buried in the wall structure. As a case study, the exterior surface of Palazzo Ducale in Venice is analysed and illustrated. In addition to IR images, visible electromagnetic band is considered to evaluate the strength of the solar radiation and the geometrical distortion. Indeed, the periodicity due to the Earth rotation is only approximately of 24 hours. The passing clouds or the possibility of rainy days can superimpose other heating or cooling frequencies to the main one. The Fourier analysis of the impinging radiation on the wall is performed. The façade of Palazzo Ducale is tiled with stone of two different colours and types. A final attempt to automatically classify the stone tiles in the visible and infrared images is conducted.

  8. Infrared ATR: a probe for cellular activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Martin, Laura E.; Alam, M. Kathleen; Haaland, David M.; Garrison, Kristen; Lyons, C. Richard; Hjelle, Brian

    2002-02-01

    We employ infrared spectroscopy (IR) with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) as a sampling technique to monitor live and dried RAW cells (a murine macrophage cell line) during activation with g-interferon and lipopolysaccharide. By comparing the spectra of activated cells at various time points to the spectra of healthy control cells, we identify spectral bands associated with nucleic acids that are markers for the cell activation process. These spectral changes are slight and can be complicated with the normal metabolic changes that occur within cells. We will discuss the use of data pretreatment strategies to accurately correct for the contribution of the buffer to the live cell spectra. We find the standard background correction method inadequate for concentrated solutions of cells. Data presented shows the severe effect incorrect background subtraction has on the cell spectra. We report a more accurate correction for phosphate buffer spectral contribution using an interactive subtraction of the buffer spectrum. We will show classification of dried control and activated macrophage cell spectra using partial-least squares analysis with multiplicative scatter correction.

  9. Infrared thermography and meridian-effect evidence and explanation in Bell's palsy patients treated by moxibustion at the Hegu (LI4) acupoint

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ling; Li, Gaobo; Yang, Yiling; Deng, Xiufang; Cai, Peisi

    2012-01-01

    Subjects with Bell's palsy and healthy individuals were treated with moxibustion thermal stimulation on the Hegu (LI4) acupoint; an infrared thermal imaging system was used to observe facial-temperature changes. Bell's palsy patients developed low or high temperatures at the affected side, with poor symmetry. Healthy people showed high temperatures on the forehead, medial angle of the eye, nasal ala and around the lips, but low temperatures on bilateral cheeks, thus forming a “T-type hot area” in the face, with good temperature symmetry. Moxibustion treatment for 11 minutes significantly improved high asymmetry in temperature in the faces of Bell's palsy patients. This evidence indicates that moxibustion treatment on Hegu enables increases in facial temperatures in healthy people and Bell's palsy patients, especially around the lips. Moxibustion stimulation at the Hegu not only improves the global circulation but also has specific effects on the lips in Bell's palsy patients, but the underlying mechanism needs further investigation. PMID:25745463

  10. Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, M.

    2013-11-01

    techniques such as attenuated total reflectance [6]. The two final papers deal with what seem to be wholly different scientific fields [7, 8]. One paper describes SOFIA, an aeroplane-based astronomical observatory covering the whole IR range [7], while the other represents a small review of the quite new topic of terahertz physics at the upper end of the IR spectral range, from around 30 µm to 3 mm wavelength, and its many applications in science and industry [8]. Although artificially separated, all these fields use similar kinds of detectors, similar kinds of IR sources and similar technologies, while the instruments use the same physical principles. We are convinced that the field of infrared physics will develop over the next decade in the same dynamic way as during the last, and this special issue may serve as starting point for regular submissions on the topic. At any rate, it shines a light on this fascinating and many-faceted subject, which started more than 200 years ago. References [1] Mangold K, Shaw J A and Vollmer M 2013 The physics of near-infrared photography Eur. J. Phys. 34 S51-71 [2] Vollmer M and Möllmann K-P 2013 Characterization of IR cameras in student labs Eur. J. Phys. 34 S73-90 [3] Ibarra-Castanedo C, Tarpani J R and Maldague X P V 2013 Nondestructive testing with thermography Eur. J. Phys. 34 S91-109 [4] Shaw J A and Nugent P W 2013 Physics principles in radiometric infrared imaging of clouds in the atmosphere Eur. J. Phys. 34 S111-21 [5] Möllmann K-P and Vollmer M 2013 Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in physics laboratory courses Eur. J. Phys. 34 S123-37 [6] Heise H M, Fritzsche J, Tkatsch H, Waag F, Karch K, Henze K, Delbeck S and Budde J 2013 Recent advances in mid- and near-infrared spectroscopy with applications for research and teaching, focusing on petrochemistry and biotechnology relevant products Eur. J. Phys. 34 S139-59 [7] Krabbe A, Mehlert D, Röser H-P and Scorza C 2013 SOFIA, an airborne observatory for infrared astronomy

  11. Active infrared thermographic testing with distance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, N.; Ando, H.; Kobayashi, C.; Yamada, H.

    2015-05-01

    In order to efficiently inspect very wide area of concrete structure wall, an infrared thermographic testing with a distance heating was developed in this study. The researched subjects were the following three; 1. Improvement of radiant heating efficiency, 2. Development of distance heating method and 3. Development of data analysis method against nonuniformity of a heating and/or a wall absorptivity. In this paper, we focus on the first issue. In order to investigate about combinations between the spectral emissivity of radiant heater and the spectral absorptivity of concrete, three different types of radiant heater, a near infrared type, a far infrared type and blackbody type, were used to heat concrete specimens. As a results, both a blackbody type and a far infrared type, e.g. a ceramics heater and a blackbody coated heater, can heat a concrete wall more efficiently than a near infrared type, e.g. a halogen lamp heater and a xenon lamp heater. This is because the spectral absorptivity of concrete is higher in a far infrared region than in a near infrared region. We find that the efficiency of the heating process may be improved by choosing a heater whose radiation is concentrated near wavelengths at which the structure to be heated exhibits maximal absorptivity. The efficiency of the concrete heating process may be easily improved simply by covering the surface of a near infrared heater with a blackbody surface coating to mimic the radiation characteristics of a blackbody.

  12. An investigation of dynamic failure events in steels using full field high-speed infrared thermography and high-speed photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guduru, Pradeep R.

    An infrared (IR) imaging system has been developed for measuring the temperature increase during the dynamic deformation of materials. The system consists of an 8 x 8 HgCdTe focal plane array, each with its own preamplifier. Outputs from all 64 signals are simultaneously acquired and held using a bank of track and hold amplifiers. An array of eight 8:1 multiplexers then routes the signals to eight 10MHz digitizers, acquiring data from each row of detectors in parallel. The maximum rate is one million frames per second. Crack tip temperature rise during dynamic deformation is known to alter the fracture mechanisms and consequently the fracture toughness of a material. However, no direct experimental measurements have ever been made to determine the same because of limited diagnostic tools. By transcending the existing experimental limitations, this investigation presents detailed, real time evolution of the transient crack tip temperature fields in two different steels (C300 and HY100 steels), using the 2-D high speed IR camera. The crack tip temperature rise at initiation in C300 steel was found to be about 55K. In case of HY100, which is a highly ductile steel, the crack tip temperature rise was above 200K and was seen to be a strong function of loading rate. HRR elastic-plastic singular field has been used to extract J integral evolution from the measured temperature field. An experimental investigation has been conducted to study the initiation and propagation characteristics of dynamic shear bands in C300 maraging steel. Pre-fatigued single edge notched specimens were impacted on the edge under the notch to produce shear dominated mixed mode stress fields. The optical technique of coherent gradient sensing (CGS) was employed to study the evolution of the mixed mode stress intensity factors. Simultaneously, a newly developed high speed IR camera was employed to obtain the temperature field evolution during the initiation and propagation of the shear bands. The

  13. Eddy current pulsed phase thermography and feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunze; Tian, GuiYun; Pan, Mengchun; Chen, Dixiang

    2013-08-01

    This letter proposed an eddy current pulsed phase thermography technique combing eddy current excitation, infrared imaging, and phase analysis. One steel sample is selected as the material under test to avoid the influence of skin depth, which provides subsurface defects with different depths. The experimental results show that this proposed method can eliminate non-uniform heating and improve defect detectability. Several features are extracted from differential phase spectra and the preliminary linear relationships are built to measure these subsurface defects' depth.

  14. Thermography in ocular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kawali, Ankush A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate ocular inflammatory and non-inflammatory conditions using commercially available thermal camera. Materials and Methods: A non-contact thermographic camera (FLIR P 620) was used to take thermal pictures of seven cases of ocular inflammation, two cases of non-inflammatory ocular pathology, and one healthy subject with mild refractive error only. Ocular inflammatory cases included five cases of scleritis, one case of postoperative anterior uveitis, and a case of meibomian gland dysfunction with keratitis (MGD-keratitis). Non-inflammatory conditions included a case of conjunctival benign reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (BRLH) and a case of central serous chorio-retinopathy. Thermal and non-thermal photographs were taken, and using analyzing software, the ocular surface temperature was calculated. Results: Patient with fresh episode of scleritis revealed high temperature. Eyes with MGD-keratitis depicted lower temperature in clinically more affected eye. Conjunctival BRLH showed a cold lesion on thermography at the site of involvement, in contrast to cases of scleritis with similar clinical presentation. Conclusion: Ocular thermal imaging is an underutilized diagnostic tool which can be used to distinguish inflammatory ocular conditions from non-inflammatory conditions. It can also be utilized in the evaluation of tear film in dry eye syndrome. Its applications should be further explored in uveitis and other ocular disorders. Dedicated “ocular thermographic” camera is today's need of the hour. PMID:24347863

  15. Thermography in Occlusive Cerebrovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mawdsley, C.; Samuel, E.; Sumerling, M. D.; Young, G. B.

    1968-01-01

    Cooling of the skin over the medial supraorbital region in 80% of patients who have an occlusion or severe stenosis of a carotid artery can be demonstrated by facial thermography. Minor stenotic lesions in the carotid arteries do not produce characteristic thermographic changes, while thermography is of no help in the diagnosis of vertebrobasilar arterial disease. Thermographic changes suggestive of carotid arterial lesions are found occasionally in patients whose angiograms are normal, owing to variations in the size of the frontal sinuses, or factors such as fever or inflammatory lesions. It is suggested that facial thermography is of value in the preliminary investigation of patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:5676953

  16. Thermography pattern analysis and separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin; Bai, Libing; Woo, W. L.; Tian, Guiyun

    2014-06-01

    Analysis of thermography spatial-transient patterns has considerable potential to enable automatic identification and quantification of defects in non-destructive testing and evaluation. This Letter proposes a non-negative pattern separation model for eddy current pulsed thermography to automatically extract important spatial and time patterns according to the transient thermal sequences without any pre-training or prior knowledge. In particular, the method is scale-invariant, such that large differences in surface emissivity, hot spots, and cool areas with dynamic range of thermal contrast can be extracted. Finally, an artificial slot in a steel sample with shining, black strip on the surface is tested to validate the proposed method.

  17. Inquiry-based Science Activities Using The Infrared Zoo and Infrared Yellowstone Resources at Cool Cosmos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daou, D.; Gauthier, A.

    2003-12-01

    Inquiry-based activities that utilize the Cool Cosmos image galleries have been designed and developed by K12 teachers enrolled in The Invisible Universe Online for Teachers course. The exploration activities integrate the Our Infrared World Gallery (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/our_ir_world_gallery.html) with either the Infrared Zoo gallery (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/ir_zoo/index.html) or the Infrared Yellowstone image http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/image_galleries/ir_yellowstone/index.html) and video (http://coolcosmos.ipac.caltech.edu/videos/ir_yellowstone/index.html) galleries. Complete instructor guides have been developed for the activities and will be presented by the authors in poster and CD form. Although the activities are written for middle and highschool learners, they can easily be adapted for college audiences. The Our Infrared World Gallery exploration helps learners think critically about visible light and infrared light as they compare sets of images (IR and visible light) of known objects. For example: by taking a regular photograph of a running faucet, can you tell if it is running hot or cold water? What new information does the IR image give you? The Infrared Zoo activities encourage learners to investigate the differences between warm and cold blooded animals by comparing sets of IR and visible images. In one activity, learners take on the role of a pit viper seeking prey in various desert and woodland settings. The main activities are extended into the real world by discussing and researching industrial, medical, and societal applications of infrared technologies. The Infrared Yellowstone lessons give learners a unique perspective on Yellowstone National Park and it's spectacular geologic and geothermal features. Infrared video technology is highlighted as learners make detailed observations about the visible and infrared views of the natural phenomena. The "Cool Cosmos" EPO activities are

  18. Activities of the CLIO infrared facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J.M.; Berset, J.M.; Chaput, R.

    1995-12-31

    The CLIO infrared FEL is operated since 1992. It is based on a 3 GHz RF linac. The laser beam time was about 2400 h in 1994, 1600 for users and 800 for FEL physics and machine optimisation. The beam time is limited mainly by user ability to work during nights.

  19. Applications of the thermography in the animal production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeiro, Carlos; Vizcaino, Elena; Morales, Joaquín.; Manso, Alberto; Díaz, Immaculada; Montalvo, Gema

    2015-04-01

    Infrared thermography is a working technology for over decades, which have been applied mainly in the buildings. We want to move this use to the animal production in order to help us to detect problems of energy efficiency in the facilities preventing, for example, the animal's welfare. In animal production it is necessary to provide a suitable microclimate according to age and production stage of the animals. This microclimate is achieved in the facilities through the environment modification artificially, providing an appropriate comfort for the animals. Many of the problems detected in farms are related to a poor environmental management and control. This is where infrared thermography becomes an essential diagnostic tool to detect failures in the facilities that will be related with health and performance of the animals. The use of this technology in energy audits for buildings, facilities, etc. is becoming more frequent, enabling the technician to easily detect and assess the temperature and energy losses, and it can be used as a support to draft reports and to transmit the situation to the owner in a visual format. In this way, both will be able to decide what improvements are required. Until now, there was not an appropriate technology with affordable prices and easy to manage enough in order to allow the use of the thermography like a routine tool for the diagnostic of these problems, but currently there are some solutions which are starting to appear on the market to meet the requirements needed by the industry.

  20. Potentialities of steady-state and transient thermography in breast tumour depth detection: A numerical study.

    PubMed

    Amri, Amina; Pulko, Susan Helen; Wilkinson, Anthony James

    2016-01-01

    Breast thermography still has inherent limitations that prevent it from being fully accepted as a breast screening modality in medicine. The main challenges of breast thermography are to reduce false positive results and to increase the sensitivity of a thermogram. Further, it is still difficult to obtain information about tumour parameters such as metabolic heat, tumour depth and diameter from a thermogram. However, infrared technology and image processing have advanced significantly and recent clinical studies have shown increased sensitivity of thermography in cancer diagnosis. The aim of this paper is to study numerically the possibilities of extracting information about the tumour depth from steady state thermography and transient thermography after cold stress with no need to use any specific inversion technique. Both methods are based on the numerical solution of Pennes bioheat equation for a simple three-dimensional breast model. The effectiveness of two approaches used for depth detection from steady state thermography is assessed. The effect of breast density on the steady state thermal contrast has also been studied. The use of a cold stress test and the recording of transient contrasts during rewarming were found to be potentially suitable for tumour depth detection during the rewarming process. Sensitivity to parameters such as cold stress temperature and cooling time is investigated using the numerical model and simulation results reveal two prominent depth-related characteristic times which do not strongly depend on the temperature of the cold stress or on the cooling period. PMID:26522612

  1. Thermography Applied to Interfacial Phenomena, Potentials and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, M.; Sefiane, K.

