Science.gov

Sample records for active l-band system

  1. A Dual Polarization, Active, Microstrip Antenna for an Orbital Imaging Radar System Operating at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Kenneth C.; Huang, John

    2000-01-01

    A highly successful Earth orbiting synthetic antenna aperture radar (SAR) system, known as the SIR-C mission, was carried into orbit in 1994 on a U.S. Shuttle (Space Transportation System) mission. The radar system was mounted in the cargo bay with no need to fold, or in any other way reduce the size of the antennas for launch. Weight and size were not limited for the L-Band, C-Band, and X-Band radar systems of the SIR-C radar imaging mission; the set of antennas weighed 10,500 kg, the L-Band antenna having the major share of the weight. This paper treats designing an L-Band antenna functionally similar to that used for SIR-C, but at a fraction of the cost and at a weight in the order of 250 kg. Further, the antenna must be folded to fit into the small payload shroud of low cost booster rocket systems. Over 31 square meters of antenna area is required. This low weight, foldable, electronic scanning antenna is for the proposed LightSAR radar system which is to be placed in Earth orbit on a small, dedicated space craft at the lowest possible cost for an efficient L- Band radar imaging system. This LightSAR spacecraft radar is to be continuously available for at least five operational years, and have the ability to map or repeat-map any area on earth within a few days of any request. A microstrip patch array, with microstrip transmission lines heavily employed in the aperture and in the corporate feed network, was chosen as the low cost approach for this active dual-polarization, 80 MHz (6.4%) bandwidth antenna design.

  2. A Dual Polarization, Active, Microstrip Antenna for an Orbital Imaging Radar System Operating at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Kenneth C.; Huang, John

    1999-01-01

    A highly successful Earth orbiting synthetic antenna aperture radar (SAR) system, known as the SIR-C mission, was carried into orbit in 1994 on a U.S. Shuttle (Space Transportation System) mission. The radar system was mounted in the cargo bay with no need to fold, or in any other way reduce the size of the antennas for launch. Weight and size were not limited for the L-Band, C-Band, and X-Band radar systems of the SIR-C radar imaging mission; the set of antennas weighed 10,500 kg, the L-Band antenna having the major share of the weight. This paper treats designing an L-Band antenna functionally similar to that used for SIR-C, but at a fraction of the cost and at a weight in the order of 250 kg. Further, the antenna must be folded to fit into the small payload shroud of low cost booster rocket systems. Over 31 square meters of antenna area is required. This low weight, foldable, electronic scanning antenna is for the proposed LightSAR radar system which is to be placed in Earth orbit on a small, dedicated space craft at the lowest possible cost for an efficient L-Band radar imaging system. This LightSAR spacecraft radar is to be continuously available for at least five operational years, and have the ability to map or repeat-map any area on earth within a few days of any request. A microstrip patch array, with microstrip transmission lines heavily employed in the aperture and in the corporate feed network, was chosen as the low cost approach for this active dual-polarization, 80 MHz (6.4%) bandwidth antenna design.

  3. Passive and Active L-Band System and Observations During the 2007 CLASIC Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon; Dinardo, Steve; Chan, Steven; Njoku, Eni; Jackson, Thomas; Bindlish, Rajat

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the upgraded PALS instrument and the characteristics of data acquired from the Cloud Land Atmospheric Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) 2007. The data acquired over lake passes were used to remove the radiometer calibration bias. The calibrated radiometer data showed significant consistency with the L-band land emission model for soil surfaces published in the literature. We observed significant temporal (days) changes of a few dB in the radar data. The change of radar backscatter appeared to correlate well with the change of in-situ soil moisture or the soil moisture data derived from the PALS dual-polarized brightness temperatures. The radar vegetation index also correlated well with the vegetation opacity estimated from the radiometer data. The preliminary analyses suggest complementary information contained in the surface emissivity and backscatter signatures for the retrieval of soil moisture and vegetation water content.

  4. PALS (Passive Active L-band System) Radiometer-Based Soil Moisture Retrieval for the SMAP Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliander, A.; Jackson, T. J.; Chan, S.; Bindlish, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Chazanoff, S. L.; McNairn, H.; Bullock, P.; Powers, J.; Wiseman, G.; Berg, A. A.; Magagi, R.; Njoku, E. G.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch in early January 2015. For pre-launch soil moisture algorithm development and validation, the SMAP project and NASA coordinated a SMAP Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) together with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in the vicinity of Winnipeg, Canada in June 7-July 19, 2012. Coincident active and passive airborne L-band data were acquired using the Passive Active L-band System (PALS) on 17 days during the experiment. Simultaneously with the PALS measurements, soil moisture ground truth data were collected manually. The vegetation and surface roughness were sampled on non-flight days. The SMAP mission will produce surface (top 5 cm) soil moisture products a) using a combination of its L-band radiometer and SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) measurements, b) using the radiometer measurement only, and c) using the SAR measurements only. The SMAPVEX12 data are being utilized for the development and testing of the algorithms applied for generating these soil moisture products. This talk will focus on presenting results of retrieving surface soil moisture using the PALS radiometer. The issues that this retrieval faces are very similar to those faced by the global algorithm using the SMAP radiometer. However, the different spatial resolution of the two observations has to be accounted for in the analysis. The PALS 3 dB footprint in the experiment was on the order of 1 km, whereas the SMAP radiometer has a footprint of about 40 km. In this talk forward modeled brightness temperature over the manually sampled fields and the retrieved soil moisture over the entire experiment domain are presented and discussed. In order to provide a retrieval product similar to that of the SMAP passive algorithm, various ancillary information had to be obtained for the SMAPVEX12 domain. In many cases there are multiple options on how to choose and reprocess these data

  5. Scanning L Band Active Passive Validation Experiment 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A. T.; Kim, E. J.; Faulkner, T.; Patel, H.; Cosh, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    SLAP (Scanning L-band Active Passive) comprises of a fully polarimetric L-band radiometer and fully polarimetric L-band radar with a shared antenna. SLAP is designed to be compatible with several aircrafts; specifically, C-23, Twin Otter, P-3, and C-130. SLAP is designed for simplicity, accuracy, & reliability. It leverages, as much as possible, existing instruments, hardware, and software in order to minimize cost, time, and risk.The SLAP airborne/ground campaign is designed to conduct flight testing and ground truth for the airborne instrument. The campaign took place the third week of December 2013 in Eastern Shore, MD. SLAP contributes to the NASA's core mission because of its ability to serve as an airborne simulator for the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite mission, one of NASA's flagship missions scheduled to launch in January 2015. A 3-day aircraft validation campaign was conducted where the new SLAP instrument flew three separate days over the proposed sampling region. The study area is a mixed agriculture and forest site located about 1 hour east of Washington, DC on the Eastern Shore (of the Chesapeake Bay). This region is located on the Delmarva Peninsula. The advantages of the selected site are: (1) Site was used before in previous field campaign (SMAPVEX08) (2) ARS HRSL has some established sampling sites within region (3) Dynamic variation in land cover (4) Variety of plant structures and densities. The goal of this campaign was to fly the instrument over the proposed site before a rain event, then have 2 other flights after the rain event to capture a dry down. In conjunction with the aircraft, there was in-situ ground sampling. Ground observations were collected concurrent with aircraft flights. These included soil moisture, soil temperature, surface temperature, surface roughness and vegetation parameters. Forest sites were monitored with small temporary networks of in situ sensors installed prior to the first flight. Soil moisture was

  6. Aquarius Active-Passive RFI Environment at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Vine, David M.; De Matthaeis, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Active/Passive instrument combinations (i.e., radiometer and radar) are being developed at L-band for remote sensing of sea surface salinity and soil moisture. Aquarius is already in orbit and SMAP is planned for launch in the Fall of 2014. Aquarius has provided for the first time a simultaneous look at the Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) environment from space for both active and passive instruments. The RFI environment for the radiometer observations is now reasonably well known and examples from Aquarius are presented in this manuscript that show that RFI is an important consideration for the scatterometer as well. In particular, extensive areas of the USA, Europe and Asia exhibit strong RFI in both the radiometer band at 1.41 GHz and in the band at 1.26 GHz employed by the Aquarius scatterometer. Furthermore, in areas such as the USA, where RFI at 1.4 GHz is relatively well controlled, RFI in the scatterometer band maybe the limiting consideration for the operation of combination active/passive instruments.

  7. L-Band Digital Aeronautical Communications System Engineering - Initial Safety and Security Risk Assessment and Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT's NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: "New ATM Requirements--Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development." ITT has completed a safety hazard analysis providing a preliminary safety assessment for the proposed L-band (960 to 1164 MHz) terrestrial en route communications system. The assessment was performed following the guidelines outlined in the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Risk Management Guidance for System Acquisitions document. The safety analysis did not identify any hazards with an unacceptable risk, though a number of hazards with a medium risk were documented. This effort represents a preliminary safety hazard analysis and notes the triggers for risk reassessment. A detailed safety hazards analysis is recommended as a follow-on activity to assess particular components of the L-band communication system after the technology is chosen and system rollout timing is determined. The security risk analysis resulted in identifying main security threats to the proposed system as well as noting additional threats recommended for a future security analysis conducted at a later stage in the system development process. The document discusses various security controls, including those suggested in the COCR Version 2.0.

  8. L-Band System Engineering - Concepts of Use, Systems Performance Requirements, and Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Stephen; Zelkin, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT s NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract NNC05CA85C, Task 7: New ATM Requirements-Future Communications, C-band and L-band Communications Standard Development. Task 7 was motivated by the five year technology assessment performed for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) under the joint FAA-EUROCONTROL cooperative research Action Plan (AP-17), also known as the Future Communications Study (FCS). It was based on direction provided by the FAA project-level agreement (PLA FY09_G1M.02-02v1) for "New ATM Requirements-Future Communications." Task 7 was separated into two distinct subtasks, each aligned with specific work elements and deliverable items. Subtask 7-1 addressed C-band airport surface data communications standards development, systems engineering, test bed development, and tests/demonstrations to establish operational capability for what is now referred to as the Aeronautical Mobile Airport Communications System (AeroMACS). Subtask 7-2, which is the subject of this report, focused on preliminary systems engineering and support of joint FAA/EUROCONTROL development and evaluation of a future L-band (960 to 1164 MHz) air/ground (A/G) communication system known as the L-band digital aeronautical communications system (L-DACS), which was defined during the FCS. The proposed L-DACS will be capable of providing ATM services in continental airspace in the 2020+ timeframe. Subtask 7-2 was performed in two phases. Phase I featured development of Concepts of Use, high level functional analyses, performance of initial L-band system safety and security risk assessments, and development of high level requirements and architectures. It also included the aforementioned support of joint L-DACS development and evaluation, including inputs to L-DACS design specifications. Phase II provided a refinement of the systems engineering activities performed during Phase I, along

  9. DSN 64-meter antenna L-band (1668-MHz) microwave system performance overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withington, J.

    1988-01-01

    In 1985, L-band (1668 MHz) receive-only feed systems were installed on the three Deep Space Network 64 meter antennas to provide tracking support for two non-NASA spacecraft. The specifications, design approach, and operational test results are presented. The L-band microwave system met all of its tracking goals and is currently being upgraded to include a C-band (5000 MHz) uplink.

  10. The Planned Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission L-Band Radar/Radiometer Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Michael; Wheeler, Kevin; Chan, Samuel; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Hudson, Derek; Medeiros, James

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is a NASA mission identified by the NRC 'decadal survey' to measure both soil moisture and freeze/thaw state from space. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band. In order to achieve a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive channels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. The instrument system has completed the preliminary design review (PDR) stage, and detailed instrument design has begun. In addition to providing an overview of the instrument design, two recent design modifications are discussed: 1) The addition of active thermal control to the instrument spun side to provide a more stable, settable thermal environment for the radiometer electronics, and 2) A 'sequential transmit' strategy for the two radar polarization channels which allows a single high-power amplifier to be used.

  11. Comparison of airborne passive and active L-band System (PALS) brightness temperature measurements to SMOS observations during the SMAP validation experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) campaign was to collect data for the pre-launch development and validation of SMAP soil moisture algorithms. SMAP is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) satellite mission designed for the m...

  12. ELBARA II, an L-Band Radiometer System for Soil Moisture Research

    PubMed Central

    Schwank, Mike; Wiesmann, Andreas; Werner, Charles; Mätzler, Christian; Weber, Daniel; Murk, Axel; Völksch, Ingo; Wegmüller, Urs

    2010-01-01

    L-band (1–2 GHz) microwave radiometry is a remote sensing technique that can be used to monitor soil moisture, and is deployed in the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). Performing ground-based radiometer campaigns before launch, during the commissioning phase and during the operative SMOS mission is important for validating the satellite data and for the further improvement of the radiative transfer models used in the soil-moisture retrieval algorithms. To address these needs, three identical L-band radiometer systems were ordered by ESA. They rely on the proven architecture of the ETH L-Band radiometer for soil moisture research (ELBARA) with major improvements in the microwave electronics, the internal calibration sources, the data acquisition, the user interface, and the mechanics. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design of the instruments and the main characteristics that are relevant for the user. PMID:22315556

  13. Scanning L-Band Active Passive (SLAP) - Recent Results from an Airborne Simulator for SMAP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Scanning L-band Active Passive (SLAP) is a recently-developed NASA airborne instrument specially tailored to simulate the new Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite instrument suite. SLAP conducted its first test flights in December, 2013 and participated in its first science campaign-the IPHEX ground validation campaign of the GPM mission-in May, 2014. This paper will present results from additional test flights and science observations scheduled for 2015.

  14. Design of an L-Band Microwave Radiometer with Active Mitigation of Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, Steven W.; Hampson, G. A.; Johnson, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    For increased sensitivity in L-band radiometry, bandwidths on the order of 100 MHz are desirable. This will likely require active countermeasures to mitigate RFI. In this paper, we describe a new radiometer which coherently samples 100 MHz of spectrum and applies real-time RFI mitigation techniques using FPGAs. A field test of an interim version of this design in a radio astronomy observation corrupted by radar pulses is described.

  15. Analysis of soil moisture retrieval from airborne passive/active L-band sensor measurements in SMAPVEX 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Song, Hongting; Tan, Lei; Li, Yinan; Li, Hao

    2014-11-01

    Soil moisture is a key component in the hydrologic cycle and climate system. It is an important input parameter for many hydrologic and meteorological models. NASA'S upcoming Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, to be launched in October 2014, will address this need by utilizing passive and active microwave measurements at L-band, which will penetrate moderately dense canopies. In preparation for the SMAP mission, the Soil Moisture Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) was conducted from 6 June to 17 July 2012 in the Carment-Elm Creek area in Manitoba, Canada. Over a period of six weeks diverse land cover types ranging from agriculture over pasture and grassland to forested sites were re-visited several times a week. The Passive/Active L-band Sensor (PALS) provides radiometer products, vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures, and radar products. Over the past two decades, successful estimation of soil moisture has been accomplished using passive and active L-band data. However, remaining uncertainties related to surface roughness and the absorption, scattering, and emission by vegetation must be resolved before soil moisture retrieval algorithms can be applied with known and acceptable accuracy using satellite observations. This work focuses on analyzing the Passive/Active L-band Sensor observations of sites covered during SMAPVEX12, investigating the observed data, parameterizing vegetation covered surface model, modeling inversion algorithm and analyzing observed soil moisture changes over the time period of six weeks. The data and analysis results from this study are aimed at increasing the accuracy and range of validity of SMAP soil moisture retrievals via enhancing the accuracy for soil moisture retrieval.

  16. Design of an L-band Microwave Radiometer with Active Mitigation of Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, S. W.; Johnson, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) impairs L-band radiometry outside the protected 20 MHz frequency band around 1413 MHz. However, bandwidths of 100 MHz or more are desired for certain remote sensing applications as well as certain astronomy applications. Because much of the RFI in this band is from radars with pulse lengths on the order of microseconds, traditional radiometers (i.e., those which directly measure total power or power spectral density integrated over time scales of milliseconds or greater) are poorly-suited to this task. Simply reducing integration time and discarding contaminated outputs may not be a practical answer due to the wide variety of modulations and pulse lengths observed in L-band RFI signals, the dynamic and complex nature of the associated propagation channels, and the logistical effort associated with post-measurement data editing. This motivates the design and development of radiometers capable of coherent sampling and adaptive, real-time mitigation of interference. Such a radiometer will be described in this presentation. This design is capable of coherently-sampling up to 100 MHz bandwidth at L-band. RFI mitigation is implemented in FPGA components so that real-time suppression is achieved. The system currently uses a cascade of basic time- and frequency- domain detection and blanking techniques; more advanced algorithms are un- der consideration. The modular FPGA-based architecture provides other benefits, such as the ability to implement extremely stable digital filters and the ability to reconfigure the system "on the fly". An overview of the basic design along with on-the-air results from an initial implementation will be provided in the presentation. Related L-band RFI surveys will be described to illustrate the relevance of this approach in a variety of operating conditions.

  17. Design of an L-band Microwave Radiometer with Active Mitigation of Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampson, G. A.; Ellingson, S. W.; Johnson, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) impairs L-band radiometry outside the protected 20 MHz frequency band around 1413 MHz. However, bandwidths of 100 MHz or more are desired for certain remote sensing applications as well as certain astronomy applications. Because much of the RFI in this band is from radars with pulse lengths on the order of microseconds, traditional radiometers (i.e., those which directly measure total power or power spectral density integrated over time scales of milliseconds or greater) are poorly-suited to this task. Simply reducing integration time and discarding contaminated outputs may not be a practical answer due to the wide variety of modulations and pulse lengths observed in L-band RFI signals, the dynamic and complex nature of the associated propagation channels, and the logistical effort associated with post-measurement data editing. This motivates the design and development of radiometers capable of coherent sampling and adaptive, real-time mitigation of interference. Such a radiometer will be described in this presentation. This design is capable of coherently-sampling up to 100 MHz bandwidth at L-band. RFI mitigation is implemented in FPGA components so that real-time suppression is achieved. The system currently uses a cascade of basic time- and frequency-domain detection and blanking techniques; more advanced algorithms are under consideration. The modular FPGA-based architecture provides other benefits, such as the ability to implement extremely stable digital filters and the ability to reconfigure the system "on the fly". An overview of the basic design along with on-the-air results from an initial implementation will be provided in the presentation. Related L-band RFI surveys will be described to illustrate the relevance of this approach in a variety of operating conditions.

  18. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Using Combined Passive and Active L-Band Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2012-01-01

    Several L-band microwave radiometer and radar missions have been, or will be, operating in space for land and ocean observations. These include the NASA Aquarius mission and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, both of which use combined passive/ active L-band instruments. Aquarius s passive/active L-band microwave sensor has been designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. SMAP s primary objectives are for soil moisture and freeze/thaw detection, but it will operate continuously over the ocean, and hence will have significant potential for ocean surface research. In this innovation, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve simultaneously ocean surface salinity and wind from combined passive/active L-band microwave observations of sea surfaces. The algorithm takes advantage of the differing response of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter to salinity, wind speed, and direction, thus minimizing the least squares error (LSE) measure, which signifies the difference between measurements and model functions of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter. The algorithm uses the conjugate gradient method to search for the local minima of the LSE. Three LSE measures with different measurement combinations have been tested. The first LSE measure uses passive microwave data only with retrieval errors reaching 1 to 2 psu (practical salinity units) for salinity, and 1 to 2 m/s for wind speed. The second LSE measure uses both passive and active microwave data for vertical and horizontal polarizations. The addition of active microwave data significantly improves the retrieval accuracy by about a factor of five. To mitigate the impact of Faraday rotation on satellite observations, the third LSE measure uses measurement combinations invariant under the Faraday rotation. For Aquarius, the expected RMS SSS (sea surface salinity) error will be less than about 0.2 psu for low winds, and increases to 0.3 psu at 25 m/s wind speed

  19. Airborne Active and Passive L-Band Observations in Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliander, A.; Yueh, S. H.; Chazanoff, S.; Jackson, T. J.; McNairn, H.; Bullock, P.; Wiseman, G.; Berg, A. A.; Magagi, R.; Njoku, E. G.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled for launch in October 2014. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state. Merging of active and passive L-band observations of the mission will enable unprecedented combination of accuracy, resolution, coverage and revisit-time for soil moisture and freeze/thaw state retrieval. For pre-launch algorithm development and validation the SMAP project and NASA coordinated a field campaign named as SMAPVEX12 (Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012) together with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in the vicinity of Winnipeg, Canada in June-July, 2012. The main objective of SMAPVEX12 was acquisition of data record that features long-time series with varying soil moisture and vegetation conditions (for testing the application of time-series approach) over aerial domain of multiple parallel lines (for spatial disaggregation studies). The coincident active and passive L-band data were acquired using the Passive Active L-band System (PALS), which is an airborne radiometer and radar developed for testing L-band retrieval algorithms. For SMAPVEX12 PALS was installed on a Twin Otter aircraft. The flight plan included flights at two altitudes. The higher altitude was used to map the whole experiment domain and the lower altitude was used to obtain measurements over a specific set of field sites. The spatial resolution (and swath) of the radar and radiometer from low altitude was about 600 m and from high altitude about 1500 m. The PALS acquisitions were complemented with high resolution (~10 m) L-band SAR measurements carried out by UAVSAR instrument on-board G-III aircraft. The campaign ran from June 7 until July 19. The PALS instrument conducted 17 brightness temperature and backscatter measurement flights and the UAVSAR conducted 14 backscatter measurement flights. The airborne data acquisition was supported by

  20. Landscape freeze/thaw retrievals from soil moisture active passive (SMAP) L-band radar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliander, A.; Derksen, C.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission produces a daily landscape freeze/thaw product (L3_FT_A) which provides categorical (frozen, thawed, or [inverse] transitional) classification of the surface state (for land areas north of 45°N) derived from ascending and descending orbits of SMAP high-resolution L-band radar measurements. The FT retrievals are output to 3 km resolution polar and global grids with temporal revisit of 2 days or better north of ~55°N and 3 days or better north of 45°N. The algorithm classifies the land surface freeze/thaw state based on the time series of L-band radar backscatter compared to frozen and thawed reference states. This presentation will describe pre-launch L3_FT_A algorithm implementation and evaluation using NASA/SAC-D Aquarius L-band radar data, and provide an update on the current status of the SMAP L3_FT_A product. In advance of SMAP measurements, the L3_FT_A algorithm was configured and evaluated using Aquarius measurements. While the temporal (weekly) and spatial (~100 km) resolution is much coarser than SMAP, Aquarius provides L-band radar measurements at an incidence angle (normalized to 40 degrees) which is close to SMAP. Evaluation of FT retrievals derived using both Aquarius freeze/thaw references and backscatter time series as inputs identified good agreement during the fall freeze-up period with FT flag agreement (Aquarius versus in situ) exceeding the 80% SMAP mission requirement when summarized on a monthly basis. Disagreement was greater during the spring thaw transition due in part to uncertainty in characterizing the surface state from in situ measurements and backscatter sensitivity to the onset of snow melt, independent of the soil temperature beneath the snowpack. Initial challenges for SMAP derived FT retrievals include the scale difference between the Aquarius references (~100 km) and the SMAP measurements (3 km) which is particularly problematic in areas of complex topography and/or mixed

  1. Airborne active and passive L-band measurements using PALS instrument in SMAPVEX12 soil moisture field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliander, Andreas; Yueh, Simon; Chazanoff, Seth; Dinardo, Steven; O'Dwyer, Ian; Jackson, Thomas; McNairn, Heather; Bullock, Paul; Wiseman, Grant; Berg, Aaron; Magagi, Ramata; Njoku, Eni

    2012-10-01

    NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled for launch in late 2014. The objective of the mission is global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state. Merging of active and passive L-band observations of the mission will enable unprecedented combination of accuracy, resolution, coverage and revisit-time for soil moisture and freeze/thaw state retrieval. For pre-launch algorithm development and validation the SMAP project and NASA coordinated a field campaign named as SMAPVEX12 (Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012) together with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and other Canadian and US institutions in the vicinity of Winnipeg, Canada in June-July, 2012. The main objective of SMAPVEX12 was acquisition of a data record that features long time-series with varying soil moisture and vegetation conditions over an aerial domain of multiple parallel flight lines. The coincident active and passive L-band data was acquired with the PALS (Passive Active L-band System) instrument. The measurements were conducted over the experiment domain every 2-3 days on average, over a period of 43 days. The preliminary calibration of the brightness temperatures obtained in the campaign has been performed. Daily lake calibrations were used to adjust the radiometer calibration parameters, and the obtained measurements were compared against the raw in situ soil moisture measurements. The evaluation shows that this preliminary calibration of the data produces already a consistent brightness temperature record over the campaign duration, and only secondary adjustments and cleaning of the data is need before the data can be applied to the development and validation of SMAP algorithms.

  2. Progress in L-Band Power Distribution System R&D at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, Christopher; Adolphsen, Chris; Wang, Faya; /SLAC

    2008-10-20

    We report on the L-band RF power distribution system (PDS) developed at SLAC for Fermilab's NML superconducting test accelerator facility. The makeup of the system, which allows tailoring of the power distribution to cavities by pairs, is briefly described. Cold test measurements of the system and the results of high power processing are presented. We also investigate the feasibility of eliminating the expensive, lossy circulators from the PDS by pair-feeding cavities through custom 3-dB hybrids. A computational model is used to simulate the impact on cavity field stability due to the reduced cavity-to-cavity isolation.

  3. Systems implications of L-band fade data statistics for LEO mobile systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devieux, Carrie L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines and analyzes research data on the role of foliage attenuation in signal fading between a satellite transmitter and a terrestrial vehicle-mounted receiver. The frequency band of measurement, called L-Band, includes the region 1610.0 to 1626.5 MHz. Data from tests involving various combinations of foliage and vehicle movement conditions clearly show evidence of fast fading (in excess of 0.5 dB per millisecond) and fade depths as great or greater than 16 dB. As a result, the design of a communications link power control that provides the level of accuracy necessary for power sensitive systems could be significantly impacted. Specific examples of this include the communications links that employ Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) as a modulation technique.

  4. L-band and SHF multiple access schemes for the MSAT system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razi, Michael; Shoamanesh, Alireza; Azarbar, Bahman

    1988-01-01

    The first generation of the Canadian Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system, planned to be operational in the early 1990s, will provide voice and data services to land, aeronautical, and maritime mobile terminals within the Canadian land mass and its territorial waters. The system will be managed by a centralized Demand Assignment Multiple Access (DAMA) control system. Users will request a communication channel by communicating with the DAMA Control System (DCS) via the appropriate signalling channels. Several access techniques for both L-band and SHF signalling channels have been investigated. For the L-band, Slotted Aloha (SA) and Reservation Aloha (RA), combined with a token scheme, are discussed here. The results of Telesat studies to date indicate that SA, when combined with token scheme, provides the most efficient access and resource management tool in a mobile propagation environment. For SHF signalling channels, slim time division multiple access (TDMA) and SA have been considered as the most suitable candidate schemes. In view of the operational environment of the SHF links, provision of a very short channel access delay and a relatively high packet success rate are highly desirable. Studies carried out generally favor slim-TDMA as the most suitable approach for SHF signalling channels.

  5. L-Band Digital Aeronautical Communications System Engineering - Concepts of Use, Systems Performance, Requirements, and Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    This NASA Contractor Report summarizes and documents the work performed to develop concepts of use (ConUse) and high-level system requirements and architecture for the proposed L-band (960 to 1164 MHz) terrestrial en route communications system. This work was completed as a follow-on to the technology assessment conducted by NASA Glenn Research Center and ITT for the Future Communications Study (FCS). ITT assessed air-to-ground (A/G) communications concepts of use and operations presented in relevant NAS-level, international, and NAS-system-level documents to derive the appropriate ConUse relevant to potential A/G communications applications and services for domestic continental airspace. ITT also leveraged prior concepts of use developed during the earlier phases of the FCS. A middle-out functional architecture was adopted by merging the functional system requirements identified in the bottom-up assessment of existing requirements with those derived as a result of the top-down analysis of ConUse and higher level functional requirements. Initial end-to-end system performance requirements were derived to define system capabilities based on the functional requirements and on NAS-SR-1000 and the Operational Performance Assessment conducted as part of the COCR. A high-level notional architecture of the L-DACS supporting A/G communication was derived from the functional architecture and requirements.

  6. Fade measurements at L-band and UHF in mountainous terrain for land mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Goldhirsh, Julius

    1988-01-01

    Fading results related to land mobile satellite communications at L-band (1502 MHz) and UHF (870 MHz) are described. These results were derived from an experiment performed in a series of canyon passes in the Boulder, Colorado region of the US. The experimental configuration involved a helicopter as the source platform, which maintained a relatively fixed geometry with a mobile van containing the receiver and data-acquisition system. An unobstructed line of sight between the radiating sources and the receiving van was, for the most part, also maintained. In this configuration, the dominant mechanism causing signal fading (or enhancement) is a result of multipath. The resulting fade distributions demonstrated that at the 1 percent and 5 percent levels, 5.5- and 2.6-dB fades were on the average exceeded at L-band and 4.8- and 2.4-dB at UHF, respectively, for a path elevation angle of 45 deg. The canyon results as compared with previous roadside-tree-shadowing results demonstrate that the deciding factor dictating fade margin for future land mobile satellite systems is tree shadowing rather than fades caused by multipath.

  7. New Combined L-band Active/Passive Soil Moisture Retrieval Algorithm Optimized for Argentine Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruscantini, C. A.; Grings, F. M.; Salvia, M.; Ferrazzoli, P.; Karszenbaum, H.

    2015-12-01

    The ability of L-band passive microwave satellite observations to provide soil moisture (mv) measurements is well known. Despite its high sensitivity to near-surface mv, radiometric technology suffers from having a relatively low spatial resolution. Conversely active microwave observations, although their finer resolution, are difficult to be interpreted for mv content due to the confounding effects of vegetation and roughness. There have been and there are strong motivations for the realization of satellite missions that carry passive and active microwave instruments on board. This has also led to important contributions in algorithm development. In this line of work, NASA-CONAE SAC-D/Aquarius mission had on board an L band radiometer and scatterometer. This was followed by the launch of NASA SMAP mission (Soil Moisture Active Passive), as well as several airborne campaigns that provide active and passive measurements. Within this frame, a new combined active/passive mv retrieval algorithm is proposed by deriving an analytical expression of brightness temperature and radar backscattering relation using explicit semi-empirical models. Simple models (i.e. that can be easily inverted and have relatively low amount of ancillary parameters) were selected: ω-τ model (Jackson et al., 1982, Water Resources Research) and radar-only model (Narvekar et al., 2015, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing). A major challenge involves coupling the active and passive models to be consistent with observations. Coupling equations can be derived using theoretical active/passive high-order radiative transfer models, such as 3D Numerical Method of Maxwell equations (Zhou et al., 2004, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing) and Tor Vergata (Ferrazzoli et al., 1995,Remote Sensing of Environment) models. In this context, different coupling equations can be optimized for different land covers using theoretical forward models with specific parametrization for each

  8. Station to instrumented aircraft L-band telemetry system and RF signal controller for spacecraft simulations and station calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scaffidi, C. A.; Stocklin, F. J.; Feldman, M. B.

    1971-01-01

    An L-band telemetry system designed to provide the capability of near-real-time processing of calibration data is described. The system also provides the capability of performing computerized spacecraft simulations, with the aircraft as a data source, and evaluating the network response. The salient characteristics of a telemetry analysis and simulation program (TASP) are discussed, together with the results of TASP testing. The results of the L-band system testing have successfully demonstrated the capability of near-real-time processing of telemetry test data, the control of the ground-received signal to within + or - 0.5 db, and the computer generation of test signals.

  9. Inferring Land Surface Model Parameters for the Assimilation of Satellite-Based L-Band Brightness Temperature Observations into a Soil Moisture Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.

    2012-01-01

    , and the single scattering albedo. After this climatological calibration, the modeling system can provide L-band brightness temperatures with a global mean absolute bias of less than 10K against SMOS observations, across multiple incidence angles and for horizontal and vertical polarization. Third, seasonal and regional variations in the residual biases are addressed by estimating the vegetation optical depth through state augmentation during the assimilation of the L-band brightness temperatures. This strategy, tested here with SMOS data, is part of the baseline approach for the Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture data product from the planned Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite mission.

  10. L-Band Ionosphere Scintillations Observed by A Spaced GPS Receiver Array during Recent Active Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.; Pelgrum, W.; van Graas, F.; Gunawardena, S.; Charney, D.; Peng, S.; Triplett, J.; Vikram, P.; Vemuru, A.

    2010-12-01

    L-Band Ionosphere Scintillations Observed by A Spaced GPS Receiver Array during Recent Active Experiments at HAARP Jade Morton*, Wouter Pelgrum**, Sanjeev Gunawardena**, Frank van Graas**, Dan Charney*, Senlin Peng***, Jeff Triplett*, Ajay Vemuru** * Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Miami University ** Avionics Engineering Center, Ohio University *** Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech Ionosphere irregularities can cause scintillation of satellite-based radio communication, navigation, and surveillance signals. While these scintillation effects will impact the corresponding receiver and system performance, carefully recovered signal parameters serve as a means of studying the background state and dynamics of the ionosphere. In this presentation, we will describe our recent effort in establishing a unique spaced GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska to collect GPS and GLONASS satellite signals at various stages of the GNSS receiver processing. Preliminary receiver processing results as well as additional on-site diagnostic instrumentation measurements obtained from two active heating experiment campaigns will be presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations.

  11. Coherence Effects in L-Band Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Quasi-Periodic Corn Canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, Cuneyt; Lang, Roger H.

    2011-01-01

    Due to their highly random nature, vegetation canopies can be modeled using the incoherent transport theory for active and passive remote sensing applications. Agricultural vegetation canopies however are generally more structured than natural vegetation. The inherent row structure in agricultural canopies induces coherence effects disregarded by the transport theory. The objective of this study is to demonstrate, via Monte-Carlo simulations, these coherence effects on L-band scattering and thermal emission from corn canopies consisting of only stalks.

  12. Survey of L Band Tower and Airborne Sensor Systems Relevant to Upcoming Soil Moisture Missions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Basic research on the physics of microwave remote sensing of soil moisture has been conducted for almost thirty years using ground-based (tower- or truck-mounted) microwave instruments at L band frequencies. Early small point-scale studies were aimed at improved understanding and verification of mi...

  13. Propagation effects by roadside trees measured at UHF and L-band for mobile satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1988-01-01

    Propagation field tests were performed in Central Maryland and involved a helicopter and mobile van as the source and receiving platforms, respectively. Tests were implemented at both UHF (870 MHz) and L-band (1.5 GHz) during a period in which the trees were in full blossom and contained maximum moisture. Cumulative fade distributions were determined from the data for various fixed elevation angles, side of the road driving, and road types for both worst and best case path geometries and for overall average road conditions.

  14. Mobile satellite system fade statistics for shadowing and multipath from roadside trees at UHF and L-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1989-01-01

    Field tests related to planned mobile satellite systems were performed, and results that add to the existing database of propagation measurements at L-band (1.5 GHz) are described. They are considered particularly useful in that propagation effects were studied systematically, with repeated and controlled runs pertaining to different path elevation angles, road types, and path geometries defining shadowing and line-of-sight modes. In addition, simultaneous L-band and UHF measurements were performed for the purpose of establishing scaling factors applicable to previous UHF (870 MHz) results. The control of the experimental parameters was made possible by using a helicopter as the source platform and a mobile van to house the receiver.

  15. Impacts of Different Assimilation Methodologies on Crop Yield Estimates Using Active and Passive Microwave Dataset at L-Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Bongiovanni, T. E.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Bindlish, R.; Judge, J.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate estimates of crop yield are important for managing agricultural production and food security. Although the crop growth models, such as the Decision Support System Agrotechnology Transfer (DSSAT), have been used to simulate crop growth and development, the crop yield estimates still diverge from the reality due to different sources of errors in the models and computation. Auxiliary observations may be incorporated into such dynamic models to improve predictions using data assimilation. Active and passive (AP) microwave observations at L-band (1-2 GHz) are sensitive to dielectric and geometric properties of soil and vegetation, including soil moisture (SM), vegetation water content (VWC), surface roughness, and vegetation structure. Because SM and VWC are one of the governing factors in estimating crop yield, microwave observations may be used to improve crop yield estimates. Current studies have shown that active observations are more sensitive to the surface roughness of soil and vegetation structure during the growing season, while the passive observations are more sensitive to the SM. Backscatter and emission models linked with the DSSAT model (DSSAT-A-P) allow assimilation of microwave observations of backscattering coefficient (σ0) and brightness temperature (TB) may provide biophysically realistic estimates of model states and parameters. The present ESA Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission provides passive observations at 1.41 GHz at 25 km every 2-3 days, and the NASA/CNDAE Aquarius mission provides L-band AP observations at spatial resolution of 150 km with a repeat coverage of 7 days for global SM products. In 2014, the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive mission will provide AP observations at 1.26 and 1.41 GHz at the spatial resolutions of 3 and 30 km, respectively, with a repeat coverage of 2-3 days. The goal of this study is to understand the impacts of assimilation of asynchronous and synchronous AP observations on crop yield

  16. Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Retrieval Algorithm Using Combined Passive-Active L-Band Microwave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius is a combined passive/active L-band microwave instrument developed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The data will support studies of the coupling between ocean circulation, the global water cycle, and climate. The primary science objective of this mission is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean with a spatial resolution of 150 kilometers and a retrieval accuracy of 0.2 practical salinity units globally on a monthly basis. The measurement principle is based on the response of the L-band (1.413 gigahertz) sea surface brightness temperatures (T (sub B)) to sea surface salinity. To achieve the required 0.2 practical salinity units accuracy, the impact of sea surface roughness (e.g. wind-generated ripples and waves) along with several factors on the observed brightness temperature has to be corrected to better than a few tenths of a degree Kelvin. To the end, Aquarius includes a scatterometer to help correct for this surface roughness effect.

  17. Scanning L-Band Active Passive (SLAP)—FLIGHT Results from a New Airborne Simulator for Smap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, E. J.; Faulkner, T.; Wu, A.; Patel, H.

    2014-12-01

    1. Introduction and BackgroundThis paper introduces a new NASA airborne instrument, the Scanning L-band Active Passive (SLAP), which is specially tailored to simulate SMAP. 2. Description of SLAPSLAP has both passive (radiometer) and active (radar) microwave L-band imaging capabilities. The radiometer observes at 1.4 GHz using duplicate front end hardware from the SMAP satellite radiometer. It also includes a duplicate of the digital backend development unit for SMAP, thus the novel Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) detection and mitigation features and algorithms for SMAP are duplicated with very high fidelity in SLAP. The digital backend provides 4-Stokes polarization capability. The real-aperture radar operates in the 1215-1300 MHz band with quad-pol capability. Radar and radiometer share one antenna via diplexers that are spare units from the Aquarius satellite instrument. 3. Flight ResultsSLAP's initial flights were conducted in Dec 2013 over the eastern shore of Maryland and successfully demonstrated radiometer imaging over 2 full SMAP 36x36 km grid cells at 1km resolution within 3 hrs, easily meeting the SMAP post-launch cal/val airborne mapping requirements. A second flight on the same day also demonstrated SLAP's quick-turn abilities and high-resolution/wide-swath capabilities with 200m resolution across a 1500m swath from 2000 ft AGL. Additional flights were conducted as part of the GPM iPHEX campaign in May, 2014. 4. ConclusionThis paper presents flight data and imagery, as well as details of the radiometer and radar performance and calibration. The paper will also describe the mission performance achievable on the King Air and other platforms.

  18. Gain flattening filter in the DWDM systems using C-band or L-band optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibac, Ionut C.

    2003-10-01

    An optical transport network based on dense wavelength - division multiplexing DWDM technology is the next logical step in the evolution of Internet network. An Optical Internet network is defined as any Internet network where the network link layer connections are "dedicated" wavelengths on a Wave Division Multiplexed optical fibre directly connected to a high performance network router. The high performance network router replaces traditional ATM and SONET/SDH switching and multiplexing equipment, the essential statistical multiplexing device that controls wavelength access, switching, routing and protection. The optical amplifier is the key element that contributes to design an Optical Internet network. The design of an optical component and in particular an optical amplifier can directly and significantly affect the performance of an optical system. With the help of PTDS toll I will demonstrate the advantage of using L - band amplifiers especially for long - haul terrestrial or submarine DWDM systems in which thousands of amplifiers might be needed in a single transmission link. This is due to the exceptional feature that permits in a cascade configuration a very flat gain. It is demonstrated that L -band amplifier doesn"t require a gain-flattening fiber (GFF) compared to C -band amplifiers.

  19. MAPSAR Image Simulation Based on L-band Polarimetric Data from the SAR-R99B Airborne Sensor (SIVAM System)

    PubMed Central

    Mura, José Claudio; Paradella, Waldir Renato; Dutra, Luciano Vieira; dos Santos, João Roberto; Rudorff, Bernardo Friedrich Theodor; de Miranda, Fernando Pellon; da Silva, Mario Marcos Quintino; da Silva, Wagner Fernando

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology applied to generate simulated multipolarized L-band SAR images of the MAPSAR (Multi-Application Purpose SAR) satellite from the airborne SAR R99B sensor (SIVAM System). MAPSAR is a feasibility study conducted by INPE (National Institute for Space Research) and DLR (German Aerospace Center) targeting a satellite L-band SAR innovative mission for assessment, management and monitoring of natural resources. Examples of simulated products and their applications are briefly discussed. PMID:22389590

  20. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission - Algorithm and Cal/Val Activities and Synergies with SMOS and Other L-Band Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Jackson, Tom; Kellogg, Kent; Entin, Jared

    2011-01-01

    applicable to soil moisture measurement, such as Aquarius, SAO COM, and ALOS-2. The algorithms and data products for SMAP are being developed in the SMAP Science Data System (SDS) Testbed. The algorithms are developed and evaluated in the SDS Testbed using simulated SMAP observations as well as observational data from current airborne and spaceborne L-band sensors including SMOS. The SMAP project is developing a Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) Plan that is designed to support algorithm development (pre-launch) and data product validation (post-launch). A key component of the Cal/Val Plan is the identification, characterization, and instrumentation of sites that can be used to calibrate and validate the sensor data (Level I) and derived geophysical products (Level 2 and higher). In this presentation we report on the development status of the SMAP data product algorithms, and the planning and implementation of the SMAP Cal/Val program. Several components of the SMAP algorithm development and Cal/Val plans have commonality with those of SMOS, and for this reason there are shared activities and resources that can be utilized between the missions, including in situ networks, ancillary data sets, and long-term monitoring sites.

  1. Mobile satellite system propagation measurements at L-band using Marecs-B2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Goldhirsh, Julius

    1990-01-01

    A mobile satellite system (MSS) propagation experiment at 1.5 GHz was performed near the east coast of the United States in central Maryland during December 1987 using the Marecs-B2 satellite as a transmitter platform. A receiving system in a vehicle measured signal fades caused by shadowing and multipath from roadside trees and utility poles. The propagation degradations were characterized for a system of three roads previously examined using a helicopter as the transmitter platform. The objectives of the Marecs-B2 MSS tests were to: (1) establish cumulative fade distributions for the particular satellite geometry for both rural and suburban roads; (2) validate the consistency of previous roadside tree measurements which employed a helicopter as the transmitter platform for the same system of roads; (3) obtain an additional set of fade levels at a lower angle hitherto not measured in central Maryland; and (4) combine the satellite-acquired data set with previous helicopter results and establish an analytic, empirically derived function describing the cumulative fade distributions for a family of path angles. An analysis of the satellite data has demonstrated the successful achievement of these objectives.

  2. L-Band Observations with the HRMS Sky Survey Prototype System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, E.; Levin, S.; Jones, D.; Gulkis, S.

    1993-01-01

    In support of the development of NASA's High Resolution Microwave Survey (HRMS) Sky Survey Operational System (SSOS), we have conducted exploratory observations at 1.4, 1.7, and 2.3 GHZ at DSS 13 (Venus Station) in Goldstone, California.

  3. L-band Soil Moisture Mapping using Small UnManned Aerial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, E.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is of fundamental importance to many hydrological, biological and biogeochemical processes, plays an important role in the development and evolution of convective weather and precipitation, and impacts water resource management, agriculture, and flood runoff prediction. The launch of NASA's Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission in 2015 promises to provide global measurements of soil moisture and surface freeze/thaw state at fixed crossing times and spatial resolutions as low as 5 km for some products. However, there exists a need for measurements of soil moisture on smaller spatial scales and arbitrary diurnal times for SMAP validation, precision agriculture and evaporation and transpiration studies of boundary layer heat transport. The Lobe Differencing Correlation Radiometer (LDCR) provides a means of mapping soil moisture on spatial scales as small as several meters (i.e., the height of the platform) .Compared with various other proposed methods of validation based on either situ measurements [1,2] or existing airborne sensors suitable for manned aircraft deployment [3], the integrated design of the LDCR on a lightweight small UAS (sUAS) is capable of providing sub-watershed (~km scale) coverage at very high spatial resolution (~15 m) suitable for scaling scale studies, and at comparatively low operator cost. The LDCR on Tempest unit can supply the soil moisture mapping with different resolution which is of order the Tempest altitude.

  4. Assimilation of L-band passive microwave brightness temperatures in the ECMWF land data assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Sabater, Joaquin; de Rosnay, Patricia; Albergel, Clement; Isaksen, Lars; Drusch, Matthias; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Kerr, Yann; Richaume, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is providing a unique and very valuable source of remote sensed information to accurately estimate the water content of soils. Accurate initialisation of soil moisture in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models is crucial for the potential it has to improve weather forecasts. As NWP centre, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) is assimilating SMOS data in their Land Data Assimilation System to adjust soil moisture estimates from land surface simulations. This paper compares the results obtained from three assimilation experiments and its impact in surface and atmospheric variables: a) In the first one, the control experiment, the same configuration as the operational system is used. This means that only 2 m temperature and 2 m relative humidity observations of the SYNOP network are assimilated to correct the model soil moisture estimates, b) In the second one, only raw SMOS brightness temperatures are assimilated, c) In the third one, both screen level variables and SMOS brightness temperatures are combined to correct soil moisture. These experiments are run over a 4 month period, from May to end of August 2010 (when evaporation rates are higher), using the entire month of May as spin-off period to reach the hydric equilibrium, as strong gradients of soil moisture can occur when a new type of data is assimilated to adjust the soil moisture states. To increase the quality of the SMOS observations that are assimilated, only those localized in the alias free field of view of the satellite footprint are used. Several flags of the SMOS data product are also used to filter out Radio Frequency Interference. Only incidence angles at 30°, 40° and 50° and at pure XX or YY polarisations are assimilated. The strategy used to evaluate the impact of SMOS data in the surface and atmospheric fields is the following; 1) the quality of the analysed soil moisture fields is evaluated through comparison

  5. Rough surface effects on active and passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture at L-band using 3D fast solution of Maxwell's equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haogang; Liao, Tien-Hao; Shi, Jiancheng; Yu, Zherui

    2014-11-01

    The forthcoming Water Cycle Observation Mission (WCOM) is to understand the water cycle system among land, atmosphere, and ocean. In both active and passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture, the surface roughness plays an important role. Electromagnetic models of roughness provide tables of emissivities and backscattering coefficients that can be used to retrieve soil moisture. In this paper, a fast and accurate three dimensional solution of Maxwell's equations is developed and employed to solve rough soil surface scattering problem at L-band. The algorithm combines QR Pre-Ranked Multilevel UV(MLUV) factorization and Hierarchical Fast Far Field Approximation. It is implemented using OpenMP interface for fast parallel calculation. In this algorithm, 1) QR based rank predetermined algorithm is derived to further compress the UV matrix pairs obtained using coarse-coarse sampling; 2) at the finer levels, MLUV is used straightforwardly to factorize the interactions between groups, while at the coarsest level, interactions between groups in the interaction list are calculated using an elegantly derived Hierarchical Fast Far Field Approximation (HFAFFA) to accelerate the calculation of interactions between large groups while keeping the accuracy of this approximation; 3) OpenMP interface is used to parallelize this new algorithm. Numerical results including the incoherent bistatic scattering coefficients and the emissivity demonstrate the efficiency of this method.

  6. Reconfigurable L-Band Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.

    2008-01-01

    The reconfigurable L-Band radar is an ongoing development at NASA/GSFC that exploits the capability inherently in phased array radar systems with a state-of-the-art data acquisition and real-time processor in order to enable multi-mode measurement techniques in a single radar architecture. The development leverages on the L-Band Imaging Scatterometer, a radar system designed for the development and testing of new radar techniques; and the custom-built DBSAR processor, a highly reconfigurable, high speed data acquisition and processing system. The radar modes currently implemented include scatterometer, synthetic aperture radar, and altimetry; and plans to add new modes such as radiometry and bi-static GNSS signals are being formulated. This development is aimed at enhancing the radar remote sensing capabilities for airborne and spaceborne applications in support of Earth Science and planetary exploration This paper describes the design of the radar and processor systems, explains the operational modes, and discusses preliminary measurements and future plans.

  7. Towards the implementation of L-band Soil Moisture Brightness Temperatures in the Canadian Land Data Assimilation System (CaLDAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Marco; Bilodeau, Bernard; Russell, Albert; Wang, Xihong; Belair, Stephane

    2016-04-01

    The Canadian Land Data Assimilation System (CaLDAS) currently runs in Environment Canada (EC) operations and provides the initial conditions for soil moisture and soil temperature to the High-Resolution Regional Deterministic Prediction System (HRDPS). Errors in screen-level temperature and dew-point temperature are used to analyze soil moisture and soil temperature. The observational gap in soil moisture is being alleviated by significant advances in remote sensing technologies specifically dedicated to the measurement of soil moisture. The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite was launched by the European Space Agency (ESA) in November 2009 and has been providing global coverage of near-surface soil moisture every 3 days. In January 2015, the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite was launched by NASA, and similar to SMOS, is equipped with a passive radiometer measuring the soil emission in the highly sensitive L-band frequency. The land-surface modeling component within CaLDAS has been coupled to the CMEM (Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform) microwave radiative transfer model to allow for the assimilation of L-band brightness temperatures (TB). This study reports upon a series of pre-operational experiments exploring how best to combine the traditional screen-level variables with the more direct measurements of soil moisture provided by SMOS and SMAP for a better analysis of the soil moisture state. The study period will be the warm season periods for 2014 and 2015 over North America. Analyzed soil moistures will be compared against in-situ monitoring networks, but the principal focus will be upon the impacts in numerical weather prediction (NWP) mode. EC's Regional Deterministic Prediction System (RDPS), with 10 km grid spacing, is the principal NWP guidance used by Meteorological Service of Canada forecasters in the 1-2 day range. CaLDAS will be run assimilating different configurations of screen-level data and SMOS/SMAP TBs to

  8. A study of L band scintillations during the initial phase of rising solar activity at an Indian low latitude station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanna, H. J.; Karia, S. P.; Pathak, K. N.

    2013-08-01

    The ionospheric scintillation and TEC (Total Electron Content) variations are studied using GPS (Global Positioning System) measurements at an Indian low latitude station Surat (21.16°N, 72.78°E; Geomagnetic: 12.90°N, 147.35°E), situated near the northern crest of the equatorial anomaly region. The results are presented for data collected during the initial phase of current rising solar activity (low to moderate solar activity) period between January 2009 and December 2011. The results show that within a total number of 656 night-time scintillation events, 340 events are observed with TEC depletions, Rate of change of TEC (ROT) fluctuations and enhancement of Rate of change of TEC Index (ROTI). A comparison of night-time scintillation events from the considered period reveal strong correlation amongst the duration of scintillation activity in S4 index, TEC depletion, ROT fluctuations and ROTI enhancement in the year 2011, followed by the year 2010 and least in 2009. The statistical analyses of scintillation activity with enhancement of ROTI also show that about 70-96% scintillation activity took place in equinox and winter months. Moreover, from a nocturnal variation in occurrence of scintillation with (S4 ⩾ 0.2) and enhancement of ROTI with (ROTI ⩾ 0.5), a general trend of higher occurrence in pre-midnight hours of equinox and winter seasons is observed in both indices during the year 2011 and 2010, while no significant trend is observed in the year 2009. The results suggest the presence of F-region ionospheric irregularities with scale sizes of few kilometers and few hundred meters over Surat and are found to be influenced by solar and magnetic activity.

  9. Broadband Upgrade for the 1.668-GHz (L-Band) Radio Astronomy Feed System on the DSN 70-m Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, D.; Khayatian, B.; Lopez, B.; Torrez, T.; Long, E.; Sosnowski, J.; Franco, M.; Teitelbaum, L.

    2015-08-01

    Currently, each of the three Deep Space Network (DSN) 70-m antennas provides a narrowband, 1.668-GHz (L-band) receive capability for radio astronomy observations. This capability is delivered by a large feedhorn mounted on the exterior of one of the feedcones. It provides a single polarization into a pair of redundant low-noise amplifiers. Recently, funding was obtained to upgrade this system to wideband (1.4-1.9 GHz) dual-polarization operation. This required development of a new feedhorn, polarizer, orthomode transducer (OMT), and waveguide transitions. In this article, we describe the design and laboratory testing of these components.

  10. L-band active/passive time series measurements over a growing season usign the COMRAD ground-based SMAP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scheduled to launch in October 2014, NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will provide high-resolution global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state every 2-3 days. These new measurements of the hydrological condition of the Earth’s surface will build on data from European Spa...

  11. Large Aperture, Scanning, L-Band SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Bach, Vinh; Grando, Maurio; Quijano, Ubaldo; Smith, Phil; Zawadzki, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We have developed the first L-band membrane-based active phased array. The antenna is a 16x16 element patch array with dimensions of 2.3mx2.6m. The array uses membrane-compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the antenna design, the fabrication of this large array, the T/R module development, the signal distribution approach and the measured results of the array.

  12. The development of a power spectral density processor for C and L band airborne radar scatterometer sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. A., III; Chladek, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A real-time signal processor was developed for the NASA/JSC L-and C-band airborne radar scatterometer sensor systems. The purpose of the effort was to reduce ground data processing costs. Conversion of two quadrature channels of data (like and cross polarized) was made to obtain Power Spectral Density (PSD) values. A chirp-z transform (CZT) approach was used to filter the Doppler return signal and improved high frequency and angular resolution was realized. The processors have been tested with record signals and excellent results were obtained. CZT filtering can be readily applied to scatterometers operating at other wavelengths by altering the sample frequency. The design of the hardware and software and the results of the performance tests are described in detail.

  13. L-band radar scattering from grass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chauhan, N.; O'Neill, P.; Le Vine, D.; Lang, R.; Khadr, N.

    1992-01-01

    A radar system based on a network analyzer has been developed to study the backscatter from vegetation. The radar is operated at L-band. Radar measurements of a grass field were made in 1991. The radar returns from the grass were measured at three incidence angles. Ground truth and canopy parameters such as blade and stem dimensions, moisture content of the grass and the soil, and blade and stem density, were measured. These parameters are used in a distorted Born approximation model to compute the backscatter coefficients from the grass layer. The model results are compared with the radar data.

  14. Searching for gas giant planets on Solar system scales - a NACO/APP L'-band survey of A- and F-type main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkat, T.; Kenworthy, M. A.; Reggiani, M.; Quanz, S. P.; Mamajek, E. E.; Meyer, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    We report the results of a direct imaging survey of A- and F-type main-sequence stars searching for giant planets. A/F stars are often the targets of surveys, as they are thought to have more massive giant planets relative to solar-type stars. However, most imaging is only sensitive to orbital separations >30 au, where it has been demonstrated that giant planets are rare. In this survey, we take advantage of the high-contrast capabilities of the Apodizing Phase Plate coronagraph on NACO at the Very Large Telescope. Combined with optimized principal component analysis post-processing, we are sensitive to planetary-mass companions (2-12 MJup) at Solar system scales (≤30 au). We obtained data on 13 stars in the L' band and detected one new companion as part of this survey: an M6.0 ± 0.5 dwarf companion around HD 984. We re-detect low-mass companions around HD 12894 and HD 20385, both reported shortly after the completion of this survey. We use Monte Carlo simulations to determine new constraints on the low-mass (<80 MJup) companion frequency, as a function of mass and separation. Assuming solar-type planet mass and separation distributions, normalized to the planet frequency appropriate for A-stars, and the observed companion mass-ratio distribution for stellar companions extrapolated to planetary masses, we derive a truncation radius for the planetary mass companion surface density of <135 au at 95 per cent confidence.

  15. Passive and Active L-Band System and Observations During the 2007 CLASIC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article describes the upgraded PALS instrument and the characteristics of data acquired from the Cloud Land Atmospheric Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) 2007. The data acquired over lake passes were used to remove the radiometer calibration bias. The calibrated radiometer data showed significant c...

  16. The emission and scattering of L-band microwave radiation from rough ocean surfaces and wind speed measurements from the Aquarius sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank J.; Ricciardulli, Lucrezia

    2014-09-01

    In order to achieve the required accuracy in sea surface salinity (SSS) measurements from L-band radiometers such as the Aquarius/SAC-D or SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission, it is crucial to accurately correct the radiation that is emitted from the ocean surface for roughness effects. We derive a geophysical model function (GMF) for the emission and backscatter of L-band microwave radiation from rough ocean surfaces. The analysis is based on radiometer brightness temperature and scatterometer backscatter observations both taken on board Aquarius. The data are temporally and spatially collocated with wind speeds from WindSat and F17 SSMIS (Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder) and wind directions from NCEP (National Center for Environmental Prediction) GDAS (Global Data Assimilation System). This GMF is the basis for retrieval of ocean surface wind speed combining L-band H-pol radiometer and HH-pol scatterometer observations. The accuracy of theses combined passive/active L-band wind speeds matches those of many other satellite microwave sensors. The L-band GMF together with the combined passive/active L-band wind speeds is utilized in the Aquarius SSS retrieval algorithm for the surface roughness correction. We demonstrate that using these L-band wind speeds instead of NCEP wind speeds leads to a significant improvement in the SSS accuracy. Further improvements in the roughness correction algorithm can be obtained by adding VV-pol scatterometer measurements and wave height (WH) data into the GMF.

  17. HIGH CURRENT L-BAND LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    S. RUSSELL; B. CARLSTEN; J. GOETTEE

    2001-02-01

    The Sub-Picosecond Accelerator (SPA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is an L-band photoinjector. Using magnetic compression, the SPA routinely compresses 8 MeV, 1 nC per bunch electron beams from an initial temporal FWHM bunch length of 20 ps to less than 1 ps. In recent plasma wakefield accelerator experiments, we have compressed a 2 nC per bunch electron beam to an approximate temporal length of 1 ps.

  18. NASA's L-band Imaging Scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael F.; Hildebrand, Peter; Hilliard, Larry; Mead, James

    2004-01-01

    NASA's L-band Imaging Scatterometer (LIS) is a new state-of-the-art radar that combines electronic beam scanning and digital beam forming technologies. The instrument will be used in conjunction with ESTAR instruments to demonstrate the capability of making concurrent measurements of radar cross-section and radiometric brightness temperature from common targets. The main application of the instrument is the measurement of ocean salinity and soil moisture. This paper will discuss the instrument design, calibration, and digital beamforming techniques.

