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Sample records for active laser illumination

  1. Optogenetic Perturbation of Neural Activity with Laser Illumination in Semi-intact Drosophila Larvae in Motion

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Teruyuki; Fushiki, Akira; Nose, Akinao; Kohsaka, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila larval locomotion is a splendid model system in developmental and physiological neuroscience, by virtue of the genetic accessibility of the underlying neuronal components in the circuits1-6. Application of optogenetics7,8 in the larval neural circuit allows us to manipulate neuronal activity in spatially and temporally patterned ways9-13. Typically, specimens are broadly illuminated with a mercury lamp or LED, so specificity of the target neurons is controlled by binary gene expression systems such as the Gal4-UAS system14,15. In this work, to improve the spatial resolution to "sub-genetic resolution", we locally illuminated a subset of neurons in the ventral nerve cord using lasers implemented in a conventional confocal microscope. While monitoring the motion of the body wall of the semi-intact larvae, we interactively activated or inhibited neural activity with channelrhodopsin16,17 or halorhodopsin18-20, respectively. By spatially and temporally restricted illumination of the neural tissue, we can manipulate the activity of specific neurons in the circuit at a specific phase of behavior. This method is useful for studying the relationship between the activities of a local neural assembly in the ventral nerve cord and the spatiotemporal pattern of motor output. PMID:23851598

  2. Laser sources for object illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, G.F.

    1994-11-15

    The considerations which formulate the specifications for a laser illuminator are explained, using the example of an underwater object. Depending on the parameters which define the scenario, widely varying laser requirements result.

  3. Laser fusion target illumination system.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C E

    1975-06-01

    Laser fusion experiments require the focusing of very intense pulsed laser beams onto very small fuel pellets. All reported experiments to date have used lenses to focus one or more laser beams onto the target. This paper describes a combined refractive/reflective illumination system that provides nearly uniform irradiance with nearly orthogonal incidence over the complete spherical target, with only two laser beams. This illumination system was used in the experiments that produced the first known symmetric target implosions. Furthermore, these experiments produced what we believe were the first thermonuclear neutrons generated by a laser-driven implosion. PMID:20154815

  4. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  5. Estimation of illuminator scintillation in laser-illuminated imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayton, David C.; Lasche, James B.

    2013-09-01

    It is well known that atmospheric turbulence corrupts the phase front of laser beam propagation. The phase distortions manifest themselves as intensity fluctuations when the beam is propagated over some distance. This intensity fluctuation is often referred to as scintillation. Laser illuminated imaging systems are used for a variety of applications including night time imaging and tracking. The illuminator intensity fluctuation is often considered a noise effect on the imagery, however if an estimate of the scintillation can be separated from the images, it would be useful in estimating atmospheric turbulence parameters. In past work we have used a Bayesian estimation approach to separate the illuminator fluctuations from the target images. In this paper we extend that approach to included calculations of the spatial and temporal statistics of the scintillation estimate to extract atmospheric turbulence parameters

  6. Atmospheric effects on active illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Scot E. J.; Kansky, Jan E.

    2005-08-01

    For some beam-control applications, we can rely on the cooperation of the target when gathering information about the target location and the state of the atmosphere between the target and the beam-control system. The typical example is a cooperative point-source beacon on the target. Light from such a beacon allows the beam-control system to track the target accurately, and, if higher-order adaptive optics is to be employed, to make wave-front measurements and apply appropriate corrections with a deformable mirror. In many applications, including directed-energy weapons, the target is not cooperative. In the absence of a cooperative beacon, we must find other ways to collect the relevant information. This can be accomplished with an active-illumination system. Typically, this means shining one or more lasers at the target and observing the reflected light. In this paper, we qualitatively explore a number of difficulties inherent to active illumination, and suggest some possible mitigation techniques.

  7. Pulsed Laser Illumination of Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland; Jenkins, Philip; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic array receivers to provide remote power. The induction FEL and the radio-frequency (RF) FEL both produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work, we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format, producing 50 ps pulses at a frequency of 78 MHz. A variety of Si, GaAs, CaSb and CdInSe2 (CIS) solar cells are tested at average incident powers between 4 mW/sq cm and 425 mW/sq cm. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced by using a pulsed laser source compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. Because the pulse separation is less than or approximately equal to the minority carrier lifetime, the illumination conditions are effectively those of a continuous wave laser. The time dependence of the voltage and current response of the cells are also measured using a sampling oscilloscope equipped with a high frequency voltage probe and current transformer. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments shows that the RF FEL pulse format yields much more efficient photovoltaic conversion of light than does an induction FEL pulse format.

  8. Pulsed laser illumination of photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic array receivers to provide remote power. Both the radio-frequency (RF) and induction FEL provide FEL produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments indicates that the RF FEL pulse format yields more efficient photovoltaic conversion than does an induction FEL pulse format.

  9. Pulsed laser illumination of photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic receivers to provide remote power. Both the radio-frequency (RF) and induction FEL produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments indicates that the RF FEL pulse format yields more efficient photovoltaic conversion than does an induction FEL format.

  10. Moonbase night power by laser illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Moonbase solar-power concepts must somehow address the energy storage problem posed by the 354-hour lunar night. Attention is presently given to the feasibility of laser-array illumination of a lunar base, using technology that is projected to be available in the near term. Beam-spreading due to atmospheric distortions could be reduced through the use of adaptive optics to compensate for atmospheric turbulence.

  11. Laser scattering by transcranial rat brain illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Marcelo V. P.; Prates, Renato; Kato, Ilka T.; Sabino, Caetano P.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.

    2012-06-01

    Due to the great number of applications of Low-Level-Laser-Therapy (LLLT) in Central Nervous System (CNS), the study of light penetration through skull and distribution in the brain becomes extremely important. The aim is to analyze the possibility of precise illumination of deep regions of the rat brain, measure the penetration and distribution of red (λ = 660 nm) and Near Infra-Red (NIR) (λ = 808 nm) diode laser light and compare optical properties of brain structures. The head of the animal (Rattus Novergicus) was epilated and divided by a sagittal cut, 2.3 mm away from mid plane. This section of rat's head was illuminated with red and NIR lasers in points above three anatomical structures: hippocampus, cerebellum and frontal cortex. A high resolution camera, perpendicularly positioned, was used to obtain images of the brain structures. Profiles of scattered intensities in the laser direction were obtained from the images. There is a peak in the scattered light profile corresponding to the skin layer. The bone layer gives rise to a valley in the profile indicating low scattering coefficient, or frontal scattering. Another peak in the region related to the brain is an indication of high scattering coefficient (μs) for this tissue. This work corroborates the use of transcranial LLLT in studies with rats which are subjected to models of CNS diseases. The outcomes of this study point to the possibility of transcranial LLLT in humans for a large number of diseases.

  12. Excimer laser processing of backside-illuminated CCDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. D.

    1993-01-01

    An excimer laser is used to activate previously implanted dopants on the backside of a backside-illuminated CCD. The controlled ion implantation of the backside and subsequent thin layer heating and recrystallization by the short wavelength pulsed excimer laser simultaneously activates the dopant and anneals out implant damage. This improves the dark current response, repairs defective pixels and improves spectral response. This process heats a very thin layer of the material to high temperatures on a nanosecond time scale while the bulk of the delicate CCD substrate remains at low temperature. Excimer laser processing backside-illuminated CCD's enables salvage and utilization of otherwise nonfunctional components by bringing their dark current response to within an acceptable range. This process is particularly useful for solid state imaging detectors used in commercial, scientific and government applications requiring a wide spectral response and low light level detection.

  13. Space power by laser illumination of PV arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    There has recently been a resurgence of interest in the use of beamed power to support space exploration activities. The utility is examined of photovoltaics and problem and research areas are identified for photovoltaics in two beamed-power applications: to convert incident laser radiation to power at a remote receiving station, and as a primary power source on space based power station transmitting power to a remote user. A particular application of recent interest is to use a ground-based free electron laser as a power source for space applications. Specific applications include: night power for a moonbase by laser illumination of the moonbase solar arrays; use of a laser to provide power for satellites in medium and geosynchronous Earth orbit, and a laser powered system for an electrical propulsion orbital transfer vehicle. These and other applications are currently being investigated at NASA Lewis as part of a new program to demonstrate the feasibility of laser transmission of power for space.

  14. Space power by ground-based laser illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Reducing energy storage requirements of space power systems by illuminating the photovoltaic arrays with a remotely located laser system is addressed. It is proposed that large lasers be located on cloud-free sites at one or more ground locations and that large lenses or mirrors with adaptive optical correction be used to reduce the beam spread due to diffraction or atmospheric turbulence. During the eclipse periods or lunar night, the lasers illuminate the solar arrays to a level sufficient to provide operating power. Two applications are discussed: illumination of geosynchronous orbit satellites and illumination of a moonbase power system. Issues for photovoltaic receivers for such a system are discussed.

  15. Illuminating Northern California's Active Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentice, Carol S.; Crosby, Christopher J.; Whitehill, Caroline S.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramón; Furlong, Kevin P.; Phillips, David A.

    2009-02-01

    Newly acquired light detection and ranging (lidar) topographic data provide a powerful community resource for the study of landforms associated with the plate boundary faults of northern California (Figure 1). In the spring of 2007, GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, acquired approximately 2000 square kilometers of airborne lidar topographic data along major active fault zones of northern California. These data are now freely available in point cloud (x, y, z coordinate data for every laser return), digital elevation model (DEM), and KMZ (zipped Keyhole Markup Language, for use in Google Earth™ and other similar software) formats through the GEON OpenTopography Portal (http://www.OpenTopography.org/data). Importantly, vegetation can be digitally removed from lidar data, producing high-resolution images (0.5- or 1.0-meter DEMs) of the ground surface beneath forested regions that reveal landforms typically obscured by vegetation canopy (Figure 2).