    Infrared (IR) thermography is a non-intrusive method for temperature measurement. Its ability to produce two-dimensional temperature images makes it a powerful tool for investigating systems exhibiting spatial variation of temperature. IR temperature measurements are almost always surface measurements; the technique has therefore found use in obtaining interfacial temperatures, primarily in heat and mass transfer investigations. The reasons for the technique's limited uptake likely stems from the requirement of accurate material emissivity data and the large number of potential sources of error. This chapter provides an overview of the underlying theory of radiative heat transfer. Key considerations and problems in the application of IR thermography are discussed with reference to some examples of recent successful applications.

  2. Using thermography for an obstruction of the lower lacrimal system.

    PubMed

    Machado, Marco Antonio de Campos; Silva, João Amaro Ferrari; Brioschi, Marcos Leal; Allemann, Norma

    2016-02-01

    Obstructions in the lacrimal pathways quite often require accurate and reliable image scanning for confirmation and documentation. Infrared thermal imaging, known as thermography, is a resource that complements diagnosis; it does not require touching the patient or applying contrast materials and has been used in various medical procedures for decades. However, there have been few studies in the literature about its use in ophthalmology. In this paper, the authors have presented a case of dacryocystitis where the obstruction of the lacrimal punctum was so acute that conventional dacryocystography could not be used. The authors have successfully reported the use of thermography as a complementary propaedeutic and will discuss the method they used. PMID:26840168

  3. Infrared Detector Activities at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Refaat, T. F.; Sulima, O. V.; Amzajerdian, F.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared detector development and characterization at NASA Langley Research Center will be reviewed. These detectors were intended for ground, airborne, and space borne remote sensing applications. Discussion will be focused on recently developed single-element infrared detector and future development of near-infrared focal plane arrays (FPA). The FPA will be applied to next generation space-based instruments. These activities are based on phototransistor and avalanche photodiode technologies, which offer high internal gain and relatively low noise-equivalent-power. These novel devices will improve the sensitivity of active remote sensing instruments while eliminating the need for a high power laser transmitter.

  4. Far-infrared activity and starburst galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belfort, P.; Mochkovitch, R.; Dennefeld, M.

    1987-01-01

    After the IRAS discovery of galaxies with large far-infrared to blue luminosity ratio, it has been proposed that an enhanced star formation could be the origin of the far-infrared emission through dust heating. Whether a simple photometric model is able to account for the FIR and optical properties of IRAS galaxies was investigated. The L sub IR/L sub B ratio, (B-V) color and H sub alpha equivalent width of normal spirals are well reproduced with smooth star formation histories. In the case of starburst galaxies, several theoretical diagrams allow us to estimate the burst strength and extinction. L sub IR/L sub B ratio up to 100 can be rather easily reached, whereas extreme values probably require IMF truncated at the low end.

  5. Glued structures inspection based on lock-in thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Laetitia; Autrique, Laurent

    2015-04-01

    Active thermography is a widely employed technique for parametric identification and non-destructive inspection. This attractive method is based on the observation of thermal waves propagation induced by a periodic heating. For nondestructive testing usual approaches are based on a global heating (a large surface of the inspected material is submitted to thermal excitation). In the following a local approach is investigated: the heated area is small (order of magnitude is one square centimeter) and lateral propagation is studied in order to reveal the defect in the sample. In fact, both modulus (heat wave amplitude) and phase lag (delay) of the measured periodic signal are modified by the defect neighborhood and the search for the most effective area leads to the defect localization. Several results are highlighted in this communication in order to investigate an automated procedure. Temperatures are measured by an infrared camera and analyses of modulus cartography are performed in order to estimate the defect location. In such an aim, the downhill simplex method is implemented in order to converge toward defect location. Illustrations are dedicated to glued structures (two plates separated by a thin glue interface) for which unknown defect is a lack of glue which can be considered as a bubble (air trapped between the lower and the upper plane surface). Automated method attractiveness is established in several configurations.

  6. Aerial thermography in archaeological prospection: Applications & processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Autumn Chrysantha

    Aerial thermography is one of the least utilized archaeological prospection methods, yet it has great potential for detecting anthropogenic anomalies. Thermal infrared radiation is absorbed and reemitted at varying rates by all objects on and within the ground depending upon their density, composition, and moisture content. If an area containing archaeological features is recorded at the moment when their thermal signatures most strongly contrast with that of the surrounding matrix, they can be visually identified in thermal images. Research conducted in the 1960s and 1970s established a few basic rules for conducting thermal survey, but the expense associated with the method deterred most archaeologists from using this technology. Subsequent research was infrequent and almost exclusively appeared in the form of case studies. However, as the current proliferation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and compact thermal cameras draws renewed attention to aerial thermography as an attractive and exciting form of survey, it is appropriate and necessary to reevaluate our approach. In this thesis I have taken a two-pronged approach. First, I built upon the groundwork of earlier researchers and created an experiment to explore the impact that different environmental and climatic conditions have on the success or failure of thermal imaging. I constructed a test site designed to mimic a range of archaeological features and imaged it under a variety of conditions to compare and contrast the results. Second, I explored a new method for processing thermal data that I hope will lead to a means of reducing noise and increasing the clarity of thermal images. This step was done as part of a case study so that the effectiveness of the processing method could be evaluated by comparison with the results of other geophysical surveys.

  7. Motor Neuron Activation in Peripheral Nerves Using Infrared Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, EJ; Tyler, DJ

    2014-01-01

    Objective Localized activation of peripheral axons may improve selectivity of peripheral nerve interfaces. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) employs localized delivery to activate neural tissue. This study investigated INS to determine whether localized delivery limited functionality in larger mammalian nerves. Approach The rabbit sciatic nerve was stimulated extraneurally with 1875 nm-wavelength infrared light, electrical stimulation, or a combination of both. Infrared-sensitive regions (ISR) of the nerve surface and electromyogram (EMG) recruitment of the Medial Gastrocnemius, Lateral Gastrocnemius, Soleus, and Tibialis Anterior were the primary output measures. Stimulation applied included infrared-only, electrical-only, and combined infrared and electrical. Main results 81% of nerves tested were sensitive to INS, with 1.7± 0.5 ISR detected per nerve. INS was selective to a single muscle within 81% of identified ISR. Activation energy threshold did not change significantly with stimulus power, but motor activation decreased significantly when radiant power was decreased. Maximum INS levels typically recruited up to 2–9% of any muscle. Combined infrared and electrical stimulation differed significantly from electrical recruitment in 7% of cases. Significance The observed selectivity of INS indicates it may be useful in augmenting rehabilitation, but significant challenges remain in increasing sensitivity and response magnitude to improve the functionality of INS. PMID:24310923

  8. Motor neuron activation in peripheral nerves using infrared neural stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, E. J.; Tyler, D. J.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Localized activation of peripheral axons may improve selectivity of peripheral nerve interfaces. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) employs localized delivery to activate neural tissue. This study investigated INS to determine whether localized delivery limited functionality in larger mammalian nerves. Approach. The rabbit sciatic nerve was stimulated extraneurally with 1875 nm wavelength infrared light, electrical stimulation, or a combination of both. Infrared-sensitive regions (ISR) of the nerve surface and electromyogram (EMG) recruitment of the Medial Gastrocnemius, Lateral Gastrocnemius, Soleus, and Tibialis Anterior were the primary output measures. Stimulation applied included infrared-only, electrical-only, and combined infrared and electrical. Main results. 81% of nerves tested were sensitive to INS, with 1.7 ± 0.5 ISR detected per nerve. INS was selective to a single muscle within 81% of identified ISR. Activation energy threshold did not change significantly with stimulus power, but motor activation decreased significantly when radiant power was decreased. Maximum INS levels typically recruited up to 2-9% of any muscle. Combined infrared and electrical stimulation differed significantly from electrical recruitment in 7% of cases. Significance. The observed selectivity of INS indicates that it may be useful in augmenting rehabilitation, but significant challenges remain in increasing sensitivity and response magnitude to improve the functionality of INS.

  9. Experimental developments towards an ITER thermography diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichle, R.; Brichard, B.; Escourbiac, F.; Gardarein, J. L.; Hernandez, D.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.; Serra, J. J.; Badie, J. M.; van Ierschot, S.; Jouve, M.; Martinez, S.; Ooms, H.; Pocheau, C.; Rauber, X.; Sans, J. L.; Scheer, E.; Berghmans, F.; Decréton, M.

    2007-06-01

    In the course of the development of a concept for a spectrally resolving thermography diagnostic for the ITER divertor using optical fibres experimental development work has been carried out in three different areas. Firstly ZrF4 fibres and hollow fibres (silica capillaries with internal AG/AgJ coating) were tested in a Co60 irradiation facility under γ irradiation up to doses of 5 kGy and 27 kGy, respectively. The ZrF4 fibres suffered more radiation induced degradation (>1 db/m) then the hollow fibres (0-0.4 db/m). Secondly multi-colour pyroreflectometry is being developed towards tokamak applicability. The emissivity and temperature of tungsten samples were measured in the range of 700-1500 °C. The angular working range for off normal observation of the method was 20-30°. The working distance of the method has been be increased from cm to the m range. Finally, encouraging preliminary results have been obtained concerning the application of pulsed and modulated active thermography.

  10. Active thermography for potato characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Sheng-Jen; Sun, Chih-Chen

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a semi-automated heating and scanning system and analytic method for potato characterization. Potatoes are heated using lamps in a heating chamber and then transferred on a movable fixture to an imaging chamber. A non-linear model was designed to predict which potatoes have excessive sugar defects and the model was evaluated with good results. Results from this research will benefit potato growers and manufacturers/producers of potato-based products such as chips and fries.

  11. Using radiation thermography and thermometry to evaluate crop water stress in soybean and cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of digital infrared thermography and thermometry to investigate unapparent but important field conditions (poor drainage, non-uniform irrigation, soil variability, or biotic infestations) offers a producer improved management tools to avoid yield declines or to deal with variability in crop ...

  12. Integration of infrared and optical imaging techniques for the nondestructive inspection of aeronautic parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, F.; Sfarra, S.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Paoletti, D.; Maldague, X.

    2015-05-01

    This work focuses in the implementation of infrared and optical imaging techniques for the inspection of aeronautics parts. To this aim, a helicopter blade with known defects is inspected with four different techniques: long pulse thermography, pulsed thermography, digital speckle photography (DSP) and holographic interferometry (HI). The first two techniques belongs to the group of infrared imaging techniques, which are based on the analysis of the infrared thermal patterns in order to detect internal anomalies in the material; whilst the last two (DSP and HI) corresponds to the optical imaging techniques which make use of visible light to measure the material response to an applied stress. Both techniques were applied using the active approach, i.e. an external stimulation is applied in order to produce a gradient in either, the thermal and/or displacement field of the material. The results are then compared in order to evaluate the advantages and limitations of each technique.

  13. Thermography and k-means clustering methods for anti-reflective coating film inspection: scratch and bubble defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xunfei; Wang, Hongjin; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen (Tony)

    2016-05-01

    Anti-reflective coating is widely used on telescopes, eyeglasses and screens to effectively enhance the transmission of light. However, the presence of defects such as bubbles or scratches lowers the usability and functionality of optical film. Optical cameras are often used for coating inspection, but their accuracy relies heavily on the illumination source, camera viewing angles and defect location. This paper describes an active thermography approach that can potentially overcome this issue. Eighteen scratch and bubble defects were located on AR film with dimensions ranging from 0.03mm to 4.4 mm. An infrared camera was used to capture thermal images of those defects over 65 seconds of heating. After the thermal images were acquired, time-domain analysis and space-domain analysis were conducted and k-means clustering methodology was used to highlight the defective area. Results suggest active thermography can be used to detect scratch defects with widths of 0.03mm to 4.40 mm and bubble defects with diameters ranging from 0.08 to 4 mm. For defects with dimensions larger than 0.4 mm, our algorithm can estimate the dimension with less than 15% bias. However, for defects with dimensions less than 0.4mm, the algorithm estimation error ranged from 68% to 900% due to camera resolution limitations. It should be noted that our algorithm can still distinguish a scratch defect with a width of less than one pixel. This study also suggests active thermography can detect scratch and bubble defects regardless of the location of the illumination source.

  14. Inspection of composite structures using line scanning thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ley, Obdulia; Butera, Manny; Godinez, Valery

    2012-06-01

    This work deals with the non destructive analysis of different composite parts and structures using Line Scanning Thermography (LST), a non-contact inspection method based in dynamic thermography. The LST technique provides a quick and efficient methodology to scan wide areas rapidly; the technique has been used on the inspection of composite propellers, sandwich panels, motor case tubes and wind turbine blades, among others. In LST a line heat source is used to thermally excite the surface under study while an infrared detector records the transient surface temperature variation of the heated region. Line Scanning Thermography (LST), has successfully been applied to determine the thickness of metallic plates and to assess boiler tube thinning. In this paper the LST protocols developed for the detection of sub-surface defects in different composite materials commonly used in aerospace applications, plates will be presented. In most cases the thermal images acquired using LST will be compared with ultrasonic c-scans. The fundamentals of LST will be discussed, as well as the limitations of this technique for NDT inspection.

  15. Active infrared materials for beam steering.

    SciTech Connect

    Brener, Igal; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Gin, Aaron V.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Miao, Xiaoyu; Barrick, Todd A.

    2010-10-01

    The mid-infrared (mid-IR, 3 {micro}m -12 {micro}m) is a highly desirable spectral range for imaging and environmental sensing. We propose to develop a new class of mid-IR devices, based on plasmonic and metamaterial concepts, that are dynamically controlled by tunable semiconductor plasma resonances. It is well known that any material resonance (phonons, excitons, electron plasma) impacts dielectric properties; our primary challenge is to implement the tuning of a semiconductor plasma resonance with a voltage bias. We have demonstrated passive tuning of both plasmonic and metamaterial structures in the mid-IR using semiconductors plasmas. In the mid-IR, semiconductor carrier densities on the order of 5E17cm{sup -3} to 2E18cm{sup -3} are desirable for tuning effects. Gate control of carrier densities at the high end of this range is at or near the limit of what has been demonstrated in literature for transistor style devices. Combined with the fact that we are exploiting the optical properties of the device layers, rather than electrical, we are entering into interesting territory that has not been significantly explored to date.

  16. Inductive pulsed phase thermography for reducing or enlarging the effect of surface emissivity variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruizhen; He, Yunze; Gao, Bin; Tian, Gui Yun

    2014-11-01

    Emissivity variation introduces illusory temperature inhomogeneity and results in false alarms in infrared thermography, thus, it is important to separate the influence of surface emissivity variation. This letter experimentally demonstrates the advantages of phase information to reduce or enlarge the effect of surface emissivity variation with inductive pulsed phase thermography, where inductive excitation is emissivity-independent and avoids the effect of emissivity variation in heating process. The directly heated area and the indirectly heated area are divided in the phasegrams. The emissivity variation is removed or enlarged perfectly at the specific frequency and defect detectability is improved remarkably.

  17. Thermography for estimating near-surface soil moisture under developing crop canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heilman, J. L.; Moore, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Previous investigations of thermal infrared techniques using remote sensors (thermography) for estimating soil water content have been limited primarily to bare soil. Ground-based and aircraft investigations were conducted to evaluate the potential for extending the thermography approach to developing crop canopies. A significant exponential relationship was found between the volumetric soil water content in the 0-4 cm soil layer and the diurnal difference between surface soil temperature measured at 0230 and 1330 LST (satellite overpass times of NASA's Heat Capacity Mapping Mission - HCMM). Surface soil temperatures were estimated using minimum air temperature, percent cover of the canopy and remote measurements of canopy temperature. Results of the investigation demonstrated that thermography can potentially be used to estimate soil temperature and soil moisture throughout a complete growing season for a number of different crops and soils.

  18. Human suspicious activity recognition in thermal infrared video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossen, Jakir; Jacobs, Eddie; Chowdhury, Fahmida K.

