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Sample records for active island arc

  1. Interactions between active faulting, volcanism, and sedimentary processes at an island arc: Insights from Les Saintes channel, Lesser Antilles arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, F.; Feuillet, N.; Deplus, C.

    2016-07-01

    New high-resolution marine geophysical data allow to characterize a large normal fault system in the Lesser Antilles arc, and to investigate the interactions between active faulting, volcanism, sedimentary, and mass-wasting processes. Les Saintes fault system is composed of several normal faults that form a 30 km wide half-graben accommodating NE-SW extension. It is bounded by the Roseau fault, responsible for the destructive Mw 6.3 21 November 2004 earthquake. The Roseau fault has been identified from the island of Basse-Terre to Dominica. It is thus 40 km long, and it could generate Mw 7 earthquakes in the future. Several submarine volcanoes are also recognized. We show that the fault system initiated after the main volcanic construction and subsequently controls the emission of volcanic products. The system propagates southward through damage zones. At the tip of the damage zones, several volcanic cones were recently emplaced probably due to fissures opening in an area of stress increase. A two-way interaction is observed between active faulting and sedimentary processes. The faults control the development of the main turbiditic system made of kilometer-wide canyons, as well as the location of sediment ponding. In turn, erosion and sedimentation prevent scarp growth at the seafloor. Faulting also enhances mass-wasting processes. Since its initiation, the fault system has consequently modified the morphologic evolution of the arc through perturbation of the sedimentary processes and localization of the more recent volcanic activity.

  2. Esmeralda Bank: Geochemistry of an active submarine volcano in the Mariana Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Robert J.; Bibee, L. D.

    1984-05-01

    Esmeralda Bank is the southernmost active volcano in the Izu-Volcano-Mariana Arc. This submarine volcano is one of the most active vents in the western Pacific. It has a total volume of about 27 km3, rising to within 30 m of sea level. Two dredge hauls from Esmeralda recovered fresh, nearly aphyric, vesicular basalts and basaltic andesites and minor basaltic vitrophyre. These samples reflect uniform yet unusual major and trace element chemistries. Mean abundances of TiO2 (1.3%) and FeO* (12.6%) are higher and CaO (9.2%) and Al2O3 (15.1%) are lower than rocks of similar silica content from other active Mariana Arc volcanoes. Mean incompatible element ratios K/Rb (488) and K/Ba (29) of Esmeralda rocks are indistinguishable from those of other Mariana Arc volcanoes. On a Ti-Zr plot, Esmeralda samples plot in the field of oceanic basalts while other Mariana Arc volcanic rocks plot in the field for island arcs. Incompatible element ratios K/Rb and K/Ba and isotopic compositions of Sr (87Sr/86Sr=0.70342 0.70348), Nd (ɛND=+7.6 to +8.1), and O(δ18O=+5.8 to +5.9) are incompatible with models calling for the Esmeralda source to include appreciable contributions from pelagic sediments or fresh or altered abyssal tholeiite from subduction zone melting. Instead, incompatible element and isotopic ratios of Esmeralda rocks are similar to those of intra-plate oceanic islands or “hot-spot” volcanoes in general and Kilauean tholeiites in particular. The conclusion that the source for Esmeralda lavas is an ocean-island type mantle reservoir is preferred. Esmeralda Bank rare earth element patterns are inconsistent with models calling for residual garnet in the source region, but are adequately modelled by 7 10% equilibrium partial melting of spinel lherzolite. This is supported by consideration of the results of melting experiments at 20 kbars, 1,150° C with CO2 and H2O as important volatile components. These experiments further indicate that low MgO (4.1%), MgO/FeO*(0.25) and

  3. Volcanic activity recorded in deep-sea sediments and the geodynamic evolution of western Pacific island arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambray, Hervé; Pubellier, Manuel; Jolivet, Laurent; Pouclet, André

    A compilation of volcanic ashes interbedded in deep-sea sediments was carried out from DSDP-IPOD and ODP data collected along the western Pacific margin. Using a tephrochronological method, we attempted to reconstruct the Cenozoic and Quaternary volcanic activity of major western Pacific arcs. For every arc, established volcanic episodes and volcanic-tectonic evolution recorded on land were compared. This study reveals close connections between tectonic events and volcanic activity of arcs, as well a temporal relationship between the opening of marginal basins and arc volcanism. In the Tohoku (NE Japan) and Bonin arcs (SE Japan), arc volcanic activity clearly vanishes during backarc spreading. In contrast, intense volcanism occurs during both arc rifting and intervals of no spreading. Detailed comparisons show that the maximum volcanic output is closely connected with the stress field evolution recorded on land. The case of Seinan arc (SW Japan) shows a good fit between volcanic episodes and periods of release of the compressional stress field after major orogenic events. Furthermore, in the marine sediments off Japan, a systematic late Miocene volcanic hiatus interpreted as a quiescence of volcanic activity corresponds to a changing stress field on the Tohoku and Bonin arcs. These correlations between volcanic episodicity and tectonic evolution of island arcs allow us to discuss the influence of subduction process on arc volcanism. In the Philippines, the volcanic signal in marine sediments is compromised by rapid alteration and diagenesis of ashes. Nonetheless, only the main events of arc volcanic activity are preserved. A comparison with on land volcanism shows that this filtered volcanic signal in different places corresponds to incipient subduction (transition from passive to active margins) or to the final stages of basin closure.

  4. Interplay between active and past tectonics in the Hellenic Arc (Greece): Geological and geomorphic evidences from Kythira Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Blanco, David; de Gelder, Gino; Delorme, Arthur; Lacassin, Robin; Armijo, Rolando

    2016-04-01

    The Hellenic Arc undergoes the largest convergence velocity and highest seismic activity among Mediterranean subduction systems. The outer-arc high islands of the Hellenic Arc are thus key to understand the mode of deformation of the crust during subduction and the mechanisms behind vertical motions at the front of overriding plates, here and elsewhere. Kythira Island, located between SW Peloponnese and NE Crete, provides an exceptional opportunity to understand the interaction between past and active tectonics in the Hellenic Arc. The recent uplift of the Kythira Island is marked in its landscape as paleosurfaces, marine terraces, abandon valleys and gorges. Together with the sedimentary record of the island and its geologic structures, we attempt to reconstruct its tectonic evolution since the latest Miocene. Here, we present exceptionally detailed geological and geomorphological maps of the Kythira Island based on fieldwork, Pleiades satellite imagery and 2-m resolution DEM, as well as the analyses of marine terraces and river network morphometrics. Pliocene or younger infill sequences rest atop of Palaeocene or older rocks in several marine basins in the island. In the largest marine basin, we found a stratigraphic sequence with a (tilted) continental conglomerate at the base, passing upwards to a disconformal subhorizontal conglomerate, calcarenites and fine sands, and terminating with a marine conglomerate. This marine conglomerate acts as a "cap rock" that marks the topography and shapes the highermost, and most extensive, low-relief surface. Overall, the infill sequence onlaps basement with the exception of the western margin where normal faults partly controlled the deposition of its lower sector. These faults reactivated older Hellenic fold-and-thrust structures, parallel to the subduction trench, and were not active during the maximum marine transgression that led to the deposition of the subhorizontal part of the infill sequence, including the topmost

  5. Remote OP-FTIR sensing of magmatic gases driving Yasur trachyandesitic explosive activity, Vanuatu island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, P.; Burton, M.; Sawyer, G.

    2012-04-01

    Yasur volcano, located in the southern part of the Vanuatu island arc (Tanna island), is a small trachyandesitic cone that has grown in the resurgent (17 cm y-1) Siwi caldera. Since about 1,400 years Yasur has displayed almost continuous Strombolian-Vulcanian explosive activity and is one of the most actively erupting volcanoes worldwide. Using open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy from the crater rim (260-300 m slanting distance) and molten lava as the radiation source, we measured during several days the high frequency compositional variations of magmatic gases driving this explosive activity. Our results expand previous observations from a first FTIR measurement in 2005 [1] and complement in-situ gas measurements made in 2007 [2] within our same research framework (French ANR 'VOLGASPEC' project). FTIR absorption spectra allowed simultaneous retrieval of the molar path amounts of volcanic H2O, CO2, SO2, HCl and CO, corrected for air background in case of H2O, CO2 and CO. We observe a rather steady composition of the crater gas release between the explosions (~one every 1-3 mn) and sharp compositional variations (increases of SO2/HCl, CO2/SO2 and CO/CO2 ratios, decrease of H2O/SO2) associated with the explosions, which demonstrate the ascent and bursting of deeper-derived, CO2-SO2-CO-enriched gas slugs. Such abrupt compositional changes of magmatic gases driving explosive activity at Yasur do resemble those recorded at Stromboli volcano [3]. However, in contrast to Stromboli, Yasur explosions generate dense ash clouds whose fast expansion significantly affects the measured column gas amounts at the onset of each event (an effect considered in our data elaboration). When referred to the pressure-related behaviour of dissolved volatiles in the trachyandesitic magma feeding Yasur (melt inclusions [2]), our results provide new constraints on the source depth(s) of the explosions and the magma degassing processes controlling the volcanic activity

  6. Earthquake location in island arcs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engdahl, E.R.; Dewey, J.W.; Fujita, K.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive data set of selected teleseismic P-wave arrivals and local-network P- and S-wave arrivals from large earthquakes occurring at all depths within a small section of the central Aleutians is used to examine the general problem of earthquake location in island arcs. Reference hypocenters for this special data set are determined for shallow earthquakes from local-network data and for deep earthquakes from combined local and teleseismic data by joint inversion for structure and location. The high-velocity lithospheric slab beneath the central Aleutians may displace hypocenters that are located using spherically symmetric Earth models; the amount of displacement depends on the position of the earthquakes with respect to the slab and on whether local or teleseismic data are used to locate the earthquakes. Hypocenters for trench and intermediate-depth events appear to be minimally biased by the effects of slab structure on rays to teleseismic stations. However, locations of intermediate-depth events based on only local data are systematically displaced southwards, the magnitude of the displacement being proportional to depth. Shallow-focus events along the main thrust zone, although well located using only local-network data, are severely shifted northwards and deeper, with displacements as large as 50 km, by slab effects on teleseismic travel times. Hypocenters determined by a method that utilizes seismic ray tracing through a three-dimensional velocity model of the subduction zone, derived by thermal modeling, are compared to results obtained by the method of joint hypocenter determination (JHD) that formally assumes a laterally homogeneous velocity model over the source region and treats all raypath anomalies as constant station corrections to the travel-time curve. The ray-tracing method has the theoretical advantage that it accounts for variations in travel-time anomalies within a group of events distributed over a sizable region of a dipping, high

  7. Andaman-Sumatra island arc: II. The December 26, 2004 earthquake as one of the key episodes in seismogenic activation of the arc in the beginning of XXI century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakina, L. M.; Moskvina, A. G.

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the nature and parameters of the source for the earthquake that occurred in Sumatra on December 26, 2004 is suggested. Our study relies on a variety of data on the geological structure of the region, long-term seismicity, spatial distribution of the foreshocks and aftershocks, and focal mechanisms; and the pattern of shaking and tsunami, regularities in the occurrence of the earthquakes, and the genetic relationship between the seismic and geological parameters inherent in various types of seismogenic zones including island arcs. The source of the Sumatran earthquake is a steep reverse fault striking parallel to the island arc and dipping towards the ocean. The length of the fault is ˜450 km, and its probable bedding depth is ˜70-100 km. The magnitude of this seismic event corresponding to the length of its source is 8.9-9.0. The vertical displacement in the source probably reached 9-13 m. The fault is located near the inner boundary of the Aceh Depression between the epicenter of the earthquake and the northern tip of the depression. The strike-slip and strike-slip reverse the faults cutting the island arc form the northern and southern borders of the source. The location and source parameters in the suggested interpretation account quite well for the observed pattern of shaking and tsunami. The Aceh Depression and its environs probably also host other seismic sources in the form of large reverse faults. The Sumatran earthquake, which was the culmination of the seismogenic activation of the Andaman-Sumatra island arc in the beginning of XXI century, is a typical tsunamigenic island-arc earthquake. By its characteristics, this event is an analogue to the M W = 9 Kamchatka earthquake of November 4, 1952. The spatial distribution of the epicenters and the focal mechanisms of the aftershocks indicate that the repeated shocks during the Sumatran event were caused by the activation of a complex system of geological structures in various parts of

  8. Evolution of intrusive activity in the Greater Antilles: Zircon U-Th-Pb Ages for island arc granitoids in Puerto Rico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavosie, A. J.; Perez, R. J.; Gehrels, G.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the timing of island arc construction in the Greater Antilles is central to unraveling the complex history and evolution of the Caribbean plate. In this study, we present zircon U-Pb ages for oceanic island arc granitoids from Puerto Rico to address both the compositional variation and timing of intrusive activity along the northeast margin of the Caribbean plate. Prior geochronology studies of plutonic rocks in PR have used the K-Ar or Ar-Ar methods on minerals and WR, which are susceptible to thermal resetting (Cox et al., 1977; Smith et al., 1998). In this study 14 plutons were analyzed from the three main igneous provinces of Puerto Rico, the southern (SIP) central (CIP), and northeast (NIP) igneous provinces, and include the following stocks/batholiths: SIP: Las Tunas, Tibes, Tea Road; CIP: Utuado, Ciales, Morovis, Barranquitas, Coamo Arriba, Cuyon, Caguas, San Lorenzo, Vieques; NIP: Rio Blanco. While the igneous bodies vary in size (1 to 500 km2), whole-rock analyses show little variation, as the plutons are primarily intermediate in composition (56 to 66 wt. % SiO2), metaluminous (avg. A/CNK = 0.91, n=135), and range from diorite to granodiorite. Exposures of gabbros associated with the above plutons are rare. Zircons were mounted in epoxy rounds, and imaged for internal zoning characteristics prior to U-Pb analysis. Cathodoluminescence images show that the zircons are mostly oscillatory and/or sector zoned, and record simple growth histories, with no single grain demonstrating evidence of inheritance. Zoning patterns are similar within a population, but differ from among samples, regardless of WR composition or pluton size. Zircons were analyzed for age by MC-ICPMS at the Univ. of Arizona. Spot analyses were made on 20-30 grains per sample. The zircon U-Pb ages record a nearly continuous interval of Cretaceous to Eocene intrusive activity from 85 to 39 Ma. Three main pulses of magmatism are distinguished: (1) intrusion of small, intermediate

  9. Heat flow in the Lesser Antilles island arc and adjacent back arc Grenada basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, Michael; Hornbach, Matthew J.; Le Friant, Anne; Ishizuka, Osamu; Stroncik, Nicole; Adachi, Tatsuya; Aljahdali, Mohammed; Boudon, Georges; Breitkreuz, Christoph; Fraass, Andrew; Fujinawa, Akihiko; Hatfield, Robert; Jutzeler, Martin; Kataoka, Kyoko; Lafuerza, Sara; Maeno, Fukashi; Martinez-Colon, Michael; McCanta, Molly; Morgan, Sally; Palmer, Martin R.; Saito, Takeshi; Slagle, Angela; Stinton, Adam J.; Subramanyam, K. S. V.; Tamura, Yoshihiko; Talling, Peter J.; Villemant, Benoit; Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Wang, Fei

    2012-08-01

    Using temperature gradients measured in 10 holes at 6 sites, we generate the first high fidelity heat flow measurements from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program drill holes across the northern and central Lesser Antilles arc and back arc Grenada basin. The implied heat flow, after correcting for bathymetry and sedimentation effects, ranges from about 0.1 W/m2 on the crest of the arc, midway between the volcanic islands of Montserrat and Guadeloupe, to <0.07 W/m2 at distances >15 km from the crest in the back arc direction. Combined with previous measurements, we find that the magnitude and spatial pattern of heat flow are similar to those at continental arcs. The heat flow in the Grenada basin to the west of the active arc is 0.06 W/m2, a factor of 2 lower than that found in the previous and most recent study. There is no thermal evidence for significant shallow fluid advection at any of these sites. Present-day volcanism is confined to the region with the highest heat flow.

  10. Heat flow in the Lesser Antilles island arc and adjacent back arc Grenada basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, M.; Hornbach, M. J.; Le Friant, A.; Ishizuka, O.; Stroncik, N.

    2012-12-01

    Using temperature gradients measured in 10 holes at 6 sites, we generate the first high fidelity heat flow measurements from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program drill holes across the northern and central Lesser Antilles arc and back arc Grenada basin. The implied heat flow, after correcting for bathymetry and sedimentation effects, ranges from about 0.1 W/m2 on the crest of the arc, midway between the volcanic islands of Montserrat and Guadeloupe, to < 0.07 W/m2 at distances > 15 km from the crest in the back arc direction. Combined with previous measurements, we find that the magnitude and spatial pattern of heat flow are similar to those at continental arcs. The heat flow in the Grenada basin to the west of the active arc is 0.06 W/m2, a factor of 2 lower than that found in the previous and most recent study. There is no thermal evidence for significant shallow fluid advection at any of these sites. Present day volcanism is confined to the region with the highest heat flow.

  11. Heat flow in the Lesser Antilles island arc and adjacent back arc Grenada basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manga, Michael; Hornbach, Matt; Le Friant, Anne; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    Using temperature gradients measured in 10 holes at 6 sites, we generate the first high fidelity heat flow measurements from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program drill holes across the northern and central Lesser Antilles arc and back arc Grenada basin. The implied heat flow, after correcting for bathymetry and sedimentation effects, ranges from about 0.1 W/m2 on the crest of the arc, midway between the volcanic islands of Montserrat and Guadeloupe, to < 0.07 W/m2 at distances > 15 km from the crest in the back arc direction. Combined with previous measurements, we find that the magnitude and spatial pattern of heat flow are similar to those at continental arcs. The heat flow in the Grenada basin to the west of the active arc is 0.06 W/m2, a factor of 2 lower than that found in the previous and most recent study. There is no thermal evidence for significant shallow fluid advection at any of these sites. Present day volcanism is confined to the region with the highest heat flow.

  12. Barrier island arcs along abandoned Mississippi River deltas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Penland, S.; Suter, J.R.; Boyd, Ron

    1985-01-01

    Generation of transgressive barrier island arcs along the Mississippi River delta plain and preservation of barrier shoreline facies in their retreat paths on the inner shelf is controlled by: (1) shoreface translation; (2) age of the transgression; and (3) the thickness of the barrier island arc sediment package. Barrier island arcs experience an average relative sea level rise of 0.50-1.00 cm yr-1 and shoreface retreat rates range from 5-15 m yr-1. Young barrier island arc sediment packages (Isles Dernieres) are thin and have experienced limited landward retreat of the shoreface. Older barrier island arcs (Chandeleur Islands) are thicker and have experienced significant landward movement of the shoreface because of the greater time available for retreat. If the transgressed barrier shoreline sediment package lies above the advancing ravinement surface, the entire sequence is truncated. A thin reworked sand sheet marks the shoreface retreat path. The base of the transgressive sediment package can lie below the ravinement surface in older barrier shorelines. In this setting, the superstructure of the barrier shoreline is truncated, leaving the basal portion of the transgressive sequence preserved on the inner shelf. A variety of transgressive stratigraphic sequences from sand sheets to truncated barrier islands to sand-filled tidal inlet scars have been identified by high resolution seismic profiling across the shoreface retreat paths of Mississippi delta barrier island arcs. One of these examples, the Isles Dernieres, represents a recently detached barrier island arc in the early stages of transgression. An older example, the Chandeleur Islands, represents a barrier island arc experiencing long-term shoreface retreat. This paper describes the stratigraphic character and preserved transgressive facies for the Isles Dernieres and Chandeleur Islands. ?? 1985.

  13. Progressive Emergence and Warping of Islands in the Active Banda Arc-Continent Collision As Recorded By Uplifted Coral Terraces: Tectonic and Geohazards Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. A.; Cox, N.; Major, J. R.; Merritts, D. J.; Prasetyadi, C.

    2014-12-01

    Uplifted coral terraces throughout the Banda-Sunda Arc transition reveal how strain is distributed over the past thousand to million years in the active arc-continent collision, and are key to identifying hazardous active faults. U-series age analysis of the lowest coral terraces yields surface uplift rates that vary in a non-systematic way along strike from 0.2 to 1.5 mm/a over short wavelengths of a few kms. For example, coral terraces are tilted varying degrees northward in Sumba, SSE in Savu, NNW in Rote and generally south along the north coast of Timor. In all of these cases the tilt is away from zones of active thrusting and folding. In Sumba the forearc is ramping up and over the northern edge of the Scott Plateau along what is likely a north dipping thrust. In Savu the coral terraces rise where the back of the accretionary wedge is ramping up over the forearc basin on the south dipping Savu Thrust. In Rote coral terraces form on the front of the accretionary wedge where it is ramping up over the subducting Australian continental margin. The north coast of East Timor is likely uplifting due to internal thrusting and closure of the Wetar Strait. Localized uplift of circular islands is associated with diapirism. The diapiric island of Kisar is cored by syn-collisional metamorphic rocks. The association of uplift and warping with short wavelength deformational processes argues against the commonly held interpretation that coral terraces in the Banda arc-continent collision manifest the effects of slab tear or some other lithospheric scale process. The pattern of uplift correlates best with proximity to active faults, folds and diapirs. In terms of geohazards, flights of uplifted coral terraces are the smoking gun for sources of large earthquakes and tsunami. Many of the terraces show signs of co-seismic uplift. Tsunami deposits with young corals are found on some of these terraces as high as 20 m above sea level.

  14. Teleseismic detection in the Aleutian Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermann, R. E.

    1983-06-01

    Recently it has become apparent that teleseismic detection has decreased substantially in many regions of the world. The major decrease was related to the closure of the VELA arrays in the United States during the late 1960's. This detection decrease has been recognized in South and Central America, Mexico, the Kuriles, the Caribbean, Tonga, and the New Hebrides. In this paper the effect of the closure of these arrays on the reporting of events in the Aleutian Island Arc is examined. In the Aleutians, the detection history is complicated by the short-term installation of a local network on and near Amchitka Island during the early 1970's. The temporal coincidence of the installation of this network and the closure of the VELA arrays delayed the detection decrease in the central Aleutians until the Amchitka network was closed in early 1973. Reporting in the eastern Aleutians was unaffected by the installation of the Amchitka network. In that region the detection decreased between 1968 and 1970, the time of the closure of the VELA arrays. New techniques have been developed which make it possible to determine the effect of station installation or closure on the reporting in some regions. These techniques rely on plots which show the distribution of an observed seismicity rate change in the magnitude domain. These plots make it possible to recognize probable detection changes and to determine quantitatively magnitude cutoffs which avoid these changes. The magnitude level at which these cutoffs are made is termed the minimum magnitude of homogeneity (mmin h). The reporting of events with mb≤4.6 in the Aleutians decreased substantially during the mid-1970's, so mmin h in this region is 4.7. This is different from the magnitude of completeness (mmin c) which is mb = 5.0±0.1. If one is interested in examining seismicity rates for changes which may be precursors to earthquakes, then awareness of detection-related changes and magnitude cutoffs which avoid these changes

  15. Back-arc spreading of the northern Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) Islands arc clarified by GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Takuya

    2011-11-01

    We examined GPS data in the northwestern Pacific region, which includes the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin)-Mariana (IBM) arc and the Japan arc. GPS velocity vectors on the Izu Islands, including Hachijo-jima and Aoga-shima, show systematic eastward movement deviating from that predicted by the rigid rotation of the Philippine Sea plate; this deviation supports the active back-arc spreading model suggested by previous geological studies. The results of a statistical F-test analysis with 99% confidence level showed that the forearc of the Izu Islands arc has an independent motion with respect to the rigid part of the Philippine Sea plate. We developed a kinematic block-fault model to estimate both rigid rotations of crustal blocks and elastic deformation due to locked faults on the block boundaries. The model suggests that the back-arc opening rate along the Izu back-arc rift zone ranges from 2 mm/yr at its southern end to 9 mm/yr near Miyake-jima, its northern end. It also predicts 23-28 mm/yr of relative motion along the Sagami Trough in the direction of ~ N25°W, where the Izu forearc subducts beneath central Japan. The orientation of this motion is supported by slip vectors of recent medium-size earthquakes, repeated slow-slip events, and the 1923 M = 7.9 Kanto earthquake.

  16. Oceanic, island arc, and back-arc remnants into eastern Kamchatka accretionary complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchuk, A.V.; Vishnevskaya, V.S.; Izvekov, I.N. )

    1990-06-01

    The Kamchatsky Mts. accretionary complex in the Eastern Kamchatka orogenic belt was studied for identification of the oceanic and suprasubduction components into accretionary wedges. That complex is divided into two tectonic units. The Lower unit is formed sedimentary and tectonic melanges containing arc-related components (Late Senonian volcaniclastics and boninitic gabbro) and oceanic fragments (Fe-Ti-tholeiites, ocean island basalts, and pelagic sediments of Valanginian to Turonian age). The Upper unit consists of ductile deformed oceanic cumulates from troctolites to Fe-Ti-gabbro, 151 to 172 Ma, which are intruded MORB-like diabases with suprasubduction characteristics, 122 to 141 Ma, and are overlain by basalts similar to latter. The Lower and Upper units are separated by a SW-dipping thrust, which is related by an ophiolitoclastic olistostrome of Late Campanian to Early Maestrichtian age. Both units are covered by Paleocene authoclastic deposits. They are all thrusted over the early Neogene island arc complex, 16 to 20 Ma. The Lower unit of the Kamchatsky Mys accretionary complex was originated in a shear zone between a Late Cretaceous island arc and an Early Cretaceous oceanic plate. The Upper unit represents a Jurassic oceanic remnant that formed a basement of Early Cretaceous back-arc or fore-arc basin. Both units were superposed in the latest Cretaceous. The Kamchatsky Mys accretionary complex was emplaced into the Eastern Kamchatka orogenic belt during late Neogene by collision of the early Neogene island arc.

  17. Sub Moho boundary beneath island arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iidaka, T.; Igarashi, T.; Lee, C.; Iwasaki, T.; Niu, F.

    2008-12-01

    reflective to seismic waves as compared to the continental ones which are relatively transparent. Locations of the observed sub-Moho appear to correlate well with the active volcanic front, suggesting that the sub-Moho might be formed as the result of arc magmatism.

  18. The preliminary results of new submarine caldera on the west of Kume-jima island, Central Ryukyu Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harigane, Y.; Ishizuka, O.; Shimoda, G.; Sato, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Ryukyu Arc occurs between the islands of Kyushu and Taiwan with approximately 1200 km in the full length. This volcanic arc is caused by subduction of the Philippine Sea plate beneath the Eurasia Plate along the Ryukyu trench, and is composed of forearc islands, chains of arc volcanoes, and a back-arc rift called Okinawa Trough. The Ryukyu Arc is commonly divided into three segments (northern, central and southern) that bounded by the Tokara Strait and the Kerama Gap, respectively (e.g., Konishi 1965; Kato et al., 1982). Sato et al. (2014) mentioned that there is no active subaerial volcano in the southwest of Iotori-shima in the Central Ryukyu Arc whereas the Northern Ryukyu Arc (i.e., the Tokara Islands) has active frontal arc volcanoes. Therefore, the existence of volcanoes and volcanotectonic history of active volcanic front in the southwestern part of the Central Ryukyu Arc are still ambiguous. Detailed geophysical and geological survey was mainly conducted using R/V Kaiyou-maru No.7 during GK12 cruise operated by the Geological Survey of Japan/National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan. As a result, we have found a new submarine volcanic caldera on the west of Kume-jima island, where located the southwestern part of Central Ryukyu Arc. Here, we present (1) the bathymetrical feature of this new submarine caldera for the first time and (2) the microstructural and petrological observations of volcanic rocks (20 volcanic samples in 13 dredge sites) sampled from the small volcanic cones of this caldera volcano. The dredged samples from the caldera consist of mainly rhyolite pumice with minor andesites, Mn oxides-crust and hydrothermally altered rocks. Andesite has plagioclase, olivine and pyroxene phenocrysts. Key words: volcanic rock, caldera, arc volcanism, active volcanic front, Kume-jima island, Ryukyu Arc

  19. Seafloor magnetotelluric soundings in the Mariana Island Arc area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filloux, J. H.

    Two seafloor magnetotelluric soundings have been performed in the Mariana Island arc and subduction area, the first (station 1) in the Mariana Trough near International Phase of Oceanic Drilling (IPOD) hole 454 (position 18° 01'N, 144° 32'E, depth 3770 m), the second (station 2) in the fore arc basin near IPOD hole 458 (position 18° 06'N, 146° 45'E, depth 3602 m). The electrical conductivity beneath the postulated spreading zone of the Mariana Trough appears to be unexpectedly low in the upper 40 km, increasing slowly and monotonically downward, to 1 S m-1 at 700 km. It does not display any significant feature such as lithosphere-asthenosphere or phase transition boundaries. The character of this profile differs considerably from those obtained near the Pacific Rise, suggesting deep as well as shallow structures, generally cooler, and implying less active magmatic processes. Cooler structures may in turn contribute in part to the greater depth versus age of the Mariana Trough compared to that of the main oceanic basins. No indication of the existence of extensive magma concentration of the kind detected on the Pacific Rise at 21°N is recognizable in the magnetic data. This fact, however, may simply result from the distance between station 1 and the spreading axis (˜30 km). A cautious speculation on the cause of the implied overall low conductivity values is presented. The MT sounding from the fore arc basin points to (1) very high conductance in the upper zone (0-10 km), accountable for by the sediment blanket, (2) moderate to high conductance in the fore arc upper mantle wedge below, possibly indicative of a moderately high temperature (composition and hydration by water subducted with sediments may also play a role, (3) a large cross section (300-400 km) of unusually little conducting materials, believed to represent the sinking slab and the cooled down environment adjacent to it, and (4) a 20-fold conductivity increase around 420 km depth, sustained over

  20. Temporal magma source changes at Gaua volcano, Vanuatu island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumais, Aurélien; Bertrand, Hervé; Chazot, Gilles; Dosso, Laure; Robin, Claude

    2016-08-01

    Gaua Island (also called Santa Maria), from the central part of the Vanuatu arc, consists of a large volcano marked by a caldera that hosts the active Mount Garet summit cone. In this paper, a geochemical study including Sr, Nd, Pb and Hf isotopic compositions of 25 lavas emitted since 1.8 Ma is presented, with a focus on the volcanic products that preceded (old volcanics, main cone and pyroclastic series) and followed (Mount Garet) the caldera forming event. All lavas show an island arc signature with enrichment in LILE and depletion in HFSE. Post-caldera lavas define a medium-K calc-alkaline trend, whereas lavas from the former main cone have high-K calc-alkaline compositions. Compared to the pre-caldera volcanic suite, the Mount Garet lavas have similar Th/Nb ( 1.5), 143Nd/144Nd ( 0.51295) and 176Hf/177Hf ( 0.28316) ratios, but higher Ba/La ( 42 vs. 27) and 87Sr/86Sr (0.70417 vs. 0.70405) ratios and lower Ce/Pb ( 2.7 vs. 4.6), La/Sm ( 2.5 vs. 4.0) and 206Pb/204Pb (18.105 vs. 18.176) ratios. High Th/Nb and low Nd and Hf isotopic ratios compared to N-MORB suggest the contribution of 2% of subducted sediment melt to the mantle source of Gaua magmas. Most of the observed differences between pre- and post-caldera lavas can be accounted for by the involvement of at least two portions of the mantle wedge, metasomatized by different slab-derived aqueous fluids. In addition, the lower La/Sm (at a given 143Nd/144Nd) ratios of Mount Garet lavas suggest a higher degree of partial melting ( 10-15%) compared to the pre-caldera lavas ( 5%). The Santa Maria Pyroclastic Series (SMPS) eruption probably triggered the caldera collapse, in response to emptying of the magmatic chamber. This event may have allowed new access to the surface for a geochemically distinct batch of magma issued from a separate magma chamber, resulting in the birth and construction of Mount Garet within the caldera. As both magmatic suites were emitted over a very short time, the storage of their parental

  1. Underwater plasma arc cutting in Three Mile Island's reactor

    SciTech Connect

    McGough, M.S.; Knetl, G.J. ); Austin, W.E. )

    1989-07-01

    On March 28, 1979, the Pennsylvania Three Mile Island nuclear power plant Unit 2 (TMI-2) suffered a partial fuel-melt accident. During this accident, over 20,000 lb of molten fuel flowed through holes melted through the baffle plates and through the lower-core support assembly (LCSA). The molten fuel subsequently resolidified in the bottom of the reactor vessel. The lower-core support assembly of the TMI-2 reactor was not structurally damaged during the accident. In order to permit defueling of that region of the core, the LCSA was cut to permit access. A five-axis teleoperator was developed to deliver plasma arc cutting, rotary grinding and abrasive waterjet cutting of end effectors to the LCSA. Complex geometry sectioning was completed in a mock-up facility at chemistry and pressure conditions simulating those of the vessel, prior to actual in-vessel operations. In-vessel activities began in early May 1988 and were completed on April 11, 1989. This paper presents the details of the in-vessel cutting efforts.

  2. Volcano-Hydrothermal Systems of the Central and Northern Kuril Island Arc - a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalacheva, E.; Taran, Y.; Voloshina, E.; Ptashinsky, L.

    2015-12-01

    More than 20 active volcanoes with historical eruptions are known on 17 islands composing the Central and Northern part of the Kurilian Arc. Six islands - Paramushir, Shiashkotan, Rasshua, Ushishir, Ketoy and Simushir - are characterized by hydrothermal activity, complementary to the fumarolic activity in their craters. There are several types of volcano-hydrothermal systems on the islands. At Paramushir, Shiashkotan and Ketoy the thermal manifestations are acidic to ultra-acidic water discharges associated with hydrothermal aquifers inside volcano edifices and formed as the result of the absorption of magmatic gases by ground waters. A closest known analogue of such activity is Satsuma-Iwojima volcano-island at the Ryukyu Arc. Another type of hydrothermal activity are wide spread coastal hot springs (Shiashkotan, Rasshua), situated as a rule within tide zones and formed by mixing of the heated seawater with cold groundwater or, in opposite, by mixing of the steam- or conductively heated groundwater with seawater. This type of thermal manifestation is similar to that reported for other volcanic islands of the world (Satsuma Iwojima, Monserrat, Ischia, Socorro). Ushishir volcano-hydrothermal system is formed by the absorption of magmatic gases by seawater. Only Ketoy Island hosts a permanent acidic crater lake. At Ebeko volcano (Paramushir) rapidly disappearing small acidic lakes (formed after phreatic eruptions) have been reported. The main hydrothermal manifestation of Simushir is the Zavaritsky caldera lake with numerous coastal thermal springs and weak steam vents. The last time measured temperatures of fumaroles at the islands are: >500ºC at Pallas Peak (Ketoy), 480ºC at Kuntamintar volcano (Shiashkotan), variable and fast changing temperatures from 120º C to 500ºC at Ebeko volcano (Paramushir), 150ºC in the Rasshua crater, and > 300ºC in the Chirpoy crater (Black Brothers islands). The magmatic and rock-forming solute output by the Kurilian volcano

  3. Phase relations of a high-Mg basalt from the Aleutian Island arc - Implications for primary island arc basalts and high-Al basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gust, D. A.; Perfit, M. R.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a primitive high-Mg basalt, MK-15, collected from lava flows of the Unalaska Island in the Aleutian Island arc has been conducted in order to study primary and parental island arc basalts and the development of island arc magmas. The results suggest a model in which high-Al basalts are generated by moderate amounts of crystal fractionation from more primitive (high Mg/Mg + Fe, lower Al2O3) basaltic magmas near the arc crust-mantle boundary. Somewhere between 20-30 depth, significant amounts of clinopyroxene and olivine, with lesser amounts of spinel and possibly amphibole, fractionate, forming layer of olivine-clinopyroxenite at the base of the arc crust.

  4. Signs of continental rifting in the southwestern Japanese Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, E. A.; Eroshenko, D. V.

    2016-03-01

    The southwestern margin of the Japan Arc evolved in the geodynamic regime of continental rifting during the Miocene-Pleistocene. This has been verified by broad manifestations of metasomatosis of mantle peridotites that underlie the lithosphere of the Japan Islands and by episodes of deep magmatism (kimberlites and melilitites) in the region. The high enrichment of deep melts in incompatible rare and rare earth elements is partially preserved in melts of regional basalts from smaller depths. In contrast, spreading basalts of the Sea of Japan and subduction basalts from the Nankai trench at the boundary with the Philippine Plate are extremely depleted in rare elements.

  5. The Quaternary adakite distribution of Kyushu Island, Ryukyu Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Takemura, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Quaternary volcanoes are widely distributed in Kyusu Island, Japan. Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath Kyushu. Clear distribution of deep seismic foci is observed below the Quaternary volcanoes in southern area, but not in northern area. Notsu et al. (1990, JVGR) examined the contribution of subduction to the magma source, and emphasized that no slab derived material is observed in northern area from Sr isotopic compositions. Volcanic activity similar to the within-plate type volcanism has been also emphasized for the magma genesis of this area (e.g. Kita et al, 2001, JVGR). However, we found adakitic rocks, which show high Sr/Y ratios and low Y concentrations (e.g. Defant and Drummond, 1990, Nature) from some Quaternary volcanoes in north Kyushu on the basis of published data (Otha et al, 1990, GANKO; Itoh, 1990, GANKO). Therefore, the magma genesis is still controversial. We studied lateral variations of Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic and trace element compositions for Quaternary volcanics from Kyushu to investigate the magma genesis. From the results, a clear variation of Sr/Y ratio, decreasing from north to south, is observed along the volcanic front. Some of the Sr/Y ratio of the most northern part of Kyusu shows the value >100. The all analyzed Pb isotope compositions show a single liner trend in 208Pb/204Pb v.s. 206Pb/204Pb diagram. The liner trend of Pb isotope ratios can be explained by the binary mixing of the Shikoku Basin basalt and tereginious sediment which might be a constituent of the subducting slab. The similar binary mixing relationships are found in Sr and Nd isotopic systematics. The isotopic characteristics of the Quaternary magma in Kyushu can be explained by the magma generation process of island arc, in spite of the lack of deep seismic foci in northern area. It is considered that high and low Sr/Y ratios suggest the contributions of partial melt in the north and aqueous fluid derived from subducting slab in the south, respectively. If

  6. Island Watershed Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Rod

    2003-01-01

    Describes a 90-minute "Island Watershed" activity to help earth science students understand the concept of the water cycle. Introduces a surface waters unit appropriate for students in grades 7-10. Includes watershed project guidelines. (Author/KHR)

  7. Fundamental structure model of island arcs and subducted plates in and around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, T.; Sato, H.; Ishiyama, T.; Shinohara, M.; Hashima, A.

    2015-12-01

    The eastern margin of the Asian continent is a well-known subduction zone, where the Pacific (PAC) and Philippine Sea (PHS) plates are being subducted. In this region, several island arcs (Kuril, Northeast Japan, Southwest Japan, Izu-Bonin and Ryukyu arcs) meet one another to form a very complicated tectonic environment. At 2014, we started to construct fundamental structure models for island arcs and subducted plates in and around Japan. Our research is composed of 6 items of (1) topography, (2) plate geometry, (3) fault models, (4) the Moho and brittle-ductile transition zone, (5) the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary, and (6) petrological/rheological models. Such information is basic but inevitably important in qualitative understanding not only for short-term crustal activities in the subduction zone (particularly caused by megathrust earthquakes) but also for long-term cumulative deformation of the arcs as a result of strong plate-arc/arc-arc interactions. This paper is the first presentation of our research, mainly presenting the results of items (1) and (2). The area of our modelling is 12o-54o N and 118o-164o E to cover almost the entire part of Japanese Islands together with Kuril, Ryukyu and Izu-Bonin trenches. The topography model was constructed from the 500-m mesh data provided from GSJ, JODC, GINA and Alaska University. Plate geometry models are being constructed through the two steps. In the first step, we modelled very smooth plate boundaries of the Pacific and Philippine Sea plates in our whole model area using 42,000 earthquake data from JMA, USGS and ISC. For 7,800 cross sections taken with several directions to the trench axes, 2D plate boundaries were defined by fitting to the earthquake distribution (the Wadati-Benioff zone), from which we obtained equi-depth points of the plate boundary. These equi-depth points were then approximated by spline interpolation technique to eliminate shorter wave length undulation (<50-100 km). The obtained

  8. Late cenozoic vertical movements of non-volcanic islands in the Banda Arc area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Smet, M. E. M.; Fortuin, A. R.; Tjokrosapoetro, S.; Van Hinte, J. E.

    During onshore campaigns of the Snellius-II Expedition late Cenozoic sections were recorded and systematically sampled on the non-volcanic outer Banda Arc Islands of Timor, Buton, Buru, Seram and Kai. Microfaunal studies provided age and palaeobathymetric data to construct geohistory diagrams. Geohistory analysis of field and laboratory data allows to calculate rates of vertical movements of the island basements. The vertical movements were intermittent and differed widely from place to place in the arc; short periods of uplift alternated with longer periods of tectonic rest or subsidence and lateral variations in timing and magnitude seem to be more the rule than the exception. Movements affected larger segments of the arc at about the same time, especially since the late Pliocene, when widespread vertical movements started, which led to the present configuration of the arc. Rates of uplift or subsidence differed within each segment. On an intermediate scale, deformation has the character of tilting or doming of whole islands or parts of islands. On a local scale, various types of deformation occur. Calculated duration of uplift pulses is in the order of a million years where less than 50 cm·ka -1 of vertical movements are involved. Sections, however, with a high time stratigraphic resolutions show pulses of uplift with a duration of only some hundreds of thousands of years and rates of more than 500 cm·ka -1. The duration of such pulses therefore is comparable to that of eustatic third order sea level changes. But because their amplitude is an order of magnitude larger, this implies that in tectonically active areas eustatic signals, preserved in the sedimentary record, will be overprinted by tectonics, i.e. will be difficult to disentangle from the tectonic signal.

  9. A Detailed Geochemical Study of Island Arc Crust: The Talkeetna Arc Section, South-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, A. R.; Debari, S. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Clift, P. D.; Blusztajn, J.

    2002-12-01

    The Talkeetna arc section in south-central Alaska is recognized as the exposed upper mantle and crust of an accreted, Late Triassic to Middle Jurassic island arc. Detailed geochemical studies of layered gabbronorite from the middle and lower crust of this arc and a diverse suite of volcanic and plutonic rocks from the middle and upper crust provide crucial data for understanding arc magma evolution. We also present new data on parental magma compositions for the arc. The deepest level of the arc section consists of residual mantle and ultramafic cumulates adjacent to garnet gabbro and basal gabbronorite interlayered with pyroxenite. The middle crust is primarily layered gabbronorite, ranging from anorthosite to pyroxenite in composition, and is the most widespread plutonic lithology. The upper mid crust is a heterogenous assemblage of dioritic to tonalitic rocks mixed with gabbro and intruded by abundant mafic dikes and chilled pillows. The upper crust of the arc is comprised of volcanic rocks of the Talkeetna Formation ranging from basalt to rhyolite. Most of these volcanic rocks have evolved compositions (<5% MgO, Mg# <60) and overlap the composition of intermediate to felsic plutonic rocks (<3.5% MgO, Mg# <45). However, several chilled mafic rocks and one basalt have primitive characteristics (>8% MgO, Mg# >60). Ion microprobe analyses of clinopyroxene in mid-crustal layered gabbronorites have parallel REE patterns with positive-sloping LREE segments (La/Sm(N)=0.05-0.17; mean 0.11) and flat HREE segments (5-25xchondrite; mean 10xchondrite). Liquids in REE equilibrium with the clinopyroxene in these gabbronorite cumulates were calculated in order to constrain parental magmas. These calculated liquids(La/Sm(N)=0.77-1.83; mean 1.26) all fall within the range of dike and volcanic rock(La/Sm(N)=0.78-2.12; mean 1.23) compositions. However, three lavas out of the 44 we have analyzed show strong HREE depletion, which is not observed in any of the liquid compositions

  10. Origin, transport, and emplacement of an exotic island-arc terrane exposed in eastern Kamchatka, Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.; Vallier, Tracy L.; Scholl, David W.

    1994-01-01

    The regional stratigraphy of eastern Kamchatka includes an exotic, Early-Late Cretaceous ophiolite and Late Cretaceous island-arc volcanic sequence. Integrating the existing geologic and geophysical data, we examine the origin, transport, emplacement, and postemplacement deformation of the island-arc terrane, which is named the Olyutorsky island arc. Results from several paleomagnetic studies consistently indicate that the island-arc terrane originated >1000 km to the south of where it is presently exposed. Although the formative paleolatitudes of the island-arc rocks approximately correspond to the location of the Izanagi-Farallon subduction zone, the age of the volcanic rocks postdates the cessation of Izanagi-Farallon convergence, thus indicating that an unnamed plate or back-arc basin existed in the northwest Pacific during Late Cretaceous time. We examine two possible models for northward transport of the island-arc terrane to Kamchatka: (1) infra-oceanic transport with the Pacific or Kula plates and (2) coastwise translation of the island-arc terrane after accretion to the Eurasian margin far to the south of Kamchatka. For both models, the dominant Eocene and Miocene deformation ages observed in eastern Kamchatka are used as two possible age limits for the cessation of northward transport. Although the observed paleolatitudes from paleomagnetic data correspond best with the infra-oceanic transport model, the provenance of the Paleogene "transport" stratigraphy indicates a near-shore sediment supply. Our preferred interpretation is that the island-arc terrane (1) accreted onto the Eurasian margin concurrent with cessation of island-arc volcanism (Maastrichtian-Danian) and (2) underwent northward coastwise translation along a major strike-slip fault zone ending by middle-late Eocene time (43-50 Ma). It is unclear whether the ophiolite was exposed during arc-continent collision or whether the ophiolite was obducted onto the island arc prior to collision. A

  11. Petrology and tectonics of Phanerozoic continent formation: From island arcs to accretion and continental arc magmatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, C.-T.A.; Morton, D.M.; Kistler, R.W.; Baird, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Mesozoic continental arcs in the North American Cordillera were examined here to establish a baseline model for Phanerozoic continent formation. We combine new trace-element data on lower crustal xenoliths from the Mesozoic Sierra Nevada Batholith with an extensive grid-based geochemical map of the Peninsular Ranges Batholith, the southern equivalent of the Sierras. Collectively, these observations give a three-dimensional view of the crust, which permits the petrogenesis and tectonics of Phanerozoic crust formation to be linked in space and time. Subduction of the Farallon plate beneath North America during the Triassic to early Cretaceous was characterized by trench retreat and slab rollback because old and cold oceanic lithosphere was being subducted. This generated an extensional subduction zone, which created fringing island arcs just off the Paleozoic continental margin. However, as the age of the Farallon plate at the time of subduction decreased, the extensional environment waned, allowing the fringing island arc to accrete onto the continental margin. With continued subduction, a continental arc was born and a progressively more compressional environment developed as the age of subducting slab continued to young. Refinement into a felsic crust occurred after accretion, that is, during the continental arc stage, wherein a thickened crustal and lithospheric column permitted a longer differentiation column. New basaltic arc magmas underplate and intrude the accreted terrane, suture, and former continental margin. Interaction of these basaltic magmas with pre-existing crust and lithospheric mantle created garnet pyroxenitic mafic cumulates by fractional crystallization at depth as well as gabbroic and garnet pyroxenitic restites at shallower levels by melting of pre-existing lower crust. The complementary felsic plutons formed by these deep-seated differentiation processes rose into the upper crust, stitching together the accreted terrane, suture and former

  12. Deep structure of the central Lesser Antilles Island Arc South of Guadeloupe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, Wolfgang; Kopp, Heidrun; Flueh, Ernst; Klaeschen, Dirk; Laigle, Mireille; Charvis, Philippe; Evain, Mikael

    2010-05-01

    The central Lesser Antilles arc around 16°N has been the site of a number of previous experiments, which have mainly focused on the accretionary complex and backstop geometry. However, no seismic profile has been acquired traversing the central island arc itself, leaving the arc geometry and basement as well as Moho depth here undetermined. We present the results of a 280 km long regional wide-angle seismic profile conducted south of Guadeloupe between 15.5°N and 16.5°N, trending approximately perpendicular to the deformation front/parallel to convergence. The profile initiates in the Grenada Basin, crosses the active island arc and extends onto the Barbados Ridge accretionary complex, where it terminates approximately 80 km west of the deformation front. On the incoming plate, the wide-angle results reveal an eight km thick oceanic crust below the accretionary prism. Underneath the island arc crust the slab dips at an angle of ~14.5°, steadily increasing underneath the island arc. Velocities of the incoming oceanic crust rise from 5.5 km/s at the oceanic basement to 7.3 km/s above the crust-mantle boundary. A distinction between oceanic layers 2 and 3 is not imaged. A décollement and subduction channel is resolved in the reflection profile as well as on selected wide-angle record sections and is characterized by low seismic velocities (~3.6 km/s) and a thickness of approximately 1200 m. Due to the thick accumulation of sediment on top of the incoming North American oceanic crust, seismic energy penetration along our profile is not sufficient to resolve the velocity structure of the oceanic mantle. The structure and seismic velocities of the incoming oceanic crust show typical values for mature, unaltered oceanic crust. We speculate that upper mantle velocities follow this trend and are in the range of 7.9-8.1 km/s associated with an anhydrous condition of peridotite in the upper mantle. As inferred from low seismic velocities of < 3.0 km/s, the island arc is

  13. Formation of Garnet Granulite in the Lower Crust of a paleo-Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Carlos J.; Padrón-Navarta, José Alberto; López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Bodinier, Jean-Louis; Bosch, Delphine; Marchesi, Claudio; Hidas, Károly

    2016-04-01

    The Jijal complex (Kohistan paleo-island arc complex, NW Pakistan) is a unique occurrence of high-pressure (HP), mafic, opx-free, garnet granulite formed in the lower crust of an island arc. The upper part of the Jijal Granulitic Gabbro Unit (GGU) records the arrested transformation of hornblende gabbronorite to garnet granulite, involving the coeval breakdown of amphibole and orthopyroxene, and the formation of garnet and quartz. Close to the transformation front (2-3 cm), clinopyroxene from the granulite displays a strong Ca-tschermak zoning with lower Al-contents at rims. REE zoning of clinopyroxene and pseudosection diagrams indicate that only clinopyroxene rims reflect chemical equilibrium with garnet in the reaction front (P = 1.1 ± 0.1 GPa, T = 800 ± 50 °C), whereas the cores retained high-Al contents inherited from precursor gabbronorite clinopyroxene and remained in chemical disequilibrium within a few centimeters of the garnet granulite assemblage. Clinopyroxene of garnet granulites from the Jijal lower GGU are completely re-equilibrated with garnet (P = 1.5 ± 0.1 GPa, T = 800 ± 50 °C). If ferric iron corrections are disregarded, equilibration pressure and temperature are highly overestimated yielding exceedingly high pressures for an island arc setting. The pressure difference between the upper and lower Jijal GGU granulites (~0.4 GPa) and its current thickness (<5 km) implies delamination of the denser parts of Jijal crust. Thermodynamically computed phase diagram sections for upper GGU bulk compositions show that, at the equilibration conditions of Jijal garnet granulite, the equilibrium assemblage is orthopyroxene-free and amphibole-free garnet granulite coexisting with melt or a fluid phase, depending on the water activity at the onset of amphibole breakdown. Pseudosections indicate that hornblende gabbronorite assemblages are highly metastable at lower arc crust depths. The transformation to garnet granulite was therefore substantially

  14. Erosion and deterioration of Isles Dernieres Barrier Island arc, Louisiana: 1842-1988

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, R.A.; Westphal, K.; Penland, S. ); Jaffe, B. ) ); Williams, S.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The Isles Dernieres barrier island arc is the most rapidly eroding coastline in the US. Located on the Mississippi River delta plain in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana, the Isles Dernieres consists of four smaller islands in a 32-km long chain. From west to east, these islands are known as Raccoon Island, Whiskey Island, Trinity Island, and East Island. The barrier island arc is separated from the mainland by Caillou Bay, Boca Caillou, and Lake Pelto lagoonal systems. The abandonment and transgression of the Bayou Petit Caillou delta (part of the larger Lafourche delta complex) over the last 600 years, along with sea level rise, repeated storm impacts, and rapid shoreface erosion, have led to the formation of the Isles Dernieres. Continued transgressive submergence combined with a diminishing sediment supply are driving the extreme coastal erosion found in the Isles Dernieres.

  15. Discovery of Active Hydrothermal Sites Along the Mariana Volcanic Arc, Western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. T.; Embley, R. W.; Resing, J. A.; Lupton, J. E.; Massoth, G. J.; de Ronde, C. E.; Nakamura, K.; Walker, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    Some 20,000 km of volcanic arcs, roughly one-third the total length of the global midocean ridge (MOR) system, rim the western Pacific Ocean. But compared to 25 years of hydrothermal investigations along MORs, exploration of similar activity on the estimated 600 submarine arc volcanoes is only beginning. In February 2003, as part of the Submarine Ring of Fire project funded by NOAA's Ocean Exploration Program, we made the first systematic survey of hydrothermal activity along the 1270-km-long Mariana intraoceanic volcanic arc, which lies almost entirely within the US EEZ. Prior fieldwork had documented active (but low-temperature) hydrothermal discharge on only three volcanoes: Kasuga 2, Kasuga 3, and Esmeralda Bank. During the cruise, we conducted 70 CTD operations over more than 50 individual volcanoes from 13° N to 23° N, plus a continuous CTD survey along 75 km of the back-arc spreading center (13° 15'N to 13° 41'N) adjacent to the southern end of the arc. We found evidence for active hydrothermal venting at 11 submarine volcanoes with summit (or caldera floor) depths ranging from 50 to 1550 m. Two additional sites were identified on the back-arc spreading center. Ongoing analyses of collected water samples could increase these totals. Our results confirmed continuing hydrothermal activity at Kasuga 2 (but not Kasuga 3) and Esmeralda Bank, in addition to newly discovered sites on nine other volcanoes. Many of these sites produce intense and widely dispersed plumes indicative of vigorous, high-temperature discharge. The volcanoes with active hydrothermal systems are about equally divided between those with and without summit calderas. The addition of the Marianas data greatly improves our view of hydrothermal sources along arcs. The 20,000 km of Pacific arcs can be divided between 6380 km of intraoceanic (i.e., mostly submarine) arcs and 13,880 km of island (i.e., mostly subaerial) arcs. At present, ˜15% of the total length of Pacific arcs has been surveyed

  16. Long-term eruptive activity at a submarine arc volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Embley, R.W.; Chadwick, W.W.; Baker, E.T.; Butterfield, D.A.; Resing, J.A.; De Ronde, C. E. J.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Lupton, J.E.; Juniper, S.K.; Rubin, K.H.; Stern, R.J.; Lebon, G.T.; Nakamura, K.-I.; Merle, S.G.; Hein, J.R.; Wiens, D.A.; Tamura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Three-quarters of the Earth's volcanic activity is submarine, located mostly along the mid-ocean ridges, with the remainder along intraoceanic arcs and hotspots at depths varying from greater than 4,000 m to near the sea surface. Most observations and sampling of submarine eruptions have been indirect, made from surface vessels or made after the fact. We describe here direct observations and sampling of an eruption at a submarine arc volcano named NW Rota-1, located 60 km northwest of the island of Rota (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands). We observed a pulsating plume permeated with droplets of molten sulphur disgorging volcanic ash and lapilli from a 15-m diameter pit in March 2004 and again in October 2005 near the summit of the volcano at a water depth of 555 m (depth in 2004). A turbid layer found on the flanks of the volcano (in 2004) at depths from 700 m to more than 1,400 m was probably formed by mass-wasting events related to the eruption. Long-term eruptive activity has produced an unusual chemical environment and a very unstable benthic habitat exploited by only a few mobile decapod species. Such conditions are perhaps distinctive of active arc and hotspot volcanoes. ?? 2006 Nature Publishing Group.

  17. Cycling of sulfur in subduction zones: The geochemistry of sulfur in the Mariana Island Arc and back-arc trough

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Jackson, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The sulfur contents and sulfur isotopic compositions of 24 glassy submarine volcanics from the Mariana Island Arc and back-arc Mariana Trough were determined in order to investigate the hypothesis that subducted seawater sulfur (??34S = 21???) is recycled through arc volcanism. Our results for sulfur are similar to those for subaerial arc volcanics: Mariana Arc glasses are enriched in 34S (??34S = up to 10.3???, mean = 3.8???) and depleted in S (20-290 ppm, mean = 100 ppm) relative to MORB (850 ppm S, ??34S = 0.1 ?? 0.5???). The back-arc trough basalts contain 200-930 ppm S and have ??34S values of 1.1 ?? 0.5???, which overlap those for the arc and MORB. The low sulfur contents of the arc and some of the trough glasses are attributed to (1) early loss of small amounts of sulfur through separation of immiscible sulfide and (2) later vapor-melt equilibrium control of sulfur contents and loss of sulfur in a vapor phase from sulfide-undersaturated melts near the minimum in sulfur solubility at f{hook}O2 ??? NNO (nickel-nickel oxide). Although these processes removed sulfur from the melts their effects on the sulfur isotopic compositions of the melts were minimal. Positive trends of ??34S with 87Sr 86Sr, LILE and LREE contents of the arc volcanics are consistent with a metasomatic seawater sulfur component in the depleted sub-arc mantle source. The lack of a 34S-rich slab signature in the trough lavas may be attributed to equilibration of metasomatic fluid with mantle material along the longer pathway from the slab to the source of the trough volcanics. Sulfur is likely to have been transported into the mantle wedge by metasomatic fluid derived from subducted sediments and pore fluids. Gases extracted from vesicles in arc and back-arc samples are predominantly H2O, with minor CO2 and traces of H2S and SO2. CO2 in the arc and back-arc rocks has ??13C values of -2.1 to -13.1???, similar to MORB. These data suggest that degassing of CO2 could explain the slightly lower

  18. Cyclicity in Silurian island-arc carbonates, Alexander terrane, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Kittredge, L.E.; Soja, C.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Silurian carbonates from Alaska (Alexander terrane) record the evolution of a submarine platform during waning volcanism in an island arc. A detailed stratigraphic analysis of a 47 meter-thick sequence revealed the existence of cyclically repeated limestones: coral-stromatoporoid wackestones alternate with oncoid packstones and bioturbated, silty lime mudstones. The coral-stromatoporoid deposits are characterized by a low-diversity assemblage of dendroid corals, massive stromatoporoids, Atrypoidea brachiopods, and rare occurrences of biostromes associated with Solenopora, high-spired gastropods, and crinoids. Oncoids typically are 2-6 mm in diameter and form massive, meter-thick units. Coated grains are symmetrically developed, have a shell or algal nucleus, and are also a minor component of coral-stromatoporoid beds. These lithologic units form seven, shallowing-upwards cycles (parasequences) that range in thickness from 3-9 meters. Coral-stomatoporoid wackestones form the base of each cycle and grade upwards into oncoid packstones with silty, lime mudstones at the top. This succession of lithofacies within each cycle reflects an increase in energy levels from relatively deeper water environments to relatively shallower ones. The lack of abrasion in the corals and stromatoporoids suggests predominantly quiet-water conditions in shallow subtidal areas affected by periodic turbulence. Comparison with correlative sections in Alaska and lack of correspondence with global sea level curves suggest that the primary cause of cyclicity was tectonic perturbations with secondary eustatic effects. Cyclic deposition in peri/subtidal sites was terminated by rapid drowning of the carbonate platform during late Silurian orogenesis.

  19. Island-arc carbonates: characterization and recognition in the ancient geologic record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soja, C. M.

    1996-10-01

    Carbonates of island-arc origin that are preserved in Paleozoic-Mesozoic terranes of the North American Cordillera exhibit a distinctive suite of paleontologic and lithologic features and share a fundamental similarity with limestones forming in modern volcanic arcs. This study provides the first detailed synthesis of carbonate depositional systems in island arcs and documents primary sedimentary constituents based on facies relationships and faunal communities. Models are developed that show patterns in the long-term evolution of shallow marine organisms and the construction, evolution, and demise of carbonate platforms in island arcs. A suite of criteria is identified that may be used to differentiate island-arc carbonates from limestones that accumulated in other platform settings. Biogeographic isolation, prolonged subsidence, steep submarine slopes and tectonic instability of volcanic edifices contribute to the development of relatively high levels of species endemism, impoverished normal marine faunas, complex provincial affinities, and relict biotas in limestones that are characterized by exceptionally thick platform and periplatform sequences, fringing and barrier reefs at the shelf margin, extensive lagoonal deposits and rapid lateral and vertical facies changes. Although destructive tectonic and geologic processes in island arcs may hinder determining the original size and extent of the carbonate platform, and particular facies types may not be represented (e.g., fringing and barrier reefs may be replaced by sand shoals at the platform, margin), many characteristics have potential value for identifying carbonates of island-arc origin in the ancient rock record. Apart from being associated with calc-alkaline volcanic and volcaniclastic assemblages, the most valuable suite of features for recognizing island-arc carbonates is marine biotas that exhibit elevated levels of endemism and mixed paleobiogeographic affinities, extraordinary thicknesses of platform

  20. Birth of an island arc : Stuctural and Kinematics records of upper plate deformation. Example of St Barthelemy, Lesser Antilles (French West Indies).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, L.; Philippon, M. M.; Mazabraud, Y.; Jean-Frederic, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Lesser Antilles subduction initiated in Lower Cretaceous at the eastern tip of the Caribbean plate where Atlantic is subducting westward bellow Caribbean plate. The associated island arc extends from St Martin (to the north) to Grenada Island (to the south). The northern half of the volcanic arc presents a peculiar morphology with (i) an eastern outer arc that was active from Eocene to Oligocene from St Martin to Martinique and (ii) a western inner one from Saba to Martinique which is active since the Miocene attesting for a westward jump of the volcanic arc at that time. The long-term deformation pattern and kinematics affecting the Lesser Antilles arcand its evolution from Eocene to Miocene, before its westward jump, remain poorly constrained. This study aims at constraining the deformation pattern expressed in the eastern outer arc of the Lesser Antilles during Eocene time, which is contemporaneous with arc formation. To achieve this goal, St Barthelemy Isand (St Barth) is a key target as it consists of Eocene volcanites inter layered with carbonate platform sequences, intruded by Oligocene dykes and pipes. During fieldwork, we accurately mapped the main tectonic features that affect the island, and characterized the mineralogy of the gouges and fluid circulation along the main faults. The kinematics data were used to perform inversions in order to recover the paleostate of stress and datable minerals found in fault gouge will be further used to constrain the timing of fault activity. We discuss the observed deformations within the regional tectonic framework and the birth of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc. Firstly, we recover the Eocene local paleostress in St Barth corresponding to the first stages of island arc building. Secondly, we discuss the Eo-Oligocene evolution of the stress field at the island scale. Thirdly, thanks to the observed mineralogy we decipher the different deformation stages that occurred at distinct structural levels.

  1. A structural outline of the Yenkahe volcanic resurgent dome (Tanna Island, Vanuatu Arc, South Pacific)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, O.; Brothelande, E.; Lénat, J.-F.; Bachèlery, P.; Garaébiti, E.

    2013-12-01

    A structural study has been conducted on the resurgent Yenkahe dome (5 km long by 3 km wide) located in the heart of the Siwi caldera of Tanna Island (Vanuatu arc, south Pacific). This spectacular resurgent dome hosts a small caldera and a very active strombolian cinder cone - the Yasur volcano - in the west and exhibits an intriguing graben in its central part. Detailed mapping and structural observations make it possible to unravel the volcano-tectonic history of the dome. It is shown that, following the early formation of a resurgent dome in the west, a complex collapse (caldera plus graben) occurred and this was associated with the recent uplift of the eastern part of the present dome. Eastward migration of the underlying magma related to regional tectonics is proposed to explain this evolution.

  2. Future accreted terranes: a compilation of island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, seamounts, and continental fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetreault, J. L.; Buiter, S. J. H.

    2014-07-01

    Allochthonous accreted terranes are exotic geologic units that originated from anomalous crustal regions on a subducting oceanic plate and were transferred to the overriding plate during subduction by accretionary processes. The geographical regions that eventually become accreted allochthonous terranes include island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, seamounts, continental fragments, and microcontinents. These future allochthonous terranes (FATs) contribute to continental crustal growth, subduction dynamics, and crustal recycling in the mantle. We present a review of modern FATs and their accreted counterparts based on available geological, seismic, and gravity studies and discuss their crustal structure, geological origin, and bulk crustal density. Island arcs have an average crustal thickness of 26 km, average bulk crustal density of 2.79 g cm-3, and have 3 distinct crustal units overlying a crust-mantle transition zone. Oceanic plateaus and submarine ridges have an average crustal thickness of 21 km and average bulk crustal density of 2.84 g cm-3. Continental fragments presently on the ocean floor have an average crustal thickness of 25 km and bulk crustal density of 2.81 g cm-3. Accreted allochthonous terranes can be compared to these crustal compilations to better understand which units of crust are accreted or subducted. In general, most accreted terranes are thin crustal units sheared off of FATs and added onto the accretionary prism, with thicknesses on the order of hundreds of meters to a few kilometers. In addition many island arcs, oceanic plateaus, and submarine ridges were sheared off in the subduction interface and underplated onto the overlying continent. And other times we find evidence of collision leaving behind accreted terranes 25 to 40 km thick. We posit that rheologically weak crustal layers or shear zones that were formed when the FATs were produced can be activated as detachments during subduction, allowing parts of the FAT crust to

  3. Future accreted terranes: a compilation of island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, seamounts, and continental fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetreault, J. L.; Buiter, S. J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Allochthonous accreted terranes are exotic geologic units that originated from anomalous crustal regions on a subducting oceanic plate and were transferred to the overriding plate by accretionary processes during subduction. The geographical regions that eventually become accreted allochthonous terranes include island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, seamounts, continental fragments, and microcontinents. These future allochthonous terranes (FATs) contribute to continental crustal growth, subduction dynamics, and crustal recycling in the mantle. We present a review of modern FATs and their accreted counterparts based on available geological, seismic, and gravity studies and discuss their crustal structure, geological origin, and bulk crustal density. Island arcs have an average crustal thickness of 26 km, average bulk crustal density of 2.79 g cm-3, and three distinct crustal units overlying a crust-mantle transition zone. Oceanic plateaus and submarine ridges have an average crustal thickness of 21 km and average bulk crustal density of 2.84 g cm-3. Continental fragments presently on the ocean floor have an average crustal thickness of 25 km and bulk crustal density of 2.81 g cm-3. Accreted allochthonous terranes can be compared to these crustal compilations to better understand which units of crust are accreted or subducted. In general, most accreted terranes are thin crustal units sheared off of FATs and added onto the accretionary prism, with thicknesses on the order of hundreds of meters to a few kilometers. However, many island arcs, oceanic plateaus, and submarine ridges were sheared off in the subduction interface and underplated onto the overlying continent. Other times we find evidence of terrane-continent collision leaving behind accreted terranes 25-40 km thick. We posit that rheologically weak crustal layers or shear zones that were formed when the FATs were produced can be activated as detachments during subduction, allowing parts of the FAT

  4. Bivergent thrust wedges surrounding oceanic island arcs: Insight from observations and sandbox models of the northeastern caribbean plate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.S.; Marshak, S.; Granja, Bruna J. L.

    2009-01-01

    At several localities around the world, thrust belts have developed on both sides of oceanic island arcs (e.g., Java-Timor, Panama, Vanuatu, and the northeastern Caribbean). In these localities, the overall vergence of the backarc thrust belt is opposite to that of the forearc thrust belt. For example, in the northeastern Caribbean, a north-verging accretionary prism lies to the north of the Eastern Greater Antilles arc (Hispaniola and Puerto Rico), whereas a south-verging thrust belt called the Muertos thrust belt lies to the south. Researchers have attributed such bivergent geometry to several processes, including: reversal of subduction polarity; subduction-driven mantle flow; stress transmission across the arc; gravitational spreading of the arc; and magmatic inflation within the arc. New observations of deformational features in the Muertos thrust belt and of fault geometries produced in sandbox kinematic models, along with examination of published studies of island arcs, lead to the conclusion that the bivergence of thrusting in island arcs can develop without reversal of subduction polarity, without subarc mantle flow, and without magmatic inflation. We suggest that the Eastern Greater Antilles arc and comparable arcs are simply crustalscale bivergent (or "doubly vergent") thrust wedges formed during unidirectional subduction. Sandbox kinematic modeling suggests, in addition, that a broad retrowedge containing an imbricate fan of thrusts develops only where the arc behaves relatively rigidly. In such cases, the arc acts as a backstop that transmits compressive stress into the backarc region. Further, modeling shows that when arcs behave as rigid blocks, the strike-slip component of oblique convergence is accommodated entirely within the prowedge and the arc-the retrowedge hosts only dip-slip faulting ("frontal thrusting"). The existence of large retrowedges and the distribution of faulting in an island arc may, therefore, be evidence that the arc is

  5. Southern Costa Rica: an Island-arc Segment That Behaves Like a Doubly Vergent Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, C.; Winsemann, J.

    2007-12-01

    Southern Central America is a Mesosoic/Cenozoic island-arc that evolved from the subduction of the Farallón Plate below the Caribbean Plate. The southern Costa Rican land-bridge comprises deformed fore-arc and back-arc basins in the west and east, respectively, separated by the up to 3.8 km high Talamanca Range. The structure of the southern Central American island-arc is similar to doubly vergent and asymmetric orogens. The deformed fore-arc basin in the west and the Limon fold-and-thrust belt in the east can be interpreted as pro-wedge and retro-wedge, respectively. The Talamanca Range represents the uplifted block in between. The pro-wedge is wider and has a lower slope angle than the retro-wedge. The uplift of the Talamanca Range is probably related to a system of conjugate shear zones. Precipitation is unevenly distributed, with orographic effects concentrating precipitation in SW Costa Rica, which has caused pro-wedge denudation, leading to exhumation of granitic rocks at in the interior of the mountain range. The large-scale structure of the Central American island-arc in southern Costa Rica can be described using models of continental collision zones. Previous studies attributed the deformation and uplift pattern to the subduction/collision of the Cocos Ridge. Another reasonable driving mechanism for the evolution of such an orogen in an oceanic island-arc setting is the basal traction due to long-term subduction of the Cocos Plate at a very low angle.

  6. A simple 2-D model for the evolution of an island-arc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharinov, S. E.; Demin, S. S.

    1990-07-01

    Slow seismotectonic movements along inclined deep fault planes under compressive horizontal stresses are supposed to be the principal mechanism controlling the structure and processes in island-arc systems. In order to treat the stress variations caused by this mechanism, a simple geomechanical model is investigated. We consider a shearing surface crack embedded in a homogeneous elastic half-space. The key element of the model is viscous interaction between the sides of the crack, the viscosity varying with depth. The model differs from the classical steady-state mode of subduction by nonstationary creep processes on deep faults and possibly by cyclical evolution of island-arc systems. The results of our numerical analysis are in good agreement with geological, geophysical and seismological data. (i) Vertical displacements of the free surface in the model fit well with the typical topography of a trench—arc-basement rise—back-arc basin system. (ii) The Benioff seismic zone is supposed to be formed due to the concentration of shear stresses near the fault plane. The characteristic patterns of seismicity, the fine geometry of Benioff zones, and their double-planed structure can be explained in terms of our model. (iii) A zone of considerable heat generation caused by viscous dissipation along the fault plane is found within a narrow area in the depth range 100-200 km. Moreover, the island-arc basement rise is characterized in the model by a relative tension of a few tens or even hundreds of bars, while at depths of 100-150 km below the surface, additional compression of the same order of magnitude acts. The magmatic plumbing system may be visualised as a "toothpaste tube" or a sponge filled with magma which is squeezed from the depths to the surface due to the redistribution of the tectonic stresses only. This can explain the physical origin of island-arc magmatism and the typical position of volcanic belts.

  7. Composition and isotopic constraints on the petrogenesis of alkaline arc lavas: Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, A.K.; Hart, S.R.; Frey, F.A. )

    1990-05-10

    The SiO{sub 2}-undersaturated lavas from Lihir island, Papua New Guinea, like most arc lavas are highly enriched in Sr, Ba, K, Rb, and Cc and depleted in Hf, Ta, Nb, and Ti relative to ocean floor basalts and oceanic island basalts. These alkali-rich lavas have arc trace element signatures and Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic systematics. However, they are not a product of present-day subduction, as this volcanism has tapped mantle which was enriched by prior subduction episodes. The narrow range of Pb isotopic compositions suggest a cogenetic origin for these lavas. During the fractionation of the primitive Lihir lavas, elements normally considered incompatible (i.e., the light rare earth elements (LREE), Rb, Th, and P) have high bulk solid/melt partition coefficients (0.15-1.5). Relatively higher partition coefficients during formation of the evolved lavas produced crossing rare earth element (REE) patterns, and primitive lavas have higher incompatible elements abundances than evolved lavas. The Lihir lavas have lower alkali, Sr, Ba, K, Rb, Cs, and LREE abundances than other Tabar-Feni lavas. They are derived from a less enriched mantle source rather than by a higher degree of melting of a source similar to that of the other islands. The similarity of Sm/Nd ratios of these undersaturated arc lavas to those of tholeiitic and calc-alkaline arc lavas and the moderate chondrite-normalized La/Yb (la/Yb{sub cn} = 3-7) indicates that there has been limited enrichment of the LREE relative to the heavy REE during generation of the arc-modified source mantle. The alkaline nature of these lavas reflects their generation, in a tensional tectonic environment, from a fossil arc mantle region that has undergone extreme arc enrichment of alkali and alkaline earth elements during two earlier subduction episodes.

  8. The May 2003 eruption of Anatahan volcano, Mariana Islands: Geochemical evolution of a silicic island-arc volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wade, J.A.; Plank, T.; Stern, R.J.; Tollstrup, D.L.; Gill, J.B.; O'Leary, J. C.; Eiler, J.M.; Moore, R.B.; Woodhead, J.D.; Trusdell, F.; Fischer, T.P.; Hilton, David R.