  16. Fiber Coupled Laser Diodes with Even Illumination Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An optical fiber for evenly illuminating a target. The optical fiber is coupled to a laser emitting diode and receives laser light. The la ser light travels through the fiber optic and exits at an exit end. T he exit end has a diffractive optical pattern formed thereon via etch ing, molding or cutting, to reduce the Gaussian profile present in co nventional fiber optic cables The reduction of the Gaussian provides an even illumination from the fiber optic cable.

  17. Infrared laser diode with visible illuminator for biomedical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Podbielska, Halina; Szafranski, C.; Kuzmin, Andrei N.; Ges, J. A.; Ryabtsev, Gennadii I.

    1995-02-01

    The special laser diode device (LDD) leasing in the near infrared region (IR) with two wavelengths: (lambda) 1 equals 850 nm and (lambda) 2 equals 1000 nm, designed for laser therapy, is presented. This device is characterized by a unique feature, namely a separate built-in illuminator, operating in 670 nm. The special construction of LDD and the illuminator enables the user to visualize exactly the surface irradiated by IR radiation. The exposure time and the output of laser power are also controlled and can be displayed on the LED monitor at the front panel. This new device, described here, is compact, low cost, and user friendly.

  18. Laser Illumination Modality of Photoacoustic Imaging Technique for Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong-qing; Peng, Yuan-yuan; Guo, Jian; Li, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has recently emerged as a promising imaging technique for prostate cancer. But there was still a lot of challenge in the PAI for prostate cancer detection, such as laser illumination modality. Knowledge of absorbed light distribution in prostate tissue was essential since the distribution characteristic of absorbed light energy would influence the imaging depth and range of PAI. In order to make a comparison of different laser illumination modality of photoacoustic imaging technique for prostate cancer, optical model of human prostate was established and combined with Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the light absorption distribution in the prostate tissue. Characteristic of light absorption distribution of transurethral and trans-rectal illumination case, and of tumor at different location was compared with each other.The relevant conclusions would be significant for optimizing the light illumination in a PAI system for prostate cancer detection.

  19. Illuminating the Hazards of Powerful Laser Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sun. The startling effect of a bright beam of light can cause serious accidents when aimed ... for Devices and Radiological Health. “A green laser beam could cause a larger startling or flash-blinding ...

  20. Response of silicon solar cell to pulsed laser illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willowby, D.; Alexander, D.; Edge, T.; Herren, K.

    1993-01-01

    The response of silicon solar cell(s) to pulsed laser illumination is discussed. The motivation was due to the interest of Earth to space/Moon power beaming applications. When this work began, it was not known if solar cells would respond to laser light with pulse lengths in the nanosecond range and a repetition frequency in the kHz range. This is because the laser pulse would be shorter than the minority carrier lifetime of silicon. A 20-nanosecond (ns) full width half max (FWHM) pulse from an aluminum-gallium/arsenide (Al-Ga-As) diode laser was used to illuminate silicon solar cells at a wavelength of 885 nanometers (nm). Using a high-speed digital oscilloscope, the response of the solar cells to individual pulses across various resistive loads was observed and recorded.

  1. Even Illumination from Fiber-Optic-Coupled Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    A method of equipping fiber-optic-coupled laser diodes to evenly illuminate specified fields of view has been proposed. The essence of the method is to shape the tips of the optical fibers into suitably designed diffractive optical elements. One of the main benefits afforded by the method would be more nearly complete utilization of the available light. Diffractive optics is a relatively new field of optics in which laser beams are shaped by use of diffraction instead of refraction.

  2. Standoff Hyperspectral Imaging of Explosives Residues Using Broadly Tunable External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2010-05-01

    We describe experimental results on the detection of explosives residues using active hyperspectral imaging by illumination of the target surface using an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) and imaging using a room temperature microbolometer camera. The active hyperspectral imaging technique forms an image hypercube by recording one image for each tuning step of the ECQCL. The resulting hyperspectral image contains the full absorption spectrum produced by the illumination laser at each pixel in the image which can then be used to identify the explosive type and relative quantity using spectral identification approaches developed initially in the remote sensing community.

  3. Random laser illumination: an ideal source for biomedical polarization imaging?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Mariana T.; Lotay, Amrit S.; Kenny, Fiona M.; Girkin, John M.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-03-01

    Imaging applications increasingly require light sources with high spectral density (power over spectral bandwidth. This has led in many cases to the replacement of conventional thermal light sources with bright light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers and superluminescent diodes. Although lasers and superluminescent diodes appear to be ideal light sources due to their narrow bandwidth and power, however, in the case of full-field imaging, their spatial coherence leads to coherent artefacts, such as speckle, that corrupt the image. LEDs, in contrast, have lower spatial coherence and thus seem the natural choice, but they have low spectral density. Random Lasers are an unconventional type of laser that can be engineered to provide low spatial coherence with high spectral density. These characteristics makes them potential sources for biological imaging applications where specific absorption and reflection are the characteristics required for state of the art imaging. In this work, a Random Laser (RL) is used to demonstrate speckle-free full-field imaging for polarization-dependent imaging in an epi-illumination configuration. We compare LED and RL illumination analysing the resulting images demonstrating that the RL illumination produces an imaging system with higher performance (image quality and spectral density) than that provided by LEDs.

  4. Color digital lensless holographic microscopy: laser versus LED illumination.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2016-08-20

    A comparison of the performance of color digital lensless holographic microscopy (CDLHM) as utilized for illumination of RGB lasers or a super-bright white-light LED with a set of spectral filters is presented. As the use of lasers in CDLHM conceals the possibility of having a compact, lightweight, portable, and low cost microscope, and additionally the limited available laser radiation wavelengths limit a real multispectral imaging microscope, here we present the use of super-bright white-light LED and spectral filters for illuminating the sample. The performance of RGB laser-CDLHM and LED-CDLHM is evaluated on imaging a section of the head of a Drosophila melanogaster fly. This comparison shows that there is trade-off between the spatial resolution of the microscope and the light sources utilized, which can be understood with regard to the coherence properties of the illuminating light. Despite the smaller spatial coherence features of LED-CDLHM in comparison with laser-CDLHM, the former shows promise as a portable RGB digital lensless holographic microscope that could be extended to other wavelengths by the use of different spectral filters. PMID:27556985

  5. Laser illuminated high speed photography of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dosser, L.R.; Reed, J.W.; Stark, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The evaluation of the properties of energetic materials, such as burn rate and ignition, is of primary importance in understanding their reactions and how devices containing them perform their function. We have recently applied high speed photography at rates of up to 20,000 images per second to this problem. When a copper vapor laser is synchronized to the high speed camera, laser illuminated images can be recorded that detail the performance of a component in a manner never before possible. The copper vapor laser used for these experiments had an average power of 30 watts, and produced pulses at a rate of up to 10 kHz. The 30 nanosecond pulsewidth of the laser essentially freezes all motion in the functioning componment, thus providing stop-action pictures at a rate of up to 10,000 per second. Each laser pulse has a peak power of approximately 170,000 watts which provides ample illumination for the high speed photography. Several energetic materials and components studied include the pyrotechnic Ti/2B, a pyrotechnic torch, laser ignition of high explosives, and a functioning igniter.

  6. Miniaturized laser illumination module for 3D areal mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaynor, Edwin S.; Blase, W. Paul; Woodward, Kim G.

    1998-01-01

    We report progress towards a miniaturized laser illumination module (LIM) for illuminating objects with structured light for 3D imaging purposes. The module, when combined with an off-axis camera and a PC, will image volumes in near-real- time at a range-dependent resolution using 256 X 256 resolution elements. The miniaturized LIM comprises a red laser diode source, a hologram, a spatial light modulator and a projection lens.We present optical and electronic design features of the device in terms of constraints on size and manufacturability. The miniature LIM can be applied to diverse 3D imaging problems to include industrial reverse engineering and inspection and medical diagnostics and prosthetics design.

  7. Dynamic thermal model of photovoltaic cell illuminated by laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Hua, Wenshen; Guo, Tong

    2015-07-01

    Photovoltaic cell is one of the most important components of laser powered unmanned aerial vehicle. Illuminated by high power laser beam, photovoltaic cell temperature increases significantly, which leads to efficiency drop, or even physical damage. To avoid such situation, the temperature of photovoltaic cell must be predicted precisely. A dynamic thermal model of photovoltaic cell is established in this paper, and the relationships between photovoltaic cell temperature and laser power, wind speed, ambient temperature are also analyzed. Simulation result indicates that illuminated by a laser beam, the temperature of photovoltaic cell rises gradually and reach to a constant maximum value. There is an approximately linear rise in photovoltaic cell temperature as the laser flux gets higher. The higher wind speed is, the stronger forced convection is, and then the lower photovoltaic cell temperature is. But the relationship between photovoltaic cell temperature and wind speed is not linear. Photovoltaic cell temperature is proportional to the ambient temperature. For each increase of 1 degree of ambient temperature, there is approximate 1 degree increase in photovoltaic cell temperature. The result will provide fundamentals to take reasonable measures to control photovoltaic cell temperature.