  19. Theoretical and experimental study of multifunction C+L band hybrid fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hai-Yin; Yu, Yi-Lin; Liaw, Shien-Kuei; Liu, Ren-Yang; Shin, Chow-Shing

    2014-03-01

    We proposed and demonstrated a 100 km hybrid C+L band fiber amplifier in the bridge-type scheme. It is composed of a C-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and an L-band Raman fiber amplifier (RFA) using double-pass dispersion compensators in a loop-back scheme. Dispersion slope mismatch is compensated precisely for all C+L band channels by writing fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) at appropriate locations. Gain variation among multiple channels can be reduced to ±0.2 dB. The pump efficiency is improved by recycling the residual pump power. The C/L band WDM coupler which at merged point rejects C band amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) using L band coupler and vice versa. Both the simulation results and experimental measurements are realized in this paper. The hybrid EDFA/RFA may find vast applications in WDM long-haul systems and optical networks.

  20. Magnetron Driven L Band RF Gun using a Photocathode Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Kirk; Fisher, Amnon; Friedman, Moshe

    1996-11-01

    Magnetron Driven L Band RF Gun using a Photocathode Emitter A tunable 5 megawatt L-Band injection locked magnetron amplifier is used to drive a 1-1/2 cell RF cavity gun, to produce a 2.5 megavolt electron beam. A tunable RF source relaxes the precision of the cavity gun construction, and therefore simplifies the design and reduces the overall cost. The design of the L-Band ( 1.3 GHz) RF cavity linear accelerator is presented, along with Superfish, SOS computer simulations, and calculations of beam energy and temporal qualities. Measurements of a few robust photocathode materials as well as measurements of the beam qualities of the final accelerator are presented. Future work will utilize new semiconductor laser diodes that can be electrically driven in the gigahertz range. This makes possible an electron gun system which can run at the RF frequency used to accelerate the electron beam. Such a system produces a "lock to clock" and synchronized RF and electron beam source which can be run single shot or any rep rate up to the RF frequency.

  1. L-band briefcase terminal network operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossiter, P.; Reveler, D.; Tibbo, L.

    1990-01-01

    During 1989, SkyWave Electronics Ltd. developed a lightweight battery powered, L Band Briefcase Satellite Terminal (LBT) which is capable of providing truly portable voice and data communications on a global scale. The LBT is designed to operate through Inmarsat's Atlantic Region Satellite MARECSB-2, and Teleglobe Canada's 18 meter Laurentides Earth Station. A small operating network, consisting of up to 20 mobile terminals and homing on the Laurentides Earth Station, was set up in the spring of 1990 to provide commercial service to LBT users, both domestic and international. This paper describes the LBT and the operation of the network.

  2. Obituary: David L. Band (1957-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn

    2011-12-01

    David L. Band, of Potomac Maryland, died on March 16, 2009 succumbing to a long battle with spinal cord cancer. His death at the age of 52 came as a shock to his many friends and colleagues in the physics and astronomy community. Band showed an early interest and exceptional aptitude for physics, leading to his acceptance at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as an undergraduate student in 1975. After graduating from MIT with an undergraduate degree in Physics, Band continued as a graduate student in Physics at Harvard University. His emerging interest in Astrophysics led him to the Astronomy Department at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), where he did his dissertation work with Jonathan Grindlay. His dissertation (1985) entitled "Non-thermal Radiation Mechanisms and Processes in SS433 and Active Galactic Nuclei" was "pioneering work on the physics of jets arising from black holes and models for their emission, including self-absorption, which previewed much to come, and even David's own later work on Gamma-ray Bursts," according to Grindlay who remained a personal friend and colleague of Band's. Following graduate school, Band held postdoctoral positions at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley and the Center for Astronomy and Space Sciences at the University of California San Diego where he worked on the BATSE experiment that was part of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), launched in 1991. BATSE had as its main objective the study of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and made significant advances in this area of research. Band became a world-renowned figure in the emerging field of GRB studies. He is best known for his widely-used analytic form of gamma-ray burst spectra known as the "Band Function." After the CGRO mission ended, Band moved to the Los Alamos National Laboratory where he worked mainly on classified research but continued to work on GRB energetics and spectra. When NASA planned

  3. Effective Tree Scattering at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; ONeill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Cosh, Michael H.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    For routine microwave Soil Moisture (SM) retrieval through vegetation, the tau-omega [1] model [zero-order Radiative Transfer (RT) solution] is attractive due to its simplicity and eases of inversion and implementation. It is the model used in baseline retrieval algorithms for several planned microwave space missions, such as ESA's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission (launched November 2009) and NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission (to be launched 2014/2015) [2 and 3]. These approaches are adapted for vegetated landscapes with effective vegetation parameters tau and omega by fitting experimental data or simulation outputs of a multiple scattering model [4-7]. The model has been validated over grasslands, agricultural crops, and generally light to moderate vegetation. As the density of vegetation increases, sensitivity to the underlying SM begins to degrade significantly and errors in the retrieved SM increase accordingly. The zero-order model also loses its validity when dense vegetation (i.e. forest, mature corn, etc.) includes scatterers, such as branches and trunks (or stalks in the case of corn), which are large with respect to the wavelength. The tau-omega model (when applied over moderately to densely vegetated landscapes) will need modification (in terms of form or effective parameterization) to enable accurate characterization of vegetation parameters with respect to specific tree types, anisotropic canopy structure, presence of leaves and/or understory. More scattering terms (at least up to first-order at L-band) should be included in the RT solutions for forest canopies [8]. Although not really suitable to forests, a zero-order tau-omega model might be applied to such vegetation canopies with large scatterers, but that equivalent or effective parameters would have to be used [4]. This requires that the effective values (vegetation opacity and single scattering albedo) need to be evaluated (compared) with theoretical definitions of

  4. UAVSAR: Airborne L-band Radar for Repeat Pass Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    The primary objectives of the UAVSAR Project were to: a) develop a miniaturized polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for use on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or piloted vehicle. b) develop the associated processing algorithms for repeat-pass differential interferometric measurements using a single antenna. c) conduct measurements of geophysical interest, particularly changes of rapidly deforming surfaces such as volcanoes or earthquakes. Two complete systems were developed. Operational Science Missions began on February 18, 2009 ... concurrent development and testing of the radar system continues.

  5. Measurement of backscattering from sea with an airborne radar at L band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xianyun; Zhang, Zhongzhi; Yin, Zhiying; Sun, Fang; Kang, Shifeng; Wang, Laibu; Yu, Yunchao; Wen, Fangru

    1998-08-01

    Measurements of electromagnetic backscattering from sea surface at L band have been done with airborne side-looking radar system. Several flights are made for various sea states. Coherent radar data ta HH polarization and some truth data such as wave height, wind velocity and direction, temperature of sea water are recorded. Corner reflectors and active backscattering coefficient can be derived from the radar data and the cinematic data. The result presented in this paper include scattering coefficient and statistical analysis of radar echo with typical probability distribution functions such as Rayleigh, Weibull, Log-normal and K distribution.

  6. How Does Dew Affect L-band Backscatter? Analysis of PALS Data at the Iowa Validation Site and Implications for SMAP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive satellite mission will use both an L-band radiometer and radar to produce global-scale measurements of soil moisture. L-band backscatter is also sensitive to the water content of vegetation. We found that a moderate dew increased the L-band backscatter of a soybea...

  7. RF performance measurement of the DSS-14 70-meter antenna at C-band/L-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatti, M. S.; Freiley, A. J.; Girdner, D.

    1989-01-01

    The calibration of the 70-meter antenna at C-band (5.01 GHz) and L-band (1.668 GHz) is described. This calibration comes after a modification to an existing L-band feed to include the C-band frequencies. The test technique employs noise-adding radiometers and associated equipment running simultaneously at both frequencies. The test procedure is described including block diagrams, and results are presented for efficiency, system temperature, and pointing.

  8. Miniature L-Band Radar Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWatters, Dalia; Price, Douglas; Edelstein, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    A miniature L-band transceiver that operates at a carrier frequency of 1.25 GHz has been developed as part of a generic radar electronics module (REM) that would constitute one unit in an array of many identical units in a very-large-aperture phased-array antenna. NASA and the Department of Defense are considering the deployment of such antennas in outer space; the underlying principles of operation, and some of those of design, also are applicable on Earth. The large dimensions of the antennas make it advantageous to distribute radio-frequency electronic circuitry into elements of the arrays. The design of the REM is intended to implement the distribution. The design also reflects a requirement to minimize the size and weight of the circuitry in order to minimize the weight of any such antenna. Other requirements include making the transceiver robust and radiation-hard and minimizing power demand. Figure 1 depicts the functional blocks of the REM, including the L-band transceiver. The key functions of the REM include signal generation, frequency translation, amplification, detection, handling of data, and radar control and timing. An arbitrary-waveform generator that includes logic circuitry and a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) generates a linear-frequency-modulation chirp waveform. A frequency synthesizer produces local-oscillator signals used for frequency conversion and clock signals for the arbitrary-waveform generator, for a digitizer [that is, an analog-to-digital converter (ADC)], and for a control and timing unit. Digital functions include command, timing, telemetry, filtering, and high-rate framing and serialization of data for a high-speed scientific-data interface. The aforementioned digital implementation of filtering is a key feature of the REM architecture. Digital filters, in contradistinction to analog ones, provide consistent and temperature-independent performance, which is particularly important when REMs are distributed throughout a large

  9. Developing an Error Model for Ionospheric Phase Distortions in L-Band SAR and InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Agram, P. S.

    2014-12-01

    Many of the recent and upcoming spaceborne SAR systems are operating in the L-band frequency range. The choice of L-band has a number of advantages especially for InSAR applications. These include deeper penetration into vegetation, higher coherence, and higher sensitivity to soil moisture. While L-band SARs are undoubtedly beneficial for a number of earth science disciplines, their signals are susceptive to path delay effects in the ionosphere. Many recent publications indicate that the ionosphere can have detrimental effects on InSAR coherence and phase. It has also been shown that the magnitude of these effects strongly depends on the time of day and geographic location of the image acquisition as well as on the coincident solar activity. Hence, in order to provide realistic error estimates for geodetic measurements derived from L-band InSAR, an error model needs to be developed that is capable of describing ionospheric noise. With this paper, we present a global ionospheric error model that is currently being developed in support of NASA's future L-band SAR mission NISAR. The system is based on a combination of empirical data analysis and modeling input from the ionospheric model WBMOD, and is capable of predicting ionosphere-induced phase noise as a function of space and time. The error model parameterizes ionospheric noise using a power spectrum model and provides the parameters of this model in a global 1x1 degree raster. From the power law model, ionospheric errors in deformation estimates can be calculated. In Polar Regions, our error model relies on a statistical analysis of ionospheric-phase noise in a large number of SAR data from previous L-band SAR missions such as ALOS PALSAR and JERS-1. The focus on empirical analyses is due to limitations of WBMOD in high latitude areas. Outside of the Polar Regions, the ionospheric model WBMOD is used to derive ionospheric structure parameters for as a function of solar activity. The structure parameters are

  10. Preliminary geologic evaluation of L-band radar imagery: Arkansas test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, H.; Waite, W. P.

    1977-01-01

    The relatively small angles of incidence (steep depression angles) of the L-band system provide minimal shadowing on terrain back-slopes and considerable foreshortening on terrain fore-slopes which sacrifice much of the topographic enhancement afforded by a more oblique angle of illumination. In addition, the dynamic range of the return from vegetated surfaces is substantially less for the L-band system, and many surface features defined primarily by subtle changes in vegetation are lost. In areas having terrain conditions similar to those of northern Arkansas, and where LANDSAT and shorter wavelength aircraft radar data are available, the value of the JPL L-band imagery as either a complimentary or supplementary geologic data source is not obvious.

  11. Earth Studies Using L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.

    1999-01-01

    L-band SAR has played an important role in studies of the Earth by revealing the nature of the larger-scale (decimeter) surface features. JERS-1, by supplying multi-seasonal coverage of the much of the earth, has demonstrated the importance of L-band SARs. Future L-band SARs such as ALOS and LightSAR will pave the way for science missions that use SAR instruments. As technology develops to enable lower cost SAR instruments, missions will evolve to each have a unique science focus. International coordination of multi-parameter constellations and campaigns will maximize science return.

  12. Large Scale Assessment of Radio Frequency Interference Signatures in L-band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Nicoll, J.

    2011-12-01

    Imagery of L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems such as the PALSAR sensor on board the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) has proven to be a valuable tool for observing environmental changes around the globe. Besides offering 24/7 operability, the L-band frequency provides improved interferometric coherence, and L-band polarimetric data has shown great potential for vegetation monitoring, sea ice classification, and the observation of glaciers and ice sheets. To maximize the benefit of missions such as ALOS PALSAR for environmental monitoring, data consistency and calibration are vital. Unfortunately, radio frequency interference (RFI) signatures from ground-based radar systems regularly impair L-band SAR data quality and consistency. With this study we present a large-scale analysis of typical RFI signatures that are regularly observed in L-band SAR data over the Americas. Through a study of the vast archive of L-band SAR data in the US Government Research Consortium (USGRC) data pool at the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) we were able to address the following research goals: 1. Assessment of RFI Signatures in L-band SAR data and their Effects on SAR Data Quality: An analysis of time-frequency properties of RFI signatures in L-band SAR data of the USGRC data pool is presented. It is shown that RFI-filtering algorithms implemented in the operational ALOS PALSAR processor are not sufficient to remove all RFI-related artifacts. In examples, the deleterious effects of RFI on SAR image quality, polarimetric signature, SAR phase, and interferometric coherence are presented. 2. Large-Scale Assessment of Severity, Spatial Distribution, and Temporal Variation of RFI Signatures in L-band SAR data: L-band SAR data in the USGRC data pool were screened for RFI using a custom algorithm. Per SAR frame, the algorithm creates geocoded frame bounding boxes that are color-coded according to RFI intensity and converted to KML files for analysis in Google Earth. From

  13. Inter-comparison of SMAP, Aquarius and SMOS L-band brightness temperature observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch on January 29, 2015. SMAP will make observations with an L-band radar and radiometer using a shared 6 m rotating reflector antenna. SMAP is a fully polarimetric radiometer with the center frequency of 1.41 GHz. The target accuracy o...

  14. Impact of the ionosphere on an L-band space based radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, Elaine; Chan, Samuel F.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Chen, Curtis W.; Martin, Jan M.; Michel, Thierry R.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Pi, Xiaoqing; Rosen, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    We have quantified the impact that the ionosphere would have on a L-band interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission using a combination of simulation, modeling, Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected during the last solar maximum, and existing spaceborne SAR data.

  15. The design of a linear L-band high power amplifier for mobile communication satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittaker, N.; Brassard, G.; Li, E.; Goux, P.

    1990-01-01

    A linear L-band solid state high power amplifier designed for the space segment of the Mobile Satellite (MSAT) mobile communication system is described. The amplifier is capable of producing 35 watts of RF power with multitone signal at an efficiency of 25 percent and with intermodulation products better than 16 dB below carrier.

  16. Impact of surface roughness on L-band emissivity of the sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miernecki, M.; Kaleschke, L.; Hendricks, S.; Søbjærg, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    In March 2014 a joint experiment IRO2/SMOSice was carried out in the Barents Sea. R/V Lance equipped with meteorological instruments, electromagnetic sea ice thickness probe and engine monitoring instruments, was performing a series of tests in different ice conditions in order to validate the ice route optimization (IRO) system, advising on his route through pack ice. In parallel cal/val activities for sea ice thickness product obtained from SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission) L-band radiometer were carried out. Apart from helicopter towing the EMbird thickness probe, Polar 5 aircraft was serving the area during the experiment with L-band radiometer EMIRAD2 and Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) as primary instruments. Sea ice Thickness algorithm using SMOS brightness temperature developed at University of Hamburg, provides daily maps of thin sea ice (up to 0.5-1 m) in polar regions with resolution of 35-50 km. So far the retrieval method was not taking into account surface roughness, assuming that sea ice is a specular surface. Roughness is a stochastic process that can be characterized by standard deviation of surface height σ and by shape of the autocorrelation function R to estimate it's vertical and horizontal scales respectively. Interactions of electromagnetic radiation with the surface of the medium are dependent on R and σ and they scales with respect to the incident wavelength. During SMOSice the radiometer was observing sea ice surface at two incidence angles 0 and 40 degrees and simultaneously the surface elevation was scanned with ALS with ground resolution of ~ 0.25 m. This configuration allowed us to calculate σ and R from power spectral densities of surface elevation profiles and quantify the effect of surface roughness on the emissivity of the sea ice. First results indicate that Gaussian autocorrelation function is suitable for deformed ice, for other ice types exponential function is the best fit.

  17. L band SAR ocean wave observations during Marsen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1983-11-01

    The L Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) was flown over the Nordsee tower during the Marine Remote Sensing Experiment (MARSEN). The five-sided flight pattern allowed viewing of the same ocean surface patch from five different directions. The results form a unique and useful base which is needed for evaluating existing wave imaging theories and developing more realistic models. The results derived from analysis of radar and in situ measurements suggest that (1) the focus dependence for optimum imaging is that for a surface moving with a speed that is approximately equal to the wave phase velocity, (2) azimuthally traveling waves can be as visible as range traveling waves when the necessary focus adjustments are made in the SAR processor, (3) visibility of azimuthally traveling waves does not improve with decreasing integration time, (4) spectra and images of azimuthally traveling waves do not show observable distortions compared to those for range traveling waves, and (5) comparisons of SAR image spectra for September 28, 1979, with in situ wave height spectra suggest that for a multi-peaked wave system the SAR image spectrum and surface wave height spectrum are not connected by a simple relationship.

  18. L-band tone-code-data transponder calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brisken, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of this program were to identify and quantify factors which affect the performance of the L-band tone-code-data ranging transponders. Specific objectives included the following: (1) assemble the L-band ranging transponder, previously deployed in Hawaii for the tracking of the ATS-5 satellite, at the GE Radio-Optical Observatory; (2) configure the observatory to conduct calibration exercises with the transponder; and (3) conduct sufficient calibration experiments to demonstrate factors which degrade transponder accuracy, precision, and reliability, to quantify these factors where possible, and to verify long term transponder stability under controlled conditions.

  19. Effective tree scattering and opacity at L-band

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper investigates vegetation effects at L-band by using a first-order radiative transfer (RT) model and truck-based microwave measurements over natural conifer stands to assess the performance of the tau-omega model over trees. The tau-omega model is a zero-order RT solution and it accounts f...

  20. Study of precise positioning at L-band using communications satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The L-band positioning experiment is reported which encompassed experiment design, experimentation, and data reduction and analysis. In the experiment the ATS-5 synchronous satellite L-band transponder was used in conjunction with the modified ALPHA 2 navigation receivers to demonstrate the technical capability of precision position fixing for oceanographic purposes. The feasibility of using relative ranging techniques implemented by two identical receiving systems, properly calibrated, to determine a line of position accurately on the surface of the earth was shown. The program demonstrated the level of resolution, repeatibility, precision, and accuracy of existing modest-cost effective navigation equipment. The experiment configuration and data reduction techniques were developed in parallel with the hardware modification tasks. Test results verify the ability of a satellite-based system to satisfy the requirements of precision position fixing.

  1. L band InSAR sudy on the Ganos section of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Michele, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF), with a total length of about 1500 km, is one of the most active right-lateral strike-slip faults in the world. It defines the tectonic boundary between the Anatolian Plate and the Eurasian Plate in northern Turkey, accommodating ~14-30 mm/yr of relative plate motion between the two plates (fig. 1). The Gazikoy-Saros segment (the Ganos fault, GF) is the onshore segment of the northern strand of the NAF between the Marmara Sea and the Gulf of Saros. It was last ruptured in 1912 with a Ms=7.4 earthquake that broke the entire inland segment of the fault, a length of about 50 km, and produced a right-lateral strike-slip component of at least 3 m. Other large historical earthquakes that have been attributed to the Ganos fault occurred in A.D. 824, 1343, 1509 and 1766 (e. g. Reilinger et al., 2000; Meade et al., 2002; Motagh et al., 2007; Janssen et al., 2009; Megraoui et al., 2012 ; Ersen Aksoy et al., 2010). The GF forms a 45 km long linear fault system and represents the link between the northern strand of the NAFZ in the Sea of Marmara and the North Aegean Trough where slip partitioning results in branching of the fault zone. The present study aims at showing the results retrieved from L band Interferometric Syntethic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements for the monitoring of Crustal Deformation in the Anatolian Fault Zone in the frame of the MARMARA SUPERSITE PROJECT "MARSITE" on the Ganos section of the North Anatolian fault zone. We processed SAR data made available through the CAT-1 ESA (European Space Agency) archives, acquired by the L-band radar sensor ALOS PALSAR between 2007 and 2011. The aim of this exercise is to test L-band capabilities to map the spatial and temporal evolution of the present-day crustal deformation phenomena affecting the Ganos section of the NAFZ with high level of spatial details. The goal of this task is to assess whether InSAR L-Band data can be useful to evaluate the long-term behavior of active faults

  2. EMI survey for maritime satellite, L-band, shipboard terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. E.; Hill, J. S.; Brandel, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The United States Lines 15,690-ton commercial-container ship, American Alliance, was selected as lead ship for an onboard EMI survey prior to installation of L-Band shipboard terminals for operation with two, geostationary, maritime satellites. In general, the EMI survey revealed tolerable interference levels onboard ship: radiometer measurements indicate antenna-noise temperatures less than 70 K, at elevation angles of 5 deg and greater, at 1559 MHz, at the output terminals of the 1.2-m-diameter, parabolic-dish antenna for the L-Band shipboard terminal. Other EMI measurements include field intensity from 3 cm- and 10 cm-wavelength pulse radars, and conducted-emission tests of primary power lines to both onboard radars.

  3. MAPSAR: a small L-band SAR mission for land observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Reinhard; Puls, Jürgen; Hajnsek, Irena; Jochim, Fritz; Neff, Thomas; Kono, Janio; Renato Paradella, Waldir; Marcos Quintino da Silva, Mario; de Morisson Valeriano, Dalton; Pereira Farias Costa, Maycira

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces Multi-Application Purpose SAR (MAPSAR). A new Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission for earth observation. MAPSAR is the result of a joint pre-phase A study conducted by INPE and DLR targeting a mission for assessment, management and monitoring of natural resources. The applicability of the sensor system was investigated for cartography, forestry, geology, geomorphology, hydrology, agriculture, disaster management, oceanography, urban studies and security. An L-band SAR, based on INPE's multi-mission platform (MMP), has been chosen as payload of the satellite. The key component of the SAR instrument is the SAR antenna, which is designed as an elliptical parabolic reflector antenna. L-band (high spatial resolution, quad-pol) has been selected for the SAR sensor as optimum frequency accounting for the majority of Brazilian and German user requirements. At the moment, the pre-phase A has been concluded and the phase A is planned to start in early 2003.

  4. L'-band AGPM vector vortex coronagraph's first light on LBTI/LMIRCam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrère, D.; Absil, O.; Hinz, P.; Kuhn, J.; Mawet, D.; Mennesson, B.; Skemer, A.; Wallace, K.; Bailey, V.; Downey, E.; Delacroix, C.; Durney, O.; Forsberg, P.; Gomez, C.; Habraken, S.; Hoffmann, W. F.; Karlsson, M.; Kenworthy, M.; Leisenring, J.; Montoya, M.; Pueyo, L.; Skrutskie, M.; Surdej, J.,

    2014-07-01

    We present the first observations obtained with the L'-band AGPM vortex coronagraph recently installed on LBTI/LMIRCam. The AGPM (Annular Groove Phase Mask) is a vector vortex coronagraph made from diamond subwavelength gratings. It is designed to improve the sensitivity and dynamic range of high-resolution imaging at very small inner working angles, down to 0.09 arcseconds in the case of LBTI/LMIRCam in the L' band. During the first hours on sky, we observed the young A5V star HR8799 with the goal to demonstrate the AGPM performance and assess its relevance for the ongoing LBTI planet survey (LEECH). Preliminary analyses of the data reveal the four known planets clearly at high SNR and provide unprecedented sensitivity limits in the inner planetary system (down to the diffraction limit of 0.09 arcseconds).

  5. Characteristics of postmidnight L band scintillation in the transition region from the equatorial to midlatitudes over the Indian longitude sector using COSMIC, C/NOFS, and GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.; Haralambous, H.; Oikonomou, C.

    2015-12-01

    Occurrence of L band scintillations around midnight and postmidnight hours have not been well studied and reported from the higher equatorial latitudes in the transition region from the equatorial to midlatitudes over the Indian longitude sector. The present paper reports cases of postmidnight L band scintillation observations by COSMIC during March 2014 over the Indian longitude sector. GPS S4 measurements from the International Global Navigation Satellite Systems Service station at Lucknow (26.91°N, 80.96°E geographic; magnetic dip: 39.75°N) corroborate occurrence of postmidnight scintillations. The F region vertical upward velocities around the magnetic equator during evening hours have been used to understand the possibility of impact of irregularities generated over the magnetic equator at latitudes north of 30°N. Postmidnight L band scintillations at latitudes greater than 30°N without corresponding premidnight scintillations present interesting scientific scenario and give rise to suggestions of (1) any coupling mechanism between the equatorial and midlatitudes through which irregularities seeded in the midlatitudes may affect transionospheric satellite links at low latitudes or (2) irregularity generation at midlatitudes not connected with equatorial instabilities. Long-term analysis of S4 at L band measured by COSMIC over the Indian longitudes during March 2007-2014 exhibits a well-defined longitude swath around 75-83°E of reduced (0.2 < S4 < 0.4) or no scintillations which may be attributed to the longitudinal variability of scintillation occurrence following the global four-cell pattern of ionospheric activity.

  6. L'-band AGPM vector vortex coronagraph's first light on LBTI/LMIRCAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defrère, D.; Absil, O.; Hinz, P.; Mawet, D.; Kuhn, J.; Mawet, D.; Mennesson, B.; Skemer, A.; Wallace, K.; Bailey, V.; Downey, E.; Delacroix, C.; Durney, O.; Forsberg, P.; Gomez, C.; Habraken, S.; Karlsson, M.; Kenworthy, M.; Leisenring, J.; Montoya, M.; Pueyo, L.; Skrutskie, M.; Surdej, J.

    2014-03-01

    We present the first science observations obtained with the L'-band AGPM coronagraph recently installed on LBTI/LMIRCAM. The AGPM (Annular Groove Phase Mask) is a vector vortex coronagraph made from diamond sub-wavelength gratings tuned to the L'-band. It is designed to improve the sensitivity and dynamic range of high-resolution imaging at very small inner working angles, down to 0.09 arcseconds in the case of LBTI/LMIRCAM in the L'- band. During the first hours on sky, we observed the young A5V star HR8799 with the goal to obtain the best sensitivity/contrast ever in the inner region (<1") of the planetary system. Preliminary analyses of the data reveal the four known planets clearly at high SNR. The performance of the instrument in this mode will be presented and compared to straight imaging (without coronagraph) which is used for the ongoing LBTI planet survey (LEECH, see abstract by A. Skemer).

  7. Picture processing of SAR L-band imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, M. L.; Stromberg, W. D.; Farr, T.

    1977-01-01

    Data digitization and thresholding are applied to two scenes - sea ice and fresh-water lakes - to define the possible uses of automatic picture processing of uncalibrated SAR L-band imagery. It is shown that certain types of features, those which have constant returns which are also very high or very low in intensity can be effectively studied using simple automatic picture processing techniques applied to uncalibrated radar data. In areas which are generally inaccessible or in which monitoring of the changes of some types of earth surfaces are required, the uncalibrated SAR data can provide valuable inputs for modeling and mapping purposes.

  8. Aquarius L-Band Radiometers Calibration Using Cold Sky Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Le Vine, David M.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Brown, Shannon T.; Hong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    An important element in the calibration plan for the Aquarius radiometers is to look at the cold sky. This involves rotating the satellite 180 degrees from its nominal Earth viewing configuration to point the main beams at the celestial sky. At L-band, the cold sky provides a stable, well-characterized scene to be used as a calibration reference. This paper describes the cold sky calibration for Aquarius and how it is used as part of the absolute calibration. Cold sky observations helped establish the radiometer bias, by correcting for an error in the spillover lobe of the antenna pattern, and monitor the long-term radiometer drift.

  9. Omni-directional L-band antenna for mobile communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C. S.; Moldovan, N.; Kijesky, J.

    1988-01-01

    The principle and design of an L-band omni-directional mobile communication antenna are discussed. The antenna is a circular wave guide aperture with hybrid circuits attached to higher order mode excitation. It produces polarized and symmetric two split beams in elevation. The circular waveguide is fed by eight probes with a 90 degree phase shift between their inputs. Radiation pattern characteristics are controlled by adjusting the aperture diameter and mode excitation. This antenna satisfies gain requirements as well as withstanding the harsh environment.

  10. Low-profile metamaterial-based L-band antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Lepage, Anne-Claire; Varault, Stefan; Begaud, Xavier; Piau, Gérard-Pascal; de Lustrac, André

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present contribution is to show that metasurfaces such as reactive impedance surfaces (RIS) and artificial magnetic conductors can be efficiently used in the design of low-profile circularly polarized L-band antennas. We present the design and simulation of the compact and low-profile antennas. The solution based on RIS will be compared to a circularly polarized microstrip patch antenna using the same materials in order to prove the benefit of metasurfaces. The engineered metasurfaces allow increasing the bandwidths with few modifications on the thickness and the overall antenna size.

  11. Omni-directional L-band antenna for mobile communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. S.; Moldovan, N.; Kijesky, J.

    1988-05-01

    The principle and design of an L-band omni-directional mobile communication antenna are discussed. The antenna is a circular wave guide aperture with hybrid circuits attached to higher order mode excitation. It produces polarized and symmetric two split beams in elevation. The circular waveguide is fed by eight probes with a 90 degree phase shift between their inputs. Radiation pattern characteristics are controlled by adjusting the aperture diameter and mode excitation. This antenna satisfies gain requirements as well as withstanding the harsh environment.

  12. L-band RF gun with a thermionic cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaitsev, S.; Andrews, R.; Church, M.; Lunin, A.; Nezhevenko, O.; Solyak, N.; Sun, D.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    We present a conceptual design for an L-band (1.3 GHz) rf gun with a two-grid thermionic cathode assembly. The rf gun is designed to provide a 9 mA average beam current for 1 ms pulses at a 5 Hz rate. These parameters match the beam requirements for both the ILC and the Fermilab Project X test facilities. In our simulations we are able to attain a full bunch length of 20-30 degrees, while the output energy can vary from 2 to 4 MeV. Simulations as well as a preliminary design will be presented.

  13. L band push broom microwave radiometer: Soil moisture verification and time series experiment Delmarva Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. J.; Shiue, J.; Oneill, P.; Wang, J.; Fuchs, J.; Owe, M.

    1984-01-01

    The verification of a multi-sensor aircraft system developed to study soil moisture applications is discussed. This system consisted of a three beam push broom L band microwave radiometer, a thermal infrared scanner, a multispectral scanner, video and photographic cameras and an onboard navigational instrument. Ten flights were made of agricultural sites in Maryland and Delaware with little or no vegetation cover. Comparisons of aircraft and ground measurements showed that the system was reliable and consistent. Time series analysis of microwave and evaporation data showed a strong similarity that indicates a potential direction for future research.

  14. Effect of Forest Canopy on Remote Sensing Soil Moisture at L-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R. H.; Jackson, T. J.; Haken, M.

    2005-01-01

    include images of the experiment site area near Huntsville, AL that included a mixture of forest and agriculture. Changes during a rain event further illustrate the issues presented by forests. Work is continuing to reduce the 2D-STAR data and to support the two future remote sensing missions. Among the goals is to process the 2D-STAR data to create multiple looks (at the same pixel) with different incidence angles. Data in this format can be used to test algorithms for retrieving soil moisture and biomass such as are planned for SMOS. Also, the data are being processed to provide images at constant incidence angles such as will be obtained by Hydros. Although Hydros will have only one incidence angle, it will also carry an L-band radar, The goal is to use the radar to improve spatial resolution, an issue for remote sensing from space at the long wavelengths. Simultaneous observations with active and passive sensors also offers interesting prospects for treating areas of high biomass (forests) and irregular terrain and may be the challenge for the future.

  15. Effective Tree Scattering and Opacity at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Cosh, Michael H.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates vegetation effects at L-band by using a first-order radiative transfer (RT) model and truck-based microwave measurements over natural conifer stands to assess the applicability of the tau-omega) model over trees. The tau-omega model is a zero-order RT solution that accounts for vegetation effects with effective vegetation parameters (vegetation opacity and single-scattering albedo), which represent the canopy as a whole. This approach inherently ignores multiple-scattering effects and, therefore, has a limited validity depending on the level of scattering within the canopy. The fact that the scattering from large forest components such as branches and trunks is significant at L-band requires that zero-order vegetation parameters be evaluated (compared) along with their theoretical definitions to provide a better understanding of these parameters in the retrieval algorithms as applied to trees. This paper compares the effective vegetation opacities, computed from multi-angular pine tree brightness temperature data, against the results of two independent approaches that provide theoretical and measured optical depths. These two techniques are based on forward scattering theory and radar corner reflector measurements, respectively. The results indicate that the effective vegetation opacity values are smaller than but of similar magnitude to both radar and theoretical estimates. The effective opacity of the zero-order model is thus set equal to the theoretical opacity and an explicit expression for the effective albedo is then obtained from the zero- and first- order RT model comparison. The resultant albedo is found to have a similar magnitude as the effective albedo value obtained from brightness temperature measurements. However, it is less than half of that estimated using the theoretical calculations (0.5 - 0.6 for tree canopies at L-band). This lower observed albedo balances the scattering darkening effect of the large theoretical albedo

  16. Precisely determined the surface displacement by the ionospheric mitigation using the L-band SAR Interferometry over Mt.Baekdu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won-Jin; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Park, Sun-Cheon; Lee, Duk Kee

    2016-04-01

    Mt. Baekdu (Changbaishan in Chinese) is located on the border between China and North Korea. It has recently attracted the attention of volcanic unrest during 2002-2005. Many researchers have applied geophysical approaches to detect magma system of beneath Mt.Baekdu such as leveling, Global Positioning System (GPS), gases analysis, seismic analysis, etc. Among them, deformation measuring instruments are important tool to evaluate for volcanism. In contrast to GPS or other deformation measuring instruments, Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has provided high resolution of 2-D surface displacement from remote sensed data. However, Mt. Baekdu area has disturbed by decorrelation on interferogram because of wide vegetation coverage. To overcome this limitation, L-band system of long wavelength is more effective to detect surface deformation. In spite of this advantage, L-band can surfer from more severe ionospheric phase distortions than X- or C- band system because ionospheric phase distortions are inverse proportion to the radar frequency. Recently, Multiple Aperture Interferometry (MAI) based ionospheric phase distortions mitigation method have proposed and investigated. We have applied this technique to the Mt.Baekdu area to measure surface deformation precisely using L-band Advanced Land Observing Satellite-1(ALOS-1) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar(PALSAR) data acquiring from 2006 to 2011.

  17. L band InSAR sudy on the Ganos section of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Michele, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF), with a total length of about 1500 km, is one of the most active right-lateral strike-slip faults in the world. It defines the tectonic boundary between the Anatolian Plate and the Eurasian Plate in northern Turkey, accommodating ~14-30 mm/yr of relative plate motion between the two plates (fig. 1). The Gazikoy-Saros segment (the Ganos fault, GF) is the onshore segment of the northern strand of the NAF between the Marmara Sea and the Gulf of Saros. It was last ruptured in 1912 with a Ms=7.4 earthquake that broke the entire inland segment of the fault, a length of about 50 km, and produced a right-lateral strike-slip component of at least 3 m. Other large historical earthquakes that have been attributed to the Ganos fault occurred in A.D. 824, 1343, 1509 and 1766 (e. g. Reilinger et al., 2000; Meade et al., 2002; Motagh et al., 2007; Janssen et al., 2009; Megraoui et al., 2012 ; Ersen Aksoy et al., 2010). The GF forms a 45 km long linear fault system and represents the link between the northern strand of the NAFZ in the Sea of Marmara and the North Aegean Trough where slip partitioning results in branching of the fault zone. The present study aims at showing the results retrieved from L band Interferometric Syntethic Aperture Radar (InSAR) measurements for the monitoring of Crustal Deformation in the Anatolian Fault Zone in the frame of the MARMARA SUPERSITE PROJECT "MARSITE" on the Ganos section of the North Anatolian fault zone. We processed SAR data made available through the CAT-1 ESA (European Space Agency) archives, acquired by the L-band radar sensor ALOS PALSAR between 2007 and 2011. The aim of this exercise is to test L-band capabilities to map the spatial and temporal evolution of the present-day crustal deformation phenomena affecting the Ganos section of the NAFZ with high level of spatial details. The goal of this task is to assess whether InSAR L-Band data can be useful to evaluate the long-term behavior of active faults

  18. L-band wavelength-tunable dissipative soliton fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dan; Li, Xingliang; Zhang, Shumin; Han, Mengmeng; Han, Huiyun; Yang, Zhenjun

    2016-01-25

    A tunable L-band dissipative soliton (DS) fiber laser with nonlinear polarization rotation (NPR) playing the roles of both a saturable absorber (SA) and a tunable filter has been demonstrated experimentally and numerically. By appropriate adjustment of the states of the polarization controllers (PCs) and the pump power, DSs with continuously tunable wavelengths have been observed over the wavelength range from 1583.0 to 1602.4 nm with a 3-dB spectral bandwidth of around 20 nm and from 1581.9 nm to 1602.6 nm with a 3-dB spectral bandwidth of around 4 nm. In addition, we have observed that by increasing the pump power, the 3-dB spectral bandwidth of the DS could be increased without pulse breaking. Numerical results for the characteristics of the DSs are in accord with the experimental data. PMID:26832459

  19. Airborne Geodetic Imaging Using the L-band UAVSAR Instrument (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, S.; Zebker, H. A.; Jones, C. E.; Michel, T.; Chapman, B. D.; Muellerschoen, R.; Fore, A.; Simard, M.

    2009-12-01

    Radar interferometry using both airborne and spaceborne platforms has become an integral tool in geodetics sciences over the past 3 decades for both fine resolution topographic mapping and for measuring surface deformation from a variety of both natural and anthropogenic sources. The UAVSAR instrument, employing an L-band actively electronically scanned antenna, had its genesis in the ESTO Instrument Incubator Program and after 3 years of development has begun the regular collection of science data in support of various geodetic applications. System design was motivated by solid Earth applications where repeat pass radar interferometry can be used to measure subtle deformation of the surface, however flexibility and extensibility to support other applications were also major design drivers. Initial testing and deployments are being carried out with the NASA Gulfstream III aircraft, which has been modified to accommodate the radar pod and has been equipped with precision autopilot capability developed by NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. With this the aircraft can fly within a 10 m diameter tube on any specified trajectory necessary for repeat-pass radar interferometric applications. To maintain the required pointing for repeat-pass interferometric applications we have employed an actively scanned antenna steered using INU measurement data. This talk will present some early deformation results made by the UAVSAR instrument over volcanoes (Mt St Helens), landslides near Parkfield CA, ice sheet motion in Greenland and Iceland, anthropogenic induced surface deformation from oil pumping near Lost Hills, CA and changes in agricultural surfaces in California’s San Joaquin Valley. This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  20. Evaluation of Spaceborne L-band Radiometer Measurements for Terrestrial Freeze/Thaw Retrievals in Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, A.; Royer, A.; Derksen, C.; Brucker, L.; Langlois, A.; Mailon, A.; Kerr, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The landscape freeze/thaw (FT) state has an important impact on the surface energy balance, carbon fluxes, and hydrologic processes; the timing of spring melt is linked to active layer dynamics in permafrost areas. L-band (1.4 GHz) microwave emission could allow the monitoring of surface state dynamics due to its sensitivity to the pronounced permittivity difference between frozen and thawed soil. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the performance of both Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) L-band passive microwave measurements using a polarization ratio-based algorithm for landscape FT monitoring. Weekly L-band satellite observations are compared with a large set of reference data at 48 sites across Canada spanning three environments: tundra, boreal forest, and prairies. The reference data include in situ measurements of soil temperature (Tsoil) and air temperature (Tair), and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST) and snow cover area (SCA) products. Results show generally good agreement between Lband FT detection and the surface state estimated from four reference datasets. The best apparent accuracies for all seasons are obtained using Tair as the reference. Aquarius radiometer 2 (incidence angle of 39.6) data gives the best accuracies (90.8), while for SMOS the best results (87.8 of accuracy) are obtained at higher incidence angles (55- 60). The FT algorithm identifies both freeze onset and end with a delay of about one week in tundra and two weeks in forest and prairies, when compared to Tair. The analysis shows a stronger FT signal at tundra sites due to the typically clean transitions between consistently frozen and thawed conditions (and vice versa) and the absence of surface vegetation. Results in the prairies were poorer because of the influence of vegetation growth in summer (which decreases the polarization ratio) and the high frequency of ephemeral thaw events during winter. Freeze onset

  1. Impact of Conifer Forest Litter on Microwave Emission at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.; Cosh, Michael H.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the utilization of microwave modeling, together with ground truth, and L-band (1.4-GHz) brightness temperatures to investigate the passive microwave characteristics of a conifer forest floor. The microwave data were acquired over a natural Virginia Pine forest in Maryland by a ground-based microwave active/passive instrument system in 2008/2009. Ground measurements of the tree biophysical parameters and forest floor characteristics were obtained during the field campaign. The test site consisted of medium-sized evergreen conifers with an average height of 12 m and average diameters at breast height of 12.6 cm. The site is a typical pine forest site in that there is a surface layer of loose debris/needles and an organic transition layer above the mineral soil. In an effort to characterize and model the impact of the surface litter layer, an experiment was conducted on a day with wet soil conditions, which involved removal of the surface litter layer from one half of the test site while keeping the other half undisturbed. The observations showed detectable decrease in emissivity for both polarizations after the surface litter layer was removed. A first-order radiative transfer model of the forest stands including the multilayer nature of the forest floor in conjunction with the ground truth data are used to compute forest emission. The model calculations reproduced the major features of the experimental data over the entire duration, which included the effects of surface litter and ground moisture content on overall emission. Both theory and experimental results confirm that the litter layer increases the observed canopy brightness temperature and obscure the soil emission.

  2. In-harbor and at-sea electromagnetic compatibility survey for maritime satellite L-band shipboard terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Geostationary maritime satellites, one over the Pacific and one over the Atlantic Ocean, are planned to make available high-speed communications and navigation (position determination) services to ships at sea. A shipboard satellite terminal, operating within the authorized maritime L-band, 1636.5 to 1645.0 MHz, will allow ships to pass voice, teletype, facsimile, and data messages to shore communication facilities with a high degree of reliability. The shore-to-ship link will also operate in the maritime L-band from 1535.0 to 1543.5 MHz. A significant number or maritime/commercial ships are expected to be equipped with an L-band satellite terminal by the year 1980, and so consequently, there is an interest in determining electromagnetic compatibility between the proposed L-band shipboard terminal and existing, on-board, shipboard communications/electronics and electrical systems, as well as determining the influence of shore-based interference sources. The shipboard electromagnetic interference survey described was conducted on-board the United States Line's American Leader class (15,690 tons) commercial container ship, the "American Alliance" from June 16 to 20, 1974. Details of the test plan and measurements are given.

  3. Savannah woody structure modelling and mapping using multi-frequency (X-, C- and L-band) Synthetic Aperture Radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidoo, Laven; Mathieu, Renaud; Main, Russell; Kleynhans, Waldo; Wessels, Konrad; Asner, Gregory; Leblon, Brigitte

    2015-07-01

    Structural parameters of the woody component in African savannahs provide estimates of carbon stocks that are vital to the understanding of fuelwood reserves, which is the primary source of energy for 90% of households in South Africa (80% in Sub-Saharan Africa) and are at risk of over utilisation. The woody component can be characterised by various quantifiable woody structural parameters, such as tree cover, tree height, above ground biomass (AGB) or canopy volume, each been useful for different purposes. In contrast to the limited spatial coverage of ground-based approaches, remote sensing has the ability to sense the high spatio-temporal variability of e.g. woody canopy height, cover and biomass, as well as species diversity and phenological status - a defining but challenging set of characteristics typical of African savannahs. Active remote sensing systems (e.g. Light Detection and Ranging - LiDAR; Synthetic Aperture Radar - SAR), on the other hand, may be more effective in quantifying the savannah woody component because of their ability to sense within-canopy properties of the vegetation and its insensitivity to atmosphere and clouds and shadows. Additionally, the various components of a particular target's structure can be sensed differently with SAR depending on the frequency or wavelength of the sensor being utilised. This study sought to test and compare the accuracy of modelling, in a Random Forest machine learning environment, woody above ground biomass (AGB), canopy cover (CC) and total canopy volume (TCV) in South African savannahs using a combination of X-band (TerraSAR-X), C-band (RADARSAT-2) and L-band (ALOS PALSAR) radar datasets. Training and validation data were derived from airborne LiDAR data to evaluate the SAR modelling accuracies. It was concluded that the L-band SAR frequency was more effective in the modelling of the CC (coefficient of determination or R2 of 0.77), TCV (R2 of 0.79) and AGB (R2 of 0.78) metrics in Southern African

  4. RFI at L-band in Synthetic Aperture Radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.; Haken, M.; Wang, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The spectral window at 1.413 GHz (L-band), set aside for passive use only, is critical for passive remote sensing of the earth from space. It is the largest spectral window available in the long wavelength end of the microwave spectrum where measurements are needed to monitor parameters of the surface such as soil moisture and sea surface salinity. The sensitivity to these parameters is rapidly lost at higher frequencies and is compromised by the ionosphere and antenna size at lower frequencies. Instruments for remote sensing from space in this spectral window are being developed by NASA (Aquarius) and ESA (SMOS) and are expected to be in orbit in a few years (2006). Although the band at 1.413 GHz is protected for passive use, RFI is a common problem. For example, the synthetic aperture radiometer, ESTAR (L-band, Horizontal polarization), has frequently experienced problems with RFI. During the Southern Great Plains Experiments (1997 and 1999), ESTAR experienced RFI significant enough to warrant changes in flight lines. The largest sources of RFI were identified as originating in airports and a likely source is air traffic control radar. In experiments in the vicinity of Richmond, VA, RFI in the form of periodic spikes was recorded, again suggestive of radar. However, in most cases the sources of the RFI are unknown. RFI is a sufficiently common problem that the first step in processing ESTAR data is a screening for RFI (a filter is used to detect large, rapid changes in brightness). Recently, measurements have been made with a new synthetic aperture radiometer, 2D-STAR. Examples of RFI observed simultaneously with ESTAR and the new synthetic aperture radiometer will be presented. 2D-STAR is an airborne instrument designed to develop the technology of aperture synthesis in two dimensions. It employs dual polarized patch antennas arranged in a cross configuration (+). Synthesis in two dimensions offers the potential for optimal thinning, but because of the wide

  5. An L-band SAR for repeat pass deformation measurements on a UAV platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Lou, Yunling; Rosen, Paul; Wheeler, Kevin; Zebker, Howard; Madsen, Soren; Miller, Tim; Hoffman, Jim; Farra, Don

    2003-01-01

    We are proposing to develop a miniaturized polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for repeat-pass differential interferometric measurements of deformation for rapidly deforming surfaces of geophysical interest such as volcanoes or earthquakes that is to be flown on a unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) or minimally piloted vehicle (MPV). Upon surveying the capabilities and availabilities of such aircraft, the Proteus aircraft and the ALTAIR UAV appear to meet our criteria in terms of payload capabilities, flying altitude, and endurance. To support the repeat pass deformation capability it is necessary to control flight track capability of the aircraft to be within a specified 10 m tube with a goal of 1 m. This requires real-time GPS control of the autopilot to achieve these objectives that has not been demonstrated on these aircraft. Based on the Proteus and ALTAIR's altitude of 13.7 km (45,000 ft), we are designing a fully polarimetric L-band radar with 80 MHz bandwidth and a 16 km range swath. The radar will have an active electronic beam steering antenna to achieve a Doppler centroid stability that is necessary for repeat-pass interferometry. This paper presents some of the trade studies for the platform, instrument and the expected science.

  6. L-Band Radiometer Measurements of Conifer Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R.; LeVine, D.; Chauhan, N.; deMatthaeis, P.; Bidwell, S.; Haken, M.

    2000-01-01

    Airborne radiometer measurements have been made at L-band over conifer forests in Virginia to study radiometric response to biomass and soil moisture. The horizontally polarized synthetic aperture radiometer, ESTAR, has been deployed abroad a NASA-P3 aircraft which is based at the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. The instrument has been mounted in the bomb bay of the P-3 and images data in the cross track direction. Aircraft and surface measurements were made in July, August and November of 1999 over relatively homogeneous conifer stands of varying biomass. The surface measurements included soil moisture measurements in several stands. The soil moisture was low during the July flight and highest in November after heavy rains had occurred. The microwave images clearly distinguished between the different forest stands. Stand age, obtained from International Paper Corporation which owns the stands, showed a strong correlation between brightness temperature and stand age. This agrees with previous simulation studies of conifer forests which show that the brightness temperature increases with increasing stand biomass. Research is continuing to seek a quantitative correlation between the observed brightness temperature of the stands and their biomass and surface soil moisture.

  7. High Resolution UAV-based Passive Microwave L-band Imaging of Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Stachura, M.; Elston, J.; McIntyre, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Due to long electrical wavelengths and aperture size limitations the scaling of passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture from spaceborne low-resolution applications to high resolution applications suitable for precision agriculture requires use of low flying aerial vehicles. This presentation summarizes a project to develop a commercial Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) hosting a precision microwave radiometer for mapping of soil moisture in high-value shallow root-zone crops. The project is based on the use of the Tempest electric-powered UAV and a compact digital L-band (1400-1427 MHz) passive microwave radiometer developed specifically for extremely small and lightweight aerial platforms or man-portable, tractor, or tower-based applications. Notable in this combination are a highly integrated UAV/radiometer antenna design and use of both the upwelling emitted signal from the surface and downwelling cold space signal for precise calibration using a lobe-correlating radiometer architecture. The system achieves a spatial resolution comparable to the altitude of the UAV above the ground while referencing upwelling measurements to the constant and well-known background temperature of cold space. The radiometer incorporates digital sampling and radio frequency interference mitigation along with infrared, near-infrared, and visible (red) sensors for surface temperature and vegetation biomass correction. This NASA-sponsored project is being developed both for commercial application in cropland water management, L-band satellite validation, and estuarian plume studies.

  8. Design of an Airborne L-Band Cross-Track Scanning Scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilliard, Lawrence M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we describe the design of an airborne L-band cross-track scanning scatterometer suitable for airborne operation aboard the NASA P-3 aircraft. The scatterometer is being designed for joint operation with existing L-band radiometers developed by NASA for soil moisture and ocean salinity remote sensing. In addition, design tradeoffs for a space-based radar system have been considered, with particular attention given to antenna architectures suitable for sharing the antenna between the radar and radiometer. During this study, we investigated a number of imaging techniques, including the use of real and synthetic aperture processing in both the along track and cross-track dimensions. The architecture selected will permit a variety of beamforming algorithms to be implemented, although real aperture processing, with hardware beamforming, provides better sidelobe suppression than synthetic array processing and superior signal-to-noise performance. In our discussions with the staff of NASA GSFC, we arrived at an architecture that employs complete transmit/receive modules for each subarray. Amplitude and phase control at each of the transmit modules will allow a low-sidelobe transmit pattern to be generated over scan angles of +/- 50 degrees. Each receiver module will include all electronics necessary to downconvert the received signal to an IF offset of 30 MHz where it will be digitized for further processing.

  9. Impact of the Ionosphere on an L-band Space Based Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapin, Elaine; Chan, Samuel F.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Chen, Curtis W.; Martin, Jan M.; Michel, Thierry R.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Pi, Xiaoqing; Rosen, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    We have quantified the impact that the ionosphere would have on a L-band interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission using a combination of simulation, modeling, Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected during the last solar maximum, and existing spaceborne SAR data. We conclude that, except for high latitude scintillation related effects, the ionosphere will not significantly impact the performance of an L-band InSAR mission in an appropriate orbit. We evaluated the strength of the ionospheric irregularities using GPS scintillation data collected at Fairbanks, Alaska and modeled the impact of these irregularities on azimuth resolution, azimuth displacement, peak sidelobe ratio (PSLR), and integrated sidelobe ratio (ISLR). Although we predict that less than 5% of auroral zone data would show scintillation related artifacts, certain sites imaged near the equinoxes could be effected up to 25% of the time because the frequency of occurrence of scintillation is a strong function of season and local time of day. Our examination of ionospheric artifacts observed in InSAR data has revealed that the artifacts occur primarily in the polar cap data, not auroral zone data as was previously thought.

  10. Development of a High-Stability Microstrip-based L-band Radiometer for Ocean Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerano, Fernando A.; Horgan, Kevin A.; Wilson, William J.; Tanner, Alan B.

    2004-01-01

    The development of a microstrip-based L-band Dicke radiometer with the long-term stability required for future ocean salinity measurements to an accuracy of 0.1 psu is presented. This measurement requires the L-band radiometers to have calibration stabilities of less than or equal to 0.05 K over 2 days. This research has focused on determining the optimum radiometer requirements and configuration to achieve this objective. System configuration and component performance have been evaluated with radiometer test beds at both JPL and GSFC. The GSFC testbed uses a cryogenic chamber that allows long-term characterization at radiometric temperatures in the range of 70 - 120 K. The research has addressed several areas including component characterization as a function of temperature and DC bias, system linearity, optimum noise diode injection calibration, and precision temperature control of components. A breadboard radiometer, utilizing microstrip-based technologies, has been built to demonstrate this long-term stability.

  11. L-band orthogonal-mode crossed-slot antenna and VHF crossed-loop antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsson, T.

    1972-01-01

    A low gain, circularly polarized, L-band antenna; a low gain, linealy polarized, L-band antenna; and a low gain, circularly polarized, upper hemisphere, VHF satellite communications antenna intended for airborne applications are described. The text includes impedance and antenna radiation pattern data, along with physical description of the construction of the antennas.

  12. Sea ice concentration and sea ice drift for the Arctic summer using C- and L-band SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Malin; Berg, Anders; Eriksson, Leif

    2014-05-01

    The decreasing amount of sea ice and changes from multi-year ice to first year ice within the Arctic Ocean opens up for increased maritime activities. These activities include transportation, fishing and tourism. One of the major threats for the shipping is the presence of sea ice. Should an oil spill occur, the search and rescue is heavily dependent on constant updates of sea ice movements, both to enable a safer working environment and to potentially prevent the oil from reaching the sea ice. It is therefore necessary to have accurate and updated sea ice charts for the Arctic Ocean during the entire year. During the melt season that ice is subject to melting conditions making satellite observations of sea ice more difficult. This period coincides with the peak in marine shipping activities and therefore requires highly accurate sea ice concentration estimates. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) are not hindered by clouds and do not require daylight. The continuous record and high temporal resolution makes C-band data preferable as input data for operational sea ice mapping. However, with C-band SAR it is sometimes difficult to distinguish between a wet sea ice surface and surrounding open water. L-band SAR has a larger penetration depth and has been shown to be less sensitive to less sensitive than C-band to the melt season. Inclusion of L-band data into sea chart estimates during the melt season in particular could therefore improve sea ice monitoring. We compare sea ice concentration melt season observations using Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) L-band images with Envisat ASAR C-band images. We evaluate if L-band images can be used to improve separation of wet surface ice from open water and compare with results for C-band.

  13. LLM: An L-band multibeam land mobile payload for Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benedicto, J.; Rammos, E.; Oppenhaeuser, G.; Roederer, A.

    1990-01-01

    The European Space Agency is developing, in the context of the ARTEMIS program, a multibeam reconfigurable mobile payload to provide pre-operational land-mobile satellite services at the L-band over Europe. The L-band Land-Mobile (LLM) payload features high capacity at L-band, efficient use of the L-band spectrum resources, and flexibility in reconfiguring the allocation of bandwith and RF power resources to the different beams. Additionally, a number of features were added to the payload purely for experimental purposes, like the provision of one steerable spot beam which can be repositioned anywhere within the coverage area, and the possibility to reuse L-band frequencies by spatial discrimination between non-adjacent beams, or via orthogonal polarizations. The architecture of the payload and the hardware implementation of the most critical subsystems are described.

  14. L-Band Radiometer Experiment in the SMOS Test Site Upper Danube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlenz, Florian; Gebhardt, Timo; Loew, Alexander; Marzahn, Philip; Mauser, Wolfram

    2010-12-01

    In the frame of calibration and validation activities for ESA's soil moisture and ocean salinity mission, SMOS, the University of Munich operates a ground based L-band radiometer (ELBARA II) at 1.4 GHz to test and validate the radiative transfer model L-MEB also used in the SMOS Level 2 processor. The radiometer is situated on a test site near Puch, about 30 km west of Munich in the Upper Danube watershed in southern Germany in a temperate agricultural area. It is mounted on a scaffolding that allows to rotate the antenna which enables it to look at 2 different fields with grass and winter rape as land use respectively. In addition to the radiometer, a variety of complementary sensors are installed measuring all important meteorological and hydrological parameters. First datasets of the radiometer experiment are presented.

  15. Application of the Tor Vergata Scattering Model to L Band Backscatter During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. T.; vanderVelde, R.; ONeill, P. E.; Lang, R.; Gish, T.

    2010-01-01

    At the USDA's Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement (OPE3) experimental site in Beltsville, Maryland, USA) a field campaign took place throughout the 2002 corn growth cycle from May 10th (emergence of corn crops) to October 2nd (harvest). One of the microwave instruments deployed was the multi-frequency (X-, C- and L-band) quad-polarized (HH, HV, VV, VH) NASA GSFC/George Washington University (GWU) truck mounted radar. During the field campaign, this radar system provided once a week fully polarized C- and L-band (4.75 and 1.6 GHz) backscatter measurements from incidence angle of 15, 35, and 55 degrees. In support of microwave observations, an extensive ground characterization took place, which included measurements of surface roughness, soil moisture, vegetation biomass and morphology. The field conditions during the campaign are characterized by several dry downs with a period of drought in the month of August. Peak biomass the corn canopies was reached on July 24th with a total biomass of approximately 6.5 kg/sq m. This dynamic range in both soil moisture and vegetation conditions within the data set is ideal for the validation of discrete medium vegetation scattering models. In this study, we compare the L band backscatter measurements with simulations by the Tor Vergata model (ferrazzoli and Guerriero 1996). The measured soil moisture, vegetation biomass and most reliably measured vegetation morphological parameters (e.g. number of leaves, number of stems and stem height) were used as input for the Tor Vergata model. The more uncertain model parameters (e.g. surface roughness, leaf thickness) and the stem diameter were optimized using a parameter estimation routine based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. As cost function for this optimization, the HH and VV polarized backscatter measured and stimulated by the TOR Vergata model for incidence angle of 15, 35, and 55 degrees were used (6 measurements in total). The calibrated

  16. Application of the Tor Vergata Scattering Model to L Band Backscatter During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A. T.; van der Velde, R.; Choudhury, B. J.; Ferrazzoli, P.; O'Neill, P. E.; Kim, E. J.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T.