    2005-01-01

    The first historical eruption of Anatahan volcano began on May 10, 2003. Samples of tephra from early in the eruption were analyzed for major and trace elements, and Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf, and O isotopic compositions. The compositions of these tephras are compared with those of prehistoric samples of basalt and andesite, also newly reported here. The May 2003 eruptives are medium-K andesites with 59-63 wt.% SiO2, and are otherwise homogeneous (varying less than 3% 2?? about the mean for 45 elements). Small, but systematic, chemical differences exist between dark (scoria) and light (pumice) fragments, which indicate fewer mafic and oxide phenocrysts in, and less degassing for, the pumice than scoria. The May 2003 magmas are nearly identical to other prehistoric eruptives from Anatahan. Nonetheless, Anatahan has erupted a wide range of compositions in the past, from basalt to dacite (49-66 wt.% SiO2). The large proportion of lavas with silicic compositions at Anatahan (> 59 wt.% SiO2) is unique within the active Mariana Islands, which otherwise erupt a narrow range of basalts and basaltic andesites. The silicic compositions raise the question of whether they formed via crystal fractionation or crustal assimilation. The lack of 87Sr/86Sr variation with silica content, the MORB-like ??18O, and the incompatible behavior of Zr rule out assimilation of old crust, altered crust, or zircon-saturated crustal melts, respectively. Instead, the constancy of isotopic and trace element ratios, and the systematic variations in REE patterns are consistent with evolution by crystal fractionation of similar parental magmas. Thus, Anatahan is a type example of an island-arc volcano that erupts comagmatic basalts to dacites, with no evidence for crustal assimilation. The parental magmas to Anatahan lie at the low 143Nd/144Nd, Ba/La, and Sm/La end of the spectrum of magmas erupted in the Marianas arc, consistent with 1-3 wt.% addition of subducted sediment to the mantle source, or roughly one

  9. The May 2003 eruption of Anatahan volcano, Mariana Islands: Geochemical evolution of a silicic island-arc volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Jennifer A.; Plank, Terry; Stern, Robert J.; Tollstrup, Darren L.; Gill, James B.; O'Leary, Julie C.; Eiler, John M.; Moore, Richard B.; Woodhead, Jon D.; Trusdell, Frank; Fischer, Tobias P.; Hilton, David R.

    2005-08-01

    The first historical eruption of Anatahan volcano began on May 10, 2003. Samples of tephra from early in the eruption were analyzed for major and trace elements, and Sr, Nd, Pb, Hf, and O isotopic compositions. The compositions of these tephras are compared with those of prehistoric samples of basalt and andesite, also newly reported here. The May 2003 eruptives are medium-K andesites with 59-63 wt.% SiO 2, and are otherwise homogeneous (varying less than 3% 2 σ about the mean for 45 elements). Small, but systematic, chemical differences exist between dark (scoria) and light (pumice) fragments, which indicate fewer mafic and oxide phenocrysts in, and less degassing for, the pumice than scoria. The May 2003 magmas are nearly identical to other prehistoric eruptives from Anatahan. Nonetheless, Anatahan has erupted a wide range of compositions in the past, from basalt to dacite (49-66 wt.% SiO 2). The large proportion of lavas with silicic compositions at Anatahan (> 59 wt.% SiO 2) is unique within the active Mariana Islands, which otherwise erupt a narrow range of basalts and basaltic andesites. The silicic compositions raise the question of whether they formed via crystal fractionation or crustal assimilation. The lack of 87Sr/ 86Sr variation with silica content, the MORB-like δ18O, and the incompatible behavior of Zr rule out assimilation of old crust, altered crust, or zircon-saturated crustal melts, respectively. Instead, the constancy of isotopic and trace element ratios, and the systematic variations in REE patterns are consistent with evolution by crystal fractionation of similar parental magmas. Thus, Anatahan is a type example of an island-arc volcano that erupts comagmatic basalts to dacites, with no evidence for crustal assimilation. The parental magmas to Anatahan lie at the low 143Nd/ 144Nd, Ba/La, and Sm/La end of the spectrum of magmas erupted in the Marianas arc, consistent with 1-3 wt.% addition of subducted sediment to the mantle source, or

  10. Morphostructural analysis and Cenozoic evolution of Elephant Island, Southern Scotia Arc, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mink, S.; Maestro, A.; López-Martínez, J.; Schmid, T.; Galindo-Zaldívar, J.; Trouw, R. A. J.

    2015-04-01

    Elephant Island, located in the vicinity of the present-day active boundary of the South Shetland Block and the Antarctic and Scotia plates, is a region of particular interest for understanding the past and present geodynamic evolution of the southern Scotia Arc. Lineament from different data sources, field-measured fractures and geomorphological evidences have been analysed in this context. The lineaments extracted from aerial photographs (1,624), from a DEM (348) and from RADARSAT-2 satellite data (1,365) indicate four dominant lineament sets with NE-SW, NW-SE, N-S and W-E strikes. All data sources identified similar lineament families, but differences in the frequency distributions and subsequently on the dominant orientations were observed. The measurements direct of fractures were obtained from 23 sites in the field at which 278 planes were measured. Fracture planes indicate main modes trending in the NNE-SSW and NNW-SSE directions and a secondary mode in the E-W. The major trends of the fracture measurements and the lineaments display a good correlation in the E-W direction. However, there is an angular variation in the azimuth values of the NNE-SSE and NNW-SSE fractures with respect to the N-S, NE-SW and NW-SE orientations of the lineaments of approximately 20°. This trend deviation may be due to the fact that mapped lineaments are composed of small fracture sets that may be related to shear fractures that cannot be distinguished at the aerial photograph or radar satellite data scales. Submerged sea-floor morphological feature orientations match the studied morphostructures on the island and the main tectonic structures in this part of the Scotia Arc. A linkage of the main lineament families to the tectonic stages from the Oligocene to the present has been proposed, taking into account the information of the orientation and sense of movement of the fractures and stresses in the Elephant Island region.

  11. Earthquake evidence for along-arc extension in the Mariana Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeszel, David S.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Shore, Patrick J.; Shiobara, Hajime; Sugioka, Hiroko

    2008-12-01

    Analysis of data from a deployment of ocean bottom and land seismographs in 2003-2004 detected four swarms of earthquakes in the overriding plate of the Mariana subduction system between the fore-arc and the back-arc spreading center. Two additional shallow swarms were identified by analyzing the teleseismic earthquake catalogs from 1967 to 2003. Focal mechanism solutions for these swarms, determined from regional waveform inversion for the 2003-2004 events or retrieved from the Centroid Moment Tensor catalog for previous years, suggest a complex system of deformation throughout the arc. We observe arc-parallel extension near volcanic cross chains, arc-perpendicular extension along the frontal arc, and arc-parallel compression farther into the back arc near the Mariana Trough. A swarm beneath the middle and eastern summits of the Diamante cross chain may have recorded magmatic activity. Volcanic cross chains showing evidence of adiabatic decompression melting from extensional upwelling are localized at regions of enhanced along-strike extension. The earthquake data are consistent with recent GPS results indicating 12 mm/a of extension between Guam and Agrihan. The along-arc extension may result from either increasing curvature of the Mariana system with time or from deformation induced by oblique subduction in the northernmost and southernmost regions of the arc.

  12. Bathymetric gradients within a Paleozoic Island Arc, southeastern Alaska (Alexander Terrane)

    SciTech Connect

    Soja, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    Early to Late Silurian (Wenlock-Ludlow) limestones belonging to the Heceta Formation reflect bathymetric gradients within the ancient island arc exposed in the Alexander terrane of southeastern Alaska. These rocks record the earliest occurrence of widespread carbonate deposition in the region and represent the earliest foundation for shallow-water platform development within the arc. The excellent preservation of platform, platform margin, and slope deposits contrasts with the poor preservation of many marine sediments that originated within other island arcs. Hence, these limestones provide important insights into the styles, processes, and bathymetry of carbonate deposition in island arcs. Carbonate depositional sites within the arc extended laterally from nearshore intertidal and relatively shallow subtidal zones of a marine platform, to the seaward margins of a rimmed shelf, and into deeper subtidal areas of a slope environment. Fossiliferous deposits that originated on the platform comprise a diversity of shelly benthos, including corals and stromatoporoids in growth position. Dasycladacean algae, oncoids, and Amphipora also indicate shallow-water conditions. Organic buildups and reefs were constructed by cyanobacteria, massive stromatoporoids, corals, and algae at the platform margin. Deposition beyond the seaward edge of the shelf is evident from the carbonate turbidites that consist of skeletal debris of shallow-water derivation and an absence of coarse siliciclastic detritus. Sedimentation and resedimentation along a bathymetric gradient within the arc is especially well illustrated by the carbonate breccias that are enclosed within these deep subtidal sediments. They comprise detached stromatolites and clasts of shallow-water origin that were derived from the platform and its margin during periodic slumping of the shelf edge.

  13. Episodic nature of continental arc activity since 750 Ma: A global compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenrong; Lee, Cin-Ty A.; Lackey, Jade Star

    2017-03-01

    Continental arcs have been recently hypothesized to outflux large amounts of CO2 compared to island arcs so that global flare-ups in continental arc magmatism might drive long-term greenhouse events. Quantitative testing of this hypothesis, however, has been limited by the lack of detailed studies on the spatial distribution of continental arcs through time. Here, we compile a worldwide database of geological maps and associated literature to delineate the surface exposure of granitoid plutons, allowing reconstruction of how the surface area addition rate of granitoids and the length of continental arcs have varied since 750 Ma. These results were integrated into an ArcGIS framework and plate reconstruction models. We find that the spatial extent of continental arcs is episodic with time and broadly matches the detrital zircon age record. Most vigorous arc magmatism occurred during the 670-480 Ma and the 250-50 Ma when major greenhouse events are recognized. Low continental arc activity characterized most of the Cryogenian, middle-late Paleozoic, and Cenozoic when climate was cold. Our results indicate that plate tectonics is not steady, with fluctuations in the nature of subduction zones possibly related in time to the assembly and dispersal of continents. Our results corroborate the hypothesis that variations in continental arc activity may play a first order role in driving long-term climate change. The dataset presented here provides a quantitative basis for upscaling continental arc processes to explore their effects on mountain building, climate, and crustal growth on a global scale.

  14. Temporal evolution of a three component system: the island of Lipari (Aeolian Arc, southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisci, G. M.; de Rosa, R.; Esperança, S.; Mazzuoli, R.; Sonnino, M.

    1991-04-01

    The volcanic products from Lipari define an evolutionary trend with a high gradient of K-enrichment, similar to the calc-alkaline to potassic volcanism of other islands in the Aeolian arc. Stratigraphic reconstruction of the island based on field and geochronological data indicate that the volcanic activity can be subdivided in two stages. The first stage, from 223 to 42 ka, consists of six eruptive cycles and is characterized by basalts and basalt-andesites showing progressive increase in both SiO2 and K2O contents with time. The second stage consists of four cycles erupted since 42 ka and is marked by an apparent rejuvenation of the geochemical system with the appearance of the first rhyolitic products. Fractional crystallization, assimilation and mixing models suggest that the geochemistry of Lipari volcanism evolved with time by a complex interplay between two mantle-derived components, one sub-alkaline and the other alkaline, in addition to crustal melts and/or crustally-derived materials. A petrogenetic model in which fractional crystallization was subordinate to mixing best fits the geochemical data and petrographic observations of macro- and microscopic features. Melts from the crustal and mantle end-members are almost always present in the system but the relative proportions appear to vary with time. The sub-alkaline mantle component (source of Tyrrhenian tholeiites) is an important contributor to the early evolution of the volcanism in Lipari; input from the alkaline mantle component (source of the Roman Comagmatic Province) increases with time, and the crustal component becomes dominant in the later activity. The preferred petrogenetic model for the temporal evolution of the volcanic system in Lipari involves melting initially caused by an increase in the thermal input related to the opening of the Tyrrhenian Sea and/or to subduction processes. The quick rise of the isotherms and almost contemporaneous melting of source materials with different

  15. Lead isotopes in volcanic rocks and possible ocean-floor thrusting beneath island arcs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.

    1969-01-01

    The isotopic composition of lead in the Japanese primary basalts gradually decreases in radiogenic character in a transverse from the Pacific Ocean side to the Japan Sea side, whereas the observed 238U 204Pb and 232Th 204Pb ratios in the basalts increase in the same direction. The isotopic composition of lead suggests that tholeiite (Pacific side) is generated at a shallower depth than alkali basalt (Japan Sea side) as postulated by Kuno. The inverse correlation of the 238U 204Pb with the 206Pb 204Pb ratios could be due to preferential Pb extraction with respect to uranium at shallow depths. Alternatively, these geochemical results can be interpreted in terms of the Pacific oceanic rigid plate being underthurst beneath the island arc. The isotopic variation in basalts across the Japanese island arc would result from different proportions of the plate material and the upper mantle of continental side in the partial melt. ?? 1969.

  16. Tracing the evolution of island-arc volcanism in the Tanna-Futuna transect (New Hebrides)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, S. M.; Haase, K. M.; Beier, C.

    2014-12-01

    The New Hebrides island arc, located in the southwestern Pacific, is associated with the fast subduction of the Australian Plate under the North Fiji Basin. It extends over 1500 km including the entire Vanuatu archipelago. Several studies dealing with the geochemistry of the most important islands interpret the chemical variability to originate from the heterogeneities in the sub-arc mantle wedge1 and variable addition of the subduction component along the arc2. In order to trace the differences between the source(s) of New Hebrides volcanic arc and back-arc magmatism, five submarine cones (4 of them aligned NE-SW), located in the Futuna Through, were sampled. The lavas range from basalt to andesite with fractionation of olivine being the main magma evolution mechanism until MgO ≈ 6 wt.%. The most primitive lavas have similar fractionation-corrected TiO2 (0.90-1.18 wt.%) and Na2O (2.89-3.41 wt.%) contents suggesting comparable degrees of partial melting. The comparison with published data from adjacent islands shows a more important contribution of the slab closer to the trench (Tanna) where the erupted basalts, basaltic trachyandesites and trachyandesites have considerably higher U/Nb and Ba/Nb ratios. Yet, these lavas display significant negative Sr anomalies (PM-normalized). This could provide evidence of input of continental derived sediments or could reflect the role of plagioclase in the source / evolution of these magmas. The first hypothesis is not supported by published data from the Vanuatu trench3 and the second is not supported by the decoupled behavior of Sr and Eu in normalized-diagrams. On the other hand, island crust samples collected along the northern flank of Futuna Island display strong positive anomalies of Sr and, although more modest, the submarine cones show a similar behavior. Based on source chemical tracers, an increasing depletion of the source is observed from east to west, consistent with progressive mantle flow towards the arc front

  17. Subduction Controls of Hf and Nd Isotopes in Lavas of the Aleutian Island Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Yogodzinski, Gene; Vervoort, Jeffery; Brown, Shaun Tyler; Gerseny, Megan

    2010-08-29

    The Hf and Nd isotopic compositions of 71 Quaternary lavas collected from locations along the full length of the Aleutian island arc are used to constrain the sources of Aleutian magmas and to provide insight into the geochemical behavior of Nd and Hf and related elements in the Aleutian subduction-magmatic system. Isotopic compositions of Aleutian lavas fall approximately at the center of, and form a trend parallel to, the terrestrial Hf-Nd isotopic array with {var_epsilon}{sub Hf} of +12.0 to +15.5 and {var_epsilon}{sub Nd} of +6.5 to +10.5. Basalts, andesites, and dacites within volcanic centers or in nearby volcanoes generally all have similar isotopic compositions, indicating that there is little measurable effect of crustal or other lithospheric assimilation within the volcanic plumbing systems of Aleutian volcanoes. Hafnium isotopic compositions have a clear pattern of along-arc increase that is continuous from the eastern-most locations near Cold Bay to Piip Seamount in the western-most part of the arc. This pattern is interpreted to reflect a westward decrease in the subducted sediment component present in Aleutian lavas, reflecting progressively lower rates of subduction westward as well as decreasing availability of trench sediment. Binary bulk mixing models (sediment + peridotite) demonstrate that 1-2% of the Hf in Aleutian lavas is derived from subducted sediment, indicating that Hf is mobilized out of the subducted sediment with an efficiency that is similar to that of Sr, Pb and Nd. Low published solubility for Hf and Nd in aqueous subduction fluids lead us to conclude that these elements are mobilized out of the subducted component and transferred to the mantle wedge as bulk sediment or as a silicate melt. Neodymium isotopes also generally increase from east to west, but the pattern is absent in the eastern third of the arc, where the sediment flux is high and increases from east to west, due to the presence of abundant terrigenous sediment in the

  18. Tracing crustal and slab contributions to arc magmatism in the lesser antilles island arc using helium and carbon relationships in geothermal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, M. C.; Hilton, D. R.; Kreulen, R.

    1998-10-01

    We report helium and carbon isotope and CO 2/ 3He ratios from a regional survey of geothermal fluids from the Lesser Antilles island arc, an arc system where there is compelling geochemical evidence for the superimposition of a crustal component onto mantle-derived magmas. A predominant mantle helium isotope signature is observed throughout the arc. The highest ratios coincide with MORB helium (˜8R A where R A = air 3He/ 4He) and occur towards the centre of the arc (the islands of Martinique, Dominica, Guadeloupe, and Montserrat). In the south and north of the arc (Grenada, St. Vincent, St. Lucia in the south and Nevis and Saba in the north) 3He/ 4He ratios are lower and lie between 4.9 and 6.8R A. This regional variation is also apparent in the carbon isotope systematics: the central portion of the arc (Martinique to Montserrat) have δ 13C(CO 2) values between -2‰ and -4‰ (vs. PDB), heavier than the range observed in MORB (-4 to -9‰). The south of the arc (Grenada to St.Lucia) is characterized by MORB-like carbon isotope ratios (centred on -6‰). CO 2/ 3He ratios are significantly higher than the MORB value (˜2 × 10 9) for the entire arc. The values in the central islands fall close to 10 10 whereas the southern volcanoes have higher ratios between 10 10-10 13. Assuming the Lesser Antilles mantle wedge has a MORB-like helium and carbon composition our data can be explained by mixing of mantle wedge carbon with at least two other carbon components: an isotopically-heavy marine limestone endmember of slab-derivation and an isotopically-lighter component representing either slab-derived organic carbon and/or an upper crustal component with a large fraction of organic carbon. The helium-carbon systematics of the central portion of the arc are consistent with a large slab-derived marine limestone input to the carbon inventory, and we calculate a non-mantle:mantle carbon flux of 5.7:1. MORB-like helium isotope ratios, which are sensitive to perturbation by

  19. Morphostructure at the junction between the Beata ridge and the Greater Antilles island arc (offshore Hispaniola southern slope)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja Bruña, J. L.; Carbó-Gorosabel, A.; Llanes Estrada, P.; Muñoz-Martín, A.; ten Brink, U. S.; Gómez Ballesteros, M.; Druet, M.; Pazos, A.

    2014-03-01

    Oblique convergence between the Caribbean plate's interior and the inactive Greater Antilles island arc has resulted in the collision and impingement of the thickened crust of the Beata ridge into southern Hispaniola Island. Deformation resulting from this convergence changes from a low-angle southward-verging thrust south of eastern Hispaniola, to collision and uplift in south-central Hispaniola, and to left-lateral transpression along the Southern peninsula of Haiti in western Hispaniola. Using new swath bathymetry and a dense seismic reflection grid, we mapped the morphological, structural and sedimentological elements of offshore southern Hispaniola. We have identified four morphotectonic provinces: the Dominican sub-basin, the Muertos margin, the Beata ridge and the Haiti sub-basin. The lower slope of the Muertos margin is occupied by the active Muertos thrust belt, which includes several active out-of-sequence thrust faults that, were they to rupture along their entire length, could generate large-magnitude earthquakes. The interaction of the thrust belt with the Beata ridge yields a huge recess and the imbricate system disappears. The upper slope of the Muertos margin shows thick slope deposits where the extensional tectonics and slumping processes predominate. The northern Beata ridge consists of an asymmetrically uplifted and faulted block of oceanic crust. Our results suggest that the shallower structure and morphology of the northern Beata ridge can be mainly explained by a mechanism of extensional unloading from the Upper Cretaceous onward that is still active residually along the summit of the ridge. The tectonic models for the northern Beata ridge involving active reverse strike-slip faults and transpression caused by the oblique convergence between the Beata ridge and the island arc are not supported by the structural interpretation. The eastern Bahoruco slope an old normal fault that acts as a passive tear fault accommodating the sharp along

  20. Silica-enriched mantle sources of subalkaline picrite-boninite-andesite island arc magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénard, A.; Arculus, R. J.; Nebel, O.; Ionov, D. A.; McAlpine, S. R. B.

    2017-02-01

    Primary arc melts may form through fluxed or adiabatic decompression melting in the mantle wedge, or via a combination of both processes. Major limitations to our understanding of the formation of primary arc melts stem from the fact that most arc lavas are aggregated blends of individual magma batches, further modified by differentiation processes in the sub-arc mantle lithosphere and overlying crust. Primary melt generation is thus masked by these types of second-stage processes. Magma-hosted peridotites sampled as xenoliths in subduction zone magmas are possible remnants of sub-arc mantle and magma generation processes, but are rarely sampled in active arcs. Published studies have emphasised the predominantly harzburgitic lithologies with particularly high modal orthopyroxene in these xenoliths; the former characteristic reflects the refractory nature of these materials consequent to extensive melt depletion of a lherzolitic protolith whereas the latter feature requires additional explanation. Here we present major and minor element data for pristine, mantle-derived, lava-hosted spinel-bearing harzburgite and dunite xenoliths and associated primitive melts from the active Kamchatka and Bismarck arcs. We show that these peridotite suites, and other mantle xenoliths sampled in circum-Pacific arcs, are a distinctive peridotite type not found in other tectonic settings, and are melting residues from hydrous melting of silica-enriched mantle sources. We explore the ability of experimental studies allied with mantle melting parameterisations (pMELTS, Petrolog3) to reproduce the compositions of these arc peridotites, and present a protolith ('hybrid mantle wedge') composition that satisfies the available constraints. The composition of peridotite xenoliths recovered from erupted arc magmas plausibly requires their formation initially via interaction of slab-derived components with refractory mantle prior to or during the formation of primary arc melts. The liquid

  1. Early Proterozoic Bell Island group: initiation of, and extension within, a continental magmatic arc

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, I.G.

    1985-01-01

    The Bell Island Group is the oldest sequence of supracrustal rocks of the Great Bear Magmatic Zone (GBMZ), western Wopmay Orogen, northwestern Canadian Shield. These rocks lie unconformably on a penetratively deformed and metamorphosed sialic basement complex and are unconformably beneath the calc-alkaline LaBine Group, which is interpreted as continental magmatic arc. The supracrustal rocks of the GBMZ are broadly folded about gently plunging, northwest trending axes and cut by transcurrent faults. The lower part of the Bell Island Group comprises 1.5-2 km of poorly sorted arkose and fanglomerate, aphyric mafic to intermediate lavas, block-and-ash flows, a mineralogically zone cooling unit of rhyolite ash-flow tuff, and aphyric to porphyritic rhyolite flows and domes. Structures and lithologies of the sedimentary rocks, as well as physical characteristics of the volcanics, suggest subaerial deposition. Chemical analyses of lavas and ash-flow tuff indicate a predominantly calc-alkaline suite, although minor tholeiitic lavas are present. Conformably overlying the lower subaerial succession is at least 3.5 km of tholeiitic pillow basalts, intercalated sedimentary rocks and breccias, and tholeiitic gabbro sills. The subaerial to subaqueous transition in rocks of the Bell Island Group suggests 2-3.5 km of syn-volcanic subsidence which may have begun during early subaerial volcanism, but if so, continued during the extrusion of the thick tholeiitic pillow basalt pile. Subaerial conditions resumed during eruption and deposition of the overlying calc-alkaline LaBine Group. Therefore, rocks of the Bell Island Group may represent initiation of calc-alkaline magmatism in a continental arc, followed by tholeiitic magmatism related to intra-arc extension.

  2. Neotectonics and basin development at a continental/island arc transition in the Western Alaska Peninsula shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    A transition in shelf structure occurs between the eastern Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutians. In the east, compressive structures striking parallel to the margin characterize the outer shelf off of Kodiak, Chirikov, and Semidi Islands. Further to the west, multichannel seismic (MSC) data exhibit a systematic transition in style of deformation and orientation of recently active structures in the shelf region of the Shumagin and Sanak Islands. In this area, deformation near the trench slope break is manifested by drapelike folds and normal faults striking parallel to the margin. In contrast, further west between the Shumagin and Sanak Island, MCS profiles for the shelf region reveal basement-involved extensional structures transverse to the margin that have controlled the development of the Sanak and East Sanak Basis. These fault bounded basins have hanging wall sequences with syndepositional rotational displacements over normal faults, indicating a protracted history of extensional faulting and basin subsidence. Present displacement is indicated by the effects of many of the faults upon the uppermost basin and shelf strata, which in some cases offset the sea floor. The aforementioned systematic change in shelf structure of the Alaska Peninsula is coincident with an arcward shift in bathymetric contours of the trench and slope. This transition zone, from margin-parallel compressive structures in the east, to margin-transverse extensional structures in the west, coincides with the continental to island arc transition in the North American plate that reflects the ancient Beringian margin of western Alaska.

  3. Tracing crustal and slab contributions to arc magmatism in the Lesser Antilles island arc using helium and carbon relationships in geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Soest, M.C. van; Hilton, D.R. |; Kreulen, R.

    1998-10-01

    The authors report helium and carbon isotope and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He ratios from a regional survey of geothermal fluids from the Lesser Antilles island arc, an arc system where there is compelling geochemical evidence for the superimposition of a crustal component onto mantle-derived magmas. A predominant mantle helium isotope signature is observed throughout the arc. The highest ratios coincide with MORB helium ({approximately}8R{sub A} where R{sub A} = air {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He) and occur towards the center of the arc (the islands of Martinique, Dominica, Guadeloupe, and Montserrat). In the south and north of the arc (Grenada, St. Vincent, St. Lucia in the south and Nevis and Saba in the north) {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios are lower and lie between 4.9 and 6.8R{sub A}. This regional variation is also apparent in the carbon isotope systematics: the central portion of the arc (Martinique to Montserrat) have {delta}{sup 13}C(CO{sub 2}) values between {minus}2{per_thousand} and {minus}4{per_thousand} (vs PDB), heavier than the range observed in MORB ({minus}4 to {minus}9{per_thousand}). The south of the arc (Grenada to St. Lucia) is characterized by MORB-like carbon isotope ratios (centered on {minus}6{per_thousand}). CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He ratios are significantly higher than the MORB value ({approximately}2 {times} 10{sup 9}) for the entire arc. The values in the central islands fall close to 10{sup 10} whereas the southern volcanoes have higher ratios between 10{sup 10}--10{sup 13}.

  4. Late Triassic island-arc--back-arc basin development along the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone (central Tibet): Geological, geochemical and chronological evidence from volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. S.; Shi, R.; Zou, H.

    2015-12-01

    A major debate related to the evolution of the Tibetan Plateau is centered on whether or not an island arc-back-arc basin system occurred along the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, central Tibet. Here we present new zircon U-Pb geochronology, rare earth elements (REE) and bulk-rock geochemistry of these magmatic rocks in the Amdo area, the middle Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, central Tibet, to identify significant and new records of Mesozoic tectonomagmatic processes. Zircon U-Pb dating using LA-ICP-MS techniques yields a concordant age with a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 228.6 ± 1.6 Ma (n = 7, MSWD = 1.19) for the Quehala basalts, and a mean ages of 220.0 ± 2.1 (n = 8, MSWD = 1.5) for the Amdo pillow lavas. On the normalized REE patterns of zircon, significant Ce enrichment indicates the magma sources of these magmatic rocks have been subjected to modification of slab-derived fluid. Geochemical features suggest that the Quehala basalts (ca. 228 Ma), displaying an island arc tholeiites (IAT) affinity, resulted from partial melting of an enriched mantle wedge in the subduction zone, whereas the Amdo pillow lavas (ca. 220 Ma) characterized by both arc-like and N-MORB-like geochemical characteristics occurred as associated back-arc basin basalts (BABB) at the spreading center of back-arc basin after the formation of island arc tholeiites. In conclusion, the volcanic rocks in the Amdo area have documented the magmatic processes from early-stage subduction to development of associated back-arc basin, confirming the occurrence of intra-oceanic subduction within the Bangong-Nujiang Tethys during the late Triassic. Furthermore, the spatial relationships among the Quehala formation, Tumengela formation and Amdo pillow lavas indicate northward subduction of the Bangong-Nujiang Tethyan Ocean during the Late Triassic to middle Jurassic.

  5. Late Triassic island-arc-back-arc basin development along the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone (central Tibet): Geological, geochemical and chronological evidence from volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Sheng; Shi, Ren-Deng; Zou, Hai-Bo; Huang, Qi-Shuai; Liu, De-Liang; Gong, Xiao-Han; Yi, Guo-Ding; Wu, Kang

    2015-08-01

    A major debate related to the evolution of the Tibetan Plateau is centered on whether or not an island arc-back-arc basin system occurred along the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, central Tibet. Here we present new zircon U-Pb geochronology, rare earth elements (REEs) and bulk-rock geochemistry of these magmatic rocks in the Amdo area, the middle Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, central Tibet, to identify significant and new records of Mesozoic tectonomagmatic processes. Zircon U-Pb dating using LA-ICP-MS techniques yields a concordant age with a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 228.6 ± 1.6 Ma (n = 7, MSWD = 1.19) for the Quehala basalts, and a mean age of 220.0 ± 2.1 (n = 8, MSWD = 1.5) for the Amdo pillow lavas. On the normalized REE patterns of zircon, significant Ce enrichment indicates that the magma sources of these magmatic rocks have been subjected to modification of slab-derived fluid. Geochemical features suggest that the Quehala basalts (ca. 228 Ma), displaying an island arc tholeiites (IATs) affinity, resulted from partial melting of an relatively enriched mantle wedge in the subduction zone, whereas the Amdo pillow lavas (ca. 220 Ma) characterized by both arc-like and N-MORB-like geochemical characteristics occurred as associated back-arc basin basalts (BABBs) at the spreading center of back-arc basin after the formation of island arc tholeiites. In conclusion, the volcanic rocks in the Amdo area have documented the magmatic processes from early-stage subduction to development of associated back-arc basin, confirming the occurrence of intra-oceanic subduction within the Bangong-Nujiang Tethys during the late Triassic. Furthermore, the spatial relationships among the Quehala formation, Tumengela formation and Amdo pillow lavas indicate likely northward subduction of the Bangong-Nujiang Tethyan Ocean during the Late Triassic to middle Jurassic.

  6. Heterogeneous stress state of island arc crust in northeastern Japan affected by hot mantle fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibazaki, Bunichiro; Okada, Tomomi; Muto, Jun; Matsumoto, Takumi; Yoshida, Takeyoshi; Yoshida, Keisuke

    2016-04-01

    By considering a thermal structure based on dense geothermal observations, we model the stress state of the crust beneath the northeastern Japan island arc under a compressional tectonic regime using a finite element method with viscoelasticity and elastoplasticity. We consider a three-layer structure (upper crust, lower crust, and uppermost mantle) to define flow properties. Numerical results show that the brittle-viscous transition becomes shallower beneath the Ou Backbone Range compared with areas near the margins of the Pacific Ocean and the Japan Sea. Moreover, several elongate regions with a shallow brittle-viscous transition are oriented transverse to the arc, and these regions correspond to hot fingers (i.e., high-temperature regions in the mantle wedge). The stress level is low in these regions due to viscous deformation. Areas of seismicity roughly correspond to zones of stress accumulation where many intraplate earthquakes occur. Our model produces regions with high uplift rates that largely coincide with regions of high elevation (e.g., the Ou Backbone Range). The stress state, fault development, and uplift around the Ou Backbone Range can all be explained by our model. The results also suggest the existence of low-viscosity regions corresponding to hot fingers in the island arc crust. These low-viscosity regions have possibly affected viscous relaxation processes following the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake.

  7. New insights into the Aeolian Islands and other arc source compositions from high-precision olivine chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamboni, Denis; Trela, Jarek; Gazel, Esteban; Sobolev, Alexander V.; Cannatelli, Claudia; Lucchi, Federico; Batanova, Valentina G.; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2017-02-01

    The Aeolian arc (Italy) is characterized by some of the strongest along-the-arc geochemical variations in the planet, making it an ideal location to study the effect of subducting components in modifying the mantle source of island arc melts. Here, we use high-precision element concentrations in primitive phenocrystic olivine from basalts along the arc to elucidate the effects of mantle source modification by the subduction process. Olivines from this arc have Ni concentrations and Fe/Mn ratios that show similarity to peridotite sources that melted to produce mid-ocean ridge basalts. Nevertheless, they also have systematically lower Ca concentrations and Fe/Mn ratios that broadly overlap with olivines from the available global arc array. These phenocrysts also do not show significant variations in Ca as a function of olivine forsterite content. The global data suggest that all olivines crystallizing from island-arc melts have suppressed Ca concentrations and Fe/Mn ratios, relative to olivines derived from melts at intraplate and mid-ocean ridge settings suggesting elevated H2O concentrations and higher oxidation state of the equilibrium melts. Based on olivine chemistry, we interpret a predominantly peridotite source (fluxed by subduction fluids) beneath the Aeolian Arc and also for other examples of arc-related lavas.

  8. Geochemistry of southern Pagan Island lavas, Mariana arc: The role of subduction zone processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marske, J.P.; Pietruszka, A.J.; Trusdell, F.A.; Garcia, M.O.

    2011-01-01

    New major and trace element abundances, and Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopic ratios of Quaternary lavas from two adjacent volcanoes (South Pagan and the Central Volcanic Region, or CVR) located on Pagan Island allow us to investigate the mantle source (i.e., slab components) and melting dynamics within the Mariana intra-oceanic arc. Geologic mapping reveals a pre-caldera (780-9.4ka) and post-caldera (<9.4ka) eruptive stage for South Pagan, whereas the eruptive history of the older CVR is poorly constrained. Crystal fractionation and magma mixing were important crustal processes for lavas from both volcanoes. Geochemical and isotopic variations indicate that South Pagan and CVR lavas, and lavas from the northern volcano on the island, Mt. Pagan, originated from compositionally distinct parental magmas due to variations in slab contributions (sediment and aqueous fluid) to the mantle wedge and the extent of mantle partial melting. A mixing model based on Pb and Nd isotopic ratios suggests that the average amount of sediment in the source of CVR (~2.1%) and South Pagan (~1.8%) lavas is slightly higher than Mt. Pagan (~1.4%) lavas. These estimates span the range of sediment-poor Guguan (~1.3%) and sediment-rich Agrigan (~2.0%) lavas for the Mariana arc. Melt modeling demonstrates that the saucer-shaped normalized rare earth element (REE) patterns observed in Pagan lavas can arise from partial melting of a mixed source of depleted mantle and enriched sediment, and do not require amphibole interaction or fractionation to depress the middle REE abundances of the lavas. The modeled degree of mantle partial melting for Agrigan (2-5%), Pagan (3-7%), and Guguan (9-15%) lavas correlates with indicators of fluid addition (e.g., Ba/Th). This relationship suggests that the fluid flux to the mantle wedge is the dominant control on the extent of partial melting beneath Mariana arc volcanoes. A decrease in the amount of fluid addition (lower Ba/Th) and extent of melting (higher Sm/Yb), and

  9. Lithospheric-folding-based understanding on the origin of the back-arc basaltic magmatism beneath Jeju volcanic island, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, S.; Shin, Y.; CHOI, K.; Koh, J.; Nakamura, E.; Na, S.

    2012-12-01

    Jeju Island is an intraplate volcanic island located at the eastern margin on the East Asia behind the Ryukyu Trench, the collisional/subduction boundary between the Eurasian plate and Philippine Sea plate. It is a symmetrical shield volcano, having numerous monogenetic cinder cones, over 365, on the Mt. Halla volcanic edifice. The basement rock mainly consists of Precambrian gneiss, Mesozoic granite and volcanic rocks. Unconsolidated sedimentary rock is found between basement rock and surface lava. The lava plateau is composed of voluminous basaltic lava flows, which extend to the coast region with a gentle slope. Based on the evidence obtained from volcanic stratigraphy, paleontology, and geochronology, the age of the Jeju basalts ranges from the early Pleistocene to Holocene(Historic). The alkaline and tholeiitic basalts exhibits OIB composition from intraplate volcanism which is not associated with plate subduction, while the basement xenolith contained in the volcanic rock indicates that there were volcanic activities associated with the Mesozoic plate subduction. The Geochemical characteristics have been explained with the plume model, lithospheric mantle origin, and melting of shallow asthenosphere by the rapid change of stress regimes between the collision of the India-Eurasia plates and subduction of the Pacific plate, while there has not been any geophysical investigation to disclose it. Compression near collisional plate boundaries causes lithospheric folding which results in the decrease of pressure beneath the ridge of the fold while the pressure increases beneath trough. The decompression beneath lithosphere is likely to accelerate basaltic magmatism along and below the ridge. We investigate the subsurface structure beneath Jeju volcanic island, South Korea and its vicinity and propose an alternative hypothesis that the basaltic magma beneath the island could be caused by episodic lithospheric folding. Unlike the prevailing hypothesis of the

  10. The Fundamental Importance of the ''Hidden'' Source of Chemical Erosion in Island Arcs : Guadeloupe and Martinique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rad, S.; Louvat, P.; Allegre, C.

    2005-12-01

    The chemical erosion of island arcs is of fundamental importance for the erosion regime of the earth and fixing the chemical and isotopic composition of the ocean. In previous work, specially Louvat et Allegre (1997, 1998) it has been shown that erosion of basalt and andesit are in the average 10 to 20 times more efficient than granitic type one. In a comprehensive study Dessert et al.(2003) concluded that basalt erosion contributes to 30 to 35 % of the atmospheric CO2 consumed by worldwide weathering. However since this time our group has surmised that island arcs contribution as estimated by the river weathering has been greatly underestimated. The source of error is supposed to be the contribution of water that circulates in island arc underground and goes directly to the ocean. We have then studied two islands of Lesser Antilles: Guadeloupe and Martinique. Guadeloupe and Martinique are characterised by a uniform andesitic lithology. They are located in a tropical climate with high temperature (24 to 28 ° C), high precipitation (they can reach 14000 mm/year), very dense vegetation, sharp relief and very thick soils. On parts of these islands, especially in Martinique, pyroclastic formations are dominant, creating a very porous surface. This allows water transfer through infiltration in more important proportions than through runoff. The proportion of this infiltrated water is 30% to 90% of the precipitation (Folio, 2001) in Reunion, which has a similar torrential regime. From hydrological budget and the chemical composition of underground waters we calculate the chemical weathering rates of infiltrated water: 280 t/km2/year for Guadeloupe and 190 t/km2/year for Martinique. Those values are much higher than the one calculated from the runoff and corrected TDS of different rivers: 120 t/km2/year in Guadeloupe and 100 t/km2/year in Martinique. This could mean that an important part of the chemical weathering process takes place in sub-surface and is not taken into

  11. Mafic dike swarms in the South Shetland Islands volcanic arc: Unravelling multiepisodic magmatism related to subduction and continental rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willan, Robert C. R.; Kelley, Simon P.

    1999-10-01

    Eight groups of mafic dikes and related high-level stocks cut Triassic accretionary complex and Mesozoic magmatic arc formations on Livingston Island. Some are affected by silicic/sericitic alteration, related to Cretaceous hydrothermal activity, and propylitic/epidosite alteration, analogous to that in ocean floor sheeted dikes. Alteration was accompanied by major and trace element metasomatism. Ar-Ar analysis of the freshest rocks indicates five intrusive events, some of which are unexpectedly young. Groups 1-3 were intruded in the mid to late Cretaceous (˜108-74 Ma) and were coeval with the calc-alkaline arc. Between 70 and 50 Ma, relatively rapid and oblique plate convergence led to strike-slip tectonism and a pause in magmatism. At ˜52 Ma, orthogonal, slow convergence resulted in extensional faulting and emplacement of calc-alkaline (group 2) and primitive tholeiitic dikes (groups 4-6) between 51 and 45 Ma. Extension of Antarctic Peninsula-southern South American crust culminated in emplacement of mafic to intermediate, medium-grained plutons and group C porphyries between 44 and 36 Ma. Localized hydrothermal flow along fault zones resulted in partial to complete argon loss from nearby Cretaceous lavas and Ar-Ar reset ages of ˜40 Ma in mid-Cretaceous hydrothermal K-feldspar. Primitive olivine basalts (group D) and epithermal carbonate veins (31-29 Ma) were emplaced during along-arc extension accompanying the opening of Drake Passage and Powell Basin. Excess argon occurs in two forms: strongly held in melt? inclusions in the primitive tholeiites and weakly held in some secondary alteration. There is no radiometric evidence, in the area studied, for magmatism related to late Cenozoic subduction, nor to the Pleistocene-Recent opening of the back arc Bransfield rift.

  12. Structure of the collision zone between Bougainville guyot and the accretionary wedge of the New Hebrides island arc, southwest Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Collot, J.-Y.; Geist, E.L.

    1991-01-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection data show the structure that develops within an island arc-guyot collision zone. The contact zone between the arc and the north and east sides of the guyot is marked by discontinuous antiforms. The extent of collision deformation to the arc and guyot depends in part on the contrast in compressibility and viscosity between these features. We propose that the high-drag, subcircular guyot evolves during collision into a more streamlined shape. We draw an analogy between some features of glacial origin and the subducted part of a guyot. -from Authors

  13. The structure and morphology of the Basse Terre Island, Lesser Antilles volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Lucie; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Mannessiez, Claire; Mazzoni, Nelly; Savry, Cécile; Troll, Valentin R.

    2013-03-01

    Basse Terre Island is made up of a cluster of composite volcanoes that are part of the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc. The morphology of these volcanoes and the onshore continuation of the grabens and strike-slip faults that surround the island are poorly documented due to erosion and rainforest cover. Therefore, we conducted a morphological analysis of the island using Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data integrated with field observations to document erosional, constructional, and deformational processes. A DEM-based analysis of 1,249 lineaments and field structural measurements of 16 normal faults, 3,741 veins and fractures, and 46 dykes was also carried to document the structures that predominate in sub-surface rocks. The results indicate that the over 1-My-old and elongated Northern Chain volcano, which makes up the northern half of the island, was built by high eruption rates and/or a low viscosity magma injected along the N-S to NNW-SSE-striking extensional structures formed by the flexure of the lithosphere by the overall subduction regime. After 1 Ma, the southern half of the island was shaped by an alignment of conical volcanoes, likely built by a more viscous magma type that was guided by the NW-SE-striking Montserrat-Bouillante strike-slip fault system. These N to NNW and NW structural directions are however poorly expressed onshore, possibly due to slow slip motion. The sub-surface rocks mostly contain E-W-striking structures, which have likely guided the many flank instabilities documented in the studied area, and guide hydrothermal fluids and shallow magmatic intrusions. These structures are possibly part of the E-W-striking Marie-Gallante offshore graben.

  14. Primitive CaO-rich, silica-undersaturated melts in island arcs: Evidence for the involvement of clinopyroxene-rich lithologies in the petrogenesis of arc magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiano, P.; Eiler, J. M.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Stolper, E. M.

    2000-05-01

    On the basis of the study of olivine-hosted melt inclusions in a calc-alkaline basalt from Batan Island (Philippines) we define a distinctive type of primitive, nepheline-normative island arc magma characterized by unusually high CaO contents (up to 19.0 wt %) that cannot be simply explained by melting of the metasomatized peridotitic mantle wedge above subducting oceanic lithosphere. CaO-rich melt inclusions with these characteristics are preserved in Fo85-90 olivine, and compositional variations among the inclusions are interpreted to reflect mixing between melts such as those found in the most CaO-rich inclusions (present in Fo90 olivine) and melts similar to primitive ``normal'' island arc magmas (trapped in Fo85 olivine). Compilation of primitive island arc magmas from the literature shows that whole rocks and olivine-hosted melt inclusions with CaO contents >13 wt % are found in many arc volcanoes from all over the world in addition to Batan. These inclusions occur in lavas ranging from CaO-rich ankaramites to basaltic andesites with low-CaO contents (i.e., <13 wt %). The globally occurring CaO-rich inclusions and whole rocks comprise a group that although defined on the basis of their CaO contents is compositionally distinctive when compared to island arc lavas that have lower CaO contents; for example, they have lower FeO at a given SiO2 content than most arc lavas, and they are all nepheline normative, with normative nepheline contents positively correlated with CaO contents. Variations in CaO content and normative compositions of experimental partial melts of lherzolite related to changes of pressure, temperature, and source composition suggest that there are no conditions under which partial melting of peridotite can generate melts having CaO contents and other properties comparable to those observed for the primitive, CaO-rich arc-derived melts identified here. Although melting of peridotite at high pressure in the presence of CO2 can produce Ca

  15. Vanadium Stable Isotope Variations in the Mariana Island Arc: Oxygen Fugacity Versus Magmatic Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytulak, J.; Elliott, T.; Halliday, A.; Kelley, K. A.; Nielsen, S. G.; Plank, T.; Schauble, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    A widely held view in igneous geochemistry is that the sub-arc mantle has elevated oxygen fugacity (fO2) compared to the upper mantle source of Mid-Ocean Ridge basalts (MORB). However, debate on the fO2 of the sub-arc mantle has arisen from examination of V/Sc ratios [1], which suggest no difference between the sub-arc mantle and the MORB source. This supposition is contrasted by recent μ-XANES determination of Fe3+/FeΣ in olivine-hosted melt inclusions [2], which supports the more traditional notion of an oxidized source for arc lavas. We have recently developed a method for high precision analyses of stable vanadium (V) isotope variations, able to resolve isotope fractionation to a precision of 0.15‰ 2sd [3, 4]. Theoretical calculations predict that stable V isotope fractionation should be robustly related to changes in fO2, with heavier isotopes favored in oxidizing conditions. Furthermore, V isotopes should be immune to alteration and late-stage degassing processes that could affect fO2 determined by Fe3+/FeΣ ratios. Therefore, examination of this new isotopic tracer in arc lavas may provide insight into the fO2 conditions of their source. Here we present the first stable V isotope measurements (reported as δ51V relative to a standard defined as 0‰) on subduction zone inputs (sediments, MORB) and outputs (arc lavas). We have focused initial efforts on well-characterized lavas from the Mariana central island province [5] and subducting sediment and underlying MORB from ODP Site 801, just outboard of the Mariana trench [6]. We find a surprisingly large, resolvable range in δ51V of the arc lavas of almost 0.8‰, which co-varies with SiO2, CaO, and V/Sc ratios. Co-variation of δ51V with SiO2 and CaO is suggestive of possible influence of clinopyroxene fractionation on the isotope composition. We explore the affects of magmatic differentiation and causes of δ51V inter-suite variability in arc lavas versus the δ51V signature of MORB. [1] Lee, C

  16. He, Ne, Ar, and C isotope systematics of geothermal emanations in the Lesser Antilles Islands Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Pedroni, A.; Hammerschmidt, K.; Friedrichsen, H.

    1999-02-01

    The authors present He, Ne, Ar, and C isotope analyses of hydrothermal brines and gases from fumaroles, hot springs, mofettes and hydrothermal exploration drillings on the major islands of the Lesser Antilles Arc. The origin of hydrothermal brines, which have been analyzed also for O and H isotopes, is essentially meteoric-hydrothermal. Air-corrected isotope compositions of helium (2.2 Rc/Ra < {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He < 8.6 Rc/Ra) and carbon ({minus}20 < {delta}{sup 13}C{sub PDB} < +0.5) are variable and require a variety of crustal and magmatic sources. The diversity of {delta}{sup 13}C{sub PDB} and {sup 3}He/CO{sub 2} ratios within individual volcanic centers suggests that crustal sources (e.g., limestone) contaminate magmatic CO{sub 2} en route from high-level magma reservoirs (depth < 15 km) to the surface. A similar contamination may be found for magmatic helium on distal springs. The {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He signature of summit fumaroles, thought to reflect the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He signature of high-level magmas, shows a remarkable systematic variation along the arc. In addition, there is a correlation throughout the arc between published Sr, Pb, and Nd isotope signatures of lavas and the {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He signatures of summit fumaroles. On the northern islands (Nevis, Montserrat, Guadeloupe, and Dominica) summit fumaroles have the N-MORB signature ({sup 3}He/{sup 4}He = 8 {+-} 1 R/Ra), and the isotope signature of lavas is not dissimilar from comparable intra-oceanic arc tholeiites elsewhere. Variable enrichments in radiogenic Sr and Pb have been reported for lavas of individual volcanic centers of the Southern Islands (Martinique, St Lucia, and Grenada), and summit fumaroles on these centers match these variations by variable radiogenic He-enrichments, i.e., lower {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios. This correlation suggests that radiogenic Sr and Pb enrichments of lavas and low {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He signatures on summit fumaroles have a common origin, i.e., a terrigenous

  17. Towards Crustal Structure of Java Island (Sunda Arc) from Ambient Seismic Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiyantoro, Sri; Zulhan, Zulfakriza; Martha, Agustya; Saygin, Erdinc; Cummins, Phil

    2015-04-01

    In our previous studies, P- and S-wave velocity structures beneath the Sunda Arc were successfully imaged using a global data set and a nested regional-global tomographic method was employed. To obtain more detailed P- and S-wave velocity structures beneath Java, in the central part of the Sunda Arc, we then used local data sets, i.e. newline from the MErapi AMphibious EXperiment (MERAMEX) and the Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency (MCGA), as well as employed a double-difference technique for tomographic imaging. The results of the imaging show e.g. that P- and S-wave velocities are significantly reduced in the uppermost mantle beneath central Java. In order to obtain detailed crustal structure information beneath Java, the Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) method was used. The application of this method to the MERAMEX data has produced a good crustal model beneath central Java. We continue our experiment to image crustal structure of eastern Java. We have used seismic waveform data recorded by 22 MCGA stationary seismographic stations and 25 portable seismographs installed for 2 to 8 weeks. The data were processed to obtain waveforms of cross-correlated noise between pairs of seismographic stations. Our preliminary results presented here indicate that the Kendeng zone, an area of low gravity anomaly, is associated with a low velocity zone. On the other hand, the southern mountain range, which has a high gravity anomaly, is related to a high velocity anomaly (as shown by our tomographic images). In future work we will install more seismographic stations in eastern Java as well as in western Java to conduct ANT imaging for the whole of Java Island. The expected result combined with the mantle velocity models resulting from our body wave tomography will allow for accurate location of earthquake hypocenters and determination of regional tectonic structures. Both of these are valuable for understanding seismic hazard in Java, the most densely populated

  18. On the time-scales of magmatism at island-arc volcanoes.

    PubMed

    Turner, S P

    2002-12-15

    Precise information on time-scales and rates of change is fundamental to an understanding of natural processes and the development of quantitative physical models in the Earth sciences. U-series isotope studies are revolutionizing this field by providing time information in the range 10(2)-10(4) years, which is similar to that of many modern Earth processes. I review how the application of U-series isotopes has been used to constrain the time-scales of magma formation, ascent and storage beneath island-arc volcanoes. Different elements are distilled-off the subducting plate at different times and in different places. Contributions from subducted sediments to island-arc lava sources appear to occur some 350 kyr to 4 Myr prior to eruption. Fluid release from the subducting oceanic crust into the mantle wedge may be a multi-stage process and occurs over a period ranging from a few hundred kyr to less than one kyr prior to eruption. This implies that dehydration commences prior to the initiation of partial melting within the mantle wedge, which is consistent with recent evidence that the onset of melting is controlled by an isotherm and thus the thermal structure within the wedge. U-Pa disequilibria appear to require a component of decompression melting, possibly due to the development of gravitational instabilities. The preservation of large (226)Ra disequilibria permits only a short period of time between fluid addition and eruption. This requires rapid melt segregation, magma ascent by channelled flow and minimal residence time within the lithosphere. The evolution from basalt to basaltic andesite probably occurs rapidly during ascent or in magma reservoirs inferred from some geophysical data to lie within the lithospheric mantle. The flux across the Moho is broadly andesitic, and some magmas subsequently stall in more shallow crustal-level magma chambers, where they evolve to more differentiated compositions on time-scales of a few thousand years or less.

  19. Characteristics of Mineralized Volcanic Centers in Javanese Sunda Island Arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setijadji, L. D.; Imai, A.; Watanabe, K.

    2007-05-01

    The subduction-related arc magmatism in Java island, Sunda Arc, Indonesia might have started in earliest Tertiary period, but the distinctively recognizable volcanic belts related with Java trench subduction occurred since the Oligocene. We compiled geoinformation on volcanic centers of different epochs, distribution of metallic mineral deposits, petrochemistry of volcanic rocks, geologic structures, and regional gravity image in order to elucidate characteristics of the known mineralized volcanic centers. Metallic deposits are present in various styles from porphyry-related, high-sulfidation, and low-sulfidation epithermal systems; all related with subaerial volcanism and subvolcanic plutonism. Only few and small occurrences of volcanigenic massive sulfides deposits suggest that some mineralization also occurred in a submarine environment. Most locations of mineral deposits can be related with location of Tertiary volcanic centers along the volcanic arcs (i.e. volcanoes whose genetic link with subduction is clear). On the other side there is no mineralization has been identified to occur associated with backarc magmatism whose genetic link with subduction is under debate. There is strong evidence that major metallic deposit districts are located within compressive tectonic regime and bound by coupling major, deep, and old crustal structures (strike-slip faults) that are recognizable from regional gravity anomaly map. So far the most economical deposits and the only existing mines at major industry scale are high-grade epithermal gold deposits which are young (Upper Miocene to Upper Pliocene), concentrated in Bayah dome complex in west Java, and are associated with alkalic magmatism-volcanism. On the other hand, known porphyry Cu-Au deposits are associated with old (Oligocene to Upper Miocene) stocks, and except for one case, all deposits are located in east Java. Petrochemical data suggest a genetic relationship between porphyry mineralization with low- to

  20. A double island arc between Taiwan and Luzon: consequence of ridge subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsanyao F.; Lee, Typhoon; Chen, Cheng-Hong; Cheng, Shih-Nan; Knittel, Ulrich; Punongbayan, Raymundo S.; Rasdas, Ariel R.

    1996-06-01

    Analysis of geomorphological, geochronological, geochemical and geophysical features in the segment of the Taiwan-Luzon Arc between Taiwan and Luzon (the Bashi Segment) allows the recognition of a double arc structure. The two volcanic chains are separated by 50 km just north of Luzon (18°N), and converge near 20°N. Islets in the western chain are older and largely composed of volcanic rocks of Miocene to Pliocene age. They all show low relief, lateritic platforms and wave-cut terraces, and are covered by massive recrystallized limestone. In contrast, all active volcanoes in this segment of the Taiwan-Luzon Arc belong to the eastern chain, where most islets are Quaternary in age. The volcanoes have well-developed cone shapes, and well-preserved deposits of near-vent facies. Magmas of the eastern chain have higher KSi, (La) n,(La/Yb) n, and lowerɛ Nd than their counterparts at the same latitude in the western chain. Therefore, the magmas erupted in the eastern chain were derived from more enriched mantle sources than the magmas erupted in the western chain. Moreover, the available seismological data seem to suggest an abrupt increase of the dip angle from 30° at 18°N to 80° at 20°N. Thus, the double arc structure is located in the region where the Benioff zone suddenly changes. In analogy with the Lesser Antilles Arc, we propose a geodynamic model in which the double arc in the Bashi Strait is the tectonic manifestation of the subduction of the aseismic Scarborough Seamount Chain, the extinct mid-ocean ridge of the South China Sea. Before that ridge reached the Manila Trench, the western chain was the volcanic front. When the ridge reached the subduction zone at 5-4 Ma, its buoyancy temporarily interrupted the subduction thus causing a time gap in magmatic activity. Furthermore, this ridge-arc collision was probably also responsible for regional uplift causing extensive sub-aerial weathering and erosion as well as massive reef formation in the western chain

  1. Hydrothermal mineralization at Kick'em Jenny submarine volcano in the Lesser Antilles island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R.; Carey, S.; Sigurdsson, H.; Cornell, W. C.

    2011-12-01

    Kick 'em Jenny (KeJ) is an active submarine volcano located in the Lesser Antilles island arc, ~7.5 km northwest of Grenada. Of the twelve eruptions detected since 1939, most have been explosive as evidenced by eyewitness accounts in 1939, 1974, and 1988 and the dominance of explosive eruption products recovered by dredging. In 2003, vigorous hydrothermal activity was observed in the crater of KeJ. Video footage taken by a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) during the cruise RB-03-03 of the R/V Ronald Brown documented the venting of a vapor phase in the form of bubbles that ascended through the water column and a clear fluid phase in the form of shimmering water. The shimmering water generally ascended through the water column but can also been seen flowing down gradient from a fissure at the top of a fine-grained sediment mound. These fine-grained sediment mounds are the only structure associated with hydrothermal venting; spire or chimney structures were not observed. Hydrothermal venting was also observed coming from patches of coarse-grained volcaniclastic sediment on the crater floor and from talus slopes around the perimeter of the crater. Samples were collected from these areas and from areas void of hydrothermal activity. XRD and ICPMS analyses of bulk sediment were carried out to investigate the geochemical relationships between sediment types. Sediment samples from the hydrothermal mound structures are comprised of the same components (plagioclase, amphibole, pyroxene, and scoria) as sediment samples from areas void of hydrothermal activity (primary volcaniclastic sediment) in the 500-63 μm size range. High resolution grain size analyses show that >78% of sediment in the hydrothermal mound samples are between 63-2 μm with 6-20% clay sized (<2 μm) whereas <40% of the primary volcaniclastic sediment is between 63-2 μm with ~2% clay sized. The presence of clay minerals (smectite, illite, talc, and I/S mixed layer) in the hydrothermal mound samples was

  2. Erosion and deterioration of the Isles Dernieres Barrier Island Arc, Louisiana, U.S.A.: 1853 to 1988

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, Randolph A.; Penland, Shea; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Sallenger, Asbury H.; Westphal, Karen A.

    1989-01-01

    Using cartographic and aerial photography data from the years 1853, 1890, 1934, 1956, 1978, 1984, and 1988, shoreline change maps of the Isles Dernieres barrier island arc were constructed. These data were accurately superimposed, using a computer mapping system, which removed projection, datum, scale, and other cartographic inconsistencies. Linear, areal, and perimeter measurements indicate that the Isles Dernieres are suffering rapid rates of coastal erosion, land loss, and breakup. Bayside and gulfside erosion, in combination with sediment shortage and subsidence, have caused the Isles Dernieres to narrow through time. In addition, the core of the barrier island arc does not migrate landward and instead, breaks up in place as a result of inlet breaching and development. This is in contrast to other models of landward barrier island migration during transgression. If these trends continue, the Isles Dernieres will likely evolve into a subaqueous inner-shelf shoal by the early 21st century. Loss of the Isles Dernieres barrier island arc will severely impact the Terrebonne parish estuary, resulting in decreased environmental quality and increased public risk from storms and hurricanes.

  3. The Permian Dongfanghong island-arc gabbro of the Wandashan Orogen, NE China: Implications for Paleo-Pacific subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-Dao; Xu, Yi-Gang; Wilde, Simon A.; Chen, Han-Lin; Yang, Shu-Feng

    2015-09-01

    The Dongfanghong hornblende gabbro is located in the western part of the Wandashan Orogen and to the east of the Jiamusi Block in NE China. It was emplaced into Early Paleozoic oceanic crust (i.e. Dongfanghong ophiolite) at ~ 275 Ma and both later collided with the eastern margin of the Jiamusi Block. The Dongfanghong gabbro is sub-alkaline with high Na2O contents and is characterized by enrichment in light rare earth elements (LREE), large ion lithosphile elements (LILE), Sr, Eu, and Ba, and depletion in high field strength elements (HFSE). The enriched isotopic signatures (87Sr/86Sri = ~ 0.7065, εNd(t) = ~- 0.5, 208Pb/204Pbi = ~ 38.05, 207Pb/204Pbi = ~ 15.56, 206Pb/204Pbi = ~ 18.20 and zircon εHf(t) = ~+ 5.8) indicate an enriched mantle (EM2) source, with some addition of continental material. It has arc geochemical affinities similar to Permian arc igneous rocks in the eastern margin of the Jiamusi Block, the Yakuno Ophiolite in SW Japan, arc rocks along the western margin of the North America Craton, and also the Gympie Group in eastern Australia. All these features, together with information from tectonic discrimination diagrams, suggest that the Dongfanghong gabbro formed in an immature island arc. The spatial configuration of ~ 290 Ma immature continental arc rocks in the eastern part of the Jiamusi Block and the ~ 275 Ma immature island arc Dongfanghong gabbro in the Wandashan Orogen to the east is best explained by eastward arc retreat and slab roll-back of the Paleo-Pacific Plate. This model is also supported by the Carboniferous-Permian stratigraphic transition in the Jiamusi Block from oceanic carbonate rocks to coal-bearing terrestrial clastic rocks and andesites. We thus suggest that both Paleo-Pacific subduction and roll-back occurred in the Early Permian along the eastern margin of Asia.

  4. Ophiolite emplacement by collision between the Sula Platform and the Sulawesi Island Arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Eli A.; McCaffrey, Robert; Joyodiwiryo, Yoko; Stevens, Scott

    1983-11-01

    Much of the tectonic complexity displayed in eastern Indonesia results from a series of Neogene collision events between island arcs, continental fragments, and the Australian continent. Here we examine the emplacement of a large ophiolite belt, resulting from the Miocene collision between the Sulawesi island arc and a continental fragment, the Sula platform. We present the results of several marine geophysical expeditions to the SW Molucca Sea and the NW Banda Sea, plus gravity and geology on the east arms of Sulawesi. The Batui thrust separates the ophiolite from sedimentary rocks deformed along the leading edge of the Sula platform. We mapped this thrust eastward from Sulawesi along the southern margin of the Gorontalo basin. The latter is floored by oceanic crust, and its south edge is uplifted against the thrust. Thus the Sulawesi ophiolite can be traced offshore to its origin as basement of the Gorontalo basin. The ophiolite is composed of harzburgite in the Southeast Arm and passes upward through a complex of gabbros and diabase dikes in the East Arm. Ophiolite melange underlies the harzburgites on the Southeast Arm beneath low-angle thrust contacts where seen. Our local observations show the melange to be composed of thrust packets of both serpentine and red shale matrix varieties. The packets are several hundred meters thick, and the melange, where studied, has a moderate north to northeast dipping foliation. This orientation, if regionally representative of the melange fabric, is consistent with a significant northward component of movement of the lower plate, probably the Sula platform or its margin. Where the ophiolite is in contact with rocks of the central schist belt, it dips under the schist, but where it encounters melange, or Mesozoic or Paleogene sedimentary rocks, the ophiolite is thrust over them. The tectonic overlap sequence, from west to east, is schist over ophiolite over older sediments or melange. The ophiolite appears to have been

  5. Early Precambrian gneiss terranes and Pan-African island arcs in Yemen: Crustal accretion of the eastern Arabian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windley, Brian F.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Ba-Bttat, Mahfood A. O.

    1996-02-01

    Within the Precambrian of Yemen, we have identified four gneiss terranes and two island-arc terranes on the basis of existing literature, mapping, and our own field observations, together with new Sm-Nd isotopic data. The two western gneiss terranes can be correlated with well-documented terranes (Asir and Afif) in Saudi Arabia. To the east of these, the Abas and Al-Mahfid gneiss terranes yield Sm-Nd model ages (tDM) of 1.7 2.3 Ga and 1.3 2.7 Ga, respectively, and cannot be correlated with any documented terranes in Saudi Arabia. These two terranes are separated by a Pan-African island-arc terrane that has been obducted onto one or both of the gneiss terranes, and a second arc bounds the Al-Mahfid gneiss terrane to the east. Our discovery of extensive Proterozoic to late Archean gneisses in Yemen provides important constraints upon the much-discussed tectonic framework of northeast Gondwana and the rate of Pan-African crustal growth. The terranes in Yemen may be correlated with comparable terranes on the eastern margin of the Arabian Shield and in northern Somalia. Thus Yemen provides a link between the arc collage of the Arabian Shield and the gneissic Mozambique belt of East Africa.

  6. Petrogenesis of dacite in an oceanic subduction environment: Raoul Island, Kermadec arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ian E. M.; Worthington, Timothy J.; Price, Richard C.; Stewart, Robert B.; Maas, R.

    2006-09-01

    Raoul Volcano in the northern Kermadec arc is typical of volcanoes in oceanic subduction systems in that it is composed mainly of low-K high-Al basalts and basaltic andesite. However, during the last 4 ka Raoul Volcano has produced mainly dacite magma in pyroclastic eruptions associated with caldera formation. The rocks produced in these episodes are almost aphyric containing only sparse crystals of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and magnetite. These apparent phenocrysts have chemical compositions that suggest that they did not crystallise from melts with the chemical composition of their host rocks. Rather they are xenocrysts and only their rims show evidence for crystallisation from their host melt. Chemical compositions of samples of the dacites show that each eruption has tapped a distinct magma batch. Compositional variations through the analysed suite cannot be accommodated in any reasonable model of fractional crystallisation from likely parental magma compositions. The hypothesis that best fits the petrology of Raoul Island dacites is one of crustal anatexis. This model requires heating of the lower crust by a magma flux to the point where dehydration melting associated with amphibole breakdown produces magma from a preconditioned source. It is suggested that Raoul is passing through an adolescent stage of development in which siliceous melts are part of an open system in which felsic and mafic magmas coexist.

  7. Geodynamic models of terrane accretion: Testing the fate of island arcs, oceanic plateaus, and continental fragments in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetreault, J. L.; Buiter, S. J. H.

    2012-08-01

    Crustal growth at convergent margins can occur by the accretion of future allochthonous terranes (FATs), such as island arcs, oceanic plateaus, submarine ridges, and continental fragments. Using geodynamic numerical experiments, we demonstrate how crustal properties of FATs impact the amount of FAT crust that is accreted or subducted, the type of accretionary process, and the style of deformation on the overriding plate. Our results show that (1) accretion of crustal units occurs when there is a weak detachment layer within the FAT, (2) the depth of detachment controls the amount of crust accreted onto the overriding plate, and (3) lithospheric buoyancy does not prevent FAT subduction during constant convergence. Island arcs, oceanic plateaus, and continental fragments will completely subduct, despite having buoyant lithospheric densities, if they have rheologically strong crusts. Weak basal layers, representing pre-existing weaknesses or detachment layers, will either lead to underplating of faulted blocks of FAT crust to the overriding plate or collision and suturing of an unbroken FAT crust. Our experiments show that the weak, ultramafic layer found at the base of island arcs and oceanic plateaus plays a significant role in terrane accretion. The different types of accretionary processes also affect deformation and uplift patterns in the overriding plate, trench migration and jumping, and the dip of the plate interface. The resulting accreted terranes produced from our numerical experiments resemble observed accreted terranes, such as the Wrangellia Terrane and Klamath Mountain terranes in the North American Cordilleran Belt.

  8. Zircon ages and geochemical compositions of the Manlay ophiolite and coeval island arc: Implications for the tectonic evolution of South Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mingshuai; Baatar, Munkhtsengel; Miao, Laicheng; Anaad, Chimedtseren; Zhang, Fochin; Yang, Shunhu; Li, Yueming

    2014-12-01

    Numerous small dismembered ophiolite fragments occur in South Mongolia, but they are very poorly studied. The lack of age data and geochemical analysis hampers our understanding of the Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the region. We conducted detailed studies on the Manlay ophiolitic complex and Huree volcanic rocks south of the Main Mongolian Lineament (MML) to provide some constraints on these rocks. The Manlay ophiolite consists of dunite, harzburgite, pyroxenite, gabbro, plagiogranite, basalt and chert, locally with chromite mineralization in dunite. The gabbro and plagiogranite yielded SHRIMP zircon weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 509 ± 5 Ma and 482 ± 4 Ma, respectively. The basalt and dolerite samples of this complex show enrichment in LREE and LILE and negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies, and the chrome spinel from the chromitite lens in the dunite is characterized by high Cr# and low TiO2 contents. These features suggest a supra-subduction zone (SSZ) origin for the ophiolitic complex. The Huree volcanic rocks, ranging from basalt to dacite, display enrichment in LREE and LILE, weak Eu anomalies and distinctly negative Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies, consistent with those of typical magmas in a subduction environment. An andesite sample from this arc yielded a SHRIMP 206Pb/238U zircon age of 487 ± 5 Ma, which is the oldest reliable age for an island arc in South Mongolia. Recognition of an Early Paleozoic ophiolitic complex and a coeval island arc indicates that South Mongolia underwent a period of active volcanism during Late Cambrian to Ordovician. Additionally, the tuff overlying the ophiolitic complex and a granite intruding the ophiolite have SHRIMP zircon U-Pb ages of 391 ± 5 Ma and 304 ± 4 Ma, respectively. Combining the available data, we propose that the Early Paleozoic subduction-accretionary complexes likely constitute the basement of the Late-Paleozoic arc formations and correlate with the Lake Zone in western Mongolia.

  9. Crustal structure along the active Costa Rican volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarralde, D.; Holbrook, W. S.; van Avendonk, H. J.; Mora Fernandez, M.; Alvarado, G. E.; Harder, S. H.

    2010-12-01

    We present results from an explosion-source seismic refraction transect along the entire active Costa Rican volcanic arc. The seismic data were acquired in 2005 as part of the TICO-CAVA experiment with the goals of delineating the basic crustal architecture of this relatively young volcanic arc, understanding magmatic emplacement processes, and estimating the bulk composition and growth rates of arc crust. The seismic transect extends ~280 km along the axis of the arc and consists of 16 shots (200 - 1200 kg) recorded by 710 seismometers. The active Costa Rican arc consists of two segments with distinct morphologies, the Guanacaste Cordillera (GC) in the north and Central Cordillera (CC) in the south. This segmentation is linked to the subducting Cocos ridge, which occurs beneath the CC and has a northern boundary roughly coincident with the arc segment boundary. Volcanoes of the GC rise from a plateau of ~500 m elevation to maximum heights of ~1500 m, while the CC volcanoes rise from ~1500 m to heights of 3500 m. The crustal structure beneath these segments is distinctly different. The entire arc is covered by a ~5-km-thick carapace with velocities of 4.5-5.8 km/s that probably represent volcaniclastics, flows and small plutons. Beneath the GC, a 1- to 2-km-thick “grainitic” layer (6.0-6.1 km/s) lies beneath the carapace. Velocities below this granitic layer suggest a somewhat more mafic composition, but they increase slowly with depth from 6.2-6.3 km/s between 6-15 km depth. Total crustal thickness beneath the GC is ~40 km, but analysis of crustal thickness is ongoing. The crust beneath Guanacaste thus has a velocity structure very similar to average continental crust, though with slightly slower velocities, perhaps due to high temperatures beneath the arc. As the arc has only been active in this location for <5 m.y., this suggests that either the earlier Neogene arc to the west substantially modified the oceanic-plateau crustal foundation here or that the

  10. Origin of the oceanic basalt basement of the Solomon Islands arc and its relationship to the Ontong Java Plateau-insights from Cenozoic plate motion models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cenozoic global plate motion models based on a hotspot reference frame may provide a useful framework for analyzing the tectonic evolution of the Solomon Islands convergent margin. A postulated late Miocene collision of the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) with a NE-facing arc is consistent with the predicted path of the OJP across the Pacific Basin and its Miocene arrival at the trench. Late-stage igneous activity (65-30 Ma) predicted for the OJP as it rode over the Samoan hotspot occurred in correlative stratigraphic sections on Malaita, the supposed accreted flake of OJP in the Solomon Islands arc. Convergence similar to the present velocities between Australia and the Pacific plates was characteristic of the last 43 million years. Prior to 43 Ma Pacific-Australia plate motions were divergent, seemingly at odds with geologic evidence for early Tertiary convergence, particularly in Papua New Guinea. A postulated South Pacific plate may have existed between Australia and the Pacific plate and would have allowed implied northward subduction along the northeastern Australia plate boundary that lasted into the early Eocene. Subsequent reorganization of plate motions in the middle Eocene correlates with middle Eocene marginal basin formation along ridges oblique to the main plate boundary. Cessation of spreading on the Pacific-South Pacific Ridge and its subsequent subduction beneath Asia followed the change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma. A trapped remnant of the extinct, NW-trending ridge may still lie beneath the western Philippine Sea. The terminal deformation, metamorphism and ophiolite obduction in the Eocene orogen of the southwest Pacific also correlates with the major change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma and the subsequent compression of the dying Eocene arc against outlying continental and oceanic crustal blocks of the Australian plate. The Solomon Islands oceanic basement may represent juxtaposition of oceanic plateaus of the Australian plate beneath

  11. Tectonic implications for the occurrence of ocean floor, hotspot, and island arc materials within accretionary prisms: Examples from the Mesozoic-Cenozoic NW Pacific Rim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Y.; Hirano, N.; Hirano, N.; Taniguchi, H.; Taniguchi, H.; Taniguchi, H.

    2001-12-01

    both the eastern and western Izu Arc collision zone since the Miocene. The arc/ridge collision caused the incorporation of a particular assemblage of basaltic rocks in this tectonic accretion system which we interpret as an ophiolite. These _gophiolitic_h rocks are composed of various types of basaltic to rhyolitic, effusive and intrusive, dismembered, disrupted, sheared and faulted rocks that are locally associated with some hotspot and island arc igneous rocks and pelagic sedimentary rocks. This ophiolite assemblage is widely distributed particularly in the trench-slope break or within the forearc sliver boundary in the Circum Izu region. Deformation and metamorphism in these settings are weaker at shallower levels than those in the accretionary prisms, other than the Izu Arc collision zone. Based on these examples from Japan, we infer that ocean floor, hotspot, and island arc rocks become accreted into active continental margins either through ordinary subduction-accretion processes in a non-collisional subduction system or by obduction-accretion processes in a collisional island arc system.