  8. Improved efficacy of dendritic cell-based immunotherapy by cutaneous laser illumination

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinyuan; Zeng, Qiyan; Wu, Mei X.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The present investigation demonstrates a convenient laser-based approach to enhance DC migration resulting in improved DC-based immunotherapy in murine models. Experimental design Influence of laser illumination on dermal tissue microenvironment and migration of DCs following intradermal injection were determined by whole-mount immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscope, and flow cytometry. We also investigated in vivo expansion of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by flow cytometry, CTL activity by in vitro CTL assay, and anti-tumor efficacy of DC immunization following cutaneous laser illumination in both preventive and therapeutic tumor models. Results Laser illumination was found to significantly enlarge perforations in the peri-lymphatic basement membrane, disarray collagen fibers and disrupt cell-matrix interactions in the dermis. The altered dermal tissue microenvironment permitted more efficient migration of intradermally injected DCs from the dermis to the draining lymph nodes (dLNs). Laser illumination also slightly but significantly enhanced the expression of costimulatory molecule CD80 and MHC I on DCs injected into the skin, when compared to those DCs administered into sham-treated skin. As a result, more vigorous expansion of tumor-specific IFN-γ+CD8+ T lymphocytes and enhanced CTL activity against 4T1 but not irrelevant tumor cells were obtained in the laser-treated group over the control group. Laser-augmented DC immunization also completely abrogated early growth of 4T1 tumor and B16F10 melanoma in preventive tumor models and significantly extended the survival of 4T1-resected mice in a therapeutic tumor model. Conclusion These data suggest a simple, safe, laser-based approach to significantly enhance DC-based immunotherapy. PMID:22392913

  9. Confocal laser scanning microscopy with spatiotemporal structured illumination.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2016-03-15

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), which is widely utilized in the biological and biomedical sciences, is limited in spatial resolution due to diffraction to about half the light wavelength. Here we have combined structured illumination with CLSM to enhance its spatial resolution. To this end, we have used a spatial light modulator (SLM) to generate fringe patterns of different orientations and phase shifts in the excitation spot without any mechanical movement. We have achieved 1.8 and 1.7 times enhanced lateral and axial resolutions, respectively, by synthesizing the object spectrum along different illumination directions. This technique is thus a promising tool for high-resolution morphological or fluorescence imaging, especially in deep tissue. PMID:26977667

  10. Photobleaching property of confocal laser scanning microscopy with masked illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, DongUk; Moon, Sucbei; Song, Hoseong; Yang, Wenzhong; Kim, Dug Y.

    2010-02-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) has become the tool of choice for high-contrast fluorescence imaging in the study of the three-dimensional and dynamic properties of biological system. However, the high cost and complexity of commercial CLSMs urges many researchers to individually develop low cost and flexible confocal microscopy systems. The high speed scanner is an influential factor in terms of cost and system complexity. Resonant galvo scanners at several kHz have been commonly used in custom-built CLSMs. However, during the repeated illumination for live cell imaging or 3D image formation, photobleaching and image distortion occurred at the edges of the scan field may be more serious than the center due to an inherent property (e.g. sinusoidal angular velocity) of the scan mirror. Usually, no data is acquired at the edges due to large image distortion but the excitation beam is still illuminated. Here, we present the photobleaching property of CLSM with masked illumination, a simple and low cost method, to exclude the unintended excitation illumination at the edges. The mask with a square hole in its center is disposed at the image plane between the scan lens and the tube lens in order to decrease photobleaching and image distortion at the edges. The excluded illumination section is used as the black level of the detected signals for a signal quantizing step. Finally, we demonstrated the reduced photobleaching at the edges on a single layer of fluorescent beads and real-time image acquisition without a standard composite video signal by using a frame grabber.

  11. Directed energy active illumination for near-Earth object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Jordan; Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; O'Neill, Hugh; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; Bible, Johanna; Johansson, Isabella E.; Griswold, Janelle; Cook, Brianna

    2014-09-01

    On 15 February 2013, a previously unknown ~20 m asteroid struck Earth near Chelyabinsk, Russia, releasing kinetic energy equivalent to ~570 kt TNT. Detecting objects like the Chelyabinsk impactor that are orbiting near Earth is a difficult task, in part because such objects spend much of their own orbits in the direction of the Sun when viewed from Earth. Efforts aimed at protecting Earth from future impacts will rely heavily on continued discovery. Ground-based optical observatory networks and Earth-orbiting spacecraft with infrared sensors have dramatically increased the pace of discovery. Still, less than 5% of near-Earth objects (NEOs) >=100 m/~100 Mt TNT have been identified, and the proportion of known objects decreases rapidly for smaller sizes. Low emissivity of some objects also makes detection by passive sensors difficult. A proposed orbiting laser phased array directed energy system could be used for active illumination of NEOs, enhancing discovery particularly for smaller and lower emissivity objects. Laser fiber amplifiers emit very narrow-band energy, simplifying detection. Results of simulated illumination scenarios are presented based on an orbiting emitter array with specified characteristics. Simulations indicate that return signals from small and low emissivity objects is strong enough to detect. The possibility for both directed and full sky blind surveys is discussed, and the resulting diameter and mass limits for objects in different observational scenarios. The ability to determine both position and speed of detected objects is also discussed.

  12. Eye-safe laser illuminators as less-than-lethal weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, John D.; Adler, Dean S.

    1997-01-01

    Law enforcement and military forces are often faced with situations requiring less-than-lethal response options. Low- power, eye-safe laser illuminators have been shown to be effective, non-lethal weapons for a variety of law enforcement and other-than-war military applications. Through the effects of illumination, glare, and psychological impact; lasers can provide unequivocal warning, threat assessment based on reaction to the warning, hesitation, distraction, and reductions in combat and functional effectiveness. This paper discusses ongoing research and development by Science and Engineering Associates into laser illuminator concepts for civilian and military use. Topics include fundamental design and safety issues, laser diode requirements, and laser illuminator concepts, including a grenade shell laser system that converts a standard 40-mm grenade launcher into a laser illuminator.

  13. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Quesada, Mark A.; Studier, F. William

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis.

  14. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, H.S.; Quesada, M.A.; Studier, F.W.

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis. 35 figs.

  15. Illuminating Northern California’s Active Faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, Carol S.; Crosby, Christopher J.; Whitehill, Caroline S.; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon; Furlong, Kevin P.; Philips, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Newly acquired light detection and ranging (lidar) topographic data provide a powerful community resource for the study of landforms associated with the plate boundary faults of northern California (Figure 1). In the spring of 2007, GeoEarthScope, a component of the EarthScope Facility construction project funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation, acquired approximately 2000 square kilometers of airborne lidar topographic data along major active fault zones of northern California. These data are now freely available in point cloud (x, y, z coordinate data for every laser return), digital elevation model (DEM), and KMZ (zipped Keyhole Markup Language, for use in Google EarthTM and other similar software) formats through the GEON OpenTopography Portal (http://www.OpenTopography.org/data). Importantly, vegetation can be digitally removed from lidar data, producing high-resolution images (0.5- or 1.0-meter DEMs) of the ground surface beneath forested regions that reveal landforms typically obscured by vegetation canopy (Figure 2)

  16. Design of a silicon avalanche photodiode pixel with integrated laser diode using back-illuminated crystallographically etched silicon-on-sapphire with monolithically integrated microlens for dual-mode passive and active imaging arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Alvin G.

    2010-08-01

    There is a growing need in scientific research applications for dual-mode, passive and active 2D and 3D LADAR imaging methods. To fill this need, an advanced back-illuminated silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) design is presented using a novel silicon-on-sapphire substrate incorporating a crystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) antireflective layer between the silicon and R-plane sapphire. This allows integration of a high quantum efficiency silicon APD with a gallium nitride (GaN) laser diode in each pixel. The pixel design enables single photon sensitive, solid-state focal plane arrays (FPAs) with wide dynamic range, supporting passive and active imaging capability in a single FPA. When (100) silicon is properly etched with TMAH solution, square based pyramidal frustum or mesa arrays result with the four mesa sidewalls of the APD formed by (111) silicon planes that intersect the (100) planes at a crystallographic angle, φ c = 54.7°. The APD device is fabricated in the mesa using conventional silicon processing technology. The GaN laser diode is fabricated by epitaxial growth inside of an inverted, etched cavity in the silicon mesa. Microlenses are fabricated in the thinned, and AR-coated sapphire substrate. The APDs share a common, front-side anode contact, and laser diodes share a common cathode. A low resistance (Al) or (Cu) metal anode grid fills the space between pixels and also inhibits optical crosstalk. SOS-APD arrays are flip-chip bump-bonded to CMOS readout ICs to produce hybrid FPAs. The square 27 μm emitter-detector pixel achieves SNR > 1 in active detection mode for Lambert surfaces at 1,000 meters.

  17. Waveform agile high-power fiber laser illuminators for directed-energy weapon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engin, Doruk; Lu, Wei; Kimpel, Frank; Gupta, Shantanu

    2012-06-01

    A kW-class fiber-amplifier based laser illuminator system at 1030nm is demonstrated. At 125 kHz pulse repetition rate, 1.9mJ energy per pulse (235W average power) is achieved for 100nsec pulses with >72% optical conversion efficiency, and at 250kHz repetition, >350W average power is demonstrated, limited by the available pumps. Excellent agreement is established between the experimental results and dynamic fiber amplifier simulation, for predicting the pulse shape, spectrum and ASE accumulation throughout the fiber-amplifier chain. High pulse-energy, high power fiber-amplifier operation requires careful engineering - minimize ASE content throughout the pre-amplifier stages, use of large mode area gain fiber in the final power stage for effective pulse energy extraction, and pulse pre-shaping to compensate for the laser gain-saturation induced intra-pulse and pulse-pattern dependent distortion. Such optimization using commercially available (VLMA) fibers with core size in the 30-40μm range is estimated to lead to >4mJ pulse energy for 100nsec pulse at 50kHz repetition rate. Such waveform agile high-power, high-energy pulsed fiber laser illuminators at λ=1030nm satisfies requirements for active-tracking/ranging in high-energy laser (HEL) weapon systems, and in uplink laser beacon for deep space communication.