    2010-12-01

    At the USDA’s Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement (OPE3) experimental site in Beltsville (Maryland, USA) a field campaign took place throughout the 2002 corn growth cycle from May 10th (emergence of corn crops) to October 2nd (harvest). One of the microwave instruments deployed was the multi-frequency (X-, C- and L-band) quad-polarized (HH, HV, VV, VH) NASA GSFC / George Washington University (GWU) truck mounted radar. During the field campaign, this radar system provided once a week fully polarized C- and L-band (4.75 and 1.6 GHz) backscatter measurements from incidence angle of 15, 35, and 55 degrees. In support of these microwave observations, an extensive ground characterization took place, which included measurements of surface roughness, soil moisture, vegetation biomass and morphology. The field conditions during the campaign are characterized by several dry downs with a period of drought in the month of August. Peak biomass of the corn canopies was reached at July 24th with a total biomass of approximately 6.5 kg m-2. This dynamic range in both soil moisture and vegetation conditions within the data set is ideal for the validation of discrete medium vegetation scattering models. In this study, we compare the L band backscatter measurements with simulations by the Tor Vergata model (Ferrazzoli and Guerriero 1996). The measured soil moisture, vegetation biomass and most reliably measured vegetation morphological parameters (e.g. number of leaves, number of stems and stem height) were used as input for the Tor Vergata model. The more uncertain model parameters (e.g. surface roughness, leaf thickness) and the stem diameter were optimized using a parameter estimation routine based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. As cost function for this optimization, the HH and VV polarized backscatter measured and simulated by the Tor Vergata model for incidence angle of 15, 35 and 55 degrees were used (6 measurements in total). The

  17. The Aquarius Ocean Salinity Mission High Stability L-band Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellerano, Fernando A.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Triesky, Michael; Horgan, Kevin; Forgione, Joshua; Caldwell, James; Wilson, William J.; Yueh, Simon; Spencer, Michael; McWatters, Dalia; Freedman, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Earth Science System Pathfinder (ESSP) mission Aquarius, will measure global ocean surface salinity with approx.120 km spatial resolution every 7-days with an average monthly salinity accuracy of 0.2 psu (parts per thousand). This requires an L-band low-noise radiometer with the long-term calibration stability of less than or equal to 0.15 K over 7 days. The instrument utilizes a push-broom configuration which makes it impractical to use a traditional warm load and cold plate in front of the feedhorns. Therefore, to achieve the necessary performance Aquarius utilizes a Dicke radiometer with noise injection to perform a warm - hot calibration. The radiometer sequence between antenna, Dicke load, and noise diode has been optimized to maximize antenna observations and therefore minimize NEDT. This is possible due the ability to thermally control the radiometer electronics and front-end components to 0.1 Crms over 7 days.

  18. Results of 1987 MSS helicopter propagation experiment at UHF and L band in Central Maryland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1988-01-01

    This effort emphasizes several important results pertaining to a mobile satellite system propagation experiment performed in Central Maryland during June 1987. Fade distributions due to multipath and roadside trees at L Band (1.5 GHz) during a period in which the deciduous trees were in full bloom are examined. The multipath statistics for roadside trees are compared with previous multipath measurements made in canyon terrain in North Central Colorado. Also examined is the repeatability of previous UHF measurements made in Central Maryland and the attenuation effects of foliage on trees at UHF. Fade duration for the multipath mode for fade levels of 5 dB and 10 dB is also presented.

  19. Simple and efficient L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifiers for WDM networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, H. B.; Oh, J. M.; Lee, D.; Ahn, S. J.; Park, B. S.; Lee, S. B.

    2002-11-01

    The performance of L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) of a simple structure with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) was investigated. The injected C-band ASE by the FBG offers low-cost amplification and greatly improves the efficiency of the EDFA. There are 9 and 4 dB improvements with the FBG at 1587 nm, at low and high input, respectively. The flat gain of 18 dB, up to a total input of -5 dBm at 150 mW of 980 nm pump, is obtained over 30 nm with less than ±0.5 dB gain variations without any gain equalizer. The proposed EDFA provides a cost-effective solution for wavelength division multiplexing systems.

  20. Amplitude fading of simultaneous transionospheric L-band and VHF signals received at the geomagnetic equator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sessions, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    At Ancon, Peru, simultaneous observations of 1550-MHz and 136-MHz signals from the ATS 5 and Intelsat-1 spacecraft showed ionospheric fading as great as 27 db at 136 MHz and 6 db at 1550 MHZ. The observations were made on 48 days during the 1970 autumnal and 1971 vernal equinox periods. Comparison of the two frequencies, in respect to rates and depths of fades, is made. Statistical distributions of the received signal levels during ionospheric scintillation occurrences are presented which may be of use to communications system engineers with operational requirements in the equatorial regions. The distributions show that during expected periods of scintillation, the L band signal typically falls 1.1 db below the median for 1.0 percent of the time, and the VHF signal falls 11.5 db below the median for 1.0 percent of the time.

  1. Aquarius L-Band Microwave Radiometer: Three Years of Radiometric Performance and Systematic Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Hong, Liang; Pellerano, Fernando A.

    2015-01-01

    The Aquarius L-band microwave radiometer is a three-beam pushbroom instrument designed to measure sea surface salinity. Results are analyzed for performance and systematic effects over three years of operation. The thermal control system maintains tight temperature stability promoting good gain stability. The gain spectrum exhibits expected orbital variations with 1f noise appearing at longer time periods. The on-board detection and integration scheme coupled with the calibration algorithm produce antenna temperatures with NEDT 0.16 K for 1.44-s samples. Nonlinearity is characterized before launch and the derived correction is verified with cold-sky calibration data. Finally, long-term drift is discovered in all channels with 1-K amplitude and 100-day time constant. Nonetheless, it is adeptly corrected using an exponential model.

  2. Analysis on the Potential of L-Band PolSAR Data for Crop Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester-Berman, J. David; Lopez-Sanchez, Juan M.

    2011-03-01

    In this work we have made use of quad-pol measurements at L-band acquired by DLRs E-SAR system during the AgriSAR06 campaign for analyzing time series of different polarimetric indicators over winter wheat, maize and winter rape fields on the basis of the phenological development. Also, the sensitivity to crop fields of parameters derived from hybrid-polarity SAR architecture as proposed by Raney in 2007 has been investigated. In both quad-pol and hybrid-pol cases a correlation study along the whole phenological development among observables and ground-truth measurements has been performed. We have focused the potential of some of these observables for the detection of particular crop conditions along certain periods within the whole growth season.

  3. The Impact of the Sun on Passive Remote Sensing at L-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.; Abraham, Saji

    2005-01-01

    The sun is a strong source of radiation at L-band behaving roughly like a thermal source with a temperature ranging between 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 7) K, depending on solar activity. This is an important consideration at 1.4 GHz (the window set aside for passive use only) where future satellite sensors will operate to monitor soil moisture and sea surface salinity (e.g. SMOS, Aquarius, and Hydros). Straight forward calculations show that such a source of radiation can be a significant issue for these remote sensing applications, especially in the case of remote sensing of sea surface salinity. Radiation from the sun impacts passive remote sensing systems in several ways. First, is the solar radiation that comes directly from the sun (line-of-sight from sun to spacecraft that enters the radiometer through antenna side lobes). This is a particular problem for sensors in sunsynchronous orbits near the terminator (e.g. orbits with equatorial crossing times near 6am/6pm) because the spacecraft is in the sun most of the time. Second, is solar radiation that is reflected (specularly) from the mean surface to the radiometer. This contribution can be nearly as large as the direct ray, especially when the reflection is from the ocean surface which has a high reflection coefficient. Finally, there is "incoherent" signal reflected from the surface structure (roughness) to the radiometer antenna. Examples illustrating the significance of these terms is presented for the case of a pushbroom radiometer such as Aquarius and a conically scanning radiometer such as proposed for Hydros. Calculations are made using a set of theoretical patterns for these beams together with data on solar radiation obtained from by a worldwide network of observing stations known as Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN). Near solar minimum, solar contamination is not a problem unless the sun enters near the main beam. But near solar maximum, account must be made for radiation from the sun even when the signal

  4. Global map of soil roughness using L-band SMOS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrens, Marie; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Richaume, Philippe; Al-Bitar, Ahmad; Mialon, Arnaud; Wang, Shu; Fernandez-Moran, Roberto; Al-Yaari, Amen; Kerr, Yann

    2015-04-01

    Since 2010, soil moisture (SM) has been mapped over the Earth by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. This mission is the first one to monitor SM over land using passive L-band radiometry technique. At this frequency the signal depends on SM and vegetation but is significantly affected by surface soil roughness. Quantifying the surface soil roughness on ground surface emissivity is a key issue to improve the quality of passive microwave large-scale SM products. The core of the SMOS algorithm permitting to provide SM operational data is the inversion of the L-band Microwave Emission of Biosphere (L-MEB) model that is the result of an extensive review of the current knowledge of the microwave emission. In this model, surface soil roughness is modeled with empirical parameters (Qr , Hr , Nrp , with p = H or V polarizations). These parameters have been estimated by numerous studies but only at local scale using in situ measurements or airborne campaigns. However, these local estimations are not representative at large scale and they are not consistent with the actual surface roughness conditions, especially in agricultural areas and can lead to important errors in the SM retrievals. In this study, a method has been developed to obtain the first global map of the roughness parameter, by combining the vegetation and soil roughness into one parameter, referred to as TR. SM and TR were retrieved globally using the SMOS L3 brigthness temperature and the forward emission model L-MEB for 2011. The effect of vegetation and roughness can be separated in TR using the LAI MODIS data to account for the vegetation. This map could lead to improve soil moisture retrievals for present and future microwave remote sensing missions such as SMOS and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP).

  5. Aquarius L-band scatterometer and radiometer observations over a Tibetan Plateau site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; van der Velde, Rogier; Su, Zhongbo; Wen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the impact of freeze-thaw, soil moisture and vegetation on L-band backscatter and emission is studied using Aquarius scatterometer/radiometer measurements collected from August 2011 to May 2013 over the northeastern part of the Tibetan Plateau. The study area is the Maqu region that holds a regional-scale monitoring network consisting of twenty soil moisture/temperature stations, which is selected as one of the core international Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val) sites for NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission. Comparisons of Aquarius scatterometer/radiometer measurements with soil moisture recorded by capacitance probes installed at a 5-cm soil depth illustrate that (i) L-band microwave observations are also sensitive to the amount of liquid water in soil below freezing point, and (ii) the sensitivity of Aquarius observations over the Maqu area dissipates above soil moisture contents of 0.3 m3 m-3. Further effects of vegetation become directly noticeable only within passive microwave observations at moisture levels larger than 0.4 m3 m-3. The impact of vegetation is studied in more detail through analysis of the Radar Vegetation Index (RVI). Although seasonal variability is captured, the dynamic range of the RVI is insufficient for a meaningful signal-to-noise. Further vegetation optical depth (τ) is estimated using the τ-ω concept by reconstructing the Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) derived from Aquarius radiometer data. Peaks in the τ estimates are noted in the months January/February and July/August. Evidence suggests that the magnitude of τ is a measure for the frost depth when temperatures are below freezing point whereas the behavior of τ in the warm season is in line with the vegetation dynamics.

  6. L-band radiometer experiment in the SMOS test site Upper Danube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlenz, Florian; Gebhardt, Timo; Loew, Alexander; Marzahn, Philip; Mauser, Wolfram

    2010-05-01

    In the frame of calibration and validation activities for ESA's soil moisture and ocean salinity mission, SMOS, the University of Munich operates a ground based L-band radiometer (ELBARA II) on an experimental farm in Southern Germany since September 2009. It is being used to validate the radiative transfer model, L-MEB, used in the SMOS Level 2 processor. The radiometer measures the natural emission of two fields in the microwave domain with a wavelength of 1.4 GHz. Its working principle is similar to that of SMOS, for which reason it can be used for validation of the radiative transfer model on the field scale. To support the validation, extensive environmental measurements are being made at the test site. The radiometer is situated on an experimental farm near Puch, about 30 km west of Munich in the Upper Danube watershed in southern Germany in a temperate agricultural area. It is mounted on a 4 m high scaffolding that allows to turn the radiometer to look at 2 different fields with grass and winter rape as land use respectively. In addition to the L-band measurements, thermal infrared (IR) measurements are performed. For this purpose, one thermal IR radiometer is attached to the ELBARA antenna to look into the same direction and two IR radiometers are constantly pointed at the two fields. Next to the radiometer is a meteorological station providing soil and air temperature profiles, precipitation, global radiation, wind speed and relative humidity measurements with an hourly resolution. In addition to that, soil moisture is measured with TDR probes in 2 profiles under each of the two fields with several probes installed at depths between 5 and 50cm. Vegetation and snow parameters are also recorded on a regularly basis. Soil roughness is measured with a photogrammetric approach. An overview about the infrastructure and existing datasets is presented.

  7. Aperture-Coupled Thin-Membrane L-Band Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    2007-01-01

    The upper part of the figure depicts an aperture-coupled L-band antenna comprising patterned metal conductor films supported on two thin polyimide membranes separated by an air gap. In this antenna, power is coupled from a microstrip line on the lower surface of the lower membrane, through a slot in a metal ground plane on the upper surface of the lower membrane, to a radiating metal patch on the upper surface of the upper membrane. The two-membrane configuration of this antenna stands in contrast to a three-membrane configuration heretofore considered as the basis for developing arrays of dual-polarization, wideband microwave antennas that could be thin and could be, variously, incorporated into, or supported on, thin structures, including inflatable structures. By reducing the number of membranes from three to two, the present design simplifies the problems of designing and fabricating such antennas or arrays of such antennas, including the problems of integrating such antennas or arrays with thin-membrane-mounted transmit/ receive modules. In addition, the use of aperture (slot) coupling eliminates the need for rigid coaxial feed pins and associated solder connections on thin membranes, making this antenna more mechanically reliable, relative to antennas that include coaxial feed pins. This antenna is designed for a nominal frequency of 1.26 GHz. The polyimide membranes are 0.05 mm thick and have a relative permittivity of 3.4. The radiating patch is square, 8.89 cm on each side. This radiating patch lies 1.27 cm above the ground plane. The feeding microstrip line is 0.12 mm wide and has a characteristic impedance of 50 . The aperture-coupling slot, etched in the ground plane, is 0.48 mm wide and 79.5 mm long. In order to maximize coupling, the microstrip line is extended beyond the middle of the slot by a length of 36 mm, which corresponds to a transmission- line electrical length of about a quarter wavelength. The other end of the microstrip line is

  8. Effective Albedo of Vegetated Terrain at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Lang, Roger H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper derives an explicit expression for an effective albedo of vegetated terrain from the zero- and multiple- order radiative transfer (RT) model comparison. The formulation establishes a direct physical link between the effective vegetation parameterization and the theoretical description of absorption and scattering within the canopy. The paper will present an evaluation of the derived albedo for corn canopies with data taken during an experiment at Alabama A&M Winfield A. Thomas Agricultural Research Station near Huntsville, Alabama in June, 1998. The test site consisted of two 50-m x 60-m plots - one with a bare surface and the other with grass cover - and four 30-m x 50-m plots of corn at different planting densities. One corn field was planted at a full density of 9.5 plants/sq m while the others were planted at 1/3, 1/2 and 2/3 of the full density. The fields were observed with a truck-mounted L-band radiometer at incident angle of 15 degree for the period of two weeks. Soil moisture (SM) changed daily due to irrigation and natural rainfall. Variations in gravimetric SM from 18 % to 34 % were seen during this period. Ground truth data, including careful characterization of the corn size and orientation statistics, and its dielectric, was also collected and used to simulate the effective albedo for the vegetation. The single-scattering albedo is defined as the fractional power scattered from individual vegetation constituents with respect to canopy extinction. It represents single-scattering properties of vegetation elements only, and is independent of ground properties. The values of the albedo get higher when there is dense vegetation (i.e. forest, mature corn, etc.) with scatterers, such as branches and trunks (or stalks in the case of corn), which are large with respect to the wavelength. This large albedo leads to a reduction in brightness temperature in the zero-order RT solution (known as tau-omega model). Higher-order multiple-scattering RT

  9. Comparing C- and L-band SAR images for sea ice motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtiranta, J.; Siiriä, S.; Karvonen, J.

    2015-02-01

    Pairs of consecutive C-band synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) images are routinely used for sea ice motion estimation. The L-band radar has a fundamentally different character, as its longer wavelength penetrates deeper into sea ice. L-band SAR provides information on the seasonal sea ice inner structure in addition to the surface roughness that dominates C-band images. This is especially useful in the Baltic Sea, which lacks multiyear ice and icebergs, known to be confusing targets for L-band sea ice classification. In this work, L-band SAR images are investigated for sea ice motion estimation using the well-established maximal cross-correlation (MCC) approach. This work provides the first comparison of L-band and C-band SAR images for the purpose of motion estimation. The cross-correlation calculations are hardware accelerated using new OpenCL-based source code, which is made available through the author's web site. It is found that L-band images are preferable for motion estimation over C-band images. It is also shown that motion estimation is possible between a C-band and an L-band image using the maximal cross-correlation technique.

  10. The Tor Vergata Scattering Model Applied to L Band Backscatter During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A. T.; van der Velde, R.; Ferrazzoli, P.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T.

    2013-12-01

    At the USDA's Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement (OPE3) experimental site in Beltsville (Maryland, USA) a field campaign took place throughout the 2002 corn growth cycle from May 10th (emergence of corn crops) to October 2nd (harvest). One of the microwave instruments deployed was the multi-frequency (X-, C- and L-band) quad-polarized (HH, HV, VV, VH) NASA GSFC / George Washington University (GWU) truck mounted radar. During the field campaign, this radar system provided once a week fully polarized C- and L-band (4.75 and 1.6 GHz) backscatter measurements from incidence angle of 15, 35, and 55 degrees. In support of these microwave observations, an extensive ground characterization took place, which included measurements of surface roughness, soil moisture, vegetation biomass and morphology. The field conditions during the campaign are characterized by several dry downs with a period of drought in the month of August. Peak biomass of the corn canopies was reached at July 24, 2002 with a total biomass of approximately 6.5 kg m-2. This dynamic range in both soil moisture and vegetation conditions within the data set is ideal for the validation of discrete medium vegetation scattering models. In this study, we compare the L band backscatter measurements with simulations by the Tor Vergata model (Bracaglia et al., 1995). The measured soil moisture, vegetation biomass and most reliably measured vegetation morphological parameters (e.g. number of leaves, number of stems and stem height) were used as input for the Tor Vergata model. The more uncertain model parameters (e.g. surface roughness, leaf thickness) and the stem diameter were optimized using a parameter estimation routine based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. As cost function for this optimization, the HH and VV polarized backscatter measured and simulated by the Tor Vergata model for incidence angle of 15, 35 and 55 degrees were used (6 measurements in total). The

  11. L-band scintillations and calibrated total electron content gradients over Brazil during the last solar maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaroni, Claudio; Spogli, Luca; Alfonsi, Lucilla; De Franceschi, Giorgiana; Ciraolo, Luigi; Francisco Galera Monico, Joao; Scotto, Carlo; Romano, Vincenzo; Aquino, Marcio; Bougard, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a contribution to the understanding of the ionospheric triggering of L-band scintillation in the region over São Paulo state in Brazil, under high solar activity. In particular, a climatological analysis of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) data acquired in 2012 is presented to highlight the relationship between intensity and variability of the total electron content (TEC) gradients and the occurrence of ionospheric scintillation. The analysis is based on the GNSS data acquired by a dense distribution of receivers and exploits the integration of a dedicated TEC calibration technique into the Ground Based Scintillation Climatology (GBSC), previously developed at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia. Such integration enables representing the local ionospheric features through climatological maps of calibrated TEC and TEC gradients and of amplitude scintillation occurrence. The disentanglement of the contribution to the TEC variations due to zonal and meridional gradients conveys insight into the relation between the scintillation occurrence and the morphology of the TEC variability. The importance of the information provided by the TEC gradients variability and the role of the meridional TEC gradients in driving scintillation are critically described.

  12. Impact of ionosphere on high-bandwidth chirp in L-band SAR and its mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Partha Sarathi; Putrevu, Deepak

    2016-05-01

    There is a trend of SAR imaging at low frequencies (VHF/UHF, L-band) and wide bandwidth, for penetration into foliage for high resolution applications. The propagation of spaceborne radar signals operating at L-band frequency or below can be seriously affected by the ionosphere. While these effects are negligible at X-band, Faraday Rotation and the frequency-dependent path delays can become seriously problematic at L-band. Range delay, interferometric phase bias, range defocussing and Faraday rotation are the most prominent ones. Due to ionospheric effects, blind use of a generic matched filter causes inaccuracies when correlating the received signal with transmitted replica. In this paper we study the effects of frequency dependent path delays in L-band SAR chirp signal due to ionospheric electron density. Also a method to correct ionospheric anomalies without the knowledge of electron content level in a single SAR acquisition is proposed.

  13. Parallel-type C+L band hybrid amplifier pumped by 1480 nm laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, S.-K.; Huang, C.-K.; Hsiao, Y.-L.

    2008-07-01

    A parallel-type, dispersion compensating C+L band erbium-doped fiber amplifier/Raman fiber amplifier is constructed by sharing a common 1480-nm pump source. The gain spectra of C+L band are flattened by optimally dividing the pump power ratio to 1:29 for EDFA and RFA, respectively. In a signal input power of -20 dBm, the average gain is 14 dB for the C-band EDFA and 13.6 dB for the L-band RFA when a pump reflector is used to recycle the residual pump power in L-band. The noise figure value ranges from 4.6 to 6.5 dB and the polarization dependent gain is less than 0.14 dB.

  14. UAV-Based L-Band SAR with Precision Flight Path Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madsen, Soren N.; Hensley, Scott; Wheeler, Kevin; Sadowy, Greg; Miller, Tim; Muellerschoen, Ron; Lou, Yunling; Rosen, Paul

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is currently implementing a reconfigurable polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track interferometric (RTI) SAR data, also know as differential interferometric measurements. Differential interferometry can provide key displacement measurements, important for the scientific studies of Earthquakes and volcanoes. Using precision real-time GPS and a sensor controlled flight management system, the system will be able to fly predefined paths with great precision. The radar will be designed to operate on a UAV (Unmanned Arial Vehicle) but will initially be demonstrated on a minimally piloted vehicle (MPV), such as the Proteus build by Scaled Composites. The application requires control of the flight path to within a 10 meter tube to support repeat track and formation flying measurements. The design is fully polarimetric with an 80 MHz bandwidth (2 meter range resolution) and 16 kilometer range swath. The antenna is an electronically steered array to assure that the actual antenna pointing can be controlled independent of the wind direction and speed. The system will nominally operate at 45,000 ft. The program started out as a Instrument Incubator Project (IIP) funded by NASA Earth Science and Technology Office (ESTO).

  15. Passive L-Band H Polarized Microwave Emission During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, A. T.; van der Velde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Kim, E. J.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Hourly L-band (1.4 GHz) horizontally (H) polarized brightness temperatures (TB's) measured during five episodes (more than two days of continuous measurements) of the 2002 corn growth cycle are analyzed. These TB measurements were acquired as a part of a combined active/passive microwave field campaign, and were obtained at five incidence and three azimuth angles relative to the row direction. In support of this microwave data collection, intensive ground sampling took place once a week. Moreover, the interpretation of the hourly TB's could also rely on the data obtained using the various automated instruments installed in the same field. In this paper, the soil moisture and temperature measured at fixed time intervals have been employed as input for the tau-omega model to reproduce the hourly TB. Through the calibration of the vegetation and surface roughness parameterizations, the impact of the vegetation morphological changes on the microwave emission and the dependence of the soil surface roughness parameter, hr, on soil moisture are investigated. This analysis demonstrates that the b parameter, appearing in the representation of the canopy opacity, has an angular dependence that varies throughout the growing period and also that the parameter hr increases as the soil dries in a portion of the dry-down cycle. The angular dependence of the b parameter imposes the largest uncertainty on TB simulations near senescence as the response of b to the incidence is also affected by the crop row orientation. On the other hand, the incorporation of a soil moisture dependent hr parameterization was responsible for the largest error reduction of TB simulations in the early growth cycle. A.T. Joseph, R. Van der Velde, P.E. O'Neill, R.H. Lang, and T. Gish, "Soil moisture retrieval during a corn growth cycle using L-band (1.6 GHz) radar observations", IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, vol. 46, DOI:10.1109/TGRS.2008.917214, Aug. 2008. M.C. Dobson, F.T. Ulaby, M

  16. L-Band Transmit/Receive Module for Phase-Stable Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andricos, Constantine; Edelstein, Wendy; Krimskiy, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has been shown to provide very sensitive measurements of surface deformation and displacement on the order of 1 cm. Future systematic measurements of surface deformation will require this capability over very large areas (300 km) from space. To achieve these required accuracies, these spaceborne sensors must exhibit low temporal decorrelation and be temporally stable systems. An L-band (24-cmwavelength) InSAR instrument using an electronically steerable radar antenna is suited to meet these needs. In order to achieve the 1-cm displacement accuracy, the phased array antenna requires phase-stable transmit/receive (T/R) modules. The T/R module operates at L-band (1.24 GHz) and has less than 1- deg absolute phase stability and less than 0.1-dB absolute amplitude stability over temperature. The T/R module is also high power (30 W) and power efficient (60-percent overall efficiency). The design is currently implemented using discrete components and surface mount technology. The basic T/R module architecture is augmented with a calibration loop to compensate for temperature variations, component variations, and path loss variations as a function of beam settings. The calibration circuit consists of an amplitude and phase detector, and other control circuitry, to compare the measured gain and phase to a reference signal and uses this signal to control a precision analog phase shifter and analog attenuator. An architecture was developed to allow for the module to be bidirectional, to operate in both transmit and receive mode. The architecture also includes a power detector used to maintain a transmitter power output constant within 0.1 dB. The use of a simple, stable, low-cost, and high-accuracy gain and phase detector made by Analog Devices (AD8302), combined with a very-high efficiency T/R module, is novel. While a self-calibrating T/R module capability has been sought for years, a practical and cost-effective solution has

  17. Soil Moisture Limitations on Monitoring Boreal Forest Regrowth Using Spaceborne L-Band SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, Eric S.; Tanase, Mihai A.; Bourgeau-Chavez, Laura L.; Borr, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the utility of L-band SAR data for estimating aboveground biomass in sites with low levels of vegetation regrowth. Data to estimate biomass were collected from 59 sites located in fire-disturbed black spruce forests in interior Alaska. PALSAR L-band data (HH and HV polarizations) collected on two dates in the summer/fall of 2007 and one date in the summer of 2009 were used. Significant linear correlations were found between the log of aboveground biomass (range of 0.02 to 22.2 t ha-1) and (L-HH) and (L-HV) for the data collected on each of the three dates, with the highest correlation found using the LHV data collected when soil moisture was highest. Soil moisture, however, did change the correlations between L-band and aboveground biomass, and the analyses suggest that the influence of soil moisture is biomass dependent. The results indicate that to use L-band SAR data for mapping aboveground biomass and monitoring forest regrowth will require development of approaches to account for the influence that variations in soil moisture have on L-band microwave backscatter, which can be particularly strong when low levels of aboveground biomass occur

  18. T/R module development for large aperture L-band phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Andricos, Constantine; Kumley, Kendra; Berkun, Andrew; Hodges, Richard; Spitz, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a transmit / receive (T/R) module for a large L-band space based radar active phased array being developed at JPL. Electrical performance and construction techniques are described, with emphasis on the former. The T/R modules have a bandwidth of more than 80 MHz centered at 1260MHz and support dual, switched polarizations. Phase and amplitude are controlled by a 6-bit phase shifter and a 6-bit attenuator, respectively. The transmitter power amplifier generates 2.4 W into a nominal 50 ohm load with 36% overall efficiency. The receiver noise figure is 4.4 dB including all front-end losses. The module weighs 32 g and has a footprint of 8 cm x 4.5 cm. Fourteen of these T/R modules were fabricated at the JPL Pick-and-Place Facility and were tested using a computer-controlled measurement facility developed at JPL. Calibrated performance of this set of T/R modules is presented and shows good agreement with design predictions.

  19. CAROLS: A New Airborne L-Band Radiometer for Ocean Surface and Land Observations

    PubMed Central

    Zribi, Mehrez; Pardé, Mickael; Boutin, Jacquline; Fanise, Pascal; Hauser, Daniele; Dechambre, Monique; Kerr, Yann; Leduc-Leballeur, Marion; Reverdin, Gilles; Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten; Albergel, Clement; Calvet, Jean Christophe; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Rius, Antonio; Tenerelli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The “Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies” (CAROLS) L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed on board a dedicated French ATR42 research aircraft, in conjunction with other airborne instruments (C-Band scatterometer—STORM, the GOLD-RTR GPS system, the infrared CIMEL radiometer and a visible wavelength camera). Following initial laboratory qualifications, three airborne campaigns involving 21 flights were carried out over South West France, the Valencia site and the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean) in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in coordination with in situ field campaigns. In order to validate the CAROLS data, various aircraft flight patterns and maneuvers were implemented, including straight horizontal flights, circular flights, wing and nose wags over the ocean. Analysis of the first two campaigns in 2007 and 2008 leads us to improve the CAROLS radiometer regarding isolation between channels and filter bandwidth. After implementation of these improvements, results show that the instrument is conforming to specification and is a useful tool for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite validation as well as for specific studies on surface soil moisture or ocean salinity. PMID:22346599

  20. Repetitive operation of an L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with metal array cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Fen; Wang, Dong; Xu, Sha; Zhang, Yong; Fan, Zhi-kai

    2016-04-01

    We present the repetitive operation research results of an L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with metal array cathode (MAC-MILO) in this paper. To ensure a more uniform emission of electrons emitted from the cathode, metal plates with different outer radii and thicknesses are periodically arranged in longitudinal direction on the cathode substrate to act as emitters. The higher order mode depressed MILO (HDMILO) structure is applied to ensure stability of the tube. Comparison experiments are carried out between velvet cathode and MAC MILO driven by a 20 GW/40 Ω/40 ns/20 Hz pulse power system. Experimental results reveal that the MAC has much lower outgassing rate, much longer life time, and higher repetitive stability. The MAC-MILO could work stably with a rep-rate up to 20 Hz at a power level of 550 MW when employing a 350 kV/35 kA electric pulse. The TE11 mode radiation pattern in the farfield region reveals the tube works steadily on the dominant mode. More than 2000 shots have been tested in repetitive mode without any obvious degradation of the detected microwave parameters.

  1. UAVSAR - A New Airborne L-Band Radar for Repeat Pass Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Thomas H.; Lou, Yunling

    2009-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed a new airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) which has become available for use by the scientific community in January, 2009. Pod mounted, the UAVSAR was designed to be portable among a variety of aircraft, including unmanned aerial systems (UAS). The instrument operates in the L-Band, has a resolution under 2m from a GPS altitude of 12Km and a swath width of approximately 20Km. UAVSAR currently flies on a modified Gulfstream-III aircraft, operated by NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California. The G-III platform enables repeat-pass interferometric measurements, by using a modified autopilot and precise kinematic differential GPS to repeatedly fly the aircraft within a specified 10m tube. The antenna is electronically steered along track to assure that the antenna beam can be directed independently, regardless of speed and wind direction. The instrument can be controlled remotely, AS AN OPTION, using the Research Environment for Vehicle Embedded Analysis on Linux (REVEAL). This allows simulation of the telepresence environment necessary for flight on UAS. Potential earth science research and applications include surface deformation, volcano studies, ice sheet dynamics, and vegetation structure.

  2. L-band radar sensing of soil moisture. [Kern County, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.; Atwater, S.; Salomonson, V. V.; Estes, J. E.; Simonett, D. S.; Bryan, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    The performance of an L-band, 25 cm wavelength imaging synthetic aperture radar was assessed for soil moisture determination, and the temporal variability of radar returns from a number of agricultural fields was studied. A series of three overflights was accomplished over an agricultural test site in Kern County, California. Soil moisture samples were collected from bare fields at nine sites at depths of 0-2, 2-5, 5-15, and 15-30 cm. These gravimetric measurements were converted to percent of field capacity for correlation to the radar return signal. The initial signal film was optically correlated and scanned to produce image data numbers. These numbers were then converted to relative return power by linear interpolation of the noise power wedge which was introduced in 5 dB steps into the original signal film before and after each data run. Results of correlations between the relative return power and percent of field capacity (FC) demonstrate that the relative return power from this imaging radar system is responsive to the amount of soil moisture in bare fields. The signal returned from dry (15% FC) and wet (130% FC) fields where furrowing is parallel to the radar beam differs by about 10 dB.

  3. Repetitive operation of an L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with metal array cathode.

    PubMed

    Qin, Fen; Wang, Dong; Xu, Sha; Zhang, Yong; Fan, Zhi-Kai

    2016-04-01

    We present the repetitive operation research results of an L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with metal array cathode (MAC-MILO) in this paper. To ensure a more uniform emission of electrons emitted from the cathode, metal plates with different outer radii and thicknesses are periodically arranged in longitudinal direction on the cathode substrate to act as emitters. The higher order mode depressed MILO (HDMILO) structure is applied to ensure stability of the tube. Comparison experiments are carried out between velvet cathode and MAC MILO driven by a 20 GW/40 Ω/40 ns/20 Hz pulse power system. Experimental results reveal that the MAC has much lower outgassing rate, much longer life time, and higher repetitive stability. The MAC-MILO could work stably with a rep-rate up to 20 Hz at a power level of 550 MW when employing a 350 kV/35 kA electric pulse. The TE11 mode radiation pattern in the farfield region reveals the tube works steadily on the dominant mode. More than 2000 shots have been tested in repetitive mode without any obvious degradation of the detected microwave parameters. PMID:27131691

  4. Weekly Gridded Aquarius L-band Radiometer-Scatterometer Observations and Salinity Retrievals over the Polar Regions - Part 2: Initial Product Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, L.; Dinnat, E. P.; Koenig, L. S.

    2014-01-01

    Following the development and availability of Aquarius weekly polar-gridded products, this study presents the spatial and temporal radiometer and scatterometer observations at L band (frequency1.4 GHz) over the cryosphere including the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, sea ice in both hemispheres, and over sub-Arctic land for monitoring the soil freeze-thaw state. We provide multiple examples of scientific applications for the L-band data over the cryosphere. For example, we show that over the Greenland Ice Sheet, the unusual 2012 melt event lead to an L-band brightness temperature (TB) sustained decrease of 5 K at horizontal polarization. Over the Antarctic ice sheet, normalized radar cross section (NRCS) observations recorded during ascending and descending orbits are significantly different, highlighting the anisotropy of the ice cover. Over sub-Arctic land, both passive and active observations show distinct values depending on the soil physical state (freeze-thaw). Aquarius sea surface salinity (SSS) retrievals in the polar waters are also presented. SSS variations could serve as an indicator of fresh water input to the ocean from the cryosphere, however the presence of sea ice often contaminates the SSS retrievals, hindering the analysis. The weekly grided Aquarius L-band products used a redistributed by the US Snow and Ice Data Center at http:nsidc.orgdataaquariusindex.html, and show potential for cryospheric studies.

  5. L-band mobile terminal antennas for helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, T. K.; Farazian, K.; Golshan, N.; Divsalar, D.; Hinedi, S.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of using a low gain antenna (LGA) as a mobile terminal antenna for a helicopter is described in this paper. The objectives are to select the lowest cost antenna system which can be easily mounted on a helicopter and capable of communicating with a satellite, and to determine the best antenna position on the helicopter to mitigate the signal blockage due to rotor blades and the multipath effect from the helicopter's body. The omnidirectional LGA is selected because it is simple, reliable, and low cost. The helix antenna is selected among the many LGA's because it is the most economical one and has the widest elevation beamwidth. Both 2-arm and 4-arm helices are studied experimentally to determine the antenna's performance and the scattering effects from the helicopter's body. It is found that the LGA should be located near the tail section and at least eight inches above the helicopter.

  6. High power l-band fast phase shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    Following successful testing of a concept prototype of a waveguide-based high power phase shifter, a design of a fast, high power device has been developed. The shifter uses two magnetically biased blocks of Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) positioned along the side walls of a rectangular waveguide. The cross-section of the waveguide is chosen to suppress unwanted RF modes that could otherwise compromise performance of the phase shifter. Static bias field in the YIG blocks is created by employing permanent magnets. Low inductance coils in the same magnetic circuit excite fast component of the bias field. Design of the device ensures effective heat extraction from the YIG blocks and penetration of the fast magnetic field inside the waveguide with minimum delay. This paper summarizes main steps in this development and gives brief description of the system.

  7. RadSTAR L-Band Imaging Scatterometer: Performance Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael; Hildebrand, Peter; Hilliard, Larry

    2007-01-01

    RadSTAR is an instrument development program aimed at combining a radiometer and a scatterometer system into a highly compact configuration that uses a single, electronically scanned antenna to provide co-located and simultaneous measurements of emission and backscatter for airborne and spaceborne applications [I]. The program was designed to map soil moisture and ocean salinity, both important components of the water cycle, and to map sea ice density and thickness, an important factor in ocean-atmosphere heat exchange in Polar Regions. The accuracy in estimation of these and a number of other Earth science parameters can be greatly enhanced by providing the co-aligned radar/radiometer microwave measurements. For instance, radiometer estimates of soil moisture from soil emission are affected by emission from vegetation, and from the roughness of the surface. Complementary measurements using the scatterometer can be used to evaluate the vegetation and surface roughness effects. Hence, the combined observations can provide an improved estimate. As with soil moisture, the ocean salinity is a function of the microwave emission from the sea surface temperature (SST) and sea roughness. There, the addition of radar backscatter measurements of sea roughness enables the correction of the emissivity and provide more accurate estimates of ocean salinity. Similar arguments can be made for other important Earth science parameters. This paper discusses the RadSTAR program, the radar system design, calibration, and digital beamforming techniques, and presents preliminary analysis of the data collected during the test flights. The data sets obtained during the flights and during the radar calibration in the anechoic chamber are also employed to asses the performance of the radar. The paper also discusses the Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR) processor, a real-time processor recently developed for the LIS instrument which enables beam synthesis, fine resolutions

  8. Comparison of Measured Galactic Background Radiation at L-Band with Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.; Abraham, Saji; Kerr, Yann H.; Wilson, William J.; Skou, Niels; Sobjaerg, Sten

    2004-01-01

    Radiation from the celestial sky in the spectral window at 1.413 GHz is strong and an accurate accounting of this background radiation is needed for calibration and retrieval algorithms. Modern radio astronomy measurements in this window have been converted into a brightness temperature map of the celestial sky at L-band suitable for such applications. This paper presents a comparison of the background predicted by this map with the measurements of several modern L-band remote sensing radiometer Keywords-Galactic background, microwave radiometry; remote sensing;

  9. The L-band radiometric measurements of FIFE test site in 1987-1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Shiue, J. C.; Schmugge, T. J.; Engman, E. T.

    1990-01-01

    Emissivity dependence in the L-band on senescent vegetation is examined with the Push-Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) aboard a NASA C-130 with special attention given to areas near two watersheds. Volumetric soil moisture is examined, and comparisons are given of burned and unburned areas. The factors are examined that contribute to differences between soil-moisture values and the ratio of L-band PBMR brightness temperature and the soil temperature measured at 2.5 cm. The explanations posited include improper calibration, extreme dryness at the time of measurements, and the difference in vegetation covers.

  10. Upward-looking L-band FMCW radar for snow cover monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Okorn, Robert; Brunnhofer, Georg; Platzer, Thomas; Heilig, Achim; Schmid, Lino; Mitterer, Christoph; Schweizer, Jürg; Eisen, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Forecasting snow avalanche danger in mountainous regions is of major importance for the protection of infrastructure in avalanche run-out zones. Inexpensive measurement devices capable of measuring snow height and layer properties in avalanche starting zones may help to improve the quality of risk assessment. We present a low-cost L-band frequency modulated continuous wave radar system (FMCW) in upward-looking configuration. To monitor the snowpack evolution, the radar system was deployed in fall and subsequently was covered by snowfalls. During two winter seasons we recorded reflections from the overlying snowpack. The influence of reflection magnitude and phase to the measured frequency spectra, as well as the influence of signal processing were investigated. We present a method to extract the phase of the reflection coefficients from the phase response of the frequency spectra and their integration into the presentation of the measurement data. The phase information significantly improved the detectability of the temporal evolution of the snow surface reflection. We developed an automated and a semi-automated snow surface tracking algorithm. Results were compared with independently measured snow height from a laser snow-depth sensor and results derived from an upward-looking impulse radar system (upGPR). The semi-automated tracking used the phase information and had an accuracy of about 6 to 8 cm for dry-snow conditions, similar to the accuracy of the upGPR, compared to measurements from the laser snow-depth sensor. The percolation of water was observable in the radargrams. Results suggest that the upward-looking FMCW system may be a valuable alternative to conventional snow-depth sensors for locations, where fixed installations above ground are not feasible. PMID:24994943

  11. L-Band Microwave Observations over land Surface using a Two-Dimensional Synthetic Aperture Radiometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A number of studies have demonstrated the potential capabilities of passive microwave remote sensing at L-band (1.4 GHz) to measure surface soil moisture. Aperture synthesis is a technology for obtaining high spatial resolution at long wavelengths with a practical radiometer antenna. During the So...

  12. An L-band SAR for repeat pass deformation measurements on a UAV platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Kevin; Hensley, Scott; Lou, Yunling

    2004-01-01

    We are proposing to develop a miniaturized polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for repeatpass differential interferometric measurements of deformation for rapidly deforming surfaces of geophysical interest such as volcanoes or earthquakes that is to be flown on a unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV or minimally piloted vehicle (MPV).

  13. Radar measurement of L-band signal fluctuations caused by propagation through trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Klein, Jeffrey D.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1991-01-01

    Fluctuations of an L-band, horizontally polarized signal that was transmitted from the ground through a coniferous forest canopy to an airborne radar are examined. The azimuth synthetic aperture radar (SAR) impulse response in the presence of the measured magnitude fluctuations shows increased sidelobes over the case with no trees. Statistics of the observed fluctuations are similar to other observations.

  14. Improvement of Bare Surface Soil Moisture Estimation with L-Band Dual-Polarization Radar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study demonstrates a new algorithm development for estimating bare surface soil moisture using dual-polarization L-band backscattering measurements. Through our analyses on the numerically simulated surface backscattering database by Advanced Integral Equation Model (AIEM) with a wide range of ...

  15. L band brightness temperature observations over a corn canopy during the entire growth cycle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During a field campaign covering the 2002 corn growing season, a dual polarized tower mounted L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometer (LRAD) provided brightness temperature (T¬B) measurements at preset intervals, incidence and azimuth angles. These radiometer measurements were supported by an extensive characte...

  16. L-Band microwave observations over land surface using a two-dimensional synthetic aperture radiometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antenna size is major factor that has limited realization of the potential capabilities of L-band (1.4 GHz) microwave radiometry to estimate surface soil moisture from space. However, emerging interferometric technology, called aperture synthesis, has been developed to address this limitation. The ...

  17. L Band Observations Over A Corn Canopy During the Entire Growing Season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New opportunities for large-scale soil moisture monitoring will emerge with the launch of two low frequency (L-band 1.4 GHz) radiometers: the European Space Agency’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and the NASA Aquarius missions. In anticipation of data to be acquired by these missions an ex...

  18. Coherent model of L-band radar scattering by soybean plants: model development, validation and retrieval

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An improved coherent branching model for L-band radar remote sensing of soybean is proposed by taking into account the correlated scattering among scatterers. The novel feature of the analytic coherent model consists of conditional probability functions to eliminate the overlapping effects of branc...

  19. L-Band Microwave Observations over Land Surface Using a Two-Dimensional Synthetic Aperture Radiometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antenna size is major factor that has limited realization of the potential capabilities of L-band (1.4 GHz) microwave radiometry to estimate surface soil moisture from space. However, emerging interferometric technology, called aperture synthesis, has been developed to address this limitation. The ...

  20. Parametric exponentially correlated surface emission model for L-band passive microwave soil moisture retrieval

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology and climate investigations. Current and future satellite missions with L-band passive microwave radiometers can provide valuable information for monitoring the global soil moisture. A factor that can play a significant role in the modeling...

  1. Low noise gain-clamped L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier by utilizing fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tianshu; Guo, Yubin; Yan, Hongwei; Wang, Yuhang; Wang, Ke

    2006-11-01

    A novel gain-clamped long wavelength band (L-band) erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) is proposed and experimented by using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) at the input end of the amplifier. This design provides a good gain clamping and decreases noise effectively. It uses two sections of erbium-doped fiber (EDF) pumped by a 1480-nm laser diode (LD) for higher efficiency and lower noise figure (NF). The gain is clamped at 23 dB with a variation of 0.5 dB from input signal power of -30 to -8 dBm for 1589 nm and NF below 5 dB is obtained. At the longer wavelength in L-band higher gain is also obtained and the gain is clamped at 16 dB for 1614 nm effectively. Because the FBG injects a portion of backward amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) back into the system, the gain enhances 5 dB with inputting small signal.

  2. High energy pulsed fiber laser transmitters in the C- and L-band for coherent lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Moor, Nick; Petersen, Eliot B.; Nguyen, Dan T.; Yao, Zhidong; Stephen, Mark A.; Chavez-Pirson, Arturo; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2011-10-01

    We report a monolithic specialized high stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) threshold fiber laser/amplifier in the C and L band based on highly co-doped phosphate glass fibers. This represents an important new development for coherent LIDAR and remote sensing applications. By using single mode polarization-maintaining large core highly Er/Yb codoped phosphate fibers in the power amplifier stages, we have achieved the highest peak power of 2.02 kW at 1530 nm for 105 ns pulses with transform-limited linewidth, and with a corresponding pulse energy of about 0.212 mJ. The achieved high-energy pulses were frequency doubled by using a commercial periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal, and the highest SHG peak power of 271 W has been achieved for the SHG pulses at 765 nm that can be used for oxygen coherent remote sensing. In the L band, more than 80 μJ fiber laser pulses at 1572 nm with 1-2 μs pulse width and transform-limited linewidth have been achieved by using a monolithic fiber laser system in MOPA configuration, which can be used for CO2 coherent remote sensing.

  3. Performance of soil moisture retrieval algorithms using multiangular L band brightness temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piles, M.; Camps, A.; Vall-Llossera, M.; Monerris, A.; Talone, M.; Sabater, J. M.

    2010-06-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission of the European Space Agency was successfully launched in November 2009 to provide global surface soil moisture and sea surface salinity maps. The SMOS single payload is the Microwave Imaging Radiometer by Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS), an L band two-dimensional aperture synthesis interferometric radiometer with multiangular and polarimetric imaging capabilities. SMOS-derived soil moisture products are expected to have an accuracy of 0.04 m3/m3 over 50 × 50 km2 and a revisit time of 3 days. Previous studies have remarked the necessity of combining SMOS brightness temperatures with auxiliary data to achieve the required accuracy. However, the required auxiliary data and optimal soil moisture retrieval setup need yet to be optimized. Also, the satellite operation mode (dual polarization or full polarimetric) is an open issue to be addressed during the commissioning phase activities. In this paper, an in-depth study of the different retrieval configurations and ancillary data needed for the retrieval of soil moisture from future SMOS observations is presented. A dedicated L2 Processor Simulator software has been developed to obtain soil moisture estimates from SMOS-like brightness temperatures generated using the SMOS End-to-End Performance Simulator (SEPS). Full-polarimetric brightness temperatures are generated in SEPS, and soil moisture retrievals are performed using vertical (Tvv) and horizontal (Thh) brightness temperatures and using the first Stokes parameter (TI). Results show the accuracy obtained with the different retrieval setups for four main surface conditions combining wet and dry soils with bare and vegetation-covered surfaces. Soil moisture retrievals using TI exhibit a significantly better performance than using Thh and Tvv in all scenarios, which indicates that the dual-polarization mode should not be disregarded. The uncertainty of the ancillary data used in the minimization process and its effect on

  4. L-Band H Polarized Microwave Emission During the Corn Growth Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. T.; va der Velde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Kim, E.; Lang, R. H.; Gish, T.

    2012-01-01

    Hourly L-band (1.4 GHz) horizontally (H) polarized brightness temperatures (T(sub B))'s measured during five episodes (more than two days of continuous measurements) of the 2002 corn growth cycle are analyzed. These T(sub B)'s measurements were acquired as a part of a combined active/passive microwave field campaign, and were obtained at five incidence and three azimuth angles relative to the row direction. In support of this microwave data collection, intensive ground sampling took place once a week. Moreover, the interpretation of the hourly T(sub B)'s could also rely on the data obtained using the various automated instruments installed in the same field. In this paper, the soil moisture and temperature measured at fixed time intervals have been employed as input for the tau-omega model to reproduce the hourly T(sub B). Through the calibration of the vegetation and surface roughness parameterizations, the impact of the vegetation morphological changes on the microwave emission and the dependence of the soil surface roughness parameter, h(sub r), on soil moisture are investigated. This analysis demonstrates that the b parameter, appearing in the representation of the canopy opacity, has an angular dependence that varies throughout the growing period and also that the parameter hr increases as the soil dries in a portion of the dry-down cycle. The angular dependence of the b parameter imposes the largest uncertainty on T(sub B) simulations near senescence as the response of b to the incidence is also affected by the crop row orientation. On the other hand, the incorporation of a soil moisture dependent h(sub r) parameterization was responsible for the largest error reduction of T(sub B) simulations in the early growth cycle.

  5. Characteristics of Ionospheric Signals in L-band SAR/INSAR Data and Methods for their Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.

    2009-12-01

    The impact of ionospheric propagation effects on the signal properties of L-band SAR systems is significant. Recent theoretical analyses of ionospheric distortions in low-frequency SAR signals have indicated many effects that are likely to affect the quality of SAR, interferometric SAR (InSAR), and polarimetric SAR (PolSAR) data acquired in L-band. Faraday rotation, relative range shifts, internal deformations of the image amplitude, range and azimuth blurring, and interferometric phase errors are some of the most significant effects. Several examples have been published that show unambiguous detection of total electron content (TEC), including TEC gradients. While SAR is sensitive to ionospheric delay on all spatial scales, it is the small scale ionospheric disturbances that have the most significant impact on InSAR applications. The significance of the ionosphere for InSAR-derived deformation analysis depends on three general conditions: i) the spatio-temporal signature of the ionospheric path delay and its manifestation in the SAR observables; ii) the spatio-temporal properties of the deformation signal and the temporal sampling of this signal; iii) the sophistication of the applied InSAR technique and the assumptions inherent to the processing method. With this paper we will introduce the spatio-temporal characteristics of ionospheric signals in L-band SAR and InSAR data both from theory and observations. We will focus our investigations on the equatorial anomaly region located ±15 degrees about the magnetic equator, and the Polar Regions, as most small scale ionospheric anomalies occur in these areas. Data from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) sensor aboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) will be used to investigate demonstrate and catalogue typical ionospheric signals observed by L-band SAR systems. Ionospheric theory will be presented to explain the origin of observed

  6. True-time-delay photonic beamformer for an L-band phased array radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmuda, Henry; Toughlian, Edward N.; Payson, Paul M.; Malowicki, John E.

    1995-10-01

    The problem of obtaining a true-time-delay photonic beamformer has recently been a topic of great interest. Many interesting and novel approaches to this problem have been studied. This paper examines the design, construction, and testing of a dynamic optical processor for the control of a 20-element phased array antenna operating at L-band (1.2-1.4 GHz). The approach taken here has several distinct advantages. The actual optical control is accomplished with a class of spatial light modulator known as a segmented mirror device (SMD). This allows for the possibility of controlling an extremely large number (tens of thousands) of antenna elements using integrated circuit technology. The SMD technology is driven by the HDTV and laser printer markets so ultimate cost reduction as well as technological improvements are expected. Optical splitting is efficiently accomplished using a diffractive optical element. This again has the potential for use in antenna array systems with a large number of radiating elements. The actual time delay is achieved using a single acousto-optic device for all the array elements. Acousto-optic device technologies offer sufficient delay as needed for a time steered array. The topological configuration is an optical heterodyne system, hence high, potentially millimeter wave center frequencies are possible by mixing two lasers of slightly differing frequencies. Finally, the entire system is spatially integrated into a 3D glass substrate. The integrated system provides the ruggedness needed in most applications and essentially eliminates the drift problems associated with free space optical systems. Though the system is presently being configured as a beamformer, it has the ability to operate as a general photonic signal processing element in an adaptive (reconfigurable) transversal frequency filter configuration. Such systems are widely applicable in jammer/noise canceling systems, broadband ISDN, and for spread spectrum secure communications

  7. Examples L-Band Interference will be Presented and Discussed, as well as the Importance of L-Band Soil Moisture Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Examples of L-band interference will be presented and discussed, as well as the importance of L-band soil moisture observations, as part of this one-day GEOSS workshop XXXVII on "Data Quality and Radio Spectrum Allocation Impact on Earth Observations" will address the broad challenges of data quality and the impact of generating reliable information for decision makers who are Earth data users but not necessarily experts in the Earth observation field. GEO has initiated a data quality assessment task (DA-09-01a) and workshop users will review and debate the directions and challenges of this effort. Radio spectrum allocation is an element of data availability and data quality, and is also associated with a GEO task (AR-06-11). A recent U.S. National Research Council report on spectrum management will be addressed as part of the workshop. Key representatives from industry, academia, and government will provide invited talks on these and related issues that impact GEOSS implementation.

  8. Comparison between ECMWF L-band brightness temperatures and SMOS observations using the Community Microwave Emission Modelling Platform (CMEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rosnay, Patricia; Muñoz Sabater, Joaquín; Dutra, Emanuel; Albergel, Clément; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Boussetta, Souhail; Isaksen, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture initialisation is crucial for Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). New generations of satellites, such as SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) and SMAP (Soil Moisture Active and Passive) provide highly suitable data from passive and active microwave sensors for soil moisture remote sensing. In order to make it possible to combine use of satellite, in situ and proxy observations to analyse soil moisture, ECMWF implemented an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) soil moisture analysis which is used for operational NWP in the ECMWF Integrated Forecasting System (IFS). The use of passive microwave sensors in the EKF soil moisture data assimilation requires an accurate radiative transfer model. In this poster we present ECMWF developments in radiative transfer modelling conducted to use SMOS and SMAP brightness temperature observations in the ECMWF data assimilation system. The ECMWF Community Microwave Emission Modelling Platform (CMEM) is described. CMEM input global fields, including soil moisture, soil temperature, snow depth and vegetation cover, were obtained from H-TESSEL land surface model simulations forced by ERA-Interim atmospheric conditions. CMEM multi-year simulations were performed using a land surface model configuration which is similar to the current operational IFS. In CMEM, combinations of three soil dielectric models, three vegetation opacity models and four soil roughness parametrizations were used, allowing comparing 36 different configurations of the microwave emission model. Global scale forward simulations of dual polarization L-band (1.4 GHz) brightness temperature were conducted at 40 degrees incidence angle for each radiative transfer model and evaluated using the SMOS near real time brightness temperature data for 2010. Best microwave emission model performances were obtained with the Wang and Schmugge dielectric model combined with the Wigneron vegetation opacity model and the simple Wigneron soil roughness parametrization. The

  9. Skylab program: Earth resources experiment package. Sensor performance evaluation. Volume 6: (S194) L-band radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, G. P.

    1975-01-01

    Analysis of the Skylab S194 L-band radiometer experiment data provided significant results pertaining to the actual realized performance during flight. Analysis of preflight test data provided a baseline from which to compare the experiment flight performance, although many radiometric data performance capabilities could only be demonstrated in the flight environment. The final results establish the overall hardware performance of the S194 system from which prospective users of the flight data can refer for various scientific applications. Instrument performance is presented in the areas of housekeeping and internal calibration parameters, antenna system integrity, dynamic range, linearity, precision, resolution, and absolute accuracy. Supplementary evaluations were included for an error analysis of system calibration stability. Results of the evaluation show that the instrument performance was generally as expected. Conclusions are drawn from the final evaluation results, and recommendations for improving the effectiveness of a future program are offered.

  10. Fpga based L-band pulse doppler radar design and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savci, Kubilay

    As its name implies RADAR (Radio Detection and Ranging) is an electromagnetic sensor used for detection and locating targets from their return signals. Radar systems propagate electromagnetic energy, from the antenna which is in part intercepted by an object. Objects reradiate a portion of energy which is captured by the radar receiver. The received signal is then processed for information extraction. Radar systems are widely used for surveillance, air security, navigation, weather hazard detection, as well as remote sensing applications. In this work, an FPGA based L-band Pulse Doppler radar prototype, which is used for target detection, localization and velocity calculation has been built and a general-purpose Pulse Doppler radar processor has been developed. This radar is a ground based stationary monopulse radar, which transmits a short pulse with a certain pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Return signals from the target are processed and information about their location and velocity is extracted. Discrete components are used for the transmitter and receiver chain. The hardware solution is based on Xilinx Virtex-6 ML605 FPGA board, responsible for the control of the radar system and the digital signal processing of the received signal, which involves Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detection and Pulse Doppler processing. The algorithm is implemented in MATLAB/SIMULINK using the Xilinx System Generator for DSP tool. The field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) implementation of the radar system provides the flexibility of changing parameters such as the PRF and pulse length therefore it can be used with different radar configurations as well. A VHDL design has been developed for 1Gbit Ethernet connection to transfer digitized return signal and detection results to PC. An A-Scope software has been developed with C# programming language to display time domain radar signals and detection results on PC. Data are processed both in FPGA chip and on PC. FPGA uses fixed

  11. Reflection L-band erbium-doped fiber-amplifier-based fiber loop mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hongyun; Liu, Songhao; Dong, Xiaoyi

    2005-01-01

    We constructed a reflection L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier based on fiber loop mirror, which reflects the backward ASE to the EDF as a secondary pumping source. A gain of 30 dB increased 6 dB compared to the forward end-pumped EDFA has been achieved in the wavelength region from 1570 to 1603 nm. In order to improve the gain and NF further, we constructed a novel configuration for reflection L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier via inserting a 980 nm LD in the input part. Adjusting the ratio of power of the two LDs, the gain and NF are greatly improved in different degree in the region from 1565 to 1615 nm. Compared to the configuration pumped by only 1480 nm LD with given power, the gain enhanced 1.5-9.9 dB and the NF decreases 1.3-9.4 dB.

  12. Galactic Noise and Passive Microwave Remote Sensing from Space At L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.; Abraham, Saji; Hildebrand Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The spectral window at L-band (1.4 GHz) is important for passive remote sensing of soil moisture and ocean salinity from space, parameters that are needed to understand the hydrologic cycle and ocean circulation. At this frequency, radiation from extraterrestrial (mostly galactic) sources is strong and, unlike the constant cosmic background, this radiation is spatially variable. This paper presents a modern radiometric map of the celestial sky at L-band and a solution for the problem of determining what portion of the sky is seen by a radiometer in orbit. The data for the radiometric map is derived from recent radio astronomy surveys and is presented as equivalent brightness temperature suitable for remote sensing applications. Examples using orbits and antennas representative of those contemplated for remote sensing of soil moisture and sea surface salinity from space are presented to illustrate the signal levels to be expected. Near the galactic plane, the contribution can exceed several Kelvin.