    2014-10-01

    Detecting suspicious behaviors is important for surveillance and monitoring systems. In this paper, we investigate suspicious activity detection in thermal infrared imagery, where human motion can be easily detected from the background regardless of the lighting conditions and colors of the human clothing and surfaces. We use locally adaptive regression kernels (LARK) as patch descriptors, which capture the underlying local structure of the data exceedingly well, even in the presence of significant distortions. Patch descriptors are generated for each query patch and for each database patch. A statistical approach is used to match the query activity with the database to make the decision of suspicious activity. Human activity videos in different condition such as, walking, running, carrying a gun, crawling, and carrying backpack in different terrains were acquired using thermal infrared camera. These videos are used for training and performance evaluation of the algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed approach achieves good performance in suspicious activity recognition.

  19. Infrared Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    United Scanning Technologies, Inc.'s Infrared thermography is a relatively new noncontact, nondestructive inspection and testing tool which makes temperatures visible to the human eye. Infrared scanning devices produce images that show, by color or black and white shading differences, heat losses through damaged or inadequately insulated walls or roofs. The MISS Aeroscan services are designed to take the guesswork out of industrial roof maintenance and provide companies big savings by identifying the location of moisture damage from roof leaks, effectively targeting maintenance attention.

  20. ENSEMBLE VARIABILITY OF NEAR-INFRARED-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzuma, S.; Yamaoka, H. E-mail: yamaoka@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2012-03-01

    We present the properties of the ensemble variability V for nearly 5000 near-infrared active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the catalog of Quasars and Active Galactic Nuclei (13th Edition) and the SDSS-DR7 quasar catalog. From three near-infrared point source catalogs, namely, Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), Deep Near Infrared Survey (DENIS), and UKIDSS/LAS catalogs, we extract 2MASS-DENIS and 2MASS-UKIDSS counterparts for cataloged AGNs by cross-identification between catalogs. We further select variable AGNs based on an optimal criterion for selecting the variable sources. The sample objects are divided into subsets according to whether near-infrared light originates by optical emission or by near-infrared emission in the rest frame; and we examine the correlations of the ensemble variability with the rest-frame wavelength, redshift, luminosity, and rest-frame time lag. In addition, we also examine the correlations of variability amplitude with optical variability, radio intensity, and radio-to-optical flux ratio. The rest-frame optical variability of our samples shows negative correlations with luminosity and positive correlations with rest-frame time lag (i.e., the structure function, SF), and this result is consistent with previous analyses. However, no well-known negative correlation exists between the rest-frame wavelength and optical variability. This inconsistency might be due to a biased sampling of high-redshift AGNs. Near-infrared variability in the rest frame is anticorrelated with the rest-frame wavelength, which is consistent with previous suggestions. However, correlations of near-infrared variability with luminosity and rest-frame time lag are the opposite of these correlations of the optical variability; that is, the near-infrared variability is positively correlated with luminosity but negatively correlated with the rest-frame time lag. Because these trends are qualitatively consistent with the properties of radio-loud quasars reported

  1. Hidden heterogeneous materials recognition in pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Zhi; Tao, Ning; Feng, Lichun; Li, Yue; Zhang, Cunlin

    2012-05-01

    Pulsed thermography has been proven to effectively identify fluid ingress in aerospace honeycomb parts while inspecting large areas in a fast manner. Water, hydraulic oil and excess glue between skin and core may have similar appearance in the infrared image sequences, it is useful to detect what kind of ingress it is. In this study, a simple structure was used to simulate the fluid ingress in a honeycomb part, a 20mm thick steel slab was machined four 1.1mm depth and four 2mm depth circular flat-bottom holes with 20mm diameter at the same side. All holes were filled with different materials: water, oil, air and wax to simulate fluid ingress and excess glue. An algorithm was proposed to first find each hole based on fundamental imaging processing technologies, and then it is based on temporal thermal diffusive properties to automatically recognize what kind of fluid ingress it is in each hole. It was verified with the experimental results of different quantities of fluid ingress and several different flash power levels.

  2. Distance makes the difference in thermography for ecological studies.

    PubMed

    Faye, E; Dangles, O; Pincebourde, S

    2016-02-01

    Surface temperature drives many ecological processes and infrared thermography is widely used by ecologists to measure the thermal heterogeneity of different species' habitats. However, the potential bias in temperature readings caused by distance between the surface to be measured and the camera is still poorly acknowledged. We examined the effect of distance from 0.3 to 80m on a variety of thermal metrics (mean temperature, standard deviation, patch richness and aggregation) under various weather conditions and for different structural complexity of the studied surface types (various surfaces with vegetation). We found that distance is a key modifier of the temperature measured by a thermal infrared camera. A non-linear relationship between distance and mean temperature, standard deviation and patch richness led to a rapid under-estimation of the thermal metrics within the first 20m and then only a slight decrease between 20 and 80m from the object. Solar radiation also enhanced the bias with increasing distance. Therefore, surface temperatures were under-estimated as distance increased and thermal mosaics were homogenized at long distances with a much stronger bias in the warmer than the colder parts of the distributions. The under-estimation of thermal metrics due to distance was explained by atmospheric composition and the pixel size effect. The structural complexity of the surface had little effect on the surface temperature bias. Finally, we provide general guidelines for ecologists to minimize inaccuracies caused by distance from the studied surface in thermography. PMID:26857971

  3. Development of a non-contact screening system for rapid medical inspection at a quarantine depot using a laser Doppler blood-flow meter, microwave radar and infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Suzuki, S; Ujikawa, K; Usui, T; Gotoh, S; Sugamata, M; Badarch, Z; Abe, S

    2009-01-01

    In order to conduct fast screening of passengers with infections such as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or pandemic influenza at a quarantine depot, we developed a non-contact screening system with a self-produced program to conduct a human screening within five seconds, via a linear discriminant function from non-contact derived variables, i.e. palmer pulse derived from a laser Doppler blood-flow meter, respiration rate determined by a 10-GHz microwave radar, and facial temperature measured by a thermography. The system evaluation was conducted on seven healthy male subjects (23+1 years). In order to achieve a pseudo-infection condition, the subjects maintained an ergo-meter exercise load (100 W, 10 minutes). Before (normal condition) and after (pseudo-infection condition) exercise, a significant linear discriminant function (p50.001) was determined to distinguish the pseudo-infection condition from the normal condition (Mahalanobis D-square 1/4 20.3, classification error rate55%). The proposed system appears promising for future application in fast screening of infection at a quarantine depot. PMID:19440915

  4. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B; Chernov, Mykyta M; Chen, Brenda R; Grosberg, Lauren E; Jansen, E Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain. PMID:24674600

  5. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B.; Chernov, Mykyta M.; Chen, Brenda R.; Grosberg, Lauren E.; Jansen, E. Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Summary Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain. PMID:24674600

  6. Reliable aerial thermography for energy conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jack, J. R.; Bowman, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    A method for energy conservation, the aerial thermography survey, is discussed. It locates sources of energy losses and wasteful energy management practices. An operational map is presented for clear sky conditions. The map outlines the key environmental conditions conductive to obtaining reliable aerial thermography. The map is developed from defined visual and heat loss discrimination criteria which are quantized based on flat roof heat transfer calculations.

  7. Trends in quantitative aerial thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Schott, J.R.; Wilkinson, E.P.

    1983-06-01

    Recent improvements in aerial thermographic techniques, particularly in achievable spatial resolution and noise equivalent temperature variation, have enabled the use of thermography in a more objective fashion. Interpretation of the information contained in thermograms has also been improved through the use of certain techniques accounting for roof material type (emissivity), background effects, and atmospheric variables. With current methods, roof surface temperature from aerial imagery can be measured to within 1.8/sup 0/F (1.0/sup 0/C) of the actual temperature. These advances in thermogram analysis have opened the door for potential direct measurement of rooftop heat-loss levels from thermogram data. Ultimately, it is felt that this type of information would make it feasible to direct intensive energy-conservation efforts toward a smaller population, where the need and cost benefits will be the greatest.

  8. On-orbit Passive Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Patricia A.; Winfree, William P.; Cramer, K. Elliott

    2008-01-01

    On July 12, 2006, British-born astronaut Piers Sellers became the first person to conduct thermal nondestructive evaluation experiments in space, demonstrating the feasibility of a new tool for detecting damage to the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) structures of the Shuttle. This new tool was an EVA (Extravehicular Activity, or spacewalk) compatible infrared camera developed by NASA engineers. Data was collected both on the wing leading edge of the Orbiter and on pre-damaged samples mounted in the Shuttle s cargo bay. A total of 10 infrared movies were collected during the EVA totaling over 250 megabytes of data. Images were downloaded from the orbiting Shuttle to Johnson Space Center for analysis and processing. Results are shown to be comparable to ground-based thermal inspections performed in the laboratory with the same type of camera and simulated solar heating. The EVA camera system detected flat-bottom holes as small as 2.54cm in diameter with 50% material loss from the back (hidden) surface in RCC during this first test of the EVA IR Camera. Data for the time history of the specimen temperature and the capability of the inspection system for imaging impact damage are presented.

  9. Analysis of signal processing techniques in pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Fernando; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Maldague, Xavier; de Paulo Nicolau, Vicente

    2013-05-01

    Pulsed Thermography (PT) is one of the most widely used approaches for the inspection of composites materials, being its main attraction the deployment in transient regime. However, due to the physical phenomena involved during the inspection, the signals acquired by the infrared camera are nearly always affected by external reflections and local emissivity variations. Furthermore, non-uniform heating at the surface and thermal losses at the edges of the material also represent constraints in the detection capability. For this reason, the thermographics signals should be processed in order to improve - qualitatively and quantitatively - the quality of the thermal images. Signal processing constitutes an important step in the chain of thermal image analysis, especially when defects characterization is required. Several of the signals processing techniques employed nowadays are based on the one-dimensional solution of Fourier's law of heat conduction. This investigation brings into discussion the three-most used techniques based on the 1D Fourier's law: Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR), Differential Absolute Contrast (DAC) and Pulsed Phase Thermography (PPT), applied on carbon fiber laminated composites. It is of special interest to determine the detection capabilities of each technique, allowing in this way more reliable results when performing an inspection by PT.

  10. A combined approach for using thermography for the detection of diabetes mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Bob

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents work done to develop an early diagnosis and monitoring method-encompassing thermography for the detection of Diabetes Mellitus. The early detection method involves fusion of images from infrared cameras, ultrasound devices, a 3D camera and a dermatascope. The project is to develop a novel system that could be easily used by physicians to allow for early intervention, and the paper highlights the approach taken by the Skindetector project.

  11. Infrared microthermography of microfabricated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C. A.; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2007-06-01

    We report a new experimental apparatus for infrared microthermography applicable to a wide class of samples including semitransparent ones and perforated devices. This setup is particularly well suited for the thermography of microfabricated devices. Traditionally, temperature calibration is performed using calibration hot plates, but this is not applicable to transmissive samples. In this work a custom designed miniature calibration oven in conjunction with spatial filtering is used to obtain accurate static and transient temperature maps of actively heated devices. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. Calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometer arrays can be a suitable detector choice in certain radiometric applications. As an example, we apply this method in the analysis of temperature profiles of an actively heated microfabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a perforated membrane and is used in trace detection of illicit substances.

  12. Infrared microthermography of microfabricated devices

    SciTech Connect

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C. A.; Stepnowski, Stanley V.; McGill, R. Andrew

    2007-06-15

    We report a new experimental apparatus for infrared microthermography applicable to a wide class of samples including semitransparent ones and perforated devices. This setup is particularly well suited for the thermography of microfabricated devices. Traditionally, temperature calibration is performed using calibration hot plates, but this is not applicable to transmissive samples. In this work a custom designed miniature calibration oven in conjunction with spatial filtering is used to obtain accurate static and transient temperature maps of actively heated devices. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. Calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometer arrays can be a suitable detector choice in certain radiometric applications. As an example, we apply this method in the analysis of temperature profiles of an actively heated microfabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a perforated membrane and is used in trace detection of illicit substances.

  13. Infrared microthermography of microfabricated devices.

    PubMed

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, C A; Stepnowski, Stanley V; McGill, R Andrew

    2007-06-01

    We report a new experimental apparatus for infrared microthermography applicable to a wide class of samples including semitransparent ones and perforated devices. This setup is particularly well suited for the thermography of microfabricated devices. Traditionally, temperature calibration is performed using calibration hot plates, but this is not applicable to transmissive samples. In this work a custom designed miniature calibration oven in conjunction with spatial filtering is used to obtain accurate static and transient temperature maps of actively heated devices. The procedure does not require prior knowledge of the emissivity. Calibration and image processing algorithms are discussed and analyzed. We show that relatively inexpensive uncooled bolometer arrays can be a suitable detector choice in certain radiometric applications. As an example, we apply this method in the analysis of temperature profiles of an actively heated microfabricated preconcentrator device that incorporates a perforated membrane and is used in trace detection of illicit substances. PMID:17614631

  14. Porosity Measurement in Laminated Composites by Thermography and FEA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip; Russell, Samuel S.; Walker, James L.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the correlation between the through-thickness thermal diffusivity and the porosity of composites. Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to determine the transient thermal response of composites that were subjected to laser heating. A series of finite element models were built and thermal responses for isotropic and orthographic materials with various thermal diffusivities subjected to different heating conditions were investigated. Experiments were conducted to verify the models and to estimate the unknown parameters such as the amount of heat flux. The analysis and experimental results show good correlation between thermal diffusivity and porosity in the composite materials. They also show that both laser and flash heating can be used effectively to obtain thermal diffusivity. The current infrared thermography system is developed for use with flash heating. The laser heating models and the FEA results can provide useful tools to develop practical thermal diffusivity measurement scheme using laser heat.

  15. IR thermography for dynamic detection of laminar-turbulent transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Bernhard; Filius, Adrian; Tropea, Cameron; Grundmann, Sven

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates the potential of infrared (IR) thermography for the dynamic detection of laminar-turbulent transition. The experiments are conducted on a flat plate at velocities of 8-14 m/s, and the transition of the laminar boundary layer to turbulence is forced by a disturbance source which is turned on and off with frequencies up to 10 Hz. Three different heating techniques are used to apply the required difference between fluid and structure temperature: a heated aluminum structure is used as an internal structure heating technique, a conductive paint acts as a surface bounded heater, while an IR heater serves as an example for an external heating technique. For comparison of all heating techniques, a normalization is introduced and the frequency response of the measured IR camera signal is analyzed. Finally, the different heating techniques are compared and consequences for the design of experiments on laminar-turbulent transition are discussed.

  16. Usefulness of high-resolution thermography in fault diagnosis of fluid power components and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietola, Matti; Varrio, Jukka P.