  18. Wide-area SWIR arrays and active illuminators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougal, Michael; Hood, Andrew; Geske, Jon; Wang, Chad; Renner, Daniel; Follman, David; Heu, Paula

    2012-01-01

    We describe the factors that go into the component choices for a short wavelength (SWIR) imager, which include the SWIR sensor, the lens, and the illuminator. We have shown the factors for reducing dark current, and shown that we can achieve well below 1.5 nA/cm2 for 15 μm devices at 7°C. We have mated our InGaAs detector arrays to 640x512 readout integrated integrated circuits (ROICs) to make focal plane arrays (FPAs). In addition, we have fabricated high definition 1920x1080 FPAs for wide field of view imaging. The resulting FPAs are capable of imaging photon fluxes with wavelengths between 1 and 1.6 microns at low light levels. The dark current associated with these FPAs is extremely low, exhibiting a mean dark current density of 0.26 nA/cm2 at 0°C. FLIR has also developed a high definition, 1920x1080, 15 um pitch SWIR sensor. In addition, FLIR has developed laser arrays that provide flat illumination in scenes that are normally light-starved. The illuminators have 40% wall-plug efficiency and provide low-speckle illumination, provide artifact-free imagery versus conventional laser illuminators.

  19. Light pipe design method and stepper experimentation for interference effects reduction in laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyet, Jean-Michel; Lutz, Yves

    2016-07-01

    The use of light pipes is an efficient and low-cost technique to get a homogeneous illumination for laser-gated viewing systems. However, this technique suffers from drawbacks when used with coherent sources like solid-state lasers. Compacting light pipe-based laser illuminators involves working with small light pipe sections, and experiments show that interference fringes appear on the laser illumination profiles. The principle of light pipe homogenization has been reviewed using geometrical optics to understand the phenomenon better, and a pragmatic light pipe design method, based on laser-gated viewing system parameters, is proposed. Another original solution based on optical stepper is studied to reduce both interference fringes and speckle noise to increase the homogeneity of laser illumination profiles.

  20. An inexpensive programmable illumination microscope with active feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tompkins, Nathan; Fraden, Seth

    2016-02-01

    We have developed a programmable illumination system capable of tracking and illuminating numerous objects simultaneously using only low-cost and reused optical components. The active feedback control software allows for a closed-loop system that tracks and perturbs objects of interest automatically. Our system uses a static stage where the objects of interest are tracked computationally as they move across the field of view allowing for a large number of simultaneous experiments. An algorithmically determined illumination pattern can be applied anywhere in the field of view with simultaneous imaging and perturbation using different colors of light to enable spatially and temporally structured illumination. Our system consists of a consumer projector, camera, 35-mm camera lens, and a small number of other optical and scaffolding components. The entire apparatus can be assembled for under 4,000. Supplemental matlab code is available to assist in the setup of the active feedback software.

  1. High-resolution imagery of a space object using an unconventional laser-illumination imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelz, David G.; O'Keefe, Shawn D.; Gonglewski, John D.; Rider, Douglas B.; Schulze, Kathy J.

    1994-12-01

    The US Air Force Phillips Laboratory's Retro-Assisted Imaging Laser Experiment (RAILE) demonstrated high-resolution imaging of a space object from the ground using an active illumination imaging technique. Results were obtained using a technique known as Imaging Correlography where images are constructed from measurements of backscattered (non-imaged) laser speckle intensity patterns. The target for the experiment was the Relay Mirror satellite that was designed and launched for a separate experiment known as the Relay Mirror Experiment (RME). The satellite carried four retroreflectors, arranged in a pattern, that comprised the actual imaging target. The satellite was tracked from a ground site and illuminated with a low-power, coherent, visible laser beam. The receiver was a simple linear array of intensity detectors, or light buckets. The use of an inverse synthetic aperture scheme allowed a modest effective receiving aperture to be realized (approximately 2 x 2 m). Although the effective receiving aperture for this experiment was no larger than that of a moderate-sized astronomical telescope, the light bucket concept is scaleable to much larger apertures. Image reconstruction was done in the computer after the sampled intensity data was collected by the receiver array. The paper contains a discussion of the imaging correlography technique, the experimental hardware, and the field results including reconstructed imagery.

  2. Three-dimensional thermal response of a metal subwavelength tip under femtosecond laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houard, J.; Vella, A.; Vurpillot, F.; Deconihout, B.

    2011-07-01

    The current work investigates numerically and experimentally the three-dimensional (3D) thermal response of a subwavelength tip illuminated by an ultrashort laser pulse. A model is developed on the nanometric scale to predict the 3D tip temperature evolution from the initial laser irradiation through the thermal equilibrium (several nanoseconds). The evolution of the ion temperature is experimentally monitored by atom probe tomography. The anisotropic ion emission observed on steel specimens illuminated with an ultrashort laser and the evaporation behavior of amorphous glasses is predicted by our 3D thermal model.

  3. Efficient vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for infrared illumination applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Guo, Baiming; Miglo, Alexander; Wang, Qing; Pradhan, Prachi; Wynn, James D.; Khalfin, Viktor; Zou, Wei-Xiong; Ghosh, Chuni; Van Leeuwen, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Infrared illumination is used in the commercial and defense markets for surveillance and security, for high-speed imaging, and for military covert operations. Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) are an attractive candidate for IR illumination applications as they offer advantageous properties such as efficiency, intrinsically low diverging circular beam, low-cost manufacturing, narrow emission spectrum, and high reliability. VCSELs can also operate at high temperatures, thereby meeting the harsh environmental requirements of many illuminators. The efficiency and brightness of these VCSELs also reduce the requirements of the power supply compared to, for example, an LED approach. We present results on VCSEL arrays for illumination applications, as well as results on VCSEL-based illumination experiments. These VCSELs are used in illuminators emitting from a few Watts up to several hundred Watts. The emission of these VCSEL-based illuminators is speckle-free with no interference patterns. Infra-red illumination at up to 1,600ft (500m) from the source has been demonstrated using VCSEL-based illumination, without any optics.

  4. Digital micromirror device-based laser-illumination Fourier ptychographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Cuifang; Ma, Ye; Zhou, Renjie; Lee, Justin; Barbastathis, George; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter T C

    2015-10-19

    We report a novel approach to Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) by using a digital micromirror device (DMD) and a coherent laser source (532 nm) for generating spatially modulated sample illumination. Previously demonstrated FPM systems are all based on partially-coherent illumination, which offers limited throughput due to insufficient brightness. Our FPM employs a high power coherent laser source to enable shot-noise limited high-speed imaging. For the first time, a digital micromirror device (DMD), imaged onto the back focal plane of the illumination objective, is used to generate spatially modulated sample illumination field for ptychography. By coding the on/off states of the micromirrors, the illumination plane wave angle can be varied at speeds more than 4 kHz. A set of intensity images, resulting from different oblique illuminations, are used to numerically reconstruct one high-resolution image without obvious laser speckle. Experiments were conducted using a USAF resolution target and a fiber sample, demonstrating high-resolution imaging capability of our system. We envision that our approach, if combined with a coded-aperture compressive-sensing algorithm, will further improve the imaging speed in DMD-based FPM systems. PMID:26480361

  5. Streak camera recording of shock wave transit times at large distances using laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyburczy, J. A.; Blayney, J. L.; Miller, W. F.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1984-09-01

    A pulsed laser illumination system for streak camera recording of impact-induced shock wave transit times (˜1 μs) during impact experiments is described. Laser illumination of centimeter-sized subjects offers many advantages over diffuse illumination techniques for streak photography. Source-to-sample and sample-to-camera distances of ˜100 to 102 m can be employed. Light filtering, and simultaneous recording of both the impact event and the camera streak rate calibration, can be carried out easily. For use in such a system we describe a Pockels cell controller in which the reference 10-MHz oscillator signal is synchronously divided down to 38 Hz to provide a trigger signal for laser and streak camera testing.

  6. Electron acceleration in an ultraintense-laser-illuminated capillary.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Akamatsu, Shin; Sakamoto, Wataru; Kodama, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Kazuo A; Azumi, Ken; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Fujita, Hisanori; Yoshida, Hidetsugu

    2004-05-21

    An ultraintense laser injected a 10 J of power at 1.053 microm in 0.5 ps into a glass capillary of 1 cm long and 60 microm in diameter and accelerated plasma electrons to 100 MeV. One- and two-dimensional particle codes describe wakefields with 10 GV/m gradient excited behind the laser pulse, which are guided by a plasma density channel far beyond the Rayleigh range. The blueshift of the laser spectrum supports that a plasma of 10(16) cm(-3) is inside the capillary. A bump at the high energy tail suggests the electron trapping in the wakefield. PMID:15169360

  7. Versatile illumination platform and fast optical switch to give standard observation camera gated active imaging capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasser, R.; Peyronneaudi, Benjamin; Yon, Kevin; Aubry, Marie

    2015-10-01

    CILAS, subsidiary of Airbus Defense and Space, develops, manufactures and sales laser-based optronics equipment for defense and homeland security applications. Part of its activity is related to active systems for threat detection, recognition and identification. Active surveillance and active imaging systems are often required to achieve identification capacity in case for long range observation in adverse conditions. In order to ease the deployment of active imaging systems often complex and expensive, CILAS suggests a new concept. It consists on the association of two apparatus working together. On one side, a patented versatile laser platform enables high peak power laser illumination for long range observation. On the other side, a small camera add-on works as a fast optical switch to select photons with specific time of flight only. The association of the versatile illumination platform and the fast optical switch presents itself as an independent body, so called "flash module", giving to virtually any passive observation systems gated active imaging capacity in NIR and SWIR.