  13. Using multiple-polarization L-band radar to monitor marsh burn recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, Elijah W., III; Nelson, G.A.; Sapkota, S.K.; Laine, S.C.; Verdi, J.; Rrasznay, S.

    1999-01-01

    Aircraft L-band VV-, HH-, and VH-polarizations were examined as tools for monitoring burn recovery in a coastal marsh. Significant relationships were observed between time-since-burn (difference between burn and image collection dates; 550-900 days after burn) and returns related to all polarizations. As marsh burn recovery progressed, VV returns decreased while HH and VH returns increased. Radar returns extracted from control sites adjacent to each burn-simulated nonburn marsh and were not individually or in combination significantly related to the timesince-burn. Normalized by the control data, VH-polarization explained up to 83% of the total variations. Overall, the L-band multipolarization radars estimated time-since-burn within ??59 to ??92 days. ?? 1999 IEEE.

  14. ATS-5 ranging receiver and L-band experiment. Volume 2: Data reduction and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results of ranging and position location experiments performed at the NASA Application Technology Satellite ground station at Mojave California are presented. The experiments are simultaneous C-band and L-band ranging to ATS-5, simultaneous C-band and VHF ranging, simultaneous 24-hour ranging and position location using ATS-1, ATS-3, and ATS-5. The data handling and processing technique is also described.

  15. No detection of L-band radio emission from SN 2007gr by GMRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Alak K.

    2007-08-01

    Sayan Chakraborti (Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, (TIFR)), Poonam Chandra (Univ Virginia and National Radio Astronomical Observatory, Charlottesville), Nirupam Roy (National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA-TIFR), Pune, and Alak Ray (TIFR) report on the Target of Opportunity observation of SN 2007gr on 2007 Aug 24 by the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) in the L-band between UT 0200 to 0400.

  16. Design and Performance of a Miniature Radar L-Band Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McWatters, D.; Price, D.; Edelstein, W.

    2004-01-01

    Radar electronics developed for past JPL space missions historically had been custom designed and as such, given budgetary, time, and risk constraints, had not been optimized for maximum flexibility or miniaturization. To help reduce cost and risk of future radar missions, a generic radar module was conceived. The module includes a 1.25-GHz (L-band) transceiver and incorporates miniature high-density packaging of integrated circuits in die/chip form. The technology challenges include overcoming the effect of miniaturization and high packaging density to achieve the performance, reliability, and environmental ruggedness required for space missions. The module was chosen to have representative (generic) functionality most likely required from an L-band radar. For very large aperture phased-array spaceborne radar missions, the large dimensions of the array suggest the benefit of distributing the radar electronics into the antenna array. For such applications, this technology is essential in order to bring down the cost, mass, and power of the radar electronics module replicated in each panel of the array. For smaller sized arrays, a single module can be combined with the central radar controller and still provide the bene.ts of configuration .exibility, low power, and low mass. We present the design approach for the radar electronics module and the test results for its radio frequency (RF) portion: a miniature, low-power, radiation-hard L-band transceiver.

  17. Measurement and modeling of land mobile satellite propagation at UHF and L-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Hong, Ui-Seok

    1988-01-01

    A propagation experiment is described in which a stratospheric balloon served as a transmitter platform at 870 and 1502 MHz in simulation of a land mobile satellite. A vehicle followed the drifting balloon along roads of western Texas and New Mexico, collecting at L-band amplitude and phase, and at UHF amplitude information only for elevation angles between 25 and 45 deg. The data obtained have been analyzed and are presented along with results from modeling of multipath scattering and roadside tree attenuation. The signal, with variations caused by multipath propagation and tree shadowing, was reduced by 3 dB at L-band and 2 dB at UHF for one percent of all locations. A median ratio of 3.9 was found between peak-to-peak phase (degrees) and power (dB) fluctuations. The ratio between L-band and UHF dB attenuation averages varied from 1.3 to 1.0 at fade levels from 6 to 23 dB. Optical sky brightness was measured and used to predict fade distribution with great accuracy. A single-scatterer multipath model is introduced. It is used to duplicate some of the measured data and to show the dependence of power variations on satellite elevation angle. Using Fresnel diffraction theory, the attenuation caused by a model tree was calculated to be near 10 dB and the maximum fade was found to increase by the logarithm of the number of branches.

  18. Detection and Monitoring of Inundation with Polarimetric L-Band SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, B. D.; Celi, J. E.; Hamilton, S. K.; McDonald, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    It has been known for decades that at wavelengths L-band or longer, SAR is a sensitive indicator of inundation underneath forest canopies. The high resolution detection of below-canopy inundation is difficult to accomplish at regional to continental scales using other types of remote sensing sensors, making it a compelling SAR measurement especially useful for studying wetland inundation dynamics, particularly in difficult-to-reach access, canopy-covered tropical forest environments. Most results have utilized spaceborne SAR observations with less than fully polarimetric data. Since one of the objectives of the NISAR mission is to characterize and understand the fundamental process that drives changes to ecosystems such as wetland inundated areas, we will discuss the sensitivity of L-band SAR to inundation. We will illustrate the detection of inundation using fully polarimetric L-band SAR data from UAVSAR, NASA's airborne SAR, over a tropical forest region in Ecuador and Peru. At the same time as the data collection, measurements were made on the ground to characterize vegetation and inundation characteristics. The field data were used to validate the results of classifying the vanZyl decomposition of the polarimetric data. We compare this classification with that possible with a reduced subset of the polarimetric observations.

  19. High gain L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier with two-stage double-pass configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, S. W.; Tamchek, N.; Poopalan, P.; Ahmad, H.

    2003-07-01

    An experiment on gain enhancement in the long wavelength band erbium-doped fiber amplifier (L-band EDFA) is demonstrated using dual forward pumping scheme in double-pass system. Compared to a single-stage single-pass scheme, the small signal gain for 1580 nm signal can be improved by 13.5 dB. However, a noise figure penalty of 2.9 dB was obtained due to the backward C-band ASE from second stage and the already amplified signal from the first pass that extracting energy from the forward C-band ASE. The maximum gain improvement of 13.7 dB was obtained at a signal wavelength of 1588 nm while signal and total pump powers were fixed at -30 dBm and 92 mW, respectively.

  20. Posterior uncertainty of GEOS-5 L-band radiative transfer model parameters and brightness temperatures after calibration with SMOS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lannoy, G. J.; Reichle, R. H.; Vrugt, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Simulated L-band (1.4 GHz) brightness temperatures are very sensitive to the values of the parameters in the radiative transfer model (RTM). We assess the optimum RTM parameter values and their (posterior) uncertainty in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) land surface model using observations of multi-angular brightness temperature over North America from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. Two different parameter estimation methods are being compared: (i) a particle swarm optimization (PSO) approach, and (ii) an MCMC simulation procedure using the differential evolution adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) algorithm. Our results demonstrate that both methods provide similar "optimal" parameter values. Yet, DREAM exhibits better convergence properties, resulting in a reduced spread of the posterior ensemble. The posterior parameter distributions derived with both methods are used for predictive uncertainty estimation of brightness temperature. This presentation will highlight our model-data synthesis framework and summarize our initial findings.

  1. Inter-spin distance determination using L-band (1-2 GHz) non-adiabatic rapid sweep electron paramagnetic resonance (NARS EPR)

    PubMed Central

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Hustedt, Eric J.; Hyde, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Site-directed spin-labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL EPR) provides insight into the local structure and motion of a spin probe strategically attached to a molecule. When a second spin is introduced to the system, macromolecular information can be obtained through measurement of inter-spin distances either by continuous wave (CW) or pulsed electron double resonance (ELDOR) techniques. If both methodologies are considered, inter-spin distances of 8 to 80 Å can be experimentally determined. However, there exists a region at the upper limit of the conventional X-band (9.5 GHz) CW technique and the lower limit of the four-pulse double electron-electron resonance (DEER) experiment where neither method is particularly reliable. The work presented here utilizes L-band (1.9 GHz) in combination with non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) EPR to address this opportunity by increasing the upper limit of the CW technique. Because L-band linewidths are three to seven times narrower than those at X-band, dipolar broadenings that are small relative to the X-band inhomogeneous linewidth become observable, but the signal loss due to the frequency dependence of the Boltzmann factor, has made L-band especially challenging. NARS has been shown to increase sensitivity by a factor of five, and overcomes much of this loss, making L-band distance determination more feasible [1]. Two different systems are presented and distances of 18–30 Å have been experimentally determined at physiologically relevant temperatures. Measurements are in excellent agreement with a helical model and values determined by DEER. PMID:22750251

  2. Drought index driven by L-band microwave soil moisture data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitar, Ahmad Al; Kerr, Yann; Merlin, Olivier; Cabot, François; Choné, Audrey; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2014-05-01

    Drought is considered in many areas across the globe as one of the major extreme events. Studies do not all agree on the increase of the frequency of drought events over the past 60 years [1], but they all agree that the impact of droughts has increased and the need for efficient global monitoring tools has become most than ever urgent. Droughts are monitored through drought indexes, many of which are based on precipitation (Palmer index(s), PDI…), on vegetation status (VDI) or on surface temperatures. They can also be derived from climate prediction models outputs. The GMO has selected the (SPI) Standardized Precipitation Index as the reference index for the monitoring of drought at global scale. The drawback of this index is that it is directly dependent on global precipitation products that are not accurate over global scale. On the other hand, Vegetation based indexes show the a posteriori effect of drought, since they are based on NDVI. In this study, we choose to combine the surface soil moisture from microwave sensor with climate data to access a drought index. The microwave data are considered from the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission at L-Band (1.4 Ghz) interferometric radiometer from ESA (European Space Agency) [2]. Global surface soil moisture maps with 3 days coverage for ascending 6AM and descending 6PM orbits SMOS have been delivered since January 2010 at a 40 km nominal resolution. We use in this study the daily L3 global soil moisture maps from CATDS (Centre Aval de Traitement des Données SMOS) [3,4]. We present a drought index computed by a double bucket hydrological model driven by operational remote sensing data and ancillary datasets. The SPI is also compared to other drought indicators like vegetation indexes and Palmer drought index. Comparison of drought index to vegetation indexes from AVHRR and MODIS over continental United States show that the drought index can be used as an early warning system for drought monitoring as

  3. Enhancing the Accessibility and Utility of UAVSAR L-band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, D.; Arko, S. A.; Gens, R.; Sanches, R. R.

    2011-12-01

    The UAVSAR instrument, developed at NASA Jet Propulsion Lab, is a reconfigurable L-band, quad-polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) developed specifically for repeat-track differential interferometry (InSAR). It offers resolution of approximately 5m and swaths greater than 16 km. Although designed to be flown aboard a UAV (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle), it is currently being flown aboard a Gulfstream III in an ambitious set of campaigns around the world. The current archive from 2009 contains data from more than 100 missions from North America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Greenland. Compared with most SAR data from satellites, UAVSAR offers higher resolution, full-polarimetry, and an impressive noise floor. For scientists, these datasets present wonderful opportunities for understanding Earth processes and developing new algorithms for information extraction. Yet despite the diverse range of coverage, UAVSAR is still relatively under-utilized. In its capacity as the NASA SAR DAAC, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) is interested in expanding recognition of this data and serving data products that can be readily downloaded into a Geographic Information System (GIS) environment. Two hurdles exist: one is the large size of the data products and the second is the format of the data. The data volumes are in excess of several GB; presenting slow downloads and overwhelming many software programs. Secondly, while the data is appropriately formatted for expert users, it may prove challenging for scientists who have not previously worked with SAR. This paper will address ways that ASF is working to reduce data volume while maintaining the integrity of the data. At the same time, the creation of value-added products that permit immediate visualization in a GIS environment will be described. Conversion of the UAVSAR polarimetric data to radiometrically terrain-corrected Pauli images in a GeoTIFF format will permit researchers to understand the scattering

  4. Mapping Upper Amazon Palm Swamps with Spaceborne L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, N.; McDonald, K. C.; Podest, E.; Schroeder, R.; Zimmermann, R.; Horna, V.

    2010-12-01

    Palm swamp ecosystems are widespread in the Amazon basin, forming where seasonal flooding is moderate and surface inundation persists. Recent studies suggest that palm swamps have a disproportional role on tropical biogeochemistry: the combination of persistently saturated soils, warm temperatures, and low oxygen soils can support significant land-atmosphere methane flux. Potential impacts of climate change on these ecosystems include changes in temperature and precipitation regimes that influence primary productivity and flood extent significantly, potentially reversing net land-atmosphere carbon exchanges regionally. Data acquired from Earth-orbiting satellites provides the opportunity to characterize vegetation structure and monitor surface inundation independently of cloud cover. Building on efforts under our NASA MEaSUREs project for assembly of a global-scale Earth System Data Record (ESDR) of inundated wetlands, we develop and evaluate a systematic approach to map the distribution and composition of palm swamps in the upper Amazon using data sets from JAXA’s Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array L-Band SAR (PALSAR). Our input dataset consists of HH backscatter images acquired in 2007 and 2009. Ground measurements for training were obtained from a study site near Loreto, Peru (4.43S 75.34W) containing the palm species Mauritia flexuosa. The ALOS PALSAR images are first averaged temporally and spatially. We then develop ancillary data layers of flood extent, distance from open water, and SAR image texture. The PALSAR data and derived ancillary layers are combined with MODIS Vegetation Indices and SRTM elevation and input in a classification framework. Since palm swamps are found in persistently flooded areas, we evaluate the potential of identifying and mapping these ecosystems using multi-temporal SAR-based flood extent maps. We conclude by comparing the performance between a decision-tree supervised vs. unsupervised approach and by

  5. Complex Ruptures of Large Earthquakes Imaged by ALOS L-band SAR with Other Geodetic and Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, E. J.; Sladen, A.; Wei, S.; Simons, M.; Avouac, J.; Burgmann, R.

    2011-12-01

    SAR of Envisat and TerraSAR-X were completely incoherent outside of urbanized areas. The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah ruptured approximately 120 km of faults that were either unmapped or not recognized as active in Baja California and Sonora. In the desert areas, both C-band Envisat and L-band ALOS interferograms mapped the earthquake deformation, but in the Colorado River Delta region, widespread liquefaction and other surface disruptions caused widespread decorrelation. Pixel tracking on the ALOS images were essential in this area to locate the previously unmapped Indiviso Fault that ruptured beneath the delta during the earthquake. Our results have important implications for the design of future InSAR missions that have earthquake mapping as science requirements, including the DESDynI mission concept recommended by the Decadal Survey.

  6. Subaru adaptive-optics high-spatial-resolution infrared K- and L'-band imaging search for deeply buried dual AGNs in merging galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Saito, Yuriko

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of infrared K- (2.2 μm) and L'-band (3.8 μm) high-spatial-resolution (<0.''2) imaging observations of nearby gas- and dust-rich infrared luminous merging galaxies, assisted by the adaptive optics system on the Subaru 8.2 m telescope. We investigate the presence and frequency of red K – L' compact sources, which are sensitive indicators of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including AGNs that are deeply buried in gas and dust. We observed 29 merging systems and confirmed at least one AGN in all but one system. However, luminous dual AGNs were detected in only four of the 29 systems (∼14%), despite our method's being sensitive to buried AGNs. For multiple nuclei sources, we compared the estimated AGN luminosities with supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses inferred from large-aperture K-band stellar emission photometry in individual nuclei. We found that mass accretion rates onto SMBHs are significantly different among multiple SMBHs, such that larger-mass SMBHs generally show higher mass accretion rates when normalized to SMBH mass. Our results suggest that non-synchronous mass accretion onto SMBHs in gas- and dust-rich infrared luminous merging galaxies hampers the observational detection of kiloparsec-scale multiple active SMBHs. This could explain the significantly smaller detection fraction of kiloparsec-scale dual AGNs when compared with the number expected from simple theoretical predictions. Our results also indicate that mass accretion onto SMBHs is dominated by local conditions, rather than by global galaxy properties, reinforcing the importance of observations to our understanding of how multiple SMBHs are activated and acquire mass in gas- and dust-rich merging galaxies.

  7. Development of NASA's Next Generation L-Band Digital Beamforming Synthetic Aperture Radar (DBSAR-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rincon, Rafael; Fatoyinbo, Temilola; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Lee, Seung-Kuk; Ranson, K. Jon; Marrero, Victor; Yeary, Mark

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Next generation Digital Beamforming SAR (DBSAR-2) is a state-of-the-art airborne L-band radar developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The instrument builds upon the advanced architectures in NASA's DBSAR-1 and EcoSAR instruments. The new instrument employs a 16-channel radar architecture characterized by multi-mode operation, software defined waveform generation, digital beamforming, and configurable radar parameters. The instrument has been design to support several disciplines in Earth and Planetary sciences. The instrument was recently completed, and tested and calibrated in a anechoic chamber.

  8. Mapping water bodies over tropical bassins from SMOS L-band brightness temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrens, Marie; Al-Bitar, Ahmad; Kerr, Yann; Cote, Rémi; Richaume, Philippe; Crétaux, Jean-François; Cherchali, Selma; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Wetlands and land surface waters play a crucial role in the global water and biogeochimal cycles. Since the 80's, remote sensing techniques provide quantitative estimates of open water surfaces over land. They appear to be a valuable tool to monitor natural and anthropogenic evolution of this variable over the globe. A large array of frequencies has been used to retrieve surface water over land: visible, infrared, radar and passive microwave. In this work, the passive microwave L-band acquisitions from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission are used to retrieve the water fraction. At this frequency, the signal is highly sensitive to surface waters. At L-band, the signal is expected to penetrate deeper in vegetation than signal in other frequency, such as visible and infrared and to some extent C-Band microwave. This asset permits to L-band signal to be more sensitive to open water under dense vegetation. In this study, authors focus on the Amazon and Congo basins. It is shown from a preliminary analysis of multi-angular, full polarized brightness temperature data that the dynamics observed over these study areas are related to the changing water bodies than the change in physical temperature. Based on this conclusion, a simple model had been built to obtain open water maps over the Amazon and Congo basin from SMOS brightness temperature at a coarse spatial resolution (25 km x 25 km) and high temporal frequency (2-days). These maps reveal the potential of L-band to monitor the evolution of open water and inundation over land. This new SMOS product is validated with visible data LandSAT. It is also compared to altimeter data (Jason-2) over the Rio Negro river. It was found that the water fraction estimated by SMOS was highly correlated with water levels measured by Jason-2 (R > 0.98). These maps exhibit also a phase shift of three months in the precipitation regime between the South and the North of the Amazon basin.

  9. A Dual-polarized Microstrip Subarray Antenna for an Inflatable L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zawadzki, Mark; Huang, John

    1999-01-01

    Inflatable technology has been identified as a potential solution to the problem of achieving small mass, high packaging efficiency, and reliable deployment for future NASA spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) antennas. Presently, there exists a requirement for a dual-polarized L-band SAR antenna with an aperture size of 10m x 3m, a center frequency of 1.25GHz, a bandwidth of 80MHz, electronic beam scanning, and a mass of less than 100kg. The work presented below is part of the ongoing effort to develop such an inflatable antenna array.

  10. Design, Manufacture and Test of the L-Band Feed for the FAST 30m Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian-Jian; Cao, Yang; Gan, Heng-Qian; Jin, Chen-Jin

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, the design, manufacture and test of the L-band feed for the FAST (Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Radio Teslescope) 30m demonstrator are presented. The HFSS is used for the simulation during the design. The feed was made by hand using cardboard, plastic board and adhesive aluminum foil tap. The test manufacture shows that this manually made feed meets the required specification of the FAST 30m demonstrator. The design using the HFSS and manufacture by hand might be a fast, economical and effective method for producing simple feed and may be helpful to other similar work.

  11. Characterization of L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter from floating and grounded thermokarst lake ice in Arctic Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engram, M.; Anthony, K. W.; Meyer, F. J.; Grosse, G.

    2013-11-01

    Radar remote sensing is a well-established method to discriminate lakes retaining liquid-phase water beneath winter ice cover from those that do not. L-band (23.6 cm wavelength) airborne radar showed great promise in the 1970s, but spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) studies have focused on C-band (5.6 cm) SAR to classify lake ice with no further attention to L-band SAR for this purpose. Here, we examined calibrated L-band single- and quadrature-polarized SAR returns from floating and grounded lake ice in two regions of Alaska: the northern Seward Peninsula (NSP) where methane ebullition is common in lakes and the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) where ebullition is relatively rare. We found average backscatter intensities of -13 dB and -16 dB for late winter floating ice on the NSP and ACP, respectively, and -19 dB for grounded ice in both regions. Polarimetric analysis revealed that the mechanism of L-band SAR backscatter from floating ice is primarily roughness at the ice-water interface. L-band SAR showed less contrast between floating and grounded lake ice than C-band; however, since L-band is sensitive to ebullition bubbles trapped by lake ice (bubbles increase backscatter), this study helps elucidate potential confounding factors of grounded ice in methane studies using SAR.

  12. Gain enhanced L-band optical fiber amplifiers and tunable fiber lasers with erbium-doped fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Leblanc, M.; Schinn, G. W.

    2003-02-01

    We report on the experimental investigation of gain enhanced L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA) by either recycling residual ASE or using a second C-band wavelength pump laser and on the experimental demonstration of L-band tunable erbium-doped fiber ring lasers. We observed that by reflecting ASE from pumped erbium-doped fiber (EDF) the L-band EDFA gain can be enhanced of 2-15 dB depending on amplifier designs. We also studied wavelength and power dependence of second pump laser on the gain enhanced L-band EDFA and found that an optimum wavelength for second pump laser was between 1550 and 1560 nm. Finally, a L-band tunable erbium-doped fiber laser was also constructed in which lazing oscillation was observed closed to 1624 nm by recycling residual ASE. This L-band tunable laser has a line-width of about 300 MHz, an output power of 1 mW, and a signal to source spontaneous emission ratio of 60 dB.

  13. Validation of Forested Inundation Extent Revealed by L-Band Polarimetric and Interferometric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Bruce; Celi, Jorge; Hamilton, Steve; McDonald, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    UAVSAR, NASA's airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), conducted an extended observational campaign in Central and South America in March 2013, primarily related to volcanic deformations along the Andean Mountain Range but also including a large number of flights studying other scientific phenomena. During this campaign, the L-Band SAR collected data over the Napo River in Ecuador. The objectives of this experiment were to acquire polarimetric and interferometric L-Band SAR data over an inundated tropical forest in Ecuador simultaneously with on-the-ground field work ascertaining the extent of inundation, and to then derive from this data a quantitative estimate for the error in the SAR-derived inundation extent. In this paper, we will first describe the processing and preliminary analysis of the SAR data. The polarimetric SAR data will be classified by land cover and inundation state. The interferometric SAR data will be used to identify those areas where change in inundation extent occurred, and to measure the change in water level between two observations separated by a week. Second, we will describe the collection of the field estimates of inundation, and have preliminary comparisons of inundation extent measured in the field field versus that estimated from the SAR data.

  14. First calculation of phase and coherence of longitudinally separated L-band equatorial ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shume, E. B.; Mannucci, A. J.

    2013-07-01

    We present the first calculation of phase and coherence of cross-wavelet transform applied to longitudinally separated L-band equatorial ionospheric scintillation observations received from Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites. The phase and coherence analysis were employed on two pairs of observations: (1) São Luís and Rio Branco and (2) Alta Floresta and Huancayo. For these case studies, in statistically significant and high-coherence regions, scintillation observations over São Luís (Alta Floresta) lead that of Rio Branco (Huancayo) by ˜2 to 3 h with a 95%frequency. If L-band scintillation happens over São Luís (Alta Floresta), there is a 95%likelihood that scintillation would happen to the west over Rio Branco (Huancayo) after ˜2 to 3 h, suggesting that a forecast can be made ahead of scintillation occurrences. The phase and coherence relationships between the longitudinally separated scintillation-producing regions can be connected to the large-scale wave structures which are reported to be related to the generation of equatorial spread F and scintillation.

  15. L-Band Brightness Temperature Variations at Dome C and Snow Metamorphism at the Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Dinnat, Emmanuel; Picard, Ghislain; Champollion, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The Antarctic Plateau is a promising site to monitor microwave radiometers' drift, and to inter-calibrate microwave radiometers, especially 1.4 GigaHertz (L-band) radiometers on board the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), and AquariusSAC-D missions. The Plateau is a thick ice cover, thermally stable in depth, with large dimensions, and relatively low heterogeneities. In addition, its high latitude location in the Southern Hemisphere enables frequent observations by polar-orbiting satellites, and no contaminations by radio frequency interference. At Dome C (75S, 123E), on the Antarctic Plateau, the substantial amount of in-situ snow measurements available allows us to interpret variations in space-borne microwave brightness temperature (TB) (e.g. Macelloni et al., 2007, 2013, Brucker et al., 2011, Champollion et al., 2013). However, to analyze the observations from the Aquarius radiometers, whose sensitivity is 0.15 K, the stability of the snow layers near the surface that are most susceptible to rapidly change needs to be precisely assessed. This study focuses on the spatial and temporal variations of the Aquarius TB over the Antarctic Plateau, and at Dome C in particular, to highlight the impact of snow surface metamorphism on the TB observations at L-band.

  16. The Detection and Mitigation of RFI with the Aquarius L-Band Scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, A. P.; Piepmeier, J. R.; Fischman, M. A.; McWatters, D. A.; Spencer, M. W.

    2008-01-01

    The Aquarius sea-surface salinity mission includes an L-band scatterometer to sense sea-surface roughness. This radar is subject to radio-frequency interference (RFI) in its passband from 1258 to 1262 MHz, a region also allocated for terrestrial radio location. Due to its received power sensitivity requirements, the expected RFI environment poses significant challenges. We present the results of a study evaluating the severity of terrestrial RFI sources on the operation of the Aquarius scatterometer, and propose a scheme to both detect and remove problematic RFI signals in the ocean backscatter measurements. The detection scheme utilizes the digital sampling of the ambient input power to detect outliers from the receiver noise floor which are statistically significant, and flags nearby radar echoes as potentially contaminated by RFI. This detection strategy, developed to meet tight budget and data downlink requirements, has been implemented and tested in hardware, and shows great promise for the detection and global mapping of L-band RFI sources.

  17. Extending ALFALFA: Reducing L-Band Wide Observations of Optically Selected Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    Observations of galaxies in the Virgo Cluster were completed at the Arecibo Observatory in the spring and summer of 2015. 161 targets were observed, selected by photometry criteria such as magnitude and shape from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The targets, some too dim to be detected by Arecibo's ALFA drift scanner, were observed with the L-Band Wide detector. Once reductions in an IDL environment were done, these data were matched to the targets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the GALEX/MAST catalog. 115 of the 161 targets observed had positive detections, a 71% success rate. Comparing the galaxies that were detected against the galaxies that were not detected (by the L-Band Wide receiver) will allow us to refine our method of using photometric data to select HI-rich galaxies in the 2000 km/s to 9000 km/s range to refine our selection for the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS), which uses the same method of target selection.

  18. The modification of X and L band radar signals by monomolecular sea slicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huehnerfuss, H.; Alpers, W.; Cross, A.; Garrett, W. D.; Keller, W. C.; Plant, W. J.; Schuler, D. L.; Lange, P. A.; Schlude, F.

    1983-01-01

    One methyl oleate and two oleyl alcohol surface films were produced on the surface of the North Sea under comparable oceanographic and meteorological conditions in order to investigate their influence on X and L band radar backscatter. Signals are backscattered in these bands primarily by surface waves with lengths of about 2 and 12 cm, respectively, and backscattered power levels in both bands were reduced by the slicks. The reduction was larger at X band than at L band, however, indicating that shorter waves are more intensely damped by the surface films. The oleyl alcohol film caused greater attenuation of short gravity waves than the film of methyl oleate, thus demonstrating the importance of the physicochemical properties of films on the damping of wind-generated gravity capillary waves. Finally, these experiments indicate a distinct dependence of the degree of damping on the angle between wind and waves. Wind-generated waves traveling in the wind direction are more intensely damped by surface films than are waves traveling at large angles to the wind.

  19. Soil moisture retrieval using L-band time-series radar observations over shrub lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Das, N. N.; Jackson, T. J.; Njoku, E. G.

    2012-12-01

    A time-series algorithm was applied to retrieve surface (from the surface down to a ~5 cm depth) soil moisture over shrub land using airborne L-band radar observations. The goal is to develop and assess algorithms as a part of the global soil moisture retrieval at 3-km spatial resolution by the Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission (due for launch in 2014). Shrub lands cover 20% of the global land surface, and reliable retrieval over this land cover is important for providing a global product. To systematically separate the effect of soil moisture from those of surface roughness and vegetation, the retrieval algorithm inverts a generalized forward model for radar scattering from vegetation-covered soil surfaces. The forward model consists of the small perturbation model for smooth bare surface, and the discrete scattering model for the scattering from vegetation and vegetation-ground interaction. The time-series measurements of co-polarized radar backscatter coefficients and ground-based vegetation water contents are inputs to the retrieval and used as initial guess of their values. These input parameters are further adjusted during the retrieval through least-square minimization. In addition to soil moisture, the roughness of the soil surface is retrieved. A constraint is imposed that the surface roughness is time-invariant, which resolves ambiguities in the soil moisture solution search. In comparison, a conventional retrieval relying on snapshot observations may not resolve the ambiguities, resulting in soil moisture retrieval error. The radar data were obtained by the Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) over the San Joaquin Valley on 8 days between May 2011 and November 2011. Each of two study regions covers an area of about 1 km x 0.5 km. Ground-based soil moisture and vegetation information were collected. Details of the vegetation structure were recorded and used to train the forward model for radar scattering. The proposed

  20. Soil moisture mapping at Bubnow Wetland using L-band radiometer (ELBARA III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łukowski, Mateusz; Schwank, Mike; Szlązak, Radosław; Wiesmann, Andreas; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Bogusław; Usowicz, Jerzy; Rojek, Edyta; Werner, Charles

    2016-04-01

    The study of soil moisture is a scientific challenge. Not only because of large diversity of soils and differences in their water content, but also due to the difficulty of measuring, especially in large scale. On this field of interest several methods to determine the content of water in soil exists. The basic and referential is gravimetric method, which is accurate, but suitable only for small spatial scales and time-consuming. Indirect methods are faster, but need to be validated, for example those based on dielectric properties of materials (e.g. time domain reflectometry - TDR) or made from distance (remote), like brightness temperature measurements. Remote sensing of soil moisture can be performed locally (from towers, drones, planes etc.) or globally (satellites). These techniques can complement and help to verify different models and assumptions. In our studies, we applied spatial statistics to local soil moisture mapping using ELBARA III (ESA L-band radiometer, 1.4 GHz) mounted on tower (6.5 meter height). Our measurements were carried out in natural Bubnow Wetland, near Polesie National Park (Eastern Poland), during spring time. This test-site had been selected because it is representative for one of the biggest wetlands in Europe (1400 km2), called "Western Polesie", localized in Ukraine, Poland and Belarus. We have investigated Bubnow for almost decade, using meteorological and soil moisture stations, conducting campaigns of hand-held measurements and collecting soil samples. Now, due to the possibility of rotation at different incidence angles (as in previous ELBARA systems) and the new azimuth tracking capabilities, we obtained brightness temperature data not only at different distances from the tower, but also around it, in footprints containing different vegetation and soil types. During experiment we collected data at area about 450 m2 by rotating ELBARA's antenna 5-175° in horizontal and 30-70° in vertical plane. This type of approach allows

  1. Passive Microwave Measurements Over Conifer Forests at L-Band and C-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Chauhan, N.; Kim, E.; Bidwell, S.; Goodberlet, M.; Haken, M.; deMatthaeis, P.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements have been made at L-band and C-band over conifer forests in Virginia to study the response of passive microwave instruments to biomass and soil moisture. A series of aircraft measurements were made in July, August and November, 1999 over relatively homogenous conifer forests of varying biomass. Three radiometers participated in these measurements. These were: 1) the L-band radiometer ESTAR, a horizontally polarized synthetic aperture radiometer which has been used extensively in past measurements of soil moisture; 2) the L-band radiometer SLFMR, a vertically polarized cross-track scanner which has been used successfully in the past for mapping sea surface salinity; and 3) The ACMR, a new C-band radiometer which operates at V- and H-polarization and in the configuration for these experiments did not scan. All three radiometers were flown on the NASA P-3 aircraft based at the Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. The ESTAR and SLFMR were mounted in the bomb bay of the P-3 and imaged across track whereas the ACMR was mounted to look aft at 54 degrees up from nadir. Data was collected at altitudes of 915 meters and 457 meters. The forests consisted of relatively homogeneous "managed" stands of conifer located near Waverly, Virginia. This is a relatively flat area about 30 miles southeast of Richmond, VA with numerous stands of trees being grown for the forestry industry. The stands selected for study consisted of areas of regrowth and mature stands of pine. In addition, a small stand of very large trees was observed. Soil moisture sampling was done in each stand during the aircraft over flights. Data was collected on July 7, August 27, November 15 and November 30, 1999. Measurements were made with ESTAR on all days. The ACMR flew on the summer missions and the SLFMR was present only on the August 27 flight. Soil moisture varied from quite dry on July 7 to quite moist on November 30 (which was shortly after a period of rain). The microwave

  2. Improved geodetic earthquake source modelling through correction of ionospheric disturbances in L-band InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhaus, Henriette; Gomba, Giorgio; Eineder, Michael

    2016-04-01

    interferogram. This method is based on the dispersive nature of the ionosphere and separates the ionospheric component of the interferometric phase from the non-dispersive component related to topography, ground motion, and tropospheric path delay. We study the ionospheric bias on the fault modelling results in a real-data case study of a non-complex earthquake rupture using the ionospheric phase screen estimations and the uninformed ramp removal in comparison. The test earthquake is the March 24 2011 Myanmar earthquake (Mw6.8), which is covered by ALOS-1. Here, the coseismic interferograms of both ascending and descending tracks show significant ionospheric distortions. We use the standard formulations of rectangular dislocations in an elastic half-space and run fully non-linear optimizations of the first-order fault parameters. We complement the optimization with a Bayesian model parameter uncertainties estimation to quantify the modelling bias in source model estimation with arbitrarily trend-corrected L-band displacement data compared to the correction based on the estimated ionospheric phase screen. For this particular strike-slip earthquake we find that fault dip, fault slip and rake are affected by the above mentioned methods of mitigating ionospheric contributions. The spurious oblique strike-slip mechanism found in the seismological gCMT solution, previous InSAR studies and our result from standard ramp correction, becomes a pure vertical strike-slip rupture for the physically-informed ionospheric delay correction. With such improved static near-field observation of seismic ruptures we also contribute towards the combined use of geodetic and seismic data in earthquake source modelling. The research of H.S and G.G. was and is funded by the Earth System Dynamics HGF Alliance. The ALOS data for this study are kindly provided by JAXA through the RA4 program under the project ID 1349.

  3. High power L-band mode-locked fiber laser based on topological insulator saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yichang; Semaan, Georges; Salhi, Mohamed; Niang, Alioune; Guesmi, Khmaies; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Sanchez, Francois

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate a passive mode-locked Er:Yb doped double-clad fiber laser using a microfiber-based topological insulator (Bi(2)Se(3)) saturable absorber (TISA). By optimizing the cavity loss and output coupling ratio, the mode-locked fiber laser can operate in L-band with high average output power. With the highest pump power of 5 W, 91st harmonic mode locking of soliton bunches with average output power of 308 mW was obtained. This is the first report that the TISA based erbium-doped fiber laser operating above 1.6 μm and is also the highest output power yet reported in TISA based passive mode-locked fiber laser. PMID:26368409

  4. Effects of the equatorial ionosphere on L-band Earth-space transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1993-01-01

    Ionosphere scintillation can effect satellite telecommunication up to Ku-band. Nighttime scintillation can be attributed to large-scale inhomogeneity in the F-region of the ionosphere predominantly between heights of 200 and 600 km. Daytime scintillation has been attributed to sporadic E. It can be thought of as occurring in three belts: equatorial, high-latitude, and mid-latitude, in order of severity. Equatorial scintillation occurs between magnetic latitudes +/- 25 degrees, peaking near +/- 10 degrees. It commonly starts abruptly near 2000 local time and dies out shortly after midnight. There is a strong solar cycle dependence and a seasonal preference for the equinoxes, particularly the vernal one. Equatorial scintillation occurs more frequently on magnetically quiet than on magnetically disturbed days in most longitudes. At the peak of the sunspot cycle scintillation depths as great as 20 dB were observed at L-band.

  5. Comparisons of Aquarius Measurements over Oceans with Radiative Transfer Models at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, E.; LeVine, D.; Abraham, S.; DeMattheis, P.; Utku, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D spacecraft includes three L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometers dedicated to measuring sea surface salinity. It was launched in June 2011 by NASA and CONAE (Argentine space agency). We report detailed comparisons of Aquarius measurements with radiative transfer model predictions. These comparisons are used as part of the initial assessment of Aquarius data and to estimate the radiometer calibration bias and stability. Comparisons are also being performed to assess the performance of models used in the retrieval algorithm for correcting the effect of various sources of geophysical "noise" (e.g. Faraday rotation, surface roughness). Such corrections are critical in bringing the error in retrieved salinity down to the required 0.2 practical salinity unit on monthly global maps at 150 km by 150 km resolution.

  6. Polarimetric Decomposition Analysis of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Slick Using L-Band UAVSAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Cathleen; Minchew, Brent; Holt, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    We report here an analysis of the polarization dependence of L-band radar backscatter from the main slick of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, with specific attention to the utility of polarimetric decomposition analysis for discrimination of oil from clean water and identification of variations in the oil characteristics. For this study we used data collected with the UAVSAR instrument from opposing look directions directly over the main oil slick. We find that both the Cloude-Pottier and Shannon entropy polarimetric decomposition methods offer promise for oil discrimination, with the Shannon entropy method yielding the same information as contained in the Cloude-Pottier entropy and averaged in tensity parameters, but with significantly less computational complexity

  7. Color composite C-band and L-band image of Kilauea volcanoe on Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This color composite C-band and L-band image of the Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii was acuired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperature Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying on the Space Shuttle Endeavour. The city of Hilo can be seen at the top. The image shows the different types of lava flows around the crater Pu'u O'o. Ash deposits which erupted in 1790 from the summit of Kilauea volcano show up as dark in this image, and fine details associated with lava flows which erupted in 1919 and 1974 can be seen to the south of the summit in an area called the Ka'u Desert. Other historic lava flows can also be seen. Highway 11 is the linear feature running from Hilo to the Kilauea volcano. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43918.

  8. A composite L-band HH radar backscattering model for coniferous forest stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guoquing; Simonett, David S.

    1988-01-01

    The radar backscattering model developed by Richards et al. (1987), has been improved and further tested in this research. The trunk term may now be calculated from the exact solution to the electromagnetic wave equations instead of the corner reflector equation. Rough surface models have been introduced into the radar model, so that the forward reflectance and the backscattering from the ground surface are now calculated from the same model and, thus, are consistent. The number of trees in an individual pixel is assumed to be Poisson distributed, with tree height in a stand log-normally distributed. The simulated results show that the match of backscattering coefficients for eight forest stands between SIR-B image data and the simulated results are satisfying, and that the trunk term now seems to be convincingly established as the dominant term in the L-band HH radar return from coniferous forest stands.

  9. Multiwavelength L-band fiber laser with bismuth-oxide EDF and photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramzia Salem, A. M.; Al-Mansoori, M. H.; Hizam, H.; Mohd Noor, S. B.; Abu Bakar, M. H.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2011-05-01

    A multiwavelength laser comb using a bismuth-based erbium-doped fiber and 50 m photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated in a ring cavity configuration. The fiber laser is solely pumped by a single 1455 nm Raman pump laser to exploit its higher power delivery compared to that of a single-mode laser diode pump. At 264 mW Raman pump power and 1 mW Brillouin pump power, 38 output channels in the L-band have been realized with an optical signal-to-noise ratio above 15 dB and a Stokes line spacing of 0.08 nm. The laser exhibits a tuning range of 12 nm and produces stable Stokes lines across the tuning range between Brillouin pump wavelengths of 1603 nm and 1615 nm.

  10. The correlation of Skylab L-band brightness temperatures with antecedent precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    The S194 L-band radiometer flown on the Skylab mission measured terrestrial radiation at the microwave wavelength of 21.4 cm. The terrain emissivity at this wavelength is strongly dependent on the soil moisture content, which can be inferred from antecedent precipitation. For the Skylab data acquisition pass from the Oklahoma panhandle to southeastern Texas on 11 June 1973, the S194 brightness temperatures are highly correlated with antecedent precipitation from the preceding eleven day period, but very little correlation was apparent for the preceding five day period. The correlation coefficient between the averaged antecedent precipitation index values and the corresponding S194 brightness temperatures between 230 K and 270 K, the region of apparent response to soil moisture in the data, was -0.97. The equation of the linear least squares line is given.

  11. Monitoring Everglades freshwater marsh water level using L-band synthetic aperture radar backscatter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Lu, Zhong; Jones, John W.; Shum, C.K.; Lee, Hyongki; Jia, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    The Florida Everglades plays a significant role in controlling floods, improving water quality, supporting ecosystems, and maintaining biodiversity in south Florida. Adaptive restoration and management of the Everglades requires the best information possible regarding wetland hydrology. We developed a new and innovative approach to quantify spatial and temporal variations in wetland water levels within the Everglades, Florida. We observed high correlations between water level measured at in situ gages and L-band SAR backscatter coefficients in the freshwater marsh, though C-band SAR backscatter has no close relationship with water level. Here we illustrate the complementarity of SAR backscatter coefficient differencing and interferometry (InSAR) for improved estimation of high spatial resolution water level variations in the Everglades. This technique has a certain limitation in applying to swamp forests with dense vegetation cover, but we conclude that this new method is promising in future applications to wetland hydrology research.

  12. L-band double Brillouin frequency spaced tunable multiwavelength Brillouin fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Tianshu; Jia, Qingsong; Dong, Keyan

    2014-12-01

    A tunable multi-wavelength Brillouin fiber laser with double Brillouin frequency spacing based on a four-port circulator is experimentally demonstrated. The fiber laser configuration formed by four-port circulator isolates the odd-order Brillouin stokes signal to circulate within the cavity only. In addition, it also allows propagation of the incoming Brillouin pump and even-order Stokes signals from four-port circulator to output coupler .A L-band erbiumdoped fiber (EDF) with 1480nm pump is used to amplify Stokes signals and to get more output channels. At the Brillouin pump power of 8dBm and the 1480 nm pump power of 200mw, 5 output channels with double Brillouin frequency spacing and tuning range of 20 nm from 1568nm to 1588nm are achieved.

  13. Wetlands Maps of Central Canada based on L-band SAR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcomb, J.; Moghaddam, M.; Clewley, D.; McDonald, K. C.; Podest, E.; Chapman, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Many boreal wetlands appear to be evolving into significant sources of greenhouse gases. The ability to accurately quantify the locations, types, and extents of northern wetlands is important to understanding their role in the global carbon cycle and responses to changes in climate. However, due to the extent of boreal wetlands and their inaccessibility, there have been few maps produced of this important ecosystem. To address this need, we have been constructing high-resolution (100 m) thematic maps of North American boreal wetlands. The maps are developed using space-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR), which is capable of efficiently providing high-resolution imagery of vast and often inaccessible regions. Unlike optical imagery, space-based SAR imagery is unaffected by cloud cover. Additionally, L-band SAR is able to sense vegetation structure and moisture content, as well as ground and surface water characteristics (even under vegetation canopies), thereby providing information unobtainable from optical sensors. Space-based L-band SAR thus constitutes an excellent tool for mapping boreal wetlands. One wetlands map is based on HH-polarized L-band SAR imagery from the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS-1), collected for both summer and winter in the late 1990s. A second map is based on dual-polarized (HH and HV) imagery from the Phased Array L-band SAR (PALSAR) sensor, collected in the summer of 2007. Prior to classification, a sequence of preprocessing steps are executed, including filtering, mosaicking, resampling, reprojection, co-registration, and the formation of supplementary data layers such as image texture, topographic slope, and proximity to water. This preprocessing is implemented by a semi-automated software suite specifically designed to handle the large volumes of data involved in the project. Training/testing data needed in the classification process are formed by merging national wetland inventory and land cover databases. Finally, a

  14. Transfer-matrices for series-type microwave antenna circuits. [L-band radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    Transfer matrices are developed which permit analysis and computer evaluation of certain series type microwave antenna circuits associated with an L-Band microwave radiometer (LBMR) under investigation at Goddard Space Flight Center. This radiometer is one of several diverse instrument designs to be used for the determination of soil moisture, sea state, salinity, and temperature data. Four port matrix notation is used throughout for the evaluation of LBMR circuits with mismatched couplers and lossy transmission lines. Matrix parameters in examples are predicted on an impedance analysis and an assumption of an array aperture distribution. The notation presented is easily adapted to longer and more varied chains of matrices, and to matrices of larger dimension.

  15. Repetitive measurements of intrarenal oxygenation in vivo using L band electron paramagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Franzén, Stephanie; Pihl, Liselotte; Khan, Nadeem; Palm, Fredrik; Gustafsson, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    Intrarenal oxygenation is heterogeneous with oxygen levels normally being highest in the superficial cortex and lowest in the inner medulla. Reduced intrarenal oxygenation has been implied in the pathology of several kidney diseases. However, there is currently no method available to repetitively monitor regional renal oxygenation using minimally invasive procedures. We therefore evaluated implantable lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) probes, which display a close correlation between EPR line width and oxygen availability.LiPc probes were implanted in the kidney cortex and medulla in the same mouse and EPR spectra were acquired using a L band scanner during inhalation of air (21 % oxygen) or a mixture of air and nitrogen (10 % oxygen). In order to separate the signals from the two probes, a 1 G/cm gradient was applied and the signals were derived from 40 consecutive sweeps. Peak-to-peak comparison of the EPR line was used to convert the signal to an approximate oxygen tension in MATLAB. Kidney cortex as well as medullary oxygenation was stable over the 45 day period (cortex 56 ± 7 mmHg and medulla 43 ± 6 mmHg). However, 10 % oxygen inhalation significantly reduced oxygenation in both cortex (56 ± 6 to 34 ± 2 mmHg n = 15 p < 0.05) and medulla (42 ± 5 to 29 ± 3 mmHg n = 7 p < 0.05).In conclusion, L band EPR using LiPc probes implanted in discrete intrarenal structures can be used to repetitively monitor regional renal oxygenation. This minimally invasive method is especially well suited for conditions of reduced intrarenal oxygenation since this increases the signal intensity which facilitates the quantification of the EPR signal to absolute oxygenation values. PMID:24729225

  16. EPR Methods for Biological Cu(II): L-Band CW and NARS

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian; Kowalski, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Copper has many roles in biology that involve the change of coordination sphere and/or oxidation state of the copper ion. Consequently, the study of copper in heterogeneous environments is an important area in biophysics. EPR is a primary technique for the investigation of paramagnetic copper, which is usually the isolated Cu(II) ion, but sometimes as Cu(II) in different oxidation states of multi-transition ion clusters. The gross geometry of the coordination environment of Cu(II) can often be determined from a simple inspection of the EPR spectrum, recorded in the traditional X-band frequency range (9 – 10 GHz). Identification and quantitation of the coordinating ligand atoms, however, is not so straightforward. In particular, analysis of the superhyperfine structure on the EPR spectrum, to determine the number of coordinated nitrogen atoms, is fraught with difficulty at X-band, despite the observation that the overwhelming number of EPR studies of Cu(II) in the literature have been carried out at X-band. Greater reliability has been demonstrated at S-band (3 – 4 GHz), using the low-field parallel (gz) features. However, analysis relies on clear identification of the outermost superhyperfine line, which has the lowest intensity of all the spectral features. Computer simulations have subsequently indicated that the much more intense perpendicular region of the spectrum can be reliably interpreted at L-band (2 GHz). The present work describes the development of L-band EPR of Cu(II) into a routine method, that is applicable to biological samples. PMID:26478491

  17. Soil moisture estimation by assimilating L-band microwave brightness temperature with geostatistics and observation localization.

    PubMed

    Han, Xujun; Li, Xin; Rigon, Riccardo; Jin, Rui; Endrizzi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The observation could be used to reduce the model uncertainties with data assimilation. If the observation cannot cover the whole model area due to spatial availability or instrument ability, how to do data assimilation at locations not covered by observation? Two commonly used strategies were firstly described: One is covariance localization (CL); the other is observation localization (OL). Compared with CL, OL is easy to parallelize and more efficient for large-scale analysis. This paper evaluated OL in soil moisture profile characterizations, in which the geostatistical semivariogram was used to fit the spatial correlated characteristics of synthetic L-Band microwave brightness temperature measurement. The fitted semivariogram model and the local ensemble transform Kalman filter algorithm are combined together to weight and assimilate the observations within a local region surrounding the grid cell of land surface model to be analyzed. Six scenarios were compared: 1_Obs with one nearest observation assimilated, 5_Obs with no more than five nearest local observations assimilated, and 9_Obs with no more than nine nearest local observations assimilated. The scenarios with no more than 16, 25, and 36 local observations were also compared. From the results we can conclude that more local observations involved in assimilation will improve estimations with an upper bound of 9 observations in this case. This study demonstrates the potentials of geostatistical correlation representation in OL to improve data assimilation of catchment scale soil moisture using synthetic L-band microwave brightness temperature, which cannot cover the study area fully in space due to vegetation effects. PMID:25635771

  18. Development of a Two Dimensional Synthetic Aperture Radiometer at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Carver, K.; Goodberlet, M.; Popstefanija, I.; Mead, J.

    2000-01-01

    A radiometer that uses aperture synthesis in two dimensions is being built as part of research under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. The instrument development team consists of engineers at the Goddard Space Flight Center, the University of Massachusetts and Quadrant Engineering. This will be an aircraft instrument operating at L-band which builds on the heritage of ESTAR. The choice of L-band was made because the problem of achieving adequate resolution in space is most critical at this wavelength and because a polarimetric, conical scanning airborne radiometer for future experiments to validate soil moisture and ocean salinity retrieval algorithms is not currently available. The instrument will be designed to fly on the NASA P-3 aircraft in a nadir pointing mode, although other options are possible. The antenna will consist of an array of modules arranged in a rectangular grid. Each module will be comprised of a printed circuit dual-polarized patch and integrated receiver. The distribution of modules within the rectangular array will be adjustable so that several different imaging configurations (e.g. "+","Y", "T") can be employed. The integrated receiver will provide amplification and conversion to IF. The IF signal will be routed to a processor where the required correlations performed. The I and Q channels will be created digitally and the correlations will be done digitally in this processor. The digitization will be done with sufficient bits to study the effects of quantization on radiometer performance. A computer/controller will store the data for conversion to an image and will also perform temperature control and other data interfacing and housekeeping tasks. The instrument is currently in the bread boarding phase of development. A design of the critical components has been completed and hardware is being assembled to test the individual elements. It is expected that a complete 2-channel correlator will be tested by the summer of 2000 and that the

  19. Forest and Forest Change Mapping with C- and L-band SAR in Liwale, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haarpaintner, J.; Davids, C.; Hindberg, H.; Zahabu, E.; Malimbwi, R. E.

    2015-04-01

    As part of a Tanzanian-Norwegian cooperation project on Monitoring Reporting and Verification (MRV) for REDD+, 2007-2011 Cand L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter data from Envisat ASAR and ALOS Palsar, respectively, have been processed, analysed and used for forest and forest change mapping over a study side in Liwale District in Lindi Region, Tanzania. Land cover observations from forest inventory plots of the National Forestry Resources Monitoring and Assessment (NAFORMA) project have been used for training Gaussian Mixture Models and k-means classifier that have been combined in order to map the study region into forest, woodland and non-forest areas. Maximum forest and woodland extension masks have been extracted by classifying maximum backscatter mosaics in HH and HV polarizations from the 2007-2011 ALOS Palsar coverage and could be used to map efficiently inter-annual forest change by filtering out changes in non-forest areas. Envisat ASAR APS (alternate polarization mode) have also been analysed with the aim to improve the forest/woodland/non-forest classification based on ALOS Palsar. Clearly, the combination of C-band SAR and L-band SAR provides useful information in order to smooth the classification and especially increase the woodland class, but an overall improvement for the wall-to-wall land type classification has yet to be confirmed. The quality assessment and validation of the results is done with very high resolution optical data from WorldView, Ikonos and RapidEye, and NAFORMA field observations.

  20. Investigation on the Frequency Allocation for Radio Astronomy at the L Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Z. Z.; Umar, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Rosli, Z.; Asanok, K.; Gasiprong, N.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the frequency allocation reserved for radio astronomy in the L band set by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), which is between 1400 and 1427 MHz, is reviewed. We argue that the nearby frequencies are still very important for radio astronomers on the ground by investigating radio objects (H i sources) around 1300-1500 MHz. The L-band window is separated into a group of four windows, namely 1400-1427 MHz (window A), 1380-1400 MHz (window B), 1350-1380 MHz (window C), and 1300-1350 MHz (window D). These windows are selected according to their redshifts from a rest frequency for hydrogen spectral line at 1420.4057 MHz. Radio objects up to z ≈ 0.1 or frequency down to 1300 MHz are examined. We argue that since window B has important radio objects within the four windows, this window should also be given to radio astronomy. They are galaxies, spiral galaxies, and galaxy clusters. This underlines the significance of window B for radio astronomers on the ground. By investigating the severeness of radio frequency interference (RFI) within these windows, we have determined that window B still has significant, consistent RFI. The main RFI sources in the four windows have also been identified. We also found that the Department of Civil Aviation of Malaysia is assigned a frequency range of 1215-1427 MHz, which is transmitted within the four windows and inside the protected frequency for radio astronomy. We also investigated the RFI in the four windows on proposed sites of future radio astronomy observatories in Malaysia and Thailand and found the two best sites as Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI) and Ubon Ratchathani, respectively. It has also been determined that RFI in window B increases with population density.

  1. Soil Moisture Estimation by Assimilating L-Band Microwave Brightness Temperature with Geostatistics and Observation Localization

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xujun; Li, Xin; Rigon, Riccardo; Jin, Rui; Endrizzi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The observation could be used to reduce the model uncertainties with data assimilation. If the observation cannot cover the whole model area due to spatial availability or instrument ability, how to do data assimilation at locations not covered by observation? Two commonly used strategies were firstly described: One is covariance localization (CL); the other is observation localization (OL). Compared with CL, OL is easy to parallelize and more efficient for large-scale analysis. This paper evaluated OL in soil moisture profile characterizations, in which the geostatistical semivariogram was used to fit the spatial correlated characteristics of synthetic L-Band microwave brightness temperature measurement. The fitted semivariogram model and the local ensemble transform Kalman filter algorithm are combined together to weight and assimilate the observations within a local region surrounding the grid cell of land surface model to be analyzed. Six scenarios were compared: 1_Obs with one nearest observation assimilated, 5_Obs with no more than five nearest local observations assimilated, and 9_Obs with no more than nine nearest local observations assimilated. The scenarios with no more than 16, 25, and 36 local observations were also compared. From the results we can conclude that more local observations involved in assimilation will improve estimations with an upper bound of 9 observations in this case. This study demonstrates the potentials of geostatistical correlation representation in OL to improve data assimilation of catchment scale soil moisture using synthetic L-band microwave brightness temperature, which cannot cover the study area fully in space due to vegetation effects. PMID:25635771

  2. The microwave emission and transmission characters of deciduous forest at L-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongjun; Yuan, Yu; Zheng, Xingming; Zhu, Xiaoming; Fu, Xiuli

    2014-11-01

    Forest covers about 30% of earth surface, which plays an important role in global forecast and carbon cycle. Monitoring forest biomass, and retrieving soil moisture at forest area, are the main goals of most passive microwave sensors on satellite missions. L-band is the most sensitive frequency among all the frequencies due to its good penetration ability. Because of its variety of the size of scattering components, the complicated structures and species of forest, it is difficult to describe the scattering and attenuation characters of forest in modeling microwave emission at forest area. In this paper, we studied the emissivity and transmissivity of deciduous forest at L(1.4GHz) by model simulation and field experiment. The microwave emission model was based on Matrix-Doubling algorithm. The comparison between simulated emissivity and measured data collected during an experiment at Maryland, USA in 2007 was good. Since theoretical model like Matrix-Doubling is too complicated to be used in retrial application, we mapped the results of Matrix-Doubling to a simple 0th-order model, also called ω-τ model, by setting the simulated emissivity to be the emissivity of 0th-order model at the same environment, which 2 unknown variables---opacity τ and effective single scattering albedo ω need to be determined. To valited τ (transmissivity of forest) simulated by Matrix-Doubling, we took an deciduous forest experiment by an L band microwave radiometer under trees at JingYueTan area, Changchun, Jilin Province in April to June in 2014. Thus the ω of forest can be determined. The matching results are presented in this paper. The relationship between LAI and forest microwave characters are discussed.

  3. Monitoring of Three Case Studies of Creeping Landslides in Ecuador using L-band SAR Interferometry (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayorga Torres, T. M.; Mohseni Aref, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tannia Mayorga Torres1,21 Universidad Central del Ecuador. Faculty of Geology, Mining, Oil, and Environment 2 Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship 2015-16 IntroductionLandslides lead to human and economic losses across the country, mainly in the winter season. On the other hand, satellite radar data has cost-effective benefits due to open-source software and free availability of data. With the purpose of establishing an early warning system of landslide-related surface deformation, three case studies were designed in the Coast, Sierra (Andean), and Oriente (jungle) regions. The objective of this work was to assess the capability of L-band InSAR to get phase information. For the calculation of the interferograms in Repeat Orbit Interferometry PACkage, the displacement was detected as the error and was corrected. The coherence images (Figure 1) determined that L-band is suitable for InSAR processing. Under this frame, as a first approach, the stacking DInSAR technique [1] was applied in the case studies [2]; however, due to lush vegetation and steep topography, it is necessary to apply advanced InSAR techniques [3]. The purpose of the research is to determine a pattern of data acquisition and successful results to understand the spatial and temporal ground movements associated with landslides. The further work consists of establishing landslide inventories to combine phases of SAR images to generate maps of surface deformation in Tumba-San Francisco and Guarumales to compare the results with ground-based measurements to determine the maps' accuracy. References[1] Sandwell D., Price E. (1998). Phase gradient approach to stacking interferograms. Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 103, N. B12, pp. 30,183-30,204. [2] Mayorga T., Platzeck G. (2014). Using DInSAR as a tool to detect unstable terrain areas in an Andes region in Ecuador. NH3.5-Blue Poster B298, Vol. 16, EGU2014-16203. Austria. [3] Wasowski J., Bovenga F. (2014). Investigating landslides and unstable slopes with

  4. Coastal Monitoring Using L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Image Data - Some Case Studies in Asian Delta Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, A.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal geomorphology is highly variable as it is affected by sea-level changes and other naturally- and human-induced fluctuations. To effectively assess and monitor geomorphological changes in various time scales is thus critical for coastal management. Asian mega deltas are vulnerable to a sea-level rise due to its low-lying delta plain, and are dynamic region given a large amount of sediment supply. However, limited data availability and accessibility in the deltas have prevented establishment of systematic coastal monitoring. A variety of remote sensing systems can be used to monitor geomorphological changes in coastal areas as it has wide spatial coverage and high temporal repeatability. Especially, analysis using SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) data not affected by the cloud conditions offer potential for monitoring in the monsoon Asia region. We will present some case studies of Asian coastal regions using L-band SAR data, ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) PALSAR (Phased Array type L-band SAR) and JERS-1 (Japanese Earth Resource Satellite-1) SAR data. One example is that time-series of radar amplitude images can be used to delineate changes quantitatively of the areal extent of river-mouth bars in distributaries of the Mekong River delta. It shows that the estimated areas of river mouthbars gradually increase on an annual time scale, and seasonal variations of areas were also recognized. Another example is that differential SAR interferometry is applied to the coast of the Yellow River delta in China. It shows very high subsidence rates, likely due to groundwater pumping. A further example is that we apply a SAR interferometry time series analysis to monitor ground deformations in the lower Chao Phraya delta plain, Thailand. A single reference time series interferogram from the stacking of unwrapped phases were applied. The subsidence and uplift pattern observed using the SAR interferometry time series analysis highlights the spatial complexity

  5. The Ground-based H-, K-, and L-band Absolute Emission Spectra of HD 209458b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellem, Robert T.; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Deroo, Pieter; Swain, Mark R.; Waldmann, Ingo P.