  12. Paleozoic subduction complex and Paleozoic-Mesozoic island-arc volcano-plutonic assemblages in the northern Sierra terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Richard E.; Girty, Gary H.; Harwood, David S.; Schweickert, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    This field trip provides an overview of the stratigraphic and structural evolution of the northern Sierra terrane, which forms a significant part of the wall rocks on the western side of the later Mesozoic Sierra Nevada batholith in California. The terrane consists of a pre-Late Devonian subduction complex (Shoo Fly Complex) overlain by submarine arc-related deposits that record the evolution of three separate island-arc systems in the Late Sevonian-Early Mississippian, Permian, and Late Triassic-Jurassic. The two Paleozoic are packages and the underlying Shoo Fly Complex have an important bearing on plate-tectonic processes affecting the convergent margin outboard of the Paleozoic Cordilleran miogeocline, although their original paleogeographic relations to North America are controversial. The third arc package represents an overlap assemblage that ties the terrane to North America by the Late Triassic and helps constrain the nature and timing of Mesozoic orogenesis. Several of the field-trip stops examine the record of pre-Late Devonian subduction contained in the Shoo Fly Complex, as well as the paleovolcanology of the overlying Devonian to Jurassic arc rocks. Excellent glaciated exposures provide the opportunity to study a cross section through a tilted Devonian volcano-plutonic association. Additional stops focus on plutonic rocks emplaced during the Middle Jurassic arc magmatism in the terrane, and during the main pulse of Cretaceous magmatism in the Sierra Nevada batholith to the east.

  13. Seismic Constraints on Water and Melt Pathways and Fluxes Through Western Pacific Island Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, Douglas; Wei, S. Shawn; Cai, Chen; Eimer, Melody; Webb, Spahr; Zha, Yang

    2016-04-01

    We use arrays of ocean bottom seismographs (OBS) as well as land seismographs on islands to image velocity anomalies resulting from the presence of melt, fluids, and hydrated minerals in the Tonga/Lau and Mariana arc systems. Studies in the Lau basin use data from 50 OBSs and 17 land seismic stations deployed for one year during 2009-2010, and focus on the interaction of the arc and backarc melt production system with water given off from the slab. Rayleigh wave tomography reveals that the slow velocity anomaly beneath the spreading center is displaced westward with greater depths, suggesting that partial melting occurs along an upwelling limb of mantle flow originating west of the backarc [Wei et al., 2015]. Variations in basalt chemistry along the spreading center result from interplay between this western source and mantle near the slab containing more water. The observed Lau backarc anomalies vary inversely with the inferred mantle water content, suggesting that water reduces the melt porosity. Water may increase the efficiency of melt transport and reduce porosity by lowering the melt viscosity, increasing grain size through faster grain growth, or by causing a different topology of melt within the mantle rock. The goal of the Mariana experiment is to better constrain the water cycle in subduction zones by determining the degree of mantle hydration in the downgoing slab and the overriding mantle forearc. 20 broadband OBSs were deployed around the Northern Mariana trench, and in addition 5 hydrophones were suspended in the water column in the deepest part of the trench to partially overcome limitations on OBS locations due to water depth greater than 6 km. Initial results show plate bending earthquakes in the incoming plate, thought to be associated with water flow into the mantle and serpentinization, occur in the upper 15 km of the subducting mantle and are most numerous within 20-30 km laterally from the trench axis. Analysis of Rayleigh wave phase and group

  14. Fluid flow, element migration, and petrotectonic evolution of the Early Mesozoic central Klamath Island arc, northwesternmost California. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, W.G.

    1992-12-11

    Investigations in the central Klamath Mountains (KM) have documented the presence of a polymetamorphosed suite of highly magnesian basaltic rocks, the Yellow Dog greenstones, in the Sawyers Bar (SB) terrane of the western Triassic and Paleozoic belt. The assemblage was laid down, altered and metasomatized during the hypothesized collapse of a Phillipine Sea-type back-arc basin which brought the westerly SB oceanic arc terrane into juxtaposition with the inboard, pre-existing Stuart Fork subduction complex, and more easterly KM terranes in an immature island arc setting. Supporting research has concentrated on elucidating the areal extent and structural/stratigraphic relations of these mafic/ultramafic Yellow Dog metavolcanic units, and has documented the insignificant degree of crustal contamination of the melts by associated terrigenous metasediments. The thermal structure and its evolution in the central KM evidently reflects surfaceward advective transport of magmatic energy derived from the partly fused downgoing oceanic slab, as well as hydrothermal fluid circulation. Clarification of the thermal evolution of this crust-constructional event in the immature basaltic island arc are the goals of the research now underway, emptying both field and geochemical methods. Continuing work is documenting the flow and P-T history of aqueous fluids through the evolving KM arc, utilizing electron microprobe and oxygen isotopic data. The authors have nearly finished a regional reconnaissance map showing the distribution of the lavas throughout the California part of the KM. Application of the terrane concept to the central KM has also been reevaluated in the light of regional petrotectonic relationships. Investigations of the regional and contact metamorphism/metasomatism of the SB metasedimentary pile are in progress.

  15. Insights on the Quaternary Tectonic Evolution of the SE Indonesia Arc-Continent Collision from the Study of Uplifted Coral Terraces on Sumba Island.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, F.; Rigaud, S.; Chiang, H. W.; Djamil, Y. S.; Herdiyanti, T.; Johnny, J.; Ildefonso, S.; Meilano, I.; Bijaksana, S.; Abidin, H. Z.; Tapponnier, P.; Wang, X.

    2015-12-01

    Sumba Island is uniquely positioned within the Sunda-Banda forearc, at the transition between oceanic subduction and arc-continent collision. There, the convergence between the Sunda and Australian plates is accommodated along at least three major structures: the megathrust, the Savu backthrust located south of Sumba and the Flores backthrust located north of the volcanic arc. The incipient collision in the vicinity of Sumba is responsible for coastal vertical movements. Quaternary reefal deposits form spectacular uplifted flights of terraces, which directly overlie Mid Miocene - Early Pliocene deep carbonate and volcaniclastic rocks at elevations exceeding 500m. Although aerial fossil reefs extensively rim the northern and eastern coasts of Sumba, studies have been limited to Cape Laundi where an uplift rate of 0.2-0.5 m/kyr is estimated for the last 400 kyr, partly on the basis of alpha-spectrometric U/Th dating. At the island scale, the relief morphology and the hydrographic network point to a N-S asymmetry, indicating a general tilt toward the north. A subducting seafloor asperity and south-dipping normal faults have been postulated to generate this asymmetry. However as the pattern and kinematics of the deformation remain partially determined, structures and processes capable of driving such deformation and accommodating the nascent collision may be undisclosed. New topographic data coupled with field observations and coral mass-spectrometric U/Th dating allow investigating the morphology, stratigraphy and age of the fossil reef terraces at the island scale. Tectonic structures disrupting the topography are identified and their activities are relatively dated with respect to fossil reef terraces. The deformation pattern of Sumba is characterized, especially in Cape Laundi where the uplift rate is re-evaluated. Through a multi-disciplinary study, we intend to reconstruct the tectonic evolution of Sumba island and, at a larger scale, of the collision in SE

  16. Geochemistry of oceanic igneous rocks - Ridges, islands, and arcs - With emphasis on manganese, scandium, and vanadium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doe, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    increasing Mn is an indication of titanomagnetite removal. Dual compatible and incompatible trends with differentiation are found chiefly for Cu, Sc, and Sr. Distinguishing mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB), oceanic-island volcanic rocks (OIV), and island-arc volcanic rocks (IAV) may be accomplished by plots of Ce/Yb versus Ba/Ce, where OIV plot to higher values of Ce/Yb than do MORB, and IAV data plot to higher values of Ba/Ce than do those of MORB. These ratios do not seem to be significantly affected by submarine weathering.

  17. Sequence stratigraphy, structure, and tectonic history of the southwestern Ontong Java Plateau adjacent to the North Solomon Trench and Solomon Islands Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phinney, Eric J.; Mann, Paul; Coffin, Millard F.; Shipley, Thomas H.

    1999-09-01

    The Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) is the largest and thickest oceanic plateau on Earth and one of the few oceanic plateaus actively converging on an island arc. We present velocity determinations and geologic interpretation of 2000 km of two-dimensional, multi-channel seismic data from the southwestern Ontong Java Plateau, North Solomon Trench, and northern Solomon Islands. We recognize three megasequences, ranging in age from early Cretaceous to Quaternary, on the basis of distinct interval velocities and seismic stratigraphic facies. Megasequence OJ1 is early Cretaceous, upper igneous crust of the OJP and correlates with basalt outcrops dated at 122-125 Ma on the island of Malaita. The top of the overlying megasequence OJ2, a late Cretaceous mudstone unit, had been identified by previous workers as the top of igneous basement. Seismic facies and correlation to distant Deep Sea Drilling Project/Ocean Drilling Program sites indicate that OJ2 was deposited in a moderately low-energy, marine environment near a fluctuating carbonate compensation depth that resulted in multiple periods of dissolution. OJ2 thins south of the Stewart Arch onto the Solomon Islands where it is correlated with the Kwaraae Mudstone Formation. Megasequence OJ3 is late Cretaceous through Quaternary pelagic cover which caps the Ontong Java Plateau; it thickens into the North Solomon Trench, and seismic facies suggest that OJ3 was deposited in a low-energy marine environment. We use seismic facies analysis, sediment thickness, structural observations, and quantitative plate reconstructions of the position of the OJP and Solomon Islands to propose a tectonic, magmatic, and sedimentary history of the southwestern Ontong Java Plateau. Prior to 125 Ma late Jurassic and early Cretaceous oceanic crust formed. From 125 to 122 Ma, the first mantle plume formed igneous crust (OJ1). Between 122 and 92 Ma, marine mudstone (OJ2 and Kwaraae mudstone of Malaita, Solomon Islands) was deposited on Ontong Java

  18. Significance of an Active Volcanic Front in the Far Western Aleutian Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Kelemen, P. B.; Hoernle, K.

    2015-12-01

    Discovery of a volcanic front west of Buldir Volcano, the western-most emergent Aleutian volcano, demonstrates that the surface expression of Aleutian volcanism falls below sea level just west of 175.9° E longitude, but is otherwise continuous from mainland Alaska to Kamchatka. The newly discovered sites of western Aleutian seafloor volcanism are the Ingenstrem Depression, a 60 km-long structural depression just west of Buldir, and an unnamed area 300 km further west, referred to as the Western Cones. These locations fall along a volcanic front that stretches from Buldir to Piip Seamount near the Komandorsky Islands. Western Aleutian seafloor volcanic rocks include large quantities of high-silica andesite and dacite, which define a highly calc-alkaline igneous series and carry trace element signatures that are unmistakably subduction-related. This indicates that subducting oceanic lithosphere is present beneath the westernmost Aleutian arc. The rarity of earthquakes below depths of 200 km indicates that the subducting plate is unusually hot. Some seafloor volcanoes are 6-8 km wide at the base, and so are as large as many emergent Aleutian volcanoes. The seafloor volcanoes are submerged in water depths >3000 m because they sit on oceanic lithosphere of the Bering Sea. The volcanic front is thus displaced to the north of the ridge of arc crust that underlies the western Aleutian Islands. This displacement, which developed since approximately 6 Ma when volcanism was last active on the islands, must be a consequence of oblique convergence in a system where the subducting plate and large blocks of arc crust are both moving primarily in an arc-parallel sense. The result is a hot-slab system where low subduction rates probably limit advection of hot mantle to the subarc, and produce a relatively cool and perhaps stagnant mantle wedge. The oceanic setting and highly oblique subduction geometry also severely limit rates of sediment subduction, so the volcanic rocks, which

  19. Alaska Open-file Report 144 Assessment of Thermal Springs Sites Aleutian Arc, Atka Island to Becherof Lake -- Preliminary Results and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, R.J.; Moorman, M.A.; Liss, S.A.

    1981-12-01

    Twenty of more than 30 thermal spring areas reported to exist in the Aleutian arc extending from Atka Island to Becherof Lake were investigated during July and August, 1980. Thermal activity of three of these sites had diminished substantially or no longer existed. At least seven more sites where thermal-spring activity is probable or certain were not visited because of their remoteness or because of time constraints. The existence of several other reported thermal spring sites could not be verified; these sites are considered questionable. On the basis of geothermometry, subsurface reservoir temperatures in excess of 150 C are estimated for 10 of the thermal spring sites investigated. These sites all occur in or near regions of Recent volcanism. Five of the sites are characterized by fumaroles and steaming ground, indicating the presence of at least a shallow vapor-dominated zone. Two, the Makushin Valley and Glacier Valley thermal areas, occur on the flanks of active Mukushin Volcano located on Unalaska Island, and may be connected to a common source of heat. Gas geothermometry suggests that the reservoir feeding the Kliuchef thermal field, located on the flanks of Kliuchef volcano of northeast Atka Island, may be as high as 239 C.

  20. Acoustic stratigraphy and hydrothermal activity within Epi Submarine Caldera, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, H. Gary; Exon, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    Geological and geophysical surveys of active submarine volcanoes offshore and southeast of Epi Island, Vanuatu, New Hebrides Arc, have delineated details of the structure and acoustic stratigraphy of three volcanic cones. These submarine cones, named Epia, Epib, and Epic, are aligned east-west and spaced 3.5 km apart on the rim of a submerged caldera. At least three acoustic sequences, of presumed Quaternary age, can be identified on single-channel seismic-reflection profiles. Rocks dredged from these cones include basalt, dacite, and cognate gabbroic inclusions with magmatic affinities similar to those of the Karua (an active submarine volcano off the southeastern tip of Epi) lavas. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  1. Arc magmatism at the incipient stage of formation of subduction zone: geochemistry of Eocene volcanic rocks from the Bonin Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, K.; Umino, S.; Ishizuka, O.

    2009-12-01

    Bonin Islands are known for the occurrence of boninite series and high-Mg arc tholeiite and calk-alkaline rock series generated at the incipient stage of formation of subduction zone. We present new analysis of major and trace elements and petrogenetic processes of volcanic rocks of the Bonin Islands. Boninite series rocks in Chichijima and Mukojima Island Group represent the primitive arc magmatism in middle Eocene time, which gave way to arc tholeiite and calk-alkaline rocks are in Hahajima Island Groups. Boninite series of the Maruberiwan and Asahiyama Formations indicates a differentiation trend that sharply increases in FeO*/MgO (0.47-32) with increasing SiO2 contents (53.8-78.2 wt %). FeO*/MgO ratios (0.74-4.19) of arc tholeiite and calk-alkaline rocks of the Hahajima Island Group are slightly lower than those of the Izu-Bonin Quaternary volcanic front lavas. Boninite series samples of the Mikazukiyama Formation show a similar trend to the Maruberiwan-Asahiyama boninite series samples. However, the former has lower SiO2 contents (55.7-58.2 wt %), and higher FeO*/MgO ratios (1.05-1.98) than the latter. Most of the Maruberiwan and Mikazukiyama boninites belong to low-Ca type, while only a small number of Maruberiwan boninite samples belong to high-Ca type. Maruberiwan boninites (MgO>8 wt%) are the most depleted in REEs (Yb=0.36-1.01 ppm), which is only about 1/10 of N-MORBs, and the most enriched in LILEs (Rb=6-23, Ba=6-58 ppm) in the Bonin Islands. Low-Ca boninites indicate a distinct positive anomaly of Zr and negative anomalies of Sm and Ti ((Sm/Zr)n=0.45-0.78, (Ti/Zr)n=0.25-0.64), while high-Ca boninites indicate moderate anomalies of these elements ((Sm/Zr)n=0.79-1.29, (Ti/Zr)n=0.57-1.02). Basalts of the Hahajima Island Group are the most enriched in REEs (Yb=1.2-2.4 ppm) and HFSEs (Nb=0.47-1.75 ppm) in the Bonin Islands. Compared to the Hahajima basalts, the present Izu-Bonin front lavas are more depleted in LREEs and HFSE, and enriched in LILEs

  2. Silicic magmatism in an Island Arc, Fiji, Southwest Pacific: implications for continental growth

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The late Miocene silicic volcanics of the Udu Volcanic Group, Vanua Levu, Fiji are uncommonly voluminous for an intra-oceanic arc. Their eruption accompanied or shortly preceded (2 m.y.) the breakup of the Vanuatu-Fiji-Tonga arc system. Dacite and rhyolite occur in two series: a predominantly dacitic medium-K one, and a predominantly rhyolitic low-K one.

  3. He, Ne, Ar, C, O and H isotope systematics of geothermal fluids in the Lesser Antilles Islands Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedroni, Anselmo; Hammerschmidt, Konrad; Friedrichsen, Hans

    1999-02-01

    We present He, Ne, Ar, and C isotope analyses of hydrothermal brines and gases from fumaroles, hot springs, mofettes and hydrothermal exploration drillings on the major islands of the Lesser Antilles Arc. The origin of hydrothermal brines, which have been analyzed also for O and H isotopes, is essentially meteoric-hydrothermal. Air-corrected isotope compositions of helium (2.2 Rc/Ra < 3He/ 4He < 8.6 Rc/Ra) and carbon (-20 < δ 13C PDB < +0.5) are variable and require a variety of crustal and magmatic sources. The diversity of δ 13C PDB and 3He/CO 2 ratios within individual volcanic centres suggests that crustal sources (e.g., limestone) contaminate magmatic CO 2 en route from high-level magma reservoirs (depth < 15 km) to the surface. A similar contamination may be found for magmatic helium on distal springs. The 3He/ 4He signature of summit fumaroles, thought to reflect the 3He/ 4He signature of high-level magmas, shows a remarkable systematic variation along the arc. In addition, there is a correlation throughout the arc between published Sr, Pb, and Nd isotope signatures of lavas and the 3He/ 4He signatures of summit fumaroles. On the northern islands (Nevis, Montserrat, Guadeloupe, and Dominica) summit fumaroles have the N-MORB signature ( 3He/ 4He = 8 ± 1 R/Ra), and the isotope signature of lavas is not dissimilar from comparable intra-oceanic arc tholeiites elsewhere. Variable enrichments in radiogenic Sr and Pb have been reported for lavas of individual volcanic centres of the Southern Islands (Martinique, St.Lucia, and Grenada), and summit fumaroles on these centres match these variations by variable radiogenic He-enrichments, i.e., lower 3He/ 4He ratios. This correlation suggests that radiogenic Sr and Pb enrichments of lavas and low 3He/ 4He signatures on summit fumaroles have a common origin, i.e., a terrigenous contaminant derived from the Orinoco depositionary fan. Crustal assimilation is thought to decouple the He isotope system from any other

  4. Role of Subducted Basalt in the Genesis Island Arc Magmas: Evidence from Western Aleutian Seafloor Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Brown, S. T.; Kelemen, P. B.; Vervoort, J. D.; Hoernle, K.; Portnyagin, M.

    2013-12-01

    Western Aleutian seafloor lavas define a highly calc-alkaline series, with Mg numbers (Mg#, Mg/Mg+Fe) greater than 0.65 in dacitic lavas with 2-4% MgO at 63-70% SiO2. These lavas have uniformly radiogenic Hf and Nd and variable, but relatively unradiogenic, Sr and Pb, at the MORB-like end of the spectrum of island-arc lavas. Andesites and dacites have high Sr >1000 ppm, fractionated trace element patterns (Sr/Y=50-350, La/Yb=8-35, Dy/Yb=2-3.5), and low relative abundances of Nb and Ta (La/Ta=100-300), consistent with an enhanced role for residual or cumulate garnet + rutile. MORB-like isotope compositions and high MgO and Mg# relative to silica, rule out an origin for the andesites and dacites by fractional crystallization from basalt, except perhaps, by a process of melt-rock reaction with peridotite. The most fractionated trace element patterns are in western seafloor rhyodacites (69-70% SiO2), which were dredged from volcanic cones built on Bering Sea oceanic lithosphere, where the crust is probably no more than 10 km thick, and so unlikely to produce garnet during crustal melting. We interpret the western seafloor andesites and dacites to have been produced by melting of subducted MORB-like basalt in the eclogite facies, followed by interaction of the resulting high-silica melt with mantle peridotite. This interpretation is consistent with the tectonic setting in the western Aleutians, which is dominated by oblique convergence, capable of producing a relatively hot subducting plate. Western seafloor lavas define an end-member composition with MORB-like isotope compositions and fractionated trace element ratios, which falls at the end of the continuum of compositions for all Aleutian lavas. The end-member character of western seafloor lavas is clearest in plots highlighting their radiogenic Hf, Nd and strong relative depletions in Ta and Yb. The western seafloor lavas also define an end-member composition for Pb isotopes and Ce/Pb (Miller et al., Nature, 1994

  5. Slab Roll-Back and Trench Retreat As Controlling Factor for Island-Arc Related Basin Evolution: A Case Study from Southern Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandes, C.; Winsemann, J.

    2014-12-01

    Slab roll-back and trench retreat are important factors for basin subsidence, magma generation and volcanism in arc-trench systems. From the sedimentary and tectonic record of the Central American island-arc it is evident that repeated slab roll-back and trench retreats occurred since the Late Cretaceous. These trench retreats were most probably related to the subduction of oceanic plateaus and seamounts. Evidence for trench retreats is given by pulses of uplift in the outer-arc area, followed by subsidence in both the fore-arc and back-arc basins. The first slab roll-back probably occurred during the Early Paleocene indicated by the collapse of carbonate platforms, and the re-deposition of large carbonate blocks into deep-water turbidites. At this time the island-arc was transformed from an incipient non-extensional stage into an extensional stage. A new pulse of uplift or decreased subsidence, respectively during the Late Eocene is attributed to subduction of rough crust, a subsequent slab detachment and the establishment of a new subduction zone further westward. Strong uplift especially affected the outer arc of the North Costa Rican arc segment. In the Sandino Fore-arc basin very coarse-grained deep-water channel-levee complexes were deposited. These deposits contain large well-rounded andesitic boulders and are rich in reworked shallow-water carbonates pointing to uplift of the inner fore-arc. Evidence for the subsequent trench retreat is given by an increased subsidence during the early Oligocene in the Sandino Fore-arc Basin and the collapse of the Barra Honda platform in North Costa Rica. Another trench retreat might have occurred in Miocene times. A phase of higher subsidence from 18 to 13 Ma is documented in the geohistory curve of the North Limon Back-arc Basin. After a short pulse of uplift the subsidence increased to approx. 300 m/myr.

  6. Ultrafast source-to-surface movement of melt at island arcs from 226Ra-230Th systematics.

    PubMed

    Turner, S; Evans, P; Hawkesworth, C

    2001-05-18

    Island arc lavas have radium-226 excesses that extend to higher values than those observed in mid-ocean ridge or ocean island basalts. The initial ratio of radium-226 to thorium-230 is largest in the most primitive lavas, which also have the highest barium/thorium ratios, and decreases with increasing magmatic differentiation. Therefore, the radium-226 excesses appear to have been introduced into the base of the mantle melting column by fluids released from the subducting plate. Preservation of this signal requires transport to the surface arguably in only a few hundreds of years and directly constrains the average melt velocity to the order of 1000 meters per year. Thus, melt segregation and channel formation can occur rapidly in the mantle.

  7. Timing of Volcanism on Yunaska Island, Central Aleutian arc, Alaska: an Investigation Applying Multi-temporal Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. E.; Nicolaysen, K. P.; Dehn, J.; Myers, J. D.

    2003-12-01

    The volcanoes of the central Aleutian arc remain largely uninstrumented and unstudied despite numerous eruptions within the last century. Many of these eruptions are not documented and others may not have been observed. Previous synthetic aperture radar (SAR) studies at Westdahl volcano show that radar can be used to relatively date a'a lava flows and to suggest whether some flows are "historic" though not recorded. This is accomplished through comparison of semi-quantitative measurements of surface roughness for young, unvegetated lavas. Because a'a lavas typically become smoother as they weather, they produce less radar backscatter. Thus, lavas that exhibit higher radar backscatter intensities are younger than those with lower backscatter intensities for regions of similar relief and aspect. Located 305 km west of Dutch Harbor, Yunaska has six volcanic centers, of which three have probably been active in the Quaternary. Based on field observations, recent volcanism on Yunaska is associated with the younger of two nested calderas and several smaller vents and cones on the eastern half of the island. Although there is a reported 1937 eruption, it is not clear if this came from fissures north of the caldera or created the intracaldera cinder cone and lava flows. Using a twenty-year composite of SAR data, we establish relative ages for five basaltic andesite lavas from these fissures and from within the young caldera. Clear stratigraphic relationships among three lavas within the caldera provide a check on the accuracy of this technique. The use of SAR to differentiate between young lavas allows us to better document the eruption history of remote volcanoes and to mitigate their hazards.

  8. Active faulting induced by the slip partitioning in the Lesser Antilles arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, Frédérique; Feuillet, Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    AGUADOMAR marine cruise data acquired 11 years ago allowed us to identified and map two main sets of active faults within the Lesser Antilles arc (Feuillet et al., 2002; 2004). The faults belonging to the first set, such as Morne-Piton in Guadeloupe, bound up to 100km-long and 50km-wide arc-perpendicular graben or half graben that disrupt the fore-arc reef platforms. The faults of the second set form right-stepping en echelon arrays, accommodating left-lateral slip along the inner, volcanic islands. The two fault systems form a sinistral horsetail east of the tip of the left-lateral Puerto Rico fault zone that takes up the trench-parallel component of convergence between the North-American and Caribbean plates west of the Anegada passage. In other words, they together accommodate large-scale slip partitioning along the northeastern arc, consistent with recent GPS measurements (Lopez et al., 2006). These intraplate faults are responsible for a part of the shallow seismicity in the arc and have produce damaging historical earthquakes. Two magnitude 6.3 events occurred in the last 25 years along the inner en echelon faults, the last one on November 21 2004 in Les Saintes in the Guadeloupe archipelago. To better constrain the seismic hazard related to the inner arc faults and image the ruptures and effects on the seafloor of Les Saintes 2004 earthquake, we acquired new marine data between 23 February and 25 March 2009 aboard the French R/V le Suroît during the GWADASEIS cruise. We present here the data (high-resolution 72 channel and very high-resolution chirp 3.5 khz seismic reflection profiles, EM300 multibeam bathymetry, Küllenberg coring and SAR imagery) and the first results. We identified, mapped and characterized in detail several normal to oblique fault systems between Martinique and Saba. They offset the seafloor by several hundred meters and crosscut all active volcanoes, among them Nevis Peak, Soufriere Hills, Soufriere de Guadeloupe and Montagne Pel

  9. Evolution and geochemistry of the Tertiary calc-alkaline plutons in the Adak Island region of the central Aleutian oceanic island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Suzanne; Citron, Gary P.; Kay, Robert W.; Jicha, Brian; Tibbetts, Ashley

    2014-05-01

    Calc-alkaline plutons are major crustal building blocks of continental margin mountain belts like the Mesozoic to Tertiary Andes and the Sierra Nevada, but are rare in oceanic island arcs. Some of the most calc-alkaline I-type island arc plutons are in the Central Aleutians with the most extreme signatures, as indicated by FeO/MgO ratios of < ~2 at 48-70% wt. % SiO2, in the ~10 km wide Oligocene Hidden Bay pluton on southern Adak Island and the 10 km wide Miocene Kagalaska pluton to the north on eastern Adak and the adjacent Kagalaska Island. Although small compared to most continental plutons, similarities in intrusive units, mineralogy and chemistry suggest common formation processes. The Aleutian calc-alkaline plutonic rocks mainly differ from continental plutons in having more oceanic like isotopic (87Sr/86Sr = 0.703-0.7033; Epsilon Nd = 9-7.8) and LIL (e.g., higher K/Rb) ratios. The Adak region plutons differ from Tertiary plutons on Unalaska Island further east in being more K-rich and in having a more oxidized and lower-temperature mineralogy. From a regional perspective, the Adak area plutons intrude Eocene/Oligocene Finger Bay Formation mafic volcanic and sedimentary rocks and postdate the small ~38 Ma tholeiitic Finger Bay pluton. The chemistry of these older magmatic rocks is basically similar to that of young Central Aleutian magmatic rocks with boninites and arc tholeiitic magmas seemingly being absent. The formation of the calc-alkaline plutons seems to require a sufficient crustal thickness, fluid concentration and contractional stress such that magma chambers can stabilize significant amounts of pargasitic hornblende. Seismic receiver function analyses (Janiszewski et al., 2013) indicate the modern Adak crust is ~ 37 km thick. Existing and new hornblende, plagioclase and biotite Ar/Ar ages from 16 Hidden Bay pluton and Gannet Lake stock gabbro, porphyritic diorite, diorite, granodiorite, leucogranodiorite and aplite samples range from 34.6 to 30

  10. Middle Jurassic strata link Wallowa, Olds Ferry, and Izee terranes in the accreted Blue Mountains island arc, northeastern Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.D.L. ); Vallier, T. ); Stanley, G.D. Jr. ); Ash, S.R. ); White, D.L.

    1992-08-01

    Middle Jurassic strata atop the Wallowa terrane in northeastern Oregon link the Wallowa, Izee, and Olds Ferry terranes as related elements of a single long-lived and complex oceanic feature, the Blue Mountains island arc. Middle Jurassic strata in the Wallowa terrane include a dacitic ash-flow deposit and contain fossil corals and bivalves of North American affinity. Plant fossils in fluvial sandstones support a Jurassic age and indicate a seasonal temperate climate. Corals in a transgressive sequence traditionally overlying the fluvial units are of Bajocian age and are closely related to endemic varieties of the Western Interior embayment. They are unlike Middle Jurassic corals in other Cordilleran terranes; their presence suggests that the Blue Mountains island arc first approached the North American craton at high paleolatitudes in Middle Jurassic time. The authors consider the Bajocian marine strata and underlying fluvial volcaniclastic units to be a basin-margin equivalent of the Izee terrane, a largely Middle Jurassic (Bajocian) succession of basinal volcaniclastic and volcanic rocks known to overlie the Olds Ferry and Baker terranes.

  11. Transition of Mount Etna lavas from a mantle-plume to an island-arc magmatic source.

    PubMed

    Schiano, P; Clocchiatti, R; Ottolini, L; Busà, T

    2001-08-30

    Mount Etna lies near the boundary between two regions that exhibit significantly different types of volcanism. To the north, volcanism in the Aeolian island arc is thought to be related to subduction of the Ionian lithosphere. On Sicily itself, however, no chemical or seismological evidence of subduction-related volcanism exists, and so it is thought that the volcanism-including that on Mount Etna itself-stems from the upwelling of mantle material, associated with various surface tectonic processes. But the paucity of geological evidence regarding the primary composition of magma from Mount Etna means that its source characteristics remain controversial. Here we characterize the trace-element composition of a series of lavas emitted by Mount Etna over the past 500 kyr and preserved as melt inclusions inside olivine phenocrysts. We show that the compositional change in primary magmas from Mount Etna reflects a progressive transition from a predominantly mantle-plume source to one with a greater contribution from island-arc (subduction-related) basalts. We suggest that this is associated with southward migration of the Ionian slab, which is becoming juxtaposed with a mantle plume beneath Sicily. This implies that the volcanism of Mount Etna has become more calc-alkaline, and hence more explosive, during its evolution.

  12. Evolution of Ataúro Island: Temporal constraints on subduction processes beneath the Wetar zone, Banda Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Kim S.; Sandiford, Mike; Hawke, Margaret L.; Phillips, David; Quigley, Mark; Reis, Joao Edmundo dos

    2011-06-01

    Ataúro is a key to understanding the late stage volcanic and subduction history of the Banda Arc to the north of Timor. A volcanic history of bi-modal subaqueous volcanism has been established and new whole rock and trace element geochemical data show two compositional groups, basaltic andesite and dacite-rhyolite. 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology of hornblende from rhyo-dacitic lavas confirms that volcanism continued until 3.3 Ma. Following the cessation of volcanism, coral reef marine terraces have been uplifted to elevations of 700 m above sea level. Continuity of the terraces at constant elevations around the island reflects regional-scale uplift most likely linked to sublithospheric processes such as slab detachment. Local scale landscape features of the eastern parts of Ataúro are strongly controlled by normal faults. The continuation of arc-related volcanism on Ataúro until at least 3.3 Ma suggests that subduction of Australian lithosphere continued until near this time. This data is consistent with findings from the earthquake record where the extent of the Wetar seismic gap to a depth of 350 km suggests slab breakoff, as a result of collision, commenced at ˜4 Ma, leading to subsequent regional uplift recorded in elevated terraces on Ataúro and neighbouring islands.

  13. The Island Arcs as a Major Source of Mantellic Sr to the Ocean: Tectonic Control over Seawater Chemistry and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louvat, P.; Allegre, C. J.; Meynadier, L.

    2005-12-01

    The evolution of 87Sr/86Sr in the Cenozoic ocean has been the subject of famous and vivid controversies between the BLAG model1 and Raymo's one2. No clear winner! Recently the question has been worsened because recent estimates of the hydrothermal flux at ridge crest3, 4, 5 and of the low-temperature oceanic crust weathering flux6 have shown that these fluxes are not enough to balance the continental radiogenic input to give 0.70917 (present-day seawater 87Sr/86Sr). We have re-examined this problem using both Sr and Nd isotopic budgets. Seawater 143Nd/144Nd isotopic ratio varies from one ocean to another as a consequence of its short residence time. For each ocean we can calculate the Nd contributions from continental (rivers) and mantellic sources. Since ridge crests cannot be the mantle-like source for Nd, this source is identified as the island arc and OIB weathering, in agreement with the observation by Goldstein and Hemming7. This approach leads us to examine the possibility of the same island arc origin for the missing mantle-like seawater Sr. The classical approach to the budget of water entering the ocean is to consider the river water fluxes as established by hydrological survey statistics. But these fluxes are too small, as they do not include the underground water flows, which are particularly important for volcanic terrains8. A budget calculation based on mean surface area, mean water fluxes and mean Sr concentrations in rivers and springs demonstrates island arc and OIB weathering is a sufficient source of mantellic Sr to the ocean to match the seawater 87Sr/86Sr budget. This result has a fundamental consequence on the explanation of the seawater 87Sr/86Sr evolution during the Cenozoic. Indeed, when a continental collision occurs a large portion of island arcs is eliminated. Thus the increase in the contribution of radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr from continental weathering and the decrease of the mantle contribution via island arc weathering are tectonically and

  14. From birth to death of arc magmatism: The igneous evolution of Komandorsky Islands recorded tectonic changes during 50 Ma of westernmost Aleutian history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höfig, T. W.; Portnyagin, M.; Hoernle, K.; Hauff, F. F.; van den Bogaard, P.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Komandorsky Islands form the westernmost end of the Aleutian Island Arc. Four igneous complexes, spanning almost 50 Ma of magmatism, have previously been identified (Ivaschenko et al., 1984: Far East Scientific Centre, Vladivostok, 192 pp.). The petrogenesis of this protracted magmatic record and accurate absolute ages of events, however, remain poorly constrained. Our study investigates the relationship between magma composition and tectonic setting. The Komandorsky igneous basement formed in subduction zone setting. It hosts some of the oldest igneous rocks of the entire Aleutian Arc with the onset of magmatism occurring at 47 Ma. This early stage was characterized by classic fluid-dominated arc volcanism, which produced two coeval but likely genetically unrelated magmatic series of tholeiitic mafic and tholeiitic to calc-alkaline felsic rocks. To date, no boninites have been found and therefore arc initiation is different at the Aleutians than at Izu-Bonin-Marianas or the oldest rocks in the Aleutians have yet to be discovered. The prolonged production of the contrasting basalt-rhyolite association on Komandorsky Islands had lasted ~25 Ma and ceased around the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. Concurrently to this long-lasting activity, a gradual transition to a different mode of arc magmatism took place reflected by newly discovered Sr-enriched, HREE-depleted calc-alkaline basaltic andesitic lavas of mid-upper Eocene age spanning a time of at least ~7 Ma. This so-called Transition Series displays a moderate garnet signature marking the increased contribution of a slab-melt component to the magma sources of the Komandorsky Islands. Slab-melt contribution increased with decreasing age leading to strongly adakitic magmatism as early as ~33 Ma (Lower Oligocene), reflected by eruption of high-Sr (up to 2,500 ppm), highly HREE-depleted Adak-type magnesian basaltic andesites and andesites. These remarkable magmas became predominant during the Lower Miocene. They were

  15. Variable SO2 emission rates for Anatahan volcano, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands: Implications for deriving arc-wide volatile fluxes from erupting volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, D. R.; Fischer, T. P.; McGonigle, A. J. S.; de Moor, J. M.

    2007-07-01

    We report new spectroscopic-derived SO2 emission rates for Anatahan volcano, Mariana Islands. Measurements of SO2 fluxes reveal large fluctuations over the 2003-2005 period - from 78 kg s-1 which occurred on the same day as resurgent volcanic activity (March, 2005) to 50 kg s-1 and 25 kg s-1 made days/weeks after the start of eruptive sequences in 2003 and 2004 respectively. Even the lowest values make Anatahan a major global source of SO2 over the past decade. These SO2 emission rates are used to estimate the CO2 flux from the arc as a whole (=3.6 - 40 × 107 mol km-1 yr-1). Such values are significantly higher than estimates derived using other approaches: they are also high compared to other convergent margins (e.g., Central America) where the input flux of CO2 is substantially greater. Our results caution against including volatile fluxes from actively-degassing volcanoes to produce volatile outputs considered representative of entire arc fronts.

  16. Plutonic xenoliths from Martinique, Lesser Antilles: evidence for open system processes and reactive melt flow in island arc crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, George F.; Davidson, Jon P.; Blundy, Jon D.

    2016-10-01

    The Lesser Antilles Volcanic Arc is remarkable for the abundance and variety of erupted plutonic xenoliths. These samples provide a window into the deeper crust and record a more protracted crystallisation history than is observed from lavas alone. We present a detailed petrological and in situ geochemical study of xenoliths from Martinique in order to establish their petrogenesis, pre-eruptive storage conditions and their contribution to construction of the sub-volcanic arc crust. The lavas from Martinique are controlled by crystal-liquid differentiation. Amphibole is rarely present in the erupted lavas, but it is a very common component in plutonic xenoliths, allowing us to directly test the involvement of amphibole in the petrogenesis of arc magmas. The plutonic xenoliths provide both textural and geochemical evidence of open system processes and crystal `cargos'. All xenoliths are plagioclase-bearing, with variable proportions of olivine, spinel, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and amphibole, commonly with interstitial melt. In Martinique, the sequence of crystallisation varies in sample type and differs from other islands of the Lesser Antilles arc. The compositional offset between plagioclase (~An90) and olivine (~Fo75), suggests crystallisation under high water contents and low pressures from an already fractionated liquid. Texturally, amphibole is either equant (crystallising early in the sequence) or interstitial (crystallising late). Interstitial amphibole is enriched in Ba and LREE compared with early crystallised amphibole and does not follow typical fractionation trends. Modelling of melt compositions indicates that a water-rich, plagioclase-undersaturated reactive melt or fluid percolated through a crystal mush, accompanied by the breakdown of clinopyroxene, and the crystallisation of amphibole. Geothermobarometry estimates and comparisons with experimental studies imply the majority of xenoliths formed in the mid-crust. Martinique cumulate xenoliths are

  17. Geochemical and isotopic constraints on island arc, synorogenic, post-orogenic and anorogenic granitoids in the Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, F. A.; Foden, J. D.; Collins, A. S.

    2015-04-01

    The Arabian Shield preserves a protracted magmatic record of repeated amalgamation of juvenile subduction terranes that host granite intrusions ranging in age from the early Neoproterozoic to the Cambrian, which were emplaced into convergent and within-plate settings. Geochronology and whole-rock geochemistry of sampled Saudi Arabian granitoids define and distinguish four discrete age groups: 1) ~ 845-700 Ma island arc and synorogenic granitoids (IA + Syn), 2) ~ 640-610 Ma granitoids from the Nabitah and Halaban Suture (NHSG), 3) ~ 610-600 Ma post-orogenic perthitic (hypersolvus) granitoids (POPG), and 4) < 600 Ma anorogenic aegirine-bearing perthitic (hypersolvus) granitoids (AAPG). Groups 1, 2 and 3 include suites ranging from I-S- to A-type granites that have REE signatures typical of volcanic arc settings and show intra-suite variation that could be controlled by a combination of crustal assimilation and fractional crystallisation. Their mafic parental magmas have N-MORB-, or arc-tholeiite-like geochemistry. By contrast, group 4 A-type granites are more enriched in HREE and in incompatible elements such as Nb, Rb, Ga, Nd, Zr and Y and have lower Ce/Yb and higher Y/Nb ratios. These granitoids are interpreted to have been emplaced into within-plate and back-arc settings. Granitoid data also provide evidence that there may be two distinct mantle sources to the mafic parents of the granite suites. These are distinguished as contaminated and enriched mantle using Nb and Y and Nd isotopes. All granitoid suites are isotopically juvenile (ɛNd + 3 to + 6) and fall between the upper field crustal values of the Paleoproterozoic Khida terrane (ɛNd + 1) and contemporary depleted mantle. However, Nd isotopes distinguish contamination in group 1-3 mafic end-members beneath sutures which are interpreted to be derived from the contemporary MORB-type mantle wedge with subsequent crustal assimilation and fractionation to I- and A-type granitoids. The youngest (after 600 Ma) A

  18. Submarine record of volcanic island construction and collapse in the Lesser Antilles arc: First scientific drilling of submarine volcanic island landslides by IODP Expedition 340

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Friant, A.; Ishizuka, O.; Boudon, G.; Palmer, M. R.; Talling, P. J.; Villemant, B.; Adachi, T.; Aljahdali, M.; Breitkreuz, C.; Brunet, M.; Caron, B.; Coussens, M.; Deplus, C.; Endo, D.; Feuillet, N.; Fraas, A. J.; Fujinawa, A.; Hart, M. B.; Hatfield, R. G.; Hornbach, M.; Jutzeler, M.; Kataoka, K. S.; Komorowski, J.-C.; Lebas, E.; Lafuerza, S.; Maeno, F.; Manga, M.; Martínez-Colón, M.; McCanta, M.; Morgan, S.; Saito, T.; Slagle, A.; Sparks, S.; Stinton, A.; Stroncik, N.; Subramanyam, K. S. V.; Tamura, Y.; Trofimovs, J.; Voight, B.; Wall-Palmer, D.; Wang, F.; Watt, S. F. L.

    2015-02-01

    IODP Expedition 340 successfully drilled a series of sites offshore Montserrat, Martinique and Dominica in the Lesser Antilles from March to April 2012. These are among the few drill sites gathered around volcanic islands, and the first scientific drilling of large and likely tsunamigenic volcanic island-arc landslide deposits. These cores provide evidence and tests of previous hypotheses for the composition and origin of those deposits. Sites U1394, U1399, and U1400 that penetrated landslide deposits recovered exclusively seafloor sediment, comprising mainly turbidites and hemipelagic deposits, and lacked debris avalanche deposits. This supports the concepts that i/ volcanic debris avalanches tend to stop at the slope break, and ii/ widespread and voluminous failures of preexisting low-gradient seafloor sediment can be triggered by initial emplacement of material from the volcano. Offshore Martinique (U1399 and 1400), the landslide deposits comprised blocks of parallel strata that were tilted or microfaulted, sometimes separated by intervals of homogenized sediment (intense shearing), while Site U1394 offshore Montserrat penetrated a flat-lying block of intact strata. The most likely mechanism for generating these large-scale seafloor sediment failures appears to be propagation of a decollement from proximal areas loaded and incised by a volcanic debris avalanche. These results have implications for the magnitude of tsunami generation. Under some conditions, volcanic island landslide deposits composed of mainly seafloor sediment will tend to form smaller magnitude tsunamis than equivalent volumes of subaerial block-rich mass flows rapidly entering water. Expedition 340 also successfully drilled sites to access the undisturbed record of eruption fallout layers intercalated with marine sediment which provide an outstanding high-resolution data set to analyze eruption and landslides cycles, improve understanding of magmatic evolution as well as offshore sedimentation

  19. High resolution seismic data coupled to Multibeam bathymetry of Stromboli island collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment: implications with the marine geophysics and volcanology of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex (Sicily, Southern Tyrrhenian sea, Italy).

    PubMed

    Aiello, Gemma; Di Fiore, Vincenzo; Marsella, Ennio; Passaro, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    New high resolution seismic data (Subbottom Chirp) coupled to high resolution Multibeam bathymetry collected in the frame of the Stromboli geophysical experiment aimed at recording active seismic data and tomography of the Stromboli Island are here presented. The Stromboli geophysical experiment has been already carried out based on onshore and offshore data acquisition in order to investigate the deep structure and the location of the magma chambers of the Stromboli volcano. A new detailed swath bathymetry of Stromboli Island is here shown and discussed to reconstruct an up-to-date morpho-bathymetry and marine geology of the area compared to the volcanologic setting of the Aeolian Arc volcanic complex. Due to its high resolution the new Digital Terrain Model of the Stromboli Island gives interesting information about the submerged structure of the volcano, particularly about the volcano-tectonic and gravitational processes involving the submarine flanks of the edifice. Several seismic units have been identified based on the geologic interpretation of Subbottom Chirp profiles recorded around the volcanic edifice and interpreted as volcanic acoustic basement pertaining to the volcano and overlying slide chaotic bodies emplaced during its complex volcano-tectonic evolution. They are related to the eruptive activity of Stromboli, mainly poliphasic and to regional geological processes involving the intriguing geology of the Aeolian Arc, a volcanic area still in activity and needing improved research interest.

  20. Occurrence rate of SAR arcs during the 23nd solar activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ievenko, Igor

    By data of photometric observations at the Maimaga station (57° N, 200° E, geomagnetic coordinates) at the Yakutsk meridian the occurrence rate of subauroral red (SAR) arcs for the 1997 to 2006 period has been analysed. The observations were carried out during winterspring periods at moonless nights under favorable atmospheric conditions. For˜370 nights of observations (total duration is˜3170 hours) 114 cases of SAR arcs occurrence (˜500 hours) have been registered. The occurrence rate of SAR arcs have been determined as a ratio of the number of registration hour intervals of SAR arcs to the summary observation time in hours for particular months. Subauroral red arcs have been registered every year both in the maximum and in the minimum of the solar activity cycle. The most observation occurrence of red arcs is registered on the rise (˜27%) and decay of the maximum of the solar activity cycle (˜36%). The average occurrence rate of SAR arcs during these years was less than in the 22nd solar activity cycle and is equal to ˜16% of the total observation time. The occurrence rate of SAR arcs observations corresponds to the changes of geomagnetic activity during the 23nd solar activity cycle.

  1. Chlorine isotopes of thermal springs in arc volcanoes for tracing shallow magmatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Long; Bonifacie, Magali; Aubaud, Cyril; Crispi, Olivier; Dessert, Céline; Agrinier, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    The evaluation of the status of shallow magma body (i.e., from the final intrusion stage, to quiescence, and back to activity), one of the key parameters that trigger and sustain volcanic eruptions, has been challenging in modern volcanology. Among volatile tracers, chlorine (Cl) uniquely exsolves at shallow depths and is highly hydrophilic. Consequently, Cl enrichment in volcanic gases and thermal springs has been proposed as a sign for shallow magmatic activities. However, such enrichment could also result from numerous other processes (e.g., water evaporation, dissolution of old chloride mineral deposits, seawater contamination) that are unrelated to magmatic activity. Here, based on stable isotope compositions of chloride and dissolved inorganic carbon, as well as previous published 3He/4He data obtained in thermal springs from two recently erupted volcanoes (La Soufrière in Guadeloupe and Montagne Pelée in Martinique) in the Lesser Antilles Arc, we show that the magmatic Cl efficiently trapped in thermal springs displays negative δ37Cl values (≤ - 0.65 ‰), consistent with a slab-derived origin but distinct from the isotope compositions of chloride in surface reservoirs (e.g. seawater, local meteoric waters, rivers and cold springs) displaying common δ37Cl values of around 0‰. Using this δ37Cl difference as an index of magmatic Cl, we further examined thermal spring samples including a 30-year archive from two thermal springs in Guadeloupe covering samples from its last eruption in 1976-1977 to 2008 and an island-wide sampling event in Martinique in 2008 to trace the evolution of magmatic Cl in the volcanic hydrothermal systems over time. The results show that magmatic Cl can be rapidly flushed out of the hydrothermal systems within <30 to 80 years after the eruption, much quicker than other volatile tracers such as CO2 and noble gases, which can exsolve at greater depths and constantly migrate to the surface. Because arc volcanoes often have well

  2. Nitrite Reductase and Nitric-oxide Synthase Activity of the Mitochondrial Molybdopterin Enzymes mARC1 and mARC2*

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney E.; Tejero, Jesús; Sun, Bin; Gauthier, Marc C.; Thomas, John; Ragireddy, Venkata; Merchant, Bonnie A.; Wang, Jun; Azarov, Ivan; Basu, Partha; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component (mARC) proteins are molybdopterin-containing enzymes of unclear physiological function. Both human isoforms mARC-1 and mARC-2 are able to catalyze the reduction of nitrite when they are in the reduced form. Moreover, our results indicate that mARC can generate nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite when forming an electron transfer chain with NADH, cytochrome b5, and NADH-dependent cytochrome b5 reductase. The rate of NO formation increases almost 3-fold when pH was lowered from 7.5 to 6.5. To determine if nitrite reduction is catalyzed by molybdenum in the active site of mARC-1, we mutated the putative active site cysteine residue (Cys-273), known to coordinate molybdenum binding. NO formation was abolished by the C273A mutation in mARC-1. Supplementation of transformed Escherichia coli with tungsten facilitated the replacement of molybdenum in recombinant mARC-1 and abolished NO formation. Therefore, we conclude that human mARC-1 and mARC-2 are capable of catalyzing reduction of nitrite to NO through reaction with its molybdenum cofactor. Finally, expression of mARC-1 in HEK cells using a lentivirus vector was used to confirm cellular nitrite reduction to NO. A comparison of NO formation profiles between mARC and xanthine oxidase reveals similar Kcat and Vmax values but more sustained NO formation from mARC, possibly because it is not vulnerable to autoinhibition via molybdenum desulfuration. The reduction of nitrite by mARC in the mitochondria may represent a new signaling pathway for NADH-dependent hypoxic NO production. PMID:24500710

  3. Paleomagnetism of the Moreton's Harbour Group, northeastern Newfoundland Appalachians: Evidence for an Early Ordovician Island Arc near the Laurentian Margin of Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Rex J. E.; van der Pluijm, Ben A.; Van der Voo, Rob

    1991-07-01

    Paleomagnetic results have been obtained from mafic volcanic units in the upper part of the Moreton's Harbour Group, which is part of an accreted island arc terrane that is preserved in the Notre Dame Bay subzone of the Central Mobile Belt of the Newfoundland Appalachians. Detailed thermal and alternating field demagnetization reveals a stable characteristic component of magnetization, carried by magnetite, at a large number of sites in pillow basalts and coeval basaltic dikes. The intrusives contain both polarities, and a primary age for the characteristic magnetization is indicated by a positive contact test for one of the dikes, and by a positive structural test involving a correction for block rotations (strike-correction). The overall mean direction for the characteristic component after tectonic (tilt and strike) correction (flows and intrusives: D = 171°, I = +22°, k = 22.6, α95 = 6.5°, pole 29°N, 135°E; flows: D = 166°, I = +22°, k = 33.2, α95 = 6.5°) corresponds to an Early Ordovician paleolatitude for the arc of 11°S, which is indistinguishable from the expected paleolatitude of the North American margin. This implies that the arc formed at or near the margin of the craton. In contrast, the Avalon block, which formed the other margin of Iapetus, was widely separated from the arc and the craton at this time. The Early Ordovician paleolatitude of the arc terrane supports a tectonic model in which coeval ophiolitic sequences inboard of the arc were formed in a narrow ocean basin between the arc and the craton. Subsequent convergence between the arc and Laurentia in Middle Ordovician time resulted in closure of this narrow ocean basin and obduction of the back-arc basin oceanic crust onto the ancient margin of the craton, thus giving rise to the Taconic orogenic pulse in the Newfoundland Appalachians.

  4. Crustal rifting and magmatic underplating in the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) intra-oceanic arc detected by active source seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Kodaira, S.; Yamashita, M.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; No, T.; Tatsumi, Y.; Kaneda, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has carried out seismic experiments using a multichannel reflection system and ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) in the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin)-Mariana (IBM) arc region since 2002 to understand growth process of continental crust. The source was an airgun array with a total capacity of 12,000 cubic inches and the OBSs as the receiver were deployed with an interval of 5 km for all seismic refraction experiments. As the results, we obtained crustal structures across the whole IBM arc with an interval of 50 km and detected the structural characteristics showing the crustal growth process. The IBM arc is one of typical oceanic island arc, which crustal growth started from subduction of an oceanic crust beneath the other oceanic crust. The arc crust has developed through repeatedly magmatic accretion from subduction slab and backarc opening. The volcanism has activated in Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene and Quaternary (e.g., Taylor, 1992), however, these detailed locations of past volcanic arc has been remained as one of unknown issues. In addition, a role of crustal rifting for the crustal growth has also been still unknown issue yet. Our seismic structures show three rows of past volcanic arc crusts except current arc. A rear arc and a forearc side have one and two, respectively. The first one, which was already reported by Kodaira et al. (2008), distributes in northern side from 27 N of the rear arc region. The second one, which develops in the forearc region next to the recent volcanic front, distributes in whole of the Izu-Ogasawara arc having crustal variation along arc direction. Ones of them sometimes have thicker crust than that beneath current volcanic front and no clear topographic high. Last one in the forearc connects to the Ogasawara Ridge. However, thickest crust is not always located beneath these volcanic arcs. The initial rifting region like the northern end of the Mariana Trough and the Sumisu

  5. Ultra-long-range hydroacoustic observations of submarine volcanic activity at Monowai, Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, D.; Watts, A. B.; Grevemeyer, I.; Rodgers, M.; Paulatto, M.

    2016-02-01

    Monowai is an active submarine volcanic center in the Kermadec Arc, Southwest Pacific Ocean. During May 2011, it erupted over a period of 5 days, with explosive activity directly linked to the generation of seismoacoustic T phases. We show, using cross-correlation and time-difference-of-arrival techniques, that the eruption is detected as far as Ascension Island, equatorial South Atlantic Ocean, where a bottom moored hydrophone array is operated as part of the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. Hydroacoustic phases from the volcanic center must therefore have propagated through the Sound Fixing and Ranging channel in the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans, a source-receiver distance of ~15,800 km. We believe this to be the furthest documented range of a naturally occurring underwater signal above 1 Hz. Our findings, which are consistent with observations at regional broadband stations and long-range, acoustic parabolic equation modeling, have implications for submarine volcano monitoring.

  6. Tectonomagmatic activity and ice dynamics in the Bransfield Strait back-arc basin, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziak, Robert P.; Park, Minkyu; Lee, Won Sang; Matsumoto, Haru; Bohnenstiehl, Delwayne R.; Haxel, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    An array of moored hydrophones was used to monitor the spatiotemporal distribution of small- to moderate-sized earthquakes and ice-generated sounds within the Bransfield Strait, Antarctica. During a 2 year period, a total of 3900 earthquakes, 5925 icequakes and numerous ice tremor events were located throughout the region. The seismic activity included eight space-time earthquake clusters, positioned along the central neovolcanic rift zone of the young Bransfield back-arc basin. These sequences of small magnitude earthquakes, or swarms, suggest ongoing magmatic activity that becomes localized along isolated volcanic features and fissure-like ridges in the southwest portion of the basin. A total of 122 earthquakes were located along the South Shetland trench, indicating continued deformation and possibly ongoing subduction along this margin. The large number of icequakes observed show a temporal pattern related to seasonal freeze-thaw cycles and a spatial distribution consistent with channeling of sea ice along submarine canyons from glacier fronts. Several harmonic tremor episodes were sourced from a large (˜30 km2) iceberg that entered northeast portion of the basin. The spectral character of these signals suggests they were produced by either resonance of a small chamber of fluid within the iceberg, or more likely, due to periodicity of discrete stick-slip events caused by contact of the moving iceberg with the seafloor. These pressure waves appear to have been excited by abrasion of the iceberg along the seafloor as it passed Clarence and Elephant Islands.

  7. Textural and chemical variation in phenocrysts from the early eruptions of Lutao volcanic island, the northern Luzon arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Iizuka, Y.; Huang, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Lutao volcanic island at the northern end of Luzon arc was formed by the subduction of South China Sea Plate beneath the Philippine Sea plate. Three edifices on the island were built up by pyroclastic deposits from different eruption stages. In this study, the textural and chemical zonings in phenocrysts are used to characterize the subvolcanic magma chamber for the earliest eruption stage (1.4-2.0 Ma). The high 143Nd/144Nd and 176Hf/177Hf ratios of six volcanic breccias collected from the lowermost layer indicate that they were derived from a common depleted mantle source. However, their compositional variations cannot be explained by simple fractional crystallization. The textures and compositions of the phenocrysts reveal the complication in the magma chamber processes. Compared to the average primitive arc basalts, two basaltic andesites have similar major element compositions with higher incompatible trace element abundances. The un-zoned or normally zoned olivine, plagioclase, and pyroxenes indicate the relatively undisturbed processes (961-1011°C and 2.8-5.5 kb) at the earlier crystallization stage. The peritectic olivine and abundance melt inclusions accompanied by abrupt XAn increase at the rims of plagioclase inferred recharge of H2O-rich mafic melt at later stage, which also triggered rapid eruption. The cryptic magma mixing had limited effect on isotopic signatures and major element variations, but had great chance to modify the bulk trace element abundances. In contrast, plagioclase phenocrysts in four low-mg# basaltic samples contain An-rich dissolved or resorbed cores with abundant melt inclusions, which were formed from rapid decompression of volatile-rich magma at H2O-undersaturated conditions. The calcic plagioclase and minor Mg-rich olivine formed at greater depth were rapidly brought to magma chamber to crystallized sodic plagioclase rim, clinopyroxene, and minor orthopyroxene (954-994°C and 2.1-4.1 kb). The normally zoned clinopyroxene

  8. Crustal structure of the lesser Antilles Island arc south of Guadeloupe : new insights from the ANTITHESIS cruise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurencin, M.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Marcaillou, B.; Evain, M.; Graindorge, D.; Heuret, A.; Jean-Frederic, L.; Lucazeau, F.; Pichot, T.; Rolandone, F.; Bouquerel, H.

    2015-12-01

    One of the goals of the Antithesis cruise, conducted in 2013, was the study of the combined deep structure and thermal regime of the lesser Antilles subduction zone in order to quantify its seismic hazard. One combined reflection and wide-angle seismic profile has been acquired in the scope of the Antithesis cruise North of Barbuda at around 18°N using 26 ocean bottom seismometers, a 4.5 km digital streamer and a 7800 cu. inch seismic source. 13 measures of heat flow were taken in the vicinity of the profile. Forward modelling of the wide-angle seismic data reveals the deep structure of the subduction zone in the study area. - The subducting Atlantic oceanic plate is about 5-7 km thick, modelled by one single layer. - Sedimentary thickness on the oceanic plate is low with maximal some hundreds of meters of sediments at the trench. - The thickness of combined two sedimentary layers is ~5 km near the trench and decreases toward the arc, based on reflection seismic data. - The ~18-km-thick Caribbean crust at the arc is subdivided in 3 layers, overlain by a 2-to-4-km-thick layer with velocities ranging from 4.5 to 5.5 km/s that might correspond to volcanic products or high velocity sediments. - The velocities in the lower crustal layer reach 7.4 km/s probably corresponding to mafic rocks and plutons. - The velocities in the upper mantle were constrained to be 8.00-8.20 km/s underneath the arc as well as underneath the oceanic crust, thereby excluding the existence of extensive serpentinization of the mantle through water entering the subduction zone. The anomalously low heat flow indicates cold calculated temperatures along the interplate contact, suggesting a hydrothermal cooling that is possibly restricted to the shallow crustal aquifer. Alternatively, these low temperatures may be due to a depressed thermal structure of the oceanic crust related to the slow-spreading at the medio-Atlantic ridge.A wide-angle seismic profile about 150 km to the South in the vicinity

  9. Zinc, copper, and lead geochemistry of oceanic igneous rocks - ridges, islands, and arcs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doe, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    Variations in the abundances of Zn, Cu, and Pb are found to be useful in identifying tectonic regimes and separating ocean-island basalts into enriched- and depleted-source categories. The average Zn, Cu, and Pb contents of normal mid-ocean ridge basalts (N-MORB) are 84, 70, and 0.35 ppm, respectively. Differences in average Zn contents for various ridges reflect more the varying degrees of differentiation than variations of Zn content in the source rocks. At a Mg# of 70, or Mg#70, which is taken to represent primitive MORB, many MORB sequences converge at a Zn content of 58??6 ppm, which is close to the value for primitive mantle (50 ppm) and ordinary chondrites (~55 ppm). -from Author

  10. Control of the location of the volcanic front in island arcs by aqueous fluid connectivity in the mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mibe, Kenji; Fujii, Toshitsugu; Yasuda, Atsushi

    1999-09-01

    The water released from descending oceanic lithosphere is thought to have an important role in subduction-zone magmatism, as this water might trigger partial melting of the mantle wedge above the subducting plate. If, however, there is incomplete wetting of mineral grain boundaries in the mantle (that is, the dihedral angle at the triple junctions between grains is more than 60°), then the water would not form an interconnected network and might instead be trapped as interstitial fluid in the mantle peridotite. The water would then be transported to deeper parts of the mantle rather than triggering partial melting. Here we use dihedral-angle data to estimate the connectivity of an aqueous fluid phase in a model upper-mantle mineral assemblage (forsterite) at pressures from 3 to 5GPa (corresponding to depths of ~80-150km). By combining these data with previous results, we find that the dihedral angle is greater than 60° at low pressure and temperature (<1,000°C at 2GPa and <800°C at 4GPa) and lower than 60° at higher pressures and temperatures, suggesting that wetting is incomplete below these conditions. This indicates that the connectivity of water in hydrous upper-mantle peridotite at convergent plate boundaries might control the position of the volcanic front in island arcs.

  11. A mid-Permian chert event: widespread deposition of biogenic siliceous sediments in coastal, island arc and oceanic basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murchey, B.L.; Jones, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Radiolarian and conodont of Permian siliceous rocks from twenty-three areas in teh the circum-Pacific and Mediterranean regions reveal a widespread Permian Chert Event during the middle Leonardian to Wordian. Radiolarian- and (or) sponge spicule-rich siliceous sediments accumulated beneath high productivity zones in coastal, island arc and oceanic basins. Most of these deposits now crop out in fault-bounded accreted terranes. Biogenic siliceous sediments did not accumulate in terranes lying beneath infertile waters including the marine sequences in terranes of northern and central Alaska. The Permian Chert Event is coeval with major phosphorite deposition along the western margin of Pangea (Phosphoria Formation and related deposits). A well-known analogue for this event is middle Miocene deposition of biogenic siliceous sediments beneath high productivity zones in many parts of the Pacific and concurrent deposition of phosphatic as well as siliceous sediments in basins along the coast of California. Interrelated factors associated with both the Miocene and Permian depositional events include plate reorientations, small sea-level rises and cool polar waters. ?? 1992.

  12. Erosive effects of the storms HELENA (1963) and HUGO (1989) on Basse-Terre island (Guadeloupe - Lesser Antilles Arc).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bivic, Rejanne; Allemand, Pascal; Delacourt, Christophe; Quiquerez, Amélie

    2014-05-01

    Basse-Terre is a volcanic island which belongs to the archipelago of Guadeloupe located in the Lesser Antilles Arc (Caribbean Sea). As a mountainous region in the tropical belt, Basse-Terre is affected by intense sediment transport due to extreme meteorological events. During the last fifty years, eight major tropical storms and hurricanes with intense rainfalls induced landslides and scars in the weathered layers. The purpose of this study is to compare two major meteorological events within a period of 26 years (HELENA in 10/1963 and HUGO in 09/1989) in order to qualify the parameters responsible of the spatial distribution of landslides and scars. The storm HELENA affected Basse-Terre between the 23rd and the 25th of October, 1963. The maximal daily rainfall reached 300 mm in Baillif which is located on the leeward coast at the altitude of 650 m while the maximum wind velocity reached 50 km/h. A similar exceptional event happened when the hurricane HUGO slammed the island in September 17, 1989. The maximum daily rainfall recorded in Sainte-Rose (on the northern coast) was 250 mm while it reached 208 mm in Petit-Bourg and the maximum wind speed was 60 km/h. Aerial images were acquired by the IGN (French Geographical Institute) before and a few weeks after the extreme events: less than three months after the event HELENA and less than a month after the event HUGO. Those images have been orthorectified at a metric resolution and combined in a GIS with a 10 m resolution DEM. Scars and landslides were digitalized and their surface area and mean slope were measured for both HELENA and HUGO. This work confirms several results proposed by a previous study related to the HELENA event: (1) the landslides occurred mainly in the center of the island and (2) the slope is the main parameter for the initiation of landslides, since all of them occurred with a slope superior to 30°. Furthermore, the resiliency of the surface affected by the landslides induced by HELENA was

  13. Application of Satellite Geodesy in Analyzing the Accelerated Movement of the Back-arc Rifting in the Izu Bonin Islands, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arisa, D.; Heki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin islands lies along the convergent boundary between the subducting Pacific plate (PA) and the overriding Philippine Sea plate (PH) in the western Pacific. Nishimura (2011) found that the back-arc rifting goes on behind the Izu arc by studying the horizontal velocities of GNSS stations on the Izu islands. Here we show that this rifting has accelerated in 2004 using GNSS data at Aogashima, Hachijoujima, and Mikurajima stations. The back-arc rifting behind the Izu islands can be seen as the increasing distance between stations in the Izu-Bonin islands and stations located in the stable part of PH. We found that their movement showed clear acceleration around the third quarter of 2004. Obtaining the Euler vector of the PH is necessary to analyzed the movement of each stations relative to the other stations on the same plate. The analyzing of GPS timeseries leads us to one initial conclusion that some accelerated movement started to occur in the third quarter of 2004. This event was closely related to the earthquake on May 29, 2004 in Nankai Trough and September 5, 2004 earthquake near the triple junction of Sagami Trough. The analyzing process help us to understand that this accelerated movement was not the afterslip of any of these earthquakes, but it was triggering these area to move faster and further than it was. We first rule out the best possible cause by constraining the onset time of the accelerated movement, and correlating it with the earthquakes. May 29, 2004 earthquake (M6.5) at the PA-PH boundary clearly lacked the jump which should mark the onset of the eastward slow movement. Moreover, additional velocity vectors do not converge to the epicenter, and onset time that minimizes the post-fit residual is significantly later than May. We therefore conclude that accelerated movement started in 2004 was not due to the afterslip of interplate earthquake in May 29. On the next step we found that the onset time coincides with the occurrence of

  14. U-series disequilibrium of basaltic rocks from Kick'em-Jenny submarine volcano, Lesser Antilles island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Lundstrom, C. C.

    2005-12-01

    Kick'em Jenny (KEJ) submarine volcano located 9 km to the north of Grenada in the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc produces lavas ranging in composition from high MgO basalts to moderately evolved andesites. We have determined U-series disequilibria in 12 porphyritic lavas erupted from KEJ volcano by TIMS and MC-ICP-MS methods to constrain the timing and identify the processes creating the magma diversity observed. The SiO2 contents of samples studied here vary from 47 to 55 wt.% SiO2 while REE patterns evolve from slightly LREE enriched, MREE/HREE = 1 patterns to strongly LREE enriched, MREE depleted concave-up patterns. Separate dissolutions of sample KEJ100 indicate an external reproducibility (1s) of 0.7% for (230Th/238U) (n=4), 0.8% for (230Th/232Th) (n=4) and 0.6% for (226Ra/230Th) (n=3), respectively. For all sample, (234U/238U) lies within 0.7% of unity, suggesting that secondary alteration by seawater has not disturbed the U-series data significantly. Sample ages for these submarine erupted samples are unknown, resulting in uncertain values for initial (226Ra/230Th); however, 10 out of 12 of the measured (226Ra/230Th) range between 3.16 and 1.13 and are thus unequivocally young with respect to decay of 230Th and 231Pa since eruption. The U (0.535 - 4.876 ppm) and Th (1.25 - 10.78 ppm) concentrations increase with SiO2 contents. (230Th/232Th) has a restricted range, varying from 0.994 to 1.093 with the exception of one sample. (230Th/238U) ranges from 0.684 to 0.875 while (231Pa/235U) ranges from 1.76 up to 2.84, among the highest 231Pa excess in island arcs yet reported. These data confirm previous observations of the unusual behavior of KEJ lavas relative to global observations in having both large 238U and 231Pa excesses. Combined with (226Ra/230Th), these disequilibria observations require that 238U excesses reflect more than solely fluid addition to the mantle wedge from the subducted oceanic slab.

  15. Formation of Island Arc-Trench System due to Plate Subduction on the Basis of Elastic Dislocation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukahata, Y.; Matsu'ura, M.

    2015-12-01

    The most conspicuous cumulative deformation in subduction zones is the formation of island arc-trench system. A pair of anomalies in topography and free-air gravity, high in the arc and low around the trench, is observed without exceptions all over the world. Since the 1960s, elastic dislocation theory has been widely used to interpret coseismic crustal deformation. For the modeling of longer-term crustal deformation, it is necessary to consider viscoelastic properties of the asthenosphere. By simply applying elastic-viscoelastic dislocation theory to plate subduction, Matsu'ura and Sato (1989, GJI) have shown that some crustal deformation remains after the completion of one earthquake cycle, which means that crustal deformation accumulates with time in a long term due to plate subduction. In fact, by constructing a plate interface model in and around Japan, Hashimoto, Fukui and Matsu'ura (2004, PAGEOPH) have demonstrated that the computed vertical displacements due to steady plate subduction well explain the observed free-air gravity anomaly pattern. Recently, we got a lucid explanation of crustal deformation due to plate subduction. In subduction zones, oceanic plates bend and descend into the mantle. Because the bending of oceanic plates is usually not spontaneous, there exists kinematic interaction between the oceanic and overriding plates, which causes cumulative deformation of the overriding plate. This may be understood based on the law of action and reaction: one is bending of an oceanic plate and the other is deformation of the overriding plate. As a special case, it is useful to consider plate subduction along a part of true circle. In this case, crustal deformation due to steady subduction is solely caused by the effect of gravity, because dislocation along a circle does not cause any intrinsic internal deformation. When an oceanic plate is descending along an arcuate plate interface from the right-hand side, according to dislocation theory, the oceanic

  16. Low-temperature thermochronometric data from the Japanese Islands and preliminary report on (U-Th)/He ages across NE Japan Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagami, T.; Sueoka, S.; Kohn, B. P.; Fukuda, S.

    2015-12-01

    A paradox of the deformation pattern in the NE Japan Arc is that the short-term (<102 years) deformation observed by geodetic techniques and the long-term (>104 years) deformation estimated from geomorphic and geologic evidence are different in both rate and/or direction. It has been proposed that elastic deformation released by a megathrust earthquake along the Japanese Trench, could resolve this paradox. However, co-seismic and post-seismic deformation associated with the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (Mw9.0) has not compensated for the misfit. To understand the physical properties of the crust and mechanism of strain accumulation and release in the NE Japan Arc, more careful and detailed comparisons of deformation using various timescales and methods may provide a fundamental clue. For estimating long-term vertical deformation rates of NE Japan Arc, we performed 1) a compilation of previous low-temperature thermochronometric data in the Japanese Islands and 2) apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He (AHe and ZHe) thermochronometric analyses on the late Cretaceous and Paleogene granitoids across the NE Japan Arc. Both the previous fission-track (FT) and newly obtained AHe ages indicate an obvious contrast in cooling/denudation histories between the fore-arc and back-arc sides of the NE Japan Arc. FT ages of 100-46 Ma and AHe ages of 59-50 Ma in the Abukuma Mountains in the fore-arc side indicate relatively slow cooling/denudation and a stable tectonic setting during the Cenozoic. On the other hand, younger apatite FT ages of 6.1 and 4.6 Ma and AHe ages of 11-1.5 Ma in the Ou Backbone range, Iide-Asahi Mountains, and Echigo Mountains in the back-arc side may reflect rapid cooling/denudation since the latest Miocene or late Pliocene. ZHe ages in the back-arc side range between 54-11 Ma, which is generally consistent with their coexisting AHe ages considering the difference in their closure temperatures.

  17. Petrology of Early Miocene volcanic rocks from Okushiri Island, Japan: geochemical characteristics of lithospheric mantle beneath the back-arc side of the NE Japan arc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Shuto, K.; Ishimoto, H.; Yagi, M.; Takazawa, E.

    2004-12-01

    The Sr and Nd isotopic studies on Tertiary to Quaternary basaltic rocks of the NE Japan arc have shown that isotopic characteristics of basaltic rocks found on the back-arc side of the NE Japan arc changed drastically from an undepleted isotopic signature (initial 87Sr/86Sr (SrI)=0.7040-0.7060 and initial 143Nd/144Nd (NdI)=0.51260-0.51284) to a depleted isotopic signature (SrI=0.7030-0.7040 and NdI=0.70284-0.51308) at around 15 Ma (Shuto et., 2004). This feature may have resulted from changes around 15 Ma in the isotopic compositions of the magma source beneath the back-arc side in the NE Japan arc due to the thinning of the undepleted subcontinental lithospheric mantle by upwelling of depleted asthenospheric mantle material during the opening of Japan Sea. Based on major and trace element data as well as SrI and NdI values for Early Miocene basaltic rocks from the back-arc side of the NE Japan arc, we examined geochemical characterization of the magma source (lithospheric mantle) for these basaltic rocks. Early Miocene (23-18 Ma) basalts and associated more felsic volcanic rocks form seven volcanic fields (Okushiri Is., Matsumae Pen., Fukaura, Oga Pen., Honjo, Atsumi and Sado Is.) delineating a 500 km-long array in the back-arc side of the NE Japan arc. In terms of major, trace element and Nd isotopic compositions, two groups of Early Miocene basalts can be distinguished. Group 1 is composed of tholeiitic basalts and alkali basalts, and is characterized by high TiO2 contents (1.5-2.5 %) and high (La/Yb)n ratios (>5.5), and high Zr/Y ratios (>6). These samples show the chondrite-normalized LREE-enriched patterns and have NdI values ranging from 0.51259 to 0.51282. Group 2 is composed of tholeiitic basalts, and is different from Group 1 by lower TiO2 contents (<1.5 %), lower (La/Yb)n ratios (<5) and lower Zr/Y ratios (<5.5). These samples show modelately LREE-enriched patterns and have NdI values ranging from 0.51250 to 0.51278. In contrast, Middle Miocene (after 15

  18. Tectonic significance of large-scale chaotic deposits in a Cretaceous fore-arc basin: Valle Formation, Cedros Island (Mexico)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.P.; Busby-Spera, C.J. )

    1990-05-01

    A mappable, deep-marine slide deposit (olistostrome) within medial-Cretaceous fore-arc basin strata (Valle Formation), located on Cedros Island, Baja California Norte, records the initiation of intrabasinal faulting. Studies of both modern and ancient olistostromes show that olistostromes can form in all physiographic provinces (including shelf and abyssal plain) and tectonic settings of the marine environment. A variety of triggering mechanisms have been suggested for olistostromes, including tectonism, sea level changes, diapirism, rapid sedimentation that overloads steep slopes, migration of gas hydrates, or combinations of the above. The olistostrome in the Valle Formation ranges in thickness from 0 to at least 180 m, and extends areally for at least 34 km{sup 2}. It can be divided into two parts. The basal 30-40 m contains large (up to 8 m) angular blocks (allolistoliths) derived from the Jurassic substrate. The allolistoliths decrease in abundance upsection, whereas internally coherent intraformational slide blocks (endolistoliths), which reach tens of meters in width, increase. Beds composing the endolistoliths are alternating mudstone and sandstone turbidites that were deposited on a tectonically stable basin plain or rise setting before catastrophic failure of the sedimentary pile produced the olistostrome. Intrabasinal faulting is invoked as a cause of the sediment failure because of the presence of allolistoliths, which must have been shed into the basin from uplifted( ) basin floor scarps. Allolistoliths occur sporadically throughout at least 400 m of coarse-clastic sediment gravity-flow deposits that cap the olistostrome, suggesting that intrabasinal faulting continued to affect the basin long after the olistrostrome formed.