  8. A laser beam shaper for homogeneous rectangular illumination based on freeform micro lens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, En-guo; Huang, Jia-min; Guo, Tai-liang; Wu, Reng-mao

    2016-07-01

    An effective design method of freeform micro lens array is presented for shaping varied laser beams into prescribed rectangular illumination. The variable separation mapping is applied to design concave freeform surfaces for constructing a freeform lens array. Several dedicated examples show that the designed freeform optical lens array can achieve a prescribed rectangular illumination pattern, especially without considering the initial states of incident laser beams. Both high collection efficiency and good spatial uniformity can be available simultaneously. Tolerance analysis is also performed to demonstrate that this optical device can well avoid fabricating difficulty in actual applications.

  9. Laser illuminator and optical system for disk patterning

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, C. Brent; Dixit, Shamasundar N.; Everett, Mathew; Honig, John

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic recording media are textured over areas designated for contact in order to minimize friction with data transducing heads. In fabricating a hard disk, an aluminum nickel-phosphorous substrate is polished to a specular finish. A mechanical means is then used to roughen an annular area intended to be the head contact band. An optical and mechanical system allows thousands of spots to be generated with each laser pulse, allowing the textured pattern to be rapidly generated with a low repetition rate laser and an uncomplicated mechanical system. The system uses a low power laser, a beam expander, a specially designed phase plate, a prism to deflect the beam, a lens to transmit the diffraction pattern to the far field, a mechanical means to rotate the pattern and a trigger system to fire the laser when sections of the pattern are precisely aligned. The system generates an annular segment of the desired pattern with which the total pattern is generated by rotating the optical system about its optic axis, sensing the rotational position and firing the laser as the annular segment rotates into the next appropriate position. This marking system can be integrated into a disk sputtering system for manufacturing magnetic disks, allowing for a very streamlined manufacturing process.

  10. Low Power Ground-Based Laser Illumination for Electric Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Michael R.; Oleson, Steven R.

    1994-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of low power, ground-based laser powered electric propulsion systems is presented. A review of available and near-term laser, photovoltaic, and adaptive optic systems indicates that approximately 5-kW of ground-based laser power can be delivered at an equivalent one-sun intensity to an orbit of approximately 2000 km. Laser illumination at the proper wavelength can double photovoltaic array conversion efficiencies compared to efficiencies obtained with solar illumination at the same intensity, allowing a reduction in array mass. The reduced array mass allows extra propellant to be carried with no penalty in total spacecraft mass. The extra propellant mass can extend the satellite life in orbit, allowing additional revenue to be generated. A trade study using realistic cost estimates and conservative ground station viewing capability was performed to estimate the number of communication satellites which must be illuminated to make a proliferated system of laser ground stations economically attractive. The required number of satellites is typically below that of proposed communication satellite constellations, indicating that low power ground-based laser beaming may be commercially viable. However, near-term advances in low specific mass solar arrays and high energy density batteries for LEO applications would render the ground-based laser system impracticable.

  11. Fast continuous tuning of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers by rear-facet illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hempel, Martin; Röben, Benjamin; Schrottke, Lutz; Hübers, Heinz-Wilhelm; Grahn, Holger T.

    2016-05-01

    GaAs-based terahertz quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) are continuously tuned in their emission frequency by illuminating the rear facet with a near-infrared, high-power diode laser. For QCLs emitting around 3.1 THz, the maximum tuning range amounts to 2.8 GHz for continuous-wave operation at a heat sink temperature of 55 K, while in pulsed mode 9.1 and 8.0 GHz are achieved at 35 and 55 K, respectively.

  12. Photoelectric properties of GaAs p-n-junction under illumination of intense laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ašmontas, S.; Gradauskas, J.; Sužiedėlis, A.; Šilėnas, A.; Vaičikauskas, V.; Žalys, O.; Steikūnas, G.; Steikūnienė, A.

    2014-10-01

    Results of experimental investigation of photoelectric properties of GaAs p-n-junction illuminated by short laser pulses of 1.06 μm wavelength are presented. The influence of laser radiation intensity and external bias voltage on the formation of photoresponse voltage has been studied. Free carrier heating was recognized to influence significantly the magnitude of the measured photovoltage. Possibility to improve the conversion efficiency of solar cells is discussed.

  13. CLEANSPACE 'Small Debris Removal By Laser Illumination And Complementary Technologies'

    SciTech Connect

    Esmiller, Bruno; Jacquelard, Christophe

    2011-11-10

    Studies show that the number of debris in Low Earth Orbit is exponentially growing despite future debris release mitigation measures considered. Especially, the already existing population of small and medium debris (between 1 cm and several dozens of cm) is today a concrete threat to operational satellites. A ground based laser solution which can remove at low expense and in a non-destructive way hazardous debris of decimetric size around selected space assets appears as one highly promising answer. This solution will be studied in the frame of CLEANSPACE project which is a part of the FP7 space theme. The overall CLEANSPACE objective is threefold: to propose an efficient and affordable global system architecture, to tackle safety regulation aspects, political implications and future collaborations, to develop affordable technological bricks and to establish roadmap for the development and the future implantation of a fully functional laser protection system. This paper will present the CLEANSPACE project.

  14. Thermal expansion of scanning tunneling microscopy tips under laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafström, S.; Schuller, P.; Kowalski, J.; Neumann, R.

    1998-04-01

    The periodic thermal expansion of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tips arising under irradiation with power-modulated laser light has been investigated. The expansion was determined by comparison with a calibrated piezomotion measured in an STM, which was operated in the constant-current mode, and instrumental effects were corrected for. The experimental data concerning the frequency response of the thermal expansion for various geometries of the tip and for different positions of the laser focus are compared with theoretical results which were derived from a numerical solution of the equation of heat conduction. A very good agreement is found. The results are also interpreted in terms of simplified analytical expressions. Furthermore, the theoretical data are used to derive the response of the tip to fast transients of the light power as in the case of pulsed irradiation.

  15. Mask inspection microscopy with 13.2 nm table-top laser illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Brizuela, Fernando; Wang, Yong; Brewer, Courtney A.; Pedaci, Francesco; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik H.; Liu, Yanwei; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Marconi, Mario C.; Attwood, David T.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2008-10-14

    We report the demonstration of a reflection microscope that operates at 13.2-nm wavelength with a spatial resolution of 55 {+-} 3 nm. The microscope uses illumination from a table-top EUV laser to acquire aerial images of photolithography masks with a 20 second exposure time. The modulation transfer function of the optical system was characterized.

  16. Simulation of the temperature increase in porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Kurtz, Ronald M.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2012-03-01

    As a model for laser exposure of the iris during femtosecond corneal surgery, we simulated the temperature rise in porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by the femtosecond laser. The temperature increase induced by a 60 kHz iFS Advanced Femtosecond Laser (AMO Inc., Santa Ana, CA) in porcine cadaver iris was simulated using COMSOL (Comsol Inc., Burlington, MA) finite element software. Temperature increases up to 2.45 °C (corresponding to 2 μJ laser pulse energy and 24 second illumination) were observed in the porcine cadaver iris from the simulation with little variation in temperature profiles compared with specimens for the same laser energy illumination in experiment. : The commercial iFS Advanced Femtosecond Laser operating with pulse energies at approximately the lower limit of the range evaluated in this study would be expected to result in a 1.23 °C temperature increase and, therefore, does not present a safety hazard to the iris.

  17. Method for controlling a laser additive process using intrinsic illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Robert; Cai, Guoshuang; Azer, Magdi; Chen, Xiaobin; Liu, Yong; Harding, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    One form of additive manufacturing is to use a laser to generate a melt pool from powdered metal that is sprayed from a nozzle. The laser net-shape machining system builds the part a layer at a time by following a predetermined path. However, because the path may need to take many turns, maintaining a constant melt pool may not be easy. A straight section may require one speed and power while a sharp bend would over melt the metal at the same settings. This paper describes a process monitoring method that uses the intrinsic IR radiation from the melt pool along with a process model configured to establish target values for the parameters associated with the manufacture or repair. This model is based upon known properties of the metal being used as well as the properties of the laser beam. An adaptive control technique is then employed to control process parameters of the machining system based upon the real-time weld pool measurement. Since the system uses the heat radiant from the melt pool, other previously deposited metal does not confuse the system as only the melted material is seen by the camera.

  18. Active depth from defocus system using coherent illumination and a no moving parts camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, M. Junaid; Riza, Nabeel A.

    2016-01-01

    Presented is an active no moving parts Depth From Defocus (DFD) system for autofocus and three-dimensional (3-D) imaging applications. The proposed system uses highly coherent laser light and its beam conditioning optics to realize an active illumination system suited for long range and large field of view imaging, overcoming the limited field of view in previous active DFD systems. This is the first time an active DFD system is implemented and experimentally demonstrated using an Electronically Controlled Variable Focus Lens (ECVFL) as an imaging lens that electrically varies the focal length to acquire images with different degrees of defocus, necessary for DFD operations. An experimental demonstration of the proposed system acting as a distance sensor is compared to an incoherent illumination projector DFD system tested over a 1 m range. Apart from showing the effectiveness of the ECVFL as an imaging optic for cameras implementing DFD based autofocus algorithms, presented experimental results for the novel system indicate a depth measurement percentage error of <11% versus a maximum 40% error obtained using an incoherent illumination source. Applications for the proposed system include imaging scenarios where high performance no moving parts autofocus is desired in weak textured scenarios, specifically for smartphone and tablet cameras where the proposed system can be miniaturized.