    2014-11-01

    Here we explore the capabilities of NASA's 3.0 m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and SpeX spectrometer and the 5.08 m Hale telescope with the TripleSpec spectrometer with near-infrared H-, K-, and L-band measurements of HD 209458b's secondary eclipse. Our IRTF/SpeX data are the first absolute L-band spectroscopic emission measurements of any exoplanet other than the hot Jupiter HD 189733b. Previous measurements of HD 189733b's L band indicate bright emission hypothesized to result from non-LTE CH4 ν3 fluorescence. We do not detect a similar bright 3.3 μm feature to ~3σ, suggesting that fluorescence does not need to be invoked to explain HD 209458b's L-band measurements. The validity of our observation and reduction techniques, which decrease the flux variance by up to 2.8 orders of magnitude, is reinforced by 1σ agreement with existent Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRAC1 observations that overlap the H, K, and L bands, suggesting that both IRTF/SpeX and Palomar/TripleSpec can measure an exoplanet's emission with high precision.

  6. The ground-based H-, K-, and L-band absolute emission spectra of HD 209458b

    SciTech Connect

    Zellem, Robert T.; Griffith, Caitlin A.; Deroo, Pieter; Swain, Mark R.; Waldmann, Ingo P.

    2014-11-20

    Here we explore the capabilities of NASA's 3.0 m Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) and SpeX spectrometer and the 5.08 m Hale telescope with the TripleSpec spectrometer with near-infrared H-, K-, and L-band measurements of HD 209458b's secondary eclipse. Our IRTF/SpeX data are the first absolute L-band spectroscopic emission measurements of any exoplanet other than the hot Jupiter HD 189733b. Previous measurements of HD 189733b's L band indicate bright emission hypothesized to result from non-LTE CH{sub 4} ν{sub 3} fluorescence. We do not detect a similar bright 3.3 μm feature to ∼3σ, suggesting that fluorescence does not need to be invoked to explain HD 209458b's L-band measurements. The validity of our observation and reduction techniques, which decrease the flux variance by up to 2.8 orders of magnitude, is reinforced by 1σ agreement with existent Hubble/NICMOS and Spitzer/IRAC1 observations that overlap the H, K, and L bands, suggesting that both IRTF/SpeX and Palomar/TripleSpec can measure an exoplanet's emission with high precision.

  7. Weekly Gridded Aquarius L-band Radiometer-scatterometer Observations and Salinity Retrievals over the Polar Regions - Part 1: Product Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, Ludovic; Dinnat, Emmanuel Phillippe; Koenig, Lora S.

    2014-01-01

    Passive and active observations at L band (frequency (is) approximately 1.4 GHz) from the Aquarius/SAC-D mission offer new capabilities to study the polar regions. Due to the lack of polar-gridded products, however, applications over the cryosphere have been limited. We present three weekly polar-gridded products of Aquarius data to improve our understanding of L-band observations of ice sheets, sea ice, permafrost, and the polar oceans. Additionally, these products intend to facilitate access to L-band data, and can be used to assist in algorithm developments. Aquarius data at latitudes higher than 50 degrees are averaged and gridded into weekly products of brightness temperature (TB), normalized radar cross section (NRCS), and sea surface salinity (SSS). Each grid cell also contains sea ice fraction, the standard deviation of TB, NRCS, and SSS, and the number of footprint observations collected during the seven-day cycle. The largest 3 dB footprint dimensions are 97 km×156 km and 74 km×122 km (along × across track) for the radiometers and scatterometer, respectively. The data is gridded to the Equal-Area Scalable Earth version 2.0 (EASE2.0) grid, with a grid cell resolution of 36 km. The data sets start in August 2011, with the first Aquarius observations and will be updated on a monthly basis following the release schedule of the Aquarius Level 2 data sets. The weekly gridded products are distributed by the US National Snow and Ice Data Center at http://nsidc.org/data/aquarius/index.html

  8. Study on Landscape Freeze/Thaw Classification and its Spatial Scale Effects using Satellite L-band radar observations over Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Kimball, J. S.; Azarderakhsh, M.; Dunbar, R.; Moghaddam, M.; McDonald, K. C.; Kim, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variability in landscape freeze-thaw (FT) status at higher latitudes and elevations significantly impacts land surface water mobility and surface energy partitioning, with major consequences for regional climate, hydrological, ecological and biogeochemical processes. With the development of new generation space-borne remote sensing instruments, future L-band missions including the NASA Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission will provide new operational retrievals of landscape FT state dynamics at relatively fine (3 km) spatial resolution. We applied theoretical simulations of L-band radar backscatter using first-order radiative transfer models with two-layer and three-layer modeling schemes to develop a modified seasonal threshold algorithm (STA) and FT classification over Alaska using finer scale (100 m resolution) satellite Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) observations. An Alaska FT map for April, 2007 was generated from PALSAR observations and showed a regionally consistent, but finer FT spatial pattern than an alternative surface air temperature based classification derived from global reanalysis data. Validation of the STA based FT classification against regional soil climate stations indicated approximately 80% and 70% spatial classification accuracy in relation to respective in situ station air temperature and soil temperature measurement based FT estimates. The STA FT classification method is found to be reliable for most of the major Alaska land cover types except for barren land. An investigation of relative spatial scale effects on FT classification accuracy indicates that the relationship between pixel size and relative FT spatial classification error follows a general logarithmic function. The optimum resolution for accurate FT classification is expected to depend on the landscape FT spatial heterogeneity. However, our results indicate that the regional FT spatial scaling error is less than 12.8% and

  9. Uncertainty Quantification of GEOS-5 L-band Radiative Transfer Model Parameters Using Bayesian Inference and SMOS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainties in L-band (1.4 GHz) radiative transfer modeling (RTM) affect the simulation of brightness temperatures (Tb) over land and the inversion of satellite-observed Tb into soil moisture retrievals. In particular, accurate estimates of the microwave soil roughness, vegetation opacity and scattering albedo for large-scale applications are difficult to obtain from field studies and often lack an uncertainty estimate. Here, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation method is used to determine satellite-scale estimates of RTM parameters and their posterior uncertainty by minimizing the misfit between long-term averages and standard deviations of simulated and observed Tb at a range of incidence angles, at horizontal and vertical polarization, and for morning and evening overpasses. Tb simulations are generated with the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) and confronted with Tb observations from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. The MCMC algorithm suggests that the relative uncertainty of the RTM parameter estimates is typically less than 25 of the maximum a posteriori density (MAP) parameter value. Furthermore, the actual root-mean-square-differences in long-term Tb averages and standard deviations are found consistent with the respective estimated total simulation and observation error standard deviations of m3.1K and s2.4K. It is also shown that the MAP parameter values estimated through MCMC simulation are in close agreement with those obtained with Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO).

  10. Total electron content and l-band amplitude and phase scintillation measurements in the polar-cap ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Klobuchar, J.A.; Bishop, G.J.; Doherty, P.H.

    1987-03-30

    The first measurements of absolute Total Electron Content (TEC) and L-band amplitude and phase scintillation was made from Thule, Greenland, a polar cap station, in early 1984. These measurements were made using signals transmitted from the Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites. The variability of the TEC, especially during the afternoon to pre-midnight hours, is large, with increases in TEC above the background values of greater than 100% not uncommon. During one disturbed time, quasi-periodic TEC enhancements having periods as short as ten minutes and amplitudes equal to the background TEC were observed for over two hours. The TEC during some of the disturbed periods in the dark Thule ionosphere exceeded mid-latitude daytime values. Amplitude scintillations were small, not exceeding 3 dB peak to peak during the entire observing period, but they were associated with the times of TEC enhancements, with some evidence for stronger scintillation occurring during the negative gradients of the TEC enhancements. Phase scintillations were highest during some of the times of enhanced TEC, and depend critically upon the phase detrend internal used.

  11. L-band all-optical gain-clamped EDFA by utilizing C-band backward ASE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Jin, Yanli; Dou, Qingying; Liu, Yange; Yuan, Shuzhong; Dong, Xiaoyi

    2006-04-01

    By using an optical circulator and C/L-band wavelength division multiplexer to recycle the C-band backward ASE, an L-band gain-clamped erbium-doped fiber amplifier is presented. We have experimentally studied the static gain clamping property of this amplifier. As the ASE feedback attenuation is set to 0, the gain at 1585 nm can be clamped at 18.84 ± 0.26 dB within dynamic range of 25 dB and the critical power reaches about -15.09 dBm. The gain variation and saturated output power at 1585 nm for 0 dB attenuation are 1 dB lower and 2.17 dB higher than those for 30 dB attenuation, which indicates that the L-band EDFA gain can be effectively clamped via the ASE injection technique.

  12. EMC test plan for shipboard in-harbor and at-sea measurements for L-band terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    This test plan is to provide a procedure for the measurement of on-board radio frequency interference resulting from the operation of on-board radars (S-Band and X-Band). Field intensity measurements in the range of 1 to 10 GHz will be made using calibrated test instrumentation to determine possible adverse effects to the operation of the future installation of a Maritime L-Band Shipboard Satellite Communications Terminal, for use with the ATS-F and MARISAT Communications Satellites. A measurement will be made of power line conducted interference to determine the degree of power line isolation that may be required. There is also consideration of interference to the radars by the proposed L-Band terminals and observations will be made of the radar displays while L-Band transmitter operation is simulated. These tests will be made aboard the American Alliance container ship, United States Lines.

  13. L'-band AGPM vector vortex coronagraph's first light on VLT/NACO. Discovery of a late-type companion at two beamwidths from an F0V star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawet, D.; Absil, O.; Delacroix, C.; Girard, J. H.; Milli, J.; O'Neal, J.; Baudoz, P.; Boccaletti, A.; Bourget, P.; Christiaens, V.; Forsberg, P.; Gonte, F.; Habraken, S.; Hanot, C.; Karlsson, M.; Kasper, M.; Lizon, J.-L.; Muzic, K.; Olivier, R.; Peña, E.; Slusarenko, N.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.; Surdej, J.

    2013-04-01

    Context. High contrast imaging has thoroughly combed through the limited search space accessible with first-generation ground-based adaptive optics instruments and the Hubble Space Telescope. Only a few objects were discovered, and many non-detections reported and statistically interpreted. The field is now in need of a technological breakthrough. Aims: Our aim is to open a new search space with first-generation systems such as NACO at the Very Large Telescope, by providing ground-breaking inner working angle (IWA) capabilities in the L' band. The L' band is a sweet spot for high contrast coronagraphy since the planet-to-star brightness ratio is favorable, while the Strehl ratio is naturally higher. Methods: An annular groove phase mask (AGPM) vector vortex coronagraph optimized for the L' band made from diamond subwavelength gratings was manufactured and qualified in the lab. The AGPM enables high contrast imaging at very small IWA, potentially being the key to unexplored discovery space. Results: Here we present the installation and successful on-sky tests of an L'-band AGPM coronagraph on NACO. Using angular differential imaging, which is well suited to the rotational symmetry of the AGPM, we demonstrated a ΔL' > 7.5 mag contrast from an IWA ≃ 0."09 onwards, during average seeing conditions, and for total integration times of a few hundred seconds.

  14. Decadal Change Characterization in Northern Wetlands Based on Analysis of L-band SAR Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcomb, J.; Moghaddam, M.; McDonald, K. C.; Podest, E.; Chapman, B. D.

    2009-12-01

    Northern wetlands are believed to have hitherto served as carbon sinks, sequestering about one third of the total global pool of soil carbon. The warmer, drier conditions occurring throughout the Arctic as a consequence of global warming may now be causing them to evolve from carbon sinks into major sources of greenhouse gases. The ability to characterize long-term changes in the condition of northern wetlands is therefore essential to the development of accurate global carbon budgets. L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) offers a unique tool for monitoring changes in the characteristics of vegetated wetlands. It is sensitive to vegetation structure, biomass, and moisture content, and can penetrate vegetation canopies to detect standing water underneath. We have been using L-band SAR imagery from two different spaceborne sensors separated in time by approximately one decade, JERS and PALSAR, to produce a thematic map of change in the type and extent of wetlands in Alaska. Summer and winter JERS imagery characterizes the wetlands status for the 1997 time frame while dual-polarized PALSAR imagery captures the wetlands status for the summer of 2007 time frame. To produce each classified wetlands map, the SAR imagery is supplemented with ancillary information derived from the SAR and other sources. The classification algorithm applied to each set of imagery is based upon the Random Forests technique, by using a multitude of decision trees. To ensure that a sufficiently wide spectrum of ground reference points are included in each map segment to be able to develop a representative set of decision trees, we classify over large geographic regions. Since our PALSAR imagery is provided at resolutions 3-8 times that of our JERS imagery, classifying it requires much more computer memory than does classifying JERS for the same size region. We have investigated resampling strategies to address computational limitations, and have found it necessary to average the PALSAR imagery

  15. Wetland Maps of Central Canada based on L-band SAR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcomb, J.; Clewley, D.; Moghaddam, M.; McDonald, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Northern wetlands have the potential to become major sources of greenhouse gases. Detailed and accurate maps of the locations, types, and extents of these wetlands are therefore essential to the development of accurate carbon budgets. However, due to their vast extent and inaccessibility, most northern wetlands remain unmapped. We have been constructing high-resolution (100 m) thematic maps of boreal wetlands, with current focus on Canadian wetlands. The maps are developed using spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR), which efficiently collects high-resolution imagery over extensive regions and, unlike optical sensors, is unimpaired by clouds or lack of sunlight. Spaceborne L-band (~1.3 GHz) SAR, in particular, records scene characteristics imperceptible to optical sensors such as vegetation structure and moisture content, soil moisture and roughness, and canopy-obscured surface waters. These attributes make it the best single tool for mapping boreal wetlands. Two L-band SAR-based wetland maps are being assembled: one using HH-polarized imagery from the JERS-1 satellite collected in the winter and summer of 1997-1998, and a second using dual-polarized (HH and HV) imagery from the PALSAR sensor of the ALOS satellite collected in the summer of 2008. Ancillary data layers such as image texture, topographic slope, and proximity to water are also generated, and a training/testing data layer is formed by merging polygons from the Canadian Wetland Inventory (CWI) with other land cover databases. A Random Forests decision tree classifier takes as input the SAR, ancillary, and training/testing data layers and uses them to produce thematic wetland maps. The accuracy of each map is quantified via producer and user error statistics. Finally, the SAR-based wetland maps are compared to form a 1998-2008 wetlands change map. Recent advances include a powerful new software suite developed to handle huge volumes of data and much-improved JERS-1 registration. Challenges, including

  16. Common References for Inter Comparison of L-Band Brightness Temperatures Satellite Acquisitions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabot, F.; Anterrieu, E.; Kerr, Y. H.; Khazaal, A.

    2014-12-01

    The SMOS mission, in orbit since November 2009, has been the first spatial instrument observing the earth at L-Band since the Skylab experiment in 1977. Since then, it has been joined by Aquarius in June 2011, and will be joined by SMAP in October 2014.Within these 4 years, earth observation at L-band has gone from historical curiosity to highly repetitive constellation.Still, since all these instruments do not share the same technology and even principle of acquisitions, direct comparison and synergistic use of their measurements is not straightforward.The objective of this paper is to propose a method to make them inter-comparable, down to a common reference. The proposed method uses SMOS as a transfer radiometer.This method can be applied over different types of surfaces: making use of a stable target to assess the consistency and stability of both data sets. This is done over the area surrounding Dome Concordia in Antarctica. After careful selection and filtering, statistics of the comparison are retrieved along with long term trends in both data sets. Once every so often, satellites overpass the same area within a very short time period. Due to different inclinations these alignments occur essentially along the equator, but over different surfaces, giving access to wide dynamic range in brightness temperature. These collocation will be happening at about the same frequency for Aquarius and SMAP. After careful selection, SMOS measurements is used in an innovative way - taking advantage of it accessibility to wide areas with a large range of incidence angles - to make it directly comparable to other instruments. Accounting for instrument characteristics such as real antenna patterns is also done at this step. This presentation will completely describe the method, along with examples of results when applied to compare SMOS and Aquarius measurement. Although these methods have already been presented and demonstrated, this presentation will include demonstration of

  17. A Model for Backscattering from Quasi Periodic Corn Canopies at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Zhao, Q.; O'Neill, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a model for backscattering at L-band from a corn canopy is proposed. The canopy consists of a quasi-periodic distribution of stalks and a random distribution of leaves. The Distorted Born Approximation (DBA) is employed to calculate the single scattered return from the corn field. The new feature of the method is that the coherence of the stalks in the row direction is incorporated in the model in a systematic fashion. Since the wavelength is on the order of the distance between corn stalks in a row, grating lobe behavior is observed at certain azimuth angles of incidence. The results are compared with experimental values measured in Huntsville, Alabama in 1998. The mean field and the effective dielectric constant of the canopy are obtained by using the Foldy approximation. The stalks are placed in the effective medium in a two dimensional lattice to simulate the row structure of a corn field. In order to mimic a real corn field, a quasi-periodic stalk distribution is assumed where the stalks are given small random perturbations about their lattice locations. Corn leaves are also embedded in the effective medium and the backscattered field from the stalks and the leaves is computed. The backscattering coefficient is calculated and averaged over successive stalk position perturbations. It is assumed that soil erosion has smoothed the soil sufficiently so that it can be assumed flat. Corn field backscatter data was collected from cornfields during the Huntsville 98 experimental campaign held at Alabama A&M University Research Station, Huntsville, Alabama in 1998 using the NASA/GW truck mounted radar. Extensive ground truth data was collected. This included soil moisture measurements and corn plant architectural data to be used in the model. In particular, the distances between the stalks in a single row have been measured. The L-band radar backscatter data was collected for both H and V polarizations and for look angles of 15o and 45o over a two week

  18. Validation of Aquarius Measurements Using Radiative Transfer Models at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, E.; LeVine, David M.; Abraham, S.; DeMattheis, P.; Utku, C.

    2012-01-01

    Aquarius/SAC-D was launched in June 2011 by NASA and CONAE (Argentine space agency). Aquarius includes three L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometers dedicated to measuring sea surface salinity. We report detailed comparisons of Aquarius measurements with radiative transfer model predictions. These comparisons were used as part ofthe initial assessment of Aquarius data. In particular, they were used successfully to estimate the radiometer calibration bias and stability. Further comparisons are being performed to assess the performance of models in the retrieval algorithm for correcting the effect of sources of geophysical "noise" (e.g. the galactic background, atmospheric attenuation and reflected signal from the Sun). Such corrections are critical in bringing the error in retrieved salinity down to the required 0.2 practical salinity unit (psu) on monthly global maps at 150 km by 150 km resolution. The forward models making up the Aquarius simulator have been very useful for preparatory studies in the years leading to Aquarius' launch. The simulator includes various components to compute effects ofthe following processes on the measured signal: 1) emission from Earth surfaces (ocean, land, ice), 2) atmospheric emission and absorption, 3) emission from the Sun, Moon and celestial Sky (directly through the antenna sidelobes or after reflection/scattering at the Earth surface), 4) Faraday rotation, and 5) convolution of the scene by the antenna gain patterns. Since the Aquarius radiometers tum-on in late July 2011, the simulator has been used to perform a first order validation of the data. This included checking the order of magnitude ofthe signal over ocean, land and ice surfaces, checking the relative amplitude of signal at different polarizations, and checking the variation with incidence angle. The comparisons were also used to assess calibration bias and monitor instruments calibration drift. The simulator is also being used in the salinity retrieval. For example, initial

  19. L Band Brightness Temperature Observations Over a Corn Canopy During the Entire Growth Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Alicia T.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.; vanderVelde, Rogier; Lang, Roger H.; Gish, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    During a field campaign covering the 2002 corn growing season, a dual polarized tower mounted L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometer (LRAD) provided brightness temperature (T(sub B)) measurements at preset intervals, incidence and azimuth angles. These radiometer measurements were supported by an extensive characterization of land surface variables including soil moisture, soil temperature, vegetation biomass, and surface roughness. During the period from May 22, 2002 to August 30, 2002 a range of vegetation water content (W) of 0.0 to 4.3 kg/square m, ten days of radiometer and ground measurements were available. Using this data set, the effects of corn vegetation on surface emissions are investigated by means of a semi-empirical radiative transfer model. Additionally, the impact of roughness on the surface emission is quantified using T(sub B) measurements over bare soil conditions. Subsequently, the estimated roughness parameters, ground measurements and horizontally (H)-polarized T(sub B) are employed to invert the H-polarized transmissivity (gamma-h) for the monitored corn growing season.

  20. False-color L-band image of Manaus region of Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This false-color L-band image of the Manaus region of Brazil was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperature Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying on the Space Shuttle Endeavour on its 46th orbit. The area shown is approximately 8 kilometers by 40 kilometers (5 by 25 miles). At the top of the image are the Solimoes and Rio Negro River. The image is centered at about 3 degrees south latitude, and 61 degrees west longitude. Blue areas show low returns at VV poloarization; hence the bright blue colors of the smooth river surfaces. Green areas in the image are heavily forested, while blue areas are either cleared forest or open water. The yellow and red areas are flooded forest. Between Rio Solimoes and Rio Negro, a road can be seen running from some cleared areas (visible as blue rectangles north of Rio Solimoes) north toward a tributary or Rio Negro. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43895.

  1. The correlation of Skylab L-band brightness temperatures with antecedent precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    The S194 L-band radiometer flown on the Skylab mission measured terrestrial radiation at the microwave wavelength of 21.4 cm. The terrain emissivity at this wavelength is strongly dependent on the soil moisture content, which can be inferred from antecedent precipitation. For the Skylab data acquisition pass from the Oklahoma panhandle to southeastern Texas on 11 June 1973, the S194 brightness temperatures are highly correlated with antecedent precipitation from the preceding eleven day period, but very little correlation was apparent for the preceding five day period. The correlation coefficient between the averaged antecedent precipitation index values and the corresponding S194 brightness temperatures between 230 K and 270 K, the region of apparent response to soil moisture in the data, was -0.97. The equation of the linear least squares line fitted to the data was: API (cm) = 31.99 -0.114 TB (K), where API is the antecedent precipitation index and TB is the S194 brightness temperature.

  2. L band brightness temperature observations over a corn canopy during the entire growth cycle.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Alicia T; van der Velde, Rogier; O'Neill, Peggy E; Choudhury, Bhaskar J; Lang, Roger H; Kim, Edward J; Gish, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    During a field campaign covering the 2002 corn growing season, a dual polarized tower mounted L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometer (LRAD) provided brightness temperature (T(B)) measurements at preset intervals, incidence and azimuth angles. These radiometer measurements were supported by an extensive characterization of land surface variables including soil moisture, soil temperature, vegetation biomass, and surface roughness. In the period May 22 to August 30, ten days of radiometer and ground measurements are available for a corn canopy with a vegetation water content (W) range of 0.0 to 4.3 kg m(-2). Using this data set, the effects of corn vegetation on surface emissions are investigated by means of a semi-empirical radiative transfer model. Additionally, the impact of roughness on the surface emission is quantified using T(B) measurements over bare soil conditions. Subsequently, the estimated roughness parameters, ground measurements and horizontally (H)-polarized T(B) are employed to invert the H-polarized transmissivity (γ(h)) for the monitored corn growing season. PMID:22163585

  3. Airborne Remote Observations of L-Band Radio Frequency Interference and Implications for Satellite Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles; Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutosh

    2011-01-01

    Passive remote sensing of the Earth s surface and atmosphere from space has significant importance in operational and research environmental studies, in particular for the scientific understanding, monitoring and prediction of climate change and its impacts. Passive remote sensing requires the measurement of naturally occurring radiations, usually of very low power levels, which contain essential information on the physical process under investigation. As such, these sensed radio frequency bands are a unique natural resource enabling space borne passive sensing of the atmosphere and the Earth s surface that deserves adequate allocation to the Earth Exploration Satellite Service and absolute protection from interference. Unfortunately, radio frequency interference (RFI) is an increasing problem for Earth remote sensing, particularly for passive observations of natural emissions. Because these natural signals tend to be very weak, even low levels of interference received by a passive sensor may degrade the fidelity of scientific data. The characteristics of RFI (low-level interference and radar-pulse noise) are not well known because there has been no systematic surveillance, spectrum inventory or mapping of RFI. While conducting a flight experiment over central Tennessee in May 2010, RFI, a concern for any instrument operating in the passive L band frequency, was observed across 16 subbands between 1402-1427 MHz. Such a survey provides rare characterization data from which to further develop mitigation technologies as well as to identify bandwidths to avoid in future sensor formulation.

  4. Surveying The Zone Of Avoidance With The Arecibo L-band Feed Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, Patricia A.; Springob, C. M.; Catinella, B.; Momjian, E.; Koribalski, B.; Masters, K.; Muller, E.; Pantoja, C.; Putman, M.; Rosenberg, J. L.; Schneider, S.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2006-06-01

    We are conducting 21-cm surveys with the Arecibo L-Band Feed Array, searching for HI galaxies at low galactic latitudes, where optical obscuration and infrared confusion preclude the mapping of galaxies and large-scale structures in those wavebands. Galaxies which contain HI are detected by these blind surveys, and their Doppler shifted emission locates them in 3 dimensions.The first survey will be of the inner Galaxy accessible to Arecibo (l=30-75 degrees), within 10 degrees of the Galactic equator, and will be relatively shallow (effective integration time of 8-10 seconds per beam, with rms about 6 mJy). We have completed two small regions using this observing mode (near l=40 degrees, and l=192 degrees). The catalog of HI detections will be presented, and future expectations for the full survey will be discussed.We will also be conducting very deep, pointed observations, with dwell times expected to be more than 260 seconds per pointing, over all longitudes accessible to Arecibo. Our expectations for this very deep low Galactic latitude survey will be presented. Both the shallow and deep surveys are conducted in "commensal" modes with other surveys on the telescope, a Galactic HI survey, and a pulsar survey, respectively.P.A.H. acknowledges support from NSF grant AST-0506676.

  5. Double spacing multi-wavelength L-band Brillouin erbium fiber laser with Raman pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, B. A.; Al-Alimi, A. W.; Abas, A. F.; Mokhtar, M.; Harun, S. W.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2012-11-01

    A new multi-wavelength Brillouin erbium fiber laser (BEFL), which operates in the L-band region with double frequency Brillouin spacing, is demonstrated. This design uses a Raman pump (RP) and a piece of 2 km highly nonlinear fiber as a gain medium. The double frequency spacing is achieved by employing a dual ring configuration, which is formed by utilizing a four-port circulator that removes the odd-order Stoke signals. Twenty Stokes and seventeen anti-Stokes lines, which have optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) greater than 15 dB, are generated simultaneously with a spacing of 0.16 nm when Brillouin pump and RP powers were fixed at the optimum values of 8 dBm and 40 mW, respectively. The BEFL can be tuned in the range between 1591 nm to 1618 nm. The proposed configuration increases the number of lines generated and the OSNR, and thus allows a compact multi-wavelength laser source to be realized.

  6. L Band Brightness Temperature Observations over a Corn Canopy during the Entire Growth Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Alicia T.; van der Velde, Rogier; O’Neill, Peggy E.; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.; Lang, Roger H.; Kim, Edward J.; Gish, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    During a field campaign covering the 2002 corn growing season, a dual polarized tower mounted L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometer (LRAD) provided brightness temperature (TB) measurements at preset intervals, incidence and azimuth angles. These radiometer measurements were supported by an extensive characterization of land surface variables including soil moisture, soil temperature, vegetation biomass, and surface roughness. In the period May 22 to August 30, ten days of radiometer and ground measurements are available for a corn canopy with a vegetation water content (W) range of 0.0 to 4.3 kg m−2. Using this data set, the effects of corn vegetation on surface emissions are investigated by means of a semi-empirical radiative transfer model. Additionally, the impact of roughness on the surface emission is quantified using TB measurements over bare soil conditions. Subsequently, the estimated roughness parameters, ground measurements and horizontally (H)-polarized TB are employed to invert the H-polarized transmissivity (γh) for the monitored corn growing season. PMID:22163585

  7. Accurately control and flatten gain spectrum of L-band erbium doped fiber amplifier based on suitable gain-clamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiuru; Meng, Xiangyu; Liu, Chunyu

    2016-04-01

    The increasing traffic with dynamic nature requires the applications of gain-clamped L-band erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA). However, the weak or over clamping may lead the unexpected gain-compression and flatness-worsening. In this article, to enhance practicality, we modify the partly gain-clamping configuration and utilize a pair of C-band fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) to non-uniformly compress the gain spectrum of L-band. Through a comprehensive test and comparison, the suitable gain-clamping region for the amplified signals is found, and the gain in L-band is accurately controlled and flattened under the matched central wavelength of FBGs. The experimental results show that, our designed L-band EDFA achieves a trade-off among the output gain, flatness and stability. The ±0.44 dB flatness and 20.2 dB average gain are together obtained in the range of 1570-1610 nm, with the ±0.1 dB stability of signals in over 30 dBm dynamic range.

  8. Soil Moisture Retrieval Using a Two-Dimenional L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radiometer in a Semi-Arid Environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface soil moisture was retrieved from L-band radiometer data collected in semi-arid regions during the Soil Moisture Experiment in 2004 (SMEX04). The two-dimensional synthetic aperture radiometer (2D-STAR) was flown over regional-scale study sites located in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. The s...

  9. 21-nm-range wavelength-tunable L-band Er-doped fiber linear-cavity laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shiquan; Zhao, Chunliu; Li, Zhaohui; Ding, Lei; Yuan, Shuzhong; Dong, Xiaoyi

    2001-10-01

    A novel method, which utilizes amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) as a secondary pump source, is presented for implanting a linear cavity erbium-doped fiber laser operating in L-Band. The output wavelength tuned from 1566 nm to 1587 nm, about 21 nm tuning range, was obtained in the experiment and the stability of the laser is very good.

  10. Quantification of L-band InSAR coherence over volcanic areas using LiDAR and in situ measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arab-Sedze, Melanie; Heggy, Essam; Bretard, Frederic; Berveiller, Daniel; Jacquemoud, Stephane

    2014-07-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is a powerful tool to monitor large-scale ground deformation at active volcanoes. However, vegetation and pyroclastic deposits degrade the radar coherence and therefore the measurement of 3-D surface displacements. In this article, we explore the complementarity between ALOS - PALSAR coherence images, airborne LiDAR data and in situ measurements acquired over the Piton de La Fournaise volcano (Reunion Island, France) to determine the sources of errors that may affect repeat-pass InSAR measure- ments. We investigate three types of surfaces: terrains covered with vegetation, lava flows (a'a, pahoehoe or slabby pahoehoe lava flows) and pyroclastic deposits (lapilli). To explain the loss of coherence observed over the Dolomieu crater between 2008 and 2009, we first use laser altimetry data to map topographic variations. The LiDAR intensity, which depends on surface reflectance, also provides ancillary information about the potential sources of coherence loss. In addition, surface roughness and rock dielectric properties of each terrain have been determined in situ to better understand how electromagnetic waves interact with such media: rough and porous surfaces, such as the a'a lava flows, produce a higher coherence loss than smoother surfaces, such as the pahoehoe lava flows. Variations in dielectric properties suggest a higher penetration depth in pyroclasts than in lava flows at L-band frequency. Decorrelation over the lapilli is hence mainly caused by volumetric effects. Finally, a map of LAI (Leaf Area Index) produced using SPOT 5 imagery allows us to quantify the effect of vegeta- tion density: radar coherence is negatively correlated with LAI and is unreliable for values higher than 7.5.

  11. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  12. A super-compact metamaterial absorber cell in L-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Z. X.; Yuan, F. G.; Li, L. H.

    2014-05-01

    A super-compact metamaterial absorber (SMA) unit cell in L band (1-2 GHz) is proposed, which is composed of a pair of electric ring resonator (ERR) and its complementary ERR (CERR) with a high dielectric substrate sandwiched in between. The CERR has a cross sectional area where approximately the etched copper foil in ERR is now retained, and the remaining region is now etched. In contract with quarter-wavelength (λ /4) thickness which is required for conventional absorbers, the largest in-plane dimension and thickness of the SMA cell are only λ /33 and λ /250, respectively, leading to a super compact cell volume. While traditionally the long straight wire is introduced in electric-LC resonators for increasing inductance, the CERR achieves similar inductance with much shorter lengths. Thus, its cell dimensions can be drastically reduced without compromising its performance. In addition, simulations together with an automated phase correction algorithm show that the SMA is a type of metamaterial possessing simultaneous negative electric permittivity (NEP) and negative magnetic permeability (NMP). Further the SMA has a very large imaginary part of the NEP and NMP, resulting in significantly large imaginary part of the refractive index at resonant frequency. These properties are well suited to design excellent absorbers. In addition, numerical results demonstrate that the maximum absorption coefficient of the SMA can reach greater than 99% at resonant frequency, and the full-width half-maximum is roughly 1% of the operating frequency, and a wide incident angle of ±49° over 90% absorption. Meanwhile, it is pointed out that this type of absorber is rather sensitive to polarization characteristic of the incident electromagnetic wave.

  13. Retrieving sea surface salinity with multiangular L-band brightness temperatures: Improvement by spatiotemporal averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camps, A.; Vall-Llossera, M.; Batres, L.; Torres, F.; Duffo, N.; Corbella, I.

    2005-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission was selected in May 1999 by the European Space Agency to provide global and frequent soil moisture and sea surface salinity maps. SMOS' single payload is Microwave Imaging Radiometer by Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS), an L band two-dimensional aperture synthesis interferometric radiometer with multiangular observation capabilities. Most geophysical parameter retrieval errors studies have assumed the independence of measurements both in time and space so that the standard deviation of the retrieval errors decreases with the inverse of square root of the number of measurements being averaged. This assumption is especially critical in the case of sea surface salinity (SSS), where spatiotemporal averaging is required to achieve the ultimate goal of 0.1 psu error. This work presents a detailed study of the SSS error reduction by spatiotemporal averaging, using the SMOS end-to-end performance simulator (SEPS), including thermal noise, all instrumental error sources, current error correction and image reconstruction algorithms, and correction of atmospheric and sky noises. The most important error sources are the biases that appear in the brightness temperature images. Three different sources of biases have been identified: errors in the noise injection radiometers, Sun contributions to the antenna temperature, and imaging under aliasing conditions. A calibration technique has been devised to correct these biases prior to the SSS retrieval at each satellite overpass. Simulation results show a retrieved salinity error of 0.2 psu in warm open ocean, and up to 0.7 psu at high latitudes and near the coast, where the external calibration method presents more difficulties.

  14. Development of a Two Dimensional Synthetic Aperture Radiometer at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Carver, K.; Swift, C.; Busalacchi, Antonio J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A radiometer that uses aperture synthesis in two dimensions is being built as part of research under NASA's Instrument Incubator Program. The instrument development team consists of engineers at the Goddard Space Flight Center, the University of Massachusetts and Quadrant Engineering. This will be an aircraft instrument operating at L-band which builds on the heritage of Electronically Steered Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR). This instrument is a next step in the development of aperture synthesis (STAR technology) to meet the goal of a future mission to monitor soil moisture globally from space. The instrument will be designed to fly on the NASA P-3 aircraft in a nadir pointing mode, although other options are possible. The antenna will consist of an array of modules in a rectangular grid. Each module will be comprised of a printed circuit dual-polarized patch and integrated receiver. The distribution of modules within the rectangular array will be adjustable so that several different imaging configurations (e.g. '+', 'Y', 'T') can be employed. The integrated receiver will provide amplification and conversion to infrared (IF). The IF signal will be routed to a processor where the required correlations performed. The I and Q channels will be created digitally and the correlations will be done digitally in this processor. The digitization will be done with sufficient bits to study the effects of quantization on radiometer performance. A computer/controller will store the data for conversion to an image and will also perform temperature control and other data interfacing and housekeeping tasks. The design of critical components has been completed and hardware is being assembled to test the individual elements. It is expected that a complete two-channel correlator will be tested by the end of 2000 and that the complete instrument will be ready for flight tests the following summer (2001).

  15. A super-compact metamaterial absorber cell in L-band

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Z. X.; Yuan, F. G.; Li, L. H.

    2014-05-14

    A super-compact metamaterial absorber (SMA) unit cell in L band (1–2 GHz) is proposed, which is composed of a pair of electric ring resonator (ERR) and its complementary ERR (CERR) with a high dielectric substrate sandwiched in between. The CERR has a cross sectional area where approximately the etched copper foil in ERR is now retained, and the remaining region is now etched. In contract with quarter-wavelength (λ/4) thickness which is required for conventional absorbers, the largest in-plane dimension and thickness of the SMA cell are only λ/33 and λ/250, respectively, leading to a super compact cell volume. While traditionally the long straight wire is introduced in electric-LC resonators for increasing inductance, the CERR achieves similar inductance with much shorter lengths. Thus, its cell dimensions can be drastically reduced without compromising its performance. In addition, simulations together with an automated phase correction algorithm show that the SMA is a type of metamaterial possessing simultaneous negative electric permittivity (NEP) and negative magnetic permeability (NMP). Further the SMA has a very large imaginary part of the NEP and NMP, resulting in significantly large imaginary part of the refractive index at resonant frequency. These properties are well suited to design excellent absorbers. In addition, numerical results demonstrate that the maximum absorption coefficient of the SMA can reach greater than 99% at resonant frequency, and the full-width half-maximum is roughly 1% of the operating frequency, and a wide incident angle of ±49° over 90% absorption. Meanwhile, it is pointed out that this type of absorber is rather sensitive to polarization characteristic of the incident electromagnetic wave.

  16. Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.-W.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.H.; Miralles-Wilhelm, F.; Sonenshein, R.

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric processing of JERS-1 L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired over south Florida during 1993-1996 reveals detectable surface changes in the Everglades wetlands. Although our study is limited to south Florida it has implication for other large-scale wetlands, because south Florida wetlands have diverse vegetation types and both managed and natural flow environments. Our analysis reveals that interferometric coherence level is sensitive to wetland vegetation type and to the interferogram time span. Interferograms with time spans less than six months maintain phase observations for all wetland types, allowing characterization of water level changes in different wetland environments. The most noticeable changes occur between the managed and the natural flow wetlands. In the managed wetlands, fringes are organized, follow patterns related to some of the managed water control structures and have high fringe-rate. In the natural flow areas, fringes are irregular and have a low fringe-rate. The high fringe rate in managed areas reflects dynamic water topography caused by high flow rate due to gate operation. Although this organized fringe pattern is not characteristic of most large-scale wetlands, the high level of water level change enables accurate estimation of the wetland InSAR technique, which lies in the range of 5-10??cm. The irregular and low rate fringe pattern in the natural flow area reflects uninterrupted flow that diffuses water efficiently and evenly. Most of the interferograms in the natural flow area show an elongated fringe located along the transitional zone between salt- and fresh-water wetlands, reflecting water level changes due to ocean tides. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultra-low-noise transition edge sensors for the SAFARI L-band on SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldie, D. J.; Gao, J. R.; Glowacka, D. M.; Griffin, D. K.; Hijmering, R.; Khosropanah, P.; Jackson, B. D.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Morozov, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Ridder, M.; Trappe, N.; O'Sullivan, C.; Withington, S.

    2012-09-01

    The Far-Infrared Fourier transform spectrometer instrument SAFARI-SPICA which will operate with cooled optics in a low-background space environment requires ultra-sensitive detector arrays with high optical coupling efficiencies over extremely wide bandwidths. In earlier papers we described the design, fabrication and performance of ultra-low-noise Transition Edge Sensors (TESs) operated close to 100mk having dark Noise Equivalent Powers (NEPs) of order 4 × 10-19W/√Hz close to the phonon noise limit and an improvement of two orders of magnitude over TESs for ground-based applications. Here we describe the design, fabrication and testing of 388-element arrays of MoAu TESs integrated with far-infrared absorbers and optical coupling structures in a geometry appropriate for the SAFARI L-band (110 - 210 μm). The measured performance shows intrinsic response time τ ~ 11ms and saturation powers of order 10 fW, and a dark noise equivalent powers of order 7 × 10-19W/√Hz. The 100 × 100μm2 MoAu TESs have transition temperatures of order 110mK and are coupled to 320×320μm2 thin-film β-phase Ta absorbers to provide impedance matching to the incoming fields. We describe results of dark tests (i.e without optical power) to determine intrinsic pixel characteristics and their uniformity, and measurements of the optical performance of representative pixels operated with flat back-shorts coupled to pyramidal horn arrays. The measured and modeled optical efficiency is dominated by the 95Ω sheet resistance of the Ta absorbers, indicating a clear route to achieve the required performance in these ultra-sensitive detectors.

  18. Real-time monitoring in passive optical access networks using L-band ASE and varied bandwidth and reflectivity of fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naim, Nani Fadzlina; Bakar, A. Ashrif A.; Ab-Rahman, Mohammad Syuhaimi

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a passive optical access network monitoring approach using an L-band amplified spontaneous emission source and varied bandwidths, reflectivity and Bragg wavelengths of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). In this technique, the reflection spectra of dedicated FBGs are used as the branch identifier to monitor the integrity of the distribution fiber in a point-to-multipoint network. FBGs with different bandwidths, reflectivity and Bragg wavelengths were used to monitor an increased number of optical network units within the limited bandwidth of the monitoring source. Simulations and experimental testing have been conducted to ensure the feasibility of this system. An experimental setup using four FBGs was conducted for different types of splitters. The signal processing to determine the faulty branches is presented. This system is capable of monitoring up to 32 distribution fibers using a limited monitoring source bandwidth of 10.8 nm with a power margin of 2 dB.

  19. A ground based L-band radiometer for the monitoring of soil moisture in the region of Millbrook, New York, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field experiment was performed in grassland near Millbrook, New York, using a NOAA Microwave Observation Facility, which comprises a network for in situ observation of soil moisture and a mobile dual polarized L band radiometer. During the field campaign, intensive measurements of L band brightnes...

  20. Interpretation of CAROLS L-band measurements in the Gulf of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, J.; Leduc-Leballeur, M.; Pardé, M.; Zribi, M.; Fanise, P.; Reverdin, G.; Tenerelli, J.; Reul, N.

    2009-04-01

    The L-band Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies (CAROLS) radiometer (see Zribi et al., Pardé et al., IGARSS 2008) flew four times over the Gulf of Biscay between September 24 to September 28, 2007 around 20UTC. These flights were the first ones over the ocean of this new instrument. Brightness temperatures (Tb) of the surface were measured by one antenna looking at 33° on the right hand side of the aircraft and optionally by a nadir antenna. Measurements are compared with simulations conducted with the Terrestrial Radiometry Analysis Package (TRAP) (Tenerelli et al., 2008) software run for CAROLS geometry and different observed geophysical conditions. Concomitant ship campaign and drifter deployments provide in situ ground truths for sea surface salinity (between 34.6 and 35.8pss) and temperature (between 15°C and 17°C). Wind speed (between 2 and 10m/s) and direction are estimated from the QSCAT scatterometer. TRAP uses the physical modelling of atmospheric radiative transfer, sea surface emissivity and galactic glint foreseen for the processing of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity satellite data. The circle flights and wing-wags movements of the CAROLS aircraft (The French research ATR42 aircraft) allow to explore a wide range of incidence angles (from 0° to about 60°) and of galactic signals reflected by the sea surface. On a whole, simulated and observed variations of Tb with incidence angle are very consistent, demonstrating a good sensitivity of CAROLS instrument. During the wing-wags, differences between observations and simulations occur in some azimutal directions possibly linked to imperfect knowledge of the galactic signal in some parts of the sky close to the Milky Way. During circle flights, observed azimutal variations are consistent with the galactic noise signal scattered by the sea surface as simulated with the model of (Tenerelli et al., 2008) and the signal due to rough sea assymmetry as simulated by a two

  1. Effects of the Antenna Aperture on Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; LeVine, David M.

    2006-01-01

    Remote sensing of sea surface salinity with sufficient accuracy to meet the needs of global oceanography is a challenging task. The global variability of the salinity signal in the open ocean is only a few Kelvin even at L-band and an accuracy on the order of 0.1K is desired to study the influence of salinity on ocean circulation and energy exchange with the atmosphere. On the other hand, resolution is not an issue for understanding the dynamics of the open ocean where scales of hundreds of km are not uncommon. This permits remote sensing with large antenna footprints and spatial averaging to reduce noise. However, antennas with large footprints introduce other problems. For example, the angle of incidence and hence the brightness temperature varies over the footprint. Similarly, the polarization of brightness temperature relative to the antenna ports changes. Studies have been conducted using antenna patterns representative of the antenna that will be flown on the Aquarius mission to examine these effects. Aquarius is a pushbroom style radiometer with three beams looking across track away from the sun. The beams are at incidences angles (at the spacecraft) of about 26.5, 34 and 40 degrees each with a half-power beam width of about 5.8 degrees. It is shown that the measured brightness temperature is biased relative to the value at boresight because of changes across the field of view. The bias can be as much as 4K and positive or negative depending on polarization. Polarization mixing because of the variations of the local plane of incidence across the footprint also occur and can result in biased polarimetric measurements. A bias in the third Stokes parameter of as much as 0.4K is possible. Such effects may affect algorithms that use the third Stokes parameter to correct for Faraday rotation. Another issue associated with the antenna is sun glint. This is an issue determined by surface roughness and antenna sidelobes. Examples will be given for the random

  2. Scattering Properties of Greenland Ice Sheets Inferred from ALOS L-band InSAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. C.; Zebker, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet is 2000 kilometers long and has a maximum thickness of over 3000 meters. It contains around ten percent of the fresh water on Earth. As both a reservoir of water and a heat sink for the Gulf Stream, it plays an important role in the Earth's climate and sea level. Therefore accurate assessments of the Greenland ice sheet's mass balance are essential for understanding global climate change and sea level. Measurements of ice scattering properties in the dry snow zone can contribute to our understanding of accumulation rates, which tend to be harder to measure than loss rates. In this study we examine data acquired by the PALSAR L-band (23.61 centimeter carrier wavelength) InSAR instrument aboard the ALOS satellite. We generate polarimetric InSAR images of two long strips of the Greenland ice sheet extending from the inner dry snow zone through the percolation and wet snow zones to the northern coastline, a total distance of about 700 kilometers. The single-look resolution is around 10 meters, and there is a temporal baseline of 46 days, and spatial baselines range from about 150 to 350 meters. We have demonstrated that the resulting geocoded differential interferograms can have high coherence (0.5 up to 0.9) in large regions of the dry snow zone, and that corrections can be made to recover coherence that is lost due to ionospheric inhomogeneity. We have also estimated radar penetration depths of 50 to 90 meters in the dry snow zone, though estimated penetration depth also depends on polarization. We apply phase and radiometric calibration to the data products generated by our SAR processor, incorporating calibration results published by JAXA. This allows us to estimate radar backscatter brightness (sigma0) and to make an estimated correction for ionospheric Faraday rotation effects in order to accurately measure polarimetric parameters. In general, the backscatter brightness in co-polarized SLC images is about 5 dB higher than in cross

  3. Simulation of L-band and HH microwave backscattering from coniferous forest stands - A comparison with SIR-B data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guo-Qing; Simonett, David S.

    1988-01-01

    SIR-B images of the Mt. Shasta region of northern California are used to evaluate a composite L-band HH backscattering model of coniferous forest stands. It is found that both SIR-B and simulated backscattering coefficients for eight stands studied have similar trends and relations to average tree height and average number of trees per pixel. Also, the dispersion and distribution of simulated backscattering coefficients from each stand broadly match SIR-B data from the same stand. Although the limited quality and quantity of experimental data makes it difficult to draw any strong conclusions, the comparisons indicate that a stand-based L-band HH composite model seems promising for explaining backscattering features.

  4. High power test results of the first SRRC/ANL high current L-band RF gun.

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C. H.

    1998-09-11

    A joint program is underway between the SRRC (Synchrotrons Radiation Research Center, Taiwan) and ANL (Argonne National Laboratory, USA) for developing a high current L-band photocathode rf guns. We have constructed an L-Band (1.3 Ghz), single cell rf photocathode gun and conducted low power tests at SRRC. High power rf conditioning of the cavity has been completed at ANL. In this paper we report on the construction and high power test results. So far we have been able to achieve > 120 MV/m axial electric field with minimal dark current. This gun will be used to replace the AWA (Argonne Wakefield Accelerator)[l] high current gun.

  5. Operation of an ungated diamond field-emission array cathode in a L-band radiofrequency electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Brau, C. A.; Gabella, W. E.; Ivanov, B.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Choi, B. K.; Blomberg, B.; Mihalcea, D.; Panuganti, H.; Jarvis, J.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.

    2014-06-30

    We report on the operation of a field-emitter-array cathode in a conventional L-band radio-frequency electron source. The cathode consisted of an array of ∼10{sup 6} diamond tips on pyramids. Maximum current on the order of 15 mA was reached and the cathode did not show appreciable signs of fatigue after weeks of operation. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristics, transverse beam density, and current stability are discussed.

  6. Use of IRI to Model the Effect of Ionosphere Emission on Earth Remote Sensing at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Saji; LeVine, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing in the window at 1.413 GHz (L-band) set aside for passive use only is important for monitoring sea surface salinity and soil moisture. These parameters are important for understanding ocean dynamics and energy exchange between the surface and atmosphere, and both NASA and ESA plan to launch satellite sensors to monitor these parameters at L-band (Aquarius, Hydros and SMOS). The ionosphere is an important source of error for passive remote sensing at this frequency. In addition to Faraday rotation, emission from the ionosphere is also a potential source of error at L-band. As an aid for correcting for emission, a regression model is presented that relates ionosphere emission to the integrated electron density (TEC). The goal is to use TEC from sources such as TOPEX, JASON or GPS to obtain estimates of emission over the oceans where the electron density profiles needed to compute emission are not available. In addition, data will also be presented to evaluate the use of the IRI for computing emission over the ocean.

  7. Combined Passive Active Soil Moisture Observations During CLASIC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important issue in advancing higher spatial resolution and better accuracy in soil moisture remote sensing is the integration of active and passive observations. In an effort to address these questions an airborne passive/active L-band system (PALS) was flown as part of CLASIC in Oklahoma over th...

  8. Development of a L-band ocean emissivity electromagnetic model using observations from the Aquarius Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejazin, Y.; Jones, W.; El-Nimri, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D ocean salinity measurement mission was launched into polar orbit during the summer of 2011. The prime sensor is an L-band radiometer/scatterometer developed jointly by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This paper deals with the development of an ocean emissivity model using AQ radiometer brightness temperature (Tb) observations. This model calculates the ocean surface emissivity as a function of ocean salinity, sea surface temperature, surface wind speed and direction. One unique aspect of this model is that it calculates ocean emissivity over wide ranges of Earth incidence angles (EIAs) from nadir to > 60°and ocean wind speeds from 0 m/s to > 70 m/s. This physical electromagnetic model with empirical coefficients follows the form of Stogryn [1967] that treats the ocean as a mixture of foam and clean rough water. The CFRSL ocean surface emissivity (ɛocean) is modeled as a linear sum of foam (ɛfoam) and foam-free seawater (ɛrough) emissivities, according to ɛocean = FF * ɛfoam + (1 - FF) * ɛrough (1) where FF is the fractional area coverage by foam. The foam emissivity is modeled as ɛfoam = Q(freq, U10, EIA) (2) where Q( ) is the empirical dependence of foam emissivity on radiometer frequency, the 10-m neutral stability wind speed and EIA according to El-Nimri [2010]. Following Stogryn, the foam-free seawater emissivity (ɛrough) is modeled ɛrough = ɛsmooth +Δɛexcess (3) where ɛsmooth = (1 - Γ) is the smooth surface emissivity, Γ is the Fresnel power reflection coefficient, and Δɛexcess is the wind-induced excess emissivity, given by Δɛexcess = G(freq, U10, WDir, EIA) (4) Where G( ) is the empirical signature of foam-free rough ocean, which depends upon the surface wind speed and wind direction. This function is determined empirically from measured AQ radiometer Tb's associated with surface wind vector from collocated NOAA GDAS numerical weather model. Ocean emissivity calculations are compared

  9. DOMEX-2 Ground-Based Antarctic L-Band Emission Measurements: a Contribution to Smos Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drinkwater, M. R.; Macelloni, G.; Brogioni, M.; Pettinato, S.

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, interest has grown in the remote sensing community for using the Antarctic ice sheet for calibrating and validating data from low-frequency satellite-borne microwave radiometers such as SMOS, Aquarius and SMAP. In particular, the East Antarctic Plateau Dome-C region around the Concordia Station appears to be particularly suited for this purpose. The specific characteristics of this region of interest are its size, structure, spatial homogeneity and thermal stability as well as frequent overpasses of these polar-orbiting satellites. In-situ measurements indicate that the roughness is limited with respect to other Antarctic areas and the temperature of the firn below 10 m remains stable on multiyear timescales. This attribute is particularly interesting for low-frequency microwave radiometers since, due to the low extinction of dry snow, the upper ice sheet layer is almost transparent and the brightness temperature (Tb) variability therefore predicted to be extremely small. At the year-round Italian-French base of Concordia ancillary data such as atmospheric parameters and snow temperature at different depths are routinely acquired as a basis for the analysis and the interpretation of satellite microwave data. Meanwhile, a first pilot experiment, called DOMEX-1 carried out an austral summer Antarctic campaign in November 2004- December 2005 to demonstrate the short-term brightness temperature stability at monthly scale. With the November 2009 launch of the European Space Agency’s SMOS satellite, a corresponding second experiment called DOMEX-2 was initiated in the Austral summer 2008-2009 with the goal to verify the assumption of year-round stability and suitability of the ice sheet as an external calibration reference target. The primary objectives of DOMEX-2 are to provide an independent source of stable reference data for SMOS satellite calibration and in particular: continuous acquisition of a calibrated time series of microwave (L-band) and

  10. Solar cell activation system

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, L.

    1983-07-05

    A system for activating solar cells involves the use of phosphorescent paint, the light from which is amplified by a thin magnifying lens and used to activate solar cells. In a typical system, a member painted with phosphorescent paint is mounted adjacent a thin magnifying lens which focuses the light on a predetermined array of sensitive cells such as selenium, cadmium or silicon, mounted on a plastic board. A one-sided mirror is mounted adjacent the cells to reflect the light back onto said cells for purposes of further intensification. The cells may be coupled to rechargeable batteries or used to directly power a small radio or watch.

  11. L-Band Ionosphere Scintillations Observed by A GNSS Receiver Array at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.; Pelgrum, W.; van Graas, F.

    2011-12-01

    As we enter a new solar maximum period, GNSS receivers, especially the ones operating in high latitude and equatorial regions, are facing an increasing threat from ionosphere scintillations. The increased solar activities, however, also offer a great opportunity to collect scintillation data to gain better understandings of scintillation effects on GNSS signals. During the past decade, many GPS receivers have been deployed around the globe to monitor ionosphere scintillations. Most of these GPS receivers are commercial receivers whose tracking mechanisms are not designed to operate under ionosphere scintillation. When strong scintillations occur, these receivers will either generate erroneous outputs or completely lose lock. Even when the scintillation is mild, the tracking loop outputs are not true representation of the signal parameters due the tracking loop transfer function. High quality, unprocessed GNSS receiver front end raw IF samples collected during ionosphere scintillations are necessary to produce realistic scintillation signal parameter estimations. In this presentation, we will update our effort in establishing a unique GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska to collect GPS and GLONASS satellite signals at various stages of the GNSS receiver processing. Signal strength, carrier phase, and relative TEC measurements generated by the receiver array as well as additional on-site diagnostic instrumentation measurements obtained from two active heating experiment campaigns conducted in 2011 will be presented. Additionally, we will also highlight and contrast the artificial heating experiment results with observations of natural scintillation events captured by our receivers using an automatic event trigger mechanism during the past year. These interesting results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations and natural disturbances.

  12. Simultaneous K- and L-band Spectroscopy of Be Stars: Circumstellar Envelope Properties from Hydrogen Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granada, A.; Arias, M. L.; Cidale, L. S.

    2010-05-01

    We present medium-resolution K- and L-band spectra of a sample of eight Be stars, obtained with Gemini/NIRI. The IR K and L bands contain many lines of different hydrogen series that are used as a diagnosis to the physical conditions in the circumstellar environments. We make an analysis on the optical depths of the line-forming regions based on the intensity ratios of Pfγ and Brα lines, the behavior of Humphreys' series, and the fluxes of Brα and Brγ lines. All our targets show spectroscopic and photometric long-term variability; thus, time-resolved K- and L-band spectroscopy is an ideal tool for studying the structure and evolution of the innermost regions of the envelope and to test models on the disk-forming mechanism. We note that the instrumental configuration used allowed us to obtain good quality IR observations and to take profit of Gemini band 3 observing time (allocation time for ranked programs in which the observing conditions are relaxed). Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (USA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  13. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  14. Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

  15. Estimating net rainfall, evaporation and water storage of a bare soil from sequential L-band emissivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroosnijder, L.; Lascano, R. J.; Newton, R. W.; Vanbavel, C. H. M.

    1984-01-01

    A general method to use a time series of L-band emissivities as an input to a hydrological model for continuously monitoring the net rainfall and evaporation as well as the water content over the entire soil profile is proposed. The model requires a sufficiently accurate and general relation between soil emissivity and surface moisture content. A model which requires the soil hydraulic properties as an additional input, but does not need any weather data was developed. The method is shown to be numerically consistent.

  16. First Operation of an Ungated Diamond Field-Emission Array Cathode in a L-Band Radiofrequency Electron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, P.; Brau, C. A.; Choi, B. K.; Blomberg, B.; Gabella, W. E.; Ivanov, B.; Jarvis, J.; Mendenhall, M. H.; Mihalcea, D.; Panuganti, S.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.

    2014-06-30

    We report on the first successful operation of a field-emitter-array cathode in a conventional L-band radio-frequency electron source. The cathode consisted of an array of $\\sim 10^6$ diamond diamond tips on pyramids. Maximum current on the order of 15~mA were reached and the cathode did not show appreciable signs of fatigue after weeks of operation. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristics, transverse beam density, and current stability are discussed. Numerical simulations of the beam dynamics are also presented.