  19. Segmented Coastal Uplift Along an Erosional Subduction Margin, Northern Hikurangi Fore Arc, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. S.; Litchfield, N. J.; Berryman, K. R.; Clark, K.; Cochran, U. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Hikurangi subduction margin along North Island, New Zealand accommodates oblique convergence of the Pacific plate westward beneath the Australian plate at 45 mm/yr. Along the southern margin, frontal accretion and pronounced forearc uplift occur inboard of the subducting Hikurangi plateau. In the north, subduction erosion and segmented uplift occur inboard of subducting seamounts along the plateau flank. Prior workers have established a robust foundation for coastal terrace studies along the northern Hikurangi margin (e.g., Berryman et al., 1989; Ota et al., 1992; Berryman, 1993; Wilson et al., 2006, 2007; Clark et al., 2010; Litchfield et al, 2007, 2010). New field observations presented here provide additional constraints on terrace uplift along this erosional subduction margin. Along Raukumara Peninsula (north of Poverty Bay), multiple Holocene to late Pleistocene marine and fluvial terraces occur at varying elevations, recording differential uplift across six coastal segments from Gisborne to East Cape (Ota et al., 1992; Wilson et al., 2007). In this study, two to three late Pleistocene terraces were observed on rocky headlands within the first segment (Gisborne to Whangara) at elevations of 80-185 m above msl. Preliminary correlation with OIS 5a-e sea level high stands (80-125 ka) indicates net uplift at 1.2-1.5 m/ky. Uplifted Holocene wavecut platforms occur in steps along the seaward edge of these terraces, consistent with coseismic uplift. At Makorori Point, an uplifted bench occurs along the modern seacliff at 2.3 m above the cliff base. A fossil gastropod shell from paleo-beach gravels on the platform inner edge yielded a calibrated radiocarbon age of 1680 ×110 ybp. At Turihaua Point, a ≥1 m thick deposit of Holocene beach sands overlies an uplifted wavecut platform at ≥1.5 m above mean sea level. Carbonate-cemented beachrock at the base of the sand deposit yields a calibrated radiocarbon age of 2990 ×70 ybp. At Mahia Peninsula (between Poverty

  20. Island of Okinawa, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The island of Okinawa, (26.5N, 128.0E) largest of the Ryukyu Islands, Japan. The Ryukyu island group lies south of the main home islands of Japan in an arc towards the Chinese island Republic of Taiwan. As is typical throughout the Japanese home islands, intense urban development can be observed all over the island in this near vertical view.

  1. Numerical Tsunami Hazard Assessment of the Only Active Lesser Antilles Arc Submarine Volcano: Kick 'em Jenny.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dondin, F. J. Y.; Dorville, J. F. M.; Robertson, R. E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Lesser Antilles Volcanic Arc has potentially been hit by prehistorical regional tsunamis generated by voluminous volcanic landslides (volume > 1 km3) among the 53 events recognized so far. No field evidence of these tsunamis are found in the vincity of the sources. Such a scenario taking place nowadays would trigger hazardous tsunami waves bearing potentially catastrophic consequences for the closest islands and regional offshore oil platforms.Here we applied a complete hazard assessment method on the only active submarine volcano of the arc Kick 'em Jenny (KeJ). KeJ is the southernmost edifice with recognized associated volcanic landslide deposits. From the three identified landslide episodes one is associated with a collapse volume ca. 4.4 km3. Numerical simulations considering a single pulse collapse revealed that this episode would have produced a regional tsunami. An edifice current volume estimate is ca. 1.5 km3.Previous study exists in relationship to assessment of regional tsunami hazard related to shoreline surface elevation (run-up) in the case of a potential flank collapse scenario at KeJ. However this assessment was based on inferred volume of collapse material. We aim to firstly quantify potential initial volumes of collapse material using relative slope instability analysis (RSIA); secondly to assess first order run-ups and maximum inland inundation distance for Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago, i.e. two important economic centers of the Lesser Antilles. In this framework we present for seven geomechanical models tested in the RSIA step maps of critical failure surface associated with factor of stability (Fs) for twelve sectors of 30° each; then we introduce maps of expected potential run-ups (run-up × the probability of failure at a sector) at the shoreline.The RSIA evaluates critical potential failure surface associated with Fs <1 as compared to areas of deficit/surplus of mass/volume identified on the volcanic edifice using (VolcanoFit 2

  2. Geology and geochemistry of the Izu-Bonin fore-arc region: Results from ODP Leg 26 and the Bonin Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.N.; Nesbitt, R.W. )

    1990-06-01

    One of the main aims of ODP Leg 126 was to investigate the origin, composition, and evolution of the Izu-Bonin fore-arc region. To achieve this, three drill sites were targeted in the hitherto uninvestigated intraoceanic fore-arc basin. Of these, Holes 792E and 793B reached basement, the latter being the deepest DSDP or ODP hole to do so. Hole 792E was located on a frontal arc promontory and drilled through a sequence of arc lavas with calc-alkaline affinities. The deep Hole 793B drilled the center of the fore-arc basin and drilled 280 m of volcanic basement overlain by late Oligocene turbidites. The basement consists of intercalated heterolithic/hyaloclastitic breccias and basaltic andesite flows. Geochemically these lavas have boninitic affinities, with low Ti/Zr and Y/Zr ratios akin to the type locality lavas from the Bonin Islands. A comprehensive study of the boninites from Chich Jima, located on the fore-arc high, has revealed that these lavas are geochemically diverse. A wide range of trace element and isotopic compositions are recognized, which represent combinations of variably depleted mantle and incompatible element enriched component(s). It is clear from the Hole 793B basement that these ingredients of depleted source and enriched additions occurred not only in the mantle wedge closest to the trench, but also beneath the region that is now the forearc basin. In addition, the boninitic signature prevailed in the forearc region from the middle Eocene at least through to late Oligocene times.

  3. Tectonics and petroleum potential of sedimentary basins in the Bering, Okhotsk, Japan seas, and island arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, L.E. )

    1993-09-01

    In this vast region located in the northwestern part of the Pacific rim, basins of two main genetic types possess petroleum potential. These two types are represented by basins of the recent active margin and basins of the transitional zone between analogs of the passive margin and the recent active margin. For basins of the active margin, the mean density of potential resources is estimated at 5000 MT/km[sup 2] or more. The total area of these basins is 324,000 km[sup 2] among which 120,000 km[sup 2] are in the Russian sector. Ultimate resources of hydrocarbons are estimated at 1.62 billing MT of oil equivalent. Basins of the zone, transitional from analogs of the passive margin to the recent active margin, are characterized by a number of factors favorable for petroleum occurrence. One of the important factors is the presence of rift trough and foredeeps that are potential sites for zones of oil and gas accumulation. The age of the rifts varies from the late Cretaceous through the Oligocene-Miocene in the Olyutorsky and Litke basins, to the Neogene in the Okhotsk Sea and Tatar-Japan basins. Only a small area of the rifts has been proven to contain zones of oil and gas accumulation. Based on the structural characteristics, the rifts are subdivided into oil-gas bearing, potentially oil-gas bearing, and nonprospective for hydrocarbon exploration. Potential hydrocarbon resources of basins of this type are estimated to be not less than 15.12 billion MT of oil equivalent including 9.2 billion MT in the Russian sector. New large zones of oil and gas accumulation are expected to be found both on the shallow shelf and in some deep-water basins such as in the Aleutian and Kuril basins.

  4. Evidence for Hydrous Metasomatism and Slab Melting in the Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni Island Arc, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watford, A.; Chadwick, J.; Kamenov, G. D.; Foster, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Tabar-Lihir-Tanga-Feni (TLTF) island arc is located 35-75 km from the northeast Pacific coast of New Ireland Island in Papua New Guinea. These volcanoes are in an extending former forearc region of the inactive Manus-Kilinailau subduction zone, at the boundary between the Pacific and Indo-Australian Plates [1]. Volcanism shifted from New Ireland to the TLTF when Pacific Plate subduction stalled there in the Miocene, when the Ontong Java Plateau impinged on the trench [1, 2]. Fresh volcanic rocks dredged from Tubaf seamount near Lihir island in 2000 (Australian CSIRO Project SHAARC) contain abundant ultramafic xenoliths, making it one of the few locations on Earth where they can be found in a subduction setting. Several xenoliths (2-3 cm in size) and their host lavas from two dredges have been analyzed in this geochemical and petrographic study. Host lavas and xenoliths were mechanically separated, and portions of each were examined for bulk major and some trace elements using X-ray fluorescence, a suite of 29 trace elements was analyzed in the host lavas using ICP-MS, and the chemistry of individual xenolith minerals was evaluated using an electron microprobe. Olivine, ortho- and clinopyroxene crystals in the xenoliths are up to 1 mm in size, and these are crosscut by veins containing smaller crystals of pyroxene, phlogopite, and amphibole, as well as glass and open voids. These veins were previously shown to be evidence of dissolution of primary minerals to form the secondary phases via hydrous metasomatism by fluids from the subducted Pacific slab [2, 3]. The primary olivines in xenoliths have homogenous compositions both within and among the samples (e.g. olivine Mg# 80.03 - 82.42; n=22), but pyroxenes show somewhat more variation (e.g. cpx Mg# 84.33 - 89.21; n=23), with low outliers consistently near and within the metasomatic veins. The host lavas are vesicular, alkali-rich trachybasalts and trachyandesites with abundant phlogopite and amphibole

  5. A LA-ICP-MS study of minerals in the Rocche Rosse magmatic enclaves: Evidence of a mafic input triggering the latest silicic eruption of Lipari Island (Aeolian Arc, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davì, Marcella; De Rosa, Rosanna; Barca, Donatella

    2009-05-01

    The volcanic products of Lipari Island (Aeolian Arc, Italy) younger than 10 ka are mostly aphyric rhyolitic pumices and obsidians emitted during unusual strombolian-type eruptions, which ended with the emplacement of lava flows. The last volcanic activity on the island dates back to 1230 ± 40 AD, with the extrusion of Rocche Rosse (RR) obsidian lava flow. Recently, mafic enclaves of latitic to trachytic composition have been identified and an evolution process between these enclaves and the rhyolitic magma has been documented in detail [Davì, M., 2007. The Rocche Rosse rhyolitic lava flow (Lipari, Aeolian Islands): magmatological and volcanological aspects. Plinius, supplement to the European Journal of Mineralogy 33, 1-8]. In this work textural and trace-element investigation of mineral phases of the RR enclaves, such as crystals of clinopyroxene, olivine, plagioclase, alkali-feldspar and biotite, was carried out to delineate the most recent feeding system of the island, since such a reconstruction could be significant in terms of hazard forecasting. The results indicate that most of the mineral phases are reversely or oscillatory zoned with respect to both major and trace elements, suggesting an early crystallization under low fO 2 conditions from melts of intermediate composition, followed by a later growth from a more mafic (presumably shoshonitic-basaltic) magma than that from which their cores crystallized. Crystals of magnesium-rich pyroxene and forsteritic-rich olivine are indicative of the presence of this shoshonitic basaltic magma. Based on microanalytical data, it is suggested here that the feeding system of recent Lipari volcanic activity was characterized by a shoshonitic-basaltic magma originating from a deep reservoir, which may have evolved and stopped in the crust, generating zoned magma chambers at different depths, in which latitic and rhyolitic magmas reside. The sudden arrival of a new input of mafic melt may have interacted with these

  6. Cold-front driven storm erosion and overwash in the central part of the Isles Dernieres, a Louisiana barrier-island arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingler, J.R.; Reiss, T.E.

    1990-01-01

    Tropical and extratropical storms produce significant erosion on the barrier islands of Louisiana. Over the past 100 years, such storms have produced at least 2 km of northward beach-face retreat and the loss of 63% of the surface area of the Isles Dernieres, a low-lying barrier-island arc along the central Louisiana coast. Elevations on the islands within the arc are typically less than 2 m above mean sea level. The islands typically have a washover-flat topography with occasional, poorly developed, dune-terrace topography consisting of low-lying and broken dunes. The central part of the arc consists of salt-marsh deposits overlain by washover sands along the Gulf of Mexico shoreline. Sand thicknesses range from zero behind the beach, to less than 2 m under the berm crest, and back to zero in the first nearshore trough. The sand veneer is sufficiently thin that storms can strip all the sand from the beach face, exposing the underlying marsh deposits. The geomorphic changes produced by cold fronts, a type of extratropical storm that commonly affect the Isles Dernieres between late fall and early spring are described. Between August 1986 and September 1987, repeated surveys along eleven shore-normal transects that covered 400 m of shoreline revealed the timing and extent of cold-front-produced beach change along a typical section of the central Isles Dernieres. During the study period, the beach face retreated approximately 20 m during the cold-front season but did not rebuild during the subsequent summer. Because the volume of sand deposited on the backshore (5600 m3) was less than the volume of material lost from the beach face (19,200 m3), approximately 13,600 m3 of material disappeared. Assuming that underlying marsh deposits decrease in volume in direct proportion to the amount of beach-face retreat, an estimate of the mud loss during the study period is 14,000 m3. Thus, the decrease in volume along the profiles can be accounted for without removing any sand

  7. Igneous history of the Koyukuk terrane, western Alaska: constraints on the origin, evolution, and ultimate collision of an accreted island arc terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Box, S.E.; Patton, W.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Koyukuk terrane consists of volcanic, volcaniclastic, and plutonic rocks which range from Late Paleozoic to Early Cretaceous in age. The terrane crops out in a U-shaped belt which is roughly paralleled by outer belts of ultramafic rocks, oceanic plate basalts and cherts, and retrograded blueschist facies rocks of continental protolith. These rocks have been interpreted as components of a volcanic arc terrane that collided with the North American continental margin in Early Cretaceous time. The Koyukuk terrane consists of four time-stratigraphic units: (1) pre-Middle Jurassic basalts, (2) Middle and Late Jurassic granitic rocks, (3) lower Lower Cretaceous volcanic rocks, and (4) upper Lower Cretaceous volcanic rocks. Limited chemical data from the basalts of unit 1 indicate that they were erupted in a nonarc tectonic environment, possibly in an oceanic island or back arc setting. Units, 2, 3, and 4 have the characteristics of subduction-related volcanic rocks. -from Authors

  8. Linear volcanic segments in the Sunda Arc, Indonesia: Implications for arc lithosphere control upon volcano distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, C. G.; Pacey, A.; McCaffrey, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    The overall curvature of many subduction zones is immediately apparent and the term island arc betrays the common assumption that subduction zone magmatism occurs in curved zones. This assumption can be expressed by approximating island arcs as segments of small circles on the surface of a sphere. Such treatments predict that the location of arc volcanoes is related to their vertical separation from the slab (in fact, the depth to seismicity in the slab) and require that the primary control on the locus of magmatism lies either within the subducted slab or the mantle wedge that separates the subducted and overriding lithospheric plates. The concept of curved arcs ignores longstanding observations that magmatism in many subduction systems occurs as segments of linearly arranged volcanic centres. Further evidence for this distribution comes from the close relationship between magmatism and large scale, arc-parallel fabrics in some arcs. Similarly, exposures of deep arc crust or mantle often reveal elongation of magmatic intrusions sub-parallel to the inferred trend of the arc. The Sunda Arc forms the Indonesian islands from Sumatra to Alor and provides an important test for models of volcano distribution for several reasons. First, Sunda has hosted abundant historic volcanic activity. Second, with the notable exception of Krakatau, every volcano in the arc is subaerial from base to cone and, therefore, can be readily identified where there is a suitable extent of local mapping that can be used to ground-truth satellite imagery. Third, there are significant changes in the stress regime along the length of the arc, allowing the influence of the upper plate to be evaluated by comparison of different arc segments. Finally, much of the Sunda Arc has proved difficult to accommodate in models that try to relate volcano distribution to the depth to the subducted slab. We apply an objective line-fitting protocol; the Hough Transform, to explore the distribution of volcanoes

  9. Regional setting and characteristics of the Neoproterozoic Wadi Hamama Zn-Cu-Ag-Au prospect: evidence for an intra-oceanic island arc-hosted volcanogenic hydrothermal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Rahman, Yasser; Surour, Adel A.; El-Manawi, Abdel Hamid W.; El-Dougdoug, Abdel-Monem A.; Omar, Sayed

    2015-04-01

    The Wadi Hamama area is a volcanogenic Zn-Cu-Au-Ag prospect. It is hosted by a Neoproterozoic bimodal-mafic sequence, which comprises basalt, dacite and rhyolite along with volcaniclastic rocks. The rocks have a low-K tholeiitic affinity and are enriched in large ion lithophile elements over high field strength elements, which indicated their formation in an intra-oceanic island arc tectonic setting. The area was intruded by a tonalite-trondhjemite body, which has an intra-oceanic island arc affinity and later by diorite, which has a cordilleran-margin geochemical affinity. These rock units were intruded by post-tectonic granite dykes, which have a within-plate geochemical signature. There is a quartz-carbonate horizon extending along the contact between the basalt and the volcaniclastic rocks, mainly banded and lapilli tuffs. This horizon is of exhalative origin and is underlain by a mushroom-shaped alteration zone extending from the horizon down to the massive basalt. The footwall alteration is characterized by a silica-rich core surrounded by a thick chlorite sheath. Both the quartz-carbonate horizon and the footwall-altered rocks enclose historical trenches and pits. Sulfide-rich core samples are enriched in Zn, relative to Cu, and in Ag, which indicates the low-temperature nature of the hydrothermal system. The prospect was affected by supergene processes, which led to the widespread occurrence of secondary copper minerals and gold enrichment relative to the leached base metals, especially Zn. The prospect formed through a limited rifting of an intra-oceanic island arc which resulted in the formation of a small-scale volcanogenic Zn-Cu-Ag-Au prospect.

  10. Detrital chrome spinel evidence for a Neotethyan intra-oceanic island arc collision with India in the Paleocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Alan T.; Aitchison, Jonathan C.; Ali, Jason R.; Chan, Jacky Sik-Lap; Chan, Gavin Heung Ngai

    2016-10-01

    Models that support a single collision scenario for India and Eurasia are incompatible with the evidence that an intra-oceanic island arc (IOIA) existed within the Neotethyan Ocean. Understanding the spatial and temporal extent of any IOIA is crucial for India-Eurasia collision studies as the entire ocean, including any intra-oceanic features, must have been consumed or emplaced prior to continental collision. Here, we review what is known about the Neotethyan IOIA and report evidence from sedimentary successions in NW India and southern Tibet to constrain when and where it was emplaced. We use detrital mineral geochemistry and supporting provenance and age data to identify the source of the sediments and compare the timing of erosion of IOIA-derived material in both regions. Detrital chrome spinels, extracted from distinct sedimentary horizons in southern Tibet (Sangdanlin) and NW India (Ladakh), exhibit similar average geochemical values (TiO2 = 0.09 and 0.24%, Cr# = 0.66 and 0.68 and Mg# = 0.45 and 0.53, respectively) and supra-subduction zone (SSZ), forearc peridotite signatures. Furthermore, they overlap with in-situ chrome spinels reported from the Spongtang Ophiolite in NW India and the Sangsang Ophiolite in southern Tibet. As with many of the ophiolitic remnants that crop out in and adjacent to the Yarlung-Tsangpo and Indus suture zones (YTSZ and ISZ respectively), the Spongtang and Sangsang ophiolites formed in an IOIA setting. Linking the source of the detrital chrome spinels to those analysed from remnant IOIA massifs in the YTSZ and ISZ is strong evidence for the emplacement of the IOIA onto the Indian margin. The timing of the IOIA collision with India is constrained by the depositional ages of the chrome spinel-bearing sediments to the end of the Paleocene (Thanetian) in southern Tibet and the Early Eocene in NW India. This indirectly provides a maximum age constraint of Late Paleocene-Early Eocene for intercontinental collision between India and

  11. Investigation of the Influence of the Amlia Fracture Zone on the Islands of Four Mountains Region of the Aleutian Arc, AK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaysen, K. P.; Myers, J. D.; Weis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Regional isotopic and trace element investigations of the magmatic source characteristics of the Aleutian arc have attributed regional patterns to variations in the contribution of eclogite through slab melting, to increased proportions of sediment melts, and to variation in the amount of fluid derived by progressive metamorphism of the downgoing slab. Currently the Amlia Fracture Zone (AFZ) is located between the islands of Atka and Seguam and marks a prominent boundary between subduction of large quantities of trench sediments to the east versus sediment impoverished subduction to the west of the AFZ. This boundary is not stationary through time. Instead oblique subduction of the Pacific plate moves the AFZ westward along the arc front, causing sequential subduction beneath the islands of Chuginadak, Yunaska and Seguam circa 5, 2.5 and 1 million years ago, respectively. Lavas from Atka Island, which has not yet received the sediment and fluid spike from the AFZ, act as reference compositions. Comparison of bulk rock trace element ratios and Sr, Nd, Hf, and Pb isotopic compositions for lavas from these islands relative to Atka show that contributions from melted subducted sediment are important in the genesis of Holocene and Pleistocene lavas erupted in the Islands of Four Mountains region of the arc. Sr and Pb isotopic compositions for Yunaska and Chuginadak lavas are as high or higher than Seguam values and trend in the direction of sediment values. La/Nb ratios similarly indicate sediment melting is important for all these lavas. Comparison of values for Holocene relative to Pleistocene values indicate that once sediments are introduced to the magma source, they persist in affecting magma compositions. Comparison of higher Mg# lavas (molar Mg#>50) shows that a group of the oldest sampled lavas on Chuginadak have much lower 208Pb/204Pb, 206Pb/204Pb, and 87Sr/86Sr and higher 143Nd/144Nd, Zr/Y and Zn/Mn relative to all sampled Holocene and Pleistocene lavas from

  12. The deep crust beneath island arcs: Inherited zircons reveal a Gondwana continental fragment beneath East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, H. R.; Hamilton, P. J.; Hall, R.; Kinny, P. D.

    2007-06-01

    Inherited zircons in Cenozoic sedimentary and igneous rocks of East Java range in age from Archean to Cenozoic. The distribution of zircons reveals two different basement types at depth. The igneous rocks of the Early Cenozoic arc, found along the southeast coast, contain only Archean to Cambrian zircons. In contrast, clastic rocks of north and west of East Java contain Cretaceous zircons, which are not found in the arc rocks to the south. The presence of Cretaceous zircons supports previous interpretations that much of East Java is underlain by arc and ophiolitic rocks, accreted to the Southeast Asian margin during Cretaceous subduction. However, such accreted material cannot account for the older zircons. The age populations of Archean to Cambrian zircons in the arc rocks are similar to Gondwana crust. We interpret the East Java Early Cenozoic arc to be underlain by a continental fragment of Gondwana origin and not Cretaceous material as previously suggested. Melts rising through the crust, feeding the Early Cenozoic arc, picked up the ancient zircons through assimilation or partial melting. We suggest a Western Australian origin for the fragment, which rifted from Australia during the Mesozoic and collided with Southeast Asia, resulting in the termination of Cretaceous subduction. Continental crust was therefore present at depth beneath the arc in south Java when Cenozoic subduction began in the Eocene.

  13. The relationship between eruptive activity, flank collapse, and sea level at volcanic islands: A long-term (>1 Ma) record offshore Montserrat, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussens, Maya; Wall-Palmer, Deborah; Talling, Peter. J.; Watt, Sebastian. F. L.; Cassidy, Michael; Jutzeler, Martin; Clare, Michael A.; Hunt, James. E.; Manga, Michael; Gernon, Thomas. M.; Palmer, Martin. R.; Hatter, Stuart. J.; Boudon, Georges; Endo, Daisuke; Fujinawa, Akihiko; Hatfield, Robert; Hornbach, Matthew. J.; Ishizuka, Osamu; Kataoka, Kyoko; Le Friant, Anne; Maeno, Fukashi; McCanta, Molly; Stinton, Adam. J.

    2016-07-01

    Hole U1395B, drilled southeast of Montserrat during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 340, provides a long (>1 Ma) and detailed record of eruptive and mass-wasting events (>130 discrete events). This record can be used to explore the temporal evolution in volcanic activity and landslides at an arc volcano. Analysis of tephra fall and volcaniclastic turbidite deposits in the drill cores reveals three heightened periods of volcanic activity on the island of Montserrat (˜930 to ˜900 ka, ˜810 to ˜760 ka, and ˜190 to ˜120 ka) that coincide with periods of increased volcano instability and mass-wasting. The youngest of these periods marks the peak in activity at the Soufrière Hills volcano. The largest flank collapse of this volcano (˜130 ka) occurred toward the end of this period, and two younger landslides also occurred during a period of relatively elevated volcanism. These three landslides represent the only large (>0.3 km3) flank collapses of the Soufrière Hills edifice, and their timing also coincides with periods of rapid sea level rise (>5 m/ka). Available age data from other island arc volcanoes suggest a general correlation between the timing of large landslides and periods of rapid sea level rise, but this is not observed for volcanoes in intraplate ocean settings. We thus infer that rapid sea level rise may modulate the timing of collapse at island arc volcanoes, but not in larger ocean-island settings.

  14. Rebalancing risk management--Part 2: The Active Risk Control (ARC) Toolkit.

    PubMed

    Card, Alan J; Ward, James R; Clarkson, P John

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of systems-focused risk assessment techniques has not led to measurable improvement in the rate of patient harm. Why? In part, because these tools focus solely on understanding problems and provide no direct support for designing and managing solutions (ie, risk control). This second installment of a 2-part series on rebalancing risk management describes a structured approach to bridging this gap: The Active Risk Control (ARC) Toolkit. A pilot study is presented to show how the ARC Toolkit can improve the quality of risk management practice.

  15. Rifting process of the Izu-Ogasawara-Mariana arc-backarc system inferred from active source seismic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Kodaira, S.; Miura, S.; Sato, T.; Yamashita, M.; No, T.; Takizawa, K.; Kaiho, Y.; Kaneda, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Izu-Ogasawara-Mariana (IBM) arc-backarc system has continued the crustal growth through crustal thickening by magmatic activities and crustal thinning by backarc opening. Tatsumi et al (2008) proposed petrological crustal growth model started from basaltic magmas rising from the slab, and showed the consistency with the seismic velocity model. Although crustal growth by the crustal thickening are modeled, crustal structural change by the backarc opening are not still unknown yet. The Shikoku Basin and Parece Vela Basin were formed by the backarc opening during approximately 15-30 Ma. Since 6 Ma, the Mariana Trough has opened and the stage already moved to spreading process from rifting process. In the northern Izu-Ogasawara arc, the Sumisu rift is in the initial rifting stage. Therefore, understanding of the crustal change by the backarc opening from rifting to spreading is indispensable to know the crustal growth of whole Izu-Ogasawara-Mariana island arc. Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) has carried out seismic studies using a multichannel reflection survey system and ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) around the IBM arc since 2003 (Takahashi et al., 2007; Kodaira et al., 2007; Takahashi et al., 2008; Kodaira et al., 2008). We already obtained eight P-wave velocity models across the IBM arc and these structures record the crustal structural change during the backarc opening process from the rifting stage to the spreading stage. As the results, we identified characteristics of the crustal structural change accompanied with backarc opening as follows. (1) Beneath the initial rifting stage without normal faults, for example, in the northern tip of the Mariana Trough, crustal thickening are identified. (2) Beneath the initial rifting stage with normal faults, for example, in the Sumisu Rift, the crustal thickness is almost similar to that beneath the volcanic front. Although an existence of the crust-mantle transition layer with

  16. Observations of Flatfish "Spas" From Three Hydrothermally Active Seamounts in the Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dower, J.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Tyler, J.; Juniper, K.; Stevens, C.; Kouris, A.; Takano, B.

    2006-12-01

    During a cruise to the Mariana Islands in spring 2004, dense aggregations of small flatfish were recorded from areas of diffuse flow on two hydrothermally active seamounts known as Kasuga-2 and Daikoku. This is quite novel, as flatfish are not known to be part of vent faunas elsewhere. Based on a single specimen, it was determined to be a new species of tonguefish in the genus Symphurus, and is currently under description. In October 2005, we returned to the Mariana Arc and collected about 60 specimens from Kasuga-2, Daikoku, and a third site, Nikko Seamount. Interestingly, the Nikko specimens were about twice as large as the flatfish from Kasuga-2 and Daikoku. Current molecular work (using the Barcode of Life Data System) will determine the relationship among these populations, and verify whether they are the same species. Under the microscope, the sandy sediments from the flatfish habitat were found to be full of tiny nematodes and polychaete worms. Our current hypothesis is that the fish are feeding on both and, thus, are ultimately supported by chemosynthesis, since the worms likely feed on bacteria in the sediments. However, during our most recent cruise in May 2006, we also observed several instances in which dead (or nearly dead) mid-water fish and shrimp fell out of the water column onto the bottom, after which they were almost immediately fed upon by the flatfish. This suggests that there may also be an additional energy subsidy to the seamount benthos from the water column. We hypothesize that sulfite (or some other toxic chemical) in the plume overlying these active volcanoes either kills or anesthetizes small pelagics that get advected over the seamount summit while feeding in near-surface waters at night. Stable isotope and lipid analysis of samples from these "fish spas" are currently underway to establish trophic relationships. We hope to use otolith microstructure analyses to quantify individual growth trajectories and population age structure of

  17. Water content, δD and δ11B tracking in the Vanuatu arc magmas (Aoba Island): Insights from olivine-hosted melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métrich, Nicole; Deloule, Etienne

    2014-10-01

    Ion microprobe measurements of H and B isotopic ratios and H2O, B and trace element contents are reported here for a series of melt inclusions typical of alkaline basalts of Aoba Island in the central part of Vanuatu arc (Southwestern Pacific). The melt inclusions, hosted in olivine Fo86-90, display large ranges in trace element concentrations and hydrogen (δD from - 48.2 to + 61.7‰) and boron (δ11B from - 11.9 to + 6.4‰) isotopic compositions. The high deuterium enrichment (δD ≥ 0‰) observed in a small subset of melt inclusions requires a proton diffusion loss through the olivine network, in addition to late-stage magma interactions with aqueous saline fluids. These melt inclusions are therefore not considered as representative of the magma from which the olivine grew. In most melt inclusions, positive correlations between H2O, K2O, Ba and Sr lead us to determine the K2O/H2O (1.5 ± 0.2), H2O/Ba (46 ± 3 × 10- 4) and H2O/Sr (29 ± 2 × 10- 4) ratios of Aoba basalts. Overall correlations between δ11B, B/Nb, and B/Nd testify to the mixing between slab-derived fluids, preferentially enriched in δ11B and fluid mobile elements and a relatively depleted MORB-type mantle wedge beneath Aoba Island. Heavy δ11B (on average 5.4 ± 0.7‰) indicate slab-derived fluids, possibly involving serpentine, which would have a mean δD value of - 28.4 ± 7‰. The chemical and isotopic variability recorded by Aoba magmas (melt inclusions) is consistent with the geodynamic context of ridge-arc collision in the central segment of Vanuatu arc.

  18. Living on Active Volcanoes - The Island of Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heliker, Christina; Stauffer, Peter H.; Hendley, James W.

    1997-01-01

    People on the Island of Hawai'i face many hazards that come with living on or near active volcanoes. These include lava flows, explosive eruptions, volcanic smog, damaging earthquakes, and tsunamis (giant seawaves). As the population of the island grows, the task of reducing the risk from volcano hazards becomes increasingly difficult. To help protect lives and property, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory closely monitor and study Hawai'i's volcanoes and issue timely warnings of hazardous activity.

  19. Surface uplift history of the incipient Banda arc-continent collision: Geology and synorogenic foraminifera of Rote and Savu Islands, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roosmawati, Nova; Harris, Ron

    2009-12-01

    Field mapping and analysis of foraminifera from synorogenic pelagic units of Rote and Savu Islands, Indonesia reveals high rates of surface uplift of the incipient Banda arc-continent collision during the past 1.8 myr. New geological maps of these islands document accretion to the Banda forearc of Triassic through Tertiary sedimentary cover units from the down-going Australian continental margin. Foraminifera-rich synorogenic deposits of the Batu Putih Formation unconformably overlie these accreted units. We use paleodepth versus time estimates from benthic and planktic foraminifera's to measure long-term surface uplift rates for the accretionary wedge. Although strong currents in the region cause some problems with reworking, several distinctive species have been found. Synorogenic deposits in Savu and Rote yield foraminifer's of biozone Neogene (N) 18 to N22 (5.6-1.0 myr) that were deposited at estimated depths of around 3000 m. These deposits are unconfomrably overlain by uplifted coral terraces. The highest coral terraces in Savu are > 300 m above sea level and perhaps as old as 0.8 myr. In Rote the highest coral terrace is 200 above sea level and ~ 0.2 myr old. These data indicate that collision of the Australian continental margin with the Banda Arc, which initiated much earlier in Timor, has propagated westward towards Rote where it is in the initial stages of accretionary wedge emergence. Collision of the Scott Plateau propagated SE from Sumba (2-3 Ma) to Savu (1.0-0.5 Ma) and then to Rote (0.2 Ma). Average rates of surface uplift of the Batu Putih Formation pelagic deposits during the past 2 myr in Rote and Savu are ~ 1.5 and 2.3 mm/a, respectively. The rise of these islands is clogging the Indo-Pacific seaway.

  20. The Chimalpahad anorthosite Complex and associated basaltic amphibolites, Nellore Schist Belt, India: Magma chamber and roof of a Proterozoic island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharma Rao, C. V.; Windley, B. F.; Choudhary, A. K.

    2011-03-01

    New major and trace element data on the Proterozoic Chimalpahad layered anorthositic Complex and associated basaltic amphibolites of the Nellore Schist Belt of South India provide new constraints on their petrogenesis and geodynamic setting. The Complex consists of layered anorthosites, leucogabbros, gabbros, ultramafic rocks and is spatially associated with basaltic amphibolites. Despite deformation and metamorphism, primary cumulate textures and igneous layering are locally well preserved throughout the Complex. Whereas the amphibolites display diverse REE systematics, the Chimalpahad anorthositic-gabbroic rocks are characterized by moderately depleted to strongly enriched LREE patterns and by flat to depleted HREE patterns. The field relations, major and trace element compositions of the basaltic amphibolites suggest that they are petrogenetically related to the anorthositic-gabbroic rocks by fractional crystallization. The anorthositic rocks and the basaltic amphibolites share the depletion of Nb relative to Th and La on primitive mantle-normalized diagrams. They exhibit signatures of arc magmatic rocks, such as high LILE and LREE relative to the HFSE and HREE, as well as high Ba/Nb, Ba/Zr, Sr/Y, La/Yb ratios that mimic chondrite-normalized REE and primitive mantle-normalized trace element patterns of arc magmas. Similarly, on log-transformed tectonic discrimination diagrams, the Chimalpahad rocks plot within the field of Phanerozoic magmatic arcs, consistent with a subduction zone origin. On the basis of field relations and geochemical characteristics, the Chimalpahad Complex is interpreted as a fragment of a magma chamber of an island arc, which is tectonically juxtaposed against its original volcanic cover. A new preliminary Sm-Nd date of anorthosite from the Chimalpahad Complex indicates a model age of 1170 Ma.

  1. The Role of Philippine Sea Plate to the Genesis of Quaternary Magmas of Northern Kyushu Island, Japan, Inferred from Along-Arc Geochemical Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Itoh, J.; Ujike, O.; Miyoshi, M.; Takemura, K.

    2013-12-01

    Quaternary volcanoes on Kyushu Island comprise volcanoes Himeshima, Futagoyama, Yufu-Tsurumi, Kuju, Aso, Kirishima and Sakurajima from north to south alongstrike the volcanic front. Adakitic lavas are observed from Yufu-Tsurumi and Kuju volcanoes in northern Kyushu (Kita et al., 2001; Sugimoto et al., 2007), whereas no Quaternary adakites were observed at Aso (e.g., Hunter, 1998) and the volcanoes south of Aso along the entire Ryukyu arc. Sugimoto et al. (2007) suggested that the trace element and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions of adakitic magmas from Yufu-Tsurumi volcano indicate derivation of the magmas by partial melting of the subducting PSP. In contrast, Zellmer et al. (2012) suggested that these adakites may have formed by fractional crystallization of mantle-derived mafic magmas within the garnet stability field in the crust. The Honshu-Kyushu arc transition is a particular favorable setting to address these controversial models for the origin of the adakitic lavas, because of the potential relationship between the PSP materials and the alongstrike variation of the lava chemistry. The Palau-Kyushu ridge divides the oceanic crust of the PSP into northeastern and southwestern segments with ages of 26-15 (Shikoku Basin) and 60-40 Ma (West Philippine Basin), respectively (Mahony et al., 2011). Although there are no clear plate images beneath northern Kyushu, the northern extension of the Palau-Kyushu ridge potentially corresponds to the boundary between the SW Japan and Ryukyu arcs. If adakite genesis was related to the subducted slab rather than the overlying crust, then the spatial distribution of Quaternary adakites should correlate with the age of the subducted PSP. In order to test such correlation and elucidate the petrogenesis of the northern Kyushu adakites, we compiled major and trace elements and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope ratios from volcanoes along the arc front that includes the transition from adakitic to non-adakitic arc volcanism. Comprehensive

  2. Accurate Source Depths and Focal Mechanisms of Shallow Earthquakes in Western South America and in the New Hebrides Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Douglas S.; Isacks, Bryan L.

    1983-12-01

    downdip width of the South American interplate zone is 2 to 3 times larger than that in the New Hebrides. Most of the intraplate events near the interplate boundary are located in the descending plate. In the upper plate, seismicity is more pronounced in the "back arc" regions of the two subduction zones. Thus our results support the generality of a relatively aseismic zone in the upper plate located trenchward of the magmatic arc. Depths of shallow earthquakes in the eastern Andes and sub-Andean regions of South America range between about 9 and 36 km, indicating that both the upper and middle crust are seismically active; about 75% of the events occurred in the upper 25 km. Furthermore, the focal mechanisms indicate that from Ecuador to Argentina the crust of the eastern side of the Andean Cordilleran is in a state of east-west compression oriented nearly parallel to the direction of convergence between the Nazca and South American plates. The depths, the orientations of the earthquake nodal planes, and the close relationships to Quaternary tectonics imply basement-involved crustal shortening in much of the Eastern Andes and sub-Andean zones of Peru and Argentina.

  3. Active Volcanoes of the Kurile Islands: A Reference Guide for Aviation Users

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Rybin, Alexander; Chibisova, Marina; Miller, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: The many volcanoes of the remote and mostly uninhabited Kurile Island arc (fig. 1; table 1) pose a serious hazard for air traffic in the North Pacific. Ash clouds from Kurile eruptions can impact some of the busiest air travel routes in the world and drift quickly into airspace managed by three countries: Russia, Japan, and the United States. Prevailing westerly winds throughout the region will most commonly send ash from any Kurile eruption directly across the parallel North Pacific airways between North America and Asia (Kristine A. Nelson, National Weather Service, oral commun., 2006; fig. 1). This report presents maps showing locations of the 36 most active Kurile volcanoes plotted on Operational Navigational Charts published by the Defense Mapping Agency (map sheets ONC F-10, F-11, and E-10; figs. 1, 2, 3, 4). These maps are intended to assist aviation and other users in the identification of restless Kurile volcanoes. A regional map is followed by three subsections of the Kurile volcanic arc (North, Central, South). Volcanoes and selected primary geographic features are labeled. All maps contain schematic versions of the principal air routes and selected air navigational fixes in this region.

  4. Activity-regulated, cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) is essential for visceral endoderm organization during early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, D; Bei, D; Parmar, H; Matus, A

    2000-04-01

    Activity-regulated, cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) was first identified as an immediate-early gene regulated by synaptic activity. We have studied its functional role in vivo using a gene-targeting approach. We found that Arc is encoded by a single exon, and Arc mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in early mouse embryos. Homozygous Arc mutants are severely growth-retarded, fail to gastrulate and subsequently die before day 8.5 of embryogenesis. Further analysis revealed severe disorganization of visceral endoderm formation, and total separation and ectopic location of embryonic and extraembryonic structure. These findings demonstrate that Arc function is essential for early embryo development and patterning in mice, and support the hypothesis that signaling from visceral endoderm is essential for normal patterning of the extraembryonic and embryonic structure.

  5. Petrology of mafic and ultramafic intrusions from the Portneuf-Mauricie Domain, Grenville Province, Canada: Implications for plutonic complexes in a Proterozoic island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sappin, A.-A.; Constantin, M.; Clark, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Portneuf-Mauricie Domain (PMD), located in the south-central part of the Grenville Province, comprises several mafic and ultramafic intrusions hosting Ni-Cu ± platinum-group element (PGE) prospects and a former small mining operation (Lac Édouard mine). These meter- to kilometer-scale, sulfide-bearing intrusions display diverse forms, such as layered and tabular bodies with no particular internal structure, and zoned plutons. They were injected ~ 1.40 Ga into a mature oceanic arc, before and during accretion of the arc to the Laurentian margin. The pressure-temperature conditions of the magmas at the beginning of their emplacement were 3 kbar and 1319-1200 °C (according to the petrologic modeling results from this study). The PMD mineralized intrusions are interpreted to represent former magma chambers or magma conduits in the roots of the oceanic arc. The parent magmas of the mineralized intrusions resulted mainly from the partial melting of a mantle source composed of spinel-bearing lherzolite. Petrologic modeling and the occurrence of primary amphibole in the plutonic rocks indicate that these parent melts were basaltic and hydrous. In addition, fractional crystallization modeling and Mg/Fe ratios suggest that most of the intrusions may have formed from evolved magmas, with Mg# = 60, resulting from the fractionation of more primitive magmas (primary magmas, with Mg# = 68). Petrologic modeling demonstrates that 30% fractional crystallization resulted in the primitive to evolved characteristics of the studied intrusive rocks (as indicated by the crystallization sequences and mineral chemistry). Exceptions are the Réservoir Blanc, Boivin, and Rochette West parent magmas, which may have undergone more extensive fractional crystallization, since these intrusions contain pyroxenes that are more iron rich and have lower Mg numbers than pyroxenes in the other PMD intrusions. The PMD mafic and ultramafic intrusions were intruded into an island arc located

  6. The arc arises: The links between volcanic output, arc evolution and melt composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, Philipp A.; Hamada, Morihisa; Arculus, Richard J.; Johnson, Kyle; Marsaglia, Kathleen M.; Savov, Ivan P.; Ishizuka, Osamu; Li, He

    2017-03-01

    Subduction initiation is a key process for global plate tectonics. Individual lithologies developed during subduction initiation and arc inception have been identified in the trench wall of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) island arc but a continuous record of this process has not previously been described. Here, we present results from International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 351 that drilled a single site west of the Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR), a chain of extinct stratovolcanoes that represents the proto-IBM island arc, active for ∼25 Ma following subduction initiation. Site U1438 recovered 150 m of oceanic igneous basement and ∼1450 m of overlying sediments. The lower 1300 m of these sediments comprise volcaniclastic gravity-flow deposits shed from the evolving KPR arc front. We separated fresh magmatic minerals from Site U1438 sediments, and analyzed 304 glass (formerly melt) inclusions, hosted by clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Compositions of glass inclusions preserve a temporal magmatic record of the juvenile island arc, complementary to the predominant mid-Miocene to recent activity determined from tephra layers recovered by drilling in the IBM forearc. The glass inclusions record the progressive transition of melt compositions dominated by an early 'calc-alkalic', high-Mg andesitic stage to a younger tholeiitic stage over a time period of 11 Ma. High-precision trace element analytical data record a simultaneously increasing influence of a deep subduction component (e.g., increase in Th vs. Nb, light rare earth element enrichment) and a more fertile mantle source (reflected in increased high field strength element abundances). This compositional change is accompanied by increased deposition rates of volcaniclastic sediments reflecting magmatic output and maturity of the arc. We conclude the 'calc-alkalic' stage of arc evolution may endure as long as mantle wedge sources are not mostly advected away from the zones of arc magma generation, or the rate of

  7. First Assessment Of Volatiles Dissolved In Magma Feeding Yasur Activity (Vanuatu Arc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metrich, N.; Bertagnini, A.; Garaebiti, E.; Belhadj, O.; Edouard, D.; Mercier, M.

    2008-12-01

    Yasur is the active volcano of Tanna island, located in the south part of the arc where the convergence rate achieves 12 cm per year. Yasur is known, since its discovery in 1774 by Cook, for its continuous strombolian to vulcanian activity. Proximal pyroclastic deposits are constituted by alternating cm to dm thick fallout layers of highly vesicular scoria and ash, most likely representative of the Yasur early activity, although not dated. The scoriae are basaltic-trachyandesites, with relatively low abundances in Th and Nb (2.1 and 1.0 ppm, respectively), intermediate Nb/Y and La/Yb ratios (0.05 and 5.2, respectively) and high Th/Ta and Ba/La ratios (23 and 37, respectively). They display an unusual low crystal content (~14% in mass), possibly suggesting a high thermal flux. The plagioclase-phyric bombs presently thrown out at the crater, during strombolian activity, have more evolved trace and major element compositions that requires ~25% crystal fractionation. The crystal textures in scoria testify to rapid crystallization. In particular, olivine Fo75-71 contains typical hopper to closed-hopper, melt/glassy inclusions (M.I.) indicative of high cooling rates that prevented significant interactions with their hosts. Their major element compositions cover a wide range encompassing that of the bulk rocks and glassy matrices. There is no evidence of boundary layer effect in M.I. due to high olivine crystallization rate. The very first dataset on dissolved volatiles indicates that these melt inclusions are rather poor in water (H2O <1.3 wt% and CO2 (<0.03 wt%) but rich in Cl (up to 0.3-0.4 wt%) and S (up to 0.25 wt%). The glassy matrices of scoria are strongly degassed (in wt% Cl = 0.07-0.09; S <0.01 to 0.03). Thus both S (>90%) and Cl (up to 75-80%) are extensively degassed from the erupting Yasur magma. The expected S/Cl wt ratio in gas emissions should be close to 1, a factor 2- 3 lower than actually measured [1]. It implies that only one third of S emissions

  8. Mechanisms for tectonic erosion of an accretionary complex in the d'Entrecasteaux Zone-New Hebrides Island arc collision zone

    SciTech Connect

    Collot, J.Y. ); Fisher, M.A. )

    1990-06-01

    In the southwest Pacific Ocean the d'Entrecasteaux Zone (DEZ) is an arcuate submarine mountain chain that collides with the central part of the New Hebrides island arc. The collision zone moves slowly (2.5 cm/yr) northward along the trench, owing to the small oblique angle between the DEZ and the azimuth of convergence. Extensive Seabeam bathymetry as well as single- and multichannel seismic reflection data were collected over both the collision zone and the accretionary wedge that lies south of this zone. These data indicate that the accretionary complex underwent considerable tectonic erosion in response to oblique subduction of the DEZ during the past 8 Ma. Simplified calculation indicates that the mean erosional rate of this complex is 800-900 km{sup 3}/Ma. The main mechanisms for tectonic erosion of the accretionary complex involve mass wasting and extensional tectonics. First, mobilization and mass wasting of accreted rocks result in overlapping slump masses that blanket the arc slope. Second, block sliding along an extensional detachment within accreted rocks strips off the upper (about 1 km) part of the accretionary complex. Third, as the DEZ moves northward, the accreted rocks in the wake of the DEZ lose support and collapse along large normal faults that trend oblique to the arc slope. An additional errosive mechanism involves the formation of a deep subcircular reentrant into the accretionary complex; the reentrant is believed to be a scar caused by the collision and subduction of a seamount. The reentrant cuts downward through the accreted rocks almost to the depth of the abyssal oceanic plain.

  9. Mesoproterozoic island arc magmatism along the south-eastern margin of the Indian Plate: Evidence from geochemistry and zircon U-Pb ages of mafic plutonic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanyam, K. S. V.; Santosh, M.; Yang, Qiong-Yan; Zhang, Ze-ming; Balaram, V.; Reddy, U. V. B.

    2016-11-01

    The Prakasam Igneous Province within the Nellore Schist Belt (NSB) preserves important imprints of mafic magmatism along the south-eastern margin of the Indian plate. Here we report petrology, geochemistry and zircon U-Pb age data from three gabbro plutons namely Purimetla, Kanigiri and P C Palle which intruded into the high grade rocks of the region. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb data on zircons from the three plutons reveal prominent late Mesoproterozoic ages of 1334 ± 15 Ma, 1338 ± 27 Ma and 1251.2 ± 9.4 Ma. The cumulative 207Pb/206Pb mean age of 1315 ± 11 Ma is interpreted to represent the timing of mafic magmatism in the Prakasam Igneous Province. These rocks show adcumulus to mesocumulus and poikilitic textures indicating fractional crystallization of plagioclase and clinopyroxenes in the Purimetla pluton whereas the Kanigiri and P C Palle intrusions possess hornblende and biotite suggesting the role of water during partial melting. The rocks show LREE enrichment (∑LREE/∑HREE = 2.2-15.0), marked Eu-anomalies (Eu/Eu∗ = 0.8-2.2) and fractionated patterns (LaN/YbN = 3-79). Primitive mantle normalised trace element spider diagrams indicate subduction modified arc signatures with LILE enrichment and depletion of Nb, Ti and Zr relative to Th and La. Tectonic discrimination diagrams show arc magmatic affinities for the three gabbro plutons consistent with subduction zone setting. We propose a tectonic model involving intra oceanic island arc accretion during late Mesoproterozoic along the eastern margin of the Indian continent.

  10. KALMAR - "Kurile-Kamchatka and Aleutean Marginal Sea-Island Arc Systems: Geodynamic and Climate Interaction in Space and Time" - an integrated science approach between Russia and Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dullo, Wolf-Christian; Baranov, Boris; van den Bogaard, Christel

    2010-05-01

    The exploration of the arctic seas require an integrated approach applying different infrastructures. In Fall 2009 German and Russian scientists performed a geo marine cruise off Kamchatka and in the western Bering Sea within the frame of the KALMAR-Project. Two main research subjects formed the scientific backbone of the cruise: The first objective focuses on the geodynamic and volcanological-magmatic development of the Kuril-Kamchatka island arc system and the Kamchatka Aleutean Islands Triple-Junction. Very little is known about the composition of the mantle and the oceanic crust as well as of the seamounts including their ages. The best studied site is the Volcanologist's Massif located between the Bering- and the Alpha Fracture Zone (Tsvetkov 1990, Volynets et al. 1992, Yogodzinsky et al. 1994), which structurally belongs to the Komandorsky Basin. The oldest rocks of the Volcanologist's Massif show very similar trace element and isotope signatures like those rocks cropping out in the volcanoes on Kamchatka in the prolongation of the Alpha Fracture Zone (Portnyagin et al. 2005a), indicating similar conditions of magma formation. The top of the Volcanologist's Massif is characterized by the young (< 0.5 Ma) and hydrothermally active Piip volcano, which consists of special magnesium rich andesites ("Piip type"). Another hot site was the Meiji-Seamount which is the northernmost Seamount of the hotspot spur of the Hawaii-Emperor-Seamount chain, having an age of probably > 85 Ma. The only existing basement rocks from this seamount were gained during DSDP Leg 19. These are basalts with MORB like trace element and isotope signatures (Keller et al. 2000, Regelous et al. 2003). These data indicate that the Hawaii-Hotspot was at a MOR in Cretaceous time and that large volumes of depleted mantle material played a role during the magma formation. The second objective focuses on paleo-oceanographic investigations concentrating on the sediments along the eastern continental

  11. Late Proterozoic island-arc complexes and tectonic belts in the southern part of the Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, William R.; Stoeser, D.B.; Fleck, R.J.; Stacey, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    Sr ratios are not included in the appendix, but all rocks more than 660 m.y. old have initial ratios in the range 0.7021-0.7035, with only two greater than 0.7030. Thus, nothing in the Rb-Sr data suggests involvement of an older continental crust during the evolution of the southern Shield. A lead isotope study of ore minerals and potassium feldspars of the Arabian Shield by Stacey and others (1980) also suggests that no older (Archean to early Proterozoic) evolved continental-type crust underlies the southern Shield. An early summary of mapping (Schmidt and others, 1973) suggests that older sialic basement underlies the late Proterozoic layered rocks in the southern Shield. However, subsequent-mapping and the isotopic studies cited above have established that all of these rocks are of late Proterozoic age and that all rocks of the southern Shield that are more than 660 m.y. old have ensimatic or mantle isotopic characteristics. Figure 2 shows, with only two exceptions, that rocks more than 800 m.y. old are present west of the boundary separating the Tayyah and Khadra belts. The exceptions are two poorly controlled Rb-Sr ages obtained by Fleck (1980) on two quartz diorite plutons in the Malahah region (appendix 1, localities 26 and 27). Preliminary uranium-thorium zircon data of Stacey now suggest that one of these quartz diorite plutons (locality 26) has an age of approximately 640 m.y. Therefore, we prefer to discount the two dates of Fleck until further information is available. As noted earlier and as described below, most of the rocks of the southern Arabian Shield have characteristics typical of those formed in the island-arc environment by subduction-related processes. We shall refer to the group of rocks in the western part of the southern Shield, which formed from 1100 to 800 m.y. ago, as the 'older ensimatic-arc complex' and those in the eastern and northwestern parts, which formed from 800 to 690 m.y. ago, as the 'younger marginal-arc compl

  12. The recent seismo-volcanic activity at Deception Island volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibáñez, Jesús M.; Almendros, Javier; Carmona, Enrique; Martínez-Arévalo, Carmen; Abril, Miguel

    2003-06-01

    This paper reviews the recent seismic studies carried out at Deception Island, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, which was monitored by the Argentinean and Spanish Antarctic Programs since 1986. Several types of seismic network have been deployed temporarily during each Antarctic summer. These networks have consisted of a variety of instruments, including radio-telemetered stations, autonomous digital seismic stations, broadband seismometers, and seismic arrays. We have identified two main types of seismic signals generated by the volcano, namely pure seismo-volcanic signals, such as volcanic tremor and long-period (LP) events, and volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes. Their temporal distributions are far from homogeneous. Volcanic tremors and LP events usually occur in seismic swarms lasting from a few hours to some days. The number of LP events in these swarms is highly variable, from a background level of less than 30/day to a peak activity of about 100 events/h. The occurrence of VT earthquakes is even more irregular. Most VT earthquakes at Deception Island have been recorded during two intense seismic crises, in 1992 and 1999, respectively. Some of these VT earthquakes were large enough to be felt by researchers working on the island. Analyses of both types of seismic events have allowed us to derive source locations, establish seismic source models, analyze seismic attenuation, calculate the energy and stress drop of the seismic sources, and relate the occurrence of seismicity to the volcanic activity. Pure seismo-volcanic signals are modelled as the consequence of hydrothermal interactions between a shallow aquifer and deeper hot materials, resulting in the resonance of fluid-filled fractures. VT earthquakes constitute the brittle response to changes in the distribution of stress in the volcanic edifice. The two VT seismic series are probably related to uplift episodes due to deep injections of magma that did not reach the surface. This evidence, however

  13. Adaptive tracking of weld joints using active contour model in arc-welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeseon; Koh, Kyoungchul; Cho, Hyungsuck

    2001-02-01

    12 This paper presents a vision processing scheme to automatic weld joint tracking in robotic arc welding process. Particular attention is concentrated on its robustness against various optical disturbances, such as arc glares and weld spatters radiating from the melted weld pool. Underlying the developed vision processing is a kind of model-based pattern searching, which is necessarily accompanied by two separate stages of modeling and tracking. In the modeling stage, a syntactic approach is adopted to identify unknown weld joint structure. The joint profile identified in the modeling stage is used as a starting point for successive tracking of variations in the geometry of weld joint during welding, which is automatically achieved by an active contour model technology following feature- based template matching. The performance of the developed scheme is investigated through a series of practical welding experiments.

  14. The Plio Quaternary Ambon arc, Eastern Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honthaas, Christian; Maury, René C.; Priadi, Bambang; Bellon, Hervé; Cotten, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    Plio-Quaternary lavas and granites have been collected from Ambon, Seram, Kelang, Haruku, Saparua, Ambelau and Banda Api islands, Eastern Indonesia. They include low-K calc-alkaline basalts, andesites, dacites and rhyolites and high-K calc-alkaline andesites, dacites, rhyolites and granites. All these rocks present the usual chemical characteristics of island-arc magmas. The high-K suite of Ambon is mostly represented by cordierite-bearing dacites (known as ambonites) and granites. Low-K and high-K magmas were emplaced in neighbouring islands or even in the same island (Ambon), often concomitantly, during two magmatic pulses at 5-3.2 Ma and 2.3-1 Ma, respectively. We propose that the low-K suite results from the evolution of basaltic magmas derived from mantle melting above the Western Irian Jaya plate which subducts along the Seram trough. Intermediate and acidic rocks of the high-K suite (e.g. ambonites) are thought to derive from low-K mafic magmas through massive assimilation of the Seram-Ambon continental crust, as originally proposed by Van Bemmelen in 1949. The timing of magmatic events and the geochemical features of the studied lavas are clearly different from those of the southern part of the Banda arc, in which the low-K suite is lacking. In agreement with earlier seismic evidence for two different slabs subducting beneath the Seram-Ambon continental block and beneath the southern Banda arc (from Wetar to Manuk), respectively, we propose to recognise a new Plio-Quaternary island arc, i.e. the Ambon arc, extending west-east from Ambelau to the Banda Archipelago active low-K volcanoes through Kelang, southwestern Seram, Ambon, Haruku and Saparua.

  15. Active deformations of the Jura arc inferred by GPS and seismotectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Mickael; Sue, Christian; Walpersdorf, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The Jura Mountain is the most recent expression of the alpine orogeny. At the northern end of the western Alps, its recent deformation is still a matter of debates. GPS data available in the Jura bear witness of disagreement between studies, as interpretations vary from uplifted belt to arc-parallel extension (Walpersdorf, et al., 2006) and very slow horizontal movements. Moreover, the traditionally accepted model of an active collisional activity of the Jura, in the dynamic continuity of the Alps, rises up the matter of its geodynamic origin. Indeed, the European Alps are in a post-collisional regime characterized by isostatic-related extension and uplift driven by interaction between buoyancy forces and erosional dynamics (e.g. Sue et al. 2007; Champagnac, et al., 2007; Vernant, et al., 2013.). We present a reappraisal of published focal mechanisms combined with a new GPS solution over the entire arc and surrounding areas. Although the Jura presents a low seismic activity, 53 focal mechanisms over the Jura have been inverted in order to infer the current stress field. Anyhow, we tested several combinations of f.m. inversions, by structural zones, in order to test the regional stress stability. It appears that the current stress field is very stable all over the arc, and following our different sub-datasets. Indeed, the stress field shows a stable near horizontal NW-SE-oriented s1, associated to a NE-SW-oriented s3. Therefore, the structural arc of the Jura seems to have very low or no impact in terms of current stress. Complementarily, we present preliminary velocity and strain fields from a GPS network composed of 25 permanent stations implemented between 1998 and 2014 all around the Jura arc. Indeed, we also integrated the recent GPS-JURA station (OSU THETA Besançon), but they are still too young to accurately constrain the strain of the belt. Preliminary results exhibit very slow velocities across the arc in term of baselines evolution, with infra

  16. Using IMS hydrophone data for detecting submarine volcanic activity: Insights from Monowai, 26°S Kermadec Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Dirk; Watts, Anthony B.; Grevemeyer, Ingo; Rodgers, Mel; Paulatto, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Only little is known on active volcanism in the ocean. As eruptions are attenuated by seawater and fallout does not regularly reach the sea surface, eruption rates and mechanisms are poorly understood. Estimations on the number of active volcanoes across the modern seas range from hundreds to thousands, but only very few active sites are known. Monowai is a submarine volcanic centre in the northern Kermadec Arc, Southwest Pacific Ocean. During May 2011, it erupted over a period of five days, with explosive activity directly linked to the generation of seismoacoustic tertiary waves ('T-phases'), recorded at three broadband seismic stations in the region. We show, using windowed cross-correlation and time-difference-of-arrival techniques, that T-phases associated with this eruption are detected as far as Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean, where two bottom-moored hydrophone arrays are operated as part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO). We observe a high incidence of T-phase arrivals during the time of the eruption, with the angle of arrival stabilizing at the geodesic azimuth between the IMS arrays and Monowai. T-phases from the volcanic centre must therefore have propagated through the Sound Fixing And Ranging (SOFAR) channel in the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans and over a total geodesic range of approximately 15,800 km, one of the longest source-receiver distances of any naturally occurring underwater signal ever observed. Our findings, which are consistent with observations at regional broadband stations and two dimensional, long-range, parabolic equation modelling, highlight the exceptional capabilities of the hydroacoustic waveform component of the IMS for remotely detecting episodes of submarine volcanic activity. Using Monowai and the hydrophone arrays at Ascension Island as a natural laboratory, we investigate the long-term eruptive record of a submarine volcano from

  17. Helium and Carbon Systematics of the Sangihe Arc, Indonesia: Tracing Volatile Sources in an Arc-Arc Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, L. A.; Hilton, D. R.; Fischer, T. P.; Hartono, U.

    2002-12-01

    The Sangihe and Halmahera arcs in northeastern Indonesia are presently colliding, forming the world's only extant example of an arc-arc collision. We report the first helium and carbon isotopic and relative abundance data from the Sangihe Arc volcanoes as a means to trace magma origins in this complicated tectonic region. Gas chemistry and N-isotopes from the same localities are reported in a companion paper (Clor et al, this volume). There is a distinct regional pattern in He and CO2 variations along the north-south strike of the Sangihe Arc. The two northernmost volcanoes (Awu and Karangetang) have 3He/4He <= 6.4RA (where RA = air 3He/4He), CO2/3He >= 30x109, and δ13C >= -2.0‰ . In contrast, the southern volcanoes along the arc (Ruang, Lokon, Mahawu) have 3He/4He >= 7.0RA, CO2/3He < 7x109 and δ13C < -3.0‰ . The southern volcanoes, therefore, sample volatiles more typical of island arc volcanoes. Resolving the CO2 into component structures (mantle-derived, plus slab-derived organic and limestone CO2 - following the approach of Sano and Marty, Chem. Geol., 1995), the northern volcanoes contain higher than average slab-derived limestone contributions. For example, limestone-derived CO2 makes up > 90% of the total CO2 at Karangetang and ~98% at Awu. These values compare with an average limestone contribution of ~65% in the southern Sangihe arc and ~73% in other arcs worldwide. We are investigating possible reasons for the enhanced limestone contributions in the northern Sangihe arc. The sedimentary mélange wedge is thickest in the north (up to 15km) - where the arcs initially collided. The greater availability of sediment may result in a greater input of subducted sediment, thereby providing enhanced dilution of mantle wedge C inputs. Alternatively, subducted sediments may be more carbonate-rich in the northern segment of the arc. This may reflect obduction of shallow, organic-bearing sediments onto the over-riding plate, leaving only pelagic carbonates to

  18. Ca(2+)-activated K current in the ARC muscle of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Brezina, V; Weiss, K R

    1995-03-01

    1. This work continues our examination of the electrophysiology and contractions of single, functionally intact fibers dissociated from a widely studied molluscan muscle, the accessory radula closer (ARC) muscle of Aplysia californica, aimed at understanding its excitation-contraction mechanisms and their modulation. Extensive previous work has characterized a number of ion currents in the fibers. 2. Here we describe an additional major current that could not be studied earlier because, unlike all of the other currents in the ARC muscle fibers, it becomes prominent only during contraction of the fiber. It is a Ca(2+)-activated K current, associated with contraction most likely because both are activated by the same elevation in intracellular free Ca2+. 3. We used several manipulations to elicit the Ca(2+)-activated K current and contraction: depolarizing voltage steps in the presence of extracellular Ca2+, application of caffeine in the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+ (and thus presumably working by releasing Ca2+ from intracellular stores), application of the Ca(2+)-ionophore A23187, and direct iontophoretic injection of Ca2+ into the fiber. 4. The Ca(2+)-activated K current reversed around -70 mV, not far from EK, and the reversal potential shifted substantially with elevated extracellular K+. Activation of the current was not only Ca2+ dependent, but also quite strongly voltage dependent, promoted by depolarization. The current was well blocked by tetraethylammonium (KD approximately 2 mM), but not blocked by even 10 mM 4-aminopyridine or low concentrations of the K-current blocking toxins charybdotoxin and apamin. 5. After a depolarizing voltage step in Ca(2+)-containing solution, the Ca(2+)-activated K current appeared, often with some delay, as a large peak of current that soon disintegrated into a prolonged period of individual oscillatory transients of Ca(2+)-activated K current, sometimes correlated with transient contractions. Similar transients

  19. Early Cretaceous arc volcanic suite in Cebu Island, Central Philippines and its implications on paleo-Pacific plate subduction: Constraints from geochemistry, zircon U-Pb geochronology and Lu-Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jianghong; Yang, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Santosh, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Philippine island arc system is a collage of amalgamated terranes of oceanic, continental and island arc affinities. Here we investigate a volcanic suite in Cebu Island of central Philippines, including basalt, diabase dike, basaltic pyroclastic rock and porphyritic andesite. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb geochronology of zircon grains from the porphyritic andesite and pyroclastic rock yielded ages of 126 ± 3 Ma and 119 ± 2 Ma, respectively, indicating an Early Cretaceous age. The age distribution of the detrital zircons from river sand in the area displays a peak at ca. 118 Ma, close to the age of the pyroclastic rock. The early Cretaceous volcanic rocks in the central Philippines were previously regarded as parts of ophiolite complexes by most investigators, whereas the Cebu volcanics are distinct from these, and display calc-alkaline affinity and island arc setting, characterized by high LREE/HREE ratios and low HFSE contents. These features are similar to the Early Cretaceous arc basalts in the Amami Plateau and east Halmahera in the northernmost and southernmost West Philippine Basin respectively. Zircon Hf isotopes of the pyroclastic rocks show depleted nature similar to those of the Amami Plateau basalts, implying the subducted Pacific-type MORB as probable source. Zircon Hf isotopes of the porphyritic andesite show slight enrichment relative to that of the pyroclastic rocks and MORB, indicating subducted sediments as a minor end-member in the source. The Hf isotopic compositions of the volcanic rocks are also reflected in the detrital zircons from the river sands. We propose that the volcanic rocks of Cebu Island were derived from partial melting of sub-arc mantle wedge which was metasomatized by dehydration of subducted oceanic crust together with minor pelagic sediments. Within the tectonic environment of Southeast Asia during Early Cretaceous, the volcanic rocks in Cebu Island can be correlated to the subduction of paleo-Pacific plate. The Early Cretaceous

  20. Early Jurassic Volcanism in the South Lhasa Terrane, Southern Tibet: Record of Back-arc Extension in the Active Continental Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhu, D. C.; Wang, Z.; Liu, D.; Mo, X.

    2015-12-01

    Indus-Yarlung Zangbo Suture Zone (IYZSZ) represents the Mesozoic remnants of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean lithosphere after its northward subduction beneath the Lhasa Terrane. The evolution of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean prior to India-Asia collision remains unclear. To explore this period of history, we investigate zircon U-Pb geochronology, geochemistry and Nd-Hf isotopes of the Early Jurassic bimodal-like volcanic sequence around Dagze area, south Tibet. The volcanic sequence comprises calc-alkaline basalts to rhyolites whereas intermediate components are volumetrically restricted. Zircons from a basaltic andesite yielded crystallization age of 178Ma whereas those from 5 silicic rocks were dated at 183-174Ma, which suggest that both the basaltic and the silicic rocks are coeval. The basaltic rocks are enriched in LREE and LILE, and depleted in HFSE, with Epsilon Nd(t) of 1.6-4.0 and zircon Epsilon Hf(t) of 0.7-11.8, which implies that they were derived from a heterogenetic mantle source metasomatized by subduction components. Trace element geochemistry shows that the basaltic rocks are compositionally transitional from normal mid-ocean ridge basalts (N-MORB) to island arc basalts (IAB, e.g. Zedong arc basalts of ~160-155Ma in the south margin of Lhasa Terrane), with the signature of immature back-arc basin basalts. The silicic rocks display similar Nd-Hf isotopic features of the Gangdese batholith with Epsilon Nd(t) of 0.9-3.4 and zircon Epsilon Hf(t) of 2.4-17.7, indicating that they were possibly generated by anatexis of basaltic juvenile lower crust, instead of derived from the basaltic magma. These results support an Early to Middle Jurassic (183-155Ma) model that the back-arc extension tectonic setting were existing in the active continental margin in the south Lhasa Terrane.

  1. 76 FR 77208 - Affirmation of Vertical Datum for Surveying and Mapping Activities for the Islands of St. Croix...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Activities for the Islands of St. Croix, St. John, and St. Thomas, United States Virgin Islands AGENCY...; Circular A-16 ( http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/circulars/a016/a016.html ), to affirm the Virgin Islands... activities for the islands of St. Croix, St. John, and St. Thomas of the United States Virgin Islands, and...

  2. 78 FR 49553 - Three Mile Island, Unit 2; Post Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Three Mile Island, Unit 2; Post Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear...) for Three Mile Island, Unit 2 (TMI-2). The PSDAR provides an overview of GPUN's...

  3. Coupled interactions between volatile activity and Fe oxidation state during arc crustal processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Humphreys, Madeleine C.S.; Brooker, R; Fraser, D.C.; Burgisser, A; Mangan, Margaret T.; McCammon, C

    2015-01-01

    Arc magmas erupted at the Earth’s surface are commonly more oxidized than those produced at mid-ocean ridges. Possible explanations for this high oxidation state are that the transfer of fluids during the subduction process results in direct oxidation of the sub-arc mantle wedge, or that oxidation is caused by the effect of later crustal processes, including protracted fractionation and degassing of volatile-rich magmas. This study sets out to investigate the effect of disequilibrium crustal processes that may involve coupled changes in H2O content and Fe oxidation state, by examining the degassing and hydration of sulphur-free rhyolites. We show that experimentally hydrated melts record strong increases in Fe3+/∑Fe with increasing H2O concentration as a result of changes in water activity. This is relevant for the passage of H2O-undersaturated melts from the deep crust towards shallow crustal storage regions, and raises the possibility that vertical variations in fO2 might develop within arc crust. Conversely, degassing experiments produce an increase in Fe3+/∑Fe with decreasing H2O concentration. In this case the oxidation is explained by loss of H2 as well as H2O into bubbles during decompression, consistent with thermodynamic modelling, and is relevant for magmas undergoing shallow degassing en route to the surface. We discuss these results in the context of the possible controls on fO2 during the generation, storage and ascent of magmas in arc settings, in particular considering the timescales of equilibration relative to observation as this affects the quality of the petrological record of magmatic fO2.

  4. The origin of the 'fluid' component and its implications for U-Th-Pa disequilibria in island arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzinelli, R.; Skora, S. E.; Blundy, J.; Elliott, T.

    2011-12-01

    Many arc lavas have two discrete slab-derived components evident from their compositional variations. These components have been interpreted to be melts of subducted sediment and a 'fluid' from the mafic oceanic crust. The 'fluid' signature is seen most clearly in depleted samples that contain the smallest fraction of the sediment component. The provenance of this 'fluid' is reliably pinned by its unradiogenic Pb isotope ratios to be from a MORB-like source. The composition of the 'fluid' phase is marked by strong enrichments in the large, divalent cations, notably Ba, Pb and Sr and (238U/230Th)>1. These characteristics have traditionally been explained by the 'mobility' of such elements in an aqueous fluid. Such fluids are anticipated to be generated during prograde, subduction-metamorphism and to flux elements into the mantle wedge. Yet no experimental dataset of solid-aqueous fluid partitioning replicates the full set of elemental enrichments described above. The recent realisation of the pivotal role of accessory phases in controlling the mobility of elements from the slab provides a more consistent explanation of the chemical characteristics of the 'fluid' phase. Notably rutile and allanite retain the 'immobile' HSFE and REE and fractionate Th from U. The enrichments in the 'fluid' thus simply reflect the displacement of homeless elements. However, Ba will not be mobile until its preferred host, phengite, is exhausted at the wet solidus of the mafic crust. Thus the 'fluid' phase transpires to be a wet melt. The dominant control of accessory phases on the composition of the 'fluid' component also helps in understanding the long-standing puzzle of arc lava 235U-231Pa systematics. By analogy with surface aqueous behaviour, many models have assumed that the 'fluid' adds only U to the mantle wedge, generating 238U-230Th and 235U-231Pa excesses. Yet many lavas with strong 'fluid' signatures and large 238U-230Th excesses have 235U-231Pa deficits. This surprising

  5. Treatment with activated water by GlidArc technology of bacteria producing Biofouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Ghita, S.; Sabau, A.; Hnatiuc, M.; Dumitrache, C. L.; Wartel, M.