    1996-03-01

    Infrared thermography has been used routinely in industrial applications for quite a long time. For example, the condition of electric power lines, district heating networks, electric circuits and components, heat exchangers, pipes and its insulations, cooling towers, and various machines and motors is monitored using infrared imaging techniques. Also the usage of this technology in predictive maintenance has proved successful, mainly because of effective computers and tailored softwares available. However, the usage of thermal sensing technique in fluid power systems and components (or other automation systems in fact) is not as common. One apparent reason is that a fluid power circuit is not (and nor is a hydraulic component) an easy object of making thermal image analyses. Especially the high flow speed, fast pressure changes and fast movements make the diagnosis complex and difficult. Also the number of people whose knowledge is good both in thermography and fluid power systems is not significant. In this paper a preliminary study of how thermography could be used in the condition monitoring, fault diagnosis and predictive maintenance of fluid power components and systems is presented. The shortages and limitations of thermal imaging in the condition monitoring of fluid power are also discussed. Among many other cases the following is discussed: (1) pressure valves (leakage, wrong settings), (2) check valves (leakage); (3) cylinders (leakage and other damages); (4) directional valves and valve assemblies; (5) pumps and motors (leakage in piston or control plate, bearings). The biggest advantage of using thermography in the predictive maintenance and fault diagnosis of fluid power components and systems could be achieved in the process industry and perhaps in the commissioning of fluid power systems in the industry. In the industry the predictive maintenance of fluid power with the aid of an infrared camera could be done as part of a condition monitoring of

  17. Biological aerosol detection with combined passive-active infrared measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifarraguerri, Agustin I.; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; Ben-David, Avishai

    2004-12-01

    A data collection experiment was performed in November of 2003 to measure aerosol signatures using multiple sensors, all operating in the long-wave infrared. The purpose of this data collection experiment was to determine whether combining passive hyperspectral and LIDAR measurements can substantially improve biological aerosol detection performance. Controlled releases of dry aerosols, including road dust, egg albumin and two strains of Bacillus Subtilis var. Niger (BG) spores were performed using the ECBC/ARTEMIS open-path aerosol test chamber located in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD. The chamber provides a ~ 20' path without optical windows. Ground truth devices included 3 aerodynamic particle sizers, an optical particle size spectrometer, 6 nephelometers and a high-volume particle sampler. Two sensors were used to make measurements during the test: the AIRIS long-wave infrared imaging spectrometer and the FAL CO2 LIDAR. The AIRIS and FAL data sets were analyzed for detection performance relative to the ground truth. In this paper we present experimental results from the individual sensors as well as results from passive-active sensor fusion. The sensor performance is presented in the form of receiver operating characteristic curves.

  18. Active infrared systems: possible roles in ballistic missile defense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paleologue, A.

    2006-05-01

    Active Infra-Red (IR) systems developed in the past ten years are now available for missile defense applications. The main purpose of this paper is to describe the advantages an active IR system could offer to a ballistic missile defense (BMD). The active IR system considered in this paper is a LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) system. Historically, the Lincoln Laboratory in the USA began using lasers in the early 1960's. The initial applications included the development of a LIDAR system enabling the measurement of the distance between the earth and the moon in 1962. Satellite tracking using LIDAR began early in 1973. Today, technological developments, with the miniaturization of systems and increased performance levels, have enabled new ambitious projects such as the Discrimination Interceptor Technology Program (DITP) program started in 1998 and the use of LIDAR to help in the discrimination of future exo-atmospheric interceptors within the framework of BMD. The first part of this paper presents the possible contribution of LIDAR to BMD: the main roles, objectives, and strategic advantages. The second part gives a brief overview of the technological features of a generic LIDAR instrument, rapidly addressing laser sources, detectors, optics and electronics. Finally, a modeling of an IR LIDAR system, limited solely to direct detection, and an estimation of performance levels will be presented. A list of possible IR active discriminators will be then presented on the basis of the previous analysis and proposed as new constraints in the design of discrete objects.

  19. Fabrication of 0.0075-Scale Orbiter Phosphor Thermography Test Models for Shuttle RTF Aeroheating Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Powers, Michael A.; Griffith, Mark S.; Hopins, John W.; Veneris, Pete H.; Kuykendoll, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    This report details the techniques and fidelity associated with aeroheating models constructed in support of the return-to-flight boundary layer transition (BLT) activity for STS-114. This report provides technical descriptions of the methods, materials, and equipment used, as well as the surface quality results obtained with the cast ceramic phosphor thermography models.

  20. Quantitative analysis of pulse thermography data for degradation assessment of historical buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Maio, Rosa; Piegari, Ester; Mancini, Cecilia; Chiapparino, Antonella

    2015-06-01

    In the last decades, infrared thermography has been successfully applied to various materials and structures for the assessment of their state of conservation and planning suitable restoration works. To this aim, mathematical models are required to characterize thermal anomaly sources, such as detachments, water infiltration and material decomposition processes. In this paper, an algorithm based on the conservative finite difference method is used to analyse pulse thermography data acquired on an ancient building in the Pompeii archaeological site (Naples, Italy). The numerical study is applied to both broad and narrow elongated thermal anomalies. In particular, from the comparison between simulated and experimental thermal decays, the plaster thickness was characterized in terms of thermal properties and areas of possible future detachments, and moisture infiltration depths were identified.

  1. Ultraviolet excitation for thermography inspection of surface cracks in welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnemalm, Anna; Broberg, Patrik; Henrikson, Per

    2014-10-01

    Infrared thermography is a non-contact and full field inspection method which has proven to be suitable for automatic surface crack detection. For automatic analysis of the inspection results, a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is required. In this paper an alternative excitation method, using ultraviolet (UV) illumination, is presented and evaluated. Artificial surface defects, so-called notches, in a titanium plate are detected both in the weld seam and in the heat affected zone. Notches with a size from 80 μm in width and 250 μm in length are detected. The SNR using UV illumination is compared with that using flash lamp excitation. The results show that UV illumination using a mercury lamp is a good alternative as excitation source for thermography when detecting surface cracks. To validate the excitation method, results from real surface cracks are included.

  2. Tone Burst Eddy-Current Thermography (tbet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ch. N. Kiran; Krishnamurthy, C. V.; Maxfield, Bruce W.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2008-02-01

    This paper reports on a Tone Burst Eddycurrent Thermography (TBET) technique that uses short-time bursts of eddy-currents induced in conducting media to generate local heating inside the material. The transient diffusion of the heat inside the material, induced by pulsed/short-time induction heating, is imaged by measuring the transient temperature profiles on the surface of the material. The presence and characteristics of the defects inside the materials changes the surface temperature transients and thus can be used for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of conducting materials. Axisymmetric numerical models of the conventional transient thermography technique are used to benchmark the TBET technique. From the temperature profile data, temperature contrast information is obtained for the different defect depths. Temperature contrast data obtained for TBET, in this process, was compared with that obtained from conventional transient thermography data. It was found that the frequency of the eddy-current and, consequently, the skin-depth of the induced field play an important role in the effective utilization of this technique. Simulation details and the experimental results are presented in the paper. Possible advantages of TBET over conventional flash thermography are also discussed and supported by experimental data.

  3. Transmission thermography for inspecting the busbar insulation layer in thermonuclear experimental reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dapeng; Zhang, Guang; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-11-01

    In Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, Superconducting Busbar is used for current transmission between magnet coils and current leads. The work temperature of the Busbar is about 4K because of liquid helium via inside. The large temperature grad from 300K to 4K could lead to the defects and damages occur on the insulation layer, which is made of glass fiber and polyimide and has a big different thermal expansion coefficient compared with the metal inner cylinder. This paper aims at developing an infrared transmission non-destructive evaluation (NDE) method for inspecting the insulation layer of Superconducting Busbar; theoretical model of transient heat conduction under a continuous inner heat source for cylindrical structure is described in the paper; a Busbar specimen which is designed with three delamination defects of different depths is heated inside by pouring hot water and monitored by an infrared detector located outside. Results demonstrate excellent detection performance for delamination defects in the insulation layer by using transmission thermography, all of the three defects of different depths can be visualized clearly in the thermal images, and the deeper defect has a better signal contrast, which is also shown in the temperature difference between defects and sound area vs. time curves. The results of light pulse thermography is also shown as a comparison, and it is found that the thermal images obtained by the transmission thermography has a much better signal contrast than that of the pulse thermography. In order to verify the experiments, finite element method is applied to simulate the heat conduction in the Busbar under the continuous inside heating, and it is found that the simulated temperature vs. time and simulated temperature difference vs. time curves are basically coincident with the experimental results. In addition, the possibility of in-service inspection for Busbar insulation layer in ITER item is discussed.

  4. Medical applications of model-based dynamic thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Antoni; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Ruminski, Jacek; Hryciuk, Marcin; Renkielska, Alicja; Grudzinski, Jacek; Siebert, Janusz; Jagielak, Dariusz; Rogowski, Jan; Roszak, Krzysztof; Stojek, Wojciech

    2001-03-01

    The proposal to use active thermography in medical diagnostics is promising in some applications concerning investigation of directly accessible parts of the human body. The combination of dynamic thermograms with thermal models of investigated structures gives attractive possibility to make internal structure reconstruction basing on different thermal properties of biological tissues. Measurements of temperature distribution synchronized with external light excitation allow registration of dynamic changes of local temperature dependent on heat exchange conditions. Preliminary results of active thermography applications in medicine are discussed. For skin and under- skin tissues an equivalent thermal model may be determined. For the assumed model its effective parameters may be reconstructed basing on the results of transient thermal processes. For known thermal diffusivity and conductivity of specific tissues the local thickness of a two or three layer structure may be calculated. Results of some medical cases as well as reference data of in vivo study on animals are presented. The method was also applied to evaluate the state of the human heart during the open chest cardio-surgical interventions. Reference studies of evoked heart infarct in pigs are referred, too. We see the proposed new in medical applications technique as a promising diagnostic tool. It is a fully non-invasive, clean, handy, fast and affordable method giving not only qualitative view of investigated surfaces but also an objective quantitative measurement result, accurate enough for many applications including fast screening of affected tissues.

  5. Near Infrared Spectroscopy of Active Galactic Nuclei Using FSpec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frechem, Joshua; Pessev, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the 2.3 meter Bok telescope on Kitt Peak and the FRANKENSpec spectrograph, we aim to investigate the circumnuclear region of over twenty active galaxies in the J, H, and K passbands in order to obtain high signal to noise spectra with reasonable investment of observing time. The sample is selected to cover a wide range of AGN types of activity in luminous nearby galaxies. The primary goal of this project was to sort and process the 9,000+ spectra, including dark subtraction, flat fielding, and creation of and application of bad pixel masks. The 2-D spectra were processed to a 1-D spectra and wavelength calibrated to reveal the exact wavelength of each peak in the spectra. Using standard stars is of utmost importance so the atmospheric lines can be corrected for and the data can be used for precise analysis. With the reduced and calibrated spectra, we measure the Paschen α, β, and γ Hydrogen lines, the Brackett γ Hydrogen line and the FeII line in the near infrared emitted from the circumnuclear regions of the galaxies. These data unveil details of what the environment is like in the area surrounding the supermassive black holes that are found in the heart of each of these galaxies.

  6. The Effect of Penetration Depth on Thermal Contrast of NDT by Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Tsuchin Philip; DiGregorio, Anthony; Russell, Samuel S.

    1999-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation by Thermography (TNDE) is generally classified into two categories, the passive approach and the active approach. The passive approach is usually performed by measuring the natural temperature difference between the ambient and the material or structure to be tested. The active approach, on the other hand, requires the application of an external energy source to stimulate the material for inspection. A laser, a heater, a hot air blower, a high power thermal pulse, mechanical, or electromagnetic energy may provide the energy sources. For the external heating method to inspect materials for defects and imperfection at ambient temperature, a very short burst of heat can be introduced to one of the surfaces or slow heating of the side opposite to the side being observed. Due to the interruption of the heat flow through the defects, the thermal images will reveal the defective area by contrasting against the surrounding good materials. This technique is called transient Thermography, pulse video Thermography, or thermal wave imaging. As an empirical rule, the radius of the smallest defect should be at least one to two times larger than its depth under the surface. Thermography is being used to inspect void, debond, impact damage, and porosity in composite materials. It has been shown that most of the defects and imperfection can be detected. However, the current method of inspection using thermographic technique is more of an art than a practical scientific and engineering approach. The success rate of determining the defect location and defect type is largely depend on the experience of the person who operates thermography system and performs the inspection. The operator has to try different type of heat source, different duration of its application time, as well as experimenting with the thermal image acquisition time and interval during the inspection process. Further-more, the complexity of the lay-up and structure of composites makes it

  7. Solar-energy absorber: Active infrared (IR) trap without glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Absorber efficiency can be improved to 90% by removing glass plates and using infrared traps. Absorber configuration may be of interest to manufacturers of solar absorbers and to engineers and scientists developing new sources of energy.

  8. Quantitative Evaluation of Pulsed Thermography, Lock-in Thermography and Vibrothermography on Foreign Object Defect (FOD) in CFRP.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Hai; Fernandes, Henrique; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    In this article, optical excitation thermographic techniques, including pulsed thermography and lock-in thermography, were used to detect foreign object defect (FOD) and delamination in CFRP. Then, vibrothermography as an ultrasonic excitation technique was used to detect these defects for the comparative purposes. Different image processing methods, including cold image subtraction (CIS), principal component thermography (PCT), thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR) and Fourier transform (FT), were performed. Finally, a comparison of optical excitation thermography and vibrothermography was conducted, and a thermographic probability of detection was given. PMID:27213403

  9. Quantitative Evaluation of Pulsed Thermography, Lock-in Thermography and Vibrothermography on Foreign Object Defect (FOD) in CFRP

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Zhang, Hai; Fernandes, Henrique; Maldague, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    In this article, optical excitation thermographic techniques, including pulsed thermography and lock-in thermography, were used to detect foreign object defect (FOD) and delamination in CFRP. Then, vibrothermography as an ultrasonic excitation technique was used to detect these defects for the comparative purposes. Different image processing methods, including cold image subtraction (CIS), principal component thermography (PCT), thermographic signal reconstruction (TSR) and Fourier transform (FT), were performed. Finally, a comparison of optical excitation thermography and vibrothermography was conducted, and a thermographic probability of detection was given. PMID:27213403

  10. Some fundamentals of handheld snow surface thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, C.; Jamieson, B.

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents the concepts needed to perform snow surface thermography with a modern thermal imager. Snow-specific issues in the 7.5 to 13 μm spectrum such as ice emissivity, photographic angle, operator heating, and others receive detailed review and discussion. To illustrate the usefulness of this measurement technique, various applications are presented. These include detecting spatial temperature variation on snow pit walls and measuring the dependence of heat conduction on grain type.

  11. Some fundamentals of handheld snow surface thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, C.; Jamieson, B.

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents the concepts needed to perform snow surface thermography with a modern thermal imager. Snow-specific issues in the 7.5 to 13 μm spectrum such as ice emissivity, photographic angle, operator heating, and others receive detailed review and discussion. To illustrate the usefulness of this measurement technique, various applications are presented. These include detecting spatial temperature variation on snow pit walls and measuring the dependence of heat conduction on grain type.

  12. Corrosion detection on pipelines by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bison, P.; Marinetti, S.; Cuogo, G.; Molinas, B.; Zonta, P.; Grinzato, E.

    2011-05-01

    IR thermography is applied to detect hidden corrosion on carbon steel pipelines for oil transportation. The research is oriented to set up a robust technique to carry out in situ the early detection of corroded zones that may evolve either towards leakage or failure. The use of thermography associated with a transient thermal technique is investigated on 12.2 mm thick samples, machined to artificially create a reduction of wall thickness that simulates the effect of real corrosion in pipes. The extension and depth of the artificial defects is controlled by ultrasounds which represents the reference for the results obtained by thermography. Two approaches are proposed: the first is based on the processing of a single thermogram taken at the optimum time after a finite pulse heating of a large area of the external surface; the second technique is carried out by scanning the pipeline by means of a device composed of a linear lamp and a thermographic camera which move jointly over the surface to test. A suitable reconstruction provides a map of the tested surface with possible hot spots in correspondence with the corroded areas. The analysis of the thermal problem by Finite Element Method is used to optimize the experimental parameters. The experimental results demonstrate a detection capability starting from 15 % of wall thickness reduction.