  17. The Soil Moisture Active/Passive Mission (SMAP)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission will deliver global views of soil moisture content and its freeze/thaw state that are critical terrestrial water cycle state variables. Polarized measurements obtained with a shared antenna L-band radar and radiometer system will allow accurate estima...

  18. Classifying Indonesian Plantation And Natural Forest Cover And Measuring Changes With C-And L-Band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xichao; Quegan, Shaun; Uryu, Yumiko; Zeng, Tao

    2013-12-01

    Tropical coverage by Envisat is sparse in space and time and has limited value for monitoring deforestation. The only available APG multi-temporal dataset over Riau province, Indonesia (9 images in a single year), is used to distinguish and monitor tropical plantations and their dynamics and is compared with L-band PALSAR data. For Envisat APG data, both VV and VH are important in discriminating different types of forest cover, while at L-band most of the relevant information is in the cross- polarised channel. Whether the underlying soil is peat or non-peat in acacia plantations has important effects on backscatter and classification. Supervised classification of the C-band data gave overall accuracies of 86.2% and kappa coefficient of 0.78 by comparison with land cover maps derived from optical data. Classifications from separate phases in the C-band time series allow the changes occurring in acacia plantations due to management to be tracked.

  19. Coastal flood inundation monitoring with Satellite C-band and L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramsey, Elijah W., III; Rangoonwala, Amina; Bannister, Terri

    2013-01-01

    Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) was evaluated as a method to operationally monitor the occurrence and distribution of storm- and tidal-related flooding of spatially extensive coastal marshes within the north-central Gulf of Mexico. Maps representing the occurrence of marsh surface inundation were created from available Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-Band SAR (PALSAR) (L-band) (21 scenes with HH polarizations in Wide Beam [100 m]) data and Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT) Advanced SAR (ASAR) (C-band) data (24 scenes with VV and HH polarizations in Wide Swath [150 m]) during 2006-2009 covering 500 km of the Louisiana coastal zone. Mapping was primarily based on a decrease in backscatter between reference and target scenes, and as an extension of previous studies, the flood inundation mapping performance was assessed by the degree of correspondence between inundation mapping and inland water levels. Both PALSAR- and ASAR-based mapping at times were based on suboptimal reference scenes; however, ASAR performance seemed more sensitive to reference-scene quality and other types of scene variability. Related to water depth, PALSAR and ASAR mapping accuracies tended to be lower when water depths were shallow and increased as water levels decreased below or increased above the ground surface, but this pattern was more pronounced with ASAR. Overall, PALSAR-based inundation accuracies averaged 84% (n = 160), while ASAR-based mapping accuracies averaged 62% (n = 245).

  20. Studies of the dependence of L-band backscatter on sea surface winds using the synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Thompson, T. W.; Gonzalez, F. I.; Jones, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    Airborne and Seasat-1 SAR measurements of over-ocean winds through the use of L-band frequencies is described. A consistent dependence has been found between the wind speeds and the microwave backscattering coefficient. Measurements were obtained for cells a few kilometers across and at an incidence angle of 20 deg from nadir. Surface measurements were included in the analyses whenever possible, including data for surface temperatures and current variations, such as in the Gulf Stream. Higher radar cross-sections have been observed from the Gulf Stream than in nearby continental shelf waters. The eye-wall of Hurricane Gloria in Sept. 1976 displayed the largest backscatter of the storm. Wind speed backscatter exponents of 0.5 for winds below 18 m/sec, and 0.58 for winds above 20 m/sec have been determined for the Seasat L-band backscatter. The same wind speeds hold true for 0.05 and 0.50, respectively, for the wind direction component.

  1. ADASY (Active Daylighting System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Moliní, Daniel; González-Montes, Mario; Fernández-Balbuena, Antonio Á.; Bernabéu, Eusebio; García-Botella, Ángel; García-Rodríguez, Lucas; Pohl, Wilfried

    2009-08-01

    The main objective of ADASY (Active Daylighting System) work is to design a façade static daylighting system oriented to office applications, mainly. The goal of the project is to save energy by guiding daylight into a building for lighting purpose. With this approach we can reduce the electrical load for artificial lighting, completing it with sustainable energy. The collector of the system is integrated on a vertical façade and its distribution guide is always horizontal inside of the false ceiling. ADASY is designed with a specific patent pending caption system, a modular light-guide and light extractor luminaire system. Special care has been put on the final cost of the system and its building integration purpose. The current ADASY configuration is able to illuminate 40 m2 area with a 300lx-400lx level in the mid time work hours; furthermore it has a good enough spatial uniformity distribution and a controlled glare. The data presented in this study are the result of simulation models and have been confirmed by a physical scaled prototype. ADASY's main advantages over regular illumination systems are: -Low maintenance; it has not mobile pieces and therefore it lasts for a long time and require little attention once installed. - No energy consumption; solar light continue working even if there has been a power outage. - High quality of light: the colour rendering of light is very high - Psychological benefits: People working with daylight get less stress and more comfort, increasing productivity. - Health benefits

  2. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  3. Evaluation of near-surface soil moisture data from an AAFC monitoring network in Manitoba, Canada: Implications for L-band satellite validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Justin R.; McNairn, Heather; Berg, Aaron A.; Champagne, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    This paper examines near-surface soil moisture data (top ∼6 cm) from an Agriculture and Agri-food Canada (AAFC) monitoring network in southern Manitoba, Canada, over the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons. This network is intended for use (in part) as a core validation site for the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission. The network currently consists of 9 stations sited within agricultural fields. Each station uses a triplicate configuration of horizontally installed Hydra Probe soil moisture sensors at near-surface (∼5 cm) to root-zone soil depths, in addition to permanently installed vertical surface sensors (0-5.7 cm). This domain was studied intensively over the 6.5 week SMAPVEX12 ground campaign in June/July 2012, providing coincident soil moisture datasets to assess network up-scaling over the domain. Results demonstrate that statistical differences exist between the network-level data from the horizontal (θ3.5-6.5cm) and vertical (θ0-5.7cm) surface Hydra Probes over 2012-13. Bootstrap resampling shows that a mean difference of 0.018 m3 m-3 (at 99% confidence) is observed between θ3.5-6.5cm and θ0-5.7cm measurement depths (θ0-5.7cm sensors exhibit dry bias). Individual station analysis shows that the largest differences between θ3.5-6.5cm and θ0-5.7cm measurement depth occur at sites with higher clay content, whereas sensors located in sandy soils exhibit negligible differences. Up-scaling comparisons of the AAFC network to field-sampled data and a dense temporary network over SMAPVEX12 demonstrate that it is representative of the domain within 0.04 m3 m-3 RMSE. This suggests that the AAFC network is suitable for coarse resolution L-band microwave soil moisture validation. Comparison of Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Level 2 soil moisture product data to the up-scaled AAFC network data over 2012-13 shows that superior temporal correlation is found with the θ0-5.7cm dataset. The difference in RMSEs between the SMOS comparisons to θ3.5-6.5cm

  4. Mitigation of Emittance Dilution Due to Transverse Mode Coupling in the L-Band Linacs of the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.M.; Jones, R.M.; Miller, R.H.; /SLAC

    2007-04-16

    The main L-band linacs of the ILC accelerate 2820 bunches from a center of mass of 10 GeV to 500 GeV (and in the proposed later upgrade, to 1 TeV). The emittance of the vertical plane is approximately 400 times less than that of the horizontal plane. Provided the vertical and horizontal mode dipole frequencies are degenerate then the motion in each plane is not coupled. However, in reality the frequency degeneracy is split and the eigenmodes are shifted due to inevitable manufacturing errors introduced in fabricating 20,000 cavities. This gives rise to a transverse coupling in the horizontal-vertical motion and can readily lead to a dilution in the emittance in the vertical plane. We investigate means to ameliorate this effect dilution by splitting the horizontal-vertical tune of the lattice.

  5. Comparison of X-Band, L-Band and C-Band Radar Images in Monitoring Subsidence in Agricultural Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motagh, Mahdi; Haghshenas Haghighi, Mahmud; Shamshiri, Roghaye; Esmaeili, Mustapha

    2015-05-01

    The ongoing pattern of groundwater induced land subsidence in major valleys and agricultural regions of Iran has been recently documented by several studies (e.g. [1-4]) using C-band Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations. In this article we present the results of our research in which we evaluated the performance of C-band, L-band and X-band SAR data, using time-series method of small baseline subset (SBAS), to retrieve long time series of ground subsidence in agricultural regions in the country. Two major groundwater basins have been selected for this purpose: (1) Rafsanjan Valley in the Kerman province of central Iran and (2) Tehran Plain (capital of Iran). We also report on our experience using dualpolarimetry (HH/VV) X-band SAR data for Persistent Scatterer (PS) deformation analysis in natural terrains subject to high rate of deformation.

  6. European Neutron Activation System.

    2013-01-11

    Version 03 EASY-2010 (European Activation System) consists of a wide range of codes, data and documentation all aimed at satisfying the objective of calculating the response of materials irradiated in a neutron flux. The main difference from the previous version is the upper energy limit, which has increased from 20 to 60 MeV. It is designed to investigate both fusion devices and accelerator based materials test facilities that will act as intense sources of high-energymore » neutrons causing significant activation of the surrounding materials. The very general nature of the calculational method and the data libraries means that it is applicable (with some reservations) to all situations (e.g. fission reactors or neutron sources) where materials are exposed to neutrons below 60 MeV. EASY can be divided into two parts: data and code development tools and user tools and data. The former are required to develop the latter, but EASY users only need to be able to use the inventory code FISPACT and be aware of the contents of the EAF library (the data source). The complete EASY package contains the FISPACT-2007 inventory code, the EAF-2003, EAF-2005, EAF-2007 and EAF-2010 libraries, and the EASY User Interface for the Window version. The activation package EASY-2010 is the result of significant development to extend the upper energy range from 20 to 60 MeV so that it is capable of being used for IFMIF calculations. The EAF-2010 library contains 66,256 reactions, almost five times more than in EAF-2003 (12,617). Deuteron-induced and proton-induced cross section libraries are also included, and can be used with EASY to enable calculations of the activation due to deuterons and proton [2].« less

  7. Estimation of Bare Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Roughness Parameter Using L-Band SAR Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Wang, James; Hsu, Ann Y.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm based on a fit of the single-scattering Integral Equation Method (IEM) was developed to provide estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness parameter (a combination of rms roughness height and surface power spectrum) from quad-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. This algorithm was applied to a series of measurements acquired at L-band (1.25 GHz) from both AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C) over a well- managed watershed in southwest Oklahoma. Prior to its application for soil moisture inversion, a good agreement was found between the single-scattering IEM simulations and the L band measurements of SIR-C and AIRSAR over a wide range of soil moisture and surface roughness conditions. The sensitivity of soil moisture variation to the co-polarized signals were then examined under the consideration of the calibration accuracy of various components of SAR measurements. It was found that the two co-polarized backscattering coefficients and their combinations would provide the best input to the algorithm for estimation of soil moisture and roughness parameter. Application of the inversion algorithm to the co-polarized measurements of both AIRSAR and SIR-C resulted in estimated values of soil moisture and roughness parameter for bare and short-vegetated fields that compared favorably with those sampled on the ground. The root-mean-square (rms) errors of the comparison were found to be 3.4% and 1.9 dB for soil moisture and surface roughness parameter, respectively.

  8. Deriving Soil Moisture with the Combined L-Band Radar and Radiometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jiancheng; Chen, K. S.; Tsang, L.; Jackson, T.; Njoku, E.; Van Zyl, J.; O'Neill, P. O.; Entekhabi, D.; Johnson, J.; Moghaddam, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we develop a combined active/passive technique to estimate surface soil moisture with the focus on the short vegetated surfaces. We first simulated a database for both active and passive signals under SMAP s sensor configurations using the radiative transfer model with a wide range of conditions for surface soil moisture, roughness and vegetation properties that we considered as the random orientated disks and cylinders. Using this database, we developed 1) the techniques to estimate surface backscattering and emission components and 2) the technique to estimate soil moisture with the estimated surface backscattering and emission components. We will demonstrate these techniques with the model simulated data and its validation with the airborne PALS image data from the soil moisture SGP 99 and SMEX 02 experiments.

  9. Final Report 200 MW L-Band Annular Beam Klystron for Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Michael; Ferguson, Patrick; Ives, Lawrence; Song, Liqun; Carlsten, Bruce; Fazio, Michael

    2009-02-11

    This program developed a 200 MW, 1.3 GHz, Annular Beam Klystron (ABK) for accelerator systems. An ABK provides lower impedance than a conventional klystron, making it possible to produce higher RF powers with lower voltages. With a higher power per unit, fewer klystrons would be required for a large accelerator. Lower voltage also simplifies and reduces the cost of the power supply system. Both features will significantly lower the cost of an RF system. This device operates at 475 kV. The klystron uses a magnetron injection gun producing 1100 A in one microsecond pulses. Power is extracted into fundamental rectangular waveguide through two output windows. The predicted gain is approximately 45 dB with estimated efficiency of 45%. The klystron was assembled, but no facility was available for testing. Consequently, no high power performance measurements are available. Because the assembled klystron is approximately 15 feet long, it was disassembled for storage. It can be reassembled should a use materialize.

  10. Characterization of L-Band RFI and Implications for Mitigation Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, Steven W.; Hampson, G. A.; Johnson, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    We describe measurements of radio frequency interference (RFI) in the 1200-1800 MHz band as observed from NASA s P-3 research aircraft during a flight along the Mid-Atlantic coast of the U.S. at altitudes of 2,000 and 20,000 ft. Both power spectra and coherently-sampled waveform data were obtained. Our results indicate that the spectrum below 1400 MHz is typically dominated by pulses from ground based radars, which, while very strong, individually have transmit duty cycles of on the order of 0.1%. We detect but are unable to identify some relatively weak intermittent RFI inside the 20 MHz protected band centered at 1413 MHz. We detect no significant RFI above 1420 MHz, but the limited sensitivity of this particular experiment makes it impossible to rule out the presence of RFI at levels damaging to total power radiometry. Implications for radiometer design, including possible active countermeasures for RFI mitigation, are discussed.

  11. Electronically Tunable Surface-Coil-Type Resonator for L-Band EPR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Walczak, Tadeusz; Swartz, Harold M.

    2000-01-01

    The automatic frequency control (AFC) circuit in conventional electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometers automatically tunes the microwave source to the resonance frequency of the resonator. The circuit works satisfactorily for samples stable enough that the geometric relations in the resonance structure do not change in a significant way. When EPR signals are measured during in vivo experiments with small rodents, however, the distance between the signal source and the surface-coil detector can change rapidly. When a conventional AFC circuit keeps the oscillator tuned to the resonator under those conditions, the resultant frequency change may exceed ±5 MHz and markedly shift the position of the EPR signal. Such a shift results in unacceptable effects on the spectra, especially when the experimenter is dealing with narrow EPR lines. The animal movement also causes a mismatching of the resonator and the 50-ohm transmission line. Direct results of this mismatching are increased noise; shifts in the position of the baseline; and a high probability of overdriving the signal preamplifier with consequent loss of the EPR signal. We therefore designed, built, and tested a new surface-coil resonator using varactor diodes for tuning the resonance frequency to the fixed frequency oscillator and for capacitive matching of the resonator to the 50-ohm transmission line. The performance of the automatic matching system was tested in vivo by measuring EPR spectra of lithium phthalocyanine implanted in rats. Stability and sensitivity of the spectrometer were evaluated by measuring EPR spectra with and without the use of the automatic matching system. The overall experimental performance of the spectrometer was found to significantly improve during in vivo experiments using the automatic matching system. Excellent matching between the 50-ohm transmission line and the resonator was maintained under all experimental circumstances that were tested. This should allow us now to

  12. The soil moisture active passive experiments (SMAPEx): Towards soil moisture retrieval from the SMAP mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, scheduled for launch in 2014, will carry the first combined L-band radar and radiometer system with the objective of mapping near surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw state globally at near-daily time step (2-3 days). SMAP will provide three soil ...

  13. Comparison of NAVSTAR satellite L band ionospheric calibrations with Faraday rotation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royden, H. N.; Miller, R. B.; Buennagel, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that interplanetary navigation at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is performed by analyzing measurements derived from the radio link between spacecraft and earth and, near the target, onboard optical measurements. For precise navigation, corrections for ionospheric effects must be applied, because the earth's ionosphere degrades the accuracy of the radiometric data. These corrections are based on ionospheric total electron content (TEC) determinations. The determinations are based on the measurement of the Faraday rotation of linearly polarized VHF signals from geostationary satellites. Problems arise in connection with the steadily declining number of satellites which are suitable for Faraday rotation measurements. For this reason, alternate methods of determining ionospheric electron content are being explored. One promising method involves the use of satellites of the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS). The results of a comparative study regarding this method are encouraging.

  14. GPS Multipath Fade Measurements to Determine L-Band Ground Reflectivity Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavak, Adnan; Xu, Guanghan; Vogel, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    In personal satellite communications, especially when the line-of-sight is clear, ground specular reflected signals along with direct signals are received by low gain, almost omni-directional subscriber antennas. A six-channel, C/A code processing, global positioning system (GPS) receiver with an almost omni-directional patch antenna was used to take measurements over three types of ground to characterize 1.575 GHz specular ground reflections and ground dielectric properties. Fade measurements were taken over grass, asphalt, and lake water surfaces by placing the antenna in a vertical position at a fixed height from the ground. Electrical characteristics (conductivity and dielectric constant) of these surfaces (grass, asphalt, lake water) were obtained by matching computer simulations to the experimental results.

  15. An L-Band Superconducting Traveling Wave Accelerating Structure With Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.; Avrakhov, P.; Yakovlev, V. P.; Solyak, N.; Kazakov, S.

    2009-01-22

    The most severe problem of the International Linear Collider is its high cost, resulting in part from the enormous length of the collider. This length is determined mainly by the achievable accelerating gradient in the RF system of the ILC. In the ILC project the required accelerating gradient is higher than 30 MeV/m. Further improvement of the coupling to the beam may be achieved by using a Traveling Wave SC structure [1]. We have demonstrated that an additional gradient increase of up to 46% may be possible if a {pi}/2 TW SC structure is employed. However, a TW SC structure requires a SC feedback waveguide to return the few GW of circulating RF power from the structure output back to the structure input. The test cavity with feedback is designed to demonstrate the possibility of achieving a significantly higher gradient than existing SC structures. The double-coupler powering excitation and tuning have been studied numerically and the corresponding model results are presented. The proposed double-coupler powering scheme significantly reduces the tuning requirements as long as any of the partial modes of given magnitude and phase are excited independently, providing a clear traveling wave regime of structure operation.

  16. Conceptual design of an L-band recirculating superconducting traveling wave accelerating structure for ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Avrakhov, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Liu, Z.; Kazakov, S.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; Gai, W.; /Argonne

    2007-06-01

    With this paper, we propose the conceptual design of a traveling wave accelerating structure for a superconducting accelerator. The overall goal is to study a traveling wave (TW) superconducting (SC) accelerating structure for ILC that allows an increased accelerating gradient and, therefore reduction of the length of the collider. The conceptual studies were performed in order to optimize the acceleration structure design by minimizing the surface fields inside the cavity of the structure, to make the design compatible with existing technology, and to determine the maximum achievable gain in the accelerating gradient. The proposed solution considers RF feedback system redirecting the accelerating wave that passed through the superconducting traveling wave acceleration (STWA) section back to the input of the accelerating structure. The STWA structure has more cells per unit length than a TESLA structure but provides an accelerating gradient higher than a TESLA structure, consequently reducing the cost. In this paper, the STWA cell shape optimization, coupler cell design and feedback waveguide solution are considered. We also discuss the field flatness in the superconducting TW structure, the HOM modes and multipactor performance have been studied as well. The proposed TW structure design gives an overall 46% gain over the SW ILC structure if the 10 m long TW structure is employed.

  17. L-band Dielectric Constant Measurements of Seawater (Oral presentation and SMOS Poster)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Roger H.; Utku, Cuneyt; LeVine, David M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a resonant cavity technique for the measurement of the dielectric constant of seawater as a function of its salinity. Accurate relationships between salinity and dielectric constant (which determines emissivity) are needed for sensor systems such as SMOS and Aquarius that will monitor salinity from space in the near future. The purpose of the new measurements is to establish the dependence of the dielectric constant of seawater on salinity in contemporary units (e.g. psu) and to take advantage of modern instrumentation to increase the accuracy of these measurements. The measurement device is a brass cylindrical cavity 16cm in diameter and 7cm in height. The seawater is introduced into the cavity through a slender glass tube having an inner diameter of 0.1 mm. By assuming that this small amount of seawater slightly perturbs the internal fields in the cavity, perturbation theory can be employed. A simple formula results relating the real part of the dielectric constant to the change in resonant frequency of the cavity. In a similar manner, the imaginary part of the dielectric constant is related to the change in the cavity s Q. The expected accuracy of the cavity technique is better than 1% for the real part and 1 to 2% for the imaginary part. Presently, measurements of methanol have been made and agree with precision measurements in the literature to within 1% in both real and imaginary parts. Measurements have been made of the dielectric constant of seawater samples from Ocean Scientific in the United Kingdom with salinities of 10, 30, 35 and 38 psu. All measurements were made at room temperature. Plans to make measurements at a range of temperatures and salinities will be discussed.

  18. Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Ray; And Others

    This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

  19. Critical assessment of the forecasting capability of L-band scintillation over the magnetic equatorial region - Campaign results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagiya, Mala S.; Sridharan, R.; Sunda, Surendra; Jose, Lijo; Pant, Tarun K.; Choudhary, Rajkumar

    2014-04-01

    A critical evaluation of the novel method suggested by Sridharan et al. (2012) to forecast L-band scintillation is made using the results from a special campaign conducted from Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.91°E, dip latitude 0.5°N), India, during April 2012. The significance of the campaign lies in the fact that, (1) efforts are made to minimise the uncertainties due to the movement of the satellite platform (TEC and S4 observations from GNSS satellites) by choosing a recently launched GSAT-8 geostationary satellite for ionospheric scintillation in L1 band, (2) unlike the previous study (Sridharan et al., 2012) wherein the GPS derived TEC fluctuations were treated as representative of ionospheric perturbations, in the present exercise, the fluctuating component of the foF2 data from the ground based digital Ionosonde have been taken as a measure of the perturbations and (3) though both the GSAT and Ionosonde are stationary, still the ionospheric regions they represent are physically separated and in order to correlate the scintillation over the GSAT location to the forecast perturbations over the ionosonde location, the required zonal velocity of the perturbations/irregularities is estimated using GSAT and GPS scintillation data during one of the close-by GPS passes and this is taken to represent the particular solar epoch and season. Following the earlier method of Sridharan et al. (2012) the relative amplitudes and phase integrity of the perturbations have been maintained and extended throughout night. By adopting the above changes, it has been noted that the forecasting capability of L band scintillation has remarkably improved vindicating the role of perturbations in the evolution of the scintillation, thus making it more useful for practical applications. The nonoccurrence of scintillation on occasions in the prescribed time windows has also been understood based on the changes in the background conditions. A threshold upward velocity for the evening F-region as

  20. Quantification of L-band InSAR decorrelation in volcanic terrains using airborne LiDAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedze, M.; Heggy, E.; Jacquemoud, S.; Bretar, F.

    2011-12-01

    Repeat-pass InSAR LOS measurements of the Piton de La Fournaise (La Reunion Island, France) suffer from substantial phase decorrelation due to the occurrence of vegetation and ash deposits on the caldera and slopes of the edifice. To correct this deficiency, we combine normalized airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) intensity data with spaceborne InSAR coherence images from ALOS PALSAR L-band acquired over the volcano in 2008 and 2009, following the 2007 major eruption. The fusion of the two data sets improves the calculation of coherence and the textural classification of different volcanic surfaces. For future missions considering both InSAR and/or LiDAR such as DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure and Dynamics of Ice), such data fusion studies can provide a better analysis of the spatiotemporal variations in InSAR coherence in order to enhance the monitoring of pre-eruptive ground displacements. The airborne surveys conducted in 2008 and 2009, cover different types of vegetation and terrain roughness on the central and western parts of the volcano. The topographic data are first processed to generate a high-resolution digital terrain model (DTM) of the volcanic edifice with elevation accuracy better than 1 m. For our purposes, the phase variations caused by the surface relief can be eliminated using the LiDAR-derived DTM. Then normalized LiDAR intensities are correlated to the L-band polarimetric coherence for different zones of the volcano to assess the LiDAR-InSAR statistical behavior of different lava flows, pyroclastics, and vegetated surfaces. Results suggest that each volcanic terrain type is characterized by a unique LiDAR-InSAR histogram pattern. We identified four LiDAR-InSAR distinguished relations: (1) pahoehoe lava flow surfaces show an agglomerate histogram pattern which may be explained by low surface scattering and low wave penetration into the geological medium; (2) eroded a'a lava surfaces is characterized by high standard deviation

  1. A Compact L-band Radiometer for High Resolution sUAS-based Imaging of Soil Moisture and Surface Salinity Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Stachura, M.; Dai, E.; Elston, J.; McIntyre, E.; Leuski, V.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the long electrical wavelengths required along with practical aperture size limitations the scaling of passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture and salinity from spaceborne low-resolution (~10-100 km) applications to high resolution (~10-1000 m) applications requires use of low flying aerial vehicles. This presentation summarizes the status of a project to develop a commercial small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) hosting a microwave radiometer for mapping of soil moisture in precision agriculture and sea surface salinity studies. The project is based on the Tempest electric-powered UAS and a compact L-band (1400-1427 MHz) radiometer developed specifically for extremely small and lightweight aerial platforms or man-portable, tractor, or tower-based applications. Notable in this combination are a highly integrated sUAS/radiometer antenna design and use of both the upwelling emitted signal from the surface and downwelling cold space signal for precise calibration using a unique lobe-differencing correlating radiometer architecture. The system achieves a spatial resolution comparable to the altitude of the UAS above the surface while referencing upwelling measurements to the constant and well-known background temperature of cold space. The radiometer has been tested using analog correlation detection, although future builds will include infrared, near-infrared, and visible (red) sensors for surface temperature and vegetation biomass correction and digital sampling for radio frequency interference mitigation. This NASA-sponsored project is being developed for commercial application in cropland water management (for example, high-value shallow root-zone crops), landslide risk assessment, NASA SMAP satellite validation, and NASA Aquarius salinity stratification studies. The system will ultimately be capable of observing salinity events caused by coastal glacier and estuary fresh water outflow plumes and open ocean rainfall events.

  2. Reliability analysis in aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers: Application to L band Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vall-Llossera, M.; Duffo, N.; Camps, A.; Corbella, I.; Torres, F.; Bará, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis (MIRAS) instrument will be the first radiometer using aperture synthesis techniques for Earth observation. It will be boarded in the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission of the European Space Agency and launched in 2005. The configuration under study in the MIRAS Demonstrator Pilot Project is a Y-shaped array with 27 dual-polarization L band antennas in each arm, spaced 0.89 wavelengths. In addition to these 81 antennas there are 3 additional ones between the arms for phase restoration and redundancy purposes and an extra one at the center of the Y array that is connected to a noise injection radiometer. The digitized in-phase and quadrature outputs of each receiver are multiplexed in groups of four and optically transmitted to the hub where the complex cross correlations are computed. In this configuration there are 85 antennas-receiving channels and 21 multiplexers. The objectives of this paper are twofold: (1) the study of the performance degradation of Y-shaped aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers in case of single or multiple subsystem failures and (2) a reliability analysis at subsystem level.

  3. Estimation of Bare Surface Soil Moisture and Surface Roughness Parameter Using L-Band SAR Image Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jian-Cheng; Wang, James; Hsu, Ann; ONeill, Peggy; Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    An algorithm based on a fit of the single-scattering Integral Equation Method (IEM) was developed to provide estimation of soil moisture and surface roughness parameter (a combination of rms roughness height and surface power spectrum) from quasi-polarized synthetic aperture radar (SAR) measurements. This algorithm was applied to a series of measurements acquired at L-band (1.25 GHz) from both AIRSAR (Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar operated by Jet Propulsion Laboratory) and SIR-C (Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C) over a well-managed watershed in southwest Oklahoma. It was found that the two co-polarized backscattering coefficients and their combinations would provide the best input to the algorithm for estimation of soil moisture and roughness parameter. Application of the inversion algorithm to the co-polarized measurements of both AIRSAR and SIR-C resulted in estimated values of soil moisture and roughness parameter for bare and short-vegetated fields that compared favorably with those sampled on the ground. The root-mean-square (rms) errors of the comparison were found to be 3.4% and 1.9 dB for soil moisture and surface roughness parameter, respectively.

  4. Clustering of Multi-Temporal Fully Polarimetric L-Band SAR Data for Agricultural Land Cover Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamiminia, H.; Homayouni, S.; Safari, A.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the unique capabilities of Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PolSAR) sensors make them an important and efficient tool for natural resources and environmental applications, such as land cover and crop classification. The aim of this paper is to classify multi-temporal full polarimetric SAR data using kernel-based fuzzy C-means clustering method, over an agricultural region. This method starts with transforming input data into the higher dimensional space using kernel functions and then clustering them in the feature space. Feature space, due to its inherent properties, has the ability to take in account the nonlinear and complex nature of polarimetric data. Several SAR polarimetric features extracted using target decomposition algorithms. Features from Cloude-Pottier, Freeman-Durden and Yamaguchi algorithms used as inputs for the clustering. This method was applied to multi-temporal UAVSAR L-band images acquired over an agricultural area near Winnipeg, Canada, during June and July in 2012. The results demonstrate the efficiency of this approach with respect to the classical methods. In addition, using multi-temporal data in the clustering process helped to investigate the phenological cycle of plants and significantly improved the performance of agricultural land cover mapping.

  5. PAU/RAD: Design and Preliminary Calibration Results of a New L-Band Pseudo-Correlation Radiometer Concept

    PubMed Central

    Bosch-Lluis, Xavier; Camps, Adriano; Ramos-Perez, Isaac; Marchan-Hernandez, Juan Fernando; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Nereida; Valencia, Enric

    2008-01-01

    The Passive Advanced Unit (PAU) for ocean monitoring is a new type of instrument that combines in a single receiver and without time multiplexing, a polarimetric pseudo-correlation microwave radiometer at L-band (PAU-RAD) and a GPS reflectometer (PAU-GNSS/R). These instruments in conjunction with an infra-red radiometer (PAU-IR) will respectively provide the sea surface temperature and the sea state information needed to accurately retrieve the sea surface salinity from the radiometric measurements. PAU will consist of an array of 4×4 receivers performing digital beamforming and polarization synthesis both for PAU-RAD and PAU-GNSS/R. A concept demonstrator of the PAU instrument with only one receiver has been implemented (PAU-One Receiver or PAU-OR). PAU-OR has been used to test and tune the calibration algorithms that will be applied to PAU. This work describes in detail PAU-OR's radiometer calibration algorithms and their performance.

  6. Evaluation of the L-band scattering characteristics of volcanic terrain in aid of lithologic identification, assessment of SIR-B calibration, and development of planetary geomorphic analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaupp, V. H.; Waite, W. P.; Macdonald, H. C.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Zisk, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) scattering study and calibration investigation of volcanic terrain are to delineate textural and structural features, to evaluate the L-band scattering characteristics, and to assess SIR-B calibration. Specific tasks are outlined and expected results are summarized.

  7. Soil Moisture Retrieval Using an L-Band Synthetic Apeture Radiometer During The Soil Moisture Experiments 2003 (SMEX03) and 2004 (SMEX04)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil moisture retrievals made using data from the airborne L-band microwave radiometer, 2D-STAR, over a wide range of land cover types are presented. The 2D-STAR was flown over six regional-scale sites during soil moisture experiments in 2003 and 2004. Four sites located in Alabama, Georgia, Arizona...

  8. Soil hydraulic parameters and surface soil moisture of a tilled bare soil plot inversely derived from l-band brightness temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We coupled a radiative transfer approach with a soil hydrological model (HYDRUS 1D) and a global optimization routine SCE-UA to derive soil hydraulic parameters and soil surface roughness from measured brightness temperatures at 1.4 GHz (L-band) and measured rainfall and calculated potential soil ev...

  9. Portable active interrogation system.

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C. E.; Brener, M. W.; Hollas, C. L.; Myers, W. L.

    2004-01-01

    The system consists of a pulsed DT neutron generator (5 x 10{sup 7} n/s) and a portable but high intrinsic efficiency, custom-designed, polyethylene-moderated {sup 3}He neutron detector. A multichannel scaler card in a ruggedized laptop computer acquires the data. A user-friendly LabVIEW program analyzes and displays the data. The program displays a warning message when highly enriched uranium or any other fissionable materials is detected at a specified number of sigmas above background in the delayed region between pulses. This report describes the system and gives examples of the response of the system to highly enriched uranium and some other fissionable materials, at several distances and with various shielding materials.

  10. Classification of Soil Moisture on Vegetated Earthen Levees Using X and L Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrooghy, M.; Aanstoos, J. V.; Hasan, K.; Nobrega, R. A.; Younan, N. H.

    2011-12-01

    Earthen levees protect large areas of land in the US from flooding. Timely inspection and repairs can reduce the potential for catastrophic failures. Changes in spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture can reveal signs of instability and help identify zones of weakness. Since analytical and empirical models have shown a relationship between SAR backscatter and soil moisture, we are using SAR to classify soil moisture on levees. Estimation of soil moisture from SAR is challenging when the surface has any significant vegetation. For the levee application, the soil is typically covered with a uniform layer of grass. Our methodology is based on a supervised soil moisture classification using a back propagation neural network with four classes of low, medium, high, and very high soil moisture. Our methodology consists of the following steps: 1) segmentation of the levee area from background and exclusion of tree-covered areas; 2) extracting the backscattering and texture features such as GLCM (Grey-Level Co-occurrence Matrix) and wavelet features; 3) training the back propagation neural network classifier; and 4) testing the area of interest and validation of the results using ground truth data. Two sources of SAR imagery are tested with this method: (1) fully polarimetric L-band data from NASA's UAVSAR; and (2) dual-polarimetric X-band data from the German TerraSAR-X satellite. The study area is a 4 km stretch of levee along the lower Mississippi River in the United States. Field data collected simultaneously with image acquisition are utilized for training and validation. Preliminary results show classification accuracies of about 50% for the UAVSAR image and 30% for the TerraSAR-X image in vegetated areas. The figure below shows a soil moisture classification using UAVSAR on April 28, 2011.

  11. Ocean Surface Emissivity at L-band (1.4 GHz): The Dependence on Salinity and Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Lang, R.; Wentz, F.; Messiner, T.

    2012-01-01

    A characterization of the emissivity of sea water at L-band is important for the remote sensing of sea surface salinity. Measurements of salinity are currently being made in the radio astronomy band at 1.413 GHz by ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and NASA's Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory. The goal of both missions is accuracy on the order of 0.1 psu. This requires accurate knowledge of the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature and also the effect of waves (roughness). The former determines the emissivity of an ideal (i.e. flat) surface and the later is the major source of error from predictions based on a flat surface. These two aspects of the problem of characterizing the emissivity are being addressed in the context of the Aquarius mission. First, laboratory measurements are being made of the dielectric constant of sea water. This is being done at the George Washington University using a resonant cavity. In this technique, sea water of known salinity and temperature is fed into the cavity along its axis through a narrow tube. The sea water changes the resonant frequency and Q of the cavity which, if the sample is small enough, can be related to the dielectric constant of the sample. An extensive set of measurements have been conducted at 1.413 GHz to develop a model for the real and imaginary part of the dielectric constant as a function of salinity and temperature. The results are compared to the predictions of models based on parameterization of the Debye resonance of the water molecule. The models and measurements are close; however, the differences are significant for remote sensing of salinity. This is especially true at low temperatures where the sensitivity to salinity is lowest.

  12. Narrow- and wide-band channel characterization for land mobile satellite systems: Experimental results at L-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahn, Axel; Buonomo, Sergio; Sforza, Mario; Lutz, Erich

    1995-01-01

    The results of an airborne measurement campaign aimed at the characterization of the mobile satellite link are presented in this paper. The experimental tests were carried out at 1.8 GHz. The objective of the campaign was to obtain results applicable to all proposed satellite constellations: LEO, HEO, and GEO. Therefore, the measurements were performed for elevation angles from 10 deg...80 deg using a light aircraft. A set of different environments and operational scenarios have been investigated, typically for hand-held and car-mounted applications. We present a survey of wide- and narrowband results for a wide range of elevation angles and environments. For the wideband characterization, the power delay profiles of the channel impulse response are presented and discussed. Figures for the delay spread versus elevation and for the carrier-to-multipath ratio versus time are also given. The narrowband behaviour of the channel is described by power series.

  13. Measurement of characteristics of an infrared free-electron laser with the L-band at Osaka University

    SciTech Connect

    Okuda, S.; Ishida, S.; Honda, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Free-electron laser (FEL) experiments have been conducted with the 38-MeV L-band electron linac at the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University. It is a 1.3 GHz RF linac with a thermoionic gun, and equipped with two 12th and one 6th sub-harmonic prebunchers for producing the high-intensity single-bunch beam with a charge up to 67 nC/bunch. For oscillation experiments of FEL, the gun is replaced with that with a smaller cathode area in order to reduce the emittance of the beam. The normalized emittance has been measured to be 200 {pi} mm-mrad. The linac is operated in the long-pulse mode and one of the 12th sub-harmonic bunchers and the 6th sub-harmonic buncher are operated, so that the time duration of the macropulse is 4 {mu}s and the spacing between micropulses is 9.2 ns. The length of the micropulse is 30-40 ps and the charge in each micropulse is 2 nC. The electron beam from the linac is transported to a wiggler which has the period length of 6 cm and the number of periods of 32. The first half of the macropulse is lost in the transport line because the energy of electrons in that part gradually changes and there is a momentum slit in the transport line. An optical resonator is 5.53 m long and the round-trip time of light in it is 37 ns, which is precisely four times as long as the spacing of micropulses. Since the time duration of the macropulse passing through the wiggler is 1.8 {mu}s, the number of amplifications of light in the cavity is 49. The first lasing was achieved in 1994 at wavelengths between 32 and 40 {mu}m and preliminary results were reported at the l6th FEL Conference last year. The laser light was detected with a Ge:Be detector which has the time resolution of 3 {mu}s. Since the time duration of the macropulse of the laser fight is estimated to be less than 2 {mu}s, we could measure only the total energy in a macropulse of the output light.

  14. A method for constraining canopy height using single-polarization L-band Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prush, V. B.; Lohman, R.

    2012-12-01

    Over the past two decades, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has proven to be a useful technique for observing a wide range of sources of crustal motion, including groundwater extraction and deformation related to volcanic processes and earthquakes. In this study we introduce a new method for the application of InSAR to the determination of canopy height in forests where extensive clearcutting has occurred. Our region of study is the Pacific Northwest, specifically Washington and Oregon, where clearcutting has been a common logging technique since the earliest days of the timber industry in the region. We analyzed twenty-nine interferograms of the Pacific Northwest in this study. The interferograms were processed using single-polarization Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired by the Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS). ALOS data is acquired at L-band (~24 cm), which provides high coherence in a region that is heavily forested and has high relief. Regions that have undergone clearcutting within the past 10 to 15 years are characterized in the interferograms by quasi-rectangular regions of line-of-sight phase change between clearcuts and the surrounding standing forest. This phase difference correlates linearly with interferometric baseline, allowing us to attribute the observed phase difference between clearcut areas and standing forest to an effective digital elevation model (DEM) error. By focusing only on the phase change over the short spatial scale between standing forest and adjacent regions that have been logged, we remove the effect of longer spatial scale atmospheric noise and satellite orbital errors. A ratio of Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) bands 2 and 7 (0.52-0.60 and 2.08-2.35 μm, respectively) was used to identify and remove areas that were logged during the timespan of the SAR data (2007 to 2011). We present a map of canopy height throughout the western coast of Oregon and Washington. Observed canopy heights are

  15. High-Resolution Regional Biomass Map of Siberia from Glas, Palsar L-Band Radar and Landsat Vcf Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G.; Ranson, K.; Montesano, P.; Zhang, Z.; Kharuk, V.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic-Boreal zone is known be warming at an accelerated rate relative to other biomes. The taiga or boreal forest covers over 16 x106 km2 of Arctic North America, Scandinavia, and Eurasia. A large part of the northern Boreal forests are in Russia's Siberia, as area with recent accelerated climate warming. During the last two decades we have been working on characterization of boreal forests in north-central Siberia using field and satellite measurements. We have published results of circumpolar biomass using field plots, airborne (PALS, ACTM) and spaceborne (GLAS) lidar data with ASTER DEM, LANDSAT and MODIS land cover classification, MODIS burned area and WWF's ecoregion map. Researchers from ESA and Russia have also been working on biomass (or growing stock) mapping in Siberia. For example, they developed a pan-boreal growing stock volume map at 1-kilometer scale using hyper-temporal ENVISAT ASAR ScanSAR backscatter data. Using the annual PALSAR mosaics from 2007 to 2010 growing stock volume maps were retrieved based on a supervised random forest regression approach. This method is being used in the ESA/Russia ZAPAS project for Central Siberia Biomass mapping. Spatially specific biomass maps of this region at higher resolution are desired for carbon cycle and climate change studies. In this study, our work focused on improving resolution ( 50 m) of a biomass map based on PALSAR L-band data and Landsat Vegetation Canopy Fraction products. GLAS data were carefully processed and screened using land cover classification, local slope, and acquisition dates. The biomass at remaining footprints was estimated using a model developed from field measurements at GLAS footprints. The GLAS biomass samples were then aggregated into 1 Mg/ha bins of biomass and mean VCF and PALSAR backscatter and textures were calculated for each of these biomass bins. The resulted biomass/signature data was used to train a random forest model for biomass mapping of entire region from 50o

  16. An observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) for the aquarius/SAC-D soil moisture product: An investigation of forward/retrieval model asymmetries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) for the Aquarius/SAC-D mission is being developed for assessing the accuracy of soil moisture retrieval from passive and active L band remote sensing. This OSSE is able to capture the influence of different error sources: land surface heterogeneity, i...

  17. Impact of the perturbation zonal velocity variation on the spatio/temporal occurrence pattern of L-band scintillation - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagiya, Mala; Pant, Tarun; Choudhary, Raj Kumar; Sunda, Surendra; Sridharan, R.

    2016-07-01

    The earlier evolved method for the forecast of the spatio-temporal variation of L-band scintillation based on the expected variation of the perturbations [Bagiya et al., 2014; Sridharan et al., 2014], under favorable ionospheric/thermospheric conditions, has been refined by duly accounting for the local time variation of the zonal velocity of the perturbations. The unique combination of the two geostationary satellites (GSAT-8 and GSAT-10) over the Indian zone has been used to estimate the typical LT dependence of the perturbation velocities by closely following identifiable features in the scintillation pattern. The measured velocities, that registered a steady decrease with the progression of night, had been shown to significantly alter the forecast pattern of the scintillations with respect to longitude and local time. The significant improvement in the forecast pattern has been demonstrated through a case study putting the forecast method on a firmer footing. References: Bagiya, M. S., R. Sridharan, S. Sunda, L. Jose, T. K. Pant and R. Chaudhary, Critical assessment of the forecasting capability of L-band scintillations over the magnetic equatorial region - Campaign results, J. Atmos. and Sol. Terr. Phys., 110-111, 15-20 2014 Sridharan, R., Mala S. Bagiya, Surendra Sunda, Rajkumar Choudhary, Tarun K. Pant, Lijo Jose, First results on forecasting the spatial occurrence pattern of L-band scintillation and its temporal evolution, J. Atmos. and Sol. Terr. Phys., 119, 53-62 2014

  18. Active Response Gravity Offload System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valle, Paul; Dungan, Larry; Cunningham, Thomas; Lieberman, Asher; Poncia, Dina

    2011-01-01

    The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) provides the ability to simulate with one system the gravity effect of planets, moons, comets, asteroids, and microgravity, where the gravity is less than Earth fs gravity. The system works by providing a constant force offload through an overhead hoist system and horizontal motion through a rail and trolley system. The facility covers a 20 by 40-ft (approximately equals 6.1 by 12.2m) horizontal area with 15 ft (approximately equals4.6 m) of lifting vertical range.

  19. Ocean Surface Emissivity at L-band (1.4 GHz): The Dependence on Salinity and Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Lang, R. H.; Wentz, F. J.; Meissner, T.

    2012-12-01

    A characterization of the emissivity of sea water at L-band is important for the remote sensing of sea surface salinity. Measurements of salinity are currently being made in the radio astronomy band at 1.413 GHz by ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and NASA's Aquarius instrument aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory. The goal of both missions is accuracy on the order of 0.2 psu. This requires accurate knowledge of the dielectric constant of sea water as a function of salinity and temperature and also the effect of waves (roughness). The former determines the emissivity of an ideal (i.e. flat) surface and the later is the major source of error from predictions based on a flat surface. These two aspects of the problem of characterizing the emissivity are being addressed in the context of the Aquarius mission. First, laboratory measurements are being made of the dielectric constant of sea water. This is being done at the George Washington University using a resonant cavity. In this technique, sea water of known salinity and temperature is fed into the cavity along its axis through a narrow tube. The sea water changes the resonant frequency and Q of the cavity which, if the sample is small enough, can be related to the dielectric constant of the sample. An extensive set of measurements have been conducted at 1.413 GHz to develop a model for the real and imaginary part of the dielectric constant as a function of salinity and temperature. The results are compared to the predictions of models based on parameterization of the Debye resonance of the water molecule. The models and measurements are close; however, the differences are significant for remote sensing of salinity. This is especially true at low temperatures where the sensitivity to salinity is lowest. Second, observations from Aquarius are being used to develop a model for the effect of wind-driven roughness (waves) on the emissivity in the open ocean. This is done by comparing the measured

  20. The JET Neutron Activation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquemore, A. L.; Bertalot, L.; Esposito, B.; Jarvis, O. N.; Loughlin, M. J.; Sadler, G.; van Belle, P.

    1997-11-01

    The JET activation system provides the absolute value of the neutron yields as well as a check on the linearity of other neutron detector systems. The total neutron yield is standardized to one irradiation end reentrant in the top of the vessel, while the results from the other seven irradiation ends are normalized to this standard end and provide redundancy as well as information on the plasma position. A pneumatic transfer system is used to transfer up to five capsules containing elemental foils for a single discharge on JET. Eleven different elemental foils have been utilized to determine the yields from both DD and DT plasmas. By placing several different foils with different activation energy thresholds in a single capsule for one DT discharge, neutron spectral information has been obtained by use of the SAND-II unfolding code. A description of the activation system hardware and calibration of the activation detector system will be presented along with the results from the DT neutron calibration campaign.

  1. Modeling approaches for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Sven; Atzrodt, Heiko; Mayer, Dirk; Thomaier, Martin

    2006-03-01

    To solve a wide range of vibration problems with the active structures technology, different simulation approaches for several models are needed. The selection of an appropriate modeling strategy is depending, amongst others, on the frequency range, the modal density and the control target. An active system consists of several components: the mechanical structure, at least one sensor and actuator, signal conditioning electronics and the controller. For each individual part of the active system the simulation approaches can be different. To integrate the several modeling approaches into an active system simulation and to ensure a highly efficient and accurate calculation, all sub models must harmonize. For this purpose, structural models considered in this article are modal state-space formulations for the lower frequency range and transfer function based models for the higher frequency range. The modal state-space formulations are derived from finite element models and/or experimental modal analyses. Consequently, the structure models which are based on transfer functions are directly derived from measurements. The transfer functions are identified with the Steiglitz-McBride iteration method. To convert them from the z-domain to the s-domain a least squares solution is implemented. An analytical approach is used to derive models of active interfaces. These models are transferred into impedance formulations. To couple mechanical and electrical sub-systems with the active materials, the concept of impedance modeling was successfully tested. The impedance models are enhanced by adapting them to adequate measurements. The controller design strongly depends on the frequency range and the number of modes to be controlled. To control systems with a small number of modes, techniques such as active damping or independent modal space control may be used, whereas in the case of systems with a large number of modes or with modes that are not well separated, other control

  2. The European Mobile System (EMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jongejans, A.; Rogard, R.; Mistretta, I.; Ananasso, F.

    1993-01-01

    The European Space Agency is presently procuring an L band payload in order to promote a regional European L band system coping with the specific needs of the European market. The payload, and the two communications systems to be supported, are described below. The potential market for EMS in Europe is discussed.

  3. The activation system EASY-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, R. A.; Kopecky, J.

    2009-04-01

    Safety and waste management of materials for ITER, IFMIF and future power plants require knowledge of the activation caused by irradiation with neutrons, or in the case of IFMIF, deuterons. The European Activation System has been developed for such calculations and a new version was released earlier this year. This contains a large amount of nuclear data in the European Activation File covering neutron-, deuteron- and proton-induced cross sections. These data are input to the FISPACT code for activation calculations. EASY-2007 is being validated using integral and differential measurements. However, only a minority of reactions have experimental support and a statistical method is described that can test the complete library. Importance diagrams are useful in finding the dominant nuclides formed following irradiation and the reactions responsible for their production. These diagrams now cover energies above 20 MeV and examples of new dominant nuclides and reactions relevant to IFMIF are given.

  4. Design and construction of a high charge and high current 1-1/2 cell L-Band RF photocathode gun.

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, M. E.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Power, J. G.; Schoessow, P.

    1999-03-26

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator has been successfully commissioned and used for conducting wakefield experiments in dielectric loaded structures and plasmas. Although the initial wakefield experiments were successful, higher drive beam quality would substantially improve the wakefield accelerating gradients. In this paper we present a new 1-1/2 cell L-band photocathode RF gun design. This gun will produce 10-100 nC beam with 2-5 ps rms pulse length and normalized emittance less than 100 mm mrad. The final gun design and numerical simulations of the beam dynamics are presented.

  5. Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array Type L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) mosaic for the Kahiltna terrane, Alaska, 2007-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, Christopher J.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Graham, Garth E.

    2015-01-01

    The USGS has compiled a continuous, cloud-free 12.5-meter resolution radar mosaic of SAR data of approximately 212,000 square kilometers to examine the suitability of this technology for geologic mapping. This mosaic was created from Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data collected from 2007 to 2010 spanning the Kahiltna terrane and the surrounding area. Interpretation of these data may help geologists understand past geologic processes and identify areas with potential for near-surface mineral resources for further ground-based geological and geochemical investigations.

  6. Retrieval of thin-ice thickness using the L-band polarization ratio measured by the helicopter-borne scatterometer HELISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Stefan; Gade, Martin; Haas, Christian; Pfaffling, Andreas

    Climate warming makes an increasing thin-ice fraction likely to occur in the Arctic, underpinning the need for its regular observation. Synchronous helicopter-borne measurements of the sea-ice thickness and like-polarized L-band radar backscatter carried out along identical flight tracks north of Svalbard during winter are combined to develop an algorithm to estimate the thin-ice thickness solely from the L-band backscatter co-polarization ratio (LCPR). Airborne ice-thickness and LCPR data are smoothed along track (to reduce noise), co-located and compared. A linear and a logarithmic fit are applied using thickness values between 0.0 and 0.6 m and 0.0 and 1.0 m, respectively. The thin-ice thickness is derived from the LCPR data using these fits, first for dependent data (used to obtain the fits) and subsequently for independent data. The results are compared to airborne ice-thickness measurements for ice-thickness values between 0.0 and 0.6 m using linear regression. The logarithmic fit gives the most reliable results, with a correlation of 0.72 and a rms difference of 8 cm. It permits us to derive the thickness of thin ice (below 50-60 cm thickness) from airborne LCPR data with an uncertainty of about 10 cm.

  7. Sea surface emissivity at L-band: results of the WInd and Salinity Experiments WISE 2000 and 2001 and preliminary results from FROG 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarino, Ramon; Camps, Adriano; Corbella, Ignasi; Vall-llossera, Merce; Duffo, Nuria; Torres, Francesc; Enrique, Luis; Miranda, Joge; Arenas, Juanjo; Font, Jordi; Julia, Agusti; Gabarro, Carolina; Etcheto, Jacqueline; Boutin, Jacqueline; Contardo, Stephanie; Weill, Alain; Rubio, Eva; Niclos, Raquel R.; Rivas, Raul; Caselles, Vicente; Wursteisen, Patrick; Berger, Michael; Neira, Manuel Martin

    2004-02-01

    Two field experiments named WISE (WInd and Salinity Experiment) were sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA) to better understand the wind and sea state effects on the L-band brightness temperatures. They took place at the Casablanca oil rig located in the North Mediterranean Sea, 40 km off shore the Ebro river delta: WISE 2000 from November 25 to December 18, 2000, and continued during the January 9 to 16, 2001, and WISE 2001 from October 23 to November 22, 2001. During the spring of 2003, under Spanish National funds, a third field experiment named FROG (Foam, Rain, Oil slicks and GPS reflectometry) took place at the Ebro river delta, to measure the phenomena that were not completely understood during the WISE field experiments, mainly the effect of foam and rain. In order to achieve the objectives of the WISE field experiments the LAURA L-band fully polarimetric radiometer from the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) was mounted on the Casablanca oil-rig at the 32 meters deck above the sea surface, pointing to the North and North-West, in the direction of the dominant winds. In this paper we present the results of the first study to determine the relationship between the brightness temperature and the sea state.

  8. Soil moisture retrieval using the time-series L-band radar observation over pasture fields through the inversion of radar scattering models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Tsang, L.; Xu, X.; Johnson, J.; Njoku, E. G.

    2011-12-01

    A time-series algorithm was developed to retrieve surface (from surface down to ~5 cm depth) soil moisture over pasture fields using airborne L-band real aperture radar observations. Our goal is to develop and assess algorithms for global soil moisture retrieval at 3 km spatial resolution by the Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP)* mission (due for launch in 2014). To systematically separate the effect of soil moisture from those of surface roughness and vegetation, the proposed retrieval algorithm inverts a state-of-the-art forward model for radar scattering from vegetation covered soil surfaces intended to model pasture fields. Time-series measurements of HH and VV radar backscatter coefficients are used as inputs. In addition to soil moisture, the roughness of the soil surface and vegetation water content are retrieved through a least-square minimization. A constraint that the surface roughness is time-invariant resolves ambiguities in the soil moisture solution search. The proposed algorithm is applied to airborne and ground measurements from the Southern Great Plains 1999 campaign in the Little Washita watershed region, Chichasha, Oklahoma. In the area, the in situ soil moisture varied from 0.05 to 0.3 cm3/cm3 and the vegetation water content is ~0.5 kg/m2. With 6 time-series inputs spanning a 12-day period, the rmse of the retrieved soil moisture is 0.054 cm3/cm3. The retrieval of the vegetation water content effectively corrects for differences in radar backscatter between observations and predictions of the scattering model. A more conventional approach, a snapshot method, performs the retrieval using radar acquisitions at each time instance independently. For comparison, the snapshot algorithm is applied to the same data set using the lookup table of the same scattering model. The rmse of the snapshot method is 0.11 cm3/cm3. The large rmse is attributed to the lack of the time-invariant roughness constraint in the snapshot method. We conclude that soil

  9. Forest above ground biomass estimation and forest/non-forest classification for Odisha, India, using L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, M.; Kiran Chand, T. R.; Fararoda, R.; Jha, C. S.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Tropical forests contribute to approximately 40 % of the total carbon found in terrestrial biomass. In this context, forest/non-forest classification and estimation of forest above ground biomass over tropical regions are very important and relevant in understanding the contribution of tropical forests in global biogeochemical cycles, especially in terms of carbon pools and fluxes. Information on the spatio-temporal biomass distribution acts as a key input to Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation Plus (REDD+) action plans. This necessitates precise and reliable methods to estimate forest biomass and to reduce uncertainties in existing biomass quantification scenarios. The use of backscatter information from a host of allweather capable Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems during the recent past has demonstrated the potential of SAR data in forest above ground biomass estimation and forest / nonforest classification. In the present study, Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) / Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) data along with field inventory data have been used in forest above ground biomass estimation and forest / non-forest classification over Odisha state, India. The ALOSPALSAR 50 m spatial resolution orthorectified and radiometrically corrected HH/HV dual polarization data (digital numbers) for the year 2010 were converted to backscattering coefficient images (Schimada et al., 2009). The tree level measurements collected during field inventory (2009-'10) on Girth at Breast Height (GBH at 1.3 m above ground) and height of all individual trees at plot (plot size 0.1 ha) level were converted to biomass density using species specific allometric equations and wood densities. The field inventory based biomass estimations were empirically integrated with ALOS-PALSAR backscatter coefficients to derive spatial forest above ground biomass estimates for the study area. Further, The Support Vector Machines (SVM) based Radial

  10. Volcanic activity of Io observed in December 2001 with the Keck AO system: 2-5μ m sunlit and eclipse observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, F.; de Pater, I.; Le Mignant, D.; Roe, H.; Fusco, T.; Graham, J. R.; Prange, R.; Macintosh, B.; Keck Science Team

    2002-09-01

    Volcanically active Io remains a mysterious and intriguing moon, despite numerous spacecraft flybys. Groundbased monitoring programs help characterize the time evolution of Io's volcanic activity, such as the frequency, spatial distribution and temperature of hot spots and outbursts. The satellite was observed intensively in December 2001 with the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) system and its recently installed near-infrared camera NIRC2. The spatial resolution after applying the MISTRAL myopic deconvolution method (130 km in K band and 200 km in L band) is better than that of the global images from the Galileo/NIMS instrument. A movie produced from 12 pictures taken every 30o in Ionian longitude provides a complete survey of Io's surface during one full rotation. A total of 26 active hot spots were detected in L band (3.8μ m), and approximatively three times more in M band (4.7μ m). One active hot spot is seen in K band (2.2μ m) in the Pele area. While Io is in Jupiter's shadow, it is invisible to the wavefront sensor, but its hot spots are easily visible in the near-infrared. We imaged Io during the 18 Dec. 2001 eclipse using Ganymede (30" from Io, moving relative to Io at 0.5"/min) as a reference source. Although isoplanatic effects limited AO performance, numerous spots are detected at both K' and L'. We will show the results of detailed studies (temperature, emission area, nature) for several of the hot spots. Keck Science team is composed of S. Kwok, P. Amico, R. Campbell, F. Chaffee, A. Conrad, A. Contos, B. Goodrich, G. Hill, D. Sprayberry, P. Stomski, P. Wizinowich (W.M. Keck Observatory). This work has been supported in part by the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, managed by the University of California at Santa Cruz under cooperative agreement No. AST-9876783.