    2015-02-01

    Corrosion in marine environment is an actual problem, being a complex dynamic process influenced mainly by physical, chemical, microbiological and mechanical parameters. Around 70% of the maintenance costs of a ship are associated with the corrosion protection. Times for maintenance related to this phenomenon are greater than 80% of the total repair. Reducing this cost would be a significant saving, and an effective treatment can reduce times related to ships repairing. Biofouling is a main cause of corrosion and for its reduction different methods could be applied, especially in the first part of its production. The atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas have been gaining an ever increasing interest for different biodecontamination applications and present potential utilisation in the control of biofouling and biodeterioration. They have a high efficiency of the antimicrobial treatment, including capacity to eradicate microbial biofilms. The adhesion microbial biofilm is mainly influenced by presence of bacteria from the liquid environment. That is why this work concerns the study of annihilation of maximum amount of bacteria from sea water, by using GlidArc technology that produces non-thermal plasma. Bacteria suspended in sea water are placed in contact with activated water. This water is activated by using GlidArc working in humid air. Experimental results refer to the number of different activated and inactivated marine organisms and their evolution, present in solution at certain time intervals after mixing different amounts of seawater with plasma activated water.

  6. Spatial distribution of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation in active volcanic islands - II: Deception Island images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, Janire; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; García-Yeguas, Araceli; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Posadas, Antonio M.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we present regional maps of the inverse intrinsic quality factor (Qi-1), the inverse scattering quality factor (Qs-1) and total inverse quality factor (Qt-1) for the volcanic environment of Deception Island (Antarctica). Our attenuation study is based on diffusion approximation, which permits us to obtain the attenuation coefficients for every single couple source-receiver separately. The data set used in this research is derived from an active seismic experiment using more than 5200 offshore shots (air guns) recorded at 32 onshore seismic stations and four ocean bottom seismometers. To arrive at a regional distribution of these values, we used a new mapping technique based on a Gaussian space probability function. This approach led us to create `2-D probabilistic maps' of values of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation. The 2-D tomographic images confirm the existence of a high attenuation body below an inner bay of Deception Island. This structure, previously observed in 2-D and 3-D velocity tomography of the region, is associated with a massive magma reservoir. Magnetotelluric studies reach a similar interpretation of this strong anomaly. Additionally, we observed areas with lower attenuation effects that bear correlation with consolidated structures described in other studies and associated with the crystalline basement of the area. Our calculations of the transport mean-free path and absorption length for intrinsic attenuation gave respective values of ≈ 950 m and 5 km, which are lower than the values obtained in tectonic regions or volcanic areas such as Tenerife Island. However, as observed in other volcanic regions, our results indicate that scattering effects dominate strongly over the intrinsic attenuation.

  7. Genetic Feedback Regulation of Frontal Cortical Neuronal Ensembles Through Activity-Dependent Arc Expression and Dopaminergic Input

    PubMed Central

    Mastwal, Surjeet; Cao, Vania; Wang, Kuan Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mental functions involve coordinated activities of specific neuronal ensembles that are embedded in complex brain circuits. Aberrant neuronal ensemble dynamics is thought to form the neurobiological basis of mental disorders. A major challenge in mental health research is to identify these cellular ensembles and determine what molecular mechanisms constrain their emergence and consolidation during development and learning. Here, we provide a perspective based on recent studies that use activity-dependent gene Arc/Arg3.1 as a cellular marker to identify neuronal ensembles and a molecular probe to modulate circuit functions. These studies have demonstrated that the transcription of Arc is activated in selective groups of frontal cortical neurons in response to specific behavioral tasks. Arc expression regulates the persistent firing of individual neurons and predicts the consolidation of neuronal ensembles during repeated learning. Therefore, the Arc pathway represents a prototypical example of activity-dependent genetic feedback regulation of neuronal ensembles. The activation of this pathway in the frontal cortex starts during early postnatal development and requires dopaminergic (DA) input. Conversely, genetic disruption of Arc leads to a hypoactive mesofrontal dopamine circuit and its related cognitive deficit. This mutual interaction suggests an auto-regulatory mechanism to amplify the impact of neuromodulators and activity-regulated genes during postnatal development. Such a mechanism may contribute to the association of mutations in dopamine and Arc pathways with neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorders. As the mesofrontal dopamine circuit shows extensive activity-dependent developmental plasticity, activity-guided modulation of DA projections or Arc ensembles during development may help to repair circuit deficits related to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27999532

  8. Genetic Feedback Regulation of Frontal Cortical Neuronal Ensembles Through Activity-Dependent Arc Expression and Dopaminergic Input.

    PubMed

    Mastwal, Surjeet; Cao, Vania; Wang, Kuan Hong

    2016-01-01

    Mental functions involve coordinated activities of specific neuronal ensembles that are embedded in complex brain circuits. Aberrant neuronal ensemble dynamics is thought to form the neurobiological basis of mental disorders. A major challenge in mental health research is to identify these cellular ensembles and determine what molecular mechanisms constrain their emergence and consolidation during development and learning. Here, we provide a perspective based on recent studies that use activity-dependent gene Arc/Arg3.1 as a cellular marker to identify neuronal ensembles and a molecular probe to modulate circuit functions. These studies have demonstrated that the transcription of Arc is activated in selective groups of frontal cortical neurons in response to specific behavioral tasks. Arc expression regulates the persistent firing of individual neurons and predicts the consolidation of neuronal ensembles during repeated learning. Therefore, the Arc pathway represents a prototypical example of activity-dependent genetic feedback regulation of neuronal ensembles. The activation of this pathway in the frontal cortex starts during early postnatal development and requires dopaminergic (DA) input. Conversely, genetic disruption of Arc leads to a hypoactive mesofrontal dopamine circuit and its related cognitive deficit. This mutual interaction suggests an auto-regulatory mechanism to amplify the impact of neuromodulators and activity-regulated genes during postnatal development. Such a mechanism may contribute to the association of mutations in dopamine and Arc pathways with neurodevelopmental psychiatric disorders. As the mesofrontal dopamine circuit shows extensive activity-dependent developmental plasticity, activity-guided modulation of DA projections or Arc ensembles during development may help to repair circuit deficits related to neuropsychiatric disorders.

  9. Active rollback in the Gibraltar Arc: Evidences from CGPS data in the western Betic Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Castillo, L.; Galindo-Zaldivar, J.; de Lacy, M. C.; Borque, M. J.; Martinez-Moreno, F. J.; García-Armenteros, J. A.; Gil, A. J.

    2015-11-01

    The Gibraltar Arc, located in the western Mediterranean Sea, is an arcuate Alpine orogen formed by the Betic and Rif Cordilleras, separated by the Alboran Sea. New continuous GPS data (2008-2013) obtained in the Topo-Iberia stations of the western Betic Cordillera allow us to improve the present-day deformation pattern related to active tectonics in this collision area between the Eurasian and African plates. These data indicate a very consistent westward motion of the Betic Cordillera with respect to the relatively stable Iberian Massif foreland. The displacement in the Betics increases toward the south and west, reaching maximum values in the Gibraltar Strait area (4.27 mm/yr in Ceuta, CEU1, and 4.06 mm/yr in San Fernando, SFER), then progressively decreasing toward the northwestern mountain front. The recent geological structures and seismicity evidence moderate deformation in a roughly NW-SE to WNW-ESE compressional stress setting in the mountain frontal areas, and moderate extension toward the internal part of the cordillera. The mountain front undergoes progressive development of folds affecting at least up to Pliocene deposits, with similar recent geological and geodetical rates. This folded strip helps to accommodate the active deformation with scarce associated seismicity. The displacement pattern is in agreement with the present-day clockwise rotation of the tectonic units in the northern branch of the Gibraltar Arc. Our data support that the westward emplacement of the Betic Cordillera continues to be active in a rollback tectonic scenario.

  10. The nature of magmatism at Palinpinon geothermal field, Negros Island, Philippines: implications for geothermal activity and regional tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Andrew J.; Cooke, David R.; Phillips, David; Zaide-Delfin, Maribel

    2004-01-01

    The Palinpinon geothermal field, Negros Island, Philippines is a high-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system in an active island-arc volcanic setting. This paper presents a regional context for the Palinpinon geology, discusses the petrogenetic evolution of magmatism in the district and assesses the genetic relationships between intrusion and geothermal circulation. The oldest rock formation, the Lower Puhagan Volcanic Formation (Middle Miocene), is part of a volcanic sequence that is traceable throughout the Visayas region and is related to subduction of the Sulu Sea oceanic basin in a southeasterly direction beneath the Sulu arc. Late Miocene to Early Pliocene times mark a period of regional subsidence and marine sedimentation. A thick sequence of calcareous sediments (Okoy Formation) was deposited during this period. Magmatism in Early Pliocene to Recent times coincided with commencement of subduction at the Negros-Sulu Arc. This produced basaltic andesites and andesites belonging to the Southern Negros and Cuernos Volcanic Formations. During this time the Puhagan dikes and the Nasuji Pluton intruded Middle Miocene, Late Miocene and Early-Late Pliocene formations. Based on radiogenic ( 40Ar/ 39Ar) dating of hornblende, the Puhagan dikes are 4.1-4.2 Ma and the Nasuji Pluton 0.3-0.7 Ma. This age difference confirms these intrusions are not genetically related. The Early Pliocene age of the Puhagan dikes also confirms they are not the heat source for the current geothermal system and that a much younger intrusion is situated beyond drill depths. Igneous rock formations in southern Negros are the products of regional island-arc magmatism with medium K, calc-alkaline, basaltic to dacitic compositions. Their adakitic affinity implies that the melting of subducted oceanic basalt has influenced magmatism in this region. Considering the regional tectonic history the most likely scenarios for the generation of slab melts are: (1) during the Middle Miocene, by the

  11. Implications Of Light And Trace Elements Signatures in Melt Inclusions Of St Vincent And Grenada Island On The Lesser Antilles Arc Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, A.; Deloule, E.; Métrich, N.

    2008-12-01

    St. Vincent and Grenada islands are located in the south part of the Lesser Antilles arc, generated by the subduction of the Atlantic plate beneath the Caribbean plate. In the both islands, the erupted high-MgO basalts (MgO > 10.0 wt%) are thought to be representative of the primary magmas and to be generated by the melting of a MORB mantle source enriched by fluids derived from the subducted slab [1]. We present here trace element compositions determined by ion probe in melt inclusions (M.I.) trapped in olivines (Fo84-91) from magnesian scoriae, for which light and volatile elements, as stable isotopes were previously measured [2-3]. Their major elements compositions point out a broad variability, but show the primitive character of these M.I. (SiO2 < 50.0 wt%). Grenada M.I. are enriched in K2O (0.4-2.5 wt%) and MgO (up to 12.5 wt%) compared to St. Vincent M.I. (up to 0.85 wt% and 10.0 wt%, respectively). Their trace element patterns encompass those of whole rocks. Compared to St. Vincent, Grenada M.I. recorded more variable trace element compositions. All M.I. patterns are characteristic of subduction zones, with Ba and Sr enrichments associated with pronounced negative Nb anomalies, implying slab-fluids influence, as also demonstrated by high Cl/F ratios (up tp 10.9) [4]. As a whole, REE patterns are enriched and poorly fractionated compared to MORB. The trace element patterns, combined with light element and isotopic compositions, are interpreted in term of variations of degree of mantle partial melting and slab influence, with variable contributions of aqueous fluids released from altered oceanic crust and from sediments, and of sediment melt. Both St. Vincent and Grenada primary magmas record the influence of aqueous fluids, whereas the addition of sediment melt is only identified in Grenada M.I., as Zr positive anomalies (Zr contents up to 1200 ppm), a rare feature in basaltic melts. Although light trace elements and stable isotopes illustrated mostly

  12. 78 FR 23910 - Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Construction at Orcas Island and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... Specified Activities; Construction at Orcas Island and Friday Harbor Ferry Terminals AGENCY: National Marine... at the Orcas Island and Friday Harbor ferry terminals in Washington State between September 2013 and... the Orcas Island and Friday Harbor ferry terminals in Washington State. On July 20, WSDOT submitted...

  13. Propagation of back-arc extension into the arc lithosphere in the southern New Hebrides volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriat, M.; Collot, J.; Danyushevsky, L.; Fabre, M.; Meffre, S.; Falloon, T.; Rouillard, P.; Pelletier, B.; Roach, M.; Fournier, M.

    2015-09-01

    New geophysical data acquired during three expeditions of the R/V Southern Surveyor in the southern part of the North Fiji Basin allow us to characterize the deformation of the upper plate at the southern termination of the New Hebrides subduction zone, where it bends eastward along the Hunter Ridge. Unlike the northern end of the Tonga subduction zone, on the other side of the North Fiji Basin, the 90° bend does not correspond to the transition from a subduction zone to a transform fault, but it is due to the progressive retreat of the New Hebrides trench. The subduction trench retreat is accommodated in the upper plate by the migration toward the southwest of the New Hebrides arc and toward the south of the Hunter Ridge, so that the direction of convergence remains everywhere orthogonal to the trench. In the back-arc domain, the active deformation is characterized by propagation of the back-arc spreading ridge into the Hunter volcanic arc. The N-S spreading axis propagates southward and penetrates in the arc, where it connects to a sinistral strike-slip zone via an oblique rift. The collision of the Loyalty Ridge with the New Hebrides arc, less than two million years ago, likely initiated this deformation pattern and the fragmentation of the upper plate. In this particular geodynamic setting, with an oceanic lithosphere subducting beneath a highly sheared volcanic arc, a wide range of primitive subduction-related magmas has been produced including adakites, island arc tholeiites, back-arc basin basalts, and medium-K subduction-related lavas.

  14. Local influences of geothermal anomalies on permafrost distribution in an active volcanic island (Deception Island, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyanes, G.; Vieira, G.; Caselli, A.; Cardoso, M.; Marmy, A.; Santos, F.; Bernardo, I.; Hauck, C.

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at understanding the spatial distribution and characteristics of the frozen and unfrozen terrain in an alluvial fan on Deception Island, which is an active strato-volcano located in the Bransfield Strait (South Shetland Islands) with recent eruptions in 1967, 1969 and 1970. The alluvial fan is dominated by debris-flow, run-off and rock fall processes and permafrost occurs in several parts in the vicinity of anomalous geothermal heat flux. The aim is to assess the ways volcanic activity controls permafrost development and associated geomorphic dynamics using shallow subsurface, surface and air temperature measurements as well as thaw depth and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys. Results show a temperature increase with depth in the lower part of the fan reaching 13 °C at 0.80 m depth, without the presence of permafrost. The shallow borehole located at this site showed a stable thermal stratification all year-round, with only the upper 0.20 m reacting to meteorological forcing. In the upper part of the alluvial fan and debris cones, c. 100 m from the coast, frozen ground is present at c. 0.70 m depth. There, the shallow borehole shows a good coupling with air temperatures and the thermal regime favours the presence of permafrost. ERT shows the lowest resistivity values in the lower part of the alluvial fan and a highly resistivity zone in the upper sector of the fan and in the debris cones. These large variations in resistivity mark the presence of a saline water wedge from the sea into the fan, reaching frozen ground conditions about 100 m inland. It can be shown that the volcano-hydrothermal activity only inhibits frost development very locally, with frozen ground conditions occurring about 100 m away.

  15. Giant stellar arcs in the Large Magellanic Cloud: a possible link with past activity of the Milky Way nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Yuri N.

    2013-02-01

    The origin of the giant stellar arcs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) remains a controversial issue, one that has been discussed since 1966. No other star/cluster arc is so perfect a segment of a circle; moreover, there is another similar arc nearby. Many hypotheses were advanced to explain these arcs and all but one of these was disproved. It was proposed in 2004 that the origin of these arcs was a bow shock from the jet that is intermittently fired by the Milky Way nucleus; during its last episode of activity the jet was pointed toward the LMC. Quite recently, evidence for such a jet indeed appeared. We suggest that it was once energetic enough to trigger star formation in the LMC, and if the jet opening angle was about 2° then it could push out H i gas from a region of about 2 kpc in size, forming a cavity LMC4, but also squeeze two dense clouds that occurred in the same area, causing the formation of stars along their surfaces facing the core of the Milky Way. As a result, spherical segments of stellar shells might arise, visible now as the arcs named the Quadrant and Sextant, the apexes of which point towards the centre of the Milky Way. The orientation of both arcs could be the key to unlocking their origin. Here we give data that confirm the above hypothesis, amongst which are the radial velocities of stars inside and outside the larger of the LMC arcs. The probability is low that a jet from an active galactic nucleus (AGN) points towards a nearby galaxy and triggers star formation there, but a few other examples are now known or suspected.

  16. Early hominin biogeography in Island Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Larick, Roy; Ciochon, Russell L

    2015-01-01

    Island Southeast Asia covers Eurasia's tropical expanse of continental shelf and active subduction zones. Cutting between island landmasses, Wallace's Line separates Sunda and the Eastern Island Arc (the Arc) into distinct tectonic and faunal provinces. West of the line, on Sunda, Java Island yields many fossils of Homo erectus. East of the line, on the Arc, Flores Island provides one skeleton and isolated remains of Homo floresiensis. Luzon Island in the Philippines has another fossil hominin. Sulawesi preserves early hominin archeology. This insular divergence sets up a unique regional context for early hominin dispersal, isolation, and extinction. The evidence is reviewed across three Pleistocene climate periods. Patterns are discussed in relation to the pulse of global sea-level shifts, as well as regional geo-tectonics, catastrophes, stegodon dispersal, and paleogenomics. Several patterns imply evolutionary processes typical of oceanic islands. Early hominins apparently responded to changing island conditions for a million-and-a-half years, likely becoming extinct during the period in which Homo sapiens colonized the region.

  17. Documenting magmatic processes at Filicudi Island, Aeolian Arc, Italy: Integrating Quantitative Modeling, Plagioclase Textural and In Situ Compositional Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, M. A.; Bohrson, W. A.; Mayfield, A.

    2012-12-01

    Although numerous studies have documented how compositional diversity develops in magmas on Earth, controversy exists regarding the roles that recharge, assimilation and fractional crystallization (RAFC) play in magma evolution. Filicudi Island is one of seven major islands of the Aeolian archipelago in the southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy. Previous whole rock geochemical studies of Filicudi Island have related its magmatic and compositional evolution from calc-alkaline basalt (51 wt. % SiO2) to high-K andesite (62 wt. % SiO2) to fractional crystallization and assimilation processes occurring within several small, separated magma chambers (Santo, 2000). New data collected on samples from Filicudi include whole rock elemental and isotopic data, plagioclase textural and in situ elemental and Sr isotope data, and MELTS modeling. Integration of data allows documentation of the roles and relative chronology that RAFC played in magmatic evolution, as well as elucidates aspects of Filicudi's magma plumbing-system structure. Best-fit MELTS results based on several hundred simulations indicate that magmas from Filicudi evolved in a polybaric magma plumbing system. At deeper levels (3.5-4 kbars), fractional crystallization of Mg-rich clinopyroxene, olivine, and spinel played a dominant role, while high initial H2O contents (3-4.5 wt.%) acted to suppress plagioclase crystallization. Upon ascent, in a shallower part of the magmatic system (0.5-1.2 kbars), magma potentially devolatilized, allowing texturally monotonous plagioclase that was relatively An (90-98 mol %) and Fe (0.6-1.0 wt. %) rich and Sr-depleted (900-1300 ppm) to crystallize. As fractional crystallization continued in the deeper chamber, melts that ascended to the shallow part of the system became progressively more silicic as evidenced by plagioclase that became less An (75-90 mol %) and Fe (0.5-0.6 wt. %) rich, and more Sr-rich (1500-1900 ppm). Similarly, continued fractional crystallization at shallow levels

  18. Formation of cordierite-bearing lavas during anatexis in the lower crust beneath Lipari Island (Aeolian arc, Italy)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Di, Martino C.; Forni, F.; Frezzotti, M.L.; Palmeri, R.; Webster, J.D.; Ayuso, R.A.; Lucchi, F.; Tranne, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Cordierite-bearing lavas (CBL;~105 ka) erupted from the Mt. S. Angelo volcano at Lipari (Aeolian arc, Italy) are high-K andesites, displaying a range in the geochemical and isotopic compositions that reflect heterogeneity in the source and/or processes. CBL consist of megacrysts of Ca-plagioclase and clinopyroxene, euhedral crystals of cordierite and garnet, microphenocrysts of orthopyroxene and plagioclase, set in a heterogeneous rhyodacitic-rhyolitic groundmass containing abundant metamorphic and gabbroic xenoliths. New petrographic, chemical and isotopic data indicate formation of CBL by mixing of basaltic-andesitic magmas and high-K peraluminous rhyolitic magmas of anatectic origin and characterize partial melting processes in the lower continental crust of Lipari. Crustal anatectic melts generated through two main dehydration-melting peritectic reactions of metasedimentary rocks: (1) Biotite + Aluminosilicate + Quartz + Albite = Garnet + Cordierite + K-feldspar + Melt; (2) Biotite + Garnet + Quartz = Orthopyroxene + Cordierite + K-feldspar + Melt. Their position into the petrogenetic grid suggests that heating and consequent melting of metasedimentary rocks occurred at temperatures of 725 < T < 900??C and pressures of 0.4-0.45 GPa. Anatexis in the lower crust of Lipari was induced by protracted emplacement of basic magmas in the lower crust (~130 Ky). Crustal melting of the lower crust at 105 ka affected the volcano evolution, impeding frequent maficmagma eruptions, and promoting magma stagnation and fractional crystallization processes. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Sedimentation rate curves as a key to understand the evolution of arc and backarc basin -Arc type and Basin type-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, K.; Matsuoka, H.

    2003-12-01

    The deepsea cores recovered from about 50 drilling sites in the Philippine Sea, equally distributed in marginal basins, remnant arcs, present arcs and other tectonic settings, during the DSDP/IPOD/ODP offer significant geotectonic information. Sediment accumulation rates, lithologic changes and frequency of tephras were examined in the light of the recent advanced nannofossil biostratigraphy of the sediment on these cores. Sediment accumulation rate curves of these drill sites were classified into two major types, A and B types, respectively. A type has rapid accumulation rates just above the arc basement and then shows a decreasing pattern. In contrast, B type has rather constant accumulation rate throughout the cores. Sediments from the rapid sediment accumulation rates imply volcanogenic debris flow and volcaniclastic turbidite sequences derived which were derived from arcs that represent an activity of magmatic arc consisting of tholeiitic and calc-alkalic volcanic rocks. On the contrary, sediments from the low sediment accumulation rates imply mostly biogenic materials instead of volcaniclastic materials. This may mean the termination of intense arc volcanism. Frequency of volcanic ash layers deduced from these cores has maxima just after the rapid sediment accumulation stage of A type curves. As for the remnant arcs such as the Kyushu-Palau and the Daito Ridge, tephra maxima exist at both late Eocene to early Oligocene time and the present arc such as the Izu-Bonin Arc, there are two major maxima at Eocene-Oligocene and Pliocene-Pleistocene time, respectively. Explosive volcanism may take place when oceanic arc develops as shallow as the pressure compensation level (PCL). If this is the case, we may draw the volcanic history of oceanic island arc. At the incipient stage of arc evolution the style of volcanism is quiet resultant formation of pillow lavas and hyaloclastite. On the contrary, the intense volcanism takes place with formation of marine tephra

  20. Application of fuzzy logic and fuzzy AHP to mineral prospectivity mapping of porphyry and hydrothermal vein copper deposits in the Dananhu-Tousuquan island arc, Xinjiang, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nannan; Zhou, Kefa; Du, Xishihui

    2017-04-01

    Mineral prospectivity mapping (MPM) is a multi-step process that ranks promising target areas for further exploration. Fuzzy logic and fuzzy analytical hierarchy process (AHP) are knowledge-driven MPM approaches. In this study, both approaches were used for data processing, based on which MPM was performed for porphyry and hydrothermal vein copper deposits in the Dananhu-Tousuquan island arc, Xinjiang. The results of the two methods were then compared. The two methods combined expert experience and the Studentized contrast (S(C)) values of the weights-of-evidence approach to calculate the weights of 15 layers, and these layers were then integrated by the gamma operator (γ). Through prediction-area (P-A) plot analysis, the optimal γ for fuzzy logic and fuzzy AHP was determined as 0.95 and 0.93, respectively. The thresholds corresponding to different levels of metallogenic probability were defined via concentration-area (C-A) fractal analysis. The prediction performances of the two methods were compared on this basis. The results showed that in MPM based on fuzzy logic, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.806 and 81.48% of the known deposits were predicted, whereas in MPM based on fuzzy AHP, the area under the ROC curve was 0.862 and 92.59% of the known deposits were predicted. Therefore, prediction based on fuzzy AHP is more accurate and can provide directions for future prospecting.

  1. Propagation of back-arc extension in the arc of the southern New Hebrides Subduction Zone (South West Pacific) and possible relation to subduction initiation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, M.; Patriat, M.; Collot, J.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Meffre, S.; Falloon, T.; Rouillard, P.; Pelletier, B.; Roach, M. J.; Fournier, M.

    2015-12-01

    Geophysical data acquired during three expeditions of the R/V Southern Surveyor allows us to characterize the deformation of the upper plate at the southern termination of the New Hebrides subduction zone where it bends 90° eastward along the Hunter Ridge. As shown by GPS measurements and earthquake slip vectors systematically orthogonal to the trench, this 90° bend does not mark a transition from subduction to strike slip as usually observed at subduction termination. Here the convergence direction remains continuously orthogonal to the trench notwithstanding its bend. Multibeam bathymetric data acquired in the North Fiji Basin reveals active deformation and fragmentation of the upper plate. It shows the southward propagation of a N-S back-arc spreading ridge into the pre-existing volcanic arc, and the connection of the southern end of the spreading axis with an oblique active rift in the active arc. Ultimately the active arc lithosphere is sheared as spreading progressively supersedes rifting. Consequently to such incursion of back-arc basin extension into the arc, peeled off and drifted pieces of arc crust are progressively isolated into the back-arc basin. Another consequence is that the New Hebrides arc is split in two distinct microplates, which move independently relative to the lower plate, and thereby define two different subduction systems. We suggest arc fragmentation could be a consequence of the incipient collision of the Loyalty Ridge with the New Hebrides Arc. We further speculate that this kinematic change could have resulted, less than two million year ago, in the initiation of a new subduction orthogonal to the New Hebrides Subduction possibly along the paleo STEP fault. In this geodynamic setting, with an oceanic lithosphere subducting beneath a sheared volcanic arc, a particularly wide range of primitive subduction-related magmas have been produced including adakites, island arc tholeiites, back-arc basin basalts, and medium-K subduction

  2. Human activity and damaging landslides and floods on Madeira Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baioni, D.

    2011-11-01

    Over the last few decades, the island of Madeira has become an important offshore tourism and business center, with rapid economic and demographic development that has caused changes to the landscape due to human activity. In Madeira's recent history, there has been an increase over time in the frequency of occurrence of damaging landslide and flood events. As a result, the costs of restoration work due to damage caused by landslide and flood events have become a larger and larger component of Madeira's annual budget. Landslides and floods in Madeira deserve particular attention because they represent the most serious hazard to human life, to property, and to the natural environment and its important heritage value. The work reported on in this paper involved the analysis of historical data regarding damaging landslide and flood events on Madeira (in particular from 1941 to 1991) together with data on geological characteristics, topographic features, and climate, and from field observations. This analysis showed that the main factor triggering the occurrence of damaging landslide and flood events is rainfall, but that the increase in the number of damaging events recorded on Madeira Island, especially in recent times, seems to be related mostly to human activity, specifically to economic development and population growth, rather than to natural factors.

  3. Arc/Arg3.1 Is a Postsynaptic Mediator of Activity-Dependent Synapse Elimination in the Developing Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Mikuni, Takayasu; Uesaka, Naofumi; Okuno, Hiroyuki; Hirai, Hirokazu; Deisseroth, Karl; Bito, Haruhiko; Kano, Masanobu

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural circuits are shaped by activity-dependent elimination of redundant synapses during postnatal development. In many systems, postsynaptic activity is known to be crucial, but the precise mechanisms remain elusive. Here we report that the immediate early gene Arc/Arg3.1 mediates elimination of surplus climbing fiber (CF) to Purkinje cell (PC) synapses in the developing cerebellum. CF synapse elimination was accelerated when activity of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing PCs was elevated by 2-day photo-stimulation. This acceleration was suppressed by PC-specific knockdown of either P/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDCC) or Arc. PC-specific Arc knockdown had no appreciable effect until around postnatal day 11, but significantly impaired CF synapse elimination thereafter, leaving redundant CF terminals on PC somata. The effect of Arc knockdown was occluded by simultaneous knockdown of P/Q-type VDCC in PCs. We conclude that Arc mediates the final stage of CF synapse elimination downstream of P/Q-type VDCC by removing CF synapses from PC somata. PMID:23791196

  4. Preliminary Geologic Map of Mount Pagan Volcano, Pagan Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, Frank A.; Moore, Richard B.; Sako, Maurice K.

    2006-01-01

    Pagan Island is the subaerial portion of two adjoining Quaternary stratovolcanoes near the middle of the active Mariana Arc, [FAT1]north of Saipan. Pagan and the other volcanic islands that constitute part of the Arc form the northern half of the East Mariana Ridge[FAT2], which extends about 2-4 km above the ocean floor. The > 6-km-deep Mariana Trench adjoins the East Mariana Ridge on the east, and the Mariana Trough, partly filled with young lava flows and volcaniclastic sediment, lies on the west of the Northern Mariana Islands (East Mariana Ridge. The submarine West Mariana Ridge, Tertiary in age, bounds the western side of the Mariana Trough. The Mariana Trench and Northern Mariana Islands (East Mariana Ridge) overlie an active subduction zone where the Pacific Plate, moving northwest at about 10.3 cm/year, is passing beneath the Philippine Plate, moving west-northwest at 6.8 cm/year. Beneath the Northern Mariana Islands, earthquake hypocenters at depths of 50-250 km identify the location of the west-dipping subduction zone, which farther west becomes nearly vertical and extends to 700 km depth. During the past century, more than 40 earthquakes of magnitude 6.5-8.1 have shaken the Mariana Trench. The Mariana Islands form two sub-parallel, concentric, concave-west arcs. The southern islands comprise the outer arc and extend north from Guam to Farallon de Medinilla. They consist of Eocene to Miocene volcanic rocks and uplifted Tertiary and Quaternary limestone. The nine northern islands extend from Anatahan to Farallon de Pajaros and form part of the inner arc. The active inner arc extends south from Anatahan, where volcanoes, some of which are active, form seamounts west of the older outer arc. Other volcanic seamounts of the active arc surmount the East Mariana Ridge in the vicinity of Anatahan and Sarigan and north and south of Farallon de Pajaros. Six volcanoes (Farallon de Pajaros, Asuncion, Agrigan, Mount Pagan, Guguan, and Anatahan) in the northern islands

  5. Paleomagnetism of the Samar Ophiolite: Implications for the Cretaceous sub-equatorial position of the Philippine island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmater, Hertz G.; Manalo, Pearlyn C.; Faustino-Eslava, Decibel V.; Queaño, Karlo L.; Dimalanta, Carla B.; Guotana, Juan Miguel R.; Ramos, Noelynna T.; Payot, Betchaida D.; Yumul, Graciano P.

    2015-11-01

    Samar island in the eastern part of Central Philippines is underlain by a complete ophiolite suite, the Samar Ophiolite. We present the first geochronological and paleomagnetic data for the Samar Ophiolite. Whole rock K-Ar dating of two basalt samples yielded an age of 100.2 ± 2.7 Ma and 97.9 ± 2.8 Ma. Thirteen sites in four localities yielded characteristic remanent magnetization with in situ direction of D = 340°, I = - 24°, k = 15, α95 = 11° and tilt-corrected direction of D = 342°, I = - 27°, k = 15, α95 = 11°. These values suggest that the ophiolitic basement rocks of Samar formed in the Late Cretaceous at a paleolatitude of 14°S ± 6°. The paleolatitude is several degrees south of the sub-equatorial positions calculated for the three other Mesozoic ophiolites of the Philippine Mobile Belt (PMB) whose paleomagnetism had been previously studied. The PMB ophiolites in eastern and central Philippines share a common age, geochemistry and paleolatitude with the Halmahera Ophiolite, suggesting that they originated from a Mesozoic supra-subduction zone that spanned a few degrees north of the equator to around 15°S.

  6. Seismic velocity variation along the Izu-Bonin arc estaimated from traveltime tomography using OBS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obana, K.; Tamura, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Kodaira, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) arc is an intra-oceanic island arc along the convergent plate boundary between the subducting Pacific and overriding Philippine Sea plates. Recent active seismic studies in the Izu-Bonin arc reveal significant along-arc variations in crustal structure [Kodaira et al., 2007]. The thickness of the arc crust shows a remarkable change between thicker Izu (~30 km) and thinner Bonin (~10 km) arcs. In addition to this, several geological and geophysical contrasts, such as seafloor topography and chemical composition of volcanic rocks, between Izu and Bonin arc have been reported [e.g., Yuasa 1992]. We have conducted earthquake observations using ocean bottom seismographs (OBSs) to reveal seismic velocity structure of the crust and mantle wedge in the Izu-Bonin arc and to investigate origin of the along-arc structure variations. We deployed 40 short-period OBSs in Izu and Bonin area in 2006 and 2009, respectively. The OBS data were processed with seismic data recorded at routine seismic stations on Hachijo-jima, Aoga-shima, and Chichi-jima operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED). More than 5000 earthquakes were observed during about three-months observation period in each experiment. We conducted three-dimensional seismic tomography using manually picked P- and S-wave arrival time data. The obtained image shows a different seismic velocity structures in the mantle beneath the volcanic front between Izu and Bonin arcs. Low P-wave velocity anomalies in the mantle beneath the volcanic front in the Izu arc are limited at depths deeper than those in the Bonin arc. On the other hand, P-wave velocity in the low velocity anomalies beneath volcanic front in the Bonin arc is slower than that in the Izu arc. These large-scale along-arc structure variations in the mantle could relate to the geological and geophysical contrasts between Izu and Bonin arcs.

  7. Tsunami recurrence in the eastern Alaska-Aleutian arc: A Holocene stratigraphic record from Chirikof Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Alan R.; Briggs, Richard; Dura, Tina; Engelhart, Simon E.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Bradley, Lee-Ann; Forman, S.L.; Vane, Christopher H.; Kelley, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    cannot estimate source earthquake locations or magnitudes for most tsunami-deposited beds. We infer that no more than 3 of the 23 possible tsunamis beds at both sites were deposited following upper plate faulting or submarine landslides independent of megathrust earthquakes. If so, the Semidi segment of the Alaska-Aleutian megathrust near Chirikof Island probably sent high tsunamis southward every 180–270 yr for at least the past 3500 yr.                   

  8. Darwin : The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site /

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, William E.; Jones, L. A.; Baldwin, T.; Nitschke, K.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program began operations in its Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale in October 1996 when the first Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) began collecting data on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Two years later, in November 1998, a second ARCS began operations on the island of Nauru in the Central Pacific. Now a third ARCS has begun collecting data in Darwin, Australia. The Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites are operated through collaborative agreements with the PNG National Weather Service, The Nauru Department of Industry and Economic Development (IED), and the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's (BOM) Special Services Unit (SSU) respectively. All ARM TWP activities in the region are coordinated with the South Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) based in Apia, Samoa. The Darwin ARM site and its role in the ARM TWP Program are discussed.

  9. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of WO(3) nanoparticles prepared by the arc discharge method in deionized water.

    PubMed

    Ashkarran, A A; Iraji Zad, A; Ahadian, M M; Mahdavi Ardakani, S A

    2008-05-14

    In this paper, we discuss the synthesis and characterization of tungsten trioxide nanoparticles prepared by the arc discharge method in deionized (DI) water. The size and morphology of WO(3) nanoparticles prepared using different arc currents (25, 35 and 45 A) were studied. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results indicate that at an arc current of 25 A, the size of the particles is about 30 nm, and this increases to 64 nm by increasing the arc current. This size increase caused a decrease of optical band gap from 2.9 to 2.6 eV. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra demonstrate the formation of the WO(3) phase. Photodegradation of Rhodamine B shows that samples prepared at the lowest current have more photocatalytic activity due to having the smallest particle size and highest surface area. The results demonstrate the ability of the arc discharge method for direct formation of WO(3) nanoparticles in DI water medium.

  10. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Molybdenum Cofactor Enzyme crARC Has a Zn-Dependent Activity and Protein Partners Similar to Those of Its Human Homologue ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chamizo-Ampudia, Alejandro; Galvan, Aurora; Fernandez, Emilio; Llamas, Angel

    2011-01-01

    The ARC (amidoxime reducing component) proteins are molybdenum cofactor (Moco) enzymes named hmARC1 and hmARC2 (human ARCs [hmARCs]) in humans and YcbX in Escherichia coli. They catalyze the reduction of a broad range of N-hydroxylated compounds (NHC) using reducing power supplied by other proteins. Some NHC are prodrugs or toxic compounds. YcbX contains a ferredoxin (Fd) domain and requires the NADPH flavin reductase CysJ to reduce NHC. In contrast, hmARCs lack the Fd domain and require a human cytochrome b5 (hCyt b5) and a human NADH Cyt b5 reductase (hCyt b5-R) to reduce NHC. The ARC proteins in the plant kingdom are uncharacterized. We demonstrate that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants defective in Moco biosynthesis genes are sensitive to the NHC N6-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP). The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ARC protein crARC has been purified and characterized. The six Chlamydomonas Fds were isolated, but none of them are required by crARC to reduce HAP. We have also purified and characterized five C. reinhardtii Cyt b5 (crCyt b5) and two flavin reductases, one that is NADPH dependent (crCysJ) and one that is NADH dependent (crCyt b5-R). The data show that crARC uses crCyt b5-1 and crCyt b5-R to reduce HAP. The crARC has a Zn-dependent activity, and the presence of Zn increases its Vmax more than 14-fold. In addition, all five cysteines of crARC were substituted by alanine, and we demonstrate that the fully conserved cysteine 252 is essential for both Moco binding and catalysis. Therefore, it is proposed that crARC belongs to the sulfite oxidase family of Moco enzymes. PMID:21803866

  11. Specification of Tectonic Tsunami Sources Along the Eastern Aleutian Island Arc and Alaska Peninsula for Inundation Mapping and Hazard Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimani, E.; Nicolsky, D.; Freymueller, J. T.; Koehler, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Alaska Earthquake Information Center conducts tsunami inundation mapping for coastal communities in Alaska along several segments of the Aleutian Megathrust, each having a unique seismic history and tsunami generation potential. Accurate identification and characterization of potential tsunami sources is a critical component of our project. As demonstrated by the 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami, correct estimation of the maximum size event for a given segment of the subduction zone is particularly important. In that event, unexpectedly large slip occurred approximately updip of the epicenter of the main shock, based on seafloor GPS and seafloor pressure gage observations, generating a much larger tsunami than anticipated. This emphasizes the importance of the detailed knowledge of the region-specific subduction processes, and using the most up-to-date geophysical data and research models that define the magnitude range of possible future tsunami events. Our study area extends from the eastern half of the 1957 rupture zone to Kodiak Island, covering the 1946 and 1938 rupture areas, the Shumagin gap, and the western part of the 1964 rupture area. We propose a strategy for generating worst-case credible tsunami scenarios for locations that have a short or nonexistent paleoseismic/paleotsunami record, and in some cases lack modern seismic and GPS data. The potential tsunami scenarios are built based on a discretized plate interface model fit to the Slab 1.0 model geometry. We employ estimates of slip deficit along the Aleutian Megathrust from GPS campaign surveys, the Slab 1.0 interface surface, empirical magnitude-slip relationships, and a numerical code that distributes slip among the subfault elements, calculates coseismic deformations and solves the shallow water equations of tsunami propagation and runup. We define hypothetical asperities along the megathrust and in down-dip direction, and perform a set of sensitivity model runs to identify coseismic deformation

  12. Dendritic transport element of human arc mRNA confers RNA degradation activity in a translation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Kensuke; Ohno, Mutsuhito; Kataoka, Naoyuki

    2016-11-01

    Localization of mRNA in neuronal cells is a critical process for spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression. Cytoplasmic localization of mRNA is often conferred by transport elements in 3' untranslated region (UTR). Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (arc) mRNA is one of the localizing mRNAs in neuronal cells, and its localization is mediated by dendritic targeting element (DTE). As arc mRNA has introns in its 3' UTR, it was thought that arc mRNA is a natural target of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Here, we show that DTE in human arc 3' UTR has destabilizing activity of RNA independent of NMD pathway. DTE alone was able to cause instability of the reporter mRNA and this degradation was dependent on translation. Our results indicate that DTE has dual activity in mRNA transport and degradation, which suggests the novel spatiotemporal regulation mechanism of activity-dependent degradation of the mRNA.

  13. Explorations of Mariana Arc Volcanoes Reveal New Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, R. W.; Baker, E. T.; Chadwick, W. W., Jr.; Lupton, J. E.; Resing, J. A.; Massoth, G. J.; Nakamura, K.

    2004-01-01

    Some 20,000 km of volcanic arcs, roughly one-third the length of the global mid-ocean ridge (MOR) system, rim the western Pacific Ocean. Compared to 25 years of hydrothermal investigations along MORs, exploration of similar activity on the estimated ~600 submarine arc volcanoes is only beginning [Ishibashi and Urabe, 1995; De Ronde et al., 2003]. To help alleviate this under-sampling, the R/V T. G. Thompson was used in early 2003 (9 February to 5 March) to conduct the first complete survey of hydrothermal activity along 1200 km of the Mariana intra-oceanic volcanic arc. This region includes both the Territory of Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The expedition mapped over 50 submarine volcanoes with stunning new clarity (Figures 1 and 2) and found active hydrothermal discharge at 12 sites, including the southern back-arc site. This includes eight new sites along the arc (West Rota, Northwest Rota, E. Diamante, Zealandia Bank, Maug Caldera, Ahyi, Daikoku, and Northwest Eifuku) and four sites of previously known hydrothermal activity (Seamount X, Esmeralda, Kasuga 2, and Nikko) (Figures 1 and 2). The mapping also fortuitously provided a ``before'' image of the submarine flanks of Anatahan Island, which had its first historical eruption on 10 May 2003 (Figures 1 and 3).

  14. Volcanology and eruptive styles of Barren Island: an active mafic stratovolcano in the Andaman Sea, NE Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu C.; Ray, Jyotiranjan S.; Bhutani, Rajneesh; Kumar, Alok; Smitha, R. S.

    2009-11-01

    Barren Island (India) is a relatively little studied, little known active volcano in the Andaman Sea, and the northernmost active volcano of the great Indonesian arc. The volcano is built of prehistoric (possibly late Pleistocene) lava flows (dominantly basalt and basaltic andesite, with minor andesite) intercalated with volcaniclastic deposits (tuff breccias, and ash beds deposited by pyroclastic falls and surges), which are exposed along a roughly circular caldera wall. There are indications of a complete phreatomagmatic tephra ring around the exposed base of the volcano. A polygenetic cinder cone has existed at the centre of the caldera and produced basalt-basaltic andesite aa and blocky aa lava flows, as well as tephra, during historic eruptions (1787-1832) and three recent eruptions (1991, 1994-95, 2005-06). The recent aa flows include a toothpaste aa flow, with tilted and overturned crustal slabs carried atop an aa core, as well as locally developed tumuli-like elliptical uplifts having corrugated crusts. Based on various evidence we infer that it belongs to either the 1991 or the 1994-95 eruptions. The volcano has recently (2008) begun yet another eruption, so far only of tephra. We make significantly different interpretations of several features of the volcano than previous workers. This study of the volcanology and eruptive styles of the Barren Island volcano lays the ground for detailed geochemical-isotopic and petrogenetic work, and provides clues to what the volcano can be expected to do in the future.

  15. In vitro antibacterial activity and cytocompatibility of bismuth doped micro-arc oxidized titanium.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dan-Jae; Tsai, Ming-Tzu; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Huang, Heng-Li; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Ko, Yi-Chun; Fuh, Lih-Jyh

    2013-01-01

    Chemical manipulations of the implant surface produce a bactericidal feature to prevent infections around dental implants. Despite the successful use of bismuth against mucosal and dermis infections, the antibacterial effect of bismuth in the oral cavity remains under investigation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activities of bismuth compounds against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Staphylococcus mutans, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and to investigate the antimicrobial effects of bismuth doped micro-arc oxidation (MAO) titanium via an agar diffusion test. Cell viability, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization level of MG63 osteoblast-like cells seeded on the coatings were evaluated at 1, 7, and 14 days. The results demonstrate that bismuth nitrate possess superior antibacterial activity when compared with bismuth acetate, bismuth subgallate, and silver nitrate. The bismuth doped MAO coating (contained 6.2 atomic percentage bismuth) had good biological affinities to the MG63 cells and showed a higher antibacterial efficacy against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and MRSA, where the reduction rates of colony numbers is higher than that of the control group by 1.5 and 1.9 times, respectively. These in vitro evaluations demonstrate that titanium implants with bismuth on the surface may be useful for better infection control.

  16. Attaining high-resolution eruptive histories for active arc volcanoes with argon geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.

    2012-04-01

    Geochronology of active arc volcanoes commonly illuminates eruptive behavior over tens to hundreds of thousands of years, lengthy periods of repose punctuated by short eruptive episodes, and spatial and compositional changes with time. Despite the >1 Gyr half-life of 40K, argon geochronology is an exceptional tool for characterizing Pleistocene to Holocene eruptive histories and for placing constraints on models of eruptive behavior. Reliable 40Ar/39Ar ages of calc-alkaline arc rocks with rigorously derived errors small enough (± 500 to 3,000 years) to constrain eruptive histories are attainable using careful procedures. Sample selection and analytical work in concert with geologic mapping and stratigraphic studies are essential for determining reliable eruptive histories. Preparation, irradiation and spectrometric techniques have all been optimized to produce reliable, high-precision results. Examples of Cascade and Alaska/Aleutian eruptive histories illustrating duration of activity from single centers, eruptive episodicity, and spatial and compositional changes with time will be presented: (1) Mt. Shasta, the largest Cascade stratovolcano, has a 700,000-year history (Calvert and Christiansen, 2011 Fall AGU). A similar sized and composition volcano (Rainbow Mountain) on the Cascade axis was active 1200-950 ka. The eruptive center then jumped west 15 km to the south flank of the present Mt. Shasta and produced a stratovolcano from 700-450 ka likely rivaling today's Mt. Shasta. The NW portion of that edifice failed in an enormous (>30 km3) debris avalanche. Vents near today's active summit erupted 300-135 ka, then 60-15 ka. A voluminous, but short-lived eruptive sequence occurred at 11 ka, including a summit explosion producing a subplinian plume, followed by >60 km3 andesite-dacite Shastina domes and flows, then by the flank dacite Black Butte dome. Holocene domes and flows subsequently rebuilt the summit and flowed to the north and east. (2) Mt. Veniaminof on

  17. Arc-parallel extension and fluid flow in an ancient accretionary wedge: The San Juan Islands, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schermer, E.R.; Gillaspy, J.R.; Lamb, R.

    2007-01-01

    Structural analysis of the Lopez Structural Complex, a major Late Cretaceous terrane-bounding fault zone in the San Juan thrust system, reveals a sequence of events that provides insight into accretionary wedge mechanics and regional tectonics. After formation of regional ductile flattening and shear-related fabrics, the area was crosscut by brittle structures including: (1) southwest-vergent thrusts, (2) extension veins and normal faults related to northwest-southeast extension, and (3) conjugate strike-slip structures that record northwest-southeast extension and northeast-southwest shortening. Aragonite-bearing veins are associated with thrust and normal faults, but only rarely with strike-slip faults. High-pressure, low-temperature (HP-LT) minerals constrain the conditions for brittle deformation to ???20 km and <250 ??C. The presence of similar structures elsewhere indicates that the brittle structural sequence is typical of the San Juan nappes. Sustained HP-LT conditions are possible only if structures formed in an accretionary prism during active subduction, which suggests that these brittle structures record internal wedge deformation at depth and early during uplift of the San Juan nappes. The structures are consistent with orogen-normal shortening and vertical thickening followed by vertical thinning and along-strike extension. The kinematic evolution may be related initially to changes in wedge strength, followed by response to overthickening of the wedge in an unbuttressed, obliquely convergent setting. The change in vein mineralogy indicates that exhumation occurred prior to the strike-slip event. The pressure and temperature conditions and spatial and temporal extent of small faults associated with fluid flow suggest a link between these structures and the silent earthquake process. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  18. The activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1) is required for memory consolidation of pavlovian fear conditioning in the lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Ploski, Jonathan E; Pierre, Vicki J; Smucny, Jason; Park, Kevin; Monsey, Melissa S; Overeem, Kathie A; Schafe, Glenn E

    2008-11-19

    The activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1) is an immediate early gene that has been widely implicated in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory and is believed to play an integral role in synapse-specific plasticity. Here, we examined the role of Arc/Arg3.1 in amygdala-dependent Pavlovian fear conditioning. We first examined the regulation of Arc/Arg3.1 mRNA and protein after fear conditioning and LTP-inducing stimulation of thalamic inputs to the lateral amygdala (LA). Quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry revealed a significant upregulation of Arc/Arg3.1 mRNA and protein in the LA relative to controls. In behavioral experiments, intra-LA infusion of an Arc/Arg3.1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) was observed to be anatomically restricted to the LA, taken up by LA cells, and to promote significant knockdown of Arc/Arg3.1 protein. Rats given intra-LA infusions of multiple doses of the Arc/Arg3.1 ODN showed an impairment of LTM (tested approximately 24 later), but no deficit in STM (tested 3 h later) relative to controls infused with scrambled ODN. Finally, to determine whether upregulation of Arc/Arg3.1 occurs downstream of ERK/MAPK activation, we examined Arc/Arg3.1 expression in rats given intra-LA infusion of the MEK inhibitor U0126. Relative to vehicle controls, infusion of U0126 impaired training-induced increases in Arc/Arg3.1 expression. These findings suggest that Arc/Arg3.1 expression in the amygdala is required for fear memory consolidation, and further suggest that Arc/Arg3.1 regulation in the LA is downstream of the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway.

  19. Agonist activation of arachidonate-regulated Ca2+-selective (ARC) channels in murine parotid and pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Mignen, Olivier; Thompson, Jill L; Yule, David I; Shuttleworth, Trevor J

    2005-05-01

    ARC channels (arachidonate-regulated Ca(2+)-selective channels) are a novel type of highly Ca(2+)-selective channel that are specifically activated by low concentrations of agonist-induced arachidonic acid. This activation occurs in the absence of any depletion of internal Ca(2+) stores (i.e. they are 'non-capacitative'). Previous studies in HEK293 cells have shown that these channels provide the predominant pathway for the entry of Ca(2+) seen at low agonist concentrations where oscillatory [Ca(2+)](i) signals are typically produced. In contrast, activation of the more widely studied store-operated Ca(2+) channels (e.g. CRAC channels) is only seen at higher agonist concentrations where sustained 'plateau-type'[Ca(2+)](i) responses are observed. We have now demonstrated the presence of ARC channels in both parotid and pancreatic acinar cells and shown that, again, they are specifically activated by the low concentrations of appropriate agonists (carbachol in the parotid, and both carbachol and cholecystokinin in the pancreas) that are associated with oscillatory [Ca(2+)](i) signals in these cells. Uncoupling the receptor-mediated activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) with isotetrandrine reduces the activation of the ARC channels by carbachol and, correspondingly, markedly inhibits the [Ca(2+)](i) signals induced by low carbachol concentrations, whilst those signals seen at high agonist concentrations are essentially unaffected. Interestingly, in the pancreatic acinar cells, activation by cholecystokinin induces a current through the ARC channels that is only approximately 60% of that seen with carbachol. This is consistent with previous reports indicating that carbachol-induced [Ca(2+)](i) signals in these cells are much more dependent on Ca(2+) entry than are the cholecystokinin-induced responses.

  20. A validated active contour method driven by parabolic arc model for detection and segmentation of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Tasel, Serdar F; Mumcuoglu, Erkan U; Hassanpour, Reza Z; Perkins, Guy

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies reveal that mitochondria take substantial responsibility in cellular functions that are closely related to aging diseases caused by degeneration of neurons. These studies emphasize that the membrane and crista morphology of a mitochondrion should receive attention in order to investigate the link between mitochondrial function and its physical structure. Electron microscope tomography (EMT) allows analysis of the inner structures of mitochondria by providing highly detailed visual data from large volumes. Computerized segmentation of mitochondria with minimum manual effort is essential to accelerate the study of mitochondrial structure/function relationships. In this work, we improved and extended our previous attempts to detect and segment mitochondria from transmission electron microcopy (TEM) images. A parabolic arc model was utilized to extract membrane structures. Then, curve energy based active contours were employed to obtain roughly outlined candidate mitochondrial regions. Finally, a validation process was applied to obtain the final segmentation data. 3D extension of the algorithm is also presented in this paper. Our method achieved an average F-score performance of 0.84. Average Dice Similarity Coefficient and boundary error were measured as 0.87 and 14nm respectively.

  1. Morpho-structural evolution of a volcanic island developed inside an active oceanic rift: S. Miguel Island (Terceira Rift, Azores)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibrant, A. L. R.; Hildenbrand, A.; Marques, F. O.; Weiss, B.; Boulesteix, T.; Hübscher, C.; Lüdmann, T.; Costa, A. C. G.; Catalão, J. C.

    2015-08-01

    The evolution of volcanic islands is generally marked by fast construction phases alternating with destruction by a variety of mass-wasting processes. More specifically, volcanic islands located in areas of intense regional deformation can be particularly prone to gravitational destabilisation. The island of S. Miguel (Azores) has developed during the last 1 Myr inside the active Terceira Rift, a major tectonic structure materializing the present boundary between the Eurasian and Nubian lithospheric plates. In this work, we depict the evolution of the island, based on high-resolution DEM data, stratigraphic and structural analyses, high-precision K-Ar dating on separated mineral phases, and offshore data (bathymetry and seismic profiles). The new results indicate that: (1) the oldest volcanic complex (Nordeste), composing the easternmost part of the island, was dominantly active between ca. 850 and 750 ka, and was subsequently affected by a major south-directed flank collapse. (2) Between at least 500 ka and 250 ka, the landslide depression was massively filled by a thick lava succession erupted from volcanic cones and domes distributed along the main E-W collapse scar. (3) Since 250 kyr, the western part of this succession (Furnas area) was affected by multiple vertical collapses; associated plinian eruptions produced large pyroclastic deposits, here dated at ca. 60 ka and less than 25 ka. (4) During the same period, the eastern part of the landslide scar was enlarged by retrogressive erosion, producing the large Povoação valley, which was gradually filled by sediments and young volcanic products. (5) The Fogo volcano, in the middle of S. Miguel, is here dated between ca. 270 and 17 ka, and was affected by, at least, one southwards flank collapse. (6) The Sete Cidades volcano, in the western end of the island, is here dated between ca. 91 and 13 ka, and experienced mutliple caldera collapses; a landslide to the North is also suspected from the presence of a

  2. Submarine evidence for large-scale debris avalanches in the Lesser Antilles Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deplus, Christine; Le Friant, Anne; Boudon, Georges; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Villemant, Benoit; Harford, Chloe; Ségoufin, Jacques; Cheminée, Jean-Louis

    2001-10-01

    Results from a recent marine geophysical survey demonstrate the importance of the process of flank collapse in the growth and evolution of volcanoes along an island arc. The Aguadomar cruise, aboard the French R/V L'Atalante, surveyed the flanks of the Lesser Antilles Arc between the islands of Montserrat and St. Lucia. Analysis of the data shows that flank collapse events occurred on active volcanoes all along the arc and resulted in debris avalanches, some of them being of large magnitude. The debris avalanche deposits display hummocky topography on the swath bathymetry, speckled pattern on backscatter images, hyperbolic facies on 3.5 kHz echosounder data and chaotic units on air gun seismic profiles. They extend from horseshoe-shaped structures previously identified on the subaerial part of the volcanoes. In the southern part of the arc, large-scale debris avalanche deposits were identified on the floor of the Grenada Basin west of active volcanoes on Dominica, Martinique and St. Lucia. The extent of debris avalanche deposits off Dominica is about 3500 km 2. The debris avalanches have resulted from major flank collapse events which may be mainly controlled by the large-scale structure of the island arc and the presence of the deep Grenada Basin. In the northern part of the arc, several debris avalanche deposits were also identified around the island of Montserrat. With smaller extent (20-120 km 2), they are present on the east, south and west submarine flanks of Soufriere Hills volcano which has been erupting since July 1995. Flank collapse is thus a recurrent process in the recent history of this volcano. The marine data are also relevant for a discussion of the transport mechanisms of debris avalanches on the seafloor surrounding a volcanic island arc.

  3. Active tectonics and mud diapirism in the Gulf of Squillace (Crotone Basin, Calabrian Arc, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artoni, A.; Capozzi, R.; Lorenzini, S.; Oppo, D.; Polonia, A.; Torelli, L.

    2009-04-01

    The Calabrian arc is a prominent accretionary prism in the Mediterranean sea that contains alpine metamorphic rocks and connects the southern Apennine chain of Calabria, to the north, with the Maghrebian chain of Sicily, to the southwest. Recent active deformation inside the prism is testified by the earthquakes records and by submarine mud volcanism. The latter, not yet well defined within the accretionary prism, is generally associated to deeper active tectonic structures. In order to unravel the relationships between mud volcanoes and deeper deformations a study has been carried out in the Gulf of Squillace, located in the central portion of the backstop zone of the Calabrian arc and inside the Crotone basin. The deeper tectono-stratigraphic frame has been defined by using 10 well logs, 330 kms of public seismic reflection lines and three CROP seismic lines (the project for deep crust of Italy) recently processed with prestack depth migration. The study has been carried out within the Italian PRIN 2006 Project: "Tectonic and Sedimentation in the Accretionary Complex at the Front of the Calabrian Arc (Ionian Sea)". Three major tectonic units could be distinguished; from the top to the bottom, they are: 1) a metamorphic basement nappe (Alpine/Calabrian units); 2) a complex and east-verging Apenninic-Maghrebian prism, that can be subdivided in an outer prism sealed by middle Eocene(?)/Oligocene deposits and an inner prism sealed by middle/late Miocene deposits; 3) a deeper Mesozoic to Neogene relatively undeformed block interpreted as a thinned block of continental crust that preserves Mesozoic extensional fault. Subsurface mapping of Alpine/Calabrian and Apenninic-Maghrebian units show that their leading edges are oriented NNE-SSW and their tectonic stack was completed at least in the late Miocene; since then, WNW-ESE trending Catanzaro-Squillace transcurrent faults system and out-of-sequence thrusting started to locally reshape the backstop. The Cantanzaro

  4. Lithospheric Contributions to Arc Magmatism: Isotope Variations Along Strike in Volcanoes of Honshu, Japan

    PubMed

    Kersting; Arculus; Gust

    1996-06-07

    Major chemical exchange between the crust and mantle occurs in subduction zone environments, profoundly affecting the chemical evolution of Earth. The relative contributions of the subducting slab, mantle wedge, and arc lithosphere to the generation of island arc magmas, and ultimately new continental crust, are controversial. Isotopic data for lavas from a transect of volcanoes in a single arc segment of northern Honshu, Japan, have distinct variations coincident with changes in crustal lithology. These data imply that the relatively thin crustal lithosphere is an active geochemical filter for all traversing magmas and is responsible for significant modification of primary mantle melts.

  5. Contrasting sedimentary processes along a convergent margin: the Lesser Antilles arc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Michel; Schneider, Jean-Luc; Boudon, Georges

    2006-12-01

    Sedimentation processes occurring in an active convergent setting are well illustrated in the Lesser Antilles island arc. The margin is related to westward subduction of the North and/or the South America plates beneath the Caribbean plate. From east to west, the arc can be subdivided into several tectono-sedimentary depositional domains: the accretionary prism, the fore-arc basin, the arc platform and inter-arc basin, and the Grenada back-arc basin. The Grenada back-arc basin, the fore-arc basin (Tobago Trough) and the accretionary prism on the east side of the volcanic arc constitute traps for particles derived from the arc platform and the South American continent. The arc is volcanically active, and provides large volumes of volcaniclastic sediments which accumulate mainly in the Grenada basin by volcaniclastic gravity flows (volcanic debris avalanches, debris flows, turbiditic flows) and minor amounts by fallout. By contrast, the eastern side of the margin is fed by ash fallout and minor volcaniclastic turbidites. In this area, the dominant component of the sediments is pelagic in origin, or derived from South America (siliciclastic turbidites). Insular shelves are the locations of carbonate sedimentation, such as large platforms which develop in the Limestone Caribbees in the northern part of the margin. Reworking of carbonate material by turbidity currents also delivers lesser amounts to eastern basins of the margin. This contrasting sedimentation on both sides of the arc platform along the margin is controlled by several interacting factors including basin morphology, volcanic productivity, wind and deep-sea current patterns, and sea-level changes. Basin morphology appears to be the most dominant factor. The western slopes of the arc platform are steeper than the eastern ones, thus favouring gravity flow processes.

  6. A plasma membrane-targeted cytosolic domain of STIM1 selectively activates ARC channels, an arachidonate-regulated store-independent Orai channel.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jill L; Shuttleworth, Trevor J

    2012-01-01

    The Orai family of calcium channels includes the store-operated CRAC channels and store-independent, arachidonic acid (AA)-regulated ARC channels. Both depend on STIM1 for their activation but, whereas CRAC channel activation involves sensing the depletion of intracellular calcium stores via a luminal N terminal EF-hand of STIM1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, ARC channels are exclusively activated by the pool of STIM1 that constitutively resides in the plasma membrane (PM). Here, the EF-hand is extracellular and unlikely to ever lose its bound calcium, suggesting that STIM1-dependent activation of ARC channels is very different from that of CRAC channels. We now show that attachment of the cytosolic portion of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM via an N terminal Lck-domain sequence is sufficient to enable normal AA-dependent activation of ARC channels, while failing to allow activation of store-operated CRAC channels. Introduction of a point mutation within the Lck-domain resulted in the loss of both PM localization and ARC channel activation. Reversing the orientation of the PM-anchored STIM1 C terminus via a C-terminal CAAX-box fails to support either CRAC or ARC channel activation. Finally, the Lck-anchored STIM1 C-terminal domain also enabled the exclusive activation of the ARC channels following physiological agonist addition. These data demonstrate that simple tethering of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM is sufficient to allow the full, normal and exclusive activation of ARC channels, and that the N-terminal regions of STIM1 (including the EF-hand domain) play no significant role in this activation.

  7. Prodigious emission rates and magma degassing budget of major, trace and radioactive volatile species from Ambrym basaltic volcano, Vanuatu island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, P.; Aiuppa, A.; Bani, P.; Métrich, N.; Bertagnini, A.; Gauthier, P.-J.; Shinohara, H.; Sawyer, G.; Parello, F.; Bagnato, E.; Pelletier, B.; Garaebiti, E.

    2016-08-01

    Ambrym volcano, in the Vanuatu arc, is one of the most active volcanoes of the Southwest Pacific region, where persistent lava lake and/or Strombolian activity sustains voluminous gas plume emissions. Here we report on the first comprehensive budget for the discharge of major, minor, trace and radioactive volatile species from Ambrym volcano, as well as the first data for volatiles dissolved in its basaltic magma (olivine-hosted melt inclusions). In situ MultiGAS analysis of H2O, CO2, SO2 and H2S in crater rim emissions, coupled with filter-pack determination of SO2, halogens, stable and radioactive metals demonstrates a common magmatic source for volcanic gases emitted by its two main active craters, Benbow and Marum. These share a high water content ( 93 mol%), similar S/Cl, Cl/F, Br/Cl molar ratios, similar (210Po/210Pb) and (210Bi/210Pb) activity ratios, as well as comparable proportions in most trace metals. Their difference in CO2/SO2 ratio (1.0 and 5.6-3.0, respectively) is attributed to deeper gas-melt separation at Marum (Strombolian explosions) than Benbow (lava lake degassing) during our measurements in 2007. Airborne UV sensing of the SO2 plume flux (90 kg s- 1 or 7800 tons d- 1) demonstrates a prevalent degassing contribution ( 65%) of Benbow crater in that period and allows us to quantify the total volatile fluxes during medium-level eruptive activity of the volcano. Results reveal that Ambrym ranks among the most powerful volcanic gas emitters on Earth, producing between 5% and 9% of current estimates for global subaerial volcanic emissions of H2O, CO2, HCl, Cu, Cr, Cd, Au, Cs and Tl, between 10% and 17% of SO2, HF, HBr, Hg, 210Po and 210Pb, and over 30% of Ag, Se and Sn. Global flux estimates thus need to integrate its contribution and be revised accordingly. Prodigious gas emission from Ambrym does not result from an anomalous volatile enrichment nor a differential excess degassing of its feeding basalt: this latter contains relatively modest

  8. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, Richard A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1997-01-01

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.

  9. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, R.A.; Kotter, D.K.

    1997-05-13

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored. 2 figs.

  10. The history of intrusive activity on the island of La Palma (Canary Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, H.; Feraud, G.; Giannerini, G.

    1986-03-01

    The island of La Palma, located in the northwest of the Canary archipelago, consists of two main geological units. (1) The subaerial extrusive Coberta Series covers most of the island and consists of alkali basaltic lavas, phonolitic plugs, and pyroclastic rocks, erupted between 1.61 Ma and the Recent. (2) The basement complex is exposed in the Barranco de Las Angustias and the Caldera de Taburiente and consists of the submarine intrusive and extrusive Seamount Series and a basal plutonic complex. Alkali basaltic dikes of different ages and orientations intruded in both units. Three groups of dikes and sills can be distinguished, based on their field relationships, petrography, geochemistry and ages. The oldest Group I, represent the feeder dikes to the Seamount Series, intruded between 2.9 and 4.0 Ma B.P. They were originally steep, with a N05°W strike and perpendicular to the originally nearly flat bedding of the layered Seamount Series. Subsequent to emplacement, Group I dikes and the extrusives of the Seamount Series were rotated into their present orientation. Group II sills, intruded parallel to the bedding of the Seamount Series ( {45}/{230}), are coeval with or younger than Group I, but older than the erosional unconformity separating the Coberta and the basement complex (i.e. > 1.6 Ma; < 4.0 Ma). Group III dikes, the feeder dikes of the Coberta Series, occur in the Coberta Series and the basement complex and are generally steep with variable strike. Two apparent maxima in strike are interpreted as a radial dike swarm with a dominant strike of N06°E. K/Ar age data suggest that Group III dikes intruded between 0.63 and 0.73 Ma in the western portion of La Palma, between 0.51 and 1.30 Ma in the north, and in the Cumbre Nueva between 0.53 and 0.70 Ma. There is no correlation of intrusive age and direction. Group I and III dikes and volcanic lineations on La Palma display a dominant northern direction of maximum horizontal compressive stress, throughout the

  11. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  12. A Neuronal Activity-Dependent Dual Function Chromatin-Modifying Complex Regulates Arc Expression1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Oey, Nicodemus E.; Leung, How Wing; Ezhilarasan, Rajaram; Zhou, Lei; Beuerman, Roger W.; VanDongen, Hendrika M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chromatin modification is an important epigenetic mechanism underlying neuroplasticity. Histone methylation and acetylation have both been shown to modulate gene expression, but the machinery responsible for mediating these changes in neurons has remained elusive. Here we identify a chromatin-modifying complex containing the histone demethylase PHF8 and the acetyltransferase TIP60 as a key regulator of the activity-induced expression of Arc, an important mediator of synaptic plasticity. Clinically, mutations in PHF8 cause X-linked mental retardation while TIP60 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Within minutes of increased synaptic activity, this dual function complex is rapidly recruited to the Arc promoter, where it specifically counteracts the transcriptionally repressive histone mark H3K9me2 to facilitate the formation of the transcriptionally permissive H3K9acS10P, thereby favoring transcriptional activation. Consequently, gain-of-function of the PHF8−TIP60 complex in primary rat hippocampal neurons has a positive effect on early activity-induced Arc gene expression, whereas interfering with the function of this complex abrogates it. A global proteomics screen revealed that the majority of common interactors of PHF8 and TIP60 were involved in mRNA processing, including PSF, an important molecule involved in neuronal gene regulation. Finally, we proceeded to show, using super-resolution microscopy, that PHF8 and TIP60 interact at the single molecule level with PSF, thereby situating this chromatin modifying complex at the crossroads of transcriptional activation. These findings point toward a mechanism by which an epigenetic pathway can regulate neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription, which has implications in the development of novel therapeutics for disorders of learning and memory. PMID:26464965

  13. Assessment of the Role of MAP Kinase in Mediating Activity-Dependent Transcriptional Activation of the Immediate Early Gene "Arc/Arg3.1" in the Dentate Gyrus in Vivo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chotiner, Jennifer K.; Nielson, Jessica; Farris, Shannon; Lewandowski, Gail; Huang, Fen; Banos, Karla; de Leon, Ray; Steward, Oswald

    2010-01-01

    Different physiological and behavioral events activate transcription of "Arc/Arg3.1" in neurons in vivo, but the signal transduction pathways that mediate induction in particular situations remain to be defined. Here, we explore the relationships between induction of "Arc/Arg3.1" transcription in dentate granule cells in vivo and activation of…

  14. Case of correlation between Rn anomalies and seismic activity on a volcano (Vulcano Island, Southern Tyrrhenian Sea)

    SciTech Connect

    Del Pezzo, E.; Gasparini, P.; Mantovani, M.S.M.; Martini, M.; Capaldi, G.; Gomes, Y.T.; Pece, R.

    1981-09-01

    A factor of 10 increase in the Rn concentration in a shallow aquifer forefunning a shallow seismic swarm was observed at the island of Vulcano (Aeolian island arc). The peak of Rn anomaly preceded by about one month the seismic swarm, which had a cumulative magnitude of 2.1. The time lag between the two phenomena is much longer than expected, given the small energy released by the swarm. The observed phenomena may not have a direct cause-effect relationship, but they both can be a consequence of volcanic phenomena.

  15. Diversity of Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Mineralization in the Manus Back-Arc Basin, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gena, K.; Chiba, H.

    2004-12-01

    The Manus back-arc basin in the Western Pacific hosts three contrasting style of mineralization called Vienna Wood, Pacmanus and Onsen site. The three deposits have distinct geology and geochemical characteristics. The Vienna Wood site in the Central Manus Basin (CMB) is hosted by mid-oceanic ridge type basalt. The mineralization is dominated by wurtzite, marcasite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, Fe-oxide and gangue minerals of anhydrite, gypsum and quartz. The filling temperatures and salinities of the inclusion range from 200-260_E#8249;C and 4.8-6.6 NaCl equiv. wt% respectively. Bulk chemical analyses of the ores indicate that the mineralization in the Vienna Wood site can be classified into the Zn-Cu type. The simple mineral assemblage indicates simple basalt-seawater interaction and is a modern analogue of the ophiolite hosted VVMS deposits. The mineralization in the Pacmanus site is hosted by dacitic lavas is characterised by a complex mineral assemblage of marcasite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, bornite, enargite, covellite, chalcocite, digenite, galena, tennantite, native gold, PbAs-sulfosalts and gangue minerals of barite, rare silica, anhydrite and native sulphur. The temperature of mineralization ranges from 230-280_E#8249;C. Bulk chemical composition of the ore samples indicates that the mineralization in the Pacmanus site can be classified into the Zn-Cu-Pb-Au type. The mineral assemblage, character of the ores and tectonic setting resembles those of ancient Kuroko and currently forming hydrothermal deposits in Lau Basin and in Okinawa Trough. The Onsen hydrothermal site in the Desmos caldera is hosted by basaltic andesite. The advanced argillic alteration is characterised by both high and low temperature acid stable minerals of pyrophyllite, natroalunite, quartz, cristobalite, amorphous silica, anhydrite, gypsum, pyrite, marcasite, enargite, covellite and native sulphur. The mineralization occurs at a temperature range of 240 to 340_E#8249;C. The high

  16. The global relevance of the Scotia Arc: An introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Andrés; Dalziel, Ian W. D.; Leat, Philip T.

    2015-02-01

    The Scotia Arc, situated between South America and Antarctica, is one of the Earth's most important ocean gateways and former land bridges. Understanding its structure and development is critical for the knowledge of tectonic, paleoenvironmental and biological processes in the southern oceans and Antarctica. It extends from the Drake Passage in the west, where the Shackleton Fracture Zone forms a prominent, but discontinuous, bathymetric ridge between the southern South American continent and the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula to the active intra-oceanic volcanic arc forming the South Sandwich Island in the east. The tectonic arc comprises the NSR to the north and to the south the South Scotia Ridge, both transcurrent plate margins that respectively include the South Georgia and South Orkney microcontinents. The Scotia and Sandwich tectonic plates form the major basin within these margins. As the basins opened, formation of first shallow sea ways and then deep ocean connections controlled the initiation and development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, which is widely thought to have been important in providing the climatic conditions for formation of the polar ice-sheets. The evolution of the Scotia Arc is therefore of global palaeoclimatic significance. The Scotia Arc has been the focus of increasing international research interest. Many recent studies have stressed the links and interactions between the solid Earth, oceanographic, paleoenvironmental and biological processes in the area. This special issue presents new works that summarize significant recent research results and synthesize the current state of knowledge for the Scotia Arc.

  17. Eighteen years of geochemical monitoring at the oceanic active volcanic island of El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asensio-Ramos, María; Alonso, Mar; Sharp, Emerson; Woods, Hannah; Barrancos, José; Pérez, Nemesio M.