  19. Spectral matching technology of a low-light-level night-vision system with a laser illuminator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Wang, Xin; Chen, Jilu

    2010-01-20

    According to the spectral distribution of a laser illuminator and the reflectivity of the objects, the reflective spectral distributions of dark green paint, rough concrete, and green vegetation under laser radiation are deduced for a low-light-level night-vision system with a laser illuminator. The spectral-matching factors of Super S(25) and New S(25) photocathodes for dark green paint, rough concrete, and green vegetation are calculated and compared. The results show that the evaluation of visual range for a night-vision system with a laser illuminator under field circumstances is greatly influenced by the spectral-matching factor. PMID:20090790

  20. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  1. PITBUL: a physics-based modeling package for imaging and tracking of airborne targets for HEL applications including active illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zandt, Noah R.; McCrae, Jack E.; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2013-05-01

    Aimpoint acquisition and maintenance is critical to high energy laser (HEL) system performance. This study demonstrates the development by the AFIT/CDE of a physics-based modeling package, PITBUL, for tracking airborne targets for HEL applications, including atmospheric and sensor effects and active illumination, which is a focus of this work. High-resolution simulated imagery of the 3D airborne target in-flight as seen from the laser position is generated using the HELSEEM model, and includes solar illumination, laser illumination, and thermal emission. Both CW and pulsed laser illumination are modeled, including the effects of illuminator scintillation, atmospheric backscatter, and speckle, which are treated at a first-principles level. Realistic vertical profiles of molecular and aerosol absorption and scattering, as well as optical turbulence, are generated using AFIT/CDE's Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) model. The spatially and temporally varying effects of turbulence are calculated and applied via a fast-running wave optical method known as light tunneling. Sensor effects, for example blur, sampling, read-out noise, and random photon arrival, are applied to the imagery. Track algorithms, including centroid and Fitts correlation, as a part of a closed loop tracker are applied to the degraded imagery and scored, to provide an estimate of overall system performance. To gauge performance of a laser system against a UAV target, tracking results are presented as a function of signal to noise ratio. Additionally, validation efforts to date involving comparisons between simulated and experimental tracking of UAVs are presented.

  2. Quantitative comparison of organic photovoltaic bulk heterojunction photostability under laser illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Lesoine, Michael D.; Bobbitt, Jonathan M.; Carr, John A.; Elshobaki, Moneim; Chaudhary, Sumit; Smith, Emily A.

    2014-11-20

    The photostability of bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic films containing a polymer donor and a fullerene-derivative acceptor was examined using resonance Raman spectroscopy and controlled laser power densities. The polymer donors were poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT), poly[[9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl]-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophenediyl] (PCDTBT), or poly({4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl}{3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl}) (PTB7). Four sample preparation methods were studied: (i) thin or (ii) thick films with fast solvent evaporation under nitrogen, (iii) thick films with slow solvent evaporation under nitrogen, and (iv) thin films dried under nitrogen followed by thermal annealing. Polymer order was assessed by monitoring a Raman peak’s full width at half-maximum and location as a function of illumination time and laser power densities from 2.5 × 103 to 2.5 × 105 W cm–2. Resonance Raman spectroscopy measurements show that before prolonged illumination, PCDTBT and PTB7 have the same initial order for all preparation conditions, while P3HT order improves with slow solvent drying or thermal annealing. All films exhibited changes to bulk heterojunction structure with 2.5 × 105 Wcm–2 laser illumination as measured by resonance Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy images show evidence of sample heating that affects the polymer over an area greater than the illumination profile. Furthermore, photostability data are important for proper characterization by techniques involving illumination and the development of devices suitable for real-world applications.

  3. Quantitative comparison of organic photovoltaic bulk heterojunction photostability under laser illumination

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lesoine, Michael D.; Bobbitt, Jonathan M.; Carr, John A.; Elshobaki, Moneim; Chaudhary, Sumit; Smith, Emily A.

    2014-11-20

    The photostability of bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic films containing a polymer donor and a fullerene-derivative acceptor was examined using resonance Raman spectroscopy and controlled laser power densities. The polymer donors were poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT), poly[[9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl]-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophenediyl] (PCDTBT), or poly({4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene-2,6-diyl}{3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl}) (PTB7). Four sample preparation methods were studied: (i) thin or (ii) thick films with fast solvent evaporation under nitrogen, (iii) thick films with slow solvent evaporation under nitrogen, and (iv) thin films dried under nitrogen followed by thermal annealing. Polymer order was assessed by monitoring a Raman peak’s full width at half-maximum and location as a function of illumination time and laser powermore » densities from 2.5 × 103 to 2.5 × 105 W cm–2. Resonance Raman spectroscopy measurements show that before prolonged illumination, PCDTBT and PTB7 have the same initial order for all preparation conditions, while P3HT order improves with slow solvent drying or thermal annealing. All films exhibited changes to bulk heterojunction structure with 2.5 × 105 Wcm–2 laser illumination as measured by resonance Raman spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy images show evidence of sample heating that affects the polymer over an area greater than the illumination profile. Furthermore, photostability data are important for proper characterization by techniques involving illumination and the development of devices suitable for real-world applications.« less

  4. Electron dynamics in strong laser pulse illumination of large rare gas clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalmann, U.; Rost, J. M.

    2005-11-01

    We analyze the dynamics of up to 105 electrons resulting from illuminating a xenon cluster with 9093 atoms with intense laser pulses of different length and peak intensity. Interesting details of electron motion are identified which can be probed with a time resolution of 100 attoseconds. Corresponding experiments would shed light on unexplored territory in complex electronic systems such as clusters and they would also permit to critically access the present theoretical description of this dynamics.

  5. A Radio System for Avoiding Illuminating Aircraft with a Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, W. A.; Murphy, T. W.; Melser, J. F.; Tu, J. K.; White, G. A.; Kassabian, K. H.; Bales, K.; Baumgartner, B. B.

    2012-01-01

    When scientific experiments require transmission of powerful laser or radio beams through the atmosphere, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requires that precautions be taken to avoid inadvertent illumination of aircraft. At present, the FAA requires that laser operators use human spotters to protect against accidental illumination. Here, we describe a simple, inexpensive, and highly reliable electronic system for detecting aircraft entering the vicinity of a laser beam that makes use of the air traffic control (ATC) radio transponders required on most aircraft. The radio system uses two antennas, both aligned with the laser beam. One antenna has a broad beam and the other has a narrow beam. The ratio of the transponder power received in the narrow beam to that received in the broad beam gives a measure of the angular distance of the aircraft from the axis that is independent of the range or the transmitter power. This ratio is easily measured and can be used to shutter the laser when the aircraft is too close to the beam. Comparisons of prototype systems operating at both the Apache Point and W. M. Keck Observatory with an FAA database indicate successful identification of commercial airplanes passing near the telescope boresight.

  6. Miniature solid-state lasers for pointing, illumination, and warning devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. C.; Singley, J. M.; Yager, E.; Kowalewski, K.; Lotito, B.; Guelzow, J.; Hildreth, J.; Kuper, J. W.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we review the current status of and progress towards higher power and more wavelength diverse diode-pumped solid-state miniature lasers. Snake Creek Lasers now offers unprecedented continuous wave (CW) output power from 9.0 mm and 5.6 mm TO type packages, including the smallest green laser in the world, the MicroGreen TM laser, and the highest density green laser in the world, the MiniGreen TM laser. In addition we offer an infrared laser, the MiniIR TM, operating at 1064 nm, and have just introduced a blue Mini laser operating at 473 nm in a 9.0 mm package. Recently we demonstrated over 1 W of output power at 1064 nm from a 12 mm TO type package, and green output power from 300-500 mW from the same 12 mm package. In addition, the company is developing a number of other innovative new miniature CW solid-state lasers operating at 750 nm, 820 nm, 458 nm, and an eye-safe Q-switched laser operating at 1550 nm. We also review recently demonstrated combining volume Bragg grating (VBG) technology has been combined with automatic power control (APC) to produce high power MiniGreen TM lasers whose output is constant to +/- 10 % over a wide temperature range, without the use of a thermoelectric cooler (TEC). This technology is expected to find widespread application in military and commercial applications where wide temperature operation is particularly important. It has immediate applications in laser pointers, illuminators, and laser flashlights, and displays.

  7. Investigation into the electromagnetic impulses from long-pulse laser illuminating solid targets inside a laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tao; Yang, Jinwen; Yang, Ming; Wang, Chuanke; Yang, Weiming; Li, Tingshuai; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Xiao, Shaoqiu

    2016-06-01

    Emission of the electromagnetic pulses (EMP) due to laser-target interaction in laser facility had been evaluated using a cone antenna in this work. The microwave in frequencies ranging from several hundreds of MHz to 2 GHz was recorded when long-pulse lasers with several thousands of joules illuminated the solid targets, meanwhile the voltage signals from 1 V to 4 V were captured as functions of laser energy and backlight laser, where the corresponding electric field strengths were obtained by simulating the cone antenna in combination with conducting a mathematical process (Tiknohov Regularization with L curve). All the typical coupled voltage oscillations displayed multiple peaks and had duration of up to 80 ns before decaying into noise and mechanisms of the EMP generation was schematically interpreted in basis of the practical measuring environments. The resultant data were expected to offer basic know-how to achieve inertial confinement fusion.