  11. Application of the Strong Scatter Theory to the Interpretation of Ionospheric Scintillation Measurements along Geostationary Satellite Links at VHF and L-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrano, C. S.; Groves, K. M.; Basu, S.; Mackenzie, E.; Sheehan, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    In a previous work, we demonstrated that ionospheric turbulence parameters may be inferred from amplitude scintillations well into in the strong scatter regime [Carrano et al., International Journal of Geophysics, 2012]. This technique, called Iterative Parameter Estimation (IPE), uses the strong scatter theory and numerical inversion to estimate the parameters of an ionospheric phase screen (turbulent intensity, phase spectral index, and irregularity zonal drift) consistent with the observed scintillations. The optimal screen parameters are determined such that the theoretical intensity spectrum on the ground best matches the measured intensity spectrum in a least squares sense. We use this technique to interpret scintillation measurements collected during a campaign at Ascension Island (7.96°S, 14.41°W) in March 2000, led by Santimay Basu and his collaborators from Air Force Research Laboratory. Geostationary satellites broadcasting radio signals at VHF and L-band were monitored along nearly co-linear links, enabling a multi-frequency analysis of scintillations with the same propagation geometry. The VHF data were acquired using antennas spaced in the magnetic east-west direction, which enabled direct measurement of the zonal irregularity drift. We show that IPE analysis of the VHF and L-Band scintillations, which exhibited very different statistics due to the wide frequency separation, yields similar estimates of the phase screen parameters that specify the disturbed ionospheric medium. This agreement provides confidence in our phase screen parameter estimates. It also suggests a technique for extrapolating scintillation measurements to frequencies other than those observed that is valid in the case of strong scatter. We find that IPE estimates of the zonal irregularity drift, made using scintillation observations along single space-to-ground link, are consistent with those measured independently using the spaced antenna technique. This encouraging result

  12. Investigating Baseline, Alternative and Copula-based Algorithm for combining Airborne Active and Passive Microwave Observations in the SMAP Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, C.; Lorenz, C.; Jagdhuber, T.; Laux, P.; Hajnsek, I.; Kunstmann, H.; Entekhabi, D.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the NASA Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) mission is to provide global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw states. SMAP integrates L-band radar and radiometer instruments as a single observation system combining the respective strengths of active and passive remote sensing for enhanced soil moisture mapping. Airborne instruments will be a key part of the SMAP validation program. Here, we present an airborne campaign in the Rur catchment, Germany, in which the passive L-band system Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR2) and the active L-band system F-SAR of DLR were flown simultaneously on the same platform on six dates in 2013. The flights covered the full heterogeneity of the area under investigation, i.e. all types of land cover and experimental monitoring sites with in situ sensors. Here, we used the obtained data sets as a test-bed for the analysis of three active-passive fusion techniques: A) The SMAP baseline algorithm: Disaggregation of passive microwave brightness temperature by active microwave backscatter and subsequent inversion to soil moisture, B), the SMAP alternative algorithm: Estimation of soil moisture by passive sensor data and subsequent disaggregation by active sensor backscatter and C) Copula-based combination of active and passive microwave data. For method C empirical Copulas were generated and theoretical Copulas fitted both on the level of the raw products brightness temperature and backscatter as well as two soil moisture products. Results indicate that the regression parameters for method A and B are dependent on the radar vegetation index (RVI). Similarly, for method C the best performance was gained by generating separate Copulas for individual land use classes. For more in-depth analyses longer time series are necessary as can obtained by airborne campaigns, therefore, the methods will be applied to SMAP data.

  13. Active thermal control system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petete, Patricia A.; Ames, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    The 'restructured' baseline of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) has eliminated many of the growth options for the Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). Modular addition of baseline technology to increase heat rejection will be extremely difficult. The system design and the available real estate no longer accommodate this type of growth. As the station matures during its thirty years of operation, a demand of up to 165 kW of heat rejection can be expected. The baseline configuration will be able to provide 82.5 kW at Eight Manned Crew Capability (EMCC). The growth paths necessary to reach 165 kW have been identified. Doubling the heat rejection capability of SSF will require either the modification of existing radiator wings or the attachment of growth structure to the baseline truss for growth radiator wing placement. Radiator performance can be improved by enlarging the surface area or by boosting the operating temperature with a heat pump. The optimal solution will require both modifications. The addition of growth structure would permit the addition of a parallel ATCS using baseline technology. This growth system would simplify integration. The feasibility of incorporating these growth options to improve the heat rejection capacity of SSF is under evaluation.

  14. An approach to effective UHF (S/L band) data communications for satellite Personal Communication Service (PCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayase, Joshua Y.

    1995-01-01

    Reliable signaling information transfer is fundamental in supporting the needs of data communication PCS via LMS (Land Mobile Service) SSs (satellite systems). The needs of the system designer can be satisfied only through the collection of media information that can be brought to bear on the pertinent design issues. We at ISI hope to continue our dialogue with fading media experts to address the unique data communications needs of PCS via LMS SSs.

  15. Per-point and per-field contextual classification of multipolarization and multiple incidence angle aircraft L-band radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, Roger M.; Hussin, Yousif Ali

    1989-01-01

    Multipolarized aircraft L-band radar data are classified using two different image classification algorithms: (1) a per-point classifier, and (2) a contextual, or per-field, classifier. Due to the distinct variations in radar backscatter as a function of incidence angle, the data are stratified into three incidence-angle groupings, and training and test data are defined for each stratum. A low-pass digital mean filter with varied window size (i.e., 3x3, 5x5, and 7x7 pixels) is applied to the data prior to the classification. A predominately forested area in northern Florida was the study site. The results obtained by using these image classifiers are then presented and discussed.

  16. Refinement of the background ionospheric conditions and plausible explanation based on neutral dynamics for the occurrence/non-occurrence of L-band scintillation patches against forecast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, R.; Jose, Lijo; Bagiya, Mala S.; Sunda, Surendra; Chaudhary, R. K.; Pant, Tarun K.

    2015-10-01

    The recently evolved L-band scintillation forecast mechanism based on the characteristic features of the daytime F-region electron density fluctuations and also on the basic ionospheric conditions had been successful to a reasonable extent in forecasting the spatio-temporal map of scintillation patches. There had been a few non-compliances in the expected pattern within/outside the forecast windows. The present paper attempts to address such non-compliances and offers a plausible explanation based on neutral dynamics, especially the local time variation of vertical winds over the magnetic equator, while at the same time refining the earlier stipulated background ionospheric conditions. With the above refinements, it is anticipated that the forecast mechanism would become very robust. The present results highlight the importance of the neutral dynamical parameters and the urgent need to concentrate on the efforts to make systematic measurements of the same in order to characterize their variability.

  17. Equatorial scintillation of satellite signals at uhf and l-band for two different elevation angles. Technical report 1 Jan 79-1 May 80

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, M.R.

    1980-05-01

    An investigation of the equatorial scintillation of satellite signals at uhf and L-band for 10-and 50-degree elevation angles is reported. diurnal and seasonal variations of scintillation, as well as solar cycle dependence, are given. The occurrence and intensity of scintillations are compared for the two frequencies and for the two elevation angles. A number of fade duration distributions for fades greater than 6 and greater than 12 dB below the undisturbed signal are shown for each frequency and each satellite. A periodicity in the occurrence of scintillation is reported and is attributed to the gravitation field of the moon. It is proposed that the moon's gravity affects the occurrence and intensity of equatorial scintillation by modulating the velocity of the zonal winds at ionospheric heights.

  18. Implications of RFI at L-Band on Passive Microwave Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture from Space: Experience with ESTAR During SGP97

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.

    2000-01-01

    Passive microwave remote sensing in the protected band at 1.413 GHz (L-band) is important for monitoring parameters of the ocean and land surface such as soil moisture and sea surface salinity. These parameters are needed for understanding energy exchange between the surface and atmosphere and therefore are important for improving our understanding of weather and climate change. Although the band at 1.413 GHz is protected for passive use, airborne radiometers experience problems with RFI. For example, during the Southern Great Plains Experiment (1997) the ESTAR radiometer experienced significant RFI associated with airports, presumably air traffic control radar. This is a potential problem for future sensors in space planned for remote sensing of the earth surface in this frequency band.

  19. Ground-Based Passive Microwave Remote Sensing Observations of Soil Moisture at S and L Band with Insight into Measurement Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Crosson, William L.; Jackson, Thomas J.; Manu, Andrew; Tsegaye, Teferi D.; Soman, V.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Accurate estimates of spatially heterogeneous algorithm variables and parameters are required in determining the spatial distribution of soil moisture using radiometer data from aircraft and satellites. A ground-based experiment in passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture was conducted in Huntsville, Alabama from July 1-14, 1996 to study retrieval algorithms and their sensitivity to variable and parameter specification. With high temporal frequency observations at S and L band, we were able to observe large scale moisture changes following irrigation and rainfall events, as well as diurnal behavior of surface moisture among three plots, one bare, one covered with short grass and another covered with alfalfa. The L band emitting depth was determined to be on the order of 0-3 or 0-5 cm below 0.30 cubic centimeter/cubic centimeter with an indication of a shallower emitting depth at higher moisture values. Surface moisture behavior was less apparent on the vegetated plots than it was on the bare plot because there was less moisture gradient and because of difficulty in determining vegetation water content and estimating the vegetation b parameter. Discrepancies between remotely sensed and gravimetric, soil moisture estimates on the vegetated plots point to an incomplete understanding of the requirements needed to correct for the effects of vegetation attenuation. Quantifying the uncertainty in moisture estimates is vital if applications are to utilize remotely-sensed soil moisture data. Computations based only on the real part of the complex dielectric constant and/or an alternative dielectric mixing model contribute a relatively insignificant amount of uncertainty to estimates of soil moisture. Rather, the retrieval algorithm is much more sensitive to soil properties, surface roughness and biomass.

  20. A Study of Radio Frequency Interference in the Space-to- Earth Exploration Allocation at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belz, J. Eric; Huneycutt, Bryan L.; Michael W., Spence

    2011-01-01

    We report on ongoing studies of the anthropogenic radio frequency interference (RFI) in the Lband allocation for space-to-Earth exploration.1,2 The studies are being conducted for the radar instrument on the proposed Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission. A review of the allocated emitters is presented, followed by analysis based on space-borne and airborne data collected from the PALSAR sensor and the UAVSAR sensor. We use these data to model the pulsed RFI environment for SMAP and to demonstrate that the baseline plans for RFI mitigation are technically sound.

  1. Murine in vivo L-band ESR spin-label oximetry with a loop-gap resonator.

    PubMed

    Subczynski, W K; Lukiewicz, S; Hyde, J S

    1986-10-01

    Small mice (approximately 20 g) were anesthetized and placed in a loop-gap resonator of diameter 25 mm resonating at 1.1 GHz. An oxygen-permeable capsule containing 2.5 X 10(-2) M perdeutero 15N TEMPONE (1-oxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone) in light paraffin oil was implanted in the peritoneal cavity. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra from the capsule are sensitive to the concentration of dissolved oxygen and calibration curves are given. The oxygen concentration was found to rise from a value close to zero when the animal breathes air to a level of 220 microM when the animal breaths pure oxygen. It is speculated that this surprisingly high level is related to the effect of the anesthetic on the cardiovascular system. Encapsulation provides a barrier to spin-label reductants and to paramagnetic metal ions that might confound the spin-label oximetric measurements. PMID:3023786

  2. Manually controlled neutron-activation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, R. A.; Carothers, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A manually controlled neutron activation system, the Manual Reactor Activation System, was designed and built and has been operating at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. With this system, samples can be irradiated for up to 24 hours and pneumatically transferred to a shielded repository for decay until their activity is low enough for them to be handled at a radiobench. The Manual Reactor Activation System was built to provide neutron activation of solid waste forms for the Alternative Waste Forms Leach Testing Program. Neutron activation of the bulk sample prior to leaching permits sensitive multielement radiometric analyses of the leachates.

  3. Wave activated power generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Y.

    1983-08-09

    A wave activated power generation system of the float type is disclosed, comprising at least one piston-cylinder device having an anchored cylinder and a piston slidable in the cylinder and cooperating with the cylinder to form a pumping chamber above the piston and a low pressure chamber below the piston. The cylinder has an intake port and an exhaust port both formed at an upper port thereof to communicate with the pumping chamber and each provided with a check valve. A float is connected through a cable to the piston of the piston- cylinder device. A pair of fluid storages are connected to the intake port and the exhaust port of the pumping chamber, respectively. A waterwheel generator is driven by the fluid flowing from one of the fluid storages to another. A pressure regulating device is connected to the low pressure chamber so as to maintain the low pressure chamber at a pressure lower than the pressure in the pumping chamber, the difference in pressure ceaselessly applying a downward force on the piston to keep the cable in a tensed condition.

  4. A First-Order Radiative Transfer Model for Microwave Radiometry of Forest Canopies at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; Lang, Roger H.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Jackson, Thomas J.; Cosh, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a new first-order radiative transfer (RT) model is developed to more accurately account for vegetation canopy scattering by modifying the basic r-co model (the zero-order RT solution). In order to optimally utilize microwave radiometric data in soil moisture (SM) retrievals over moderately to densely vegetated landscapes, a quantitative understanding of the relationship between scattering mechanisms within vegetation canopies and the microwave brightness temperature is desirable. A first-order RT model is used to investigate this relationship and to perform a physical analysis of the scattered and emitted radiation from vegetated terrain. The new model is based on an iterative solution (successive orders of scattering) of the RT equations up to the first order. This formulation adds a new scattering term to the i-w model. The additional term represents emission by particles (vegetation components) in the vegetation layer and emission by the ground that is scattered once by particles in the layer. The new model is tested against 1.4 GHz brightness temperature measurements acquired over deciduous trees by a truck-mounted microwave instrument system called ComRAD in 2007. The model predictions are in good agreement with the data and they give quantitative understanding for the influence of first-order scattering within the canopy on the brightness temperature. The model results show that the scattering term is significant for trees and modifications are necessary to the T-w model when applied to dense vegetation. Numerical simulations also indicate that the scattering term has a negligible dependence on SM and is mainly a function of the angle and polarization of the microwave observation.

  5. A First-Order Radiative Transfer Model for Microwave Radiometry of Forest Canopies at L-Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurum, Mehmet; Lang, Roger H.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Joseph, Alicia T.; Jackson, Thomas J.; Cosh, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a first-order radiative transfer (RT) model is developed to more accurately account for vegetation canopy scattering by modifying the basic Tau-Omega model (the zero-order RT solution). In order to optimally utilize microwave radiometric data in soil moisture (SM) retrievals over vegetated landscapes, a quantitative understanding of the relationship between scattering mechanisms within vegetation canopies and the microwave brightness temperature is desirable. The first-order RT model is used to investigate this relationship and to perform a physical analysis of the scattered and emitted radiation from vegetated terrain. This model is based on an iterative solution (successive orders of scattering) of the RT equations up to the first order. This formulation adds a new scattering term to the . model. The additional term represents emission by particles (vegetation components) in the vegetation layer and emission by the ground that is scattered once by particles in the layer. The model is tested against 1.4-GHz brightness temperature measurements acquired over deciduous trees by a truck-mounted microwave instrument system called ComRAD in 2007. The model predictions are in good agreement with the data, and they give quantitative understanding for the influence of first-order scattering within the canopy on the brightness temperature. The model results show that the scattering term is significant for trees and modifications are necessary to the . model when applied to dense vegetation. Numerical simulations also indicate that the scattering term has a negligible dependence on SM and is mainly a function of the incidence angle and polarization of the microwave observation. Index Terms Emission,microwave radiometry, scattering, soil, vegetation.

  6. Soil moisture, dielectric permittivity and emissivity of soil: effective depth of emission measured by the L-band radiometer ELBARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lukowski, Mateusz; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Jerzy; Lipiec, Jerzy; Rojek, Edyta; Slominska, Ewa; Slominski, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Due to the large variation of soil moisture in space and in time, obtaining soil water balance with an aid of data acquired from the surface is still a challenge. Microwave remote sensing is widely used to determine the water content in soil. It is based on the fact that the dielectric constant of the soil is strongly dependent on its water content. This method provides the data in both local and global scales. Very important issue that is still not solved, is the soil depth at which radiometer "sees" the incoming radiation and how this "depth of view" depends on water content and physical properties of soil. The microwave emission comes from its entire profile, but much of this energy is absorbed by the upper layers of soil. As a result, the contribution of each layer to radiation visible for radiometer decreases with depth. The thickness of the surface layer, which significantly contributes to the energy measured by the radiometer is defined as the "penetration depth". In order to improve the physical base of the methodology of soil moisture measurements using microwave remote sensing and to determine the effective emission depth seen by the radiometer, a new algorithm was developed. This algorithm determines the reflectance coefficient from Fresnel equations, and, what is new, the complex dielectric constant of the soil, calculated from the Usowicz's statistical-physical model (S-PM) of dielectric permittivity and conductivity of soil. The model is expressed in terms of electrical resistance and capacity. The unit volume of soil in the model consists of solid, water and air, and is treated as a system made up of spheres, filling volume by overlapping layers. It was assumed that connections between layers and spheres in the layer are represented by serial and parallel connections of "resistors" and "capacitors". The emissivity of the soil surface is calculated from the ratio between the brightness temperature measured by the ELBARA radiometer (GAMMA Remote

  7. Assessment of Decadal Change in North American Wetlands Based on JERS and PALSAR Space-Based L-band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitcomb, J.; Moghaddam, M.; McDonald, K. C.; Podest, E.; Chapman, B. D.

    2010-12-01

    Northern wetlands are believed to have sequestered about one third of the total global pool of soil carbon. With warmer, drier conditions occurring throughout the arctic as a consequence of global warming, they have the potential to evolve into major sources of atmospheric carbon. The ability to characterize long-term changes in the condition of northern wetlands is therefore essential to the development of accurate global carbon budgets. Space-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) produces high-resolution imagery of vast inaccessible regions regardless of clouds or solar illumination. Especially at L-band, it presents a unique tool for monitoring changes in the characteristics of vegetated wetlands due to its inherent ability to sense vegetation structure and moisture content, biomass, and standing water underneath vegetation canopies. We have, therefore, been using L-band SAR imagery from two different spaceborne sensors separated in time by approximately one decade, JERS and PALSAR, to produce a thematic map of change in the types and extent of wetlands in Alaska and Canada. Two-season JERS imagery characterizes the wetlands status for the 1997 time frame while dual-polarized PALSAR imagery captures the wetlands status for the 2007 time frame. The SAR imagery is supplemented with ancillary information such as texture, image collection dates, slope, and latitude. The classification algorithm applied to each set of imagery is based upon the Random Forests technique. To classify, it first forms a multitude of decision trees based on characteristics of the imagery and ancillary data within designated training regions, then assigns each pixel in the raster to the wetlands class chosen for that pixel by the most decision trees. We have been generating a PALSAR-based wetlands map of Alaska along with an associated JERS-to-PALSAR decadal change map. We have also been extending our JERS-based wetlands map into Canada. Since our classifications are based on SAR, ancillary

  8. What Is an Activity? Appropriating an Activity-Centric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarosh, Svetlana; Matthews, Tara; Moran, Thomas P.; Smith, Barton

    Activity-Centric Computing (ACC) systems seek to address the fragmentation of office work across tools and documents by allowing users to organize work around the computational construct of an Activity. Defining and structuring appropriate Activities within a system poses a challenge for users that must be overcome in order to benefit from ACC support. We know little about how knowledge workers appropriate the Activity construct. To address this, we studied users’ appropriation of a production-quality ACC system, Lotus Activities, for everyday work by employees in a large corporation. We contribute to a better understanding of how users articulate their individual and collaborative work in the system by providing empirical evidence of their patterns of appropriation. We conclude by discussing how our findings can inform the design of other ACC systems for the workplace.

  9. Surface deformation associated with the March 1996 earthquake swarm at Akutan Island, Alaska, revealed by C-band ERS and L-band JERS radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Wicks, C., Jr.; Kwoun, O.; Power, J.A.; Dzurisin, D.

    2005-01-01

    In March 1996, an intense earthquake swarm beneath Akutan Island, Alaska, was accompanied by extensive ground cracking but no eruption of Akutan volcano. Radar interferograms produced from L-band JERS-1 and C-band ERS-1/2 images show uplift associated with the swarm by as much as 60 cm on the western part of the island. The JERS-1 interferogram has greater coherence, especially in areas with loose surface material or thick vegetation. It also shows subsidence of similar magnitude on the eastern part of the island and displacements along faults reactivated during the swarm. The axis of uplift and subsidence strikes about N70??W, which is roughly parallel to a zone of fresh cracks on the northwest flank of the volcano, to normal faults that cut the island and to the inferred maximum compressive stress direction. A common feature of models that fit the deformation is the emplacement of a shallow dike along this trend beneath the northwest flank of the volcano. Both before and after the swarm, the northwest flank was uplifted 5-20 mm/year relative to the southwest flank, probably by magma intrusion. The zone of fresh cracks subsided about 20 mm during 1996-1997 and at lesser rates thereafter, possibly because of cooling and degassing of the intrusion. ?? 2005 CASI.

  10. Characteristics of a transient axial mode from the formation of anode plasma in a gigawatt-class L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Sun-Hong; Kwon, Ohjoon; Sattorov, Matlabjon; Jung, Hoechun; Shin, Sang-Ho; Baek, In-Keun; Kim, Seontae; Park, Seunghyuk; Park, Gun-Sik

    2016-06-01

    An experimental result of a gigawatt-class L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) shows the generation of a transient axial mode pertaining to an anode plasma effect in the circuit of the MILO. The transient axial mode between the desired π mode and the 5 π / 6 mode causes the output power to become eccentric. When the electrons impact onto the metallic surface, plasma exists on the surface of the anode due to the electron-impact distortion process. As a result, the anode plasma causes the emitted current to increase the neutralization near the cathode. The increase of the current induces faster and stronger magnetic insulation, which lowers the drift velocity and suppresses the mode earlier during the beam pulse. After the 5 π / 6 mode, which initially interacts with the electron beam, remains as a transient axial mode for a very short time, it shows the capability to convert to the π mode, which is more stable and slowly grows.

  11. Urban change detection with polarimetric Advanced Land Observing Satellite phased array type L-band synthetic aperture radar data: a case study of Tai'an, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinyan; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Yong; Wang, He; Liao, Mingsheng

    2013-01-01

    Change detection in Tai'an city of eastern China using a pair of qual-polarimetric Advanced Land Observing Satellite phased array type L-band synthetic aperture radar (ALOS PALSAR) data was studied. The procedures consisted of polarimetric features extraction, optimal polarimetric feature group selection, supervised classification, and result accuracy assessment. Feature extraction from PALSAR data was performed first, and then the polarimetric features were categorized into several groups. Polarimetric optimum index factor (POIF) and distance factor (DF) were selected to measure and evaluate the suitability of each feature group for urban change detection. The best group of features was identified including linear polarization correlation coefficient (ρ), right-left (R-L) circular polarization correlation coefficient (ρ), total power (TP), and cross-polarization isolation (XPI). Afterward, four difference images of the identified features extracted from the two PALSAR data were derived, respectively. Then, the random forest (RF) classifier was employed to perform a supervised classification of the four difference images. Three classes were quantified, including no-change, change from undeveloped area to developed area, and vice versa. The overall accuracy of change detection was about 84% and Cohen's Kappa coefficient was 0.71. Consequently, satisfactory outcomes were obtained in the application of the polarimetric ALOS PALSAR data of moderate resolution in detecting urban land use and land cover type changes.

  12. On the use of L-band multipolarization airborne SAR for surveys of crops, vineyards, and orchards in a California irrigated agricultural region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    The airborne L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) collected multipolarization calibrated image data over an irrigated agricultural test site near Fresno, CA, on March 6, 1984. The conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) the effects of incidence angle on the measured backscattering coefficients could be removed by using a correction factor equal to the secant of the angle raised to the 1.4 power, (2) for this scene and time of year, the various polarization channels were highly correlated such that the use of more than one polarization added little to the ability of the radar to discriminate vegetation type or condition; the exception was barley which separated from vineyards only when a combination of like and cross polarization data were used (polarization was very useful for corn identification in fall crops), (3) an excellent separation between herbaceous vegetation (alfalfa, barley, and oats) or bare fields and trees in orchards existed in brightness was well correlated to alfalfa height or biomass, especially for the HH polarization combination, (5) vineyards exhibited a narrow range of brightnesses with no systematic effects of type or number of stakes nor of number of wires in the trellises nor of the size of the vines, (6) within the orchard classes, areal biomass characterized by basal area differences caused radar image brightness differences for small to medium trees but not for medium to large trees.

  13. Data base management systems activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Data Management System-1100 is designed to operate in conjunction with the UNIVAC 1100 Series Operating System on any 1100 Series computer. DMS-1100 is divided into the following four major software components: (1) Data Definition Languages (DDL); (2) Data Management Routine (DMR); (3) Data Manipulation Languages (DML); and (4) Data Base Utilities (DBU). These software components are described in detail.

  14. Orbiter active thermal control system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief description of the Orbiter Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) including (1) major functional requirements of heat load, temperature control and heat sink utilization, (2) the overall system arrangement, and (3) detailed description of the elements of the ATCS.

  15. Experiment system of LAMOST active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiangqun; Su, Ding; Li, Guoping; Yao, Zhengqiu; Zhang, Zhengcao; Li, Yeping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, You; Xu, Xinqi; Wang, Hai

    2004-10-01

    Active optics is the most difficult part in LAMOST project. Especially for the segmented reflecting Schmidt plate Ma, in which both segmented mirror active optics and thin mirror (or deformable mirror) active optics are applied. To test and optimize the thin mirror active optics of Ma, and to approach the reality of operating environment of the telescope, an outdoor experiment system has been established. This experiment system is also a `small LAMOST" with one sub-mirror of the primary mirror Mb and one sub-mirror of the Schmidt plate Ma, and with full scale in spacing (40 meters) between Ma and Mb. many parts of LAMOST were tested in the experiment system except segmented mirror active optics. Especially for force actuators, thin mirror support system, friction driving of the alt-azimuth mounting and its control system, wave front test along such a long optical path. This paper presents the experiment system, research and developments, and some experiment results.

  16. Modeling Cytoskeletal Active Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Robert

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many important cellular processes. One of the most important microtubule-motor protein assemblies is the mitotic spindle, a self-organized active liquid-crystalline structure that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. Although the spindle has been intensively studied for decades, the physical principles that govern its self-organization and function remain mysterious. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, I investigate course-grained models of active liquid-crystalline networks composed of microtubules, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of active crosslinks, modeled as hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. This model is investigated using a combination of brownian dynamics and kinetic monte carlo simulation. I have further refined this model to simulate spindle formation and kinetochore capture in the fission yeast S. pombe. I then make predictions for experimentally realizable perturbations in motor protein presence and function in S. pombe.

  17. High speed hybrid active system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Ignacio F.; Chang, Fu-Kuo; Qing, Peter X.; Kumar, Amrita; Zhang, David

    2005-05-01

    A novel piezoelectric/fiber-optic system is developed for long-term health monitoring of aerospace vehicles and structures. The hybrid diagnostic system uses the piezoelectric actuators to input a controlled excitation to the structure and the fiber optic sensors to capture the corresponding structural response. The aim of the system is to detect changes in structures such as those found in aerospace applications (damage, cracks, aging, etc.). This system involves the use of fiber Bragg gratings, which may be either bonded to the surface of the material or embedded within it in order to detect the linear strain component produced by the excitation waves generate by an arbitrary waveform generator. Interrogation of the Bragg gratings is carried out using a high speed fiber grating demodulation unit and a high speed data acquisition card to provide actuation input. With data collection and information processing; is able to determine the condition of the structure. The demands on a system suitable for detecting ultrasonic acoustic waves are different than for the more common strain and temperature systems. On the one hand, the frequency is much higher, with typical values for ultrasonic frequencies used in non-destructive testing ranging from 100 kHz up to several MHz. On the other hand, the related strain levels are much lower, normally in the μstrain range. Fiber-optic solutions for this problem do exist and are particularly attractive for ultrasonic sensing as the sensors offer broadband detection capability.

  18. SEARCHING FOR YOUNG JUPITER ANALOGS AROUND AP COL: L-BAND HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING OF THE CLOSEST PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Avenhaus, Henning; Meyer, Michael R.; Crepp, Justin R.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Janson, Markus

    2012-08-01

    The nearby M-dwarf AP Col was recently identified by Riedel et al. as a pre-main-sequence star (age 12-50 Myr) situated only 8.4 pc from the Sun. The combination of its youth, distance, and intrinsically low luminosity make it an ideal target to search for extrasolar planets using direct imaging. We report deep adaptive optics observations of AP Col taken with VLT/NACO and Keck/NIRC2 in the L band. Using aggressive speckle suppression and background subtraction techniques, we are able to rule out companions with mass m {>=} 0.5-1 M{sub Jup} for projected separations a > 4.5 AU, and m {>=} 2 M{sub Jup} for projected separations as small as 3 AU, assuming an age of 40 Myr using the COND theoretical evolutionary models. Using a different set of models, the mass limits increase by a factor of {approx}>2. The observations presented here are the deepest mass-sensitivity limits yet achieved within 20 AU on a star with direct imaging. While Doppler radial velocity surveys have shown that Jovian bodies with close-in orbits are rare around M-dwarfs, gravitational microlensing studies predict that 17{sup +6}{sub -9}% of these stars host massive planets with orbital separations of 1-10 AU. Sensitive high-contrast imaging observations, like those presented here, will help to validate results from complementary detection techniques by determining the frequency of gas giant planets on wide orbits around M-dwarfs.

  19. Gold Mineral Prospecting Using Phased Array Type L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (palsar) Satellite Remote Sensing Data, Central Gold Belt, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiranvand Pour, Amin; Hashim, Mazlan

    2016-06-01

    The Bentong-Raub Suture Zone (BRSZ) of Peninsular Malaysia is one of the significant structural zones in Sundaland, Southeast Asia. It forms the boundary between the Gondwana-derived Sibumasu terrane in the west and Sukhothai arc in the east. The BRSZ is also genetically related to the sediment-hosted/orogenic gold deposits associated with the major lineaments and form-lines in the central gold belt Central Gold Belt of Peninsular Malaysia. In tropical environments, heavy tropical rainforest and intense weathering makes it impossible to map geological structures over long distances. Advances in remote sensing technology allow the application of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data in geological structural analysis for tropical environments. In this investigation, the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) satellite remote sensing data were used to analyse major geological structures in Peninsular Malaysia and provide detailed characterization of lineaments and form-lines in the BRSZ, as well as its implication for sediment-hosted/orogenic gold exploration in tropical environments. The major geological structure directions of the BRSZ are N-S, NNE-SSW, NE-SW and NW-SE, which derived from directional filtering analysis to PALSAR data. The pervasive array of N-S faults in the study area and surrounding terrain is mainly linked to the N-S trending of the Suture Zone. N-S striking lineaments are often cut by younger NE-SW and NW-SE-trending lineaments. Gold mineralized trends lineaments are associated with the intersection of N-S, NE-SW, NNW-SSE and ESE-WNW faults and curvilinear features in shearing and alteration zones. Lineament analysis on PALSAR satellite remote sensing data is a useful tool for detecting the boundary between the Gondwana-derived terranes and major geological features associated with suture zone especially for large inaccessible regions in tropical environments.

  20. Centrally activated pipe snubbing system

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, William E.

    1985-01-01

    An electromechanical pipe snubbing system and an electromechanical pipe snubber. In the system, each pipe snubber, in a set of pipe snubbers, has an electromechanical mechanism to lock and unlock the snubber. A sensor, such as a seismometer, measures a quantity related to making a snubber locking or unlocking decision. A control device makes an electrical connection between a power supply and each snubber's electromechanical mechanism to simultaneously lock each snubber when the sensor measurement indicates a snubber locking condition. The control device breaks the connection to simultaneously unlock each snubber when the sensor measurement indicates a snubber unlocking condition. In the snubber, one end of the shaft slides within a bore in one end of a housing. The other end of the shaft is rotatably attached to a pipe; the other end of the housing is rotatively attached to a wall. The snubber's electromechanical mechanism locks the slidable end of the shaft to the housing and unlocks that end from the housing. The electromechanical mechanism permits remote testing and lockup status indication for each snubber.

  1. Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency, and avalanches.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, C; Reichhardt, C J Olson

    2015-03-01

    We examine the mobility and velocity fluctuations of a driven particle moving through an active matter bath of self-mobile disks for varied density or area coverage and varied activity. We show that the driven particle mobility can exhibit nonmonotonic behavior that is correlated with distinct changes in the spatiotemporal structures that arise in the active media. We demonstrate that the probe particle velocity distributions exhibit specific features in the different dynamic regimes and identify an activity-induced uniform crystallization that occurs for moderate activity levels and is distinct from the previously observed higher activity cluster phase. The velocity distribution in the cluster phase has telegraph noise characteristics produced when the probe particle moves alternately through high-mobility areas that are in the gas state and low-mobility areas that are in the dense phase. For higher densities and large activities, the system enters what we characterize as an active jamming regime. Here the probe particle moves in intermittent jumps or avalanches that have power-law-distributed sizes that are similar to the avalanche distributions observed for nonactive disk systems near the jamming transition. PMID:25871116

  2. PASS: Creating Physically Active School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciotto, Carol M.; Fede, Marybeth H.

    2014-01-01

    PASS, a Physically Active School System, is a program by which school districts and schools utilize opportunities for school-based physical activity that enhance overall fitness and cognition, which can be broken down into four integral parts consisting of connecting, communicating, collaborating, and cooperating. There needs to be an…

  3. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  4. Phase Transitions in Model Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel S.

    The amazing collective behaviors of active systems such as bird flocks, schools of fish, and colonies of microorganisms have long amazed scientists and laypeople alike. Understanding the physics of such systems is challenging due to their far-from-equilibrium dynamics, as well as the extreme diversity in their ingredients, relevant time- and length-scales, and emergent phenomenology. To make progress, one can categorize active systems by the symmetries of their constituent particles, as well as how activity is expressed. In this work, we examine two categories of active systems, and explore their phase behavior in detail. First, we study systems of self-propelled spherical particles moving in two dimensions. Despite the absence of an aligning interaction, this system displays complex emergent dynamics, including phase separation into a dense active solid and dilute gas. Using simulations and analytic modeling, we quantify the phase diagram and separation kinetics. We show that this nonequilibrium phase transition is analogous to an equilibrium vapor-liquid system, with binodal and spinodal curves and a critical point. We also characterize the dense active solid phase, a unique material which exhibits the structural signatures of a crystalline solid near the crystal-hexatic transition point, as well as anomalous dynamics including superdiffusive motion on intermediate timescales. We also explore the role of interparticle attraction in this system. We demonstrate that attraction drastically changes the phase diagram, which contains two distinct phase-separated regions and is reentrant as a function of propulsion speed. We interpret this complex situation with a simple kinetic model, which builds from the observed microdynamics of individual particles to a full description of the macroscopic phase behavior. We also study active nematics, liquid crystals driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these

  5. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.

    1993-04-13

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  6. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.

    1993-01-01

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  7. System for objective assessment of fetal activity.

    PubMed

    Kaluzynski, K J; Kret, T; Czajkowski, K; Sieńko, J; Zmigrodzki, J

    2011-07-01

    Fetal activity is an important indicator of fetal well-being. It is proposed to assess this activity using the pulsed wave Doppler method to collect fetal activity data and dedicated software for on-line processing. The system, addressed to 3rd trimester pregnancies, provides information on presence of pseudobreathing, the heart rate trace, the fetal movement trace, the movement velocity spectrogram, histograms of the velocity and acceleration of both the body movements and pseudobreathing, parameters of these histograms (mean values, standard deviations, shape descriptors), and cumulative counts of the velocity histograms. These parameters form the feature vector of the fetal activity. The system was validated by simultaneous echographic and cardiotocographic recordings and during oxytocin challenge tests. Feature vectors obtained from 1h recordings in 61 pregnancies were submitted to multivariate analysis of variance. Activity patterns of physiological cases and "borderline pathologies" were discriminated using reduced feature vectors, containing cumulative counts of velocity histograms. PMID:21277248

  8. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Lundie, P. |; McLeod, N.

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  9. Protection of Active Distribution Systems with DGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akila, Abdelrahman Ahmed; Helal, Ahmed; Eldesouki, Hussein

    2015-10-01

    Distribution systems are traditionally designed as radial passive systems fed from a single source. Protection coordination of such systems has been easily established assuming the system radiality. Insertion of distributed generators (DGs) into distribution systems makes the distribution system to be more active which causes redistribution of fault currents magnitudes and directions. This causes negative impacts on the original protection system coordination, since the distribution system losses its radiality and passiveness. Recently protection coordination in the presence of distributed generation has been paid a great attention. Researchers proposed various solutions to solve the protection coordination problem caused by adding DG into the distribution network. In this paper, the proposed solutions for the protection coordination problem considering the DG insertion will be illustrated, classified, and criticized.

  10. Aging assessment for active fire protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, S.B.; Nowlen, S.P.; Tanaka, T.

    1995-06-01

    This study assessed the impact of aging on the performance and reliability of active fire protection systems including both fixed fire suppression and fixed fire detection systems. The experience base shows that most nuclear power plants have an aggressive maintenance and testing program and are finding degraded fire protection system components before a failure occurs. Also, from the data reviewed it is clear that the risk impact of fire protection system aging is low. However, it is assumed that a more aggressive maintenance and testing program involving preventive diagnostics may reduce the risk impact even further.

  11. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Milan; Kozakovič, Radko; Magdolen, Luboš; Masaryk, Michal

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES). The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC) are updated based upon a "gap sensor" which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  12. Gamma Band Activity in the Reticular Activating System

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high-threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep–wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep–wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem–thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep–wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by pre-conscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of

  13. Traveling and Resting Crystals in Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Andreas M.; Löwen, Hartmut

    2013-02-01

    A microscopic field theory for crystallization in active systems is proposed which unifies the phase-field-crystal model of freezing with the Toner—Tu theory for self-propelled particles. A wealth of different active crystalline states are predicted and characterized. In particular, for increasing strength of self-propulsion, a transition from a resting crystal to a traveling crystalline state is found where the particles migrate collectively while keeping their crystalline order. Our predictions, which are verifiable in experiments and in particle-resolved computer simulations, provide a starting point for the design of new active materials.

  14. Distributed control system for active mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ramos, Luis F.; Williams, Mark R.; Castro, Javier; Cruz, A.; Gonzalez, Juan C.; Mack, Brian; Martin, Carlos; Pescador, German; Sanchez, Vicente; Sosa, Nicolas A.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents the IAC (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canaries, Spain) proposal of a distributed control system intended for the active support of a 8 m mirror. The system incorporates a large number of compact `smart' force actuators, six force definers, and a mirror support computer (MSC) for interfacing with the telescope control system and for general housekeeping. We propose the use of a network for the interconnection of the actuators, definers and the MSC, which will minimize the physical complexity of the interface between the mirror support system and the MSC. The force actuator control electronics are described in detail, as is the system software architecture of the actuator and the MSC. As the network is a key point for the system, we also detail the evaluation of three candidates, before electing the CAN bus.

  15. Modular System to Enable Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to perform extravehicular activity (EVA), both human and robotic, has been identified as a key component to space missions to support such operations as assembly and maintenance of space system (e.g. construction and maintenance of the International Space Station), and unscheduled activities to repair an element of the transportation and habitation systems that can only be accessed externally and via unpressurized areas. In order to make human transportation beyond lower earth orbit (BLEO) practical, efficiencies must be incorporated into the integrated transportation systems to reduce system mass and operational complexity. Affordability is also a key aspect to be considered in space system development; this could be achieved through commonality, modularity and component reuse. Another key aspect identified for the EVA system was the ability to produce flight worthy hardware quickly to support early missions and near Earth technology demonstrations. This paper details a conceptual architecture for a modular extravehicular activity system (MEVAS) that would meet these stated needs for EVA capability that is affordable, and that could be produced relatively quickly. Operational concepts were developed to elaborate on the defined needs and define the key capabilities, operational and design constraints, and general timelines. The operational concept lead to a high level design concept for a module that interfaces with various space transportation elements and contains the hardware and systems required to support human and telerobotic EVA; the module would not be self-propelled and would rely on an interfacing element for consumable resources. The conceptual architecture was then compared to EVA Systems used in the Shuttle Orbiter, on the International Space Station to develop high level design concepts that incorporate opportunities for cost savings through hardware reuse, and quick production through the use of existing technologies and hardware designs

  16. Active Annuloplasty System for Mitral Valve Insufficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; Lafont, Pilar; Rada, Ignacio; Jiménez, Antonio; Hernández, José Luis; Lorenzo-Yustos, Héctor; Muñoz-García, Julio

    Active materials are capable of responding in a controlled way to different external physical or chemical stimuli by changing some of their properties. These materials can be used to design and develop sensors, actuators and multifunctional systems with a large number of applications for developing medical devices.

  17. METALS DISTRIBUTIONS IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project developed models to predict the distribution of metals in activated sludge system process streams. The data used to develop the models were obtained through extended pilot studies from a previous project. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effects of wa...

  18. Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Saito, Nobuji A.; Paredes J., Rosa G.; San Martin, Gerardo Ayala; Yano, Yoneo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the…

  19. Design of nutrient removal activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Manga, J; Ferrer, J; Seco, A; Garcia-Usach, F

    2003-01-01

    A mechanistic mathematical model for nutrient and organic matter removal was used to describe the behavior of a nitrification denitrification enhanced biological phosphorus removal (NDEBPR) system. This model was implemented in a user-friendly software DESASS (design and simulation of activated sludge systems). A 484-L pilot plant was operated to verify the model results. The pilot plant was operated for three years over three different sludge ages. The validity of the model was confirmed with data from the pilot plant. Also, the utility of DESASS as a valuable tool for designing NDEBPR systems was confirmed. PMID:12906279

  20. Targeted activation in deterministic and stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhower, Bryan; Mezić, Igor

    2010-02-01

    Metastable escape is ubiquitous in many physical systems and is becoming a concern in engineering design as these designs (e.g., swarms of vehicles, coupled building energetics, nanoengineering, etc.) become more inspired by dynamics of biological, molecular and other natural systems. In light of this, we study a chain of coupled bistable oscillators which has two global conformations and we investigate how specialized or targeted disturbance is funneled in an inverse energy cascade and ultimately influences the transition process between the conformations. We derive a multiphase averaged approximation to these dynamics which illustrates the influence of actions in modal coordinates on the coarse behavior of this process. An activation condition that predicts how the disturbance influences the rate of transition is then derived. The prediction tools are derived for deterministic dynamics and we also present analogous behavior in the stochastic setting and show a divergence from Kramers activation behavior under targeted activation conditions.

  1. Green Bank Telescope active surface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasse, Richard J.

    1998-05-01

    During the design phase of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), various means of providing an accurate surface on a large aperture paraboloid, were considered. Automated jacks supporting the primary reflector were selected as the appropriate technology since they promised greater performance and potentially lower costs than a homologous or carbon fiber design, and had certain advantages over an active secondary. The design of the active surface has presented many challenges. Since the actuators are mounted on a tipping structure, it was required that they support a significant side-load. Such devices were not readily available commercially so they had to be developed. Additional actuator requirements include low backlash, repeatable positioning, and an operational life of at least 230 years. Similarly, no control system capable of controlling the 2209 actuators was commercially available. Again a prime requirement was reliability. Maintaining was also a very important consideration. The system architecture is tree-like. An active surface 'master-computer' controls interaction with the telescope control system, and controls ancillary equipment such as power supplies and temperature monitors. Two slave computers interface with the master- computer, and each closes approximately 1100 position loops. For simplicity, the servo is an 'on/off' type, yet achieves a positioning resolution of 25 microns. Each slave computer interfaces with 4 VME I/O cards, which in turn communicate with 140 control modules. The control modules read out the positions of the actuators every 0.1 sec and control the actuators' DC motors. Initial control of the active surface will be based on an elevation dependant structural model. Later, the model will be improved by holographic observations.Surface accuracy will be improved further by using laser ranging system which will actively measure the surface figure. Several tests have been conducted to assure that the system will perform as desired when

  2. Active gated imaging in driver assistance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauer, Yoav

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we shall present the active gated imaging system (AGIS) in relation to the automotive field. AGIS is based on a fast-gated camera and pulsed illuminator, synchronized in the time domain to record images of a certain range of interest. A dedicated gated CMOS imager sensor and near infra-red (NIR) pulsed laser illuminator, is presented in this paper to provide active gated technology. In recent years, we have developed these key components and learned the system parameters, which are most beneficial to nighttime (in all weather conditions) driving in terms of field of view, illumination profile, resolution, and processing power. We shall present our approach of a camera-based advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) named BrightEye™, which makes use of the AGIS technology in the automotive field.

  3. Modular System to Enable Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to perform extravehicular activity (EVA), both human and robotic, has been identified as a key component to space missions to support such operations as assembly and maintenance of space systems (e.g. construction and maintenance of the International Space Station), and unscheduled activities to repair an element of the transportation and habitation systems that can only be accessed externally and via unpressurized areas. In order to make human transportation beyond lower Earth orbit (LEO) practical, efficiencies must be incorporated into the integrated transportation systems to reduce system mass and operational complexity. Affordability is also a key aspect to be considered in space system development; this could be achieved through commonality, modularity and component reuse. Another key aspect identified for the EVA system was the ability to produce flight worthy hardware quickly to support early missions and near Earth technology demonstrations. This paper details a conceptual architecture for a modular EVA system that would meet these stated needs for EVA capability that is affordable, and that could be produced relatively quickly. Operational concepts were developed to elaborate on the defined needs, and to define the key capabilities, operational and design constraints, and general timelines. The operational concept lead to a high level design concept for a module that interfaces with various space transportation elements and contains the hardware and systems required to support human and telerobotic EVA; the module would not be self-propelled and would rely on an interfacing element for consumable resources. The conceptual architecture was then compared to EVA Systems used in the Space Shuttle Orbiter, on the International Space Station to develop high level design concepts that incorporate opportunities for cost savings through hardware reuse, and quick production through the use of existing technologies and hardware designs. An upgrade option

  4. Optically Active Porphyrin and Phthalocyanine Systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; Kobayashi, Nagao

    2016-05-25

    This review highlights and summarizes various optically active porphyrin and phthalocyanine molecules prepared using a wide range of structural modification methods to improve the design of novel structures and their applications. The induced chirality of some illustrative achiral bis-porphyrins with a chiral guest molecule is introduced because these systems are ideal for the identification and separation of chiral biologically active substrates. In addition, the relationship between CD signal and the absolute configuration of the molecule is analyzed through an analysis of the results of molecular modeling calculations. Possible future research directions are also discussed. PMID:27186902

  5. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  6. Advanced extravehicular activity systems requirements definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A study to define the requirements for advanced extravehicular activities (AEVA) was conducted. The purpose of the study was to develop an understanding of the EVA technology requirements and to map a pathway from existing or developing technologies to an AEVA system capable of supporting long-duration missions on the lunar surface. The parameters of an AEVA system which must sustain the crewmembers and permit productive work for long periods in the lunar environment were examined. A design reference mission (DRM) was formulated and used as a tool to develop and analyze the EVA systems technology aspects. Many operational and infrastructure design issues which have a significant influence on the EVA system are identified.

  7. Active State Model for Autonomous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Han; Chien, Steve; Zak, Michail; James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Fisher, Forest

    2003-01-01

    The concept of the active state model (ASM) is an architecture for the development of advanced integrated fault-detection-and-isolation (FDI) systems for robotic land vehicles, pilotless aircraft, exploratory spacecraft, or other complex engineering systems that will be capable of autonomous operation. An FDI system based on the ASM concept would not only provide traditional diagnostic capabilities, but also integrate the FDI system under a unified framework and provide mechanism for sharing of information between FDI subsystems to fully assess the overall health of the system. The ASM concept begins with definitions borrowed from psychology, wherein a system is regarded as active when it possesses self-image, self-awareness, and an ability to make decisions itself, such that it is able to perform purposeful motions and other transitions with some degree of autonomy from the environment. For an engineering system, self-image would manifest itself as the ability to determine nominal values of sensor data by use of a mathematical model of itself, and selfawareness would manifest itself as the ability to relate sensor data to their nominal values. The ASM for such a system may start with the closed-loop control dynamics that describe the evolution of state variables. As soon as this model was supplemented with nominal values of sensor data, it would possess self-image. The ability to process the current sensor data and compare them with the nominal values would represent self-awareness. On the basis of self-image and self-awareness, the ASM provides the capability for self-identification, detection of abnormalities, and self-diagnosis.

  8. Research on an Active Seat Belt System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Takeshi

    In a car crash, permanent injury can be avoided if deformation of an occupant's rib cage is maintained within the allowable value. In order to realize this condition, the occupant's seat belt tension must be instantaneously adjusted by a feedback control system. In this study, a seat belt tension control system based on the active shock control system is proposed. The semi-active control law used is derived from the sliding mode control method. One advantage of this proposed system is that it does not require a large power actuator because the seat belt tension is controlled by a brake mechanism. The effectiveness is confirmed by numerical simulation using general parameters of a human thorax and a passenger car in a collision scenario with a wall at a velocity of 100 km/h. The feasibility is then confirmed with a control experiment using a scale model of about 1/10 scale. The relative displacement of the thorax model approaches the allowable value smoothly along the control reference and settles near this value. Thus, the proposed seat belt tension control system design is established.

  9. Multipurpose active/passive motion compensation system

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.A.; Clements, R.E.; Davenport, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    A microprocessor-controlled active/passive motion compensation system has been developed for deploying a variety of geotechnical in-situ testing devices with mobile drilling rigs from low-cost service vessels. The light-weight rotary heave compensator incorporates a hydraulic motor as the compensator actuator and a servo-controlled closed loop pump to reduce the air storage and power requirements. Unique features of the system are the use of inertial sensors to measure three components of boat motion, the ability to run the system in active/passive or passive modes, and the ability to automatically lower the drillstring at a constant velocity while maintaining motion compensation. Quantitative measurements made during sea trials offshore California yielded motion compensation accuracy approaching 98 percent which is much better than the compensation achieved with passive systems. Results are presented from offshore in-situ testing with a cone penetrometer, a vane shear device, and a suspension PS logger. The system can also be used for other offshore applications.

  10. Active laser system for sea ice control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtikhiev, Nickolay N.; Gaponov, Alexandr E.; Kuluba, Yury N.; Matous, Vladislav I.; Radominov, Oleg E.; Tuzikov, Vladimir Z.; Vargaftic, Vasiliy N.

    1997-01-01

    The airborne systems are used for complex investigations of coastline very successfully, for example it can be used to measure the depth of the sea, to discover the reefs and so on. Such information may be used in navigation too. The specific conditions of navigation in the North and Pole seas defines the necessity of exact knowledge about the ice cracks in order to find the possible direction of the ship movement. The active optical system, working in the near IR region, has many advantages before the passive one, especially if it is necessary to work during the polar night and at bad weather conditions. In this article we discuss the demands to the laser active airborne systems, that given the accurate picture of the ice with high resolution in the daytime and nighttime conditions. Such system based on the laser, mechanical scanner and avalanche photodiode is very compact, reliable and informative. The picture of the ice surface can be shown on the TV monitor, can be written to the memory and can be delivered to the processing center by the radiochannel. The experimental results are shown together with results of this system probing in the conditions of the North Pole Ocean.

  11. PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

    2005-01-01

    A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

  12. Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Elmiligui, Alaa A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active pylon noise control system for an aircraft includes a pylon structure connecting an engine system with an airframe surface of the aircraft and having at least one aperture to supply a gas or fluid therethrough, an intake portion attached to the pylon structure to intake a gas or fluid, a regulator connected with the intake portion via a plurality of pipes, to regulate a pressure of the gas or fluid, a plenum chamber formed within the pylon structure and connected with the regulator, and configured to receive the gas or fluid as regulated by the regulator, and a plurality of injectors in communication with the plenum chamber to actively inject the gas or fluid through the plurality of apertures of the pylon structure.

  13. Spontaneous activity in the developing auditory system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han Chin; Bergles, Dwight E

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous electrical activity is a common feature of sensory systems during early development. This sensory-independent neuronal activity has been implicated in promoting their survival and maturation, as well as growth and refinement of their projections to yield circuits that can rapidly extract information about the external world. Periodic bursts of action potentials occur in auditory neurons of mammals before hearing onset. This activity is induced by inner hair cells (IHCs) within the developing cochlea, which establish functional connections with spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) several weeks before they are capable of detecting external sounds. During this pre-hearing period, IHCs fire periodic bursts of Ca(2+) action potentials that excite SGNs, triggering brief but intense periods of activity that pass through auditory centers of the brain. Although spontaneous activity requires input from IHCs, there is ongoing debate about whether IHCs are intrinsically active and their firing periodically interrupted by external inhibitory input (IHC-inhibition model), or are intrinsically silent and their firing periodically promoted by an external excitatory stimulus (IHC-excitation model). There is accumulating evidence that inner supporting cells in Kölliker's organ spontaneously release ATP during this time, which can induce bursts of Ca(2+) spikes in IHCs that recapitulate many features of auditory neuron activity observed in vivo. Nevertheless, the role of supporting cells in this process remains to be established in vivo. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for generating IHC activity in the developing cochlea will help reveal how these events contribute to the maturation of nascent auditory circuits. PMID:25296716

  14. Voice activity detection for speaker verification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Filip

    2008-01-01

    Complex algorithm for speech activity detection was presented in this article. It is based on speech enhancement, features extraction and final detection algorithm. The first one was published in ETSI standard as a module of "Advanced front-end feature extraction algorithm" in distributed speech recognition system. It consists of two main parts, noise estimatiom and Wiener filtering. For the final detection modified linear prediction coefficients and spectral entropy features are extracted form denoised signal.

  15. Light and immune systems: activation of immunological activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2006-02-01

    Light has been used to treat diseases for hundreds of years. Convenient and powerful light sources such as lasers make photomedicine a major branch in diseases treatment and detection. Originally, light was often used for local treatment, using photomechanical, photochemical, photothermal reactions and photomodulation as the major mechanisms. More and more investigators have become interested in the systemic effects of light, particularly in its effects on immune systems. Much work has been done to activate and/or enhance the host immune system to combat cancer, either using light as a direct tool or as an adjuvant method. Light has long been used for assisting disease detection and diagnosis. Advances in light technology have made photo-diagnostics ever more precise spatially and temporally. Many techniques facilitate observation of bio-molecule interactions and other biological processes at the cellular level, hence providing opportunities to detect and monitor immune activities. This manuscript will review recent photo-immunological research in treatment of cancer. The recent development of combination therapies involving lasers will be presented. Specifically, the results of cancer treatment using laser photothermal interaction, either with or without additional immunological stimulation will be discussed. The immunological effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT), and of its combination with immunotherapy in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Much interest has been recently concentrated in the immunological responses after laser treatment. Such responses at cellular and molecular levels will be discussed. The effect of these treatment modalities on the distant metastases also showed promise of light induced antitumor immunity. The combination therapy and induced immunological responses appear to be the key for long-term control of tumors.

  16. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  17. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor); Bell, Joseph L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprising at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  18. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  19. Dislocation boundaries and active slip systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J.A.; Hansen, N.

    1995-11-01

    Part of the dislocations which have participated in the plastic deformation of a polycrystalline metal are stored in dislocation boundaries in a two- or three-dimensional arrangement. The dislocation in such boundaries can be analyzed by determining the misorientation between neighboring crystallites and the boundary orientation. Information about the dislocations in the boundaries can also be obtained by an analysis of active slip systems based on the crystallite orientation and the imposed stress or strain state in combination with appropriate constraint conditions. In the present paper an analysis of the boundary dislocation structure and of the slip systems has been conducted for pure aluminium cold-rolled to a von Mises strain of 0.41. The results show that a substantial majority of dislocations in different types of dislocation boundaries are from the primary and conjugate slip system in the adjoining crystallites. A basis is therefore provided for integrating deformation structure observations with plastic deformation behavior.

  20. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 101: Constellation EVA Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Nicole C.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems is shown. The topics include: 1) Why do we need space suits? 2) Protection From the Environment; 3) Primary Life Support System (PLSS); 4) Thermal Control; 5) Communications; 6) Helmet and Extravehicular Visor Assy; 7) Hard Upper Torso (HUT) and Arm Assy; 8) Display and Controls Module (DCM); 9) Gloves; 10) Lower Torso Assembly (LTA); 11) What Size Do You Need?; 12) Boot and Sizing Insert; 13) Boot Heel Clip and Foot Restraint; 14) Advanced and Crew Escape Suit; 15) Nominal & Off-Nominal Landing; 16) Gemini Program (mid-1960s); 17) Apollo EVA on Service Module; 18) A Bold Vision for Space Exploration, Authorized by Congress; 19) EVA System Missions; 20) Configurations; 21) Reduced Gravity Program; and 22) Other Opportunities.

  1. Monitoring Io volcanic activity using the Keck AO system: 2-5μm sunlit and eclipse observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, F.; de Pater, I.; Le Mignant, D.; Roe, H. G.; Fusco, T.; Graham, J. R.; Prange, R.; Macintosh, B.

    2002-12-01

    Galileo provided us with spectacular images of the volcanically active Io moon over the last 7 years, but we understand little about the physical processes occurring on this moon. Groundbased monitoring programs help characterize the long time evolution of Io's volcanic activity, such as the frequency, spatial distribution and temperature of hot spots and outbursts. Our group started a monitoring program of Io's volcanic activity using the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) system and its recently installed near-infrared camera NIRC2. Here we report groundbased observations of Io conducted in December 2001 (UT), at 0.05" resolution (120-140 km on Io) in K', i.e., ~4 times better than HST and than global Galileo NIMS images. Our 1-5 micron data enable us to determine the temperature of individual hot spots, a key parameter for geophysical/volcanic flow models. We will present: i) Io in reflected sunlight in K', L', and M bands. We used Io itself as reference source for the wavefront sensor of the AO system. Our L and M-band images show both reflected sunlight and thermal emission from volcanic hot spots. The contrast of images is enhanced using the MISTRAL deconvolution algorithme. The 12 images taken on 10 days provides a complete survey of Io surface during one full rotation. 26 active hot spots were detected on the entire surface in L band (3.8μm), approximatively three times more in M band (4.7μm). One active hot spot is seen in K band (2.2μm) in the Pele area. A study of individual hot spot (temperature, emission area, nature) will be presented. ii) Io in eclipse. While Io is in Jupiter's shadow, it is invisible to the wavefront sensor, but its hot spots are easily visible in the near-infrared. We imaged Io during the 18 Dec. 2001 eclipse using Ganymede (30" from Io, moving relative to Io at ~0.5"/min) as a reference source. A dozen of faint hot spots are detected at both K' and L', allowing temperature estimates for each of them. Keck Science team is composed of

  2. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-08-01

    We have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. The technique, termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND), follows a method used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. We have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. Results are preliminary but promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly; it also appears resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be non-thermal and penetrating. Work remains to fully explore relevant physics and optimize instrument design.

  3. Active Thermal Control System Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    All space vehicles or habitats require thermal management to maintain a safe and operational environment for both crew and hardware. Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCS) perform the functions of acquiring heat from both crew and hardware within a vehicle, transporting that heat throughout the vehicle, and finally rejecting that energy into space. Almost all of the energy used in a space vehicle eventually turns into heat, which must be rejected in order to maintain an energy balance and temperature control of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, Active Thermal Control Systems are pumped fluid loops that are made up of components designed to perform these functions. NASA has been actively developing technologies that will enable future missions or will provide significant improvements over the state of the art technologies. These technologies have are targeted for application on the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), or Orion, and a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The technologies that have been selected and are currently under development include: fluids that enable single loop ATCS architectures, a gravity insensitive vapor compression cycle heat pump, a sublimator with reduced sensitivity to feedwater contamination, an evaporative heat sink that can operate in multiple ambient pressure environments, a compact spray evaporator, and lightweight radiators that take advantage of carbon composites and advanced optical coatings.