  13. Effects of Near-Infrared Laser on Neural Cell Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki-Oda, Noriko; Kataoka, Yosky; Yamada, Hisao; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-08-01

    Near-infrared laser has been used to relieve patients from various kinds of pain caused by postherpetic neuralgesia, myofascial dysfunction, surgical and traumatic wound, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis. Clinically, He-Ne (λ=632.8 nm, 780 nm) and Ga-Al-As (805 ± 25 nm) lasers are used to irradiate trigger points or nerve ganglion. However the precise mechanisms of such biological actions of the laser have not yet been resolved. Since laser therapy is often effective to suppress the pain caused by hyperactive excitation of sensory neurons, interactions with laser light and neural cells are suggested. As neural excitation requires large amount of energy liberated from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), we examined the effect of 830-nm laser irradiation on the energy metabolism of the rat central nervous system and isolated mitochondria from brain. The diode laser was applied for 15 min with irradiance of 4.8 W/cm2 on a 2 mm-diameter spot at the brain surface. Tissue ATP content of the irradiated area in the cerebral cortex was 19 % higher than that of the non-treated area (opposite side of the cortex), whereas the ADP content showed no significant difference. Irradiation at another wavelength (652 nm) had no effect on either ATP or ADP contents. The temperature of the brain tissue was increased 4.5 - 5.0 °C during the irradiation of both 830-nm and 652-nm laser light. Direct irradiation of the mitochondrial suspension did not show any wavelength-dependent acceleration of respiration rate nor ATP synthesis. These results suggest that the increase in tissue ATP content did not result from the thermal effect, but from specific effect of the laser operated at 830 nm. Electrophysiological studies showed the hyperpolarization of membrane potential of isolated neurons and decrease in membrane resistance with irradiation of the laser, suggesting an activation of potassium channels. Intracellular ATP is reported to regulate some kinds of potassium channels. Possible mechanisms

  14. Clinical study on thermography, as modern investigation method for Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Iosif, Laura; Preoteasa, Cristina Teodora; Murariu-Măgureanu, Cătălina; Preoteasa, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is an infectious inflammatory condition of the oral mucosa, with frequent recurrences. The aim of this study was to assess the use of infrared thermography as investigation method for Candida-associated denture stomatitis (as inflammatory disorder of the maxillary denture bearing area), by comparing disease and non-disease groups. An observational study was conducted on maxillary edentulous patients treated by acrylic dentures, with and without Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Diagnostic test methods used were clinical examination for denture stomatitis and conventional microbiological culture method for oral candidiasis. Thermography analysis of the maxillary denture bearing area was made using the ThermaCAM PM350 infrared camera (Inframetrics, Flir Systems) and ThermaGram Pro 95 software, data being acquired by usage of standard protocol of thermographic registrations. The sample included 52 patients, 21 with and 31 without Candida-associated denture stomatitis. The temperature of the maxillary mucosa corresponding to the denture bearing area was found to be statistically significantly higher in Candida-associated denture stomatitis (mean 36.20°C), compared to healthy oral mucosa (mean 34.85°C). The thermal threshold value of 35.44°C was identified as best differentiating a pathological from normal state of the maxillary mucosa corresponding to the denture bearing area. In conclusion, infrared thermography, a rapid non-invasive investigation method, has the premises to bring valuable data in inflammatory disorders of the maxillary denture bearing area, as Candida-associated denture stomatitis that may be used for screening, diagnostic or monitoring purposes. PMID:27151707

  15. Isoconversion effective activation energy profiles by variable temperature diffuse reflection infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    White, Daniel R; White, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    Thermal process characterization based on calculating effective activation energies from variable temperature diffuse reflection infrared spectroscopy (VT-DRIFTS) measurements is demonstrated. Experimental factors that affect the accuracies of activation energy values are outlined. Infrared radiation scattering efficiency, thermal conductivity, and inertness towards chemical reactions are factors that should be considered when selecting an appropriate diluent for preparing samples. The Kubelka-Munk representation is superior to apparent absorbance when baseline variations in spectra measured at different temperatures can be minimized. Variable-temperature infrared spectral features, such as integrated absorption band area, can be used to compute isoconversion effective activation energies, provided that measured quantities are proportional to species concentrations. PMID:18230216

  16. MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL INDICATORS OF STAR FORMATION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY IN NORMAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Treyer, Marie; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted; Schiminovich, David; O'Dowd, Matt; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Charlot, Stephane; Heckman, Timothy; Martins, Lucimara; Seibert, Mark; Van der Hulst, J. M.

    2010-08-20

    We investigate the use of mid-infrared (MIR) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bands, the continuum, and emission lines as probes of star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in a sample of 100 'normal' and local (z {approx} 0.1) emission-line galaxies. The MIR spectra were obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph as part of the Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey, which includes multi-wavelength photometry from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared and optical spectroscopy. The continuum and features were extracted using PAHFIT, a decomposition code which we find to yield PAH equivalent widths (EWs) up to {approx}30 times larger than the commonly used spline methods. Despite the lack of extreme objects in our sample (such as strong AGNs, low-metallicity galaxies, or ULIRGs), we find significant variations in PAH, continuum, and emission-line properties, and systematic trends between these MIR properties and optically derived physical properties, such as age, metallicity, and radiation field hardness. We revisit the diagnostic diagram relating PAH EWs and [Ne II]12.8 {mu}m/[O IV]25.9 {mu}m line ratios and find it to be in much better agreement with the standard optical SF/AGN classification than when spline decompositions are used, while also potentially revealing obscured AGNs. The luminosity of individual PAH components, of the continuum, and, with poorer statistics, of the neon emission lines and molecular hydrogen lines are found to be tightly correlated to the total infrared (TIR) luminosity, making individual MIR components good gauges of the total dust emission in SF galaxies. Like the TIR luminosity, these individual components can be used to estimate dust attenuation in the UV and in H{alpha} lines based on energy balance arguments. We also propose average scaling relations between these components and dust-corrected, H{alpha}-derived SF rates.

  17. Photothermal Thermography Applied to the Non-destructive Testing of Different Types of Works of Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, J. L.; Mouhoubi, K.; Szatanik-Perrier, G.; Vallet, J. M.; Detalle, V.

    2012-11-01

    In this article, various cases in helping to restore works of art by stimulated infrared thermography are presented. First, the method allows detecting old restorations found on a mural painting in the French senate. Then, it is demonstrated how the photothermal method enables determination of the underlying structure of the mural painting "The Apotheosis of Saint Bruno" in the Charterhouse of Villeneuve-lez-Avignon. Finally, the method allows locating separate canvas paintings on "Avenant de l'aurore" in the "Luxembourg" French Senate building.

  18. Characterization of an Inclusion of Plastazote Located in an Academic Fresco by Photothermal Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, J. L.; Nicolas, J. L.; Mouhoubi, K.; Candore, J. C.; Detalle, V.

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to approach the possibilities of stimulated infrared thermography in dimensional characterization of defects situated in mural paintings. For this purpose, it is suggested to proceed in two stages. First, an in situ longitudinal thermal-diffusivity measurement is developed. Then the characterization of the depth of the studied defect by means of an extended photothermal analysis and a comparison between theory and experiment is carried out. In this article is shown that this approach allows a good estimate of the depth of a plastazote inclusion in a partial copy of the “Saint Christophe” of the Campana collection in the Louvre Museum.

  19. Infrared technology and applications; Proceedings of the Meeting, London, England, June 26-28, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Lettington, A.H.

    1990-01-01

    Industrial infrared spectroscopy, detectors, applied thermography, optical manufacturing techniques, and optical design and testing are covered. Papers on various aspects of ductile grinding and diamond machining are presented, and focus is placed on thermal signature applications of a high-speed spectroradiometer, and industrial applications of the photothermal effect. Uncooled infrared thermal detector arrays are covered as well as submicron thin-film MOM diodes for the detection of 10-micron infrared laser radiation. Infrared thermal-imaging construction-fault location, industrial and research applications of thermography, and the control of materials by infrared thermography are considered. The optical design of a dual-magnification infrared telescope is presented, and image restoration in thermo-dynamic applications of infrared digital imagery is investigated along with a measurement method for wide-angle afocal telescopes.

  20. Gamma-irradiation tests of IR optical fibres for ITER thermography--a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Reichle, R.; Pocheau, C.; Jouve, M.

    2008-03-12

    In the course of the development of a concept for a spectrally resolving infrared thermography diagnostic for the ITER divertor we have tested 3 types of infrared (IR) fibres in Co{sup 60} irradiation facilities under {gamma} irradiation. The fibres were ZrF{sub 4} (and HfF{sub 4}) fibres from different manufacturers, hollow fibres (silica capillaries with internal Ag/AgJ coating) and a sapphire fibre. For the IR range, only the latter fibre type encourages to go further for neutron tests in a reactor. If one restricted the interest onto the near infrared range, high purity core silica fibres could be used. This study might be seen as a typical example of the relation between diagnostic development for a nuclear environment and irradiation experiments.

  1. Active tuning of mid-infrared metamaterials by electrical control of carrier densities.

    PubMed

    Jun, Young Chul; Gonzales, Edward; Reno, John L; Shaner, Eric A; Gabbay, Alon; Brener, Igal

    2012-01-16

    We demonstrate electrically-controlled active tuning of mid-infrared metamaterial resonances using depletion-type devices. The depletion width in an n-doped GaAs epilayer changes with an electric bias, inducing a change of the permittivity of the substrate and leading to frequency tuning of the resonance. We first present our detailed theoretical analysis and then explain experimental data of bias-dependent metamaterial transmission spectra. This electrical tuning is generally applicable to a variety of infrared metamaterials and plasmonic structures, which can find novel applications in chip-scale active infrared devices. PMID:22274535

  2. Fusing Passive and Active Sensed Images to Gain Infrared-Textured 3d Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinmann, M.; Hoegner, L.; Leitloff, J.; Stilla, U.; Hinz, S.; Jutzi, B.

    2012-07-01

    Obtaining a 3D description of man-made and natural environments is a basic task in Computer Vision, Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. New active sensors provide the possibility of capturing range information by images with a single measurement. With this new technique, image-based active ranging is possible which allows for capturing dynamic scenes, e.g. with moving pedestrians or moving vehicles. The currently available range imaging devices usually operate within the close-infrared domain to capture range and furthermore active and passive intensity images. Depending on the application, a 3D description with additional spectral information such as thermal-infrared data can be helpful and offers new opportunities for the detection and interpretation of human subjects and interactions. Therefore, thermal-infrared data combined with range information is promising. In this paper, an approach for mapping thermal-infrared data on range data is proposed. First, a camera calibration is carried out for the range imaging system (PMD[vision] CamCube 2.0) and the thermal-infrared system (InfraTec VarioCAM hr). Subsequently, a registration of close-infrared and thermal infrared intensity images derived from different sensor devices is performed. In this context, wavelength independent properties are selected in order to derive point correspondences between the different spectral domains. Finally, the thermal infrared images are enhanced with information derived from data acquired with the range imaging device and the enhanced IR texture is projected onto the respective 3D point cloud data for gaining appropriate infrared-textured 3D models. The feasibility of the proposed methodology is demonstrated for an experimental setup which is well-suited for investigating these proposed possibilities. Hence, the presented work is a first step towards the development of methods for combined thermal-infrared and range representation.

  3. INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NEARBY RADIO ACTIVE ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Mould, Jeremy; Reynolds, Tristan; Readhead, Tony; Matthews, Keith; Floyd, David; Brown, Michael; Jannuzi, Buell; Atlee, David; Cotter, Garret; Ferrarese, Laura

    2012-11-15

    In preparation for a study of their circumnuclear gas we have surveyed 60% of a complete sample of elliptical galaxies within 75 Mpc that are radio sources. Some 20% of our nuclear spectra have infrared emission lines, mostly Paschen lines, Brackett {gamma}, and [Fe II]. We consider the influence of radio power and black hole mass in relation to the spectra. Access to the spectra is provided here as a community resource.

  4. Determination of stomatal conductance by means of infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajons, P.; Klinger, G.; Schlosser, V.

    2005-06-01

    The leaf energy balance equation is extended to obtain the boundary layer resistances to heat transfer and the stomatal resistance, the stomatal conductance respectively, of leaves in vivo. Calculations are based on the determination of temperature rise and fall times (thermal time constants of leaves in different states) which are caused by a sudden change of irradiation intensity. The change in the irradiation was performed by turning on/off a laser diode (675 nm). To measure the temperature and its changes without direct contact with the leaves, a commercial IR-imaging system (thermo-camera) was employed. Experiments were made on ivy leaves under laboratory conditions. The advantages and the applicability of the new method are demonstrated and experienced experimental difficulties are discussed.

  5. VISUALIZATION OF FREEZING PROGRESSION IN TURFGRASSES USING INFRARED VIDEO THERMOGRAPHY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Freezing injury can be a significant problem in turfgrasses. Understanding how freezing develops and ramifies throughout the plant could assist in the development of improved management or screening processes for cultivar improvemen. The development of freezing injury is not well understand due pa...

  6. Using Infrared Thermography to Assess Emotional Responses to Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito, Gianluca; Nakazawa, Jun; Ogawa, Shota; Stival, Rita; Putnick, Diane L.; Bornstein, Marc H.

    2015-01-01

    Adult-infant interactions operate simultaneously across multiple domains and at multiple levels -- from physiology to behaviour. Unpackaging and understanding them, therefore, involve analysis of multiple data streams. In this study, we tested physiological responses and cognitive preferences for infant and adult faces in adult females and males.…

  7. Heat-stimulus correction for pulsed-infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, Hernán D.; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; Bendada, AbdelHakim; Maldague, Xavier

    2009-05-01

    The modified DAC version with thermal quadrupoles can be considered an interesting alternative to thermal contrast computations since it provides an automated tool for depth retrieval and eliminates the need of selecting a non-defective area. In practice it is important to have heat stimulus with complex shapes and long durations (several seconds) in order to cover larger inspection areas, enhance thermal contrast between defective and sound areas and increase the depth of inspection inside the material. In this work we present a heat stimulus correction by using the thermal quadrupoles theory and its validation with several heat stimulus shapes and durations.

  8. Value of Mammary Thermography in Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, B. E.; Burn, J. Ian; MacErlean, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Thermographic examinations of the breasts were carried out in 359 women, most of whom had mammary symptoms. Of the 195 patients with abnormal thermograms, 27 had cancer of the breast, 53 had benign lesions, and 115 had no confirmed organic disease. The incidence of false-positive thermograms was 59%. Of the 164 patients with normal thermograms, 116 had no confirmed organic disease, 41 had benign lesions, and 7 had cancer. The incidence of false-negative mammary thermograms was 29%. We conclude that mammary thermography is of no practical value in the differential diagnosis of symptomatic mammary disease. PMID:5022040

  9. Study Methods to Characterize and Implement Thermography Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    1998-01-01

    The limits and conditions under which an infrared thermographic nondestructive evaluation can be utilized to assess the quality of aerospace hardware is demonstrated in this research effort. The primary focus of this work is on applying thermography to the inspection of advanced composite structures such as would be found in the International Space Station Instrumentation Racks, Space Shuttle Cargo Bay Doors, Bantam RP-1 tank or RSRM Nose Cone. Here, the detection of delamination, disbond, inclusion and porosity type defects are of primary interest. In addition to composites, an extensive research effort has been initiated to determine how well a thermographic evaluation can detect leaks and disbonds in pressurized metallic systems "i.e. the Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzles". In either case, research into developing practical inspection procedures was conducted and thermographic inspections were performed on a myriad of test samples, subscale demonstration articles and "simulated" flight hardware. All test samples were fabricated as close to their respective structural counterparts as possible except with intentional defects for NDE qualification. As an added benefit of this effort to create simulated defects, methods were devised for defect fabrication that may be useful in future NDE qualification ventures.

  10. On Field Inspection of Composite Pipes Using Pulsed Phase Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, M. P. V.; Almeida, R. M.; Rebello, J. M. A.; Soares, S. D.