  8. Multiphoton photoemission from a copper cathode illuminated by ultrashort laser pulses in an RF photoinjector.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, P; Cultrera, L; Ferrario, M; Filippetto, D; Gatti, G; Gutierrez, M S; Moody, J T; Moore, N; Rosenzweig, J B; Scoby, C M; Travish, G; Vicario, C

    2010-02-26

    In this Letter we report on the use of ultrashort infrared laser pulses to generate a copious amount of electrons by a copper cathode in an rf photoinjector. The charge yield verifies the generalized Fowler-Dubridge theory for multiphoton photoemission. The emission is verified to be prompt using a two pulse autocorrelation technique. The thermal emittance associated with the excess kinetic energy from the emission process is comparable with the one measured using frequency tripled uv laser pulses. In the high field of the rf gun, up to 50 pC of charge can be extracted from the cathode using a 80 fs long, 2 microJ, 800 nm pulse focused to a 140 mum rms spot size. Taking into account the efficiency of harmonic conversion, illuminating a cathode directly with ir laser pulses can be the most efficient way to employ the available laser power. PMID:20366937

  9. Numerical analysis of the direct drive illumination uniformity for the Laser MegaJoule facility

    SciTech Connect

    Temporal, M.; Canaud, B.; Garbett, W. J.; Ramis, R.

    2014-01-15

    The illumination uniformity provided during the initial imprinting phase of the laser foot pulse in a direct drive scenario at the Laser MegaJoule facility has been analyzed. This study analyzes the quality of the illumination of a spherical capsule and concerns the uniformity of the first shock generate in the absorber of an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule. Four configurations making use of all or some of the 80 laser beams organized in the 20 quads of the cones at 49° and 131° with respect to the polar axis have been considered in order to assemble the foot pulse. Elliptical and circular super-gaussian laser intensity profiles taking into account beam-to-beam power imbalance (10%), pointing error (50 μm), and target positioning (20 μm) have been considered. It has been found that the use of the Polar Direct Drive technique can in some cases reduce the irradiation non-uniformity by a factor as high as 50%. In all cases, elliptical profile provides better results in comparison with the circular one and it is shown that the minimum of the non-uniformity is also a function of the capsule radius.

  10. Direct Phasing of Finite Crystals Illuminated with a Free-Electron Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirian, Richard A.; Bean, Richard J.; Beyerlein, Kenneth R.; Barthelmess, Miriam; Yoon, Chun Hong; Wang, Fenglin; Capotondi, Flavio; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the extended intensity profiles surrounding Bragg reflections that arise when a series of finite crystals of varying size and shape are illuminated by the intense, coherent illumination of an x-ray free-electron laser may enable the crystal's unit-cell electron density to be obtained ab initio via well-established iterative phasing algorithms. Such a technique could have a significant impact on the field of biological structure determination since it avoids the need for a priori information from similar known structures, multiple measurements near resonant atomic absorption energies, isomorphic derivative crystals, or atomic-resolution data. Here, we demonstrate this phasing technique on diffraction patterns recorded from artificial two-dimensional microcrystals using the seeded soft x-ray free-electron laser FERMI. We show that the technique is effective when the illuminating wavefront has nonuniform phase and amplitude, and when the diffraction intensities cannot be measured uniformly throughout reciprocal space because of a limited signal-to-noise ratio.

  11. First Results from Laser-Driven MagLIF Experiments on OMEGA: Optimization of Illumination Uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, P.-Y.; Barnak, D. H.; Betti, R.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.

    2015-11-01

    The physics principles of magnetic liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) are investigated on the Omega Laser Facility using 40 beams for compression and 1 beam for preheating a small (300- μm-radius, 1-mm-long) cylindrical plastic shell. Here we report of the first implosion experiments to optimize the illumination uniformity. These initial experiments do not include laser preheat. The beams in ring 3 and ring 4 around the symmetric axis are used to implode a cylindrical target. Beams in different rings illuminate the target surface with different incident angles, leading to different energy-coupling efficiencies. The beams in ring 3 have a shallower angle of incident than ring 4. When implosion velocities are compared for targets driven by either ring 3 or ring 4, we find that ring 3 couples ~ 40 % less kinetic energy than ring 4. One- and two-dimensional simulations using LILAC (1-D) and FLASH (2-D) are used to compare to the experimental results and to optimize the illumination uniformity. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and by DE-FG02-04ER54786 and DE-FC02-04ER54789 (Fusion Science Center).

  12. Three dimensional HiLo-based structured illumination for a digital scanned laser sheet microscopy (DSLM) in thick tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Dipanjan; Singh, Vijay Raj; Zhi, Chen; So, Peter T. C.; Matsudaira, Paul; Barbastathis, George

    2012-01-01

    Laser sheet based microscopy has become widely accepted as an effective active illumination method for real time three-dimensional (3D) imaging of biological tissue samples. The light sheet geometry, where the camera is oriented perpendicular to the sheet itself, provides an effective method of eliminating some of the scattered light and minimizing the sample exposure to radiation. However, residual background noise still remains, limiting the contrast and visibility of potentially interesting features in the samples. In this article, we investigate additional structuring of the illumination for improved background rejection, and propose a new technique, “3D HiLo” where we combine two HiLo images processed from orthogonal directions to improve the condition of the 3D reconstruction. We present a comparative study of conventional structured illumination based demodulation methods, namely 3Phase and HiLo with a newly implemented 3D HiLo approach and demonstrate that the latter yields superior signal-to-background ratio in both lateral and axial dimensions, while simultaneously suppressing image processing artifacts. PMID:23262684

  13. Large-solid-angle illuminators for extreme ultraviolet lithography with laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiak, G.D.; Tichenor, D.A.; Sweatt, W.C.; Chow, W.W.

    1995-06-01

    Laser Plasma Sources (LPSS) of extreme ultraviolet radiation are an attractive alternative to synchrotron radiation sources for extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) due to their modularity, brightness, and modest size and cost. To fully exploit the extreme ultraviolet power emitted by such sources, it is necessary to capture the largest possible fraction of the source emission half-sphere while simultaneously optimizing the illumination stationarity and uniformity on the object mask. In this LDRD project, laser plasma source illumination systems for EUVL have been designed and then theoretically and experimentally characterized. Ellipsoidal condensers have been found to be simple yet extremely efficient condensers for small-field EUVL imaging systems. The effects of aberrations in such condensers on extreme ultraviolet (EUV) imaging have been studied with physical optics modeling. Lastly, the design of an efficient large-solid-angle condenser has been completed. It collects 50% of the available laser plasma source power at 14 nm and delivers it properly to the object mask in a wide-arc-field camera.

  14. Initiation of vacuum insulator surface high-voltage flashover with electrons produced by laser illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Leopold, J. G.

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, experiments are described in which cylindrical vacuum insulator samples and samples inclined at 45° relative to the cathode were stressed by microsecond timescale high-voltage pulses and illuminated by focused UV laser beam pulses. In these experiments, we were able to distinguish between flashover initiated by the laser producing only photo-electrons and when plasma is formed. It was shown that flashover is predominantly initiated near the cathode triple junction. Even dense plasma formed near the anode triple junction does not necessarily lead to vacuum surface flashover. The experimental results directly confirm our conjecture that insulator surface breakdown can be avoided by preventing its initiation [J. G. Leopold et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 060401 (2007)] and complement our previous experimental results [J. Z. Gleizer et al., IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul. 21, 2394 (2014) and J. Z. Gleizer et al., J. Appl. Phys. 117, 073301 (2015)].

  15. Initiation of vacuum insulator surface high-voltage flashover with electrons produced by laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasik, Ya. E.; Leopold, J. G.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, experiments are described in which cylindrical vacuum insulator samples and samples inclined at 45° relative to the cathode were stressed by microsecond timescale high-voltage pulses and illuminated by focused UV laser beam pulses. In these experiments, we were able to distinguish between flashover initiated by the laser producing only photo-electrons and when plasma is formed. It was shown that flashover is predominantly initiated near the cathode triple junction. Even dense plasma formed near the anode triple junction does not necessarily lead to vacuum surface flashover. The experimental results directly confirm our conjecture that insulator surface breakdown can be avoided by preventing its initiation [J. G. Leopold et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 060401 (2007)] and complement our previous experimental results [J. Z. Gleizer et al., IEEE Trans. Dielectr. Electr. Insul. 21, 2394 (2014) and J. Z. Gleizer et al., J. Appl. Phys. 117, 073301 (2015)].

  16. Thermally enhanced field emission from a laser-illuminated tungsten tip: temperature rise of tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. J. G.; Reifenberger, R.; Robins, E. S.; Lindenmayr, H. G.

    1980-09-01

    Thermal field emission of electrons has been investigated from a tungsten field emitter illuminated by the focused beam of a laser operating at a range of wavelengths in the visible region of the spectrum. The temperature rise of the tip is determined as a function of the displacement of the focused spot of light along the shank, and of its polarization. The experimental data are compared with the results of a first-principle calculation of the temperature rise, based on an experimental investigation of the intensity distribution within the focused spot of light and of the geometry of the field emitter. The comparison shows that when the laser beam is focused close to the tip the temperature rise is anomalously large; evidence is presented which suggests that the temperature rise of the tip is substantially enhanced by diffraction effects.