    2016-04-01

    We report herein the latest results of a diffuse CO2 efflux survey at El Hierro volcanic system carried out during the summer period of 2015 to constrain the total CO2 output from the studied area a during post-eruptive period. El Hierro Island (278 km2) is the youngest and the SW-most of the Canary Islands. On July 16, 2011, a seismic-volcanic crisis started with the occurrence of more than 11,900 seismic events and significant deformation along the island. On October 10, 2011, the dominant character of seismicity changed dramatically from discrete earthquakes to continuous tremor, a clear indication that magma was rapidly approaching the surface immediately before the onset of the eruption, October 12. Eruption was declared over on 5 March, 2012. In order to monitor the volcanic activity of El Hierro Island, from 1998 to 2015 diffuse CO2 emission studies have been performed at El Hierro volcanic system in a yearly basis (˜600 observation sites) according to the accumulation chamber method. Spatial distribution maps were constructed following the sequential Gaussian simulation (sGs) procedure. To quantify the total CO2 emission from the studied area, 100 simulations for each survey have been performed. During the eruption period, soil CO2 efflux values range from non-detectable (˜0.5 g m-2 d-1) up to 457 g m-2 d-1, reaching in November 27, 2011, the maximum CO2 output estimated value of all time series, 2,398 t d-1, just before the episodes of maximum degassing observed as vigorous bubbling at the sea surface and an increment in the amplitude of the tremor signal. During the 2015 survey, soil CO2 efflux values ranged from non-detectable up to 41 g m-2 d-1. The spatial distribution of diffuse CO2 emission values seemed to be controlled by the main volcano structural features of the island. The total diffuse CO2 output released to atmosphere was estimated at 575 ± 24 t d-1, value slightly higher that the background CO2 emission estimated at 422 t d-1 (Melián et

  18. Hf-Nd isotope and trace element constraints on subduction inputs at island arcs: limitations of Hf anomalies as sediment input indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, H. K.; Turner, S.; MacPherson, C.; Davidson, J. P.; Gertisser, R.

    2010-12-01

    New Nd-Hf isotope and trace element data for Javanese volcanoes are combined with recently published data to place constraints on subduction inputs at the Sunda arc in Indonesia and assess the value of Hf anomalies (expressed as Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios) as tracers of such inputs. Hf anomaly does not correlate with Hf isotope ratio in Javanese lavas however, Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios do correlate with SiO2. Contrary to previous work, we show that Hf anomaly variation may be controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene and/or amphibole during magmatic differentiation and does not represent the magnitude or type of subduction input in some arcs. Correlation of Sm/Hf with indices of differentiation for other arcs (e.g. Vanuatu, New Britain, Mariana) suggests that differentiation control on Sm/Hf ratios of volcanic rocks may be a relatively common phenomenon. This study corroborates the use of Nd-Hf isotope co-variations in arc volcanic rocks to ascertain subduction input characteristics. The trajectories of regional volcano groups (East, Central and West Java) in Nd-Hf isotope space reveal heterogeneity in the subducted sediment input along Java, which reflects present-day spatial variations in sediment compositions on the down-going plate in the Java Trench.

  19. Geochemical components in a Cretaceous island arc: The Th/La-(Ce/Ce*)Nd diagram and implications for subduction initiation in the inter-American region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastie, Alan R.; Mitchell, Simon F.; Treloar, Peter J.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Neill, Iain; Barfod, Dan N.

    2013-03-01

    Tectonic models of the evolution of the inter-American region show that induced subduction initiation/polarity reversal is required in order to isolate the Caribbean as a separate plate. However, the timing and mechanism of this subduction initiation/reversal are still controversial. In order to shed light on this issue we investigate the geochemistry of arc-derived, ~ 80 Ma, basic to acidic igneous rocks from the Main Ridge Formation (MRF) in central Jamaica. The affinity of the mantle component in the MRF arc rocks can help increase our understanding of the initiation of any new subduction zone in the inter-American region. Trace element geochemistry demonstrates that the MRF mantle source component was N-MORB-like. Conversely, younger circum-Caribbean arc rocks (≤ 75 Ma) have a more enriched plume-like mantle component. Unfortunately, when considering the slab component, some of the most useful trace elements that can be used to identify the affinity of a slab flux in arc lavas (e.g., Ba) have been mobilised by subsolidus alteration processes in the MRF. Consequently, the immobile element Th/La-(Ce/Ce*)Nd discrimination diagram is proposed as a method of determining the affinity of slab components from altered igneous rocks. This diagram identifies sedimentary slab components that have potentially contaminated an arc source region, e.g., continental detritus, volcanic detritus, hydrogenous Fe-Mn oxides, fish debris-rich clay and hydrothermal sediments. In this study, the Th/La-(Ce/Ce*)Nd diagram suggests that the slab component in most of the MRF samples has a composition similar to continental detritus/GLOSS II. Additionally, several MRF samples are derived from a source region that has been fluxed with a subduction component, in part, composed of fish debris and hydrothermal sediments. These results help constrain the timing and mechanism of Cretaceous subduction initiation in the inter-American region. The geochemical components recognised in the MRF rocks

  20. The petrology, phase relations and tectonic setting of basalts from the taupo volcanic zone, New Zealand and the Kermadec Island arc - havre trough, SW Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, John A.; Smith, Ian E. M.; Graham, Ian J.; Peter Kokelaar, B.; Cole, James W.; Houghton, Bruce F.; Wilson, Colin J. N.

    1990-10-01

    Volcanism in the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) and the Kermadec arc-Havre Trough (KAHT) is related to westward subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the Indo-Australian Plate. The tectonic setting of the TVZ is continental whereas in KAHT it is oceanic and in these two settings the relative volumes of basalt differ markedly. In TVZ, basalts form a minor proportion (< 1%) of a dominant rhyolite (97%)-andesite association while in KAHT, basalts and basaltic andesites are the major rock types. Neither the convergence rate between the Pacific and Indo-Australian Plates nor the extension rates in the back-arc region or the dip of the Pacific Plate Wadati-Benioff zone differ appreciably between the oceanic and continental segments. The distance between the volcanic front and the axis of the back-arc basin decreases from the Kermadec arc to TVZ and the distance between trench and volcanic front increases from around 200 km in the Kermadec arc to 280 km in TVZ. These factors may prove significant in determining the extent to which arc and backarc volcanism in subduction settings are coupled. All basalts from the Kermadec arc are porphyritic (up to 60% phenocrysts) with assemblages generally dominated by plagioclase but with olivine, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. A single dredge sample from the Havre Trough back arc contains olivine and plagioclase microphenocrysts in glassy pillow rind and is mildly alkaline (< 1% normative nepheline) contrasting with the tholeiitic nature of the other basalts. Basalts from the TVZ contain phenocryst assemblages of olivine + plagioclase ± clinopyroxene; orthopyroxene phenocrysts occur only in the most evolved basalts and basaltic andesites from both TVZ and the Kermadec Arc. Sparsely porphyritic primitive compositions (Mg/(Mg+Fe 2) > 70) are high in Al 2O 3 (>16.5%), and project in the olivine volume of the basalt tetrahedron. They contain olivine (Fo 87) phenocrysts and plagioclase (> An 60) microphenocrysts. These magmas have ratios of

  1. Hf-Nd isotope and trace element constraints on subduction inputs at island arcs: Limitations of Hf anomalies as sediment input indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Heather K.; Turner, Simon; Macpherson, Colin G.; Gertisser, Ralf; Davidson, Jon P.

    2011-04-01

    New Nd-Hf isotope and trace element data for Javanese volcanoes are combined with recently published data to place constraints on subduction inputs at the Sunda arc in Indonesia and assess the value of Hf anomalies (expressed as Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios) as tracers of such inputs. Hf anomaly does not correlate with Hf isotope ratio in Javanese lavas, however, Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios do correlate with SiO 2. Contrary to previous work, we show that Hf anomaly variation may be controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene and/or amphibole during magmatic differentiation and does not represent the magnitude or type of subduction input in some arcs. Correlation of Sm/Hf with indices of differentiation for other arcs (e.g., Vanuatu, New Britain, and Mariana) suggests that differentiation control on Sm/Hf ratios in volcanic arc rocks may be a relatively common phenomenon. This study corroborates the use of Nd-Hf isotope co-variations in arc volcanic rocks to ascertain subduction input characteristics. The trajectories of regional volcano groups (East, Central and West Java) in Nd-Hf isotope space reveal heterogeneity in the subducted sediment input along Java, which reflects present-day spatial variations in sediment compositions on the down-going plate in the Java Trench. The high Sm/Hf ratio required in the sediment end-member for some Javanese basalts suggests that partial melting of subducted sediment occurs in the presence of residual zircon, and is inconsistent with residual monazite or allanite.

  2. Experimental investigations on active cooling thermal protection structure of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor in arc heated facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianqiang, Tu; Jinlong, Peng; Xianning, Yang; Lianzhong, Chen

    2016-10-01

    The active cooling thermal protection technology is the efficient method to resolve the long-duration work and reusable problems of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor, where worst thermo-mechanical loads occur. The fuel is passed through coolant channels adjacent to the heated surfaces to absorb heat from the heating exchanger panels, prior to injection into the combustor. The heating exchanger both cooled down the wall temperature of the combustor wall and heats and cracks the hydrocarbon fuel inside the panel to permit an easier combustion and satisfying combustion efficiency. The subscale active cooling metallic panels, with dimensions of 100×100 mm and different coolant channel sizes, have been tested under typical combustion thermal environment produced by arc heated Turbulent Flow Duct (TFD). The heat exchange ability of different coolant channel sizes has been obtained. The big-scale active cooling metallic panel, with dimensions of 100 × 750 mm and the coolant channel sizes of better heating exchange performance, has been made and tested in the big-scale arc heated TFD facility. The test results show that the local superheated ablation is easy to happen for the cooling fuel assigned asymmetrically in the bigscale active cooling metallic panel, and the cooling fuel rate can reduce 8%˜10% after spraying the Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) in the heating surface.

  3. Contribution of Egr1/zif268 to Activity-Dependent Arc/Arg3.1 Transcription in the Dentate Gyrus and Area CA1 of the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Penke, Zsuzsa; Chagneau, Carine; Laroche, Serge

    2011-01-01

    Egr1, a member of the Egr family of transcription factors, and Arc are immediate early genes known to play major roles in synaptic plasticity and memory. Despite evidence that Egr family members can control Arc transcriptional regulation, demonstration of a selective role of Egr1 alone is lacking. We investigated the extent to which activity-dependent Arc expression is dependent on Egr1 by analyzing Arc mRNA expression using fluorescence in situ hybridization in the dorsal dentate gyrus and CA1 of wild-type (WT) and Egr1 knockout mice. Following electroconvulsive shock, we found biphasic expression of Arc in area CA1 in mice, consisting in a rapid (30 min) and transient wave followed by a second late-phase of expression (8 h), and a single but prolonged wave of expression in the dentate gyrus. Egr1 deficiency abolished the latest, but not the early wave of Arc expression in CA1, and curtailed that of the dentate gyrus. Since the early wave of Arc expression was not affected in Egr1 mutant mice, we next analyzed behaviorally induced Arc expression patterns as an index of neural ensemble activation in the dentate gyrus and area CA1 of WT and Egr1 mutant mice. Spatial exploration of novel or familiar environments induced in mice a single early and transient wave of Arc expression in the dentate gyrus and area CA1, which were not affected in Egr1 mutant mice. Analyses of Arc-expressing cells revealed that exploration recruits similar size dentate gyrus and CA1 neural ensembles in WT and Egr1 knockout mice. These findings suggest that hippocampal neural ensembles are normally activated immediately following spatial exploration in Egr1 knockout mice, indicating normal hippocampal encoding of information. They also provide evidence that in condition of strong activation Egr1 alone can control late-phases of activity-dependent Arc transcription in the dentate gyrus and area CA1 of the hippocampus. PMID:21887136

  4. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2010 Aleutian arc and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benz, Harley M.; Herman, Matthew; Tarr, Arthur C.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Dart, Richard L.; Rhea, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This map shows details of the Aleutian arc not visible in an earlier publication. The Aleutian arc extends about 3,000 km from the Gulf of Alaska to the Kamchatka Peninsula. It marks the region where the Pacific plate subducts into the mantle beneath the North America plate. This subduction is responsible for the generation of the Aleutian Islands and the deep offshore Aleutian Trench. Relative to a fixed North America plate, the Pacific plate is moving northwest at a rate that increases from about 55 mm per year at the arc's eastern edge to 75 mm per year near its western terminus. In the east, the convergence of the plates is nearly perpendicular to the plate boundary. However, because of the boundary's curvature, as one travels westward along the arc, the subduction becomes more and more oblique to the boundary until the relative plate motion becomes parallel to the arc at the Near Islands near its western edge. Subduction zones such as the Aleutian arc are geologically complex and produce numerous earthquakes from multiple sources. Deformation of the overriding North America plate generates shallow crustal earthquakes, whereas slip at the interface of the plates generates interplate earthquakes that extend from near the base of the trench to depths of 40 to 60 km. At greater depths, Aleutian arc earthquakes occur within the subducting Pacific plate and can reach depths of 300 km. Since 1900, six great earthquakes have occurred along the Aleutian Trench, Alaska Peninsula, and Gulf of Alaska: M8.4 1906 Rat Islands; M8.6 1938 Shumagin Islands; M8.6 1946 Unimak Island; M8.6 1957 Andreanof Islands; M9.2 1964 Prince William Sound; and M8.7 1965 Rat Islands. Several relevant tectonic elements (plate boundaries and active volcanoes) provide a context for the seismicity presented on the main map panel. The plate boundaries are most accurate along the axis of the Aleutian Trench and more diffuse or speculative in extreme northeastern Russia. The active volcanoes parallel

  5. Rock magnetic and petrographical-mineralogical studies of the dredged rocks from the submarine volcanoes of the Sea-of-Okhotsk slope within the northern part of the Kuril Island Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidov, V. A.; Pilipenko, O. V.; Petrova, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    The rock magnetic properties of the samples of dredged rocks composing the submarine volcanic edifices within the Sea-of-Okhotsk slope of the northern part of the Kuril Island Arc are studied. The measurements of the standard rock magnetic parameters, thermomagnetic analysis, petrographical studies, and microprobe investigations have been carried out. The magnetization of the studied rocks is mainly carried by the pseudo-single domain and multidomain titanomagnetite and low-Ti titanomagnetite grains. The high values of the natural remanent magnetization are due to the pseudo-single-domain structure of the titanomagnetite grains, whereas the high values of magnetic susceptibility are associated with the high concentration of ferrimagnetic grains. The highest Curie points are observed in the titanomagnetite grains of the igneous rocks composing the edifices of the Smirnov, Edelshtein, and 1.4 submarine volcanoes.

  6. Seizure-like activity in a juvenile Angelman syndrome mouse model is attenuated by reducing Arc expression

    PubMed Central

    Mandel-Brehm, Caleigh; Salogiannis, John; Dhamne, Sameer C.; Rotenberg, Alexander; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder arising from loss-of-function mutations in the maternally inherited copy of the UBE3A gene, and is characterized by an absence of speech, excessive laughter, cognitive delay, motor deficits, and seizures. Despite the fact that the symptoms of AS occur in early childhood, behavioral characterization of AS mouse models has focused primarily on adult phenotypes. In this report we describe juvenile behaviors in AS mice that are strain-independent and clinically relevant. We find that young AS mice, compared with their wild-type littermates, produce an increased number of ultrasonic vocalizations. In addition, young AS mice have defects in motor coordination, as well as abnormal brain activity that results in an enhanced seizure-like response to an audiogenic challenge. The enhanced seizure-like activity, but not the increased ultrasonic vocalizations or motor deficits, is rescued in juvenile AS mice by genetically reducing the expression level of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc. These findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that reduce the level of Arc expression have the potential to reverse the seizures associated with AS. In addition, the identification of aberrant behaviors in young AS mice may provide clues regarding the neural circuit defects that occur in AS and ultimately allow new approaches for treating this disorder. PMID:25848016

  7. Seizure-like activity in a juvenile Angelman syndrome mouse model is attenuated by reducing Arc expression.

    PubMed

    Mandel-Brehm, Caleigh; Salogiannis, John; Dhamne, Sameer C; Rotenberg, Alexander; Greenberg, Michael E

    2015-04-21

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder arising from loss-of-function mutations in the maternally inherited copy of the UBE3A gene, and is characterized by an absence of speech, excessive laughter, cognitive delay, motor deficits, and seizures. Despite the fact that the symptoms of AS occur in early childhood, behavioral characterization of AS mouse models has focused primarily on adult phenotypes. In this report we describe juvenile behaviors in AS mice that are strain-independent and clinically relevant. We find that young AS mice, compared with their wild-type littermates, produce an increased number of ultrasonic vocalizations. In addition, young AS mice have defects in motor coordination, as well as abnormal brain activity that results in an enhanced seizure-like response to an audiogenic challenge. The enhanced seizure-like activity, but not the increased ultrasonic vocalizations or motor deficits, is rescued in juvenile AS mice by genetically reducing the expression level of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc. These findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that reduce the level of Arc expression have the potential to reverse the seizures associated with AS. In addition, the identification of aberrant behaviors in young AS mice may provide clues regarding the neural circuit defects that occur in AS and ultimately allow new approaches for treating this disorder.

  8. Origin of primitive ultra-calcic arc melts at crustal conditions - Experimental evidence on the La Sommata basalt, Vulcano, Aeolian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzo, Giovanni; Di Carlo, Ida; Pichavant, Michel; Rotolo, Silvio G.; Scaillet, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    To interpret primitive magma compositions in the Aeolian arc and contribute to a better experimental characterization of ultra-calcic arc melts, equilibrium phase relations have been determined experimentally for the La Sommata basalt (Som-1, Vulcano, Aeolian arc). Som-1 (Na2O + K2O = 4.46 wt.%, CaO = 12.97 wt.%, MgO = 8.78 wt.%, CaO/Al2O3 = 1.03) is a reference primitive ne-normative arc basalt with a strong ultra-calcic affinity. The experiments have been performed between 44 and 154 MPa, 1050 and 1150 °C and from NNO + 0.2 to NNO + 1.9. Fluid-present conditions were imposed with H2O-CO2 mixtures yielding melt H2O concentrations from 0.7 to 3.5 wt.%. Phases encountered include clinopyroxene, olivine, plagioclase and Fe-oxide. Clinopyroxene is slightly earlier than olivine in the crystallization sequence. It is the liquidus phase at 150 MPa, being joined by olivine on the liquidus between 44 and 88 MPa. Plagioclase is the third phase to appear in the crystallization sequence and orthopyroxene was not found. Experimental clinopyroxenes (Fs7-16) and olivines (Fo78-92) partially reproduce the natural phenocryst compositions (respectively Fs5-7 and Fo87-91). Upon progressive crystallization, experimental liquids shift towards higher SiO2 (up to ~ 55 wt.%), Al2O3 (up to ~ 18 wt.%) and K2O (up to ~ 5.5 wt.%) and lower CaO, MgO and CaO/Al2O3. Experimental glasses and natural whole-rock compositions overlap, indicating that progressive crystallization of Som-1 type melts can generate differentiated compositions such as those encountered at Vulcano. The low pressure cotectic experimental glasses reproduce glass inclusions in La Sommata clinopyroxene but contrast with glass inclusions in olivine which preserve basaltic melts more primitive than Som-1. Phase relations for the La Sommata basalt are identical in all critical aspects to those obtained previously on a synthetic ultra-calcic arc composition. In particular, clinopyroxene + olivine co-saturation occurs at very low

  9. The time course of activity-regulated cytoskeletal (ARC) gene and protein expression in the whisker-barrel circuit using two paradigms of whisker stimulation.

    PubMed

    Khodadad, Aida; Adelson, P David; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Thomas, Theresa Currier

    2015-05-01

    Immediate early genes have previously demonstrated a rapid increase in gene expression after various behavioral paradigms. The main focus of this article is to identify a molecular marker of circuit activation after manual whisker stimulation or exploration of a novel environment. To this end, we investigated the dynamics of ARC transcription in adult male rats during whisker somatosensation throughout the whisker barrel circuit. At various time points, tissue was biopsied from the ventral posterior medial nucleus (VPM) of the thalamus, primary somatosensory barrel field (S1BF) cortex and hippocampus for quantification using real-time PCR and western blot. Our results show that there were no significant differences in ARC gene or protein expression in the VPM after both types of stimulation. However, manual whisker stimulation resulted in increased ARC gene expression at 15, 30, 60 and 300 min in the S1BF, and 15 min in the hippocampus (p<0.05). Also, exploration of a novel environment resulted in increased ARC mRNA expression at 15 and 30 min in the S1BF and at 15 min in the hippocampus (p<0.05). The type of stimulation (manual versus exploration of a novel environment) influenced the magnitude of ARC gene expression in the S1BF (p<0.05). These data are the first to demonstrate that ARC is a specific, quantifiable and input dependent molecular marker of circuit activation which can serve to quantify the impact of brain injury and subsequent rehabilitation on whisker sensation.

  10. The ArgR regulatory protein, a helper to the anaerobic regulator ANR during transcriptional activation of the arcD promoter in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lu, C D; Winteler, H; Abdelal, A; Haas, D

    1999-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, when deprived of oxygen, generates ATP from arginine catabolism by enzymes of the arginine deiminase pathway, encoded by the arcDABC operon. Under conditions of low oxygen tension, the transcriptional activator ANR binds to a site centered 41.5 bp upstream of the arcD transcriptional start. ANR-mediated anaerobic induction was enhanced two- to threefold by extracellular arginine. This arginine effect depended, in trans, on the transcriptional regulator ArgR and, in cis, on an ArgR binding site centered at -73.5 bp in the arcD promoter. Binding of purified ArgR protein to this site was demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting. This ArgR recognition site contained a sequence, 5'-TGACGC-3', which deviated in only 1 base from the common sequence motif 5'-TGTCGC-3' found in other ArgR binding sites of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, an alignment of all known ArgR binding sites confirmed that they consist of two directly repeated half-sites. In the absence of ANR, arginine did not induce the arc operon, suggesting that ArgR alone does not activate the arcD promoter. According to a model proposed, ArgR makes physical contact with ANR and thereby facilitates initiation of arc transcription.

  11. Active morphotectonics related to the upper crustal shortening in the back-arc of the Northeast Japan arc, based on geomorphic terrace deformation and elastic dislocation models for reverse faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soeda, Y.; Miyauchi, T.

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of active morphotectonics, the relationship between active faults and morphological evolution, is important for understanding on-going active tectonic processes in the trench-arc system and evaluating the activity of faults. Especially in regions where the main active faults are concealed, such as in the back-arc of the Northeast Japan arc. The Dewa Hills in the back-arc of the Northeast Japan arc is a tectonic uplifted zone parallel to the main direction of the arc, bounded by Kitayuri thrust system (KTS) at western margin. The activity of reverse faults as a result of upper crustal shortening related to the subduction of the Pacific plate beneath the Eurasian plate has affected the morpho-tectonogenesis in the back-arc. This study examines the deep geometry and net slip rate of faults at seismogenic depth in the back-arc, and presents active morphotectonic models related to upper crustal shortening, by analyzing the deformation patterns of topography and geology, and through an examination of elastic dislocation models for reverse faults. The Pleistocene fluvial terraces, a practical geomorphic marker for quantifying crustal movement in the late Quaternary, are developed along some antecedent valleys that truncate the Dewa Hills. Through an investigation of the chronology and correlation of Pleistocene marine and fluvial terraces based on geomorphological and tephrochronological investigations, M terraces correlated with MIS 5 have been widely identified in the back-arc. The maximum uplift rates in the back-arc in the late Quaternary are estimated as 1.0 mm/yr in the Oga Peninsula (Imaizumi 1977; Miyauchi, 1988), and 1.4 mm/yr in the Dewa Hills. The height distribution of geomorphic terraces shows two types of surface deformation patterns in the late Quaternary, and these are produced by the activity of reverse faults: a major deformation unit with a half wavelength of 20-40 km or more, and a secondary deformation unit with a half wavelength of less

  12. Opening of the Grenada back-arc Basin and evolution of the Caribbean plate during the Mesozoic and early Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouysse, Philippe

    1988-06-01

    Geological and geophysical data indicate that the Grenada Basin was presumably created, during the Paleocene, by sundering of a proto-Eastern Caribbean arc into a remnant arc to the west (Aves Swell) and an active arc to the east (Lesser Antilles Ridge). Grenada Basin spreading is thought to have been penecontemporaneous with the creation of the Yucatan Basin located at the opposite side of the Caribbean Sea. I suggest that a continuous Mesozoic Caribbean Arc (M.C.A.), including the Greater Antilles, the Aves-Lesser Antilles system, and the Aruba-Blanquilla Chain (Netherland-Venezuelan Antilles), was initiated in the Pacific, probably about 130-120 Ma ago. Its arrival in front of, and its subsequent motion inside the Central Atlantic ("Tethyan") seaway caused the opening of both Yucatan and Grenada basins which occurred at the two initial points of contact with the North and South American cratons. In contrast to the style of many other island arcs, this back-arc spreading event occurred only once in the long history of the M.C.A. The Lesser Antilles appear to be the oldest currently active intra-oceanic island arc.

  13. Can Small Islands Protect Nearby Coasts From Tsunamis? An Active Experimental Design Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanakis, Themistoklis; Contal, Emile; Vayatis, Nicolas; Dias, Frédéric; Synolakis, Costas

    2013-04-01

    In recent years we have witnessed the dreadful damage tsunamis caused in coastal areas around the globe. In some of these locations, small islands in the vicinity of the mainland offer protection from wind-generated waves and thus communities were developed. But do these islands act as natural barriers to tsunamis? Recent post-tsunami survey data reveal that in certain cases the run-up in coastal areas behind small offshore islands was significantly higher than in neighboring locations. To study the conditions of this run-up amplification, we solve numerically the nonlinear shallow water equations. We use the simplified geometry of a conical island sitting on a flat bed in front of a uniform sloping beach. Hence, the experimental setup is controlled by five physical parameters, namely the island slope, the beach slope, the water depth, the distance between the island and the plane beach and the incoming wavelength, while the wave height was kept fixed. An active experimental design approach was adopted in order to find with the least number of simulations the maximum run-up amplification on the area of the beach behind the island with respect to a lateral location on the beach, not directly affected by the presence of the island. For this purpose, a statistical emulator was built to guide the selection of the query points in the input space and a stopping criterion was used to signal when no further simulations were needed. We have found that in all cases explored, the run-up amplification was larger than unity and in certain occasions reached up to 70% increase. The presence of the island delays the run-up of the wave on the plane beach behind it, while edge waves generated by the run-up in lateral locations on the beach converge towards the center. The synchronous arrival of the three waves (2 edge waves and tsunami from the lee side of the island) is responsible for the run-up amplification in these areas. The use of the active experimental design approach can

  14. Active control of massively separated high-speed/base flows with electric arc plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBlauw, Bradley G.

    The current project was undertaken to evaluate the effects of electric arc plasma actuators on high-speed separated flows. Two underlying goals motivated these experiments. The first goal was to provide a flow control technique that will result in enhanced flight performance for supersonic vehicles by altering the near-wake characteristics. The second goal was to gain a broader and more sophisticated understanding of these complex, supersonic, massively-separated, compressible, and turbulent flow fields. The attainment of the proposed objectives was facilitated through energy deposition from multiple electric-arc plasma discharges near the base corner separation point. The control authority of electric arc plasma actuators on a supersonic axisymmetric base flow was evaluated for several actuator geometries, frequencies, forcing modes, duty cycles/on-times, and currents. Initially, an electric arc plasma actuator power supply and control system were constructed to generate the arcs. Experiments were performed to evaluate the operational characteristics, electromagnetic emission, and fluidic effect of the actuators in quiescent ambient air. The maximum velocity induced by the arc when formed in a 5 mm x 1.6 mm x 2 mm deep cavity was about 40 m/s. During breakdown, the electromagnetic emission exhibited a rise and fall in intensity over a period of about 340 ns. After breakdown, the emission stabilized to a near-constant distribution. It was also observed that the plasma formed into two different modes: "high-voltage" and "low-voltage". It is believed that the plasma may be switching between an arc discharge and a glow discharge for these different modes. The two types of plasma do not appear to cause substantial differences on the induced fluidic effects of the actuator. In general, the characterization study provided a greater fundamental understanding of the operation of the actuators, as well as data for computational model comparison. Preliminary investigations

  15. Spatial distribution of intrinsic and scattering seismic attenuation in active volcanic islands - I: model and the case of Tenerife Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudencio, Janire; Del Pezzo, Edoardo; García-Yeguas, Araceli; Ibáñez, Jesús M.

    2013-12-01

    The complex volcanic system of Tenerife Island is known to have a highly heterogeneous character, as recently confirmed by velocity tomography. We present new information derived from intrinsic quality factor inverse maps (Qi-1), scattering quality factor inverse maps (Qs-1) and total quality factor inverse maps (Qt-1) obtained for the same region. The data set used in this work is the result of the analysis of an active seismic experiment carried out, using offshore shots (air guns) recorded at over 85 onshore seismic stations. The estimates of the attenuation parameters are based on the assumption that the seismogram energy envelopes are determined by seismic energy diffusion processes occurring inside the island. Diffusion model parameters, proportional to Qi-1 and to Qs-1, are estimated from the inversion of the energy envelopes for any source-receiver couple. They are then weighted with a new graphical approach based on a Gaussian space probability function, which allowed us to create `2-D probabilistic maps' representing the space distribution of the attenuation parameters. The 2-D images obtained reveal the existence of a zone in the centre of the island characterized by the lowest attenuation effects. This effect is interpreted as highly rigid and cooled rocks. This low-attenuation region is bordered by zones of high attenuation, associated with the recent historical volcanic activity. We calculate the transport mean free path obtaining a value of around 4 km for the frequency range 6-12 Hz. This result is two orders of magnitude smaller than values calculated for the crust of the Earth. An absorption length between 10 and 14 km is associated with the average intrinsic attenuation parameter. These values, while small in the context of tectonic regions, are greater than those obtained in volcanic regions such as Vesuvius or Merapi. Such differences may be explained by the magnitude of the region of study, over three times larger than the aforementioned study

  16. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, J.; Vezzoli, L.; De Rosa, R.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Acocella, V.

    2016-02-01

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic, and structural field data along the strike-slip central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures, and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion, consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activities steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long × 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  17. Three-Dimensional Seismic Attenuation Structure in the Ryukyu Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, M.; Takenaka, H.

    2015-12-01

    Tomographic studies have been conducted to retrieve 3D seismic attenuation structure around Japan Arc since 1980s. However, in the Ryukyu Arc, 3D attenuation structures has never been estimated. It is important to estimate the 3D attenuation structure in this region, since there are highly active volcanos and seismicity between the Okinawa Trough and the Ryukyu Trench. In this study, we estimate 3D seismic attenuation structure in the Ryukyu Arc. We use seismic waveform data recorded by seismic observation networks of NIED, JMA and Kagoshima University, from 2004/06 to 2014/05. We select seismic events of more than 4,500. Since the Ryukyu Arc region are so wide, we separate it into three subregions: Sakishima Islands, Okinawa Islands and Amami Islands subregions. Before calculating the attenuation quantity t*, the corner frequency of the source spectrum for each event is estimated by using an omega square model. The t* is estimated from the amplitude decay rate from the source-corrected spectra. We then invert the t* data to the attenuation structure by a 3D tomographic technique using the non-negative least squares method. Our estimated attenuation structure has the remarkable features: in Sakishima Islands subregion, high attenuation zone exists beneath northern Ishigaki Island. This region corresponds to the Okinawa Trough. High attenuation zone also exists beneath Hateruma Island in upper crust. It corresponds to the accretionary prism formed by subducting Philippine Sea Plate. In Amami Islands subregion, high attenuation zone is located along volcanic front. Low attenuation zone spreads over subducting Philippine Sea slab in all subregions.Acknowledgements: We used JMA Unified Hypocenter Catalogs and seismic waveform data recorded by NIED, JMA and Kagoshima University. We also used a computer program by Zhao et al. (1992, JGR) for the tomographic analysis.

  18. Winter activity of Phlebotomus (Transphlebotomus) mascittii, Grassi 1908 (Diptera: Psychodidae) on the island of Corsica.

    PubMed

    Naucke, T J; Menn, B; Massberg, D; Lorentz, S

    2008-07-01

    In the first week of February 2008 on the island of Corsica, 55 Phlebotomus (Transphlebotomus) mascittii, 39 males and 16 females, were caught in a railway tunnel. This is the first proof of the winter activity of the adult P. mascittii in Europe.

  19. Elements of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

  20. GPS geodesy in the northern Lesser Antilles: implications for arc kinematics and subduction zone dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, S. E.; Rodriguez, H.; Jansma, P. E.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2002-12-01

    The Lesser Antilles island arc extends from Grenada in the south to the island of Sombrero in the north and formed from the westward subduction of Atlantic lithosphere below the Caribbean plate. A break in the Wadati-Benioff zone occurs between Martinique and St. Lucia effectively splitting the island arc into a more seismically active north and lesser seismically active south. GPS geodesy has been conducted in the northern Lesser Antilles since 1998 when sites (number in parentheses) were established on Saba (4), St. Eustatius (4), St. Kitts (4), Nevis (4) and Antigua (2). Sites established in 2001 and 2002 include: St. Martin (2); Anguilla (2); Barbuda (1); and one additional site each in St. Kitts and Nevis. Islands with potentially active volcanoes (Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Kitts, and Nevis) have both tectonic and volcanic sites. Data from occupations in 1998, 2000, 2001, and 2002 have been processed with GIPSY-OASIS II with final orbit and clock parameters from JPL and recast into the Caribbean reference frame to assess 1) velocities of individual island sites relative to the stable Caribbean, 2) internal island deformation and 3) seismic coupling along the plate interface. Results from individual quiescent volcanoes demonstrate that they are deforming at several millimeters per year with respect to the stable Caribbean. The cause of the observed deformation is likely a combination of edifice failure and coupling along the plate interface. Simple 2D locking models have been investigated and will be presented.

  1. A bird's eye view of "Understanding volcanoes in the Vanuatu arc"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergniolle, S.; Métrich, N.

    2016-08-01

    The Vanuatu intra-oceanic arc, located between 13 and 22°S in the southwest Pacific Ocean (Fig. 1), is one of the most seismically active regions with almost 39 earthquakes magnitude 7 + in the past 43 years (Baillard et al., 2015). Active deformation in both the Vanuatu subduction zone and the back-arc North-Fiji basin accommodates the variation of convergence rates which are c.a. 90-120 mm/yr along most of the arc (Taylor et al., 1995; Pelletier et al., 1998). The convergence rate is slowed down to 25-43 mm/yr (Baillard et al., 2015) in the central segment where the D'Entrecasteaux ridge - an Eocene-Oligocene island arc complex on the Australian subducting plate - collides and is subducted beneath the fore-arc (Taylor et al., 2005). Hence, the Vanuatu arc is segmented in three blocks which move independently; as the north block rotates counter-clockwise in association with rapid back-arc spreading ( 80 mm/year), the central block translates eastward and the south block rotates clockwise (Calmant et al., 2003; Bergeot et al., 2009). (See Fig. 1.)

  2. Preliminary results of trace elements mobility in soils and plants from the active hydrothermal area of Nisyros island (Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalopoulou, Kyriaki; Calabrese, Sergio; Milazzo, Silvia; Brusca, Lorenzo; D'Alessandro, Walter; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos; Tassi, Franco; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Trace elements, i.e. chemical constituents of rocks with concentration <1000 ppm, play a structural role in the organisms and use proteins as a carrier to their target site. Their toxicity depends on their concentration, speciation and reactions with other elements. In volcanic environments, significant amounts of trace elements discharged from gas emissions, contribute to produce air particulate. Nisyros Island is a stratovolcano located at the South Aegean active Volcanic Arc. Intense hydrothermal activity characterise the Lakki caldera. In particular, the fumaroles located in the craters of Stefanos, Kaminakia, Lofos Dome and the area comprising Phlegeton, Polyvotes Micros and Polyvotes Megalos discharge hydrothermal fluids rich in H2O (91- 99%), SO2 and H2S. Their temperatures are almost 100o C and H2S is highly abundant accounting for 8-26 % of the released dry gas phase. On June 2013, during a multidisciplinary field trip on Nisyros island, 39 samples of top soils and 31 of endemic plants (Cistus Creticus and Salvifolius and Erica Arborea and Manipuliflora) were collected in the caldera area, with the aim to investigate the distribution of concentrations of trace elements related to the contribution of deep originated fluids. Moreover, one sample of plant and soil was collected outside the caldera as local background, for comparison. All the soil samples were powdered avoiding metal contamination and they were extracted twice, using HNO3 + HCl for one extraction (closed microwave digestion) and ultrapure de- ionized water for the other one (leaching extraction). The leaves of plants were gently isolated, dried and powdered for acid microwave extraction (HNO3 + H2O2). All the solutions were analysed for major and trace elements contents by using ionic chromatography (IC) and inductively plasma spectrometry (ICP-MS and ICP-OES). The preliminary results showed high enrichment of many trace elements both in plant and soils respect to the local background, in

  3. Performance Analysis of Positive-feedback-based Active Anti-islanding Schemes for Inverter-Based Distributed Generators

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Pengwei; Aponte, Erick E.; Nelson, J. Keith

    2010-06-14

    Recently proposed positive-feedback-based anti-islanding schemes (AI) are highly effective in preventing islanding without causing any degradation in power quality. This paper aims to analyze the performance of these schemes quantitatively in the context of the dynamic models of inverter-based distributed generators (DG). In this study, the characteristics of these active anti-islanding methods are discussed and design guidelines are derived.

  4. Nurture Versus Nature: Accounting for the Differences Between the Taiwan and Timor active arc-continent collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The active Banda arc/continent collision of the Timor region provides many important contrasts to what is observed in Taiwan, which is mostly a function of differences in the nature of the subducting plate. One of the most important differences is the thermal state of the respective continental margins: 30 Ma China passive margin versus 160 Ma NW Australian continental margin. The subduction of the cold and strong NW Australian passive margin beneath the Banda trench provides many new constraints for resolving longstanding issues about the formative stages of collision and accretion of continental crust. Some of these issues include evidence for slab rollback and subduction erosion, deep continental subduction, emplacement or demise of forearc basement, relative amounts of uplift from crustal vs. lithospheric processes, influence of inherited structure, partitioning of strain away from the thrust front, extent of mélange development, metamorphic conditions and exhumation mechanisms, continental contamination and accretion of volcanic arcs, does the slab tear, and does subduction polarity reverse? Most of these issues link to the profound control of lower plate crustal heterogeneity, thermal state and inherited structure. The thermomechanical characteristics of subducting an old continental margin allow for extensive underthrusting of lower plate cover units beneath the forearc and emplacement and uplift of extensive nappes of forearc basement. It also promotes subduction of continental crust to deep enough levels to experience high pressure metamorphism (not found in Taiwan) and extensive contamination of the volcanic arc. Seismic tomography confirms subduction of continental lithosphere beneath the Banda Arc to at least 400 km with no evidence for slab tear. Slab rollback during this process results in massive subduction erosion and extension of the upper plate. Other differences in the nature of the subducting plates in Taiwan in Timor are differences in the

  5. Discovery of an active shallow submarine silicic volcano in the northern Izu-Bonin Arc: volcanic structure and potential hazards of Oomurodashi Volcano (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, K.; Ishizuka, O.; Nichols, A. R.; Hirahara, Y.; Carey, R.; McIntosh, I. M.; Masaki, Y.; Kondo, R.; Miyairi, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Oomurodashi is a bathymetric high located ~20 km south of Izu-Oshima, an active volcanic island of the northern Izu-Bonin Arc. Using the 200 m bathymetric contour to define its summit dimensions, the diameter of Oomurodashi is ~20 km. Oomurodashi has been regarded as inactive, largely because it has a vast flat-topped summit at 100 - 150 meters below sea level (mbsl). During cruise NT07-15 of R/V Natsushima in 2007, we conducted a dive survey in a small crater, Oomuro Hole, located in the center of the flat-topped summit, using the remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) Hyper-Dolphin. The only heat flow measurement conducted on the floor of Oomuro Hole during the dive recorded an extremely high value of 4,200 mW/m2. Furthermore, ROV observations revealed that the southwestern wall of Oomuro Hole consists of fresh rhyolitic lavas. These findings suggest that Oomurodashi is in fact an active silicic submarine volcano. To confirm this hypothesis, we conducted detailed geological and geophysical ROV Hyper-Dolphin (cruise NT12-19). In addition to further ROV surveys, we carried out single-channel seismic (SCS) surveys across Oomurodashi in order to examine the shallow structures beneath the current edifice. The ROV surveys revealed numerous active hydrothermal vents on the floor of Oomuro Hole, at ~200 mbsl, with maximum water temperature measured at the hydrothermal vents reaching 194°C. We also conducted a much more detailed set of heat flow measurements across the floor of Oomuro Hole, detecting very high heat flows of up to 29,000 mW/m2. ROV observations revealed that the area surrounding Oomuro Hole on the flat-topped summit of Oomurodashi is covered by extensive fresh rhyolitic lava and pumice clasts with minimum biogenetic or manganese cover, suggesting recent eruption(s). These findings strongly indicate that Oomurodashi is an active silicic submarine volcano, with recent eruption(s) occurring from Oomuro Hole. Since the summit of Oomurodashi is in shallow water, it

  6. Cinnabar, arsenian pyrite and thallium-enrichment in active shallow submarine hydrothermal vents at Paleochori Bay, Milos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kati, Marianna; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Magganas, Andreas; Baltatzis, Emmanouil; Kanellopoulos, Christos; Mavrogonatos, Constantinos

    2015-04-01

    We herein report the discovery of active cinnabar-depositing hydrothermal vents in a submarine setting at Paleochori Bay, within the offshore southeastern extension of the Milos Island Geothermal Field, South Aegean Active Volcanic Arc. Active, low temperature (up to 115 °C) hydrothermal venting through volcaniclastic material has led to a varied assemblage of sulfide and alteration mineral phases in an area of approximately 1 km2. Our samples recovered from Paleochori Bay are hydrothermal edifices composed of volcaniclastic detrital material cemented by pyrite, or pure sulfide (mainly massive pyrite) mounts. Besides pyrite and minor marcasite, the hydrothermal minerals include cinnabar, amorphous silica, hydrous ferric oxides, carbonates (aragonite and calcite), alunite-jarosite solid solution and Sr-rich barite. Among others, growth textures, sieve-textured pyrite associated with barite, alunite-jarosite solid solution and hydrous ferric oxides rims colloform-banded pyrite layers. Overgrowths of arsenian pyrite layers (up to 3.2 wt. % As and/or up to 1.1 wt. % Mn) onto As-free pyrite indicate fluctuation in As content of the hydrothermal fluid. Mercury, in the form of cinnabar, occurs in up to 5 μm grains within arsenian pyrite layers, usually forming distinct cinnabar-enriched micro-layers. Hydrothermal Sr-rich barite (barite-celestine solid solution), pseudocubic alunite-jarosite solid solution and Mn- and Sr-enriched carbonates occur in various amounts and closely associated with pyrite and/or hydrous ferric oxides. Thallium-bearing sulfides and/or sulfosalts were not detected during our study; however, hydrous ferric oxides show thallium content of up to 0.5 wt. % Tl. The following scenarios may have played a role in pyrite precipitation at Paleochori: (a) H2S originally dissolved in the deep fluid but separated upon boiling could have reacted with oxygenated seawater under production of sulphuric acid, thus causing leaching and dissolution of primary iron

  7. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Public information report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The document presents answers to frequently asked questions about plans for cleanup and decontamination activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Answers to the questions asked are based on information in the NRC 'Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2,' NUREG-0683.

  8. Controls on the Evolution of River Channel Morphology on Volcanic Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlquist, M. P.; West, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    River channel morphology is thought to record the interaction of climatic and tectonic drivers of erosion, together with material properties of bedrock and the temporal changes in each of these parameters. However, unraveling the geophysical story told by river networks is complicated by the complexity of the interactions involved and the impracticality of making observations of river network evolution in situ over geological time scales. In this work, we exploit spatial gradients in an effort to understand fundamental controls on river channel morphology in volcanic terrains. We focus primarily on the Banda Arc, a complex tectonic domain with tectonic, volcanic, and climatic gradients that produce islands with river network geometries in a variety of stages and styles of evolution. We compute the Χ statistic - an integration of upstream drainage area over the length of a river - for rivers draining the Banda Arc islands, focusing on the currently and formerly active volcanic islands of the Arc. We compare Χ plots from across the Banda Arc with those from the Hawaiian Islands, which offer a time series of evolving river networks on volcanic islands of similar composition and a more stable tectonic domain to gain improved understanding of the role of tectonics and time in river network evolution. We find major disequilibria across main drainage divides in extinct volcanic terrains with little tectonic activity, as networks are forced away from their initial radial patterns by variations in lithology and/or climate. Tectonically active islands in the Banda Arc have generally smaller disequilibria across divides and produce more regular drainage patterns, indicating that, at the scale of individual volcanic islands, the tectonic signal may dominate in channel morphology.

  9. Evidence of sub-vent biosphere: enzymatic activities in 308 °C deep-sea hydrothermal systems at Suiyo seamount, Izu Bonin Arc, Western Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takano, Yoshinori; Edazawa, Yae; Kobayashi, Kensei; Urabe, Tetsuro; Marumo, Katsumi

    2005-01-01

    A high-temperature deep-sea hydrothermal system related to dacitic arc-volcanism was drilled using a tethered, submarine rock-drill system as a part of the Archaean Park Project. The benthic multi-coring system (BMS) employed allowed for direct sampling of microorganisms, rocks and fluids beneath hydrothermal vents. The samples examined in this study were from sites APSK 05 and APSK 07 on the Suiyo Seamount of the Izu-Bonin Arc in the Pacific Ocean. Based on the vertical distribution of samples derived from this vigorous sub-vent environment, a model of deep-sea subterranean chemistry and biology was determined detailing optimal microbial activities. Deep-sea hydrothermal sub-vent core samples of dacitic arc-volcanism obtained at the Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, Western Pacific Ocean were analyzed for acid and alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activities. Useful biomarkers of acid phosphatase (ACP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) enzymatic activities were positively correlated against each other and was greatest at the partial middle core sequences; ACP and ALP activities determined were as high as 5.10 and 6.80 nmol/min/g rock, respectively. Biochemical indicators of ACP and ALP were consistent with the origin of biogenic amino acids occupied in the sub-vent region and microbial cell number in the fluid. The significant enzymatic activities demonstrated in this study provides crucial evidence that sub-vent regions represent part of the previously unknown extreme-environment biosphere, extending the known subterranean habitable spaces of, for example, extremophilic microbes. This boring trial was first example of discharging high temperature hydrothermal activities at the frontal arc volcanoes.

  10. Comment on "207Pb-206Pb single-zircon evaporation ages of some granitoid rocks reveal continent-oceanic island arc collision during the Cretaceous geodynamic evolution of the Central Anatolian crust, Turkey" - Boztug, D., Tichomirowa, M. & Bombach, K., 2007, JAES 31, 71-86

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göncüoglu, M. Cemal

    A continent-oceanic island arc collision model was proposed as a new geodynamic scenario for the evolution of the Cretaceous Central Anatolian granitoids in the Central Anatolian crystalline complex (CACC) by Boztug et al. (2007b) [Boztug, D., Tichomirowa, M., Bombach, K., 2007b. 207Pb-206Pb single-zircon evaporation ages of some granitoid rocks reveal continent-oceanic island arc collision during the Cretaceous geodynamic evolution of the central Anatolian crust, Turkey. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences 31, 71-86]. The key aspects of this model include an intra-oceanic subduction in the Neotethyan Izmir-Ankara Ocean, formation of an island arc and its subsequent collision with the northern margin of the Tauride-Anatolide Platform. The identical scenario was initially proposed by Göncüoglu et al. (1992) [Göncüoglu, M.C., Erler, A., Toprak, V., Yalınız, K., Olgun, E., Rojay, B., 1992. Geology of the western Central Anatolian Massif, Part II: Central Areas. TPAO Report No: 3155, 76 p] . Moreover, the weighted mean values of the reported 207Pb-206Pb single-zircon evaporation ages by Boztug et al. (2007b) [Boztug, D., Tichomirowa, M., Bombach, K., 2007b. 207Pb-206Pb single-zircon evaporation ages of some granitoid rocks reveal continent-oceanic island arc collision during the Cretaceous geodynamic evolution of the central Anatolian crust: Turkey. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences 31, 71-86] from A-type granitoids in the CACC seem to be miscalculated and contrast with the field data.

  11. What drives centuries-long polygenetic scoria cone activity at Barren Island volcano?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Hetu

    2014-12-01

    Barren Island in the Andaman Sea is an active mafic stratovolcano, which had explosive and effusive eruptions, followed by caldera formation, in prehistoric time (poorly dated). A scoria cone within the caldera, marking volcanic resurgence, was active periodically from 1787 to 1832 (the historic eruptions). Since 1991, the same scoria cone has produced six eruptions, commonly including lava flows. Links between Barren Island's eruptions and giant earthquakes (such as the 26 December 2004 Great Sumatra megathrust earthquake) have been suggested, though there is no general correlation between them. The ≥ 227-year-long activity of the scoria cone, named here Shanku ("cone"), is normally driven by purely magmatic processes. I present a "source to surface" model for Barren Island and Shanku, including the source region, deeper and shallow magma chambers, volcanotectonics, dyking from magma chambers, and eruptions and eruptive style as controlled by crustal stresses, composition and volatile content. Calculations show that dykes ~ 0.5 m thick and a few hundred meters long, originating from shallow-level magma chambers (~ 5 km deep), are suitable feeders of the Shanku eruptions. Shanku, a polygenetic scoria cone (at least 13 eruptions since 1787), has three excellent analogues, namely Anak Krakatau (40 eruptions since 1927), Cerro Negro (23 eruptions since 1850), and Yasur (persistent activity for the past hundreds of years). This is an important category of volcanoes, gradational between small "monogenetic" scoria cones and larger "polygenetic" volcanoes.

  12. Erosion under extreme climatic events in tropical climates : the case of the storm Helena (1963) in the Guadeloupe island (Lesser Antilles Arc)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allemand, P.; Lajeunesse, E.; Devauchelle, O.; Delacourt, C.

    2012-04-01

    he volume of sediment exported from a tropical watershed is dramatically increased during extreme climatic events, such as storms and tropical cyclones (Dadson et al. 2004; Hilton et al. 2008). Indeed, the exceptionally high rainfall rates reached during these events generate runoff and trigger landslides which accumulate a significant amount of sediments in flooded rivers (Gabet et al., 2004; Lin et al., 2008). We estimate the volume of sediments mobilized by the storm Helena (26 to 28 October 1963) on Basse-Terre Island in the archipelago of Guadeloupe. This is achieved using images acquired by IGN (Institut Géographique National) a few weeks after the storm which produced numerous landslides. All the available images from this campaign have been pseudo-orthorectified and included in a GIS with a Digital Elevation Model with a resolution of 10 m. Two hundred fifty three landslides have been identified and mapped. Most of them are located in the center of the island, where the highest slopes are. The cumulated surface of the landslides is 0.5 km2. Field observations on Basse-Terre show that landslides mobilized the whole regolith layer, which is about 1m thick. Assuming an average landslide thickness of 1m, we find that the total volume of sediment mobilized by the storm Helena is 0.5 km3. The associated denudation averaged over all watersheds affected by landslides is 1.4 mm with a maximum of 5 mm for the watersheds of Vieux-Habitants and Capesterre. The impact of the storm Helena is then discussed with respect to 1) the erosion induced on the Capesterre catchment by the highest flood available in a two years survey record (less than 0.1 mm/y); 2) the long term denudation rate of the major watersheds of Basse-Terre estimated by reconstructing the initial volcanic topography (between 0.1 and 0.4 mm/y).

  13. Spatial and temporal evolution of Liassic to Paleocene arc activity in southern Peru unraveled by zircon U-Pb and Hf in-situ data on plutonic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouy, Sophie; Paquette, Jean-Louis; de Saint Blanquat, Michel; Benoit, Mathieu; Belousova, Elena A.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; García, Fredy; Tejada, Luis C.; Gallegos, Ricardo; Sempere, Thierry

    2012-12-01

    Cordilleran-type batholiths are built by prolonged arc activity along active continental margins and provide detailed magmatic records of the subduction system evolution. They complement the stratigraphic record from the associated forearcs and backarcs. We performed in-situ U-Pb geochronology and Hf isotope measurements on zircon grains from a large set of plutonic rocks from the Coastal Batholith in southern Peru. This batholith emplaced into the Precambrian basement and the Mesozoic sedimentary cover. We identify two major periods of voluminous arc activity, during the Jurassic (200-175 Ma) and the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene (90-60 Ma). Jurassic arc magmatism mainly resulted in the emplacement of a dominantly mafic suite with ɛHf values ranging from - 9.5 to + 0.1. Published ages south of the Arequipa area suggest that the arc migrated southwestward out of the study area during the Middle Jurassic. After a magmatic gap of 85 Ma, arc activity abruptly resumed 90 Ma ago in Arequipa. Intrusive bodies emplaced into both basement and older Jurassic intrusions and strata. This activity culminated between 70 and 60 Ma with the emplacement of very large volumes of dominantly quartz-dioritic magmas. This last episode may be considered as a flare-up event, characterized by intense magmatic transfers into the crust and rapid relief creation. The Late Cretaceous-Paleocene initial ɛHf are shifted toward positive values (up to + 3.3 and + 2.6) compared to the Jurassic ones, indicating either a larger input of juvenile magmas, a lesser interaction with the ancient crust, or an increase of re-melting of young mantle-derived mafic lower crust. These magmatic fluxes with juvenile component are coeval with the onset of the crustal thickening at 90 Ma and represent a significant contribution to the formation of the continental crust in this area.

  14. All Three Endogenous Quinone Species of Escherichia coli Are Involved in Controlling the Activity of the Aerobic/Anaerobic Response Regulator ArcA

    PubMed Central

    van Beilen, Johan W. A.; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.

    2016-01-01

    The enteron Escherichia coli is equipped with a branched electron transfer chain that mediates chemiosmotic electron transfer, that drives ATP synthesis. The components of this electron transfer chain couple the oxidation of available electron donors from cellular metabolism (e.g., NADH, succinate, lactate, formate, etc.) to the reduction of electron acceptors like oxygen, nitrate, fumarate, di-methyl-sulfoxide, etc. Three different quinones, i.e., ubiquinone, demethyl-menaquinone and menaquinone, couple the transfer of electrons between the dehydrogenases and reductases/oxidases that constitute this electron transfer chain, whereas, the two-component regulation system ArcB/A regulates gene expression, to allow the organism to adapt itself to the ambient conditions of available electron donors and acceptors. Here, we report that E. coli can grow and adjust well to transitions in the availability of oxygen, with any of the three quinones as its single quinone. In all three ‘single-quinone’ E. coli strains transitions in the activity of ArcB are observed, as evidenced by changes in the level of phosphorylation of the response regulator ArcA, upon depletion/readmission of oxygen. These results lead us to conclude that all quinol species of E. coli can reduce (i.e., activate) the sensor ArcB and all three quinones oxidize (i.e., de-activate) it. These results also confirm our earlier conclusion that demethyl-menaquinone can function in aerobic respiration. PMID:27656164

  15. Antimicrobial activity of Alstonia macrophylla: a folklore of bay islands.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, D; Maiti, K; Kundu, A P; Chakraborty, M S; Bhadra, R; Mandal, S C; Mandal, A B

    2001-09-01

    The methanolic crude and methanol-aqueous extract of Alstonia macrophylla leaves and n-butanol part of the crude extract showed antimicrobial activity against various strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes var. mentagrophytes and Microsporum gypseum. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranges from 64 to 1000 microg/ml for bacteria and 32-128 mg/ml for dermatophytes. However, the strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella sp. and Vibrio cholerae showed resistance against in vitro treatment of the extracts up to 2000 microg/ml concentration, while the two yeast species were resistant even at 128 mg/ml concentration. The stem bark extract prepared similarly was found to be less active compared to the leaves. Phytochemical study indicates that the crude extract contains tannins, flavonoids, saponins, sterols, triterpene and reducing sugars. Further fractionation and purification of n-butanol part of the extract showed the presence of beta-sitosterol, ursolic acid, beta-sitosterol glucoside and a mixture of minor compounds only detected in TLC.

  16. Cloud Arcs in the Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Small cumulus clouds in this natural-color view from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer have formed a distinctive series of quasi-circular arcs. Clues regarding the formation of these arcs can be found by noting that larger clouds exist in the interior of each arc.

    The interior clouds are thicker and likely to be more convectively active than the other clouds, causing much of the air near the centers of the arcs to rise. This air spreads out horizontally in all directions as it rises and continues to spread out as it begins to sink back to the surface. This pushes any existing small cumulus clouds away from the central region of convection.

    As the air sinks, it also warms, preventing other small clouds from forming, so that the regions just inside the arcs are kept clear. At the arcs, the horizontal flow of sinking air is now quite weak and on meeting the undisturbed air it can rise again slightly -- possibly assisting in the formation of new small cumulus clouds. Although examples of the continuity of air, in which every rising air motion must be compensated by a sinking motion elsewhere, are very common, the degree of organization exhibited here is relatively rare, as the wind field at different altitudes usually disrupts such patterns. The degree of self organization of this cloud image, whereby three or four such circular events form a quasi-periodic pattern, probably also requires a relatively uncommon combination of wind, temperature and humidity conditions for it to occur.

    The image was acquired by MISR's nadir camera on March 11, 2002, and is centered west of the Marshall Islands. Enewetak Atoll is discernible through thin cloud as the turquoise band near the right-hand edge of the image.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and views almost the entire globe every 9 days. This image is a portion of the data acquired during Terra orbit 11863, and covers an area of about 380

  17. Arc of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Adam Vai

    2011-07-01

    Born in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, the author had a 20 year career in diplomacy, political affairs, and development policy analysis at the Pacific Islands Forum, the United Nations in New York; the Prime Minister's Department in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and in the Foreign Ministry of PNG. He has also been involved in theatre for over a decade in PNG, and participated in a three-month program at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre Center in Connecticut, USA. He is currently the Business Development Manager at the Torres Strait Regional Authority (Commonwealth) on Thursday Island. Since 1975 the Australian government's overseas development policy has supported various sectoral programs in its neighbouring countries, in particular Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. The "creative" field has not been prominent in this strategy. While natural resources and the sports sectors have gained much greater attention, in terms of being viable international commercial enterprises, the arts, have remained stagnant. In this paper the need for joint programs genuinely supporting "wellbeing" and promoting social enterprise throughout the "arc of opportunity" is described to harness Melanesian creativity to compete successfully in world-markets, starting with penetration of the largest economy at its door-step: Australia.

  18. Can human activities alter the drowning fate of barrier islands?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo-Trueba, J.; Ashton, A. D.; Jin, D.; Hoagland, P.; Kite-Powell, H.

    2012-12-01

    Low-lying coastal barriers face an uncertain future over the coming century and beyond as sea levels rise, with many projections suggesting end-of-century rates of sea-level rise as high or higher than 1 cm/yr. Geologically, such rates of sea-level rise have been experienced several thousand years ago and we can use our understanding of geological processes and sedimentary evidence to help unravel the dynamics of natural barriers experiencing sea-level rise. Along many modern coastal barriers, however, anthropic change, such as beach nourishment, dune construction, and emplacement of hard structures, plays a dominant role in coastline dynamics. A fundamental question to be addressed is whether human activities intended to preserve infrastructure and beach recreation may make wholesale collapse, or 'drowning,' of barrier systems more likely. Here we present a numerical modeling tool that couples natural processes and the human responses to these changes (and the subsequent of human responses on natural processes). Recent theoretical model development suggests that barriers are intrinsically morphodynamic features, responding to sea-level rise in complex ways through the interactions of marine processes and barrier overwash. Undeveloped coastal barriers would therefore respond to an accelerated sea-level rise in complex, less predictable manners than suggested by existing long-term models. We have developed a model that examines non-equilibrium cross-shore evolution of barrier systems at decadal to centennial temporal scales, focusing on the interactions between processes of shoreface evolution and overwash deposition. Model responses demonstrate two means of barrier collapse during sea-level rise: 'height drowning', which occurs when overwash fluxes are insufficient to maintain the landward migration rate required to keep in pace with sea-level rise, and 'width drowning', which occurs when the shoreface response is insufficient to maintain the barrier geometry

  19. Impact of Island-Induced Clouds on Surface Measurements: Analysis of the ARM Nauru Island Effect Study Data

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Long, Charles N.; Flynn, Donna M.

    2005-07-01

    The Department of Energy's second Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) site in the tropical western Pacific (TWP) region was established on the island of Nauru as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Analysis of data taken during the Nauru99 intensive field experiment indicated that the cloud and radiation measurements at the ARCS site were being affected by a cloud plume, which was induced by the island due to diurnal heating relative to the ocean and the predominantly easterly flow of the tradewinds. The Nauru Island Effects Study (NIES) was developed to identify times when the island cloud effect occurs and to quantify the effect on the ARCS measurements. The Nauru cloud plume is found to be highly correlated with surface wind direction. During suppressed conditions the plume heading is predominantly to the west because of the consistency of the easterly trade winds. During El Nino conditions, the cloud plume can occur with almost any heading due to the variability of the surface winds. During suppressed conditions the cloud plume was observed in 60% of the visible satellite images after 10:30 LST. During active conditions, the plume was observed in only 25% of the satellite images and only half of the observed plumes were downwind of the ARCS site. This study indicates that the absolute increase in low cloud frequency due to the cloud plume is on the order of 10% and the effect of the cloud plume on the average daily surface radiation is around 50-60 wm. By installing a simple measurement platform consisting of surface meteorological instruments and a global shortwave radiometer at a site on the opposite side of the island, the effect of the cloud plume on the radiation field at the ARCS site can be quantified on a long term basis.

  20. Listeriolysin O Membrane Damaging Activity Involves Arc Formation and Lineaction -- Implication for Listeria monocytogenes Escape from Phagocytic Vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Yi; Rezelj, Saša; Bedina Zavec, Apolonija; Anderluh, Gregor; Scheuring, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Listeriolysin-O (LLO) plays a crucial role during infection by Listeria monocytogenes. It enables escape of bacteria from phagocytic vacuole, which is the basis for its spread to other cells and tissues. It is not clear how LLO acts at phagosomal membranes to allow bacterial escape. The mechanism of action of LLO remains poorly understood, probably due to unavailability of suitable experimental tools that could monitor LLO membrane disruptive activity in real time. Here, we used high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) featuring high spatio-temporal resolution on model membranes and optical microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) to investigate LLO activity. We analyze the assembly kinetics of toxin oligomers, the prepore-to-pore transition dynamics and the membrane disruption in real time. We reveal that LLO toxin efficiency and mode of action as a membrane-disrupting agent varies strongly depending on the membrane cholesterol concentration and the environmental pH. We discovered that LLO is able to form arc pores as well as damage lipid membranes as a lineactant, and this leads to large-scale membrane defects. These results altogether provide a mechanistic basis of how large-scale membrane disruption leads to release of Listeria from the phagocytic vacuole in the cellular context. PMID:27104344

  1. A twice liquid arc discharge approach for synthesis of visible-light-active nanocrystalline Ag:ZnO photocatalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkarran, Ali Akbar

    2012-05-01

    Ag:ZnO hybrid nanostructures were successfully prepared by a twice arc discharge method in liquid. The visible light photocatalytic activities were successfully demonstrated for the degradation of Rhodamine B (Rh. B), Methyl orange (MO), and Methylene blue (MB) as standard organic compounds under the irradiation of 90 W halogen light for 2 h. The Ag:ZnO nanostructures were characterized by X-Ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis). The results revealed that the Ag:ZnO nanostructures extended the light absorption spectrum toward the visible region and significantly enhanced the Rh. B photodegradation under visible light irradiation. 3 mM Ag:ZnO nanostructures exhibited highest photocatalytic efficiency. It has been confirmed that the Ag:ZnO nanostructures could be excited by visible light ( E<3.3 eV). The significant enhancement in the Ag:ZnO nanostructures photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation can be ascribed to the effect of physisorbed noble metal Ag by acting as electron traps in ZnO band gap. A mechanism for photocatalytic degradation of organic pollutant over Ag:ZnO photocatalyst was proposed based on our observations.

  2. Volcanic Supply Rate and Evolving of the Izu-Bonin Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, K.; Kido, M.

    2001-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin Arc-Trench system is one of the oceanic arc-trench system which is crucial for understanding how to evolve island arc and continental crust during Archean. We estimated total volume of the volcanic materials accreted to IB arc since 48 Ma by the model crustal structure and bathymetric map available through IB arc which is divided into three segments by two tectonic lines. ODP Leg 125 and 126 have revealed the volcanic history of the IB arc. We took into account the spatial distribution and isotopic ages of the volcanic rocks and elucidated the arc evolution by the division of events occurred during 48-43, 43-34, 34-27, 27-15, 15-6, 6-2, and < 2Ma, respectively. Boninitic rocks pored out on the deep sea environment during 48-43 Ma. After the change of the Pacific plate motion strong boninitic and calc-alkalic volcanism took place along the paleo-IB arc during 43-34 Ma. The arc grew quickly to the shallow level and yielded explosive volcanic materials and debris flow deposits until 34 Ma. Paleo-IB arc split into to halves, present-day IB arc and Palau-Kyushu remnant arc to form Shikoku and Parece Vela backarc basins at 30-27 Ma. Volcanic activity during the 27-15 Ma was quiescent compared to the other stage because of the backarc spreading consumed a large amount of volcanic materials. Explosive and bimodal volcanism were dominated to form backarc depressions in the backarc area and strata-volcanoes on the volcanic front during 15-6 Ma. Finally, strato-volcanoes and catastrophic explosion of the caldera forming acidic volcanics were predominating on the volcanic front since 2 Ma. Through the volcanic history the IB arc was formed most part during initial 10 my to build a paleo-IB arc and volcanic supply rate during initial 10 my was very high, almost compatible to that of super plume.

  3. Fore- and Back-Arc Structures Along the Hikurangi-Kermadec Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherwath, M.; Kopp, H.; Flueh, E. R.; Henrys, S. A.; Sutherland, R.

    2009-04-01

    The Hikurangi-Kermadec subduction zone northeast of New Zealand represents an ideal target to study lateral variations of subduction zone processes. The incoming Pacific plate changes from being a large igneous province, called the Hikurangi Plateau, in the south to normal oceanic plate north of the Rapuhia Scarp. The overriding Australian plate is continental in the south, forming the North Island of New Zealand, and changes to an island arc in the north. Further lateral variability exists in changes in volcanic and hydro-thermal activity, transitions from accretion to subduction erosion, backarc spreading and rifting, and is accompanied by northward increasing seismicity. As part of the MANGO project (Marine Geoscientific Investigations on the Input and Output of the Kermadec Subduction Zone), four marine geophysical transects of largely seismic reflection and refraction data provide constraints on the upper lithospheric structures across the Hikurangi-Kermadec Trench between 29-38 degrees South. On MANGO profile 1 in the south, the initially shallow subduction of the incoming plateau coincides with crustal underplating beneath the East Cape ridge. To the west lies the 100 km wide and over 10 km deep Raukumara Basin. Seismic velocities of the upper arc mantle are around 8 km/s and are considered normal. In contrast, on MANGO profile 4, about 1000 km to the north around the volcanically active Raoul Island, the incoming oceanic crust appears to bend considerably steeper and thus causes a 50 km narrower forearc with a smaller forearc basin. Furthermore, the upper mantle velocities in both plates are relatively low (7.4-7.7 km/s), likely indicating strong bending related deformation of the incoming plate and thermal activity within the arc possibly due to spreading. Here, arc volcanism is relatively active, with many large volcanoes directly on the ridge. The central two transects MANGO 2 and 3, though without data coverage of the structure of the incoming plate

  4. Effect of Aseismic Ridge Subduction on Volcanism in the NE Lesser Antilles Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinton, A. J.; Hatfield, R. G.; McCanta, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of aseismic ridges or buoyant crust in subduction zones can affect the volcanism occurring on the overriding plate. Here we describe the affect of the subduction of an aseismic ridge on volcanism in the NE Lesser Antilles. The Lesser Antilles island arc is a result of westward subduction of the North American plate beneath the Caribbean plate and stretches 800 km from Saba in the north to Grenada in the south. From Guadeloupe northwards, the arc bifurcates into an eastern, inactive arc (known as the Limestone Caribees) and a western, active arc (Volcanic Caribees). It has been suggested that this bifurcation is the result of the subduction of buoyant crust in the form of at least two aseismic ridges, in the North American plate. In 2012, IODP Expedition 340 recovered 130 m of core from site U1396, located 55 km SW of Montserrat, Lesser Antilles. The core contains a detailed record of volcanism, in the form of more than 180 tephra layers, that stretches back nearly 4.5 Ma. This is the longest and most complete record of volcanism for the NE Lesser Antilles and provides insight into the evolution and development of the island arc in this region. A variety of techniques are being applied to the tephra layers from U1396 to determine their age, chemistry, components and origin. Here we present preliminary results from paeleomagnetic age determinations for each tephra layer to show how the subduction of aseismic ridges on the North American plate has affected the rate of volcanism and development of the island arc in the NE Lesser Antilles over the last 4.5 Ma.

  5. Active chromatin domains are defined by acetylation islands revealed by genome-wide mapping.

    PubMed

    Roh, Tae-Young; Cuddapah, Suresh; Zhao, Keji

    2005-03-01

    The identity and developmental potential of a human cell is specified by its epigenome that is largely defined by patterns of chromatin modifications including histone acetylation. Here we report high-resolution genome-wide mapping of diacetylation of histone H3 at Lys 9 and Lys 14 in resting and activated human T cells by genome-wide mapping technique (GMAT). Our data show that high levels of the H3 acetylation are detected in gene-rich regions. The chromatin accessibility and gene expression of a genetic domain is correlated with hyperacetylation of promoters and other regulatory elements but not with generally elevated acetylation of the entire domain. Islands of acetylation are identified in the intergenic and transcribed regions. The locations of the 46,813 acetylation islands identified in this study are significantly correlated with conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) and many of them are colocalized with known regulatory elements in T cells. TCR signaling induces 4045 new acetylation loci that may mediate the global chromatin remodeling and gene activation. We propose that the acetylation islands are epigenetic marks that allow prediction of functional regulatory elements.

  6. Active chromatin domains are defined by acetylation islands revealed by genome-wide mapping

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Tae-Young; Cuddapah, Suresh; Zhao, Keji

    2005-01-01

    The identity and developmental potential of a human cell is specified by its epigenome that is largely defined by patterns of chromatin modifications including histone acetylation. Here we report high-resolution genome-wide mapping of diacetylation of histone H3 at Lys 9 and Lys 14 in resting and activated human T cells by genome-wide mapping technique (GMAT). Our data show that high levels of the H3 acetylation are detected in gene-rich regions. The chromatin accessibility and gene expression of a genetic domain is correlated with hyperacetylation of promoters and other regulatory elements but not with generally elevated acetylation of the entire domain. Islands of acetylation are identified in the intergenic and transcribed regions. The locations of the 46,813 acetylation islands identified in this study are significantly correlated with conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) and many of them are colocalized with known regulatory elements in T cells. TCR signaling induces 4045 new acetylation loci that may mediate the global chromatin remodeling and gene activation. We propose that the acetylation islands are epigenetic marks that allow prediction of functional regulatory elements. PMID:15706033

  7. Deformation of the Calabrian Arc subduction complex and its relation to STEP activity at depth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonia, Alina; Wortel, Rinus; Nijholt, Nicolai; Govers, Rob; Torelli, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Propagating tear faults at the edge of subducted slabs ("Subduction transform edge propagator", STEP) are an intrinsic part of lithospheric plate dynamics. The surface expression of a STEP is generally not known yet, and is expected to vary significantly from one region to the other. We choose the Sicily -Calabria-Ionian Sea region, of which the lithosphere-upper mantle structure has the characteristics of a STEP zone, as a study area. The area has a very prominent accretionary wedge, the formation and subsequent deformation of which presumably were affected by the STEP activity at depth. In this contribution, we use seismic data on the near surface structure and deformation in combination with numerical model results to investigate the relation between deep STEP activity and near surface expression. Prominent features in the surface tectonics are the Malta escarpment (with predominantly normal faulting), the newly identified Ionian Fault and Alfeo-Etna fault system, and a distinct longitudinal division of the wedge into a western and an eastern lobe (Polonia et al., Tectonics, 2011). The two lobes are characterized by different structural style, deformation rates and basal detachment depths. Numerical model results indicate that the regional lithospheric structure, such as the orientation of the eastern passive (albeit subsequently activated) margin of Sicily relative to the Calabrian subduction zone, has a profound effect on possible fault activity along the Malta escarpment. Fault activity along the above primary fault structures may have varied in time, implying the possibility of intermittent activity. Interpreting seismicity in the context of a possible STEP, and the accompanying deformation zone at or near the surface, is not (yet) straightforward. Although direct evidence for recognizing all aspects of STEP activity is - as usual - lacking, a comparison with two well-known STEP regions, the northern part of the Tonga subduction zone and southern part of the

  8. The mobility of W and Mo in subduction zone fluids and the Mo-W-Th-U systematics of island arc magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, E.; Keppler, H.; Audetat, A.

    2012-10-01

    We have studied the solubility of W- and Mo-oxide in aqueous fluids at 2.61 GPa, 600 to 800 °C at variable controlled oxygen fugacity conditions, relevant to subduction zones. We observed that the solubility of W-oxide is only slightly dependent on fO2 between conditions buffered by Co-CoO and Re-ReO2. In contrast, Mo-oxide solubility is strongly dependent on both oxygen fugacity and fluid salinity under the same conditions. At 2.61 GPa, in the fO2 range between Co-CoO and Re-ReO2 their solubility can be described by the following equations: logW=0.07logfO2-4.72×1000/T+4.43 and logMo=0.44logfO2+0.42logNaCl-1.8×1000/T+4.80 where W, Mo and NaCl are concentrations in molalities, fO2 is oxygen fugacity and T is temperature in Kelvin. We also studied the solubility of Mo and W in mantle minerals coexisting with Mo- and W-oxide and combined these data with the fluid solubilities to calculate fluid/mineral partition coefficients of W and Mo. Both W and Mo are incompatible in the structure of major eclogite minerals (garnet and clinopyroxene) in the presence of aqueous fluid, but they are compatible in rutile. Thus, the presence or absence of rutile strongly affects the mobility of these elements in subduction zones. From the partition coefficients we calculated the composition of aqueous fluid released from an N-MORB eclogite source. We found that the Mo-Ce-W-Th-U systematics of arc magmas can be modeled by the mixing of depleted mantle with an aqueous fluid phase that was released from a rutile-bearing N-MORB source in fO2-conditions between FMQ-1.6 and FMQ+3 having a maximum salinity of 20 wt% NaClequiv. If rutile contents in residual eclogite are independently determined, redox conditions, salinity and amount of fluid added to the source region of melting can be tightly constrained by plotting Mo/Ce, W/Th, and Mo/W vs. U/Th. In particular, the W/Th ratio is a sensitive indicator of the amount of fluid, since W always very strongly partitions into the fluid, nearly

  9. Monitoring seasonal bat activity on a coastal barrier island in Maryland, USA.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joshua B; Gates, J Edward; Zegre, Nicolas P

    2011-02-01

    Research on effects of wind turbines on bats has increased dramatically in recent years because of significant numbers of bats killed by rotating wind turbine blades. Whereas most research has focused on the Midwest and inland portions of eastern North America, bat activity and migration on the Atlantic Coast has largely been unexamined. We used three long-term acoustic monitoring stations to determine seasonal bat activity patterns on the Assateague Island National Seashore, a barrier island off the coast of Maryland, from 2005 to 2006. We recorded five species, including eastern red bats (Lasiurus borealis), big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus), tri-colored bats (Perimyotis subflavus), and silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans). Seasonal bat activity (number of bat passes recorded) followed a cosine function and gradually increased beginning in April, peaked in August, and declined gradually until cessation in December. Based on autoregressive models, inter-night bat activity was autocorrelated for lags of seven nights or fewer but varied among acoustic monitoring stations. Higher nightly temperatures and lower wind speeds positively affected bat activity. When autoregressive model predictions were fitted to the observed nightly bat pass totals, model residuals>2 standard deviations from the mean existed only during migration periods, indicating that periodic increases in bat activity could not be accounted for by seasonal trends and weather variables alone. Rather, the additional bat passes were attributable to migrating bats. We conclude that bats, specifically eastern red, hoary, and silver-haired bats, use this barrier island during migration and that this phenomenon may have implications for the development of near and offshore wind energy.