    2010-02-01

    The pulsed phase thermography (PPT) is becoming a valuable tool on the detection and dimensioning of defects on composite materials. However, the most of the works that adopt the PPT needs very sophisticated equipment to thermal excitation of the specimen and data acquisition. This work uses the concepts of the PPT to inspect sections of fiberglass reinforced epoxy pipes used on adhesively bonded joints applied on the oil industry on extraction and transportation of fluids, using low cost and simple equipment to thermal excitation. A MatLab routine to data processing was used intending to achieve a fast and reliable non-destructive method to be performed on field. Amplitude and phase images are generated from the infrared images without any pre-processing technique revealing simulated defects that were impossible to be detected on the original data. A study of how deep the thermal wave can reach along the thickness of this kind of material is also performed trying to estipulate the limits of the technique aiming on the detection of problems on adhesive layers using two heat sources: halogen lamp and industrial air blower. Results support the possibility of implementing a reliable and low cost method of inspection on field to various values of pipe thicknesses found on plants of the oil industry.

  11. Analysis of solar collector array systems using thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Eden, A.

    1980-01-01

    The use of thermography to analyze large solar collector array systems under dynamic operating conditions is discussed. The research has focused on thermographic techniques and equipment to determine temperature distributions, flow patterns, and air blockages in solar collectors. The results of this extensive study, covering many sites and types of collectors, illustrate the capabilities of infrared analysis as an analysis tool and operation and maintenance procedure when applied to large arrays. Thermographic analysis of most collector systems showed temperature distributions that indicated balanced flow patterns with both the thermographs and the hand-held unit. In three significant cases, blocked or broken collector arrays, which previously had gone undetected, were discovered. Using this analysis, validation studies of large computer codes could examine collector arrays for flow patterns or blockages that could cause disagreement between actual and predicted performance. Initial operation and balancing of large systems could be accomplished without complicated sensor systems not needed for normal operations. Maintenance personnel could quickly check their systems without climbing onto the roof and without complicated sensor systems.

  12. Aerial Thermography - Cartographic Presentation Of Thermographic Data For Building Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Ake

    1989-03-01

    When using aerial thermography to indicate energy-related conditions of buildings in a large investigation area the question arises how to store and present the final product of classified, energy-related data. A full scale study of 7000 buildings demonstrated the need fur computerbased systems and cartographic methods to store, to arrange and to illustrate thermograpic data. A data base was created including aerial thermograpic data, technical data on the buildings and information on energy consumption of each building. The data base consisted of 100 variables. The key-code for the data base was the real estate name and number. The position of each building was given in terms of coordinates of the real estate. The main purpose of the study was to create an energy-related data base to be used for assigning a priority to measurements within the local energy conservation program. The thermographic data was collected with a longwave airborne infrared line-scanner (3-14 um). The technical data on the buildings and their energy consumption were gathered from existing data bases and from field investigations. Thermograpic data, technical data of the buildings and information on energy consumption was classified and different symbols were used to identify the classes presented on thematic maps. Results from this study implies that computerbased cartography is a favorable method to present and illustrate thermographic information on buildings in large investigation areas. The paper deals mainly with the aspect of carthography for presentation of thermographic and energy-related data.

  13. Inferring deep-brain activity from cortical activity using functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ning; Cui, Xu; Bryant, Daniel M.; Glover, Gary H.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2015-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an increasingly popular technology for studying brain function because it is non-invasive, non-irradiating and relatively inexpensive. Further, fNIRS potentially allows measurement of hemodynamic activity with high temporal resolution (milliseconds) and in naturalistic settings. However, in comparison with other imaging modalities, namely fMRI, fNIRS has a significant drawback: limited sensitivity to hemodynamic changes in deep-brain regions. To overcome this limitation, we developed a computational method to infer deep-brain activity using fNIRS measurements of cortical activity. Using simultaneous fNIRS and fMRI, we measured brain activity in 17 participants as they completed three cognitive tasks. A support vector regression (SVR) learning algorithm was used to predict activity in twelve deep-brain regions using information from surface fNIRS measurements. We compared these predictions against actual fMRI-measured activity using Pearson’s correlation to quantify prediction performance. To provide a benchmark for comparison, we also used fMRI measurements of cortical activity to infer deep-brain activity. When using fMRI-measured activity from the entire cortex, we were able to predict deep-brain activity in the fusiform cortex with an average correlation coefficient of 0.80 and in all deep-brain regions with an average correlation coefficient of 0.67. The top 15% of predictions using fNIRS signal achieved an accuracy of 0.7. To our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the feasibility of using cortical activity to infer deep-brain activity. This new method has the potential to extend fNIRS applications in cognitive and clinical neuroscience research. PMID:25798327

  14. MID-INFRARED SELECTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER. I. CHARACTERIZING WISE-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto J.; Eisenhardt, Peter; Benford, Dominic J.; Blain, Andrew; Cutri, Roc; Griffith, Roger L.; Jarrett, T. H.; Masci, Frank; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Yan, Lin; Dey, Arjun; Lake, Sean; Petty, Sara; Wright, E. L.; Stanford, S. A.; Harrison, Fiona; Madsen, Kristin

    2012-07-01

    The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) is an extremely capable and efficient black hole finder. We present a simple mid-infrared color criterion, W1 - W2 {>=} 0.8 (i.e., [3.4]-[4.6] {>=}0.8, Vega), which identifies 61.9 {+-} 5.4 active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates per deg{sup 2} to a depth of W2 {approx} 15.0. This implies a much larger census of luminous AGNs than found by typical wide-area surveys, attributable to the fact that mid-infrared selection identifies both unobscured (type 1) and obscured (type 2) AGNs. Optical and soft X-ray surveys alone are highly biased toward only unobscured AGNs, while this simple WISE selection likely identifies even heavily obscured, Compton-thick AGNs. Using deep, public data in the COSMOS field, we explore the properties of WISE-selected AGN candidates. At the mid-infrared depth considered, 160 {mu}Jy at 4.6 {mu}m, this simple criterion identifies 78% of Spitzer mid-infrared AGN candidates according to the criteria of Stern et al. and the reliability is 95%. We explore the demographics, multiwavelength properties and redshift distribution of WISE-selected AGN candidates in the COSMOS field.

  15. Infrared-Active Heterostructured Nanocrystals with Ultralong Carrier Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Doh C.; Robel, Istvan; Pietryga, Jeffrey M.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2010-07-01

    We present the synthesis of composite PbSe/CdSe/CdS nanocrystals with two distinct geometries: core/shell/shell structures and tetrapods. These novel nanostructures exhibit extremely long carrier decay times up to 20 μs that are combined with high emission efficiencies in the infrared. The increase in carrier lifetimes is attributed to the reduction of the electron-hole overlap as a result of delocalization of the electron wave function into the outer CdS shell or arms. The ultralong carrier lifetimes and controlled geometry render these nanocrystals attractive for a variety of applications from lasing to photocatalysis and photovoltaics.

  16. Optically active substituted polyacetylene@carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation, characterization and infrared emissivity property study

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yongjuan; Zhang, Zewu; He, Man

    2014-08-15

    Optically active substituted polyacetylene@multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SPA@MWCNTs) nanohybrids were fabricated by wrapping helical SPA copolymers onto the surface of modified nanotubes through ester bonding linkage. SPA copolymer based on chiral phenylalanine and serine was pre-polymerized by a rhodium zwitterion catalyst in THF, and evidently proved to possess strong optical activity and adopt a predominately one-handed helical conformation. Various characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SPA had been covalently grafted onto the nanotubes without destroying their original graphite structure. The wrapped SPA was found to exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability and still maintained considerable optical activity after grafting. The infrared emissivity property of the nanohybrids at 8–14 μm was investigated in addition. The results indicated that the SPA@MWCNTs hybrid matrix could possess a much lower infrared emissivity value (ε=0.707) than raw MWCNTs, which might be due to synergistic effect of the unique helical conformation of optically active SPA and strengthened interfacial interaction between the organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids with low infrared emissivity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of optically active SPA copolymer derived from serine and phenylalanine. • Preparation and characterization of optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids. • Application study of the SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids (ε=0.707) in lowering the infrared emissivity.

  17. Evidence for Infrared-faint Radio Sources as z > 1 Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Minh T.; Norris, Ray P.; Siana, Brian; Middelberg, Enno

    2010-02-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6-70 μm) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these objects shows that they are consistent with high-redshift (z >~ 1) active galactic nuclei.

  18. Thermal diffusivity estimation with quantitative pulsed phase thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina-Borras, J. E.; Florez-Ospina, Juan F.; Benitez-Restrepo, H. D.; Maldague, X.

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative Pulsed Phase Thermography (PPT) has been only used to estimate defect parameters such as depth and thermal resistance. Here, we propose a thermal quadrupole based method that extends quantitative pulsed phase thermography. This approach estimates thermal diffusivity by solving a inversion problem based on non-linear squares estimation. This approach is tested with pulsed thermography data acquired from a composite sample. We compare our results with another technique established in time domain. The proposed quantitative analysis with PPT provides estimates of thermal diffusivity close to those obtained with the time domain approach. This estimation requires only the a priori knowledge of sample thickness.

  19. Quasar S5 0836+710 active in near-infrared and optical bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, V. M.; Arkharov, A. A.; Efimova, N. V.; Klimanov, S. A.; Di Paola, A.

    2015-11-01

    As reported in ATels #8223, #8266, #8271, quasar S5 0836+710 (4C 71.07) is in enhanced state of activity. We perform optical and near-infrared monitoring of this object using 40-cm LX-200 (optical, St.Petersburg, Russia), 70-cm AZT-8 (optical, Crimea) and 1.1-m AZT-24 (near-infrared, Campo Imperatore, Italy), as a part of WEBT/GASP project.

  20. Effects of peripheral dynamic movements on the lower-limb circulation assessed by thermography: three one-group studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaerki, Anne; Laehdeniemi, Matti

    2002-03-01

    Peripheral dynamic movements are used as part of postoperative protocols and for preventing vascular complications during bed rest. The effects of peripheral movements have not been studied. The purposes of these studies were to explain the effects of peripheral dynamic movements on lower limb circulation. The aim was also to explain how other factors like sex, age, BMI, medication, smoking, sports activity etc. affect the circulation. Healthy young subjects (N=19), healthy elderly subjects (N=19) and diabetic subjects (N=21) participated in the studies between 1997 and 1999. The study design was the same in each study. Infrared technology and image processing belong to our focus fields of applied research and IR is widely used in our real time industrial applications including also ongoing research of new possibilities. This paper presents the results of our newest application of IR thermography, where it was used to measure the skin temperature over the soleus muscle during and after dynamic ankle movements. The results showed that the skin temperature increased further during the recovery period after movements, and temperature was highest after 3- 5 minutes. Diabetic male subjects were the only subgroup that had immediate decrease during recovery period. The studies showed that smoking had a negative effect on circulation. BMI had also negative correlation (-0,356), showing that subjects with higher BMI had less increase. The results proved that peripheral movements were effective for increasing circulation in the soleus muscle and the effect was still seen after 15 minutes.

  1. Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.

    SciTech Connect

    Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

  2. Active Shape Model-Based Gait Recognition Using Infrared Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daehee; Lee, Seungwon; Paik, Joonki

    We present a gait recognition system using infra-red (IR) images. Since an IR camera is not affected by the intensity of illumination, it is able to provide constant recognition performance regardless of the amount of illumination. Model-based object tracking algorithms enable robust tracking with partial occlusions or dynamic illumination. However, this algorithm often fails in tracking objects if strong edge exists near the object. Replacement of the input image by an IR image guarantees robust object region extraction because background edges do not affect the IR image. In conclusion, the proposed gait recognition algorithm improves accuracy in object extraction by using IR images and the improvements finally increase the recognition rate of gaits.

  3. The correction model and error analysis of infrared radiation temperature measurement of semitransparent object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaolong; Yang, Li

    2015-10-01

    Based on the theory of infrared radiation and of the infrared thermography, the mathematical correction model of the infrared radiation temperature measurement of semitransparent object is developed taking account by the effects of the atmosphere, surroundings, radiation of transmissivity and many other factors. The effects of the emissivity, transmissivity and measurement error are analysed on temperature measurement error of the infrared thermography. The measurement error of semitransparent object are compared with that of opaque object. The countermeasures to reduce the measurement error are also discussed.

  4. Study on the activation of styrene-based shape memory polymer by medium-infrared laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Leng Jinsong; Yu Kai; Lan Xin; Zhang Dawei; Liu Yanju

    2010-03-15

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of shape memory polymer (SMP) activation by medium-infrared laser light. Medium-infrared light is transmitted by an optical fiber embedded in the SMP matrix, and the shape recovery process and temperature distribution are recorded by an infrared camera. Light-induced SMP exhibits potential applications in biomedicines and flexible displays.

  5. MID- AND FAR-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF LOCAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kohei; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Terashima, Yuichi; Oyabu, Shinki; Gandhi, Poshak; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuta, Keiko

    2012-07-20

    We investigate the mid- (MIR) to far-infrared (FIR) properties of a nearly complete sample of local active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected in the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) all-sky hard X-ray (14-195 keV) survey, based on the cross correlation with the AKARI infrared survey catalogs complemented by those with Infrared Astronomical Satellite and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. Out of 135 non-blazer AGNs in the Swift/BAT nine-month catalog, we obtain the MIR photometric data for 128 sources either in the 9, 12, 18, 22, and/or 25 {mu}m band. We find good correlation between their hard X-ray and MIR luminosities over three orders of magnitude (42 < log {lambda}L{sub {lambda}}(9, 18 {mu}m) < 45), which is tighter than that with the FIR luminosities at 90 {mu}m. This suggests that thermal emission from hot dusts irradiated by the AGN emission dominate the MIR fluxes. Both X-ray unabsorbed and absorbed AGNs follow the same correlation, implying isotropic infrared emission, as expected in clumpy dust tori rather than homogeneous ones. We find excess signals around 9 {mu}m in the averaged infrared spectral energy distribution from heavy obscured 'new type' AGNs with small scattering fractions in the X-ray spectra. This could be attributed to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission feature, suggesting that their host galaxies have strong starburst activities.

  6. Induction thermography for non-destructive evaluation of adhesive bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, L.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2013-01-01

    Adhesive bonding is widely used in automotive industry in the recent times. One of the major problems with adhesive bonds is the lack of a suitable non-destructive evaluation technique for assessing bonding. In this paper, an experimental study was carried out to apply induction thermography technique to evaluate adhesively bonded steel plates. Samples were fabricated with artificial defects such as air gap, foreign material, and improper adhesive filling. Induction thermography technique was found to detect defects and foreign inclusions. The sample specimen was also inspected using standard techniques such as Ultrasonic testing and Radiography testing. Defect detecting capabilities of the three techniques are compared. Induction thermography heating was FE modelled in 3D using COMSOL 3.5a. The simulated Induction thermography model was compared and validated with experimental results.

  7. Building thermography and energy performance directive of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppinen, Timo; Siikanen, Sami

    2012-06-01

    Energy Performance of Buildings Directive came in to the force in Europe couple of years ago and it had an immediate effect on Building Codes in Europe. Finland have changed its building codes since 2007 - the insulation requirements have been tightened and the requirements have been specified. The biggest change is energy efficient calculations and determination of energy efficiency and energy label for buildings. This has caused a boom of new service providers (thermography services, air-tightness measurements and other services like new calculation tools). Thermography is used in verification in performance of buildings. In this presentation some examples of building thermography in walk-through energy audits combined with the results of energy efficiency calculations are presented - also some special problems in buildings of specific use (e.g. an art museum) and use of thermography to solve them.

  8. Camera characterization for face recognition under active near-infrared illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernoth, Thorsten; Grigat, Rolf-Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Active near-infrared illumination may be used in a face recognition system to achieve invariance to changes of the visible illumination. Another benefit of active near-infrared illumination is the bright pupil effect which can be used to assist eye detection. But long time exposure to near-infrared radiation is hazardous to the eyes. The level of illumination is therefore limited by potentially harmful effects to the eyes. Image sensors for face recognition under active near-infrared illumination have therefore to be carefully selected to provide optimal image quality in the desired field of application. A model of the active illumination source is introduced. Safety issues with regard to near-infrared illumination are addressed using this model and a radiometric analysis. From the illumination model requirements on suitable imaging sensors are formulated. Standard image quality metrics are used to assess the imaging device performance under application typical conditions. The characterization of image quality is based on measurements of the Opto-Electronic Conversion Function, Modulation Transfer Function and noise. A methodology to select an image sensor for the desired field of application is given. Two cameras with low-cost image sensors are characterized using the key parameters that influence the image quality for face recognition.