  4. Tunable C- and L-band erbium-doped fiber ring lasers for performance testing of a wavelength-division multiplexing access network with injection-locked Fabry-Pérot laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zih-Rong; Liu, Cheng-Kuang; Keiser, Gerd; Tseng, Chih-Lung; Chiu, Chia-Ming

    2010-10-01

    A widely wavelength-tunable erbium-doped-fiber laser (T-EDFL) located at a central office is proposed for the bidirectional high-speed performance testing of wavelength-division-multiplexing access networks in which injection-locked Fabry-Pérot laser diodes located at optical network units are used for upstream transmissions. The T-EDFL not only generates laser light for downstream transmission testing, but also serves as the injection source for upstream transmission testing. It has a wide tunable range of 64 nm (1540 to 1604 nm), a high output power of 2.2 dBm, and a good signal-to-noise ratio above 46 dB. For 10-Gb/s downstream and 1.25-Gb/s upstream transmissions over a 10-km single-mode fiber (SMF), power penalties at a bit error rate of 10-9 are less than 0.94 dB and 0.76 dB (1.26 dB and 1.68 dB) for downstream and upstream transmissions at C-band (at L-band) wavelengths, respectively. In the transmissions over a 25-km SMF, the penalties are 2.24 dB and 2.36 dB (3.66 dB and 4.18 dB) at C-band (at L-band) for downstream and upstream transmissions, respectively.

  5. Advanced Active Thermal Control Systems Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanford, Anthony J.; Ewert, Michael K.

    1996-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) initiated a dynamic study to determine possible improvements available through advanced technologies (not used on previous or current human vehicles), identify promising development initiatives for advanced active thermal control systems (ATCS's), and help prioritize funding and personnel distribution among many research projects by providing a common basis to compare several diverse technologies. Some technologies included were two-phase thermal control systems, light-weight radiators, phase-change thermal storage, rotary fluid coupler, and heat pumps. JSC designed the study to estimate potential benefits from these various proposed and under-development thermal control technologies for five possible human missions early in the next century. The study compared all the technologies to a baseline mission using mass as a basis. Each baseline mission assumed an internal thermal control system; an external thermal control system; and aluminum, flow-through radiators. Solar vapor compression heat pumps and light-weight radiators showed the greatest promise as general advanced thermal technologies which can be applied across a range of missions. This initial study identified several other promising ATCS technologies which offer mass savings and other savings compared to traditional thermal control systems. Because the study format compares various architectures with a commonly defined baseline, it is versatile and expandable, and is expected to be updated as needed.

  6. Noninvasive ambulatory measurement system of cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Pino, Esteban J; Chavez, Javier A P; Aqueveque, Pablo

    2015-08-01

    This work implements a noninvasive system that measures the movements caused by cardiac activity. It uses unobtrusive Electro-Mechanical Films (EMFi) on the seat and on the backrest of a regular chair. The system detects ballistocardiogram (BCG) and respiration movements. Real data was obtained from 54 volunteers. 19 of them were measured in the laboratory and 35 in a hospital waiting room. Using a BIOPAC acquisition system, the ECG was measured simultaneously to the BCG for comparison. Wavelet Transform (WT) is a better option than Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) for signal extraction and produces higher effective measurement time. In the laboratory, the best results are obtained on the seat. The correlation index was 0.9800 and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement were 0.7136 ± 4.3673 [BPM]. In the hospital waiting room, the best results are also from the seat sensor. The correlation index was 0.9840, and the limits of agreement were 0.4386 ± 3.5884 [BPM]. The system is able to measure BCG in an unobtrusive way and determine the cardiac frequency with high precision. It is simple to use, which means the system can easily be used in non-standard settings: resting in a chair or couch, at the gym, schools or in a hospital waiting room, as shown. PMID:26738057

  7. Ka-band mobile and personal systems development at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessouky, K.; Estabrook, P.; Jedrey, T.; Sue, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Expanding the commercial applications of space is one of the primary goals of NASA. Throughout the eighties NASA has pursued this objective by sponsoring and undertaking the development of system concepts, enabling high risk technologies, and actual proof of concept demonstration hardware. In the mobile and personal arena, or the so-called low data rate applications area, JPL is NASA's lead center. JPL's focus of activities has been the Mobile Satellite-Experiment (MSAT-X) project, which developed mobile communication technologies at L-band, and its present successors, which aim to expand the mobile arena by exploiting Ka-band.

  8. Velocity distribution in active particles systems

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Gnan, Nicoletta; Paoluzzi, Matteo; Maggi, Claudio; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the distribution of velocities of multiple interacting active particles which we test by numerical simulations. In clear contrast with equilibrium we find that the velocities are coupled to positions. Our model shows that, even for two particles only, the individual velocities display a variance depending on the interparticle separation and the emergence of correlations between the velocities of the particles. When considering systems composed of many particles we find an analytic expression connecting the overall velocity variance to density, at the mean-field level, and to the pair distribution function valid in the limit of small noise correlation times. Finally we discuss the intriguing analogies and main differences between our effective free energy functional and the theoretical scenario proposed so far for phase-separating active particles. PMID:27001289

  9. Velocity distribution in active particles systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Gnan, Nicoletta; Paoluzzi, Matteo; Maggi, Claudio; di Leonardo, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the distribution of velocities of multiple interacting active particles which we test by numerical simulations. In clear contrast with equilibrium we find that the velocities are coupled to positions. Our model shows that, even for two particles only, the individual velocities display a variance depending on the interparticle separation and the emergence of correlations between the velocities of the particles. When considering systems composed of many particles we find an analytic expression connecting the overall velocity variance to density, at the mean-field level, and to the pair distribution function valid in the limit of small noise correlation times. Finally we discuss the intriguing analogies and main differences between our effective free energy functional and the theoretical scenario proposed so far for phase-separating active particles.

  10. A Group Recommender System for Tourist Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Inma; Sebastia, Laura; Onaindia, Eva; Guzman, Cesar

    This paper introduces a method for giving recommendations of tourist activities to a group of users. This method makes recommendations based on the group tastes, their demographic classification and the places visited by the users in former trips. The group recommendation is computed from individual personal recommendations through the use of techniques such as aggregation, intersection or incremental intersection. This method is implemented as an extension of the e-Tourism tool, which is a user-adapted tourism and leisure application, whose main component is the Generalist Recommender System Kernel (GRSK), a domain-independent taxonomy-driven search engine that manages the group recommendation.

  11. Influenza virus activation of the interferon system

    PubMed Central

    Killip, Marian J.; Fodor, Ervin; Randall, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The host interferon (IFN) response represents one of the first barriers that influenza viruses must surmount in order to establish an infection. Many advances have been made in recent years in understanding the interactions between influenza viruses and the interferon system. In this review, we summarise recent work regarding activation of the type I IFN response by influenza viruses, including attempts to identify the viral RNA responsible for IFN induction, the stage of the virus life cycle at which it is generated and the role of defective viruses in this process. PMID:25678267

  12. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  13. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six-inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. The experimental results for those component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  14. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. Thermal, mechanical, and structural considerations leading to the design of the tray hardware are discussed. In general, changes in the retested component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials, multilayer optical interference filters, and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  15. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  16. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  17. Spontaneous Oscillations in an Active Matter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert; Tsang, Boyce; Granick, Steve

    Active matter (which consumes energy to move about) can organize into dynamic structures more interesting than those possible at steady-state. Here we show spontaneous periodic self-assembly in a simple three-component system of water, oil phase, and surfactant at constant room temperature, with emphasis on one model system. Benchtop experiments show that liquid crystal oil droplets spontaneously and collectively oscillate like a `beating heart' for several hours; contract, relax, and subsequently re-contract in a petri dish at a rate of a few `beats' per minute. These oscillations, emergent from the cooperative interaction of the three components, are driven by the competition between positive and negative feedback processes. This illustration of feedback in action reveals a new way to program self-assembled structures to vary with time.

  18. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  19. Active alignment/contact verification system

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A system involving an active (i.e. electrical) technique for the verification of: 1) close tolerance mechanical alignment between two component, and 2) electrical contact between mating through an elastomeric interface. For example, the two components may be an alumina carrier and a printed circuit board, two mating parts that are extremely small, high density parts and require alignment within a fraction of a mil, as well as a specified interface point of engagement between the parts. The system comprises pairs of conductive structures defined in the surfaces layers of the alumina carrier and the printed circuit board, for example. The first pair of conductive structures relate to item (1) above and permit alignment verification between mating parts. The second pair of conductive structures relate to item (2) above and permit verification of electrical contact between mating parts.

  20. Active balance system and vibration balanced machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass.

  1. Next Generation Active Buffet Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Ryall, Thomas G.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.; White, Edward V.; Zimcik, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon that is common to high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. This paper describes an international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States involving the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads. The research program is being co-ordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and is being conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). This truly unique collaborative program has been developed to enable each participating country to contribute resources toward a program that coalesces a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation. This collaborative program is directed toward a full-scale test of an F/A-18 empennage, which is an extension of an earlier initial test. The current program aims at applying advanced directional piezoactuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers and advanced control strategies on a full-scale structure to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration.

  2. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-09-01

    The authors have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. They are using a Schlumberger neutron generator for the direct measurement of the fissile material content in spent fuel, in place of the indirect measures used at present. The technique they are investigating is termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND). It closely follows a method that has been used routinely in other branches of physics for the detection of very small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. They have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The results to data are preliminary but quite promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly. It also appears to be quite resilient to background neutron interference.

  3. Systemic lupus erythematosus activity. An operational definition.

    PubMed

    Liang, M H; Stern, S; Esdaile, J M

    1988-04-01

    Improved diagnosis and treatment have reduced mortality from SLE and present us with an opportunity to consider SLE in finer distinctions than alive or dead. Although much has been learned about SLE without a gold standard of disease activity or a universally agreed-upon definition of SLE activity, standardization of one or more measures would greatly enhance our ability to compare results from different centers and to communicate more precisely. It is unlikely that any of the existing measures or any ones to be developed will completely satisfy everyone's needs but it is pointless to proliferate new ones without testing their metric properties. Some differences in concept are desirable, particularly for investigators who have specialized interests or insights, but each should meet criteria of reliability and validity and have explicit definitions of terms, rules for their ascertainment, and the time period covered. Moreover, agreement on minimum essential elements of any SLE activity measure and their operational definitions would be a boon. SLE activity is one dimension in the disease pathway of lupus and implies a continuous phenomena that is potentially reversible. Organ damage, another point in the path of causation, connotes irreversible disease. We recommend that minimum essential elements be based on their frequency of occurrence, biological sensibleness, and the likelihood that degrees of activity can be rated reliably to show a change in a clinical state. The rating should be independent of whether a therapy is employed. Since activity is always considered with severity, the two dimensions could be recognized in the scale. Severity can be used to expand a scale's gradations if a symptom or sign is present. Severity could be rated by the need to treat with immunosuppressive agents, the need to follow the patient more closely, or the functional or prognostic consequences of the manifestation. For every organ system clinical judgment should be used to decide

  4. A new melanoma diagnosis active support system.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, R A; Dacquino, G; Laguteta, G

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the operational performance of a new MDASS (Melanoma Diagnosis Active Support System) prototype able to distil optimal knowledge from acquired data to automatically capture and reliably discriminate and quantify the stage of disease evolution. Automated classification dermatoscopical parameters can be divided into two main classes: Size Descriptor (point size, local, and global) and Intrinsic Descriptor (morphological, geometrical, chromatic, others). Usually elementary geometric shape robust and effective characterization, invariant to environment and optical geometry transformations, on a rigorous mathematical level is a key and computational intensive problem. MDASS uses GEOGINE (GEOmetrical enGINE), a state-of-the-art OMG (Ontological Model Generator) based on n-D Tensor Moment Invariants for shape/texture effective description. MDASS main results show robust disease classification procedure with distillation of minimal reference grids for pathological cases and they ultimately achieve effective early diagnosis of melanocytic lesion. System results are validated by carefully designed experiments with certified clinical reference database. Overall system operational performance is presented. Finally, MDASS error analysis and computational complexity are addressed and discussed. PMID:17270962

  5. UAVSAR Active Electronically Scanned Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory, A.; Chamberlain, Neil F.; Zawadzki, Mark S.; Brown, Kyle M.; Fisher, Charles D.; Figueroa, Harry S.; Hamilton, Gary A.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Vorperian, Vatche; Grando, Maurio B.

    2011-01-01

    The Uninhabited Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is a pod-based, L-band (1.26 GHz), repeatpass, interferometric, synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) used for Earth science applications. Repeat-pass interferometric radar measurements from an airborne platform require an antenna that can be steered to maintain the same angle with respect to the flight track over a wide range of aircraft yaw angles. In order to be able to collect repeat-pass InSAR data over a wide range of wind conditions, UAVSAR employs an active electronically scanned array (AESA). During data collection, the UAVSAR flight software continuously reads the aircraft attitude state measured by the Embedded GPS/INS system (EGI) and electronically steers the beam so that it remains perpendicular to the flight track throughout the data collection

  6. Activity systems in the inquiry classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortham, Donald William

    Inquiry science, as called for by reform-minded organizations such as the National Research Council (1996), offers a platform with the potential for introducing all students to the practice of science while maintaining focus on key concepts and theories. This project followed two small groups as they completed an inquiry unit on genetics at a Midwestern high school. I investigated whether levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, student-apparatus, and student-concept connections were approximately equal across all students in each of the two groups. I found differences among students in levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and student-concept connections. From a situated idiopathic perspective, these differences may indicate different levels of opportunity-to-learn. At a more abstract (nomothetic) level, these differences may be due to emergent divisions of labor (roles) within the two groups. From the perspective of Activity Theory (Leont'ev, 1978; Engestrom, 1987), roles serve as important mediators that simultaneously allow the social unit to accomplish its objectives, while shaping the development of participants. I describe three roles that capture modes of participation for students interacting in the small groups, and that may contribute to what Engestrom (2001) calls subject-producing activity systems: networked contributor, social member, and isolate. This paper also describes tools for teachers and researchers to use in identifying levels of mediation and roles as they occur in small groups.

  7. ROVER: A prototype active vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, David J.; Marsh, Brian D.

    1987-08-01

    The Roving Eyes project is an experiment in active vision. We present the design and implementation of a prototype that tracks colored balls in images from an on-line charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Rover is designed to keep up with its rapidly changing environment by handling best and average case conditions and ignoring the worst case. This allows Rover's techniques to be less sophisticated and consequently faster. Each of Rover's major functional units is relatively isolated from the others, and an executive which knows all the functional units directs the computation by deciding which jobs would be most effective to run. This organization is realized with a priority queue of jobs and their arguments. Rover's structure not only allows it to adapt its strategy to the environment, but also makes the system extensible. A capability can be added to the system by adding a functional module with a well defined interface and by modifying the executive to make use of the new module. The current implementation is discussed in the appendices.

  8. Sensitivity of Active and Passive Microwave Observations to Soil Moisture during Growing Corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, J.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Liu, P.; De Roo, R. D.; England, A. W.; Nagarajan, K.

    2011-12-01

    at the site were Lakeland fine sand, with 89% sand content by volume. The crop was heavily irrigated via a linear move irrigation system. Every 15-minute ground-based passive and active microwave observations at L-band were conducted at an incidence angle of 40°. In addition, concurrent observations were conducted of soil moisture, temperature, heat flux at various depths in the root zone, along with concurrent micrometeorological conditions. Weekly vegetation sampling included measurements of LAI, green and dry biomass of stems, leaves, and ears, crop height and width, vertical distribution of moisture in the canopy, leaf size and orientation, other phonological observations. Such observations at high temporal density allow detailed sensitivity analyses as the vegetation grows.

  9. ILC RF System R and D

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The Linac Group at SLAC is actively pursuing a broad range of R&D to improve the reliability and reduce the cost of the L-band (1.3 GHz) rf system proposed for the ILC linacs. Current activities include the long-term evaluation of a 120 kV Marx Modulator driving a 10 MW Multi-Beam Klystron, design of a second-generation Marx Modulator, testing of a sheet-beam gun and beam transport system for a klystron, construction of an rf distribution system with remotely-adjustable power tapoffs, and development of a system to combine the power from many klystrons in low-loss circular waveguide where it would be tapped-off periodically to power groups of cavities. This paper surveys progress during the past few years.

  10. Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

  11. The AMSC mobile satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Carson E.; Bhagat, Jai; Hopper, Edwin A.; Kiesling, John D.; Exner, Michael L.; Melillo, Lawrence; Noreen, Gary K.; Parrott, Billy J.

    1988-01-01

    The American Mobile Satellite Consortium (AMSC) Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) system is described. AMSC will use three multi-beam satellites to provide L-band MSS coverage to the United States, Canada and Mexico. The AMSC MSS system will have several noteworthy features, including a priority assignment processor that will ensure preemptive access to emergency services, a flexible SCPC channel scheme that will support a wide diversity of services, enlarged system capacity through frequency and orbit reuse, and high effective satellite transmitted power. Each AMSC satellite will make use of 14 MHz (bi-directional) of L-band spectrum. The Ku-band will be used for feeder links.

  12. Activity Systems and Moral Reasoning: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardi, Eva; Helkama, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Seventeen social educator students were taught to analyze their work activity by means of a Vygotsky-inspired method, drawing on Engeström's notion of an activity system. The method aimed at increasing the consciousness of the students of the structure of work activity system. The participants wrote two accounts of their field-work practice…

  13. New approaches to enhance active steering system functionalities: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serarslan, Benan

    2014-09-01

    An important development of the steering systems in general is active steering systems like active front steering and steer-by-wire systems. In this paper the current functional possibilities in application of active steering systems are explored. A new approach and additional functionalities are presented that can be implemented to the active steering systems without additional hardware such as new sensors and electronic control units. Commercial active steering systems are controlling the steering angle depending on the driving situation only. This paper introduce methods for enhancing active steering system functionalities depending not only on the driving situation but also vehicle parameters like vehicle mass, tyre and road condition. In this regard, adaptation of the steering ratio as a function of above mentioned vehicle parameters is presented with examples. With some selected vehicle parameter changes, the reduction of the undesired influences on vehicle dynamics of these parameter changes has been demonstrated theoretically with simulations and with real-time driving measurements.

  14. Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system

    DOEpatents

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

  15. Student Activity Funds: Creating a System of Controls That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles

    1995-01-01

    Although student-activity funds usually represent a small portion of school-system monies, their very nature makes them a high risk. Outlines three steps for maintaining an efficient and effective system of controls over student-activity funds: (1) identifying control issues; (2) designing a control system; and (3) using checks and balances.…

  16. Land Data Assimilation Activities in Preparation of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slated for launch in 2013, the NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive mission represents a generational advance in our ability to globally observe time and space variations in surface soil moisture fields. The SMAP mission concept is based on the integrated use of L-band active radar and passive radiome...

  17. Land Data Assimilation Activities in Preparation of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)Mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slated for launch in 2013, the NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive mission represents a significant advance in our ability to globally observe time and space variations in surface soil moisture fields. The SMAP mission concept is based on the integrated use of L-band active radar and passive radiomet...

  18. Active fluidization in dense glassy systems.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rituparno; Bhuyan, Pranab Jyoti; Rao, Madan; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-07-20

    Dense soft glasses show strong collective caging behavior at sufficiently low temperatures. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a model glass former, we show that the incorporation of activity or self-propulsion, f0, can induce cage breaking and fluidization, resulting in the disappearance of the glassy phase beyond a critical f0. The diffusion coefficient crosses over from being strongly to weakly temperature dependent as f0 is increased. In addition, we demonstrate that activity induces a crossover from a fragile to a strong glass and a tendency of active particles to cluster. Our results are of direct relevance to the collective dynamics of dense active colloidal glasses and to recent experiments on tagged particle diffusion in living cells. PMID:27380935

  19. Active vibration control of lightweight floor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baader, J.; Fontana, M.

    2016-04-01

    Wide-span and lightweight floors are often prone to structural vibrations due to their low resonance frequency and poor material damping. Their dynamic behaviour can be improved using passive, semi-active or active vibration control devices. The following article proposes a novel method for the controller synthesis for active vibration control. An existing passive TMD (tuned mass damper) is modelled and equipped with an actuator in order to provide more efficient damping. Using an iterative optimization approach under constraints, an optimal controller is found which minimizes a quadratic cost function in frequency domain. A simulation of an existing test bench shows that the active vibration control device is able to provide increased damping compared to the passive TMD.

  20. Power System Considerations and Test Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J.

    1983-01-01

    The potential benefits of an IPACS system compared to NiCd and/or Regen Fuel Cell systems are summarized. The benefits are: (1) significant life cycle cost savings; (2) total weight to orbit savings (30 yrs) as much as 10 times; (3) end to end efficiency increase results in approximately 10 kW reduction in array size(6%); (4) motor/generator controller regulation during discharge simplifies distribution system; and (5) momentum stored for attitude control increased by 4 times.

  1. Description of data base management systems activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    One of the major responsibilities of the JPL Computing and Information Services Office is to develop and maintain a JPL plan for providing computing services to the JPL management and administrative community that will lead to improved productivity. The CISO plan to accomplish this objective has been titled 'Management and Administrative Support Systems' (MASS). The MASS plan is based on the continued use of JPL's IBM 3032 Computer system for administrative computing and for the MASS functions. The current candidate administrative Data Base Management Systems required to support the MASS include ADABASE, Cullinane IDMS and TOTAL. Previous uses of administrative Data Base Systems have been applied to specific local functions rather than in a centralized manner with elements common to the many user groups. Limited capacity data base systems have been installed in microprocessor based office automation systems in a few Project and Management Offices using Ashton-Tate dBASE II. These experiences plus some other localized in house DBMS uses have provided an excellent background for developing user and system requirements for a single DBMS to support the MASS program.

  2. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  3. Experimental acquisition system for impedance tomography with active electrode approach.

    PubMed

    Rigaud, B; Shi, Y; Chauveau, N; Morucci, J P

    1993-11-01

    An experimental system for impedance tomography has been constructed. The acquisition system uses 16 multifunctional active electrodes, each including a current source and a voltage buffer. Images of active and reactive parts of different target impedances in a phantom filled with liquid have been obtained. The system performance has been compared with those of other systems using either a mesh phantom or rods as point sources used for the determination of the modulation transfer function. PMID:8145585

  4. Practical engineering: control of active systems using the stagnation temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lunde, P.J.

    1982-04-01

    Solar active systems with flat plate collectors are discussed with reference to the temperature at which the system should be activated. It is concluded that the system should be activated when the stagnation temperature (temperature under the absorber plate when no fluid is circulating) equals the temperature of the fluid in storage. A thermistor Wheatstone bridge control system is described which will eliminate pump relay chatter and the permissible control differential is calculated from the collector efficiency curve. To avoid dedication of an entire collector to house the control system, a method is described for determining the stagnation temperature using a portion of an active collector. For an active solar hot water system, a calculation is carried out to show that a 2/sup 0/F temperature differential (stagnation temperature-storage temperature) is satisfactory. (MJJ)

  5. Electricity/Electronics Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This electricity/electronics guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 35 modules on the following topics: electrical…

  6. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to electrical and functional tests of its pyrotechic petal deployer system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers and technicians in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the Sojourner autonomous rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  7. PEGASUS: Designing a System for Supporting Group Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyprianidou, Maria; Demetriadis, Stavros; Pombortsis, Andreas; Karatasios, George

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the design and first results of the integration of a web-based system person-centred group-activity support system (PEGASUS) in university instruction, as a means for advancing person-centred learning by supporting group activity. The PEGASUS is expected to help students and teachers in two distinct…

  8. Applying an Activity System to Online Collaborative Group Work Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hyungshin; Kang, Myunghee

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether an activity system provides a systematic framework to analyse collaborative group work. Using an activity system as a unit of analysis, the research examined learner behaviours, conflicting factors and facilitating factors while students engaged in collaborative work via asynchronous computer-mediated communication.…

  9. Entry-Level Activities in System Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hylander, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    System-level consultation or organizational development in schools is an area in great need of theoretical models and definitions. The three articles in this special issue provide a unique learning opportunity not only for consultation across borders but also for consultation within the same nation. In my commentary, I limit my remarks to a few…

  10. Methodology for the systems engineering process. Volume 1: System functional activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Systems engineering is examined in terms of functional activities that are performed in the conduct of a system definition/design, and system development is described in a parametric analysis that combines functions, performance, and design variables. Emphasis is placed on identification of activities performed by design organizations, design specialty groups, as well as a central systems engineering organizational element. Identification of specific roles and responsibilities for doing functions, and monitoring and controlling activities within the system development operation are also emphasized.

  11. A microscopic field theoretical approach for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaimo, F.; Praetorius, S.; Voigt, A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a microscopic modeling approach for active systems. The approach extends the phase field crystal (PFC) model and allows us to describe generic properties of active systems within a continuum model. The approach is validated by reproducing results obtained with corresponding agent-based and microscopic phase field models. We consider binary collisions, collective motion and vortex formation. For larger numbers of particles we analyze the coarsening process in active crystals and identify giant number fluctuation in a cluster formation process.

  12. Motor Cortex Activity Organizes the Developing Rubrospinal System

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Preston T.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The corticospinal and rubrospinal systems function in skilled movement control. A key question is how do these systems develop the capacity to coordinate their motor functions and, in turn, if the red nucleus/rubrospinal tract (RN/RST) compensates for developmental corticospinal injury? We used the cat to investigate whether the developing rubrospinal system is shaped by activity-dependent interactions with the developing corticospinal system. We unilaterally inactivated M1 by muscimol microinfusion between postnatal weeks 5 and 7 to examine activity-dependent interactions and whether the RN/RST compensates for corticospinal tract (CST) developmental motor impairments and CST misprojections after M1 inactivation. We examined the RN motor map and RST cervical projections at 7 weeks of age, while the corticospinal system was inactivated, and at 14 weeks, after activity returned. During M1 inactivation, the RN on the same side showed normal RST projections and reduced motor thresholds, suggestive of precocious development. By contrast, the RN on the untreated/active M1 side showed sparse RST projections and an immature motor map. After M1 activity returned later in adolescent cat development, RN on the active M1/CST side continued to show a substantial loss of spinal terminations and an impaired motor map. RN/RST on the inactivated side regressed to a smaller map and fewer axons. Our findings suggest that the developing rubrospinal system is under activity-dependent regulation by the corticospinal system for establishing mature RST connections and RN motor map. The lack of RS compensation on the non-inactivated side can be explained by development of ipsilateral misprojections from the active M1 that outcompete the RST. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Skilled movements reflect the activity of multiple descending motor systems and their interactions with spinal motor circuits. Currently, there is little insight into whether motor systems interact during development to

  13. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical and functional tests of its pyrotechic petal deployer system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers and technicians in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). In the background is the Pathfinder cruise stage, which the lander will be mated to once its functional tests are complete. The lander will remain attached to this stage during its six-to-seven-month journey to Mars. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the Sojourner autonomous rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  14. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical test of its pyrotechnic system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers Lorraine Garcia (foreground) and Linda Robeck in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). A wheel of the Sojourner autonomous rover, which is attached to one of the lander's petals, can be seen behind the lander. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  15. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a test of its pyrotechnic system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineer Jerry Gutierrez in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). A wheel of the Sojourner autonomous rover, which is attached to one of the lander's petals, can be seen behind the lander. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  16. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Active cooling system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross section and structural arrangement on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles are investigated. An active cooling system which maintains the aircraft's entire surface area at temperatures below 394 K at Mach 6 is developed along with a hydrogen fuel tankage thermal protection system. Thermodynamic characteristics of the actively cooled thermal protection systems established are summarized. Design heat loads and coolant flowrate requirements are defined for each major structural section and for the total system. Cooling system weights are summarized at the major component level. Conclusions and recommendations are included.

  17. Active and intelligent packaging systems for a modern society.

    PubMed

    Realini, Carolina E; Marcos, Begonya

    2014-11-01

    Active and intelligent packaging systems are continuously evolving in response to growing challenges from a modern society. This article reviews: (1) the different categories of active and intelligent packaging concepts and currently available commercial applications, (2) latest packaging research trends and innovations, and (3) the growth perspectives of the active and intelligent packaging market. Active packaging aiming at extending shelf life or improving safety while maintaining quality is progressing towards the incorporation of natural active agents into more sustainable packaging materials. Intelligent packaging systems which monitor the condition of the packed food or its environment are progressing towards more cost-effective, convenient and integrated systems to provide innovative packaging solutions. Market growth is expected for active packaging with leading shares for moisture absorbers, oxygen scavengers, microwave susceptors and antimicrobial packaging. The market for intelligent packaging is also promising with strong gains for time-temperature indicator labels and advancements in the integration of intelligent concepts into packaging materials. PMID:25034453

  18. Active synchronization between two different chaotic dynamical system

    SciTech Connect

    Maheri, M.; Arifin, N. Md; Ismail, F.

    2015-05-15

    In this paper we investigate on the synchronization problem between two different chaotic dynamical system based on the Lyapunov stability theorem by using nonlinear control functions. Active control schemes are used for synchronization Liu system as drive and Rossler system as response. Numerical simulation by using Maple software are used to show effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  19. Active synchronization between two different chaotic dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheri, M.; Arifin, N. Md; Ismail, F.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we investigate on the synchronization problem between two different chaotic dynamical system based on the Lyapunov stability theorem by using nonlinear control functions. Active control schemes are used for synchronization Liu system as drive and Rossler system as response. Numerical simulation by using Maple software are used to show effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  20. NASA's UAS [Unmanned Aircraft Systems] Related Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    NASA continues to operate all sizes of UAS in all classes of airspace both domestically and internationally. Missions range from highly complex operations in coordination with piloted aircraft, ground, and space systems in support of science objectives to single aircraft operations in support of aeronautics research. One such example is a scaled commercial transport aircraft being used to study recovery techniques due to large upsets. NASA's efforts to support routine UAS operations continued on several fronts last year. At the national level in the United States (U.S.), NASA continued its support of the UAS Executive Committee (ExCom) comprised of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Defense (DoD), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and NASA. The committee was formed in recognition of the need of UAS operated by these agencies to access to the National Airspace System (NAS) to support operational, training, development and research requirements. Recommendations were received on how to operate both manned and unmanned aircraft in class D airspace and plans are being developed to validate and implement those recommendations. In addition the UAS ExCom has begun developing recommendations for how to achieve routine operations in remote areas as well as for small UAS operations in class G airspace. As well as supporting the UAS ExCom, NASA is a participant in the recently formed Aviation Rule Making Committee for UAS. This committee, established by the FAA, is intended to propose regulatory guidance which would enable routine civil UAS operations. As that effort matures NASA stands ready to supply the necessary technical expertise to help that committee achieve its objectives. By supporting both the UAS ExCom and UAS ARC, NASA is positioned to provide its technical expertise across the full spectrum of UAS airspace access related topic areas. The UAS NAS Access Project got underway this past year under the leadership of NASA s Aeronautics

  1. Retinal waves coordinate patterned activity throughout the developing visual system

    PubMed Central

    Ackman, James B.; Burbridge, Timothy J.; Crair, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The morphologic and functional development of the vertebrate nervous system is initially governed by genetic factors and subsequently refined by neuronal activity. However, fundamental features of the nervous system emerge before sensory experience is possible. Thus, activity-dependent development occurring before the onset of experience must be driven by spontaneous activity, but the origin and nature of activity in vivo remains largely untested. Here we use optical methods to demonstrate in live neonatal mice that waves of spontaneous retinal activity are present and propagate throughout the entire visual system before eye opening. This patterned activity encompassed the visual field, relied on cholinergic neurotransmission, preferentially initiated in the binocular retina, and exhibited spatiotemporal correlations between the two hemispheres. Retinal waves were the primary source of activity in the midbrain and primary visual cortex, but only modulated ongoing activity in secondary visual areas. Thus, spontaneous retinal activity is transmitted through the entire visual system and carries patterned information capable of guiding the activity-dependent development of complex intra- and inter- hemispheric circuits before the onset of vision. PMID:23060192

  2. Active Venting System Offshore Northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, Shyam; Rise, Leif; Bellec, Valérie; Dolan, Margaret; Bøe, Reidulv; Thorsnes, Terje; Buhl-Mortensen, Pål; Buhl-Mortensen, Lene

    2008-07-01

    A combined sediment-sampling, high-resolution seismic, multiple echo sounder, and video survey was conducted offshore Vesterålen, northern Norway, in October 2007 as part of the ongoing Marine Area Database for Norwegian Coast and Oceanic Regions (MAREANO) program. MAREANO is a multidisciplinary seabed mapping program conducting physical, biological, and environmental mapping in the Lofoten/southern Barents Sea area. Data and analysis arising from this program will provide the basis for ecosystem-based management of Norway's coastal and offshore regions. The survey used multicorer, box corer, and grab samplers; a TOPAS parametric subbottom profiler; 18-, 38-, 70-, 120-, 200-, and 400-kilohertz echo sounders; and a CAMPOD camera system with two video cameras and lights mounted on an aluminum frame.

  3. Correlated Rotational Noise in Active Brownian Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Caleb; Baskaran, Aparna

    We consider a system of self-propelled particles in a viscous medium for which the angle parametrizing the direction of particle propulsion is subject to correlated noise. The physics involved in the correlated noise is explored by deriving a modified Smoluchowski equation that governs the evolution of the probability distribution for particle positions and orientations. More precisely, given noise correlations that decay exponentially in time with decay constant ν, we give the modified Smoluchowski equation as a perturbative expansion in ν. While the physical origins of correlated noise may be diverse, we give one interpretation of the resulting dynamics in terms of inertial effects that are absent from the usual overdamped description of self-propelled particles in a viscous medium.

  4. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, D.E.

    1988-01-12

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed. 4 figs.

  5. Active control system for high speed windmills

    DOEpatents

    Avery, Don E.

    1988-01-01

    A pump stroke is matched to the operating speed of a high speed windmill. The windmill drives a hydraulic pump for a control. Changes in speed of a wind driven shaft open supply and exhaust valves to opposite ends of a hydraulic actuator to lengthen and shorten an oscillating arm thereby lengthening and shortening the stroke of an output pump. Diminishing wind to a stall speed causes the valves to operate the hydraulic cylinder to shorten the oscillating arm to zero. A pressure accumulator in the hydraulic system provides the force necessary to supply the hydraulic fluid under pressure to drive the actuator into and out of the zero position in response to the windmill shaft speed approaching and exceeding windmill stall speed.

  6. An Active RFID Accountability System (RAS) for Constrained Wireless Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, Alan M; Hanson, Gregory R; Sexton, Angela Kay; Jones Jr, J P; Freer, Eva B; Sjoreen, Andrea L

    2011-01-01

    A team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed an RFID Accountability System (RAS) that allows items with active RFID tags to be tracked in environments where tags may not be able to transmit their location continuously. The system uses activators that transmit a short range signal. Active RFID tags are in a sleep state until they encounter an activator. Then they transmit a signal that is picked up by the antennas installed throughout the building. This paper presents the theory of operation, application areas, lessons learned, and key features developed over the course of seven years of development and use.

  7. [Activities of System Studies and Simulation, Inc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. Launch Vehicle Interface Work Performed: a. S3 provided to KSC the new launch inclination targets needed for the April '04 launch date. 2. Prelaunch operations work performed: a. S3 updated the staffing plan for MSFC on-console personnel\\during the Final Countdown prior to launch. 3. Software Assessment Work Performed: a. S3 evaluated and recommended approval for Program Control Board (PCB) proposed change 649 for ground software changes, as well as change 650 and 650A for Stored Program Commands. 4. Education and Public Outreach Work Performed: a. S3 continues to coordinate the effort for the design and fabrication of scale models of the GP-3 for use at the launch site, education forums, and management/technical briefings. S3 also prepared a Change Request for additional funds needed for fabrication of additional scale models. S3 drafted the planned uses of these models, including the possibility of participation in the Boston, MA showings of the traveling Einstein Exhibit. 5. Program Management Support Work Performed: a. S3 prepared the input for and closed three MSFC Centerwide Action Item Tracking Systems (CAITS) actions during this period.

  8. Comparative study between two different active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1978-01-01

    An activated leading-edge (LE)-tailing-edge (TE) control system is applied to a drone aircraft with the objective of enabling the drone to fly subsonically at dynamic pressures which are 44% above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure. The control synthesis approach is based on the aerodynamic energy concept and it incorporates recent developments in this area. A comparison is made between the performance of the activated LE-TE control system and the performance of a TE control system, analyzed in a previous work. The results obtained indicate that although all the control systems achieve the flutter suppression objectives, the TE control system appears to be somewhat superior to the LE-TE control system, in this specific application. This superiority is manifested through reduced values of control surface activity over a wide range of flight conditions.

  9. Space Activism as an Epiphanic Belief System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendell, Wendell

    2006-01-01

    Years of interaction with young people in the space industry and in space activists groups led to my observation that many such individuals can cite a quite specific life event that triggered a life-long interest in or commitment to creating a space future. I am particularly intrigued by parallels between such experiences and the phenomenon of epiphanic experiences among committed Christians. I see analogies between the puzzlement among space activists and among Christian groups as to the reasons for so many people being "unbelievers." At a small international meeting on lunar exploration in 2003, I heard two separate lunch speakers cite such personal experiences. At the beginning of a break in that meeting, I grabbed the microphone from the chairman and asked each person to write down on a pad by his chair whether or not he (or she) had experienced a specific event that led to their involvement in space. If the answer was positive, I asked for a brief narrative, for their age at the time, and for their current age. I received 53 submissions, 20% of which simply stated that their involvement in space exploration was happenstance. (Apollo astronaut John Young was among these.) The other 80% of the submissions had specific stories. The ages at the time of the epiphany ranged from 4 to 47; and their current ages ranged from 22 to 78. I will present a high-level characterization of these inputs. Interest in space exploration as a form of belief system is consistent with choosing NASA goals for the purpose of inspiration and with phenomena such as the "Overview Effect". More research might explore what form the transcendent experience takes and whether it might be associated with feelings of universal connection such as the noosphere or "The Force". From a pragmatic point of view, outreach strategies for exploration should focus on giving individuals access to personal, potentially transformational experiences as opposed to astronaut talks at civic clubs.

  10. Active Storage Processing in a Parallel File System

    SciTech Connect

    Felix, Evan J.; Fox, Kevin M.; Regimbal, Kevin M.; Nieplocha, Jarek

    2006-01-01

    By creating a processing system within a parallel file system one can harness the power of unused processing power on servers that have very fast access to the disks they are serving. By inserting a module the Lustre file system the Active Storage Concept is able to perform processing with the file system architecture. Results of using this technology are presented as the results of the Supercomputing StorCloud Challenge Application are reviewed.

  11. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Status and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entekhabi, D.; Yueh, S. H.; O'Neill, P. E.; Entin, J. K.; Njoku, E. G.; Kellogg, K.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched on January 31, 2015. SMAP provides high-resolution, frequent revisit global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state based on coincident L-band radiometer and L-band radar measurements. The primary science goal of SMAP is to provide new perspectives on how the three fundamental cycles of the Earth system, the water, energy and carbon cycles, are linked together over land. Soil moisture is the key variable that links the three cycles and makes their co-variations synchronous in time. Soil moisture products with varying resolution and coverage are produced from the radiometer alone, radar alone, radiometer-radar combination and data assimilation. In this session the status of the SMAP observatory and early results based on the science data products will be included. The science data acquisition began in May 2015 following several weeks of observatory and instrument commissioning. An intense calibration and validation period followed. Preliminary science products on instrument measurements, soil moisture, landscape frozen or thawed status, and net ecosystem exchange are available at publicly-accessible data archives. The presentation will include early and summary results on the validation of these products. The instrument measurements can also be used to map sea-ice coverage, ocean surface winds and sea surface salinity. Examples of these global retrievals are also presented.

  12. Bactericidal activity of metal-mediated peroxide-ascorbate systems.

    PubMed

    Drath, D B; Karnovsky, M L

    1974-11-01

    Model systems containing ascorbate, hydrogen peroxide, and divalent copper or cobalt have been shown to possess marked bactericidal activity. At equivalent concentrations, copper-containing systems were more bactericidal than the corresponding mixtures containing cobalt. Cobalt at concentrations below 10(-4) M did not appreciably augment microbicidal activity, whereas systems containing copper at concentrations as low as 5 x 10(-6) M were still capable of causing some bacterial death. Manganese was inactive. None of these systems was as potent as the well known myeloperoxidase-peroxide-halide system. The mechanisms of action of these systems are not as yet clear. The possibility that they function through the generation of superoxide (O(2) (-)), hydroxyl radical (OH.), or other free radicals was explored through the use of superoxide dismutase and several free radical scavengers. It seems likely at present that the two active metal-mediated systems function via separate mechanisms. The copper system acts with dehydroascorbate, whereas the cobalt system does not. Activity in the cobalt system appears to depend upon the generation of free radicals. PMID:16558093

  13. Complement profile and activation mechanisms by different LDL apheresis systems.

    PubMed

    Hovland, Anders; Hardersen, Randolf; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Enebakk, Terje; Christiansen, Dorte; Ludviksen, Judith Krey; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Lappegård, Knut Tore

    2012-07-01

    Extracorporeal removal of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by means of selective LDL apheresis is indicated in otherwise uncontrolled familial hypercholesterolemia. During blood-biomaterial interaction other constituents than the LDL particles are affected, including the complement system. We set up an ex vivo model in which human whole blood was passed through an LDL apheresis system with one of three different apheresis columns: whole blood adsorption, plasma adsorption and plasma filtration. The concentrations of complement activation products revealed distinctly different patterns of activation and adsorption by the different systems. Evaluated as the final common terminal complement complex (TCC) the whole blood system was inert, in contrast to the plasma systems, which generated substantial and equal amounts of TCC. Initial classical pathway activation was revealed equally for both plasma systems as increases in the C1rs-C1inh complex and C4d. Alternative pathway activation (Bb) was most pronounced for the plasma adsorption system. Although the anaphylatoxins (C3a and C5a) were equally generated by the two plasma separation systems, they were efficiently adsorbed to the plasma adsorption column before the "outlet", whereas they were left free in the plasma in the filtration system. Consequently, during blood-biomaterial interaction in LDL apheresis the complement system is modulated in different manners depending on the device composition. PMID:22373816

  14. Dual-Actuator Active Vibration-Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Albert F.; Kiraly, Louis J.; Montague, Gerald T.; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Manchala, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    Dual-actuator active vibration-control (DAAVC) system is developmental system of type described in "Active Vibration Dampers for Rotating Machinery" (LEW-15427). System features sensors and actuators positioned and oriented at bearings to measure and counteract vibrations of shaft along either of two axes perpendicular to axis of rotation. Effective in damping vibrations of helicopter-engine test stand, making it safer to operate engine at speeds near and above first resonance of engine/test-stand system. Opens new opportunities for engine designers to draw more power from engine, and concept applicable to other rotating machines.

  15. Activity-Based Costing Systems for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Dennis H.

    1993-01-01

    Examines traditional costing models utilized in higher education and pinpoints shortcomings related to proper identification of costs. Describes activity-based costing systems as a superior alternative for cost identification, measurement, and allocation. (MLF)

  16. Active mirror alignment control system for the MACE telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulgod, S. V.; Pious, Lizy; Chadda, V. K.; Kaul, S. R.; Yadav, K. K.; Koul, R.

    2002-03-01

    The conceptual design of an active mirror contol system for the MACE telescope, being set up by the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Mt. Abu, is described. Preliminary results obtained from recent laboratory trials are also described.

  17. A Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. This paper provides a tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements as well as a comparison of the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation. This paper also surveys the flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: Suppression of Transient Accelerations By Levitation (STABLE); the Microgravity Vibration Isolation Mount (MIM); and the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS).

  18. Survey of Active Vibration Isolation Systems for Microgravity Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grodsinsky, Carlos M.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2000-01-01

    In view of the utility of space vehicles as orbiting science laboratories, the need for vibration isolation systems for acceleration-sensitive experiments has gained increasing visibility. To date, three active microgravity vibration isolation systems have successfully been demonstrated in flight. A tutorial discussion of the microgravity vibration isolation problem, including a description of the acceleration environment of the International Space Station and attenuation requirements, as well as a comparison or the dynamics of passive isolation, active rack-level isolation, and active payload-level isolation is provided. The flight test results of the three demonstrated systems: suppression of transient accelerations by levitation, the microgravity vibration isolation mount, and the active rack isolation system are surveyed.

  19. Activity Theory in Information Systems Research and Practice: Theoretical Underpinnings for an Information Systems Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mursu, Anja; Luukkonen, Irmeli; Toivanen, Marika; Korpela, Mikko

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of information systems is to facilitate work activities: here we consider how Activity Theory can be applied in information systems development. Method. The requirements for an analytical model for emancipatory, work-oriented information systems research and practice are specified. Previous research work in Activity…

  20. Overview of coupled bunch active damper systems at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Steimel, J.; Crisp, J.; Ma, Hengjie; Marriner, J.; McGinnis, D.

    1996-05-01

    Beam intensities in all of the accelerators at Fermilab will increase significantly when the Main Injector becomes operational and will cause unstable oscillations in transverse position and energy. Places where the coupled bunch oscillations could dilute emittances include the Booster, Main Injector, and Tevatron. This paper provides an overview of the active feedback system upgrades which will be used to counteract the problem. It will explain the similarities between all the systems and will also explain design differences between longitudinal and transverse systems, fast sweeping systems, and systems for partially filled machines. Results from operational systems will also be shown. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Overview of coupled-bunch active damper systems at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Steimel, J.; Crisp, J.; Ma, H.; Marriner, J.; McGinnis, D.

    1997-01-01

    Beam intensities in all of the accelerators at Fermilab will increase significantly when the Main Injector becomes operational and will cause unstable oscillations in transverse position and energy. Places where the coupled bunch oscillations could dilute emittances include the Booster, Main Injector, and Tevatron. This paper provides an overview of the active feedback system upgrades which will be used to counteract the problem. It will explain the similarities between all the systems and will also explain design differences between longitudinal and transverse systems, fast sweeping systems, and systems for partially filled machines. Results from operational systems will also be shown. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Understanding Tensions: Activity Systems Analysis of Cross-Continental Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, LanHui Zhang; Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Using the lens of Vygotsky's sociocultural theory, activity theory, and Engeström's activity systems analysis, this qualitative study explores students' experiences in the context of a sixteen-week transpacific collaboration between seven students at Northern Illinois University (NIU) and seven students from Shandong Normal…

  3. World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ): Global Activity Module

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Global Activity Module Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the World Energy Projection Plus (WEPS ) Global Activity Module (GAM) used to develop the International Energy Outlook for 2013 (IEO2013). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code.

  4. Disorder-mediated crowd control in an active matter system

    PubMed Central

    Pinçe, Erçağ; Velu, Sabareesh K. P.; Callegari, Agnese; Elahi, Parviz; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni; Volpe, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Living active matter systems such as bacterial colonies, schools of fish and human crowds, display a wealth of emerging collective and dynamic behaviours as a result of far-from-equilibrium interactions. The dynamics of these systems are better understood and controlled considering their interaction with the environment, which for realistic systems is often highly heterogeneous and disordered. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of spatial disorder can alter the long-term dynamics in a colloidal active matter system, making it switch between gathering and dispersal of individuals. At equilibrium, colloidal particles always gather at the bottom of any attractive potential; however, under non-equilibrium driving forces in a bacterial bath, the colloids disperse if disorder is added to the potential. The depth of the local roughness in the environment regulates the transition between gathering and dispersal of individuals in the active matter system, thus inspiring novel routes for controlling emerging behaviours far from equilibrium. PMID:26956085

  5. Disorder-mediated crowd control in an active matter system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinçe, Erçağ; Velu, Sabareesh K. P.; Callegari, Agnese; Elahi, Parviz; Gigan, Sylvain; Volpe, Giovanni; Volpe, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    Living active matter systems such as bacterial colonies, schools of fish and human crowds, display a wealth of emerging collective and dynamic behaviours as a result of far-from-equilibrium interactions. The dynamics of these systems are better understood and controlled considering their interaction with the environment, which for realistic systems is often highly heterogeneous and disordered. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of spatial disorder can alter the long-term dynamics in a colloidal active matter system, making it switch between gathering and dispersal of individuals. At equilibrium, colloidal particles always gather at the bottom of any attractive potential; however, under non-equilibrium driving forces in a bacterial bath, the colloids disperse if disorder is added to the potential. The depth of the local roughness in the environment regulates the transition between gathering and dispersal of individuals in the active matter system, thus inspiring novel routes for controlling emerging behaviours far from equilibrium.

  6. SMAP Science Data System Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, D.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will retrieve global surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw state based on measurements acquired by remote sensing instruments that fly on an Earth orbiting satellite. The SMAP observatory will launch no earlier than January 8, 2015 into a near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit for a three-year mission. The SMAP instrument suite includes a L-band radiometer and a L-band synthetic aperture radar. This paper will describe the architecture of the Science Data System (SDS) that processes the SMAP raw data into higher-level products. All of the SMAP products appear in the Hierarchical Data Format-5 (HDF5) format. Metadata that conform to the ISO 19115 standard accompany each product. SMAP products range from raw data (Level 0) through parsed and organized telemetry (Level 1A), calibrated signals (Level 1B/1C), retrieved geophysical values (Level 2), daily composite maps (Level 3), to analysis and modeling data (Level 4). This paper will describe an architecture that automates the challenge of delivering multiple products with large data volumes within a few hours to a few days of instrument acquisition. Additional challenges include handling data for a diverse user community as well as rapid data visualization. SMAP faces the additional complexity that the archive and access to the SMAP data processes through two NASA Data Active Archive Centers (DAAC): The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) hosts and distributes SMAP Radar data, while the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) hosts and distributes all other SMAP products.

  7. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences

    PubMed Central

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T.; Sugawara, Sho K.; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  8. Perceiving active listening activates the reward system and improves the impression of relevant experiences.

    PubMed

    Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Sugawara, Sho K; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Shinohara, Ryoji; Sugisawa, Yuka; Tokutake, Kentaro; Mochizuki, Yukiko; Anme, Tokie; Sadato, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Although active listening is an influential behavior, which can affect the social responses of others, the neural correlates underlying its perception have remained unclear. Sensing active listening in social interactions is accompanied by an improvement in the recollected impressions of relevant experiences and is thought to arouse positive feelings. We therefore hypothesized that the recognition of active listening activates the reward system, and that the emotional appraisal of experiences that had been subject to active listening would be improved. To test these hypotheses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on participants viewing assessments of their own personal experiences made by evaluators with or without active listening attitude. Subjects rated evaluators who showed active listening more positively. Furthermore, they rated episodes more positively when they were evaluated by individuals showing active listening. Neural activation in the ventral striatum was enhanced by perceiving active listening, suggesting that this was processed as rewarding. It also activated the right anterior insula, representing positive emotional reappraisal processes. Furthermore, the mentalizing network was activated when participants were being evaluated, irrespective of active listening behavior. Therefore, perceiving active listening appeared to result in positive emotional appraisal and to invoke mental state attribution to the active listener. PMID:25188354

  9. Human activity recognition based on Evolving Fuzzy Systems.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Jose Antonio; Angelov, Plamen; Ledezma, Agapito; Sanchis, Araceli

    2010-10-01

    Environments equipped with intelligent sensors can be of much help if they can recognize the actions or activities of their users. If this activity recognition is done automatically, it can be very useful for different tasks such as future action prediction, remote health monitoring, or interventions. Although there are several approaches for recognizing activities, most of them do not consider the changes in how a human performs a specific activity. We present an automated approach to recognize daily activities from the sensor readings of an intelligent home environment. However, as the way to perform an activity is usually not fixed but it changes and evolves, we propose an activity recognition method based on Evolving Fuzzy Systems. PMID:20945515

  10. THE STATE TOBACCO ACTIVITIES TRACKING AND EVALUATION (STATE) SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System is an electronic data warehouse containing up-to-date and historical state-level data on tobacco use prevention and control. The STATE System is designed to integrate many data sources to provide comprehensive su...

  11. PILOT PLANT EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Step feed, plug flow and complete mix activated sludge systems were compared on a pilot plant scale under similar operating conditions with the same municipal wastewater. The process loading to each system was varied over a wide range during the course of the investigation. Exten...

  12. Emergent Ultra-Long-Range Interactions Between Active Particles in Hybrid Active-Inactive Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua; Aragones, Juan; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    Particle-particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range and magnitude of such interactions has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless, immobile objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our system is a two dimensional colloidal monolayer composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids and a very small fraction of active (sinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra-long-range attractive interaction between active particles induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation time scale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials.

  13. Activation of the reward system boosts innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shaanan, Tamar L; Azulay-Debby, Hilla; Dubovik, Tania; Starosvetsky, Elina; Korin, Ben; Schiller, Maya; Green, Nathaniel L; Admon, Yasmin; Hakim, Fahed; Shen-Orr, Shai S; Rolls, Asya

    2016-08-01

    Positive expectations contribute to the clinical benefits of the placebo effect. Such positive expectations are mediated by the brain's reward system; however, it remains unknown whether and how reward system activation affects the body's physiology and, specifically, immunity. Here we show that activation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a key component of the reward system, strengthens immunological host defense. We used 'designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs' (DREADDs) to directly activate dopaminergic neurons in the mouse VTA and characterized the subsequent immune response after exposure to bacteria (Escherichia coli), using time-of-flight mass cytometry (CyTOF) and functional assays. We found an increase in innate and adaptive immune responses that were manifested by enhanced antibacterial activity of monocytes and macrophages, reduced in vivo bacterial load and a heightened T cell response in the mouse model of delayed-type hypersensitivity. By chemically ablating the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), we showed that the reward system's effects on immunity are, at least partly, mediated by the SNS. Thus, our findings establish a causal relationship between the activity of the VTA and the immune response to bacterial infection. PMID:27376577

  14. Advanced Active-Magnetic-Bearing Thrust-Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlach, Joseph; Kasarda, Mary; Blumber, Eric

    2008-01-01

    An advanced thrust-measurement system utilizes active magnetic bearings to both (1) levitate a floating frame in all six degrees of freedom and (2) measure the levitation forces between the floating frame and a grounded frame. This system was developed for original use in measuring the thrust exerted by a rocket engine mounted on the floating frame, but can just as well be used in other force-measurement applications. This system offers several advantages over prior thrust-measurement systems based on mechanical support by flexures and/or load cells: The system includes multiple active magnetic bearings for each degree of freedom, so that by selective use of one, some, or all of these bearings, it is possible to test a given article over a wide force range in the same fixture, eliminating the need to transfer the article to different test fixtures to obtain the benefit of full-scale accuracy of different force-measurement devices for different force ranges. Like other active magnetic bearings, the active magnetic bearings of this system include closed-loop control subsystems, through which the stiffness and damping characteristics of the magnetic bearings can be modified electronically. The design of the system minimizes or eliminates cross-axis force-measurement errors. The active magnetic bearings are configured to provide support against movement along all three orthogonal Cartesian axes, and such that the support along a given axis does not produce force along any other axis. Moreover, by eliminating the need for such mechanical connections as flexures used in prior thrust-measurement systems, magnetic levitation of the floating frame eliminates what would otherwise be major sources of cross-axis forces and the associated measurement errors. Overall, relative to prior mechanical-support thrust-measurement systems, this system offers greater versatility for adaptation to a variety of test conditions and requirements. The basic idea of most prior active

  15. Low Energy Physical Activity Recognition System on Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Morillo, Luis Miguel Soria; Gonzalez-Abril, Luis; Ramirez, Juan Antonio Ortega; de la Concepcion, Miguel Angel Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    An innovative approach to physical activity recognition based on the use of discrete variables obtained from accelerometer sensors is presented. The system first performs a discretization process for each variable, which allows efficient recognition of activities performed by users using as little energy as possible. To this end, an innovative discretization and classification technique is presented based on the χ2 distribution. Furthermore, the entire recognition process is executed on the smartphone, which determines not only the activity performed, but also the frequency at which it is carried out. These techniques and the new classification system presented reduce energy consumption caused by the activity monitoring system. The energy saved increases smartphone usage time to more than 27 h without recharging while maintaining accuracy. PMID:25742171

  16. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  17. Individual popularity and activity in online social systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haibo; Han, Dingyi; Wang, Xiaofan

    2010-03-01

    We propose a stochastic model of web user behaviors in online social systems, and study the influence of the attraction kernel on the statistical property of user or item occurrence. Combining the different growth patterns of new entities and attraction patterns of old ones, different heavy-tailed distributions for popularity and activity which have been observed in real life, can be obtained. From a broader perspective, we explore the underlying principle governing the statistical feature of individual popularity and activity in online social systems and point out the potential simple mechanism underlying the complex dynamics of the systems.

  18. Vehicle dynamics control using an active third-axle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Amir; Goodarzi, Avesta; Hassan Shojaeefard, Mohammad; Khajepour, Amir

    2014-11-01

    This paper introduces the active third-axle system as an innovative vehicle dynamic control method. This method can be applicable for different kinds of three-axle vehicles such as buses, trucks, or even three-axle passenger cars. In this system, an actuator on the middle axle actively applies an independent force on the suspension to improve the handling characteristics, and hence, its technology is similar to slow-active suspension systems. This system can change the inherent vehicle dynamic characteristics, such as under/over steering behaviour, in the linear handling region, as well as vehicle stability in the nonlinear, limit handling region. In this paper, our main focus is to show the potential capabilities of this method in enhancing vehicle dynamic performance. For this purpose, as the first step, the proposed method in both linear and nonlinear vehicle handling regions is studied mathematically. Next, a comprehensive, nonlinear, 10 degrees of freedom vehicle model with a fuzzy control strategy is used to evaluate the effectiveness of this system. The dynamic behaviour of a vehicle, when either uncontrolled or equipped with the active third axle is then compared. Simulation results show that this active system can be considered as an innovative method for vehicle dynamic control.

  19. Narrowband system activities in the NASA communications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durrani, S. H.

    1979-01-01

    The objective of NASA's narrowband system activities is to identify, develop, and test the technology needed for future commercial satellite-aided mobile communications systems. Desired characteristics include low service cost, efficient spectrum utilization, and compatibility with terrestrial systems. Ongoing effort includes system concept definition and market analysis. A typical system would need a large spaceborne antenna with 50 to 100 beams, each 0.5 to 0.7 degree wide, onboard switching and processing, linear solid-state amplifiers, and low-cost user terminals. The paper describes current studies and discusses future NASA plans in this field.

  20. Fault detection and isolation for an active wheelset control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzapour, Mohammad; Mei, T. X.; Xuesong, Jin

    2014-05-01

    Active control for railway wheelsets in the primary suspension has been shown to offer a number of performance gains, and especially it can be used to stabilise the wheelsets without compromising the vehicle's performance on curves. However, the use of actuators, sensors and data processors to replace the traditional passive suspension raises the issue of system safety in the event of a failure of the active control, which could result in the loss of stability (i.e. wheelset hunting), and in more severe cases, derailment. This paper studies the key issue of condition monitoring for an actively controlled railway system, with a focus on actuator failures to detect and isolate failure modes in such a system. It seeks to establish the necessary basis for fault detection to ensure system reliability in the event of malfunction in one of the two actuators. Computer simulations are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.