  10. Diffuse flow hydrothermal manganese mineralization along the active Mariana and southern Izu-Bonin arc system, western Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, J.R.; Schulz, M.S.; Dunham, R.E.; Stern, R.J.; Bloomer, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    Abundant ferromanganese oxides were collected along 1200 km of the active Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc system. Chemical compositions and mineralogy show that samples were collected from two deposit types: Fe-Mn crusts of mixed hydrogenetic/hydrothermal origin and hydrothermal Mn oxide deposits; this paper addresses only the second type. Mn oxides cement volcaniclastic and biogenic sandstone and breccia layers (Mn sandstone) and form discrete dense stratabound layers along bedding planes and within beds (stratabound Mn). The Mn oxide was deposited within coarse-grained sediments from diffuse flow systems where precipitation occurred below the seafloor. Deposits were exposed at the seabed by faulting, mass wasting, and erosion. Scanning electron microscopy and microprobe analyses indicate the presence of both amorphous and crystalline 10 ?? and 7 ?? manganate minerals, the fundamental chemical difference being high water contents in the amorphous Mn oxides. Alternation of amorphous and crystalline laminae occurs in many samples, which likely resulted from initial rapid precipitation of amorphous Mn oxides from waxing pulses of hydrothermal fluids followed by precipitation of slow forming crystallites during waning stages. The chemical composition is characteristic of a hydrothermal origin including strong fractionation between Fe (mean 0.9 wt %) and Mn (mean 48 wt %) for the stratabound Mn, generally low trace metal contents, and very low rare earth element and platinum group element contents. However, Mo, Cd, Zn, Cu, Ni, and Co occur in high concentrations in some samples and may be good indicator elements for proximity to the heat source or to massive sulfide deposits. For the Mn sandstones, Fe (mean-8.4%) and Mn (12.4%) are not significantly fractionated because of high Fe contents in the volcaniclastic material. However, the proportion of hydrothermal Fe (nondetrital Fe) to total Fe is remarkably constant (49-58%) for all the sample groups, regardless of the degree of

  11. Crustal structure of the Caribbean-northeastern South America arc-continent collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeson, Gail L.; Mann, Paul; Escalona, Alejandro; Aitken, Trevor J.

    2008-08-01

    We present the results of a 568-km-long regional wide-angle seismic profile conducted in the southeastern Caribbean that crosses an active island arc, a remnant arc, two basins possibly floored by oceanic crust, an allochthonous terrane of forearc affinity, and the passive margin of northern South America. The velocity structures of the Late Cretaceous Aves Ridge remnant arc and Miocene and younger Lesser Antilles arc are remarkably similar, which implies that magmatic processes have remained moderately steady over time. Crustal thickness is ˜26 km at the Aves Ridge and ˜24 km at the Lesser Antilles arc. In comparison to the Izu-Bonin and Aleutian arcs, the Lesser Antilles arc is thinner and has no evidence for a lower crustal cumulate layer, which is consistent with the estimated low magma production rates of the Lesser Antilles arc. Crustal thickness beneath the Grenada and Tobago basins is 4-10 km, and the velocity structure suggests that these basins could be floored by oceanic crust. A decrease of ˜1 km/s in average seismic velocity of the upper crust is observed from NW to SE across the North Coast fault zone; we argue that this marks the suture between the far-traveled Caribbean arc and the passive margin of the South American continent. Current strike-slip motion between the Caribbean and South American plates is located ˜30 km to the south, and thus material originally deposited on the South American passive margin has now been transferred to the Caribbean plate.

  12. Geodetic implications on block formation and geodynamic domains in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrocoso, M.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Prates, G.; García, A.; Kraus, S.

    2016-01-01

    The South Shetland Islands archipelago is dynamically complex due to its tectonic surroundings. Most islands are part of a formerly active volcanic arc, although Deception, Penguin and Bridgeman Islands, as well as several submarine volcanoes, are characterized by active back-arc volcanism. Geodetic benchmarks were deployed and the movement of the lithosphere to which they were fixed measured to provide geodynamic insight for the South Shetland Islands, Bransfield Basin and Antarctic Peninsula area based on surface deformation. These benchmarks' data add spatial and temporal coverage to previous results. The results reveal two different geodynamic patterns, each confined to a distinct part of the South Shetland Islands archipelago. The inferred absolute horizontal velocity vectors for the benchmarks in the northeastern part of the archipelago are consistent with the opening of the Bransfield Basin, while benchmark vectors in the southwestern part of the archipelago are similar to those of the benchmarks on the Antarctic Peninsula. In between, Snow, Deception and Livingston Islands represent a transition zone. In this area, the horizontal velocity vectors relative to the Antarctic plate shift northeastwards from N to NW. Furthermore, the South Shetland Islands benchmarks, except for that at Gibbs (Elephant) Islands, indicate subsidence, which might be a consequence of the slab roll-back at the South Shetland Trench. In contrast, the uplift revealed by the Antarctic Peninsula benchmarks suggests glacial isostatic adjustment after the Larson B ice-shelf breakup.

  13. Radioactively contaminated electric arc furnace dust as an addition to the immobilization mortar in low- and medium-activity repositories.

    PubMed

    Castellote, Marta; Menéndez, Esperanza; Andrade, Carmen; Zuloaga, Pablo; Navarro, Mariano; Ordóñez, Manuel

    2004-05-15

    Electric arc furnace dust (EAFD), generated by the steel-making industry, is in itself an intrinsic hazardous waste; however, the case may also be that scrap used in the process is accidentally contaminated by radioactive elements such as cesium. In this case the resulting EAFD is to be handled as radioactive waste, being duly confined in low- and medium-activity repositories (LMAR). What this paper studies is the reliability of using this radioactive EAFD as an addition in the immobilization mortar of the containers of the LMAR, that is, from the point of view of the durability. Different mixes of mortar containing different percentages of EAFD have been subjected to flexural and compressive strength, initial and final setting time, XRD study, total porosity and pore size distribution, determination of the chloride diffusion coefficient, dimensional stability tests, hydration heat, workability of the fresh mix, and leaching behavior. What is deduced from the results is that for the conditions used in this research, (cement + sand) can be replaced by EAFD upto a ratio [EAFD/(cement + EAFD)] of 46% in the immobilization mortar of LMAR, apparently without any loss in the long-term durability properties of the mortar.

  14. Effects of Arc/Arg3.1 gene deletion on rhythmic synchronization of hippocampal CA1 neurons during locomotor activity and sleep.

    PubMed

    Malkki, Hemi A I; Mertens, Paul E C; Lankelma, Jan V; Vinck, Martin; van Schalkwijk, Frank J; van Mourik-Donga, Laura B; Battaglia, Francesco P; Mahlke, Claudia; Kuhl, Dietmar; Pennartz, Cyriel M A

    2016-05-01

    The activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein/activity regulated gene (Arc/Arg3.1) is crucial for long-term synaptic plasticity and memory formation. However, the neurophysiological substrates of memory deficits occurring in the absence of Arc/Arg3.1 are unknown. We compared hippocampal CA1 single-unit and local field potential (LFP) activity in Arc/Arg3.1 knockout and wild-type mice during track running and flanking sleep periods. Locomotor activity, basic firing and spatial coding properties of CA1 cells in knockout mice were not different from wild-type mice. During active behavior, however, knockout animals showed a significantly shifted balance in LFP power, with a relative loss in high-frequency (beta-2 and gamma) bands compared to low-frequency bands. Moreover, during track-running, knockout mice showed a decrease in phase locking of spiking activity to LFP oscillations in theta, beta and gamma bands. Sleep architecture in knockout mice was not grossly abnormal. Sharp-wave ripples, which have been associated with memory consolidation and replay, showed only minor differences in dynamics and amplitude. Altogether, these findings suggest that Arc/Arg3.1 effects on memory formation are not only manifested at the level of molecular pathways regulating synaptic plasticity, but also at the systems level. The disrupted power balance in theta, beta and gamma rhythmicity and concomitant loss of spike-field phase locking may affect memory encoding during initial storage and memory consolidation stages.

  15. Subduction erosion of the Jurassic Talkeetna-Bonanza arc and the Mesozoic accretionary tectonics of western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clift, P.D.; Pavlis, T.; DeBari, S.M.; Draut, A.E.; Rioux, M.; Kelemen, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    The Jurassic Talkeetna volcanic arc of south-central Alaska is an oceanic island arc that formed far from the North American margin. Geochronological, geochemical, and structural data indicate that the arc formed above a north-dipping subduction zone after ca. 201 Ma. Magmatism migrated northward into the region of the Talkeetna Mountains ca. 180 Ma. We interpret this magmatism as the product of removal of the original forearc while the arc was active, mainly by tectonic erosion. Rapid exhumation of the arc after ca. 160 Ma coincided with the sedimentation of the coarse clastic Naknek Formation. This exhumation event is interpreted to reffect collision of the Talkeetna arc with either the active margin of North America or the Wrangellia composite terrane to the north along a second north-dipping subduction zone. The juxtaposition of accreted trench sedimentary rocks (Chugach terrane) against the base of the Talkeetna arc sequence requires a change from a state of tectonic erosion to accretion, probably during the Late Jurassic (before 150 Ma), and definitely before the Early Cretaceous (ca. 125 Ma). The change from erosion to accretion probably reflects increasing sediment flux to the trench due to collision ca. 160 Ma. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  16. Shrimp Populations on Northwest Rota, an Active Volcano of the Mariana Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnicliffe, V.; Juniper, S. K.; Limén, H.; Jones, W. J.; Vrijenhoek, R.; Webber, R.; Eerkes-Medrano, D.

    2004-12-01

    NW Rota-1 is a submarine volcano that manifested active volcanic and hydrothermal activity during submersible surveys in March 2004 (see Embley et al.). Substratum on the volcano summit (520 m depth) was entirely basalt outcrop or variously-sized ejecta lying near the angle of repose. While no fauna inhabited the rim of the volcanic pit, patches of shrimp were located within 25 m and on the nearby summit. Two species are present. Opaepele cf. loihi shows few morphological differences from either a nearby population on Eifuku Volcano (see Chadwick et al.) at 1700 m depth or from the type locality in Hawaii. A molecular comparison of COI sequences of 13 specimens found little difference from two Hawaiian sequences. Video observations detail frequent feeding activity using spatulate chelipeds to trim microbial filaments as the cephalothorax sways across the substratum. The second species is an undescribed Alvinocaris. Juveniles of this species appear to form clusters distinct from Opaepele where they also graze on filaments. Sparse adults of Alvinocaris range up to 5.5 cm long and display aggressive behaviour moving through patches of smaller shrimp. Densities of Opaepele were highest on sloping rock walls (over 500 per sq.m.) whereas adult Alvinocaris were more abundant on rubble. This division may reflect food preference: microbial filaments versus polychaetes and meiofauna. Characterization of particulates from these substrata was conducted using visual sorting and stable isotope composition. As Alvinocaris matures, the chelipeds enlarge, enabling a greater predatory capacity. Measurements of Opaepele from digital in situ images reveal a population structure suggesting a recent recruitment. Average size is significantly smaller than the Eifuku population and no egg-bearing females were collected. The disjunct range of this species where it occurs on active volcanoes 6000 km apart is puzzling. Further work on intermediate sites and into the reproductive strategy of

  17. A snapshot of physical activity programs targeting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia.

    PubMed

    Macniven, Rona; Elwell, Michelle; Ride, Kathy; Bauman, Adrian; Richards, Justin

    2017-01-19

    Issue addressed: Participation in physical activity programs can be an effective strategy to reduce chronic disease risk factors and improve broader social outcomes. Health and social outcomes are worse among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders than non-Indigenous Australians, who represent an important group for culturally specific programs. The extent of current practice in physical activity programs is largely unknown. This study identifies such programs targeting this population group and describes their characteristics.Methods: Bibliographic and Internet searches and snowball sampling identified eligible programs operating between 2012 and 2015 in Australia (phase 1). Program coordinators were contacted to verify sourced information (phase 2). Descriptive characteristics were documented for each program.Results: A total of 110 programs were identified across urban, rural and remote locations within all states and territories. Only 11 programs were located through bibliographic sources; the remainder through Internet searches. The programs aimed to influence physical activity for health or broader social outcomes. Sixty five took place in community settings and most involved multiple sectors such as sport, health and education. Almost all were free for participants and involved Indigenous stakeholders. The majority received Government funding and had commenced within the last decade. More than 20 programs reached over 1000 people each; 14 reached 0-100 participants. Most included process or impact evaluation indicators, typically reflecting their aims.Conclusion: This snapshot provides a comprehensive description of current physical activity program provision for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Australia. The majority of programs were only identified through the grey literature. Many programs collect evaluation data, yet this is underrepresented in academic literature.So what?: Capturing current practice can inform future efforts to

  18. Evolution and petroleum geology of Amlia and Amukta intra-arc summit basins, Aleutian Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.; Childs, J. R.; Scholl, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    Amlia and Amukta Basins are the largest of many intra-arc basins formed in late Cenozoic time along the crest of the Aleutian Arc. Both basins are grabens filled with 2-5 km of arc-derived sediment. A complex system of normal faults deformed the basinal strata. Although initial deposits of late Micocene age may be non-marine in origin, by early Pliocene time, most of the basinfill consisted of pelagic and hemipelagic debris and terrigenous turbidite deposits derived from wavebase and subaerial erosion of the arc's crestal areas. Late Cenozoic volcanism along the arc commenced during or shortly after initial subsidence and greatly contributed to active deposition in Amlia and Amukta Basins. Two groups of normal faults occur: major boundary faults common to both basins and 'intra-basin' faults that arise primarily from arc-parallel extension of the arc. The most significant boundary fault, Amlia-Amukta fault, is a south-dipping growth fault striking parallel to the trend of the arc. Displacement across this fault forms a large half-graben that is separated into the two depocentres of Amlia and Amukta Basins by the formation of a late Cenozoic volcanic centre, Seguam Island. Faults of the second group reflect regional deformation of the arc and offset the basement floor as well as the overlying basinal section. Intra-basin faults in Amlia Basin are predominantly aligned normal to the trend of the arc, thereby indicating arc-parallel extension. Those in Amukta basin are aligned in multiple orientations and probably indicate a more complex mechanism of faulting. Displacement across intra-basin faults is attributed to tectonic subsidence of the massif, aided by depositional loading within the basins. In addition, most intra-basin faults are listric and are associated with high growth rates. Although, the hydrocarbon potential of Amlia and Amukta Basins is difficult to assess based on existing data, regional considerations imply that an adequate thermal history conducive

  19. Anatahan Island

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... deepest ocean trench. Anatahan had no known historical eruptions until May 2003. The evacuation of the island's residents in 1990 was ... earthquake swarm that suggested the possibility of impending volcanic activity. The Micronesian Megapode is an endangered species of ...

  20. Microbial Activity in Active and Upper Permafrost Layers in Axel Heiberg Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Allan, J.; Cheng, K.; Chourey, K.; Hettich, R. L.; Layton, A.; Liu, X.; Murphy, J.; Mykytczuk, N. C.; Phelps, T. J.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Saarunya, G.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Whyte, L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2011-12-01

    Data on microbial communities and their metabolic activity in Arctic wetlands and underlying permafrost sediments is lacking. Samples were collected from different depths of a cryosol (D1, D2) and upper permafrost (D3) at the Axel Heiberg Island in July 2009. Upper cryosol has lower H2O but higher C and N content when compared to deeper horizons including upper permafrost layer. Deep cryosol and upper permafrost contained SO42- (155 and 132 ppm) and NO3- (0.12 and 0.10 ppm), respectively. The phylogenetic analyses of the environmental 16S rRNA genes showed the putative SRB were more abundant in permafrost (8%) than in cryosols, D1 (0.2%) and D2 (1.1%). Putative denitrifying bacteria varied along depth with near 0.1% in D1 and a significant increase in D2 (2.7%) and D3 (2.2%). Methanogens were not detected; methanotrophs were present at low levels in D3 (1%). Two sets of microcosms were set up. Firstly, anaerobic microcosms, amended with 10 mM glucose, sulfate or nitrate, were cultivated at varying temperatures (15o, 6o, and 0o C) for 10 months. Metabolic activity was monitored by measuring CO2 and CH4 every 3 months. A total of 89.5% of the D3-originated microcosms showed higher activity in comparison to cryosols in first 3 months. CH4 was not detected in these microcosms, whereas CO2 production was higher at 15o C or with glucose. Metaproteomics analyses of microcosms with higher levels of CO2 production indicated the presence of stress responsive proteins (e.g. DnaK, GroEL) and proteins essential for energy production and survival under carbon starvation (e.g. F0F1 ATP synthase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase). These proteins have been previously shown to be up-regulated at low temperatures by permafrost bacteria. Metaproteomics data based on the draft sequences indicated the presence of proteins from the genera Bradyrhizobium, Sphingomonas, Lysinibacillus and Methylophilaceae and these bacteria were also detected by pyrosequencing. Secondly, a duplicate set of anaerobic

  1. Estimation of phytochemicals and antioxidant activity of underutilized fruits of Andaman Islands (India).

    PubMed

    Singh, D R; Singh, Shrawan; Salim, K M; Srivastava, R C

    2012-06-01

    The present study aimed to determine the antioxidant activity and phytochemical contents in 10 underutilized fruits of Andaman Islands (India) namely Malpighia glabra L., Mangifera andamanica L., Morinda citrifolia L., Syzygium aqueum (Burm.f) Alst., Annona squamosa L., Averrhoa carambola L., Averrhoa bilimbi L., Dillenia indica L., Annona muricata L. and Ficus racemosa L. The antioxidant activity varied from 74.27% to 98.77%, and the methanol extract of M. glabra showed the highest antioxidant activity (98.77%; inhibitory concentration, IC(50) = 262.46 μg/ml). Methanol was found to be a better solvent than acetone and aqueous for estimating the antioxidant activity. M. glabra was found to be rich in phytochemicals viz. polyphenol (355.74 mg/100 g), anthocyanin (91.31 mg/100 g), carotenoids (109.16 mg/100 g), tannin (24.39 mg/100 g) and ascorbic acid (394.23 mg/100 g). Carbohydrate content was estimated to be highest in M. glabra (548 mg/100 g). Phenols, tannins, anthocyanins and carotenoids contents showed positive correlation (r² = 0.846, r² = 0.864, r² = 0.915 and r² = 0.806, respectively) with antioxidant activity. The information generated in present study will be useful for bioprospecting of underutilized fruits of Andaman Islands.

  2. Active layer dynamics in three sites with contrasted topography in the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Marc; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2015-04-01

    Topography exerts a key role on permafrost distribution in areas where mean annual temperatures are slightly negative. This is the case of low-altitude environments in Maritime Antarctica, namely in the South Shetland Islands, where permafrost is marginal to discontinuous until elevations of 20-40 m asl turning to continuous at higher areas. Consequently, the active layer dynamics is also strongly conditioned by the geomorphological setting. In January 2014 we installed three sites for monitoring the active layer dynamics across the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands) in different geomorphological environments at elevations between 60 and 100 m. The purpose was to examine the role of the topography and microclimatic conditions on the active layer dynamics. At each site a set of loggers was set up to monitor: air temperatures, snow thickness, ground temperatures until 80 cm together with the coupling atmosphere-ground temperatures. During the first year of monitoring the mean annual air temperatures show similar values in the three sites, in all cases slightly below freezing. The snowy conditions during this year in this archipelago have resulted in a late melting of snow, which has also conditioned the duration of frozen conditions in the uppermost soil layers. Topography has a strong influence on snow cover duration, which in turn affects frozen ground conditions. The Domo site is located in a higher position with respect to the central plateau of Byers; here, the wind is stronger and snow cover thinner, which has conditioned a longer thawing season than in the other two sites (Cerro Negro, Escondido). These two sites are located in topographically protected areas favouring snow accumulation. The longer persistence of snow conditions a longer duration of negative temperatures in the active layer of the permafrost. This research was financially supported by the HOLOANTAR project (Portuguese Science Foundation) and the AXA Research Fund.

  3. Submarine explosive activity and ocean noise generation at Monowai Volcano, Kermadec Arc: constraints from hydroacoustic T-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Metz, Dirk; Watts, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Submarine volcanic activity is difficult to detect, because eruptions at depth are strongly attenuated by seawater. With increasing depth the ambient water pressure increases and limits the expansion of gas and steam such that volcanic eruptions tend to be less violent and less explosive with depth. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of water causes rapid cooling of ejected products and hence erupted magma cools much more quickly than during subaerial eruptions. Therefore, reports on submarine volcanism are restricted to those sites where erupted products - like the presence of pumice rafts, gas bubbling on the sea surface, and local seawater colour changes - reach the sea surface. However, eruptions cause sound waves that travel over far distances through the Sound-Fixing-And-Ranging (SOFAR) channel, so called T-waves. Seismic networks in French Polynesia recorded T-waves since the 1980's that originated at Monowai Volcano, Kermadec Arc, and were attributed to episodic growth and collapse events. Repeated swath-mapping campaigns conducted between 1998 and 2011 confirm that Monowai volcano is a highly dynamic volcano. In July of 2007 a network of ocean-bottom-seismometers (OBS) and hydrophones was deployed and recovered at the end of January 2008. The instruments were located just to the east of Monowai between latitude 25°45'S and 27°30'S. The 23 OBS were placed over the fore-arc and on the incoming subducting plate to obtain local seismicity associated with plate bending and coupling of the subduction megathrust. However, we recognized additional non-seismic sleuths in the recordings. Events were best seen in 1 Hz high-pass filtered hydrophone records and were identified as T-waves. The term T-wave is generally used for waves travelling through the SOFAR channel over large distances. In our case, however, they were also detected on station down to ~8000 m, suggesting that waves on the sea-bed station were direct waves caused by explosive

  4. Faults Activities And Crustal Deformation Along The Arc-Continent Collision Boundary, Eastern Taiwan - Observed From Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Jiun-Yee; Chang, Chung-Pai; Hooper, Andrew; Chang, Yo-Ho; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Chang, Tsui-Yu

    2010-05-01

    Located in the southeastern periphery of the Eurasian plate, eastern Taiwan marks the collional boundary between the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate. These two plates converge at about 8 cm/yr near Taiwan and nearly half of the shortening is consumed in eastern Taiwan. There have been many studies in this area about the dynamics of the plate convergence, however, most of the geodetic studies focused on small area (strainmeter), with very few data points (GPS), or only gather data along a specific profile (leveling). We applied the Persistent Scatterer SAR Interferometry in the Longitudinal Valley of eastern Taiwan to observe temporally-variable processes using both ERS and Envisat data. At the same time, leveling and GPS data were measured for the auxiliary tool to verify the deformation rate in this area. Our result indicated that although the area is under active collision, faults do not move in the same fashion along the boundary. In the very northern part of the collided arc, small subsidence has been detected, while in the north-central part very few activity is observed. In the central and southern part of the collisional boundary, patches of faults are moving as rapidly as 15 mm/yr along radar line-of-sight. In addition. between late 2004 and middle 2005 there had been an earthquake swarm consists of shallow earthquakes, which coincided with PSI observation of a large vertical displacement. The comparison between our leveling data and PS results indicated PSI is a reliable tool even in the highly vegetated area in eastern Taiwan.

  5. Let's Move for Pacific Islander Communities: an Evidence-Based Intervention to Increase Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    LaBreche, Mandy; Cheri, Ashley; Custodio, Harold; Fex, Cleo Carlos; Foo, Mary Anne; Lepule, Jonathan Tana; May, Vanessa Tui'one; Orne, Annette; Pang, Jane Ka'ala; Pang, Victor Kaiwi; Sablan-Santos, Lola; Schmidt-Vaivao, Dorothy; Surani, Zul; Talavou, Melevesi Fifita; Toilolo, Tupou; Palmer, Paula Healani; Tanjasiri, Sora Park

    2016-06-01

    Pacific Islander (PI) populations of Southern California experience high obesity and low physical activity levels. Given PI's rich cultural ties, efforts to increase physical activity using a community-tailored strategy may motivate members in a more sustainable manner. In this paper, we (1) detail the program adaptation methodology that was utilized to develop the Weaving an Islander Network for Cancer Awareness, Research and Training (WINCART) Center's PI Let's Move Program, a culturally tailored program aimed to increase physical activity levels among members of PI organizations in Southern California, and (2) share the program's pilot evaluation results on individual and organizational changes. The WINCART Center applied the National Cancer Institute's program adaptation guidelines to tailor the evidence-based Instant Recess program to fit the needs of PIs. The end product, the PI Let's Move Program, was piloted in 2012 with eight PI organizations, reaching 106 PI adults. At baseline, 52 % of participants reported that they were not physically active, with the average number of days engaged in medium-intensity physical activity at 2.09 days/week. After the 2-month program, participants increased the number of days that they engaged in medium-intensity physical activity from 2.09 to 2.90 days/week. Post-pilot results found that 82 % of participants reported intentions to engage in physical activity for at least the next 6 months. At baseline, only one organization was currently implementing a physical activity program, and none had implemented an evidence-based physical activity program tailored for PIs. After the 2-month timeframe, despite varying levels of capacity, all eight organizations were able to successfully implement the program. In conclusion, results from our program provide evidence that disparity populations, such as PIs, can be successfully reached through programs that are culturally tailored to both individuals and their community

  6. Historical changes in the Mississippi-Alabama barrier islands and the roles of extreme storms, sea level, and human activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    westward sediment transport by alongshore currents, and Cat Island is being reshaped as it adjusts to post-formation changes in wave and current patterns associated with deposition of the St. Bernard lobe of the Mississippi delta. The principal causes of barrier island land loss are frequent intense storms, a relative rise in sea level, and a deficit in the sediment budget. The only factor that has a historical trend that coincides with the progressive increase in rates of land loss is the progressive reduction in sand supply associated with nearly simultaneous deepening of channels dredged across the outer bars of the three tidal inlets maintained for deep-draft shipping. Neither rates of relative sea level rise nor storm parameters have long-term historical rends that match the increased rates of land loss since the mid 1800s. The historical rates of relative sea level rise in the northern Gulf of Mexico have been relatively constant and storm frequencies and intensities occur in multidecal cycles. However, the most recent land loss accelerations likely related to the increased storm activity since 1995. Considering the predicted trends for storms and sea level related to global warming, it is clear that the barrier islands will continue to lose land area at a rapid rate without a reversal in trend of at least one of the causal factors. The reduction in sand supply related to disruption of the alongshore sediment transport system is the only factor contributing to land loss that can be managed directly. This can be accomplished by placing dredged material so that the adjacent barrier island shores revive it for island nourishment and rebuilding.

  7. Diversity and enzyme activity of Penicillium species associated with macroalgae in Jeju Island.

    PubMed

    Park, Myung Soo; Lee, Seobihn; Oh, Seung-Yoon; Cho, Ga Youn; Lim, Young Woon

    2016-10-01

    A total of 28 strains of 19 Penicillium species were isolated in a survey of extracellular enzyme-producing fungi from macroalgae along the coast of Jeju Island of Korea. Penicillium species were identified based on morphological and β-tubulin sequence analyses. In addition, the halo-tolerance and enzyme activity of all strains were evaluated. The diversity of Penicillium strains isolated from brown algae was higher than the diversity of strains isolated from green and red algae. The commonly isolated species were Penicillium antarcticum, P. bialowiezense, P. brevicompactum, P. crustosum, P. oxalicum, P. rubens, P. sumatrense, and P. terrigenum. While many strains showed endoglucanase, β-glucosidase, and protease activity, no alginase activity was detected. There was a positive correlation between halo-tolerance and endoglucanase activity within Penicillium species. Among 19 Penicillium species, three species-P. kongii, P. olsonii, and P. viticola-have not been previously recorded in Korea.

  8. Safety enhancement of oil trunk pipeline crossing active faults on Sakhalin Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishkina, E.; Antropova, N.; Korotchenko, T.

    2015-11-01

    The article explores the issues concerning safety enhancement of pipeline active fault crossing on Sakhalin Island. Based on the complexity and analysis results, all the faults crossed by pipeline system are classified into five categories - from very simple faults to extremely complex ones. The pipeline fault crossing design is developed in accordance with the fault category. To enhance pipeline safety at fault crossing, a set of methods should be applied: use of pipes of different safety classes and special trench design in accordance with soil permeability characteristics.

  9. Magmatic activity at Islas Marias Archipelago, Gulf of California: Oceanic lithosphere with gabbroic sills versus Jurassic-Cretaceous arc components.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, P. E. G.; Solis-Pichardo, G.; Hernandez-Trevino, T.; Villanueva, D.; Arrieta, G. F.; Rochin, H.; Rodriguez, L. F.; Bohnel, H.; Weber, B.

    2015-12-01

    Islas Marias Archipelago consists of four islands located in the mouth of the Gulf of California. Lithologically three of them (Maria Madre, San Juanito, and Maria Cleofas) are quite similar with a 165-170 Ma metamorphic basement, 75-85 Ma intrusive and extrusive rocks, and a sedimentary sandstone cover, which according to its foraminiferous content recorded multiple uplift and subsidence events related to the opening of the Gulf. However, these units are absent on Maria Magdalena island which is positioned between the other islands. Here, instead, oceanic lithosphere with pillow lavas and gabbroic sills, intercalated with sandstones form the dominant outcrops. Their geochemical and isotopic characteristics are similar to N-MORB with epsilon Nd values around +10 and 87Sr/86Sr of 0.70290. The gabbros are not older than 22 Ma. Magdalena island was obviously uplifted separately from the other islands of the archipelago, probably along a now hidden transform fault system along the East Pacific Rise. Metamorphic and igneous rocks of the other islands can be correlated to lithologically similar units in the Los Cabos Block, Baja California, or to the continental margin units in Sinaloa, Nayarit and Jalisco states when looking at their geochemical and geochronological signatures. Paleomagnetic studies on 35 sampling sites from all 4 islands give evidence for relatively small scale tectonic movements.

  10. Hawaii Regional Sediment Management: Application of SBAS for ArcGIS 10 to Develop Regional Sediment Budgets for the Island of Maui, HI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    represent regular maintenance activities such as dredging, bypassing, or nourishment . The regions addressed in this study have experienced one or...Hawaii Coastal Geology Group US United States USACE US Army Corps of Engineers USGS US Geological Survey WIS Wave Information Study NOTE: The...by Jessica H. Podoski PURPOSE. This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) summarizes the methods and tools used to develop a

  11. Geologic map of Mount Gareloi, Gareloi Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, Michelle L.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Browne, Brandon L.

    2012-01-01

    As part of an effort to both monitor and study all historically active volcanoes in Alaska, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) undertook a field program at Mount Gareloi in the summer of 2003. During a month-long period, seismic networks were installed at Mount Gareloi and the neighboring Tanaga volcanic cluster. During this time, we undertook the first geologic field study of the volcano since Robert Coats visited Gareloi Island for four days in 1946. Understanding the geology of this relatively small island is important from a hazards perspective, because Mount Gareloi lies beneath a heavily trafficked air route between North America and Asia and has frequently erupted airborne ash since 1760. At least two landslides from the island have deposited debris on the sea floor; thus, landslide-generated tsunamis are also a potential hazard. Since seismic instruments were installed in 2003, they have detected small but consistent seismic signals from beneath Mount Gareloi's edifice, suggesting an active hydrothermal system. Mount Gareloi is also important from the standpoint of understanding subduction-related volcanism, because it lies in the western portion of the volcanically active arc, where subduction is oblique to the arc front. Understanding the compositional evolution of Mount Gareloi fills a spatial gap in along-arc studies.

  12. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism.

    PubMed

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-28

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ(26)Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ(26)Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  13. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  14. Antidiatom activity of marine bacteria associated with sponges from San Juan Island, Washington.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cuili; Xin, Xiaying; Yu, Siyu; Qiu, Jingjing; Miao, Li; Feng, Ke; Zhou, Xiaojian

    2014-04-01

    Crude extracts of 52 marine bacteria associated with sponges, which were collected from the sea near San Juan Island, Washington, USA, were screened using diatom attachment assays against Amphora sp., Nitzschia closterium, Sellaphora sp. and Stauroneis sp. to investigate their antidiatom activities. Among these samples, five expressed strong anti-adhesion effects on all four tested diatoms. There was no negative effect observed from those five active samples on the growth of Amphora sp. Those five active samples were prepared from respective isolates, which all belonged to the genus Bacillus based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. The results of present study indicate that Bacillus may play important roles for sponges' chemical defence against biofouling of diatoms and that the metabolites of Bacillus may be a potential source of natural antifouling compounds.

  15. Permafrost and active layer monitoring in the maritime Antarctic: Preliminary results from CALM sites on Livingston and Deception Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramos, M.; Vieira, G.; Blanco, J.J.; Hauck, C.; Hidalgo, M.A.; Tome, D.; Nevers, M.; Trindade, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained from scientific work and experiments performed on Livingston and Deception Islands. Located in the South Shetland Archipelago, these islands have been some of the most sensitive regions over the last 50 years with respect to climate change with a Mean Annual Air Temperature (MAAT) close to -2 ºC. Three Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) sites were installed to record the thermal regime and the behaviour of the active layer in different places with similar climate, but with different soil composition, porosity, and water content. The study’s ultimate aim is to document the influence of climate change on permafrost degradation. Preliminary results, obtained in 2006, on maximum active-layer thickness (around 40 cm in the CALM of Deception Island), active layer temperature evolution, snow thickness, and air temperatures permit early characterization of energy exchange mechanisms between the ground and the atmosphere in the CALM-S sites.

  16. Microearthquake activity around Kueishantao island, offshore northeastern Taiwan: Insights into the volcano-tectonic interactions at the tip of the southern Okinawa Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, K. I.; Pan, C.-Y.; Lin, C.-H.

    2013-05-01

    Kueishantao is a volcanic island located offshore the northeastern coast of Taiwan and lies at the tip of the southern Okinawa Trough which is the back-arc basin of the Ryukyu subduction zone. Its last eruption occurred during the Holocene (~ 7 ka), hence Kueishantao can be considered as an active volcano. In an effort to better understand how magmatic processes may interact with the regional tectonics, a seismic network was installed in the area during early January 2008. This network consisted of 16 three-component seismometers located both on Kueishantao and the coast of northeastern Taiwan. One year of data was analyzed yielding 425 earthquakes whose P and S arrival times were manually picked and each event was located using a nonlinear probabilistic location method. In order to improve the location accuracy, the minimum 1-D velocity model for this dataset was derived and all earthquakes were relocated using this model. The results show a tight cluster of events near Kueishantao while the remaining earthquakes are scattered between the island and mainland Taiwan. The majority of hypocentral depths range between 2.5 and 10 km where the former depth coincides with the bottom of the shallow sedimentary layer and the latter with the ductile lower crust. Waveforms of the three largest events were also inverted for the determination of their deviatoric and full moment tensor. No statistically significant isotropic component was found, while two of the events can be explained by a double-couple source. The third event exhibited a low frequency content (< 10 Hz) and a large non-double-couple component suggesting fluid involvement at its source. A stress inversion of all available focal mechanisms in the area shows that fluid circulation in the upper crust generates a local stress field around Kueishantao facilitating the opening of cracks along the NW-SE direction of regional extension.

  17. Seismic tomography model reveals mantle magma sources of recent volcanic activity at El Hierro Island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Yeguas, Araceli; Ibáñez, Jesús M.; Koulakov, Ivan; Jakovlev, Andrey; Romero-Ruiz, M. Carmen; Prudencio, Janire

    2014-12-01

    We present a 3-D model of P and S velocities beneath El Hierro Island, constructed using the traveltime data of more than 13 000 local earthquakes recorded by the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN, Spain) in the period from 2011 July to 2012 September. The velocity models were performed using the LOTOS code for iterative passive source tomography. The results of inversion were thoroughly verified using different resolution and robustness tests. The results reveal that the majority of the onshore area of El Hierro is associated with a high-velocity anomaly observed down to 10-12-km depth. This anomaly is interpreted as the accumulation of solid igneous rocks erupted during the last 1 Myr and intrusive magmatic bodies. Below this high-velocity pattern, we observe a low-velocity anomaly, interpreted as a batch of magma coming from the mantle located beneath El Hierro. The boundary between the low- and high-velocity anomalies is marked by a prominent seismicity cluster, thought to represent anomalous stresses due to the interaction of the batch of magma with crust material. The areas of recent eruptions, Orchilla and La Restinga, are associated with low-velocity anomalies surrounding the main high-velocity block. These eruptions took place around the island where the crust is much weaker than the onshore area and where the melted material cannot penetrate. These results put constraints on the geological model that could explain the origin of the volcanism in oceanic islands, such as in the Canaries, which is not yet clearly understood.

  18. The Impact of Anthropogenic Activities on Ecosystems of Long Island Sound, N.Y.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauture, E.; McHugh, C. M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Kenna, T. C.

    2015-12-01

    Long Island Sound (LIS) is a tide-dominated estuary located along heavily populated regions on the eastern coast of the US. Western LIS has been impacted by heavy metals and is susceptible to hypoxic and anoxic conditions since the 1900's. As part of the Long Island Sound Cable Fund and the National Science Foundation programs, we surveyed the western and central regions of LIS in 2006 and 2013, respectively. From the R/V Hugh Sharp and the R/V Seawolf, we collected high-resolution subbottom profiles, multibeam bathymetry, sediment cores, and grabs in distinct sedimentary environments such as channels, terraces, and river mouths. The goal was to evaluate the impact of anthropogenic activities as they relate to physical processes and populated regions. Along western LIS, total organic carbon (TOC) and heavy metal concentrations are higher from the 1850s to the present, especially along locations of known high organic waste. Pre-industrial concentrations of TOC average 2.22% with maximum values of 4.75%. A similar trend is observed with heavy metals. For example, lead (Pb) increased from background levels of ~10 to 20 ppm to over 200 ppm. Benthic foraminifers seem to be influenced by these trends with changes in ecosystems. The dominant assemblage, Elphidium excavatum clavatum remains dominant with a slight decrease in their abundance during anthropogenic times. From ~1850's to the present Ammonia beccarii becomes more abundant. These shifts in foraminifer species to assemblages that tolerate low oxygen conditions reflect the increasing hypoxic conditions. In central LIS, surface sediments average TOC of 1.34% with highest values of 5.21% near the Housatonic River that drains industrialized portions of Connecticut, and lowest values of 0.073% near the Long Island coastline. Understanding the evolution of hypoxia as well as the sources of heavy metals can lead to important implications for restoration of marine ecosystems.

  19. Why are so many arc magmas close to 238U- 230Th radioactive equilibrium?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condomines, Michel; Sigmarsson, Olgeir

    1993-09-01

    New analyses of 238U- 230Th disequilibria are reported for four active volcanoes: Merapi and Krakatoa in the Sunda arc (Indonesia), Masaya in Central America (Nicaragua), and Ambrym in the New Hebrides island arc. Despite a large range in ( 230Th /232Th ) ratios (from 0.65 in Merapi andesites to 2.5 in Masaya basalts), 238U and 230Th are close to radioactive equilibrium, as in many other arc magmas. In several mantle sources, Th/U ratios have clearly been modified by metasomatic processes associated with subduction. This is demonstrated in Central America by the correlation between ( 230Th /232Th ) and 10Be /9Be ratios for several active volcanoes along the arc. It is proposed that the 238U- 230Th radioactive equilibrium found in many arc magmas is the result of disequilibrium melting involving an easily melted, slab-derived, metasomatic component which dominates the uranium and thorium budget of the mantle sources. The departure from equilibrium may be either due to mixing with 230Th enriched melts derived from unmetasomatized mantle sources or to a late stage uranium addition by fluids. This latter process, producing uranium enriched magmas, has a greater influence in uranium and thorium poor magmas.

  20. Weld arc simulator

    DOEpatents

    Burr, Melvin J.

    1990-01-30

    An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  1. Os and S isotope studies of ultramafic rocks in the Duke Island Complex, Alaska: variable degrees of crustal contamination of magmas in an arc setting and implications for Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stifter, Eric C.; Ripley, Edward M.; Li, Chusi

    2016-10-01

    The Duke Island Complex is one of the several "Ural-Alaskan" intrusions of Cretaceous age that occur along the coast of SE Alaska. Significant quantities of magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide mineralization are locally found in the complex, primarily within olivine clinopyroxenites. Sulfide mineralization is Ni-poor, consistent with petrologic evidence which indicates that sulfide saturation was reached after extensive olivine crystallization. Olivine clinopyroxenites were intruded by magmas that produced sulfide-poor, adcumulate dunites. As part of a study to investigate the potential for Ni-rich sulfide mineralization in association with the dunites, a Re-Os and S isotope study of the dunites, as well as sulfide mineralization in the olivine clinopyroxenites, was initiated. Importantly, recent drilling in the complex identified the presence of sulfidic and carbonaceous country rocks that may have been involved in the contamination of magmas and generation of sulfide mineralization. γOs (110 Ma) values of two sulfidic country rocks are 1022 and 2011. δ34S values of the country rocks range from -2.6 to -16.1 ‰. 187Os/188Os ratios of sulfide minerals in the mineralization hosted by olivine clinopyroxenites are variable and high, with γOs (110 Ma) values between 151 and 2059. Extensive interaction with Re-rich sedimentary country rocks is indicated. In contrast, γOs (110 Ma) values of the dunites are significantly lower, ranging between 2 and 16. 187Os/188Os ratios increase with decreasing Os concentration. This inverse relation is similar to that shown by ultramafic rocks from several arc settings, as well as altered abyssal dunites and peridotites. The relation may be indicative of magma derivation from a sub-arc mantle that had experienced metasomatism via slab-derived fluids. Alternatively, the relation may be indicative of minor contamination of magma by crustal rocks with low Os concentrations but high 187Os/188Os ratios. A third alternative is that the low Os

  2. Holocene glacier activity on Kerguelen Island: preliminary results from a novel proglacial lake sediment record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Støren, Eivind; Bakke, Jostein; Arnaud, Fabien; Poulenard, Jérôme; Fanget, Bernard; Malet, Emmanuel; Sabatier, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Polar-regions are changing rapidly as greenhouse warming is continuing with huge impact on e.g. sea ice extent and snow cover. This change triggers teleconnections to low latitude areas challenging societies and human activity. We have, however, very little quantitative information of past climate in the Polar-regions that can be used to evaluate the potential responses and the response patterns to forcing changes and changes in boundary conditions. Whatever anthropogenic changes may occur in the future, they will be superimposed on, and interact with, natural climate variations due to all the forcing we are aware of. This means we need to better document past climate/environmental variability of the Polar-regions. Especially in the Southern Ocean there are few time series recording past climate due to few suitable land areas and the few Sub-Antarctic Islands is remote and has cumbersome logistics. Continuous terrestrial records from this region are therefore urgently needed for constraining future scenarios from earth system models. Glaciers and ice caps are still ubiquitous in the Polar-regions, although they are rapidly shrinking due to the on-going warming. The continuous sedimentary records produced by glaciers, which are stored in downstream lakes, represent supreme archives of past variability wherefrom quantitative information of key climate system components can be extracted. Kerguelen Island is located within the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the Southern Westerly wind belt and contains several glaciers and smaller ice caps. Terrestrial archives recording past history of the glaciers at Kerguelen thus have a unique potential to record past changes in oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns from southern mid-latitudes. Here we present preliminary results from the first distal glacier-fed lake that is sampled from Kerguelen Island. A 2.8 m long sediment core was obtained from Lac Guynemer (121masl.) located at the Peninsule Loranchet at the

  3. New insights into regional tectonics of the Sunda-Banda Arcs region from integrated magnetic and gravity modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubaidah, Teti; Korte, Monika; Mandea, Mioara; Hamoudi, Mohamed

    2014-02-01

    The Lombok Island (Indonesia), situated along the Sunda-Banda Arcs transition region, lies between zones characterized by very large intensity magnetic anomalies. These anomalies have been noted as being part of the eight most important ones seen on the 1st edition of the World Digital Magnetic Anomaly Map. Unfortunately, only marine magnetic data of surroundings are available, and no regional high-resolution magnetic surveys of this island had been done. Since 2004, we have carried out several geomagnetic ground surveys in this region. Here, we present modelling results for a new geological and tectonic interpretation of the magnetic anomalies. The new results confirm the general pattern of contiguous negative-positive anomalies, revealing two active Quaternary normal faults and a magmatic arc related to a subduction region. This outcome agrees with earlier results in surrounding areas obtained by satellite, aeromagnetic, and marine platforms, and provides a more detailed picture of strong anomalies on this island. Considering both magnetic anomalies and gravity models, it is possible to suggest an extension of the Flores Thrust zone (reaching the northwest off the Lombok Island). The Flores Thrust zone may be considered as a mature subduction in the back arc region, showing a tendency of progressive subduction during last decades.

  4. Back-arc basin basalt systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Brian; Martinez, Fernando

    2003-05-01

    The Mariana, east Scotia, Lau, and Manus back-arc basins (BABs) have spreading rates that vary from slow (<50 mm/yr) to fast (>100 mm/yr) and extension axes located from 10 to 400 km behind their island arcs. Axial lava compositions from these BABs indicate melting of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-like sources in proportion to the amount added of previously depleted, water-rich, arc-like components. The arc-like end-members are characterized by low Na, Ti and Fe, and by high H 2O and Ba/La; the MORB-like end-members have the opposite traits. Comparisons between basins show that the least hydrous compositions follow global MORB systematics and an inverse correlation between Na8 and Fe8. This is interpreted as a positive correlation between the average degree and pressure of mantle melting that reflects regional variations in mantle potential temperatures (Lau/Manus hotter than Mariana/Scotia). This interpretation accords with numerical model predictions that faster subduction-induced advection will maintain a hotter mantle wedge. The primary compositional trends within each BAB (a positive correlation between Fe8, Na8 and Ti8, and their inverse correlation with H 2O(8) and Ba/La) are controlled by variations in water content, melt extraction, and enrichments imposed by slab and mantle wedge processes. Systematic axial depth (as a proxy for crustal production) variations with distance from the island arc indicate that compositional controls on melting dominate over spreading rate. Hydrous fluxing enhances decompression melting, allowing depleted mantle sources just behind the island arc to melt extensively, producing shallow spreading axes. Flow of enriched mantle components around the ends of slabs may augment this process in transform-bounded back-arcs such as the east Scotia Basin. The re-circulation (by mantle wedge corner flow) to the spreading axes of mantle previously depleted by both arc and spreading melt extraction can explain the greater depths and thinner

  5. Crustal recycling and the aleutian arc

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, R.W.; Kay, S.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Two types of crustal recycling transfer continental crust back into its mantle source. The first of these, upper crustal recycling, involves elements that have been fractionated by the hydrosphere-sediment system, and are subducted as a part of the oceanic crust. The subduction process (S-process) then fractionates these elements, and those not removed at shallow tectonic levels and as excess components of arc magmas are returned to the mantle. Newly determined trace element composition of Pacific oceanic sedimants are variable and mixing is necessary during the S-process, if sediment is to provide excess element in the ratios observed in Aleutian arc magmas. Only a small fraction of the total sediment subducted at the Aleutian trench is required to furnish the excess elements in Aleutian arc magmas. Ba and {sub 10}Be data indicate that this small fraction includes a contribution from the youngest subducted sediment. The second type of recycling, lower crustal recycling, involves crystal cumulates of both arc and oceanic crustal origin, and residues from crustal melting within arc crust. Unlike the silicic sediments, recycled lower crust is mafic to ultramafic in composition. Trace element analyses of xenoliths representing Aleutian arc lower crust are presented. Recycling by delamination of lower crust and attached mantle lithosphere may occur following basalt eclogite phase transformations that are facilitated by terrane suturing events that weld oceanic island arcs to the continents. The relative importance of upper and lower crustal recycling exerts a primary control on continental crustal composition.

  6. Comprehensive study of the seismotectonics of the eastern Aleutian arc and associated volcanic systems. Annual progress report, March 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, K.H.; Davies, J.N.; House, L.

    1981-01-01

    Refined hypocenter locations beneath the Shumagin Islands seismic network of the eastern Aleutian arc, Alaska, provide for the first time conclusive evidence for a double-sheeted dipping seismic (Benioff) zone in this arc. This refined seismicity structure was obtained in the arc section centered on the Shumagin seismic gap. A thorough review of three seismic gaps in the eastern Aleutian arc shows a high potential for great earthquakes within the next one to two decades in the Shumagin and Yakataga seismic gaps, and a less certain potential for a large or great earthquake in the possible Unalaska gap. A tilt reversal was geodetically observed to have occurred in 1978/79 in the forearc region of the Shumagin gap and could indicate the onset of a precursory strain relief episode prior to a great quake. A comparative study of the Pavlof volcano seismicity with that of other recently active volcanoes (i.e., Mt. St. Helens) indicates that island-arc (explosive-type) volcanoes respond to small ambient, periodic stress changes (i.e., tides). Stress drop measurements from earthquakes on the main thrust zone indicate high stress drops within the seismic gap regions of the Aleutian arc and low stress drops outside the gap region.

  7. Interannual active layer thermal and dynamics evolution at the crater Lake CALM site, Deception Island (Antarctica).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Miguel; Vieira, Gonzalo; Ángel De Pablo, Miguel; Molina, Antonio; Abramov, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    Deception Island, is an active strato-volcano on South Shetland Archipelago of Antarctica (62° 55' 0″ S, 60° 37' 0″ W), is a cold region with harsh remote and hostile environmental conditions. The permafrost and active layer existence, and the cold climate conditions together with volcanic material with height water content inside made this region of the Earth a perfect site to study the active layer and permafrost evolution involved in the Circumpolar Active Layer South (CALM-S) program. The active layer is measured in late January or firs february (during the end of the thaw period) at the "Crater Lake" CALM site (62°58'06.7''; 60°40'44.8'') on Deception Island, Antarctica, at the period 2006 to 2014 we obtained a mean annual value of 29,7±2 cm. In this paper, we describe the spatial active layer thickness distribution and report the reduction on the mean thickness between February 2006 and 2014. Below the active layer, permafrost could be also reported (with a mean thickness of 4.5± 0.5 m.) based on the temperature data acquired by sensors installed at different depth inside the soil; three different shallow boreholes was drilled (1.0 m., 1.6 m., 4.5 m. in depth) and we have been registered its temperature gradient at the 2010 to 2013 period. Here we use all those data 1) to describe the thermal behavior of the permafrost at the CALM site, and 2) to describe its evolution (aggradation/degradation) along fourteen years of continuous measurements. We develop this study, to known the thermal behavior of the permafrost and the active layer related with the air/soil interaction being one of the most important factors the snow layer that was measured by the installation of termo-snowmeters with the complement of an automatic digital camera during the 2008 to 2014 period. On the other hand, the pyroclastics soil materials has a very high values of water content then the latent heat in the freezing/thawing process controls the active layer evolution and the

  8. Thermal regime of active layer at two lithologically contrasting sites on James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrbáček, Filip; Nývlt, Daniel; Láska, Kamil

    2016-04-01

    Antarctic Peninsula region (AP) represents one of the most rapidly warming parts of our planet in the last 50 years. Despite increasing research activities along both western and eastern sides of AP in last decades, there is still a lot of gaps in our knowledge relating to permafrost, active layer and its thermal and physical properties. This study brings new results of active layer monitoring on James Ross Island, which is the largest island in northern AP. Its northern part, Ulu Peninsula, is the largest ice-free area (more than 200 km2) in the region. Due its large area, we focused this study on sites located in different lithologies, which would affect local thermal regime of active layer. Study site (1) at Abernethy Flats area (41 m a.s.l.) lies ~7 km from northern coast. Lithologically is formed by disintegrated Cretaceous calcareous sandstones and siltstones of the Santa Marta Formation. Study site (2) is located at the northern slopes of Berry Hill (56 m a.s.l.), about 0.4 km from northern coastline. Lithology is composed of muddy to intermediate diamictites, tuffaceous siltstones to fine grained sandstones of the Mendel Formation. Data of air temperature at 2 meters above ground and the active layer temperatures at 75 cm deep profiles were obtained from both sites in period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014. Small differences were found when comparing mean air temperatures and active temperatures at 5 and 75 cm depth in the period 2012-2014. While the mean air temperatures varied between -7.7 °C and -7.0 °C, the mean ground temperatures fluctuated between -6.6 °C and -6.1 °C at 5 cm and -6.9 °C and -6.0 °C at 75 cm at Abernethy Flats and Berry Hill slopes respectively. Even though ground temperature differences along the profiles weren't pronounced during thawing seasons, the maximum active layer thickness was significantly larger at Berry Hill slopes (80 to 82 cm) than at Abernethy Flats (52 to 64 cm). We assume this differences are affected by

  9. The Great 2006 and 2007 Kuril Earthquakes, Forearc Segmentation and Seismic Activity of the Central Kuril Islands Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, B. V.; Ivashchenko, A. I.; Dozorova, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present a structural study of the Central Kuril Islands forearc region, where the great megathrust tsunamigenic earthquake ( M w 8.3) occurred on November 15, 2006. Based on new bathymetry and seismic profiles obtained during two research cruises of R/V Akademik Lavrentiev in 2005 and 2006, ten crustal segments with along-arc length ranging from 30 to 100 km, separated by NS- and NW-trending transcurrent faults were identified within the forearc region. The transcurrent faults may serve as barriers impeding stress transfer between the neighboring segments, so that stress accumulated within separate forearc segments is usually released by earthquakes of moderate-to-strong magnitudes. However, the great November 15, 2006 earthquake ruptured seven of the crustal segments probably following a 226-year gap since the last great earthquake in 1780. The geographic extent of earthquake rupture zones, aftershock areas and earthquake clusters correlate well with forearc crustal segments identified using the geophysical data. Based on segmented structure of the Central Kuril Islands forearc region, we consider and discuss three scenarios of a great earthquake occurrence within this area. Although the margin is segmented, we suggest that a rupture could occupy the entire seismic gap with a total length of about 500 km. In such a case, the earthquake magnitude M w might exceed 8.5, and such an event might generate tsunami waves significantly exceeding in height to those produced by the great 2006-2007 Kuril earthquakes.

  10. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  11. Phytochemical screening and antiviral activity of some medicinal plants from the island Soqotra.

    PubMed

    Mothana, Ramzi A A; Mentel, Renate; Reiss, Christiane; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2006-04-01

    Methanol and hot-aqueous extracts of 25 different plant species, used in Yemeni traditional medicine and growing, partly as endemic plants, on the island Soqotra have been investigated for their antiviral activity. In addition, the phytochemical identification of the main chemical constituents was performed. The extracts were assayed in two in vitro viral systems, which used influenza virus type A/MDCK cells and herpes simplex virus type 1/Vero cells, at non-cytotoxic concentrations. The herpes simplex virus type 1 showed more sensitivity than the influenza virus type A against the extracts investigated. The methanol extracts of Boswellia ameero, Boswellia elongata, Buxus hildebrandtii, Cissus hamaderohensis, Cleome socotrana, Dracaena cinnabari, Exacum affine, Jatropha unicostata and Kalanchoe farinacea showed anti-influenza virus type A activity with 50% inhibition (IC50) concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 12.5 microg/mL. In addition, 17 plants of the 25 investigated exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity. The antiviral activity of some active extracts was also observed on a molecular level.

  12. Crustal evolution of Eocene paleo arc around Ogasawara region obtained by seismic reflection survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, M.; Takahashi, N.; Kodaira, S.; Miura, S.; Ishizuka, O.; Tatsumi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara)-Mariana (IBM) arc is known to the typical oceanic island arc, and it is the most suitable area to understand the growth process of island arc. The existence of two paleo arc which consists of Oligocene and Eocene paleo age is known in IBM forearc region by geological and geophysical studies. The Ogasawara ridge is also known to locate the initial structure of arc evolution from geologic sampling of research submersible. In this region, IODP drilling site: IBM-2 is proposed in order to understand the temporal and spatial change in arc crust composition from 50 to 40Ma magmatism. Site IBM-2 consists of two offset drilling holes (BON-1, BON-2). BON-1 designed to first encounter forearc basalt and will reach the sheeted dykes. BON-2 will start in boninites and finish in fore arc basalts. The purpose of these drilling is sampling the full volcanic stratigraphy from gabbro to boninite. There is no seismic data around BON-1 and BON-2, therefore it is need to conduct the multi-channel seismic reflection survey. Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology carried out multi-channel seismic reflection survey and wide-angle reflection survey using 7,800 cu.in. air gun, 5 km streamer with 444 ch hydrophones and 40 OBSs in March 2011. We obtained two seismic reflection profiles of lines KT06 and KT07 along the paleo arc around Ogasawara ridge. Line KT06 located the north side of Ogasawara ridge. Line KT07 located the trench side of Ogasawara ridge. Lines KT06 is also deployed the OBSs every 5 km interval. Thin sediments are covered with basement in both survey lines. There are some sediment filled in depression topography. The low-frequency reflection from the top of subducting Pacific plate is recognized in line KT06. The continuity of this reflection is not clear due to the complicated bathymetry. The displacement of basement in northern side of Ogasawara ridge is identified along the lineament of bathymetry in Line 06. This structure is

  13. Basalts erupted along the Tongan fore arc during subduction initiation: Evidence from geochronology of dredged rocks from the Tonga fore arc and trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meffre, Sebastian; Falloon, Trevor J.; Crawford, Tony J.; Hoernle, Kaj; Hauff, Folkmar; Duncan, Robert A.; Bloomer, Sherman H.; Wright, Dawn J.

    2012-12-01

    A wide variety of different rock types were dredged from the Tonga fore arc and trench between 8000 and 3000 m water depths by the 1996 Boomerang voyage. 40Ar-39Ar whole rock and U-Pb zircon dating suggest that these fore arc rocks were erupted episodically from the Cretaceous to the Pliocene (102 to 2 Ma). The geochemistry suggests that MOR-type basalts and dolerites were erupted in the Cretaceous, that island arc tholeiites were erupted in the Eocene and that back arc basin and island arc tholeiite and boninite were erupted episodically after this time. The ages generally become younger northward suggesting that fore arc crust was created in the south at around 48-52 Ma and was extended northward between 35 and 28 Ma, between 9 and 15 Ma and continuing to the present-day. The episodic formation of the fore arc crust suggested by this data is very different to existing models for fore arc formation based on the Bonin-Marianas arc. The Bonin-Marianas based models postulate that the basaltic fore arc rocks were created between 52 and 49 Ma at the beginning of subduction above a rapidly foundering west-dipping slab. Instead a model where the 52 Ma basalts that are presently in a fore arc position were created in the arc-back arc transition behind the 57-35 Ma Loyalty-Three Kings arc and placed into a fore arc setting after arc reversal following the start of collision with New Caledonia is proposed for the oldest rocks in Tonga. This is followed by growth of the fore arc northward with continued eruption of back arc and boninitic magmas after that time.

  14. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    This question-and-answer report provides answers in nontechnical language to frequently asked questions about the status of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. The answers update information first prepared in 1981, shortly after the cleanup got under way. Since then, a variety of important developments in the cleanup has occurred. The information in the report should be read in conjunction with NUREG 1060, a discussion of increased occupational exposure estimates for the cleanup. The questions and answers in this report cover purpose and community involvement, decontamination of water and reactor, fuel removal, radwaste transport, environmental impact, social and economic effects, worker exposures and safety, radiation monitoring, potential for accidents, and schedule and funding.

  15. The Fractionation of Sulfur Isotopes during Arc Initiation - Preliminary Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, P. A.; Ireland, T. R.; O'Neill, H. S.

    2014-12-01

    The "Stable Isotope Sensitive High-Resolution Ion Microprobe" (SHRIMP-SI) at the ANU in Canberra provides a powerful tool for in-situ analyses of light isotopes. Recently, we developed a technique to analyze the sulfur isotope composition (δ34S) of volcanic glasses. Since no interlaboratory reference material is available for this purpose, we carried out piston cylinder experiments to create artificial glasses of known sulfur isotope composition. We used natural sulfides mixed with CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 (with PtO2 in 5 mm Pt capsule) and high-Ti Mare basalt powder (graphite capsule inside the Pt capsule). Experimental conditions were set to 1400°C, 5 kbar and 4 hours. We used these artificial glasses to survey sulfur isotope fractionation during our experimental runs and for use as standard material with calibrated δ34S. Additionally, natural standards Juan de Fuca basalt (VG-2), Makaopuhi basalt (VG-A99; Hawai'i), SEIR MORB (NMNH 113716), and one rhyolite (VG-568) were analyzed repeatedly to provide sulfur isotope data of commonly used natural glass standards. IODP expedition 351 to the Amami-Sankaku Basin adjacent to the Kyushu-Palau Ridge in June-July 2014 recovered a variety of rocks related to the history of the Izu-Bonin Mariana (IBM) Arc. Basalts of the oceanic igneous crust underlying the IBM arc give us information of the basement prior to arc initiation and volcaniclastic rocks eroded from active volcanoes of the IBM arc record its evolution from inception in the Eocene through Oligocene and Miocene. Ash layers intercalated in hemipelagic sediments record the evolution of the IBM and Ryukyu arcs during the Neogene. The aim of this study is to track changes in the oxidation state of island arc magmas and the mantle wedge during the time of arc initiation. Experimental results as well as preliminary data from IODP Exp. 351 will be presented by the time of the conference.

  16. Spatial distribution of helium isotopes in volcanic gases and thermal waters along the Vanuatu (New Hebrides) volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean-Baptiste, P.; Allard, P.; Fourré, E.; Bani, P.; Calabrese, S.; Aiuppa, A.; Gauthier, P. J.; Parello, F.; Pelletier, B.; Garaebiti, E.

    2016-08-01

    We report the first helium isotope survey of volcanic gases, hot springs and some olivine phenocrysts along the Vanuatu island arc, from Tanna in the south to Vanua Lava in the north. Low CO2 content and low 3He/4He ratios in thermal fluids of Epi (4.0 ± 0.1 Ra), Efate (4.5 ± 0.1 Ra) and Pentecost (5.3 ± 0.5 Ra) islands coherently indicate reduced mantle gas leakage and crustal contamination by radiogenic helium on these extinct volcanic systems of the former (Pliocene) arc. Instead, presently active Vanuatu volcanoes display 3He/4He and C/3He ratios typical of subduction-related volcanic arcs: 3He/4He ratios range from 6.4 ± 0.5 Ra in southernmost Tanna and 7.23 ± 0.09 Ra in northernmost Vanua Lava to typical MORB values in the central islands of Gaua (7.68 ± 0.06 Ra), Ambrym (7.6 ± 0.8 Ra) and Ambae (7 ± 2 Ra in groundwaters, 7.9 ± 1.4 Ra in olivine phenocrysts, and 8.0 ± 0.1 Ra in summit fumaroles of Aoba volcano). On Ambrym, however, we discover that hydrothermal manifestations separated by only 10-15 km on both sides of a major E-W transverse fault zone crossing the island are fed by two distinct helium sources, with different 3He/4He signatures: while fluids in southwest Ambrym (Baiap and Sesivi areas) have typical arc ratios (7.6 ± 0.8 Ra), fluids on the northwest coast (Buama Bay area) display both higher 3He/4He ratios (9.8 ± 0.2 Ra in waters to 10.21 ± 0.08 Ra in bubbling gases) and lower C/3He ratios that evidence a hotspot influence. We thus infer that the influx of Indian MORB mantle beneath the central Vanuatu arc, from which Ambrym magmas originate, also involves a 3He-rich hotspot component, possibly linked to a westward influx of Samoan hotspot material or another yet unknown local source. This duality in magmatic He source at Ambrym fits with the bimodal composition and geochemistry of the erupted basalts, implying two distinct magma sources and feeding systems. More broadly, the wide He isotopic variations detected along the Vanuatu

  17. Magma genesis of the acidic volcanism in the intra-arc rift zone of the Izu volcanic arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraguchi, S.; Tokuyama, H.; Ishii, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Izu volcanic arc extends over 550 km from the Izu Peninsula, Japan, to the Nishinoshima Trough or Sofugan tectonic line. It is the northernmost segment of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc system, which is located at the eastern side of the Philippine Sea Plate. The recent magmatism of the Izu arc is bimodal and characterized by basalt and rhyolite (e.g. Tamura and Tatsumi 2002). In the southern Izu arc, volcanic front from the Aogashima to the Torishima islands is characterized by submarine calderas and acidic volcanisms. The intra-arc rifting, characterized by back-arc depressions, small volcanic knolls and ridges, is active in this region. Volcanic rocks were obtained in 1995 during a research cruise of the R/V MOANA WAVE (Hawaii University, cruise MW9507). Geochemical variation of volcanic rocks and magma genesis was studied by Hochstaedter et al. (2000, 2001), Machida et al (2008), etc. These studies focused magma and mantle dynamics of basaltic volcanism in the wedge mantle. Acidic volcanic rocks were also dredged during the curies MW9507. However, studies of these acidic volcanics were rare. Herein, we present petrographical and chemical analyses of these acidic rocks, and compare these results with those of other acidic rocks in the Izu arc and lab experiments, and propose a model of magma genesis in a context of acidic volcanism. Dredge sites by the cruise MW9507 are 120, and about 50 sites are in the rift zone. Recovered rocks are dominated by the bimodal assemblage of basalt-basaltic andesite and dacite-rhyolite. The most abundant phase is olivine basalt, less than 50 wt% SiO2. Andesites are minor in volume and compositional gap from 56 to 65 wt% SiO2 exists. The across-arc variation of the HFSE contents and ratios, such as Zr/Y and Nb/Zr of rhyolites exhibit depleted in the volcanic front side and enriched in reararc side. This characteristic is similar to basaltic volcanism pointed out by Hochstaedter et al (2000). The petrographical features of rhyolites

  18. GPS and seismological constraints on active tectonics and arc-continent collision in Papua New Guinea: Implications for mechanics of microplate rotations in a plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Laura M.; Stevens, Colleen; Silver, Eli; McCaffrey, Rob; Loratung, Wesley; Hasiata, Suvenia; Stanaway, Richard; Curley, Robert; Rosa, Robert; Taugaloidi, Jones

    2004-05-01

    The island of New Guinea is located within the deforming zone between the Pacific and Australian plates that converge obliquely at ˜110 mm/yr. New Guinea has been fragmented into a complex array of microplates, some of which rotate rapidly about nearby vertical axes. We present velocities from a network of 38 Global Positioning System (GPS) sites spanning much of the nation of Papua New Guinea (PNG). The GPS-derived velocities are used to explain the kinematics of major tectonic blocks in the region and the nature of strain accumulation on major faults in PNG. We simultaneously invert GPS velocities, earthquake slip vectors on faults, and transform orientations in the Woodlark Basin for the poles of rotation of the tectonic blocks and the degree of elastic strain accumulation on faults in the region. The data are best explained by six distinct tectonic blocks: the Australian, Pacific, South Bismarck, North Bismarck, and Woodlark plates and a previously unrecognized New Guinea Highlands Block. Significant portions of the Ramu-Markham Fault appear to be locked, which has implications for seismic hazard determination in the Markham Valley region. We also propose that rapid clockwise rotation of the South Bismarck plate is controlled by edge forces initiated by the collision between the Finisterre arc and the New Guinea Highlands.

  19. Potential landslide activity affecting the archaeological site of Orongo (Easter Island-Chile): preliminary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margottini, C.; Delmonaco, G.; Spizzichino, D.; Pandolfi, O.; Crisostomo, R.; Nohe, S.

    2009-04-01

    Easter Island forms part of the Easter Line, a continuous latitudinal chain of volcanic seamounts and islands in the Pacific Sea. The island's roughly triangular shape is determined by the merging of lava flows produced by its three main volcanoes (Rano Kau, Terevaka, Poike) which form its main mass. The Rano Kau volcano, sited in the SW vertex of the island, is made up of numerous basaltic lava flows and has been reduced in size by faulting and marine erosion. Its crater (1.4 km wide) is a small caldera that collapsed after a late, large explosive phase, as attested by the presence of breccia deposits around the eastern rim of the crater. The archaeological stone village of Orongo is located above the inner wall of the crater at an altitude of ca. 300m a.s.l. Prominent historical remains are the numerous petroglyphs that represent the ancient ceremonial of the birdman cult (tangata manu). Rano Kau is mainly composed of sequences of basaltic and intermediate lavas and pyroclastics. Most of the of the original caldera area, especially in the southern flank, has been disrupted by marine erosion. This has caused a dramatic change of the original morphology, resulting in a sub-vertical cliff and steep slopes, especially in the middle-low portions. In the upper part of the slopes weathered soils and regolith are outcropping. Topographical and geomorphological analysis of the area conducted by a direct field surveys in January and July 2008 have provided clear evidences of slope instability along the southern external flank of the caldera. Different landslide areas have been detected. The most active area is located at east of the village in correspondence of the crest zone of Rano Kau where a debris slide/fall has recently occurred. The analysis of photos taken in Nov. 2007 in the same area evidences that the landslide crown area was originated at an elevation of ca. 200m a.s.l. along a probable contact between basaltic layers on the top and weathered lava. Other minor

  20. Transient crustal movement in the northern Izu-Bonin arc starting in 2004: A large slow slip event or a slow back-arc rifting event?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arisa, Deasy; Heki, Kosuke

    2016-07-01

    The Izu-Bonin arc lies along the convergent boundary where the Pacific Plate subducts beneath the Philippine Sea Plate. Horizontal velocities of continuous Global Navigation Satellite System stations on the Izu Islands move eastward by up to 1 cm/year relative to the stable part of the Philippine Sea Plate suggesting active back-arc rifting behind the northern part of the arc. Here, we report that such eastward movements transiently accelerated in the middle of 2004 resulting in 3 cm extra movements in 3 years. We compare three different mechanisms possibly responsible for this transient movement, i.e. (1) postseismic movement of the 2004 September earthquake sequence off the Kii Peninsula far to the west, (2) a temporary activation of the back-arc rifting to the west dynamically triggered by seismic waves from a nearby earthquake, and (3) a large slow slip event in the Izu-Bonin Trench to the east. By comparing crustal movements in different regions, the first possibility can be shown unlikely. It is difficult to rule out the second possibility, but current evidence support the third possibility, i.e. a large slow slip event with moment magnitude of 7.5 may have occurred there.

  1. NOTE: Monte Carlo simulation of RapidArc radiotherapy delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, K.; Townson, R.; Zavgorodni, S.

    2008-10-01

    RapidArc radiotherapy technology from Varian Medical Systems is one of the most complex delivery systems currently available, and achieves an entire intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment in a single gantry rotation about the patient. Three dynamic parameters can be continuously varied to create IMRT dose distributions—the speed of rotation, beam shaping aperture and delivery dose rate. Modeling of RapidArc technology was incorporated within the existing Vancouver Island Monte Carlo (VIMC) system (Zavgorodni et al 2007 Radiother. Oncol. 84 S49, 2008 Proc. 16th Int. Conf. on Medical Physics). This process was named VIMC-Arc and has become an efficient framework for the verification of RapidArc treatment plans. VIMC-Arc is a fully automated system that constructs the Monte Carlo (MC) beam and patient models from a standard RapidArc DICOM dataset, simulates radiation transport, collects the resulting dose and converts the dose into DICOM format for import back into the treatment planning system (TPS). VIMC-Arc accommodates multiple arc IMRT deliveries and models gantry rotation as a series of segments with dynamic MLC motion within each segment. Several verification RapidArc plans were generated by the Eclipse TPS on a water-equivalent cylindrical phantom and re-calculated using VIMC-Arc. This includes one 'typical' RapidArc plan, one plan for dual arc treatment and one plan with 'avoidance' sectors. One RapidArc plan was also calculated on a DICOM patient CT dataset. Statistical uncertainty of MC simulations was kept within 1%. VIMC-Arc produced dose distributions that matched very closely to those calculated by the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) that is used in Eclipse. All plans also demonstrated better than 1% agreement of the dose at the isocenter. This demonstrates the capabilities of our new MC system to model all dosimetric features required for RapidArc dose calculations.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of RapidArc radiotherapy delivery.