  9. Thermography in mass screening investigations of industrial workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehter, A. I.; Ginsburg, L. I.; Traktinsky, A. G.

    1993-11-01

    The role of thermography in screening, directed to diagnose breast diseases, chronic tonsillitis, neurocirculatory dystonia, gall bladder dyskinesia, sinusitis, and to detect the character of influence of harmful factors on workers organisms is studied. The investigations demonstrate a possibility of a successful utilization of thermography in mass prophylactive examinations in order to diagnose these diseases, but the problem of breast tumors diagnostics demands the following investigations.

  10. Nondestructive testing of rocket engine injector panel using ultrasonic burst phase thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dapeng; Zhang, Cunlin; Wu, Naiming; Zeng, Zhi; Xing, Chunfei; Li, Yue; Zhao, Shibin; Ning, Tao

    2010-10-01

    As the key parts of the liquid rocket oxyhydrogen engine, the injector panel is a kind of transpiration material, which is braided and Sintered with stainless steel wire. If some hidden delaminition defects that are difficult to detect appear in the process of Sintering and rolling, a significant safety problem would occur. In this paper, we use the Ultrasonic Burst Phase Thermography (UBP) to detect the delamination defects in the injector panel, UBP is a rapid and reliable nondestructive technique derived from Ultrasonic Lock-in Thermography(ULT). It uses a controllable, adjustable ultrasonic burst as the heat source to stimulate the sample, the defects within the material are revealed through their heat generation caused by friction, clapping and thermoelastic effect, as the resulting surface temperature distribution is observed by an infrared camera. The original thermal images sequence is processed by Fast Fourier Transformation to obtain the phase information of the defects. In the experiments of the delamination sample, the UBP realized the selective heating of delamination defects in the injector panel, and the signal to noise of phase image is higher than the original thermal image because the phase information can not be disturbed by the initial conditions (such as the reflective surface of sample). However, the result of the detection of flat bottom hole transpiration panel sample reflects that UBP is not appropriate for the detection of this kind of defects, because it is difficult to induce frictional heating of flat bottom holes. As contrast, Flash Pulse Thermography is used to detect the flat bottom holes, all of the holes of different depth and sizes can be seen distinctly. The results show that PT is more appropriate for the detection of flat bottom holes defects than UBP, therefore, it is important to select the appropriate excitation method according to different defects.

  11. Angular effects on thermochromic liquid crystal thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodzwa, Paul M.; Eaton, John K.

    2007-12-01

    This paper directly discusses the effects of lighting and viewing angles on liquid crystal thermography. This is because although thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs) are a widely-used and accepted tool in heat transfer research, little effort has been directed to analytically describing these effects. Such insight is invaluable for the development of effective mitigation strategies. Using analytical relationships that describe the perceived color shift, a systematic manner of improving the performance of a TLC system is presented. This is particularly relevant for applications where significant variations in lighting and/or viewing angles are expected (such as a highly curved surface). This discussion includes an examination of the importance of the definition of the hue angle used to calibrate the color of a TLC-painted surface. The theoretical basis of the validated high-accuracy calibration approach reported by Kodzwa et al. (Exp Fluids s00348-007-0310-6, 2007) is presented.

  12. Thermography evaluation of metal bonding materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safai, Morteza

    The thermographic technique used for the nondestructive evaluation of bondline integrity in metal and silicone rubber bonded material is described. An AGEMA model 880 IR thermographic scanner combined with a 20-deg lens was used to detect the IR radiation from the test panel. A video tape recorder was used to record the live temperature distribution at 25 picture frames per second. A personal computer with an AGEMA TIC-8000 digital image processor was used to record and plot the temperature vs time. The technique was found to be capable of detecting subsurface disbonds as small as 0.0625 sq in. in 0.187-in.-thick thermal protection system bonded materials. The thermography technique meets all the requirements of other approved NDT techniques, and it works well with complex structures and is noncontaminating, noncontact, real-time, and portable.

  13. Thermography evaluation of metal bonding materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safai, Morteza

    1992-04-01

    The thermographic technique used for the nondestructive evaluation of bondline integrity in metal and silicone rubber bonded material is described. An AGEMA model 880 IR thermographic scanner combined with a 20-deg lens was used to detect the IR radiation from the test panel. A video tape recorder was used to record the live temperature distribution at 25 picture frames per second. A personal computer with an AGEMA TIC-8000 digital image processor was used to record and plot the temperature vs time. The technique was found to be capable of detecting subsurface disbonds as small as 0.0625 sq in. in 0.187-in.-thick thermal protection system bonded materials. The thermography technique meets all the requirements of other approved NDT techniques, and it works well with complex structures and is noncontaminating, noncontact, real-time, and portable.

  14. Air tightness monitoring by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinzato, Ermanno G.; Marinetti, Sergio; Bison, Paolo G.

    2004-04-01

    The standard air tightness test of containers is based on measurement of global parameters as the outlet of a specific gas, detected by specialised mass spectrometers. The identification and location of air leakages is extremely important especially for the container manufacturer. At the same time, the measure of the mass flux is of importance. IR Thermography has been successfully applied for leakages detection on buildings, but unfortunately, the noise due to The standard air tightness test of containers is based on measurement of global parameters as the outlet of a specific gas, detected by specialised mass spectrometers. The identification and location of air leakages is extremely important especially for the container manufacturer. At the same time, the measure of the mass flux is of importance. IR Thermography has been successfully applied for leakage detection on buildings, but unfortunately, the noise due to environment limits its applicability, particularly in case of a small flux. A new thermal procedure has been developed for the leakage detection. The technique is based on the stimulation of the envelope with a low oscillating heat flux and lock-in analysis. An airflow is injected, with a harmonically varying flowrate and a slightly higher temperature than the ambient. Then, the thermograms sequence is analyzed in the frequency domain. A review of quantitative techniques for the convective heat exchange measurement is reported. The procedure has been utilized for special containers used for both transport and exhibition of pictures inside museums. Tests performed before and after gaskets improvements show the capability of the technique to estimate qualitatively the airflow.

  15. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION AND INFRARED REACTIVATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study evaluated the effectiveness and cost of removing trace organic contaminants and surrogates from drinking water by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The effect of multiple reactivations of spent GAC was also evaluated. Results indicated that reactivated GAC eff...

  16. Solar-energy absorber: Active infrared (IR) trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Efficiency of solar-energy absorbers may be improved to 95% by actively cooling their intermediate glass plates. This approach may be of interest to manufacturers of solar absorbers and to engineers and scientists developing new sources of energy.

  17. Method for improving visualization of infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimbalista, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Thermography has an extremely important difference from the other visual image converting electronic systems, like XRays or ultrasound: the infrared camera operator usually spend hour after hour with his/her eyes looking only at infrared images, sometimes several intermittent hours a day if not six or more continuous hours. This operational characteristic has a very important impact on yield, precision, errors and misinterpretation of the infrared images contents. Despite a great hardware development over the last fifty years, quality infrared thermography still lacks for a solution for these problems. The human eye physiology has not evolved to see infrared radiation neither the mind-brain has the capability to understand and decode infrared information. Chemical processes inside the human eye and functional cells distributions as well as cognitive-perceptual impact of images plays a crucial role in the perception, detection, and other steps of dealing with infrared images. The system presented here, called ThermoScala and patented in USA solves this problem using a coding process applicable to an original infrared image, generated from any value matrix, from any kind of infrared camera to make it much more suitable for human usage, causing a substantial difference in the way the retina and the brain processes the resultant images. The result obtained is a much less exhaustive way to see, identify and interpret infrared images generated by any infrared camera that uses this conversion process.

  18. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel. Part 5: Infrared imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A survey of infrared thermography for aerodynamics was made. Particular attention was paid to boundary layer transition detection. IR thermography flow visualization of 2-D and 3-D separation was surveyed. Heat transfer measurements and surface temperature measurements were also covered. Comparisons of several commercial IR cameras were made. The use of a recently purchased IR camera in the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels was studied. Optical access for these facilities and the methods to scan typical models was investigated.

  19. Optically active polyurethane@indium tin oxide nanocomposite: Preparation, characterization and study of infrared emissivity

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yong; Zhou, Yuming; Ge, Jianhua; Yang, Xiaoming

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► Silane coupling agent of KH550 was used to connect the ITO and polyurethanes. ► Infrared emissivity values of the hybrids were compared and analyzed. ► Interfacial synergistic action and orderly secondary structure were the key factors. -- Abstract: Optically active polyurethane@indium tin oxide and racemic polyurethane@indium tin oxide nanocomposites (LPU@ITO and RPU@ITO) were prepared by grafting the organics onto the surfaces of modified ITO nanoparticles. LPU@ITO and RPU@ITO composites based on the chiral and racemic tyrosine were characterized by FT-IR, UV–vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, TEM, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and the infrared emissivity values (8–14 μm) were investigated in addition. The results indicated that the polyurethanes had been successfully grafted onto the surfaces of ITO without destroying the crystalline structure. Both composites possessed the lower infrared emissivity values than the bare ITO nanoparticles, which indicated that the interfacial interaction had great effect on the infrared emissivity. Furthermore, LPU@ITO based on the optically active polyurethane had the virtue of regular secondary structure and more interfacial synergistic actions between organics and inorganics, thus it exhibited lower infrared emissivity value than RPU@ITO based on the racemic polyurethane.

  20. Improving spatial resolution in skin-contact thermography: comparison between a spline based and linear interpolation.

    PubMed

    Giansanti, Daniele

    2008-07-01

    A wearable device for skin-contact thermography [Giansanti D, Maccioni G. Development and testing of a wearable integrated thermometer sensor for skin contact thermography. Med Eng Phys 2006 [ahead of print

  1. Evaluation of Microbolometer-Based Thermography for Gossamer Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jonathan J.; Blandino, Joseph R.; Jenkins, Christopher H.; Pappa, Richard S.; Banik, Jeremy; Brown, Hunter; McEvoy, Kiley

    2005-01-01

    In August 2003, NASA's In-Space Propulsion Program contracted with our team to develop a prototype on-board Optical Diagnostics System (ODS) for solar sail flight tests. The ODS is intended to monitor sail deployment as well as structural and thermal behavior, and to validate computational models for use in designing future solar sail missions. This paper focuses on the thermography aspects of the ODS. A thermal model was developed to predict local sail temperature variations as a function of sail tilt to the sun, billow depth, and spectral optical properties of front and back sail surfaces. Temperature variations as small as 0.5 C can induce significant thermal strains that compare in magnitude to mechanical strains. These thermally induced strains may result in changes in shape and dynamics. The model also gave insight into the range and sensitivity required for in-flight thermal measurements and supported the development of an ABAQUS-coupled thermo-structural model. The paper also discusses three kinds of tests conducted to 1) determine the optical properties of candidate materials; 2) evaluate uncooled microbolometer-type infrared imagers; and 3) operate a prototype imager with the ODS baseline configuration. (Uncooled bolometers are less sensitive than cooled ones, but may be necessary because of restrictive ODS mass and power limits.) The team measured the spectral properties of several coated polymer samples at various angles of incidence. Two commercially available uncooled microbolometer imagers were compared, and it was found that reliable temperature measurements are feasible for both coated and uncoated sides of typical sail membrane materials.

  2. Evaluation of microbolometer-based thermography for gossamer space structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jonathan J.; Blandino, Joseph R.; Jenkins, Christopher H. M.; Pappa, Richard S.; Banik, Jeremy; Brown, Hunter; McEvoy, Kiley

    2005-08-01

    In August 2003, NASA's In-Space Propulsion Program contracted with our team to develop a prototype on-board Optical Diagnostics System (ODS) for solar sail flight tests. The ODS is intended to monitor sail deployment as well as structural and thermal behavior, and to validate computational models for use in designing future solar sail missions. This paper focuses on the thermography aspects of the ODS. A thermal model was developed to predict local sail temperature variations as a function of sail tilt to the sun, billow depth, and spectral optical properties of front and back sail surfaces. Temperature variations as small as 0.5 oC can induce significant thermal strains that compare in magnitude to mechanical strains. These thermally induced strains may result in changes in shape and dynamics. The model also gave insight into the range and sensitivity required for in-flight thermal measurements and supported the development of an ABAQUS-coupled thermo-structural model. The paper also discusses three kinds of tests conducted to 1) determine the optical properties of candidate materials; 2) evaluate uncooled microbolometer-type infrared imagers; and 3) operate a prototype imager with the ODS baseline configuration. (Uncooled bolometers are less sensitive than cooled ones, but may be necessary because of restrictive ODS mass and power limits.) The team measured the spectral properties of several coated polymer samples at various angles of incidence. Two commercially available uncooled microbolometer imagers were compared, and it was found that reliable temperature measurements are feasible for both coated and uncoated sides of typical sail membrane materials.

  3. On the infrared-active overtones n nu 3 of uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Merwe, P. du T.

    1993-10-01

    A perspective is provided of the infrared-active fundamental mode ν3 and the band structure of its overtones relevant for uranium hexafluoride. The treatment is based on nonlinear (Morse-type) creation and annihilation operators. The spectrum generating algebra provides ready access to anharmonic spectral features which incorporate dissociation characteristics.

  4. Research on acupuncture points and cortical functional activation position in cats by infrared imaging detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuwang; Sha, Zhanyou; Wang, Shuhai; Wen, Huanming

    2007-12-01

    The research of the brain cognition is mainly to find out the activation position in brain according to the stimulation at present in the world. The research regards the animals as the experimental objects and explores the stimulation response on the cerebral cortex of acupuncture. It provides a new method, which can detect the activation position on the creatural cerebral cortex directly by middle-far infrared imaging. According to the theory of local temperature situation, the difference of cortical temperature maybe associate with the excitement of cortical nerve cells, the metabolism of local tissue and the local hemal circulation. Direct naked detection of temperature variety on cerebral cortex is applied by middle and far infrared imaging technology. So the activation position is ascertained. The effect of stimulation response is superior to other indirect methods. After removing the skulls on the head, full of cerebral cortex of a cat are exposed. By observing the infrared images and measuring the temperatures of the visual cerebral cortex during the process of acupuncturing, the points are used to judge the activation position. The variety in the cortical functional sections is corresponding to the result of the acupuncture points in terms of infrared images and temperatures. According to experimental results, we know that the variety of a cortical functional section is corresponding to a special acupuncture point exactly.

  5. Thermal diffusivity measurements of thin plates and filaments using lock-in thermography.

    PubMed

    Mendioroz, Arantza; Fuente-Dacal, Raquel; Apiñaniz, Estibaliz; Salazar, Agustín

    2009-07-01

    Photothermal radiometry has been widely used to measure the thermal diffusivity of bulk materials. In the case of thin plates and filaments, a one-dimensional heat propagation model including heat losses has been developed, predicting that the thermal diffusivity can be obtained by recording both the surface temperature amplitude and phase profile slopes ("slope method"). However, this method has given highly overestimated values of the thermal diffusivity of poor-conducting films and filaments. In this paper we analyze the effect of the experimental factors affecting the thermal diffusivity measurements of thin plates and filaments using infrared thermography, in order to establish the experimental conditions needed to obtain accurate and reliable values of the diffusivity of any kind of material using the slope method. We present the calculations of the surface temperature of thin isotropic and anisotropic plates heated by a modulated and tightly focused laser beam, showing that the slope method is also valid for this kind of pointlike heating. Special attention is paid to the effect of surface heat losses (convective and radiative) on the diffusivity measurements of small-dimension and poor-conducting materials. Lock-in thermography measurements performed in the best experimental conditions on a wide set of samples of different thermal properties (thin isotropic and anisotropic plates and filaments) confirm the validity of the slope method to measure accurately the thermal diffusivity of samples of these shapes. PMID:19655974

  6. Toward understanding the complex mechanisms behind breast thermography: an overview for comprehensive numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Li; Zhan, Wang; Loew, Murray H.