    PubMed

    Bush, K; Townson, R; Zavgorodni, S

    2008-10-07

    RapidArc radiotherapy technology from Varian Medical Systems is one of the most complex delivery systems currently available, and achieves an entire intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment in a single gantry rotation about the patient. Three dynamic parameters can be continuously varied to create IMRT dose distributions-the speed of rotation, beam shaping aperture and delivery dose rate. Modeling of RapidArc technology was incorporated within the existing Vancouver Island Monte Carlo (VIMC) system (Zavgorodni et al 2007 Radiother. Oncol. 84 S49, 2008 Proc. 16th Int. Conf. on Medical Physics). This process was named VIMC-Arc and has become an efficient framework for the verification of RapidArc treatment plans. VIMC-Arc is a fully automated system that constructs the Monte Carlo (MC) beam and patient models from a standard RapidArc DICOM dataset, simulates radiation transport, collects the resulting dose and converts the dose into DICOM format for import back into the treatment planning system (TPS). VIMC-Arc accommodates multiple arc IMRT deliveries and models gantry rotation as a series of segments with dynamic MLC motion within each segment. Several verification RapidArc plans were generated by the Eclipse TPS on a water-equivalent cylindrical phantom and re-calculated using VIMC-Arc. This includes one 'typical' RapidArc plan, one plan for dual arc treatment and one plan with 'avoidance' sectors. One RapidArc plan was also calculated on a DICOM patient CT dataset. Statistical uncertainty of MC simulations was kept within 1%. VIMC-Arc produced dose distributions that matched very closely to those calculated by the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) that is used in Eclipse. All plans also demonstrated better than 1% agreement of the dose at the isocenter. This demonstrates the capabilities of our new MC system to model all dosimetric features required for RapidArc dose calculations.

  3. Geochronologic and isotopic study of the La Désirade island basement complex: Jurassic oceanic crust in the Lesser Antilles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattinson, James M.; Fink, L. Kenneth; Hopson, Clifford A.

    1980-01-01

    Désirade complex to be an uplifted segment of oceanic crust that represents the basement on which the later island arcs grew: first the Aves Ridge, an arc that was active in middle to late Cretaceous time (but whose exact mode of origin is enigmatic, and is considered in four alternate tectonic models), then the Eocene to Recent Lesser Antilles arc.

  4. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  5. New Caledonia a classic example of an arc continent collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitchison, J.

    2011-12-01

    The SW Pacific island of New Caledonia presents a classic example of an arc-continent collision. This event occurred in the Late Eocene when elements of an intra-oceanic island arc system, the Loyalty-D'Entrecasteaux arc, which stretched SSE from near Papua New Guinea east of New Caledonia to offshore New Zealand, collided with micro-continental fragments that had rifted off eastern Gondwana (Australia) in the late Cretaceous. Intervening Late Cretaceous to Paleogene oceanic crust of the South Loyalty Basin was eliminated through eastward subduction beneath this west-facing intra-oceanic island arc. As with many arc-continent collisions elsewhere collision was accompanied by ophiolite emplacement. The erosional remnants of which are extensive in New Caledonia. Collision led to subduction flip, followed by extensive rollback in front of the newly established east-facing Vitiaz arc. Post-collisional magmatism occurred after slab break-off and is represented by small-scale granitoid intrusions. Additional important features of New Caledonia include the presence of a regionally extensive UHP metamorphic terrain consisting of blueschists and eclogites that formed during the subduction process and were rapidly exhumed as a result of the collision Not only was collision and associated orogeny short-lived this collision system has not been overprinted by any major subsequent collision. New Caledonia thus provides an exceptional location for the study of processes related to arc-continent collision in general.

  6. The effects of Sao Paulo urban heat island on lightning activity: Decadal analysis (1999-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourscheidt, Vandoir; Pinto, Osmar; Naccarato, Kleber P.

    2016-05-01

    Eleven years of lightning data from the Brazilian Integrated National Lightning Detection Network were used to analyze the effects of the urban heat island (UHI) of Sao Paulo on lightning activity, extending the investigation of previous works. Cloud-to-ground lightning data were analyzed in both spatial and temporal perspectives, using different approaches: flash density, flash rate, thunderstorm hours (TH), and the cell initiation technique (CIT), which aims to identify the onset of thunderstorms. Land surface temperature (LST) from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) was used to analyze the UHI evolution over the years. MODIS data were validated using ground stations, distributed within the urban area. Different time intervals (seasonal and intraday) were used in an attempt to separate local convective systems from synoptic-scale events. The results indicate significant effects of the UHI (using LST) on THs and CIT. The CIT showed a nearly ring pattern, especially during the afternoon (14:00-18:00 LT) of summer months, reinforcing temperature contrast as a condition for storm initiation. The results also suggest an amplification of the UHI effects on thunderstorm activity by local factors (sea and country breeze, synoptic events, and terrain). Higher flash rates were also observed throughout the urban region, which influences the lightning density. Temporal analysis indicates that minimum temperature and lightning activity increase in wintertime. In summary, the results agree with previous studies about the UHI and indicate its importance on lightning occurrence, especially by increasing the temperature contrast and the instability in these regions.

  7. Investigating correlation of lighting activity and precipitation in an Eastern Mediterranean island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanidou, Vasiliki; Koutroulis, Aristeidis; Tsanis, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    This study examines conditions under which lightning activity and precipitation events can be correlated in an Eastern Mediterranean island climate. As a first step, the activity within a predefined area of 50km radius around the gauge station is examined, given the temporal evolution of rain accumulation at an hourly time step. Then the lightning activity is grouped in time-space clusters and for each lightning-cluster precipitation recordings of 10 minutes time step from nearby gauges are searched in an area of variable radius ranging from 10 to 100km. The number of clusters is decided according to the g-means algorithm in which the number of clusters is increasing until the data of all clusters follow the Gaussian distribution. For different durations, number of lightning events and radius the proportion of the corresponding precipitation events for the given radius around the lightning-clusters is investigated. The methods are tested in the case study of the island of Crete. Precipitation data from 22 gauging stations over Crete and lightning data from the Global Lightning Network (GLN) are examined for the investigation of possible associations in a period of almost two years (09/2012-07/2014). For the first approach, for half of the stations rain accumulations over 10mm/h (90th percentile of rain) are recorded up to a day after lightning activity occurrence. According to the second approach, lightning-clusters of smaller duration (up to 5 hours) and more lightning flashes (more than 100) are highly associated with rain events. The optimal radius from the center of the lightning-cluster, according to the proportion of rain events, is found to be 30km. The results establish a better understanding of the relations between lightning and precipitation and could provide valuable information to the now-casting of flash flood events triggered by severe thunderstorms. The research reported in this study effort was fully supported by the "ARISTEIA II" Action

  8. Subalkaline andesite from Valu Fa Ridge, a back-arc spreading center in southern Lau Basin: petrogenesis, comparative chemistry, and tectonic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallier, T.L.; Jenner, G.A.; Frey, F.A.; Gill, J.B.; Davis, A.S.; Volpe, A.M.; Hawkins, J.W.; Morris, J.D.; Cawood, Peter A.; Morton, J.L.; Scholl, D. W.; Rautenschlein, M.; White, W.M.; Williams, Ross W.; Stevenson, A.J.; White, L.D.

    1991-01-01

    Tholeiitic andesite was dredged from two sites on Valu Fa Ridge (VFR), a back-arc spreading center in Lau Basin. Valu Fa Ridge, at least 200 km long, is located 40-50 km west of the active Tofua Volcanic Arc (TVA) axis and lies about 150 km above the subducted oceanic plate. One or more magma chambers, traced discontinuously for about 100 km along the ridge axis, lie 3-4 km beneath the ridge. The mostly aphyric and glassy lavas had high volatile contents, as shown by the abundance and large sizes of vesicles. An extensive fractionation history is inferred from the high SiO2 contents and FeO* MgO ratios. Chemical data show that the VFR lavas have both volcanic arc and back-arc basin affinities. The volcanic arc characteristics are: (1) relatively high abundances of most alkali and alkaline earth elements; (2) low abundances of high field strength elements Nb and Ta; (3) high U/Th ratios; (4) similar radiogenic isotope ratios in VFR and TVA lavas, in particular the enrichment of 87Sr 86Sr relative to 206Pb 204Pb; (5) high 238U 230Th, 230Th 232Th, and 226Ra 230Th activity ratios; and (6) high ratios of Rb/Cs, Ba/Nb, and Ba/La. Other chemical characteristics suggest that the VFR lavas are related to MORB-type back-arc basin lavas. For example, VFR lavas have (1) lower 87Sr 86Sr ratios and higher 143Nd 144Nd ratios than most lavas from the TVA, except samples from Ata Island, and are similar to many Lau Basin lavas; (2) lower Sr/REE, Rb/Zr, and Ba/Zr ratios than in arc lavas; and (3) higher Ti, Fe, and V, and higher Ti/V ratios than arc lavas generally and TVA lavas specifically. Most characteristics of VFR lavas can be explained by mixing depleted mantle with either small amounts of sediment and fluids from the subducting slab and/or an older fragment of volcanic arc lithosphere. The eruption of subalkaline andesite with some arc affinities along a back-arc spreading ridge is not unique. Collision of the Louisville and Tonga ridges probably activated back-arc extension

  9. Prioritising weed management activities in a data deficient environment: the Pilbara islands, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Cheryl; Passeretto, Kellie; Lohr, Michael; Keighery, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Along the Pilbara coast of Western Australia (WA) there are approximately 598 islands with a total area of around 500 km(2). Budget limitations and logistical complexities mean the management of these islands tends to be opportunistic. Until now there has been no review of the establishment and impacts of weeds on Pilbara islands or any attempt to prioritise island weed management. In many instances only weed occurrence has been documented, creating a data deficient environment for management decision making. The purpose of this research was to develop a database of weed occurrences on WA islands and to create a prioritisation process that will generate a ranked list of island-weed combinations using currently available data. Here, we describe a model using the pairwise comparison formulae in the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP), four metrics describing the logistical difficulty of working on each island (island size, ruggedness, travel time, and tenure), and two well established measures of conservation value of an island (maximum representation and effective maximum rarity of eight features). We present the sensitivity of the island-weed rankings to changes in weights applied to each decision criteria using Kendall's tau statistics. We also present the top 20 ranked island-weed combinations for four modelling scenarios. Many conservation prioritisation tools exist. However, many of these tools require extrapolation to fill data gaps and require specific management objectives and dedicated budgets. To our knowledge, this study is one of a few attempts to prioritise conservation actions using data that are currently available in an environment where management may be opportunistic and spasmodic due to budgetary restrictions.

  10. Volcano flank instability in the Lesser Antilles Arc: Diversity of scale, processes, and temporal recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Georges; Le Friant, Anne; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Deplus, Christine; Semet, Michel P.

    2007-08-01

    The 1997 Boxing Day collapse, a remarkable feature of the ongoing eruption of Soufrière Hills on Montserrat, has prompted new interest in the study of volcano stability in the Lesser Antilles. Building on a few cases documented in the literature, we have now identified at least 47 flank collapse events on volcanoes of the Caribbean arc where this type of behavior is characteristic and repetitive. About 15 events occurred on active volcanoes within the last 12,000 years. In the northern part of the arc, flank collapses are repetitive, do not exceed 1 km3 in volume, occur in all directions, and are promoted by intense hydrothermal alteration and well-developed fracturing of the summit part of the edifices. In contrast, infrequent but large sector collapses, with volumes up to tens of km3, are typical of the southern volcanoes. They are always directed to the west as a result of the high overall slopes of the islands toward the deep back-arc Grenada Basin. Because Caribbean islands are small, a large part of the resulting debris avalanches have flowed into the sea thus contributing voluminous and sudden inputs of volcaniclastic sediments to the Grenada Basin. Deposits from such submarine flows have been identified during the recent AGUADOMAR and CARAVAL oceanographic cruises and traced to their source structures on land. Edifice collapses have a major influence on subsequent volcanic activity but also are of high concern because of their tsunamigenic potential.

  11. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  12. High-Ca Boninites From the Modern Tonga Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, L. B.; Plank, T.; Arculus, R. J.; Hauri, E. H.; Worthington, T. J.

    2007-12-01

    High-Ca boninites are volcanic rocks with unusual compositions (SiO2>53 wt%, Mg#>0.6, CaO/Al2O3>0.75) found in forearcs and trenches, continental cratons, and ophiolites. Generation of high-Ca boninites requires a combination of refractory mantle sources, elevated mantle temperatures and the addition of hydrous fluids. To satisfy these conditions, petrogenetic models invoke unusual tectonic settings such as subduction initiation, ridge subduction, or mantle plume interaction. We have discovered high-Ca boninites from an active arc volcano, Volcano A, a submarine volcano in the Tonga arc dredged during the NoToVE cruise in Nov 2004. Multi-beam sonar images of two pristine volcanic cones and glassy samples lacking Mn coatings suggest that these edifices were formed by modern volcanism. The boninites are represented in both the whole rock and melt inclusion populations of a sample dredged from a ridge on the northern flank of the northern cone. Similarities in the major element compositions of the largely aphyric whole rock and the glassy melt inclusions support both as samples of true boninitic liquids (MgO>9 wt%). These liquids are related by coupled crystal fractionation (from Fo92 to Fo85 in olivine hosts) and degassing (from 4 to 1 wt% H2O in the melt inclusions). Three other dredges from Volc A include whole rocks, glass, and melt inclusions that are related to the boninites by crystal fractionation. Taken together, the samples from Volc A represent a suite of boninites and their differentiates, forming a coherent liquid line of descent with parallel whole rock REE patterns which become more enriched with decreasing Mg#. The REE patterns for Volc A whole rocks are depleted in LREE, however, in contrast to the characteristic U-shaped REE patterns of classic boninites. Volc A is only the second example of boninites being erupted in an active volcanic arc, the first being Bamus volcano in New Britain (Johnson et al., Geol. Rund., 1983). Volc A is not remarkable in

  13. Recent activity of Anatahan volcano, Northern Marina Islands, and its magma plumbing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, S.; Morita, Y.; Matsushima, T.; Tabei, T.; Watanabe, A.; Maeno, F.; Camacho, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    The volcanic activity of Anatahan that began in 2003 has declined such as faint emission of volcanic gas from the crater and scarcity of volcanic tremor in 2009. Our team carried out geological, geodetic and seismological observation repeatedly till mid-2009 from the beginning of the eruption. The early phase of the eruption (2003-2004) can be characterized by magmatic and phreatomagmatic explosions, contrasting to mainly phreatic nature in the later phase (2005-2008). The active crater (Eastern Crater) was widened and deepened (much below the sea level) as the eruption progressed. Dominant products of phreatic explosions comprise of thick accumulation of thin layers of fine ash. A rough estimate of the total volume during these 5 years is as much as 1 km3, close to the volume of materials lost by enlargement of the active crater. Seismic observation was carried out during mid-2008 and mid-2009 by settling 5 temporary stations covering the whole of the island, each of which includes a 3 components short-period seismometer with corner frequency of 1Hz and a low-power consumption digital data recorder with 24-bits AD resolutions. GPS campaign observation was repeated in the same station during this period. VT and LP event were observed, though very low in occurrence in this period. Hypocenters of VT and LP events show all events occurred at the depth of less than 8km around the eastern crater. Among them, LP events occurred in the shallower (less than 3km) region. The error in the depth may be not more than a few kilometers, but that in the epicenter should be smaller than 1km because the most events are located inside of the seismic network. Moreover, the tremors observed in the 2008 summer continued for about 3 weeks. The amplitude increased gradually, kept at the maximum, and stopped abruptly. During the maximum amplitude period, ash emission was observed by VAAC. Estimated reduced displacement at the maximum is about 1 cm2, typical of a hydro-magmatic eruption

  14. Language, Aid and Literacy: An Outline of Activities in the Solomon Islands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Lesley

    1994-01-01

    Problems facing the literacy movement in the Solomon Islands are related to communication, economic, and linguistic barriers. The island is linguistically diverse. English is the official language, but a national literacy committee found that only 26% of people could speak English. Improving primary education is a government priority. Training of…

  15. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This welding curriculum guide treats two topics in detail: the care of tungsten electrodes and the entire concept of contamination control and the hafnium electrode and its importance in dual-air cutting systems that use compressed shop air for plasma arc cutting activities. The guide contains three units of instruction that cover the following…

  16. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  17. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  18. Spatio-temporal variation and seasonality of Odontocetes' foraging activity in the leeward side of the island of Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorli, Giacomo; Au, Whitlow W. L.

    2017-03-01

    The Kona coast of the island of Hawaii hosts many species of odontocetes. These marine mammals are top predators and their foraging activity plays an important role in the ecosystem dynamics. Three passive acoustics recorders were used to study the temporal and spatial occurrence of the foraging activity of odontocetes (excluding beaked and sperm whales) at three locations along the Kona coast of Hawaii between 2012 and 2013. Echolocation clicks were detected using the M3R1

  19. Development and recent activity of the San Andrés landslide on El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimeš, Jan; Yepes, Jorge; Becerril, Laura; Kusák, Michal; Galindo, Inés; Blahut, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Extremely voluminous landslides with a long run-out (also known as megalandslides) on oceanic volcanic islands are infrequent denudational processes on such islands. At the same time, they represent a major geological hazard that must be looked into to avoid negative consequences for the inhabitants of these islands. Their occurrence can be related to periods of intense seismo-volcanic activity, similar to that which occurred on El Hierro Island over 2011-2012. Landslides on volcanic islands are studied using onshore and offshore geological, geophysical and geomorphological records, considering their unique triggering conditions (e.g. lava intrusions, eruptive vents, magma chamber collapses). Previous work has pointed out similarities between specific cases of landslides on volcanic islands and deep-seated gravitational slope deformations (DSGSDs) which are typical in high mountain settings. Nevertheless, the methodological approaches and concepts used to investigate DSGSDs are not commonly applied on volcanic islands studies, even though their use may provide new information about the development stage, recent movements and future hazards. Therefore, this approach for studying the San Andrés landslide (SAL) on El Hierro (Canary Islands) has been developed applying a detailed morphological field mapping, an interpretation of digital elevation models, structural measurements, kinematic testing, and a precise movement monitoring system. The acquired information revealed a strong structural influence on the landslide morphology and the presence of sets of weakened planes acting as the sliding surfaces of the SAL or secondary landslides within its body. The presence of secondary landslides, deep erosive gullies, coastal cliffs and high on-shore relative relief also suggests a high susceptibility to future landslide movement. Direct monitoring on the landslide scarps and the slip plane, performed between February 2013 and July 2014, using an automated optical

  20. Investigating the relationship of lightning activity and rainfall: A case study for Crete Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanidou, V.; Koutroulis, A. G.; Tsanis, I. K.

    2016-05-01

    The relationship of lightning activity and rainfall is investigated for rain events of variable intensity. Rain data from 22 gauging stations over the island of Crete and lightning activity from the Global Lightning Network including both cloud-to-ground and some cloud flashes are analyzed for the period September 2012 to June 2014. Local thunderstorms' characteristics are investigated both individually as well as in groups according to the results of k-means clustering algorithm in 3 dimensions (space (x, y) and time (t)) in which the number of clusters is decided by G-means algorithm. Correlation of non-zero pairs of rain intensity and number of flashes is examined at various time intervals, time lags and effective radii. Also, correlation of flash count within 50 km radius around the stations is examined for the rain events of maximum hourly intensity for each gauging station. The highest coincidence of lightning clusters with intense rain events reaches 60% when gauges are 25-30 km from the cluster center. Maximum correlation within non-zero pairs of rain intensity and flashes number is obtained for more intense rain (99th percentile) and for increased flash count within the searching area (more than 10 flashes). Also, correlation is stronger for shorter time windows. The findings of this study improve the understanding of thunderstorm events and could provide staple information for the improvement of forecasting extreme events.

  1. Asian Indians of Guadeloupe are less physically active than their island counterparts.

    PubMed

    Sinnapah, S; Antoine-Jonville, S; Donnet, J P; Hue, O

    2009-04-01

    The status of ethnic minority has been reported to be associated with a tendency toward sedentary behavior. The Guadeloupean population is composed of Afro-Caribbeans and an Asian Indian minority. This study examined the association of ethnicity and physical activity on the island. Energy expenditures (EE), energy intakes (EI), and macronutrient intakes of 122 Guadeloupean workers (60 Indians and 62 controls) were assessed by three consecutive 24-h recalls. Two-way analyses of variance were conducted to test the hypothesis of an effect of ethnicity, taking the potential effect of sex into account, on these variables. Asian Indians reported lower EE (P=0.011), lower EE/EI ratios (P=0.001), and lower physical activity (P=0.003) than their Afro-Carribean counterparts. Their food intakes were not different in terms of EI or macronutrient intake. No sex x ethnicity interactions were significant. The present study reports a tendency toward physical inactivity in Asian Indians of Guadeloupe associated with EI similar to those of controls. Sedentary lifestyles and energetic imbalances are well-documented risk factors for several diseases, including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, both major public health concerns in Guadeloupe. Strategies to prevent sedentary lifestyles should be considered for Asian Indian Guadeloupeans.

  2. Heat Islands

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  3. A critical evaluation of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1)'s putative role in regulating dendritic plasticity, cognitive processes, and mood in animal models of depression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Pehrson, Alan L.; Waller, Jessica A.; Dale, Elena; Sanchez, Connie; Gulinello, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is primarily conceptualized as a mood disorder but cognitive dysfunction is also prevalent, and may limit the daily function of MDD patients. Current theories on MDD highlight disturbances in dendritic plasticity in its pathophysiology, which could conceivably play a role in the production of both MDD-related mood and cognitive symptoms. This paper attempts to review the accumulated knowledge on the basic biology of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc or Arg3.1), its effects on neural plasticity, and how these may be related to mood or cognitive dysfunction in animal models of MDD. On a cellular level, Arc plays an important role in modulating dendritic spine density and remodeling. Arc also has a close, bidirectional relationship with postsynaptic glutamate neurotransmission, since it is stimulated by multiple glutamatergic receptor mechanisms but also modulates α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor internalization. The effects on AMPA receptor trafficking are likely related to Arc's ability to modulate phenomena such as long-term potentiation, long-term depression, and synaptic scaling, each of which are important for maintaining proper cognitive function. Chronic stress models of MDD in animals show suppressed Arc expression in the frontal cortex but elevation in the amygdala. Interestingly, cognitive tasks depending on the frontal cortex are generally impaired by chronic stress, while those depending on the amygdala are enhanced, and antidepressant treatments stimulate cortical Arc expression with a timeline that is reminiscent of the treatment efficacy lag observed in the clinic or in preclinical models. However, pharmacological treatments that stimulate regional Arc expression do not universally improve relevant cognitive functions, and this highlights a need to further refine our understanding of Arc on a subcellular and network level. PMID:26321903

  4. Active layer temperature in two Cryosols from King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Roberto F. M.; Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto G. R.; Poelking, Everton L.; Simas, Felipe N. B.; Fernandes Filho, Elpidio I.; Bockheim, James G.

    2012-06-01

    This study presents soil temperature and moisture regimes from March 2008 to January 2009 for two active layer monitoring (CALM-S) sites at King George Island, Maritime Antarctica. The monitoring sites were installed during the summer of 2008 and consist of thermistors (accuracy of ± 0.2 °C), arranged vertically with probes at different depths and one soil moisture probe placed at the bottommost layer at each site (accuracy of ± 2.5%), recording data at hourly intervals in a high capacity datalogger. The active layer thermal regime in the studied period for both soils was typical of periglacial environments, with extreme variation in surface temperature during summer resulting in frequent freeze and thaw cycles. The great majority of the soil temperature readings during the eleven month period was close to 0 °C, resulting in low values of freezing and thawing degree days. Both soils have poor thermal apparent diffusivity but values were higher for the soil from Fildes Peninsula. The different moisture regimes for the studied soils were attributed to soil texture, with the coarser soil presenting much lower water content during all seasons. Differences in water and ice contents may explain the contrasting patterns of freezing of the studied soils, being two-sided for the coarser soil and one-sided for the loamy soil. The temperature profile of the studied soils during the eleven month period indicates that the active layer reached a maximum depth of approximately 92 cm at Potter and 89 cm at Fildes. Longer data sets are needed for more conclusive analysis on active layer behaviour in this part of Antarctica.

  5. Izu-Bonin Arc: Intra-oceanic from the beginning? Unraveling the crustal structure of the Mesozoic proto-Philippine Sea Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, K.; Ishizuka, O.; Ueda, H.; Shukuno, H.; Hirahara, Y.; Nichols, A. R.; Dunkley, D. J.; Horie, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Morishita, T.; Tatsumi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The Izu-Bonin Arc is widely regarded as a typical intra-oceanic arc, where the oceanic Pacific Plate is subducting beneath the Philippine Sea Plate, an evolving complex of active and inactive arcs and back-arc basins. It is dominated by oceanic crust forming three large back-arc basins; Shikoku, Parece Vela, and West Philippine Basins, making the present Philippine Sea Plate look like an "oceanic" plate. However, all of these back-arc basins were formed after the inception of subduction at Izu-Bonin Arc, which began at ~52 Ma (Ishizuka et al. 2011, EPSL). Little is known about the proto-Philippine Sea Plate, which existed as a counterpart to the Pacific Plate during subduction initiation and before the formation of back-arc basins. To investigate the crustal structures of the proto-Philippine Sea Plate, we conducted manned-submersible SHINKAI6500 and Deep-Tow camera surveys during the April 2010 cruise of the R/V YOKOSUKA cruise (YK10-04) at the Amami Plateau, Daito Ridge, and Okidaito Ridge (ADO) region. The ADO region comprises the northwestern Philippine Sea Plate along with what are regarded as remnants of the proto-Philippine Sea Plate. Submersible observations and rock sampling revealed that ADO region exposes deep crustal sections of gabbroic, granitic, and metamorphic rocks, indicating that part of the proto-Philippine Sea Plate is composed of older, possibly continental, crust. Jurassic to Cretaceous magmatic zircon U-Pb ages have been obtained from the ADO plutonic rocks. These findings and tectonic reconstruction of the proto-Philippine Sea Plate (Deschamps and Lallemand 2002, JGR) suggests that subduction of the Izu-Bonin Arc initiated at the continental margin of the Southeast Asia, possibly correlating to the Mesozoic island-arc and ophiolite complexes exposed in the Philippine Islands and Borneo, and later acquired "intra-oceanic"-like setting through formation of the backarc basins. Furthermore, detrital zircon ages from volcaniclastic sandstones

  6. Increasing the active surface of titanium islands on graphene by nitrogen sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashoff, T.; Convertino, D.; Miseikis, V.; Coletti, C.; Piazza, V.; Tozzini, V.; Beltram, F.; Heun, S.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium-island formation on graphene as a function of defect density is investigated. When depositing titanium on pristine graphene, titanium atoms cluster and form islands with an average diameter of about 10 nm and an average height of a few atomic layers. We show that if defects are introduced in the graphene by ion bombardment, the mobility of the deposited titanium atoms is reduced and the average diameter of the islands decreases to 5 nm with monoatomic height. This results in an optimized coverage for hydrogen storage applications, since the actual titanium surface available per unit graphene area is significantly increased.

  7. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from −0.25 to −0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (−0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid−mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration. PMID:27303032

  8. Signs of potential renewal of eruptive activity at La Fossa (Vulcano, Aeolian Islands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, A.

    1996-04-01

    Since the end of the last magmatic eruption (1890), activity of La Fossa (southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) has consisted of fumarolic emissions of fluctuating intensity. Fluids are discharged principally at two fumarolic fields located in the northern rim of the active crater and at the beach sited at its northern foot. Increased thermal, seismic and geochemical activity has been recorded since 1978, when an earthquake of M=5.5 occurred in the region. This paper combines available geophysical and geochemical information in order to develop a tentative interpretation of two episodes of apparent unrest which occurred in 1985 and 1987 1988, enhancing the risk of renewal of the eruptive activity. The 1985 unrest consisted essentially of a sharp build up of the internal pressure in the shallow hydrothermal system, which was induced by the injection of hot gases of magmatic origin. The crater fumaroles displayed significant increases in CO2 and other acid species, but their outlet temperature did not change. Conversely, the 1987 1988 episode was characterized by appreciable modifications at the crater fumaroles, with only secondary effects at the fumarole system of the beach. The sliding of part of the eastern flank of the La Fossa cone into the sea occurred on 20 April 1988, when the region was affected by crustal dilatation producing a seismic sequence of relatively high intensity. Both episodes of unrest were accompanied by increases of local microseismic activity, which affected the nothern sector of the island in 1985, and the southern one in 1988. Finally, a phase of appreciable areal contraction was detected in 1990, probably due to the effect of the cooling and crystallization of magma at relatively shallow depths, accompanying the increased thermal activity at the crater fumaroles. Regional tectonic stress seems to play an important role in the transition of the volcanic system from a phase of relative stability to a phase of apparent unrest, inducing the heating

  9. Activity patterns and time budgets of the declining sea otter population at Amchitka Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelatt, Thomas S.; Siniff, Donald B.; Estes, James A.

    2002-01-01

    Time budgets of predators may reflect population status if time spent foraging varies with local prey abun- dance. We assumed that the sea otter (Enhydra lutris) population at Amchitka Island, Alaska, USA, had been at equilibrium since the early 1960s and collected time budgets of otters to be used to represent future conditions of currently expanding sea otter populations. We used radiotelemetry to monitor activity-time budgets of otters from August 1992 to March 1994. Sea otter activity was directly linked to sex, age, weather condition, season, and time of day. Sea otters differed in percent time foraging among cohorts but not within cohorts. Percent time foraging ranged from 21% for females with very young (≤ 3weeks of age) dependent pups to 52% for females with old (≥10 weeks of age) pups. Otters foraged more and hauled out more as local sea conditions worsened. Adult males spent less time foraging during winter and spring, consistent with seasonal changes in prey selection. Time spent for- aging was similar to that reported for otters in California and an established population in Prince William Sound, Alaska, but greater than that of otters in recently established populations in Oregon and Alaska. Despite current evidence indicating that the population was in decline during our study, we were unable to recognize this change using time budgets. Our results illustrate the importance of stratifying analyses of activity patterns by age and sex cohorts and the complexity inherent in comparisons of behavioral data between different populations relying on distinct prey bases.

  10. Geology and tectonics of Japanese islands: A review - The key to understanding the geology of Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakita, Koji

    2013-08-01

    complexes in the Japanese Islands are of Permian, Jurassic and Cretaceous-Paleogene age. These accretionary complexes became altered locally to low-temperature and high-pressure metamorphic, or high-temperature and low-pressure metamorphic rocks. Medium-pressure metamorphic rocks are limited to the Unazuki and Higo belts. Major plutonism occurred in Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic time. Early Paleozoic Cambrian igneous activity is recorded as granites in the South Kitakami Belt. Late Paleozoic igneous activity is recognized in the Hida Belt. During Cretaceous to Paleogene time, extensive igneous activity occurred in Japan. The youngest granite in Japan is the Takidani Granite intruded at about 1-2 Ma. During Cenozoic time, the most important geologic events are back-arc opening and arc-arc collision. The major back-arc basins are the Sea of Japan and the Shikoku and Chishima basins. Arc-arc collision occurred between the Honshu and Izu-Bonin arcs, and the Honshu and Chishima arcs.

  11. Heat stress control in the TMI-2 (Three Mile Island Unit 2) defueling and decontamination activities

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, J.S.; Parfitt, B.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the initial stages of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) defueling and decontamination activities for the reactor building, it was realized that the high levels of loose radioactive contamination would require the use of extensive protective clothing by entry personnel. While there was no doubt that layered protective clothing protects workers from becoming contaminated, it was recognized that these same layers of clothing would impose a very significant heat stress burden. To prevent the potentially serious consequences of a severe reaction to heat stress by workers in the hostile environment of the TMI-2 reactor building and yet maintain the reasonable work productivity necessary to perform the recovery adequately, an effective program of controlling worker exposure to heat stress had to be developed. Body-cooling devices produce a flow of cool air, which is introduced close to the skin to remove body heat through convection and increased sweat evaporation. The cooling effect produced by the Vortex tube successfully protected the workers from heat stress, however, there were several logistical and operational problems that hindered extensive use of these devices. The last type of cooling garment examined was the frozen water garment (FWG) developed by Elizier Kamon at the Pennsylvania State University as part of an Electric Power Research Institute research grant. Personal protection, i.e., body cooling, engineering controls, and administrative controls, have been implemented successfully.

  12. Responses of brown bears to human activities at O'Malley River, Kodiak Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilker, Gregory A.; Barnes, Victor G.

    1998-01-01

    We classified levels of direct response of brown bears (Ursus arctos middendorffi) to aircraft, watercraft, and groups of people on the O'Malley River area of Kodiak Island, Alaska. General public use occurred on the area in 1991 and 1993, whereas structured bear viewing programs used the area in 1992 and 1994. Brown bears displayed high (running) or moderate (walking away) response on 18 (48%) occasions when fixed-wing aircraft flew over the animals <100 m above ground. Three of 4 helicopter flights <200 m overhead and 9 interactions with watercraft at ≤200 m distance also elicited strong response. Encounters between people and bears resulted in strong responses from bears more frequently (37%, n = 134) during years of general public use than in years of structured bear viewing (6%, n = 72, P < 0.0001). We suggest that higher levels of low or neutral response by bears to encounters with guided bear viewing groups was the result of consistent and predictable patterns of human activity.

  13. Ambient noise and temporal patterns of boat activity in the US Virgin Islands National Park.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Maxwell B; Mooney, T Aran

    2015-09-15

    Human activity is contributing increasing noise to marine ecosystems. Recent studies have examined the effects of boat noise on marine fishes, but there is limited understanding of the prevalence of this type of sound source. This investigation tracks vessel noise on three reefs in the US Virgin Islands National Park over four months in 2013. Ambient noise levels ranged from 106 to 129dBrms re 1μPa (100Hz-20kHz). Boat noise occurred in 6-12% of samples. In the presence of boat noise, ambient noise in a low-frequency band (100-1000Hz) increased by >7dB above baseline levels and sound levels were significantly higher. The frequency with the most acoustic energy shifted to a significantly lower frequency when boat noise was present during the day. These results indicate the abundance of boat noise and its overlap with reef organism sound production, raising concern for the communication abilities of these animals.

  14. Forest harvesting is associated with increased landslide activity during an extreme rainstorm on Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J. N.; Guthrie, R. H.; Brenning, A.

    2015-06-01

    Safe operations of forest practices in mountainous regions require effective development planning to mitigate hazards posed by landslides. British Columbia, Canada, has for the past 2 decades implemented landslide risk management policies aimed at reducing the impacts of the forestry industry on landslides. Consequently, it is required that timber harvesting sites be evaluated for their potential or existing impacts on terrain stability. Statistical landslide susceptibility modelling can enhance this evaluation by geographically highlighting potential hazardous areas. In addition, these statistical models can also improve our understanding of regional landslide controlling factors. The purpose of this research was to explore the regional effects of forest harvesting activities, topography, precipitation and geology on landslides initiated during an extreme rainfall event in November 2006 on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. These effects were analyzed with a nonparametric statistical method, the generalized additive model (GAM). Although topography was the strongest predictor of landslide initiation, low density forest interpreted as regrowth areas and proximity to forest service roads were jointly associated with a 6- to 9-fold increase in the odds of landslide initiation, while accounting for other environmental confounders. This result highlights the importance of continuing proper landslide risk management to control the effects of forest practices on landslide initiation.

  15. Forest harvesting is associated with increased landslide activity during an extreme rainstorm on Vancouver Island, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, J. N.; Guthrie, R. H.; Brenning, A.

    2014-08-01

    Safe operations of forest practices in mountainous regions require effective development planning to mitigate hazards posed by landslides. British Columbia, Canada, has for the past two decades implemented landslide risk management policies aimed at reducing the impacts of the forest industry on landslides; it is required that timber harvesting sites are evaluated for their potential or existing impacts on terrain stability. Statistical landslide susceptibility modelling can enhance this evaluation by geographically highlighting potential hazardous areas. In addition, these statistical models can also improve our understanding of regional landslide controlling factors. The purpose of this research was to explore the regional effects of forest harvesting activities, topography, precipitation and geology on landslides initiated during an extreme rainfall event in November 2006 on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. These effects were analysed with a nonparametric statistical method, the generalized additive model (GAM). Although topography was the strongest predictor of landslide initiation, low density forest interpreted as regrowth areas and proximity to forest service roads were jointly associated with a six- to nine-fold increase in the odds of landslide initiation, while accounting for other environmental cofounders. This result highlights the importance of continuing proper landslide risk management to control the effects of forest practices on landslide initiation.

  16. Investigation of the deep crustal structure and magmatic activity at the NW Hellenic Volcanic Arc with 3-D aeromagnetic inversion and seimotectonic analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, Angeliki; Tzanis, Andreas; Chailas, Stylianos; Stamatakis, Michael

    2013-04-01

    We report the results of a joint analysis of geophysical (aeromagnetic) and seismotectonic data, applied to the investigation of the deep structure, magmatic activity and geothermal potential of the north-western stretches of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). The HVA is usually considered to be a single arcuate entity stretching from Sousaki (near Corinth) at the NW, to Nisyros Island at the SE. However, different types of and their ages indicate the presence of two different volcanic groups. Our study focuses on the northern part of the west (older) volcanic group and includes the Crommyonian (Sousaki) volcanic field at the west end of Megaris peninsula (east margin on the contemporary Corinth Rift), the Aegina and Methana volcanic complex at the Saronic Gulf, where typical Quaternary calc-alkaline volcanics predominate, and the Argolid peninsula to the south and south-west. In addition to the rocks associated with Quaternary volcanism, the study area includes a series of Mesozoic ultramafic (ophiolitic) outcrops at the Megaris peninsula, to the north and north-east of the Crommyonian volcanic field, as well as throughout the Argolid. A major deep structural and tectonic feature of the study area, and one with profound influence on crustal deformation and the evolution of rapidly deforming extensional structures like the Corinth Rift and the Saronic Gulf, is the local geometry and dynamics of the African oceanic crust subducting beneath the Aegean plate. Locally, the subducting slab has a NNW strike and ENE plunge, with the dip angle changing rapidly (steepening) approx. beneath the Argolid. The aeromagnetic data was extracted from the recently (re)compiled aeromagnetic map of Greece (Chailas et al, 2010) and was inverted with the UBC-GIF magnetic inversion suite (Li and Oldenburg, 1996). The inversion included rigorous geological constraints introduced by means of numerous in-situ magnetic susceptibility measurements. The inversion has imaged several isolated

  17. Detailed bathymetry and magnetic anomaly inthe Central Ryukyu Arc, Japan: implications for a westward shift of the volcanic front after ~2.1 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Oda, H.; Ishizuka, O.; Arai, K.

    2014-12-01

    Detailed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies in the southern part of the Central Ryukyu Arc reveal recent volcanic structures in a southwestward extension of the active volcanic front of the Ryukyu Arc. A line of bathymetric highs running subparallel to this recent volcanic front was observed ~20 km to the east. A set of small, sharply defined magnetic anomalies extends southward from this line of bathymetric highs to the islands Kume-jima and Aguni-jima, suggesting the former existence of an ancient volcanic front. The ages of volcanic rocks from these islands indicate that magmatic activity along the ancient volcanic front continued until at least ~2.1 Ma. The presence of magnetic anomalies between the two volcanic fronts suggests that the volcanic front has moved gradually westward. This shift can be explained by the termination of asthenospheric upwelling and/or the rapid retreat of the Ryukyu Trench after its change in subduction direction.

  18. Detailed bathymetry and magnetic anomaly in the Central Ryukyu Arc, Japan: implications for a westward shift of the volcanic front after approximately 2.1 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Taichi; Oda, Hirokuni; Ishizuka, Osamu; Arai, Kohsaku

    2014-12-01

    Detailed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies in the southern part of the Central Ryukyu Arc reveal recent volcanic structures in a southwestward extension of the active volcanic front of the Ryukyu Arc. A line of bathymetric highs running subparallel to this recent volcanic front was observed approximately 20 km to the east. A set of small, sharply defined magnetic anomalies extends southward from this line of bathymetric highs to the islands Kume-jima and Aguni-jima, suggesting the former existence of an ancient volcanic front. The ages of volcanic rocks from these islands indicate that magmatic activity along the ancient volcanic front continued until at least approximately 2.1 Ma. The presence of magnetic anomalies between the two volcanic fronts suggests that the volcanic front has moved gradually westward. This shift can be explained by the termination of asthenospheric upwelling and/or the rapid retreat of the Ryukyu Trench after its change in subduction direction.

  19. Quantitative Flow Morphology, Recent Volcanic Evolution and Future Activity of the Kameni Islands, Santorini, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J. R.; Pyle, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    The fundamental importance of careful field investigation, and the long term value of detailed published volcanic eruption reports, means that much can be learned about eruption processes even many decades after an eruption has ceased. We illustrate this with reference to the young dacite lava flows of the Kameni islands, Santorini. We have created a new, high resolution digital elevation model (DEM) for the intra-caldera Kameni islands, Santorini, based on new data from a recent airborne laser-ranging (LiDAR) and aerial photography mission. This DEM reveals a wealth of surface morphological information on the dacite lava flows that comprise the Kameni islands. When combined with a re-analysis of contemporary eruption accounts, these data yield important insights into the physical properties and flow behaviour of dacite magma during slow effusive eruptions. Kameni island lava flows exhibit the classic surface morphologies associated with viscous aa: levees, and compression folds. Levee heights and flow widths are consistent with a Bingham rheology, and lava yield strengths of (3 to 7)× 104 Pa. Analysis of the shapes of flow edges confirms that the blocky aa dacite lava flows show a scale-invariant morphology with a typical fractal dimension that is indistinguishable from Hawaiian aa. Dome-growth rates during eruptions of the Kameni islands in 1866 and 1939 are consistent with a model of slow inflation of a dome with a strong crust. Lava domes on the Kameni islands have a crustal yield strength (4×107 Pa) that is lower by a factor of 2 to 4 than the domes at Pinatubo and Mount St Helens. The dome height model, combined with the apparent time-predictable nature of volcanic eruptions of the Kameni islands, allows us to predict that the next eruption of the Kameni islands will last for > 2.6 years (in 2005) and will involve formation of a dome ca. 115 to 123 m high.

  20. Rethinking Recycling in Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.; Behn, M. D.; Jagoutz, O.

    2012-12-01

    Hacker et al EPSL 2011 and Behn et al Nature Geosci 2011 investigated pathways for return of buoyant, subducted material to arc crust. These include (1) diapirs rising into the hot mantle wedge, with extensive melts adding a component to arc magmas, (2) flow of material back up a relatively cold "subduction channel", adding solids to the lower crust and small-degree partial melts to the upper crust, (3) flow from the forearc along the base of arc crust, and (4) imbrication of forearc material into arc crust. These processes add felsic, incompatible-element-rich components to arc crust. The flux of incompatible elements such as Th in arc lavas, thought to be mainly recycled from subducted sediments, is > sediment subduction flux. There are large uncertainties: arc crustal growth rates are imprecise; young, primitive arc lavas may not be representative of magmatic flux into arc crust; sediment subduction flux may have varied. Nevertheless, this result is found for all arcs examined, using recently published growth rates. Perhaps arc growth rates that include subduction erosion are systematically overestimated. Instead or in addition, maybe significant Th comes from material other than sediments. Here, we consider the implications of pathways 1-4 for arc growth rates and incompatible element enrichment, in the context of subduction erosion and arc-arc collision. Subducting arc lithologies can become separated, with only felsic components returned to arc crust. Buoyant lithologies are mobile in viscous instabilities at > 700-800°C. Whereas thin layers such as sediments may become mobile all at once, instabilities may periodically strip the hottest parts from the top of thick buoyant layers, replacing them with hot mantle. In arc-arc collision, the top of a subducting plate starts at about 0°C on the seafloor, so heating is slow. In subduction erosion, forearc material in the subducting package can be > 200°C before erosion so buoyant lithologies reach 700-800

  1. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  2. Submarine Arc Volcanism in the Southern Mariana Arc: Results of Recent ROV studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, A. R.; Tamura, Y.; Stern, R. J.; Embley, R. W.; Hein, J. R.; Jordan, E.; Ribeiro, J. M.; Sica, N.; Kohut, E. J.; Whattam, S. A.; Hirahara, Y.; Senda, R.; Nunokawa, A.

    2009-12-01

    The submarine Diamante cross-arc volcanoes (~16°N) and the Sarigan-Zealandia Bank Multi-Volcano Complex (SZBMVC; ~16°45’N), north and south, respectively, of Anatahan Island in the southern Mariana Arc, were studied during several dives in June 2009 using the ROV Hyper-Dolphin, cruise NT09-08 (R/V Natsushima); neither has been studied in detail before. The data collected provide a new perspective on how the subduction factory operates to complement previous studies on other cross-arc volcanic chains in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana Arc. The Diamante complex consists of three major edifices, two cones (West and Central Diamante) and a more complex caldera-like edifice at the volcanic front (East Diamante). West and Central Diamante are basaltic volcanoes but East Diamante has a more complex history. Our studies indicate initial construction of a basaltic volcano. Magmatic evolution led to a violent caldera-forming and quieter dome-building events. Post-caldera quiescence allowed a carbonate platform to grow, now preserved on the eastern caldera wall. Felsic magma or hot rock provides a heat source for an active hydrothermal field associated with felsic domes in the caldera, which NOAA investigators discovered in 2004. A new type of hydrothermal deposit was discovered in the hydrothermal field, consisting of large sulfide-sulfate mounds topped by bulbous constructions of low-temperature Fe and Mn oxides. Vents on the mounds were observed to emit shimmering water. The SZBMVC consists of six closely spaced edifices whose loci are aligned along two parallel trends, one along the volcanic front (Zealandia Bank, Sarigan and South Sarigan), and one about 15 km west towards the rear-arc (Northwest Zealandia, West Zealandia and West Sarigan). Zealandia Bank dives revealed that, as with East Diamante, initial activity was basaltic and became more evolved with time. The western half of Zealandia Bank is dominated by felsic lavas centered on a small (~2 km diameter) caldera and

  3. Back-arc with frontal-arc component origin of Triassic Karmutsen basalt, British Columbia, Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, F.; Sutherland, Brown A.; Budahn, J.R.; Plafker, G.

    1989-01-01

    The largely basaltic, ???4.5-6.2-km-thick, Middle to Upper Triassic Karmutsen Formation is a prominent part of the Wrangellian sequence. Twelve analyses of major and minor elements of representative samples of pillowed and massive basalt flows and sills from Queen Charlotte and Vancouver Islands are ferrotholeiites that show a range of 10.2-3.8% MgO (as normalized, H2O- and CO2-free) and related increases in TiO2 (1.0-2.5%), Zr (43-147 ppm) and Nb (5-16 ppm). Other elemental abundances are not related simply to MgO: distinct groupings are evident in Al2O3, Na2O and Cr, but considerable scatter is present in FeO* (FeO + 0.9Fe2O3) and CaO. Some of the variation is attributed to alteration during low-rank metamorphism or by seawater - including variation of Ba, Rb, Sr and Cu, but high-field-strength elements (Sc, Ti, Y, Zr and Nb) as well as Cr, Ni, Cu and rare-earth elements (REE's) were relatively immobile. REE's show chondrite-normalized patterns ranging from light-REE depleted to moderately light-REE enriched. On eleven discriminant plots these analyses fall largely into or across fields of within-plate basalt (WIP), normal or enriched mid-ocean-ridge tholeiite (MORB) and island-arc tholeiite (IAT). Karmutsen basalts are chemically identical to the stratigraphically equivalent Nikolai Greenstone of southern Alaska and Yukon Territory. These data and the fact that the Karmutsen rests on Sicker Group island-arc rocks of Paleozoic age suggest to us that: 1. (1) the basal arc, after minor carbonate-shale deposition, underwent near-axial back-arc rifting (as, e.g., the Mariana arc rifted at different times); 2. (2) the Karmutsen basalts were erupted along this rift or basin as "arc-rift" tholeiitite; and 3. (3) after subsequent deposition of carbonates and other rocks, and Jurassic magmatism, a large fragment of this basalt-sediment-covered island arc was accreted to North America as Wrangellia. The major- and minor-elemental abundances of Karmutsen basalt is modeled

  4. The geomorphology of the Chandeleur Island Wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Debusschere, K.; Penland, S.; Westphal, K. ); Handley, L. ); Michot, T. ); Reed, D.; Seal, R.

    1990-09-01

    The Chandeleur Islands represent the largest and oldest transgressive barrier island arc in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Generated by the transgressive submergence of the St. Bernard delta complex, the Chandeleur Islands form the protective geologic framework for one of the richest areas of salt marsh and seagrass flats in Louisiana. The Chandeleur barrier island arc is 60 km long and consists of five individual islands backed by a linear, multiple bar system enclosing a shallow basin floored by extensive seagrass flats. The northern part of the Chandeleur chain is the highest in relief, elevation, width, and habitat diversity. Nonstorm morphology is predominantly a combination of continuous dunes and dune terraces. Numerous washover channels and large washover fans extend into the backbarrier environment. Further south, the island width decreases and washover flats and terraces dominate the shoreline morphology In the southernmost section, the island arc is fragmented into a series of small islands and shoals separated by tidal inlets. Between 1984 and 1989, aerial videotape, aerial photographic, and bathymetric surveys were used to map and monitor the geomorphic changes occurring along the shoreline and in backbarrier areas. The aerial videotape mapping surveys focused on the impacts of hurricanes Danny, Elena, and Juan on the geomorphology of the islands. Videotape imagery was acquired in July 1984 and in July (prestorm), August (post-Danny), September (post-Elena), and November (post-Juan) 1985. A coastal geomorphic classification was developed to map the spatial and temporal landscape changes between surveys.

  5. Warm storage for arc magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboni, Mélanie; Boehnke, Patrick; Schmitt, Axel K.; Harrison, T. Mark; Shane, Phil; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas

    2016-12-01

    Felsic magmatic systems represent the vast majority of volcanic activity that poses a threat to human life. The tempo and magnitude of these eruptions depends on the physical conditions under which magmas are retained within the crust. Recently the case has been made that volcanic reservoirs are rarely molten and only capable of eruption for durations as brief as 1,000 years following magma recharge. If the “cold storage” model is generally applicable, then geophysical detection of melt beneath volcanoes is likely a sign of imminent eruption. However, some arc volcanic centers have been active for tens of thousands of years and show evidence for the continual presence of melt. To address this seeming paradox, zircon geochronology and geochemistry from both the frozen lava and the cogenetic enclaves they host from the Soufrière Volcanic Center (SVC), a long-lived volcanic complex in the Lesser Antilles arc, were integrated to track the preeruptive thermal and chemical history of the magma reservoir. Our results show that the SVC reservoir was likely eruptible for periods of several tens of thousands of years or more with punctuated eruptions during these periods. These conclusions are consistent with results from other arc volcanic reservoirs and suggest that arc magmas are generally stored warm. Thus, the presence of intracrustal melt alone is insufficient as an indicator of imminent eruption, but instead represents the normal state of magma storage underneath dormant volcanoes.

  6. Warm storage for arc magmas.

    PubMed

    Barboni, Mélanie; Boehnke, Patrick; Schmitt, Axel K; Harrison, T Mark; Shane, Phil; Bouvier, Anne-Sophie; Baumgartner, Lukas

    2016-12-06

    Felsic magmatic systems represent the vast majority of volcanic activity that poses a threat to human life. The tempo and magnitude of these eruptions depends on the physical conditions under which magmas are retained within the crust. Recently the case has been made that volcanic reservoirs are rarely molten and only capable of eruption for durations as brief as 1,000 years following magma recharge. If the "cold storage" model is generally applicable, then geophysical detection of melt beneath volcanoes is likely a sign of imminent eruption. However, some arc volcanic centers have been active for tens of thousands of years and show evidence for the continual presence of melt. To address this seeming paradox, zircon geochronology and geochemistry from both the frozen lava and the cogenetic enclaves they host from the Soufrière Volcanic Center (SVC), a long-lived volcanic complex in the Lesser Antilles arc, were integrated to track the preeruptive thermal and chemical history of the magma reservoir. Our results show that the SVC reservoir was likely eruptible for periods of several tens of thousands of years or more with punctuated eruptions during these periods. These conclusions are consistent with results from other arc volcanic reservoirs and suggest that arc magmas are generally stored warm. Thus, the presence of intracrustal melt alone is insufficient as an indicator of imminent eruption, but instead represents the normal state of magma storage underneath dormant volcanoes.

  7. Embedded ARM System for Volcano Monitoring in Remote Areas: Application to the Active Volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica)

    PubMed Central

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis. PMID:24451461

  8. Embedded ARM system for volcano monitoring in remote areas: application to the active volcano on Deception Island (Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Peci, Luis Miguel; Berrocoso, Manuel; Fernández-Ros, Alberto; García, Alicia; Marrero, José Manuel; Ortiz, Ramón

    2014-01-02

    This paper describes the development of a multi-parameter system for monitoring volcanic activity. The system permits the remote access and the connection of several modules in a network. An embedded ARM™ processor has been used, allowing a great flexibility in hardware configuration. The use of a complete Linux solution (Debian™) as Operating System permits a quick, easy application development to control sensors and communications. This provides all the capabilities required and great stability with relatively low energy consumption. The cost of the components and applications development is low since they are widely used in different fields. Sensors and commercial modules have been combined with other self-developed modules. The Modular Volcano Monitoring System (MVMS) described has been deployed on the active Deception Island (Antarctica) volcano, within the Spanish Antarctic Program, and has proved successful for monitoring the volcano, with proven reliability and efficient operation under extreme conditions. In another context, i.e., the recent volcanic activity on El Hierro Island (Canary Islands) in 2011, this technology has been used for the seismic equipment and GPS systems deployed, thus showing its efficiency in the monitoring of a volcanic crisis.

  9. Steady rotation of the Cascade arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Ray E.; McCaffrey, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Displacement of the Miocene Cascade volcanic arc (northwestern North America) from the active arc is in the same sense and at nearly the same rate as the present clockwise block motions calculated from GPS velocities in a North American reference frame. Migration of the ancestral arc over the past 16 m.y. can be explained by clockwise rotation of upper-plate blocks at 1.0°/m.y. over a linear melting source moving westward 1–4.5 km/m.y. due to slab rollback. Block motion and slab rollback are in opposite directions in the northern arc, but both are westerly in the southern extensional arc, where rollback may be enhanced by proximity to the edge of the Juan de Fuca slab. Similarities between post–16 Ma arc migration, paleomagnetic rotation, and modern GPS block motions indicate that the secular block motions from decadal GPS can be used to calculate long-term strain rates and earthquake hazards. Northwest-directed Basin and Range extension of 140 km is predicted behind the southern arc since 16 Ma, and 70 km of shortening is predicted in the northern arc. The GPS rotation poles overlie a high-velocity slab of the Siletzia terrane dangling into the mantle beneath Idaho (United States), which may provide an anchor for the rotations.

  10. Long arc stabilities with various arc gas flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, K.; Takeda, K.; Sugimoto, M.; Noguchi, Y.

    2014-11-01

    A new arc torch for use in magnetically driven arc device was developed with a commercially available TIG welding arc torch. The torch has a water-cooling system to the torch nozzle and has a nozzle nut to supply a swirling-free plasma gas flow. Its endurance against arc thermal load is examined. Features of its generated arc are investigated.

  11. Crustal thickening drives arc front migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Lee, Cin-Ty; Manga, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The location of volcanic arcs, relative to the trench evolves over time. Arc front migration has been observed in relic (Sierra Nevada, Andes) as well as active (Cascades) arcs, sometimes with cycles of retreat and return of the front towards the trench over millions of years. Other arcs, particularly where back-arc extension dominates, migrate more slowly, if at all. Coupled with arc migration there are systematic changes in the geochemistry of magmas such as the ratio of trace elements La/Yb and 87Sr/86Sr isotopes (e.g., Haschke et al., 2002). The position of active volcanic arcs relative to the trench is controlled by the location where melt is generated in the mantle wedge, in turn controlled by the geometry of subduction, and the processes that focus rising melt. Arc front migration is commonly attributed to variation in dip angle of the downgoing slab, delamination of overthickened crust, or to subduction erosion. Here we present an alternative hypothesis. Assuming mantle wedge melting is a largely temperature-dependant process, the maximum isotherm in the wedge sets arc front location. Isotherm location depends on slab angle, subduction velocity and wedge thermal diffusivity (England and Katz, 2010). It also depends on crustal thickness, which evolves as melt is transferred from the wedge to the crust. Arc front migration can thus occur purely through magmatic thickening of crust and lithosphere. Thickening rate is determined by the mantle melt flux into the crust, modulated by tectonics and surface erosion. It is not steady in time, as crustal thickening progressively truncates the mantle melt column and eventually shuts it off. Thus slab angle need not change, and in the absence of other contribution processes front location and crustal thickness have long-time steady state values. We develop a quantitative model for arc front migration that is consistent with published arc front data, and explains why arc fronts do not move when there is extension, such

  12. Tectonic evolution of Late Cenozoic arc-continent collision in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.S. )

    1990-06-01

    The island of Taiwan is an active orogen formed by the collision between the Luzon arc and the Asian continent. The kinematic progression of the arc-continent collision can be reconstructed by superimposing the restored paleopositions of Luzon arc upon the precollisional Asian continental margin. The geological history of the collision can be interpreted from the rock records of the mountain ranges of Taiwan. By incorporating geological information into plate kinematics, the collision can be attributed to the northwesterly impingement of the Luzon arc upon the continental margin in the last 12 million years. During the initial stage of the collision, some of the continental materials might have been metamorphosed in the deep subduction zone, but no distinct effects can be perceived in the sedimentary record. In the Mio-Pliocene time (about 5 Ma), the accretionary wedge grew large enough to become a sediment source for the Luzon forearc basin and to induce foreland subsidence on the continental margin. In the early late Pliocene (about 3 Ma), drastic collision caused rapid uplift of the collision orogen that shed voluminous orogenic sediments into the forearc and foreland basins. Continued collision progressively accreted the forearc and foreland basins to the collision orogen from north to south to the present configuration.

  13. The generation of high Sr/Y plutons following Late Jurassic arc-arc collision, Blue Mountains province, NE Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Joshua J.; Johnson, Kenneth; Miranda, Elena A.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2011-09-01

    High Sr/Y plutons (Sr/Y > 40) occupy large areas in ancient and modern orogenic belts, yet considerable controversy exists regarding mechanisms of their generation, the tectonic settings in which they form, and their relationship to contractional deformation through time. In the Blue Mountains province (NE Oregon), a suite of Late Jurassic (148-145 Ma), high Sr/Y plutons intrude Middle Jurassic (162-157 Ma), low Sr/Y (< 40) arc-related lavas and plutons in the Dixie Butte area immediately after widespread Late Jurassic arc-arc collision (159-154 Ma). Early, pre- to syn-kinematic low Sr/Y lavas and plutons (162-157 Ma) have flat to slightly enriched light rare earth element (REE) abundances, low Sr (< 400 ppm) and Sr/Y values (< 40), and strongly positive initial epsilon Hf values (+ 10.1 to + 12.3: 2σ weighted average). Ce/Y values from basalts and gabbros yield a maximum crustal thickness of ~ 23 km. These geochemical and isotopic features suggest derivation from a depleted-mantle source and/or shallow-level (≪ 40 km) melting of pre-existing island arc crust with little to no evolved crustal input. In contrast, post-kinematic high Sr/Y plutons (148-145 Ma) are more compositionally restricted (tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite) and display depleted heavy REE abundances, an absence of Eu anomalies, elevated Sr (> 600 ppm) and Sr/Y values (> 40), and positive initial epsilon Hf values (+ 10.5 to + 7.8: 2σ weighted average). These geochemical and isotopic results are consistent with geochemical models suggesting derivation from partial melting of island arc crust in the presence of a plagioclase-poor to absent, clinopyroxene + hornblende + garnet-bearing source (depths > 35-40 km). We propose that the transition from low Sr/Y to high Sr/Y magmatism resulted from orogenic thickening of island arc crust in the Dixie Butte area during Late Jurassic arc-arc collision between the Olds Ferry and Wallowa island arcs at 159-154 Ma. This fundamental change in crustal

  14. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  15. The volcanoes of an oceanic arc from origin to destruction: A case from the northern Luzon Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yu-Ming; Song, Sheng-Rong

    2013-09-01

    Volcanoes were created, grew, uplifted, became dormant or extinct, and were accreted as part of continents during continuous arc-continent collision. Volcanic rocks in Eastern Taiwan's Coastal Range (CR) are part of the northern Luzon Arc, an oceanic island arc produced by the subduction of the South China Sea Plate beneath the Philippine Sea Plate. Igneous rocks are characterized by intrusive bodies, lava and pyroclastic flows, and volcaniclastic rocks with minor tephra deposits. Based on volcanic facies associations, Sr-Nd isotopic geochemistry, and the geography of the region, four volcanoes were identified in the CR: Yuemei, Chimei, Chengkuangao, and Tuluanshan. Near-vent facies associations show different degrees of erosion in the volcanic edifices for Chimei, Chengkuangao, and Tuluanshan. Yuemei lacks near-vent rocks, implying that Yuemei's main volcanic body may have been subducted at the Ryukyu Trench with the northward motion of the Philippine Sea Plate. These data suggest a hypothesis for the evolution of volcanism and geomorphology during arc growth and ensuing arc-continent collision in the northern Luzon Arc, which suggests that these volcanoes were formed from the seafloor, emerging as islands during arc volcanism. They then became dormant or extinct during collision, and finally, were uplifted and accreted by additional collision. The oldest volcano, Yuemei, may have already been subducted into the Ryukyu Trench.

  16. Arc - arc collisional tectonics within the Central Mobile Belt of the Newfoundland Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorevski, A.; Rogers, N.; van Staal, C. R.; McNicoll, V. J.; Valverde-Vaquero, P.

    2007-12-01

    The Central Mobile Belt of Newfoundland Appalachians records the Ordovician arc - arc collision between the peri-Laurentian Red Indian Lake Arc of the Annieopsquotch accretionary tract (c. 480-460 Ma), and the peri- Gondwanan Victoria - Popelogan Arc (c. 473-453 Ma), which marks the closure of the Cambro-Ordovician Iapetus Ocean. Although the arc systems are in part coeval, they are distinguishable by the preservation of distinct structural histories and stratigraphies, unique basement characteristics as demonstrated by lead isotopic values of volcanic massive sulphide deposits and faunal differences. A modern analogue of such an arc - arc collision is observed in the Molucca and Solomon seas of the southwest Pacific. From such modern analogues it is evident that the Victoria - Popelogan Arc occupied a lower-plate setting during collision. This tectonic setting is demonstrated by subsidence of the Victoria - Popelogan Arc similar to the collision induced subsidence that is developed on the Australian active margin and Halmahera arcs of the Southwest Pacific. The timing of Victoria - Popelogan Arc subsidence is constrained by three age dates that form the last vestiges of arc volcanism (457 ± 2; 456.8 ± 3.1; 457 ± 3.6 Ma). These volcanic rocks are immediately overlain by Caradocian black shale of the Point Leamington Formation that marks the base of the Badger Group and the initiation of a successor basin. Caradocian black shale is noticeably absent from the top of the Red Indian Lake Arc with this time interval instead represented by a sub-Silurian unconformity, formed in response to collisional uplift. Emergence of the peri- Laurentian margin is demonstrated by detritus from it preserved in the Badger Group, which as it stratigraphically overlies the peri-Gondwanan Victoria - Popelogan Arc, requires that Iapetus was closed by this time. Following this collision, subduction stepped back into the outboard Tetagouche - Exploits back-arc basin. Whereas correlative

  17. Methanotrophic activity and bacterial diversity in volcanic-geothermal soils at Pantelleria island (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, A. L.; D'Alessandro, W.; Tagliavia, M.; Parello, F.; Quatrini, P.

    2014-04-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic/geothermal soils are source of methane, but also sites of methanotrophic activity. Methanotrophs are able to consume 10-40 Tg of CH4 a-1 and to trap more than 50% of the methane degassing through the soils. We report on methane microbial oxidation in the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria island (Italy), Favara Grande, whose total methane emission was previously estimated in about 2.5 t a-1. Laboratory incubation experiments with three top-soil samples from Favara Grande indicated methane consumption values up to 950 ng g-1 dry soil h-1. One of the three sites, FAV2, where the highest oxidation rate was detected, was further analysed on a vertical soil profile and the maximum methane consumption was measured in the top-soil layer but values > 100 ng g-1 h-1 were maintained up to a depth of 15 cm. The highest consumption rate was measured at 37 °C, but a still recognizable consumption at 80 °C (> 20 ng g-1 h-1) was recorded. In order to estimate the bacterial diversity, total soil DNA was extracted from Favara Grande and analysed using a Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis (TTGE) analysis of the amplified bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The three soil samples were probed by PCR using standard proteobacterial primers and newly designed verrucomicrobial primers targeting the unique methane monooxygenase gene pmoA; the presence of methanotrophs was detected in sites FAV2 and FAV3, but not in FAV1, where harsher chemical-physical conditions and negligible methane oxidation were detected. The pmoA gene libraries from the most active site FAV2 pointed out a high diversity of gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs distantly related to Methylococcus/Methylothermus genera and the presence of the newly discovered acido-thermophilic methanotrophs

  18. Postcaldera volcanism and hydrothermal activity revealed by autonomous underwater vehicle surveys in Myojin Knoll caldera, Izu-Ogasawara arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honsho, Chie; Ura, Tamaki; Kim, Kangsoo; Asada, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Myojin Knoll caldera, one of the submarine silicic calderas lying on the volcanic front of the northern Izu-Ogasawara arc, has attracted increasing attention since the discovery of a large hydrothermal field called the Sunrise deposit. Although numerous submersible surveys have been conducted in Myojin Knoll caldera, they have not sufficiently explored areas to produce a complete picture of the caldera and understand the origin of the Sunrise deposit. We conducted comprehensive deep-sea surveys using an autonomous underwater vehicle and obtained high-resolution bathymetric and magnetic data and sonar images from ~70% of the caldera. The detailed bathymetric map revealed that faulting and magma eruptions, possibly associated with an inflation-deflation cycle of the magma reservoir during postcaldera volcanism, had generally occurred in the caldera wall. The main dome of the central cone was covered with lava flows and exhibits exogenous growth, which is unusual for rhyolitic domes. The magnetization distribution in the central cone indicates preferential magma intrusion along a NW-SE direction. It is presumed that magma migrated along this direction and formed a rhyolite dome at the foot of the southeastern caldera wall, where the Sunrise deposit occurs. The Sunrise deposit is composed mainly of three ridges extending in slope directions and covers ~400 × ~400 m. Magnetization reduction in the deposit area is small, indicating that the alteration zone beneath the Sunrise deposit is slanting rather than vertical. It is presumed that several slanting and near-vertical volcanic vents serve as pathways of hydrothermal fluid in Myojin Knoll caldera.

  19. Active layer thermal monitoring at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Roberto; Schaefer, Carlos; Simas, Felipe; Pregesbauer, Michael; Bockheim, James

    2013-04-01

    International attention on the climate change phenomena has grown in the last decade, intense modelling of climate scenarios were carried out by scientific investigations searching the sources and trends of these changes. The cryosphere and its energy flux became the focus of many investigations, being recognised as a key element for the understanding of future trends. The active layer and permafrost are key components of the terrestrial cryosphere due to their role in energy flux regulation and high sensitivity to climate change (Kane et al., 2001; Smith and Brown, 2009). Compared with other regions of the globe, our understanding of Antarctic permafrost is poor, especially in relation to its thermal state and evolution, its physical properties, links to pedogenesis, hydrology, geomorphic dynamics and response to global change (Bockheim, 1995, Bockheim et al., 2008). The active layer monitoring site was installed in the summer of 2008, and consist of thermistors (accuracy ± 0.2 °C) arranged in a vertical array (Turbic Eutric Cryosol 600 m asl, 10.5 cm, 32.5 cm, 67.5 cm and 83.5 cm). King George Island experiences a cold moist maritime climate characterized by mean annual air temperatures of -2°C and mean summer air temperatures above 0°C for up to four months (Rakusa-Suszczewski et al., 1993, Wen et al., 1994). Ferron et al., (2004) found great variability when analysing data from 1947 to1995 and identified cycles of 5.3 years of colder conditions followed by 9.6 years of warmer conditions. All probes were connected to a Campbell Scientific CR 1000 data logger recording data at hourly intervals from March 1st 2008 until November 30th 2012. Meteorological data for Fildes was obtained from the near by stations. We calculated the thawing days, freezing days; thawing degree days and freezing degree days; all according to Guglielmin et al. (2008). The active lawyer thickness was calculated as the 0 °C depth by extrapolating the thermal gradient from the two

  20. Methamphetamine-induced stereotypy correlates negatively with patch-enhanced prodynorphin and arc mRNA expression in the rat caudate putamen: the role of mu opioid receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Horner, Kristen A; Noble, Erika S; Gilbert, Yamiece E

    2010-06-01

    Amphetamines induce stereotypy, which correlates with patch-enhanced c-Fos expression the patch compartment of caudate putamen (CPu). Methamphetamine (METH) treatment also induces patch-enhanced expression of prodynorphin (PD), arc and zif/268 in the CPu. Whether patch-enhanced activation of any of these genes correlates with METH-induced stereotypy is unknown, and the factors that contribute to this pattern of expression are poorly understood. Activation of mu opioid receptors, which are expressed by the neurons of the patch compartment, may underlie METH-induced patch-enhanced gene expression and stereotypy. The current study examined whether striatal mu opioid receptor blockade altered METH-induced stereotypy and patch-enhanced gene expression, and if there was a correlation between the two responses. Animals were intrastriatally infused with the mu antagonist CTAP (10 microg/microl), treated with METH (7.5 mg/kg, s.c.), placed in activity chambers for 3h, and then sacrificed. CTAP pretreatment attenuated METH-induced increases in PD, arc and zif/268 mRNA expression and significantly reduced METH-induced stereotypy. Patch-enhanced PD and arc mRNA expression in the dorsolateral CPu correlated negatively with METH-induced stereotypy. These data indicate that mu opioid receptor activation contributes to METH-induced gene expression in the CPu and stereotypy, and that patch-enhanced PD and arc expression may be a homeostatic response to METH treatment.

  1. Monitoring the evolution of Deception Island volcano from magnetic anomaly data (South Shetland Islands, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, Manuel; Martos, Yasmina M.; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Funaki, Minoru

    2014-12-01

    Deception Island is a young and active volcano located in the south-western part of Bransfield back-arc basin. During the last twenty years the Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy has carried out geophysical surveys in the area. In addition, an unmanned aerial vehicle flight was conducted in 2011 at 800 m height on the northern half of Deception Island. Analysing and comparing magnetic grids obtained in different periods and tie point readings allow us to detect temporal changes and isolate signals of volcanic origin. Magnetic survey cruises performed in Deception Island's inner bay (1988, 1999 and 2008), and the study of its outer area's magnetic anomaly changes, point to a period of high variations concentrated between December 1989 and December 1999 that may be related to the two main recent periods of seismic activity (1992 and January 1999). From December 1999 to December 2008, there were no significant changes in seismic activity; nevertheless, our data show some magnetic alterations, which might signal the slow progress of a volcanic environment towards equilibrium. Interpreting these magnetic changes called for the construction of several forward models. Additionally, we put forth this kind of study as a suitable, economical and easy method for monitoring an active volcanic system whenever it is possible to measure the magnetic field with accurate positioning, and if the external field components are removed correctly.

  2. Back to Treasure Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shriki, Atara

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the Treasure Island problem and some inquiry activities derived from the problem. Trying to find where pirates buried a treasure leads to a surprising answer, multiple solutions, and a discussion of problem solving. The Treasure Island problem is an example of an inquiry activity that can be implemented in…

  3. Domain Analysis of ArcS, the Hybrid Sensor Kinase of the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Arc Two-Component System, Reveals Functional Differentiation of Its Two Receiver Domains

    PubMed Central

    Bubendorfer, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    In all species of the genus Shewanella, the redox-sensing Arc two-component system consists of the response regulator ArcA, the sensor kinase ArcS, and the separate phosphotransfer protein HptA. Compared to its counterpart ArcB in Escherichia coli, ArcS has a significantly different domain structure. Resequencing and reannotation revealed that in the N-terminal part, ArcS possesses a periplasmic CaChe-sensing domain bracketed by two transmembrane domains and, moreover, that ArcS has two cytoplasmic PAS-sensing domains and two receiver domains, compared to a single one of each in ArcB. Here, we used a combination of in vitro phosphotransfer studies on purified proteins and phenotypic in vivo mutant analysis to determine the roles of the different domains in ArcS function. The analysis revealed that phosphotransfer occurs from and toward the response regulator ArcA and involves mainly the C-terminal RecII domain. However, RecI also can receive a phosphate from HptA. In addition, the PAS-II domain, located upstream of the histidine kinase domain, is crucial for function. The results support a model in which phosphorylation of RecI stimulates histidine kinase activity of ArcS in order to maintain an appropriate level of phosphorylated ArcA according to environmental conditions. In addition, the study reveals some fundamental mechanistic differences between ArcS/HptA and ArcB with respect to signal perception and phosphotransfer despite functional conservation of the Arc system in Shewanella and E. coli. PMID:23161031

  4. NAc Shell Arc/Arg3.1 Protein Mediates Reconsolidation of Morphine CPP by Increased GluR1 Cell Surface Expression: Activation of ERK-Coupled CREB is Required

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiu-Fang; Sun, Lin-Lin; Han, Ji-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Relapse into drug abuse evoked by reexposure to the drug-associated context has been a primary problem in the treatment of drug addiction. Disrupting the reconsolidation of drug-related context memory would therefore limit the relapse susceptibility. Methods: Morphine conditioned place preference (CPP) was used to assess activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1) and correlative molecule expression in the Nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell during the reconsolidation of morphine CPP. U0126 and Arc/Arg3.1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide were adapted to evaluate the role and the underlying mechanism of Arc/Arg3.1 during the reconsolidation. Results: The retrieval of morphine CPP in rats specifically increased the Arc/Arg3.1 protein level in the NAc shell, accompanied simultaneously by increases in the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (pERK1/2), the phosphorylation of Cyclic Adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element-binding (pCREB), and the up-regulation of the membrane α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptors GluR1 subunit level. Intra-NAc shell infusion U0126, an inhibitor of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), prevented the retrieval-induced up-regulation of pERK1/2, pCREB, Arc/Arg3.1, and membrane GluR1 immediately after retrieval of morphine CPP. The effect of disrupting the reconsolidation of morphine CPP by U0126 could last for at least 14 days, and could not be evoked by a priming injection of morphine. Furthermore, the specific knockdown of Arc/Arg3.1 in the NAc shell decreased the membrane GluR1 level, and impaired both the reconsolidation and the reinstatement of morphine CPP. Conclusions: Arc/Arg3.1 in the NAc shell mediates the reconsolidation of morphine-associated context memory via up-regulating the level of membrane of GluR1, for which the local activation of the ERK-CREB signal pathway, as an upstream mechanism of Arc/Arg3.1, is required. PMID