    2011-03-01

    The abnormal thermogram has been shown to be a reliable indicator of a high risk of breast cancer. Nevertheless, a major weakness of current infrared breast thermography is its poor sensitivity for deeper tumors. Numerical modeling for breast thermography provides an effective tool to investigate the complex relationships between the breast thermal behaviors and the underlying patho-physiological conditions. We have developed a set of new modeling techniques to take into account some subtle factors usually ignored in previous studies, such as gravity-induced elastic deformations of the breast, nonlinear elasticity of soft tissues, and dynamic behavior of thermograms. Conventional "forward problem" modeling cannot be used directly to improve tumor detectability, however, because the underlying tissue thermal properties are generally unknown. Therefore, we propose an "inverse problem" modeling technique that aims to estimate the tissue thermal properties from the breast surface thermogram. Our data suggest that the estimation of the tumor-induced thermal contrast can be improved significantly by using the proposed inverse problem solving techniques to provide the individual-specific thermal background, especially for deeper tumors. We expect the proposed new methods, taken together, to provide a stronger foundation for, and greater specificity and precision in, thermographic diagnosis, and treatment, of breast cancer.

  7. Building thermography as a tool in energy audits and building commissioning procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppinen, Timo

    2007-04-01

    A Building Commissioning-project (ToVa) was launched in Finland in the year 2003. A comprehensive commissioning procedure, including the building process and operation stage was developed in the project. This procedure will confirm the precise documentation of client's goals, definition of planning goals and the performance of the building. It is rather usual, that within 1-2 years after introduction the users complain about the defects or performance malfunctions of the building. Thermography is one important manual tool in verifying the thermal performance of the building envelope. In this paper the results of one pilot building (a school) will be presented. In surveying the condition and energy efficiency of buildings, various auxiliary means are needed. We can compare the consumption data of the target building with other, same type of buildings by benchmarking. Energy audit helps to localize and determine the energy saving potential. The most general and also most effective auxiliary means in monitoring the thermal performance of building envelopes is an infrared camera. In this presentation some examples of the use of thermography in energy audits are presented.

  8. Validation of quantitative IR thermography for estimating the U-value by a hot box apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardi, I.; Paoletti, D.; Ambrosini, D.; de Rubeis, T.; Sfarra, S.

    2015-11-01

    Energy saving plays a key role in the reduction of energy consumption and carbon emission, and therefore it is essential for reaching the goal of the 20-20-2020 policy. In particular, buildings are responsible of about 30% of the total amount of Europe energy consumption; the increase of their energy efficiency with the reduction of the thermal transmittance of the envelope is a point of strength with the actions and strategies of the policy makers. Currently, the study of energy performance of buildings is based on international standards, in particular the Italian one allows to calculate the U-value according the ISO 6946 or by in-situ measurements, using a heat flow meter (HFM), following recommendations provided in ISO 9869. In the last few years, a new technique, based on Infrared Thermography (IRT) (also referred to as Infrared Thermovision Technique - ITT), has been proposed for in situ determination of the thermal transmittance of opaque building elements. Some case studies have been reported. This method has already been applied on existing buildings, providing reliable results, but also revealing some weaknesses. In order to overcome such weak points and to assess a systematic procedure for the application of IRT, a validation of the method has been performed in a monitored environment. Infrared camera, the heat flow meter sensors and a nearby meteorological station have been used for thermal transmittance measurement. Comparison between the U-values measured in a hot box with IRT as well as values calculated following international standards and HFM results has been effected. Results give a good description of the advantages, as well as of the open problems, of IR Thermography for estimating the U-value. Further studies will help to refine the technique, and to identify the best operative conditions.

  9. Optical Activation of Germanium Plasmonic Antennas in the Mid-Infrared.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marco P; Schmidt, Christian; Sakat, Emilie; Stock, Johannes; Samarelli, Antonio; Frigerio, Jacopo; Ortolani, Michele; Paul, Douglas J; Isella, Giovanni; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Biagioni, Paolo; Brida, Daniele

    2016-07-22

    Impulsive interband excitation with femtosecond near-infrared pulses establishes a plasma response in intrinsic germanium structures fabricated on a silicon substrate. This direct approach activates the plasmonic resonance of the Ge structures and enables their use as optical antennas up to the mid-infrared spectral range. The optical switching lasts for hundreds of picoseconds until charge recombination redshifts the plasma frequency. The full behavior of the structures is modeled by the electrodynamic response established by an electron-hole plasma in a regular array of antennas. PMID:27494498

  10. Spectroscopy of infrared-active phonons in high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvinchuk, A. P.; Thomsen, C.; Cardona, M.; Borjesson, L.

    1995-01-01

    For a large variety of superconducting materials both experimental and theoretical lattice dynamical studies have been performed to date. The assignment of the observed infrared- and Raman-active phonon modes to the particular lattice eigenmodes is generally accepted. We will concentrate here upon the analysis of the changes of the infrared-phonon parameters (frequency and linewidth) upon entering the superconducting state which, as will be shown, may provide information on the magnitude of the superconductivity-related gap and its dependence on the superconducting transition temperature Tc.

  11. Optical Activation of Germanium Plasmonic Antennas in the Mid-Infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Marco P.; Schmidt, Christian; Sakat, Emilie; Stock, Johannes; Samarelli, Antonio; Frigerio, Jacopo; Ortolani, Michele; Paul, Douglas J.; Isella, Giovanni; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Biagioni, Paolo; Brida, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    Impulsive interband excitation with femtosecond near-infrared pulses establishes a plasma response in intrinsic germanium structures fabricated on a silicon substrate. This direct approach activates the plasmonic resonance of the Ge structures and enables their use as optical antennas up to the mid-infrared spectral range. The optical switching lasts for hundreds of picoseconds until charge recombination redshifts the plasma frequency. The full behavior of the structures is modeled by the electrodynamic response established by an electron-hole plasma in a regular array of antennas.

  12. The hunt for red active galactic nuclei: a new infrared diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadda, Dario; Rodighiero, Giulia

    2014-10-01

    We introduce a new infrared diagnostic to separate galaxies on the basis of their dominant infrared emission: stellar or nuclear. The main novelty with respect to existing diagnostics is the use of a broad band encompassing at the same time the 9.7-μm silicate absorption feature and one of the adjacent broad polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features. This provides a robust estimate of the near- to mid-infrared continuum slope and enables a clear distinction among different classes of galaxies up to a redshift z ˜ 2.5. The diagnostic can be applied to a wealth of archival data from the ISO, Spitzer and Akari surveys, as well as future James Webb Space Telescope surveys. Based on data in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), Lockman Hole and North Ecliptic Pole fields, we find that approximately 70 per cent of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) detected with X-ray and optical spectroscopy dominate the total mid-infrared emission. Finally, we estimate that AGNs contribute less than 30 per cent of the mid-infrared extragalactic integrated emission.

  13. INFRARED CLASSIFICATION AND LUMINOSITIES FOR DUSTY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THE MOST LUMINOUS QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine; Houck, James; Barry, Donald; Lebouteiller, Vianney

    2012-12-20

    Mid-infrared spectroscopic measurements from the Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) on Spitzer are given for 125 hard X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs; 14-195 keV) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample and for 32 AGNs with black hole masses (BHMs) from reverberation mapping. The 9.7 {mu}m silicate feature in emission or absorption defines an infrared AGN classification describing whether AGNs are observed through dust clouds, indicating that 55% of the BAT AGNs are observed through dust. The mid-infrared dust continuum luminosity is shown to be an excellent indicator of intrinsic AGN luminosity, scaling closely with the hard X-ray luminosity, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m)/L(X) = -0.31 {+-} 0.35, and independent of classification determined from silicate emission or absorption. Dust luminosity scales closely with BHM, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) = (37.2 {+-} 0.5) + 0.87 log BHM for luminosity in erg s{sup -1} and BHM in M{sub Sun }. The 100 most luminous type 1 quasars as measured in {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) are found by comparing Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) optically discovered quasars with photometry at 22 {mu}m from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), scaled to rest frame 7.8 {mu}m using an empirical template determined from IRS spectra. The most luminous SDSS/WISE quasars have the same maximum infrared luminosities for all 1.5 < z < 5, reaching total infrared luminosity L{sub IR} = 10{sup 14.4} L{sub Sun }. Comparing with dust-obscured galaxies from Spitzer and WISE surveys, we find no evidence of hyperluminous obscured quasars whose maximum infrared luminosities exceed the maximum infrared luminosities of optically discovered quasars. Bolometric luminosities L{sub bol} estimated from rest-frame optical or ultraviolet luminosities are compared to L{sub IR}. For the local AGN, the median log L{sub IR}/L{sub bol} = -0.35, consistent with a covering factor of 45% for the absorbing dust clouds. For the SDSS/WISE quasars, the median log L

  14. Three-dimensional non-destructive testing (NDT) in the infrared spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhloufi, Moulay A.; Guyon, Yannis; Bendada, Abdelhakim; Castenado, Clemente-Ibarra

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) vision scanning for metrology and inspection applications is an area that knows an increasing interest in the industry. This interest is driven by the recent advances in 3D technologies, permitting to attain high precision measurements at an affordable cost. 3D vision allows for the modelling and inspection of the visible surface of objects. When it is necessary to detect subsurface defects, active infrared (IR) thermography is one of the most used tools today for non-destructive testing (NDT) of materials. Fusion of these two modalities allows the simultaneous detection of surface and subsurface defects and to visualize these defects overlaid on a 3D model of the scanned and modelled parts or their 3D computer-aided design (CAD) models. In this work, we present a framework for automatically fusing 3D data (scanned or CAD) with the infrared thermal images for an NDT process in 3D space.

  15. Defect characterisation based on heat diffusion using induction thermography testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunze; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed eddy current (PEC) thermography (a.k.a. induction thermography) has been successfully applied to detect defects (corrosion, cracks, impact, and delamination) in metal alloy and carbon fiber reinforced plastic. During these applications, the defect detection mechanism is mainly investigated based on the eddy current interaction with defect. In this paper, defect characterisation for wall thinning defect and inner defect in steel is investigated based on heat diffusion. The paper presents the PEC thermography testing, which integrates the reflection mode and transmission mode by means of configuring two cameras on both sides of sample. The defect characterisation methods under transmission mode and reflection mode are investigated and compared through 1D analytical analysis, 3D numerical studies, and experimental studies. The suitable detection mode for wall thinning and inner defects quantification is concluded.

  16. Defect characterisation based on heat diffusion using induction thermography testing.

    PubMed

    He, Yunze; Pan, Mengchun; Luo, Feilu

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed eddy current (PEC) thermography (a.k.a. induction thermography) has been successfully applied to detect defects (corrosion, cracks, impact, and delamination) in metal alloy and carbon fiber reinforced plastic. During these applications, the defect detection mechanism is mainly investigated based on the eddy current interaction with defect. In this paper, defect characterisation for wall thinning defect and inner defect in steel is investigated based on heat diffusion. The paper presents the PEC thermography testing, which integrates the reflection mode and transmission mode by means of configuring two cameras on both sides of sample. The defect characterisation methods under transmission mode and reflection mode are investigated and compared through 1D analytical analysis, 3D numerical studies, and experimental studies. The suitable detection mode for wall thinning and inner defects quantification is concluded. PMID:23126785

  17. THE SPITZER MID-INFRARED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SURVEY. I. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF OBSCURED CANDIDATES AND NORMAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SELECTED IN THE MID-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, M.; Ridgway, S. E.; Gates, E. L.; Petric, A. O.; Sajina, A.; Urrutia, T.; Cox Drews, S.; Harrison, C.; Seymour, N.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a program of optical and near-infrared spectroscopic follow-up of candidate active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected in the mid-infrared. This survey selects both normal and obscured AGNs closely matched in luminosity across a wide range, from Seyfert galaxies with bolometric luminosities L {sub bol} ∼ 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} to highly luminous quasars (L {sub bol} ∼ 10{sup 14} L {sub ☉}), all with redshifts ranging from 0 to 4.3. Samples of candidate AGNs were selected with mid-infrared color cuts at several different 24 μm flux density limits to ensure a range of luminosities at a given redshift. The survey consists of 786 candidate AGNs and quasars, of which 672 have spectroscopic redshifts and classifications. Of these, 137 (20%) are type 1 AGNs with blue continua, 294 (44%) are type 2 objects with extinctions A{sub V} ∼> 5 toward their AGNs, 96 (14%) are AGNs with lower extinctions (A{sub V} ∼ 1), and 145 (22%) have redshifts, but no clear signs of AGN activity in their spectra. Of the survey objects 50% have L {sub bol} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}, in the quasar regime. We present composite spectra for type 2 quasars and objects with no signs of AGN activity in their spectra. We also discuss the mid-infrared—emission-line luminosity correlation and present the results of cross correlations with serendipitous X-ray and radio sources. The results show that: (1) obscured objects dominate the overall AGN population, (2) mid-infrared selected AGN candidates exist which lack AGN signatures in their optical spectra but have AGN-like X-ray or radio counterparts, and (3) X-ray and optical classifications of obscured and unobscured AGNs often differ.

  18. Heat flux determination at the AWJ cutting zone using IR thermography and inverse heat conduction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R.S.; Kovacevic, R.; Beardsley, H.E.

    1996-12-31

    In abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting, the cutting tool is a thin stream of high velocity abrasive waterjet slurry which can be considered as a moving line heat source that increases the temperature of the narrow zone along the cut kerf wall. A suitably defined inverse heat conduction problem which uses the experimentally determined temperature histories at various points in the workpiece, is adopted to determine the heat flux at the cutting zone. Temperature distribution in the workpiece and the cutting nozzle during AWJ cutting is monitored using infrared thermography. A suitable strategy for on-line monitoring of the radial and axial wear of the AWJ nozzle based on the nozzle temperature distribution is also proposed.

  19. Real Time Fatigue Damage Growth Assessment of a Composite Three-Stringer Panel Using Passive Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Horne, Michael R.; Bly, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue testing of advanced composite structures is critical to validate both structural designs and damage prediction models. In-situ inspection methods are necessary to track damage onset and growth as a function of load cycles. Passive thermography is a large area, noncontact inspection technique that is used to detect composite damage onset and growth in real time as a function of fatigue cycles. The thermal images are acquired in synchronicity to the applied compressive load using a dual infrared camera acquisition system for full (front and back) coverage. Image processing algorithms are investigated to increase defect contrast areas. The thermal results are compared to non-immersion ultrasound inspections and acoustic emission data.

  20. Fuel Cell Manufacturing Diagnostic Techniques: IR Thermography with Reactive Flow through Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Manak, A. J.; Ulsh, M.; Bender, G.

    2012-01-01

    While design and material considerations for PEMFCs have a large impact on cost, it is also necessary to consider a transition to high volume production of fuel cell systems, including MEA components, to enable economies of scale and reduce per unit cost. One of the critical manufacturing tasks is developing and deploying techniques to provide in‐process measurement of fuel cell components for quality control. This effort requires a subsidiary task: The study of the effect of manufacturing defects on performance and durability with the objective to establish validated manufacturing tolerances for fuel cell components. This work focuses on the development of a potential quality control method for gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs). The method consists of infrared (IR) thermography combined with reactive flow through (RFT) excitation. Detection of catalyst loading reduction defects in GDE catalyst layers will be presented.