  17. Analysis of pyrotechnic devices by laser-illuminated high speed photography

    SciTech Connect

    Dosser, L.R.; Stark, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Several types of pyrotechnic igniters have been evaluated using the technique of laser-illuminated high speed photography with a copper vapor laser. The accompanying video tape shows the results of high speed films recorded for two types of igniters (Type X1 and Type X2) fired in confinement in a lucite block and four types of igniters (Type X1, Type X2, Type X3, and Type X4) igniters fired at ambient. The films of the Type X1 and Type X2 igniters were recorded for both a coarse particle titanium potassium perchlorate (TiKP) output charge and a fine particle TiKP output charge. The results of these films are most informative, and the technique is shown to be useful as a design tool for studying the performance of igniters. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Quantitative Rayleigh thermometry for high background scattering applications with structured laser illumination planar imaging.

    PubMed

    Kempema, Nathan J; Long, Marshall B

    2014-10-10

    This work demonstrates structured laser illumination planar imaging (SLIPI) for Rayleigh thermometry with high background scattering. Two coherent laser beams were crossed to produce an interference pattern, from which the modulated Rayleigh signal was collected. The modulated signal serves as a signature that identifies information about Rayleigh scattering from the probe volume against additional contributions in the image from background scattering. This work shows that the structured nature of the illumination allows for a simplified background correction. The experimental approach is validated in a non-premixed methane/air flame, and the temperature is found to be in excellent agreement with previous experimental and computational results. Rayleigh SLIPI is then applied to a high background scattering application as part of the full-field temperature measurement of sooting non-premixed ethylene/air flames. For these flames, standard Rayleigh background corrections are impossible since scattering from soot just outside the field of view is the main source of the background. Good agreement is found between SLIPI and intensity-ratio thin-filament pyrometry-derived temperature along their adjoining interface in the flame. PMID:25322370

  19. [Lung autofluorescence. Preliminary study of two systems without laser illumination or photosensitization].

    PubMed

    Homasson, J P; Capron, F; Angebault, M; Nguyen Bich, N

    2001-06-01

    When illuminated with a certain wavelength, lung tissue emits a weak fluorescence. The fluorescence from normal tissue is different from that from diseased tissue. This technique can thus be used for early diagnosis of precancerous lesions. Technical manipulations are required to amplify the fluorescence signal. Numerous studies have used the LIFE (Lung Imaging Fluorescent Endoscope) to study lung diseases. This system of detection uses a laser helium-cadmium excitation source; the principal photosensitizing agents are hematoporphyrin derivatives. The cost, bulkiness and secondary effects have limited diffusion of this type of photodynamic diagnostic system. We have used 2 systems (SAFE 1000 Pentax and D-LIGHT Storz) successively in a prospective study to analyze autofluorescence of lung tissue without laser illumination or photosensitization. Fifty-four patients were selected for their risk factors. We were able to detect one case of severe dysplasia but did not identify any case of carcinoma in situ. Among 18 cases, 16 were evident with white light. Two were detected with autofluorescence used to orient biopsies while white light had only revealed a common inflammatory aspect. Thirty-nine low-grade lesions (metaplasia, dysplasia) were found. The systems are easy to use. Lower cost would allow more widespread use of these systems currently reserved for risk populations. These techniques broaden the scope of interventional endoscopy. PMID:11416803

  20. High direct drive illumination uniformity achieved by multi-parameter optimization approach: a case study of Shenguang III laser facility.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chao; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Bo; Shan, Lianqiang; Zhou, Weimin; Liu, Dongxiao; Bi, Bi; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Weiwu; Zhang, Baohan; Gu, Yuqiu

    2015-05-01

    The uniformity of the compression driver is of fundamental importance for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). In this paper, the illumination uniformity on a spherical capsule during the initial imprinting phase directly driven by laser beams has been considered. We aim to explore methods to achieve high direct drive illumination uniformity on laser facilities designed for indirect drive ICF. There are many parameters that would affect the irradiation uniformity, such as Polar Direct Drive displacement quantity, capsule radius, laser spot size and intensity distribution within a laser beam. A novel approach to reduce the root mean square illumination non-uniformity based on multi-parameter optimizing approach (particle swarm optimization) is proposed, which enables us to obtain a set of optimal parameters over a large parameter space. Finally, this method is applied to improve the direct drive illumination uniformity provided by Shenguang III laser facility and the illumination non-uniformity is reduced from 5.62% to 0.23% for perfectly balanced beams. Moreover, beam errors (power imbalance and pointing error) are taken into account to provide a more practical solution and results show that this multi-parameter optimization approach is effective. PMID:25969321

  1. Camera characterization for face recognition under active near-infrared illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gernoth, Thorsten; Grigat, Rolf-Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Active near-infrared illumination may be used in a face recognition system to achieve invariance to changes of the visible illumination. Another benefit of active near-infrared illumination is the bright pupil effect which can be used to assist eye detection. But long time exposure to near-infrared radiation is hazardous to the eyes. The level of illumination is therefore limited by potentially harmful effects to the eyes. Image sensors for face recognition under active near-infrared illumination have therefore to be carefully selected to provide optimal image quality in the desired field of application. A model of the active illumination source is introduced. Safety issues with regard to near-infrared illumination are addressed using this model and a radiometric analysis. From the illumination model requirements on suitable imaging sensors are formulated. Standard image quality metrics are used to assess the imaging device performance under application typical conditions. The characterization of image quality is based on measurements of the Opto-Electronic Conversion Function, Modulation Transfer Function and noise. A methodology to select an image sensor for the desired field of application is given. Two cameras with low-cost image sensors are characterized using the key parameters that influence the image quality for face recognition.

  2. Measurement of the temperature increase in the porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Kurtz, Ronald M.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2010-02-01

    Multiple femtosecond lasers have now been cleared for use for ophthalmic surgery, including for creation of corneal flaps in LASIK surgery. Preliminary measurements indicated that during typical surgical use, 50-60% of laser energy may pass beyond the cornea with potential effects on the iris. To further evaluate iris laser exposure during femtosecond corneal surgery, we measured the temperature increase in porcine cadaver iris in situ during direct illumination by the iFS Advanced Femtoosecond Laser (AMO Inc. Santa Ana, CA) with an infrared thermal imaging camera. To replicate the illumination geometry of the eye during the surgery, an excised porcine cadaver iris was placed 1.5 mm from the flat glass contact lens. The temperature field was observed in twenty cadaver iris at laser pulse energy levels ranging from 1 to 2 μJ (corresponding approximately to surgical energies of 2 to 4 μJ per pulse). Temperature increases up to 2.3 °C (corresponding to 2 μJ per pulse and 24 second procedure time) were observed in the cadaver iris with little variation in temperature profiles between specimens for the same laser energy illumination. For laser pulse energy and procedure time characteristic to the iFS Advanced Femtoosecond Laser the temperature increase was measured to be 1.2 °C. Our studies suggest that the magnitude of iris heating that occurs during such femtosecond laser corneal surgery is small and does not present a safety hazard to the iris.

  3. X-ray lasers and methods utilizing two component driving illumination provided by optical laser means of relatively low energy and small physical size

    DOEpatents

    Rosen, Mordecai D.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10), and related methodology, are disclosed wherein an X-ray laser target (12) is illuminated with a first pulse of optical laser radiation (14) of relatively long duration having scarcely enough energy to produce a narrow and linear cool plasma of uniform composition (38). A second, relatively short pulse of optical laser radiation (18) is uniformly swept across the length, from end to end, of the plasma (38), at about the speed of light, to consecutively illuminate continuously succeeding portions of the plasma (38) with optical laser radiation having scarcely enough energy to heat, ionize, and invert them into the continuously succeeding portions of an X-ray gain medium. This inventive double pulse technique results in a saving of more than two orders of magnitude in driving optical laser energy, when compared to the conventional single pulse approach.

  4. Tunable Broadband Radiation Generated Via Ultrafast Laser Illumination of an Inductively Charged Superconducting Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulmer, John; Bullard, Thomas; Dolasinski, Brian; Murphy, John; Sparkes, Martin; Pangovski, Krste; O'Neill, William; Powers, Peter; Haugan, Timothy

    2015-12-01

    An electromagnetic transmitter typically consists of individual components such as a waveguide, antenna, power supply, and an oscillator. In this communication we circumvent complications associated with connecting these individual components and instead combine them into a non-traditional, photonic enabled, compact transmitter device for tunable, ultrawide band (UWB) radiation. This device is a centimeter scale, continuous, thin film superconducting ring supporting a persistent super-current. An ultrafast laser pulse (required) illuminates the ring (either at a point or uniformly around the ring) and perturbs the super-current by the de-pairing and recombination of Cooper pairs. This generates a microwave pulse where both ring and laser pulse geometry dictates the radiated spectrum’s shape. The transmitting device is self contained and completely isolated from conductive components that are observed to interfere with the generated signal. A rich spectrum is observed that extends beyond 30 GHz (equipment limited) and illustrates the complex super-current dynamics bridging optical, THz, and microwave wavelengths.

  5. Tunable Broadband Radiation Generated Via Ultrafast Laser Illumination of an Inductively Charged Superconducting Ring.

    PubMed

    Bulmer, John; Bullard, Thomas; Dolasinski, Brian; Murphy, John; Sparkes, Martin; Pangovski, Krste; O'Neill, William; Powers, Peter; Haugan, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    An electromagnetic transmitter typically consists of individual components such as a waveguide, antenna, power supply, and an oscillator. In this communication we circumvent complications associated with connecting these individual components and instead combine them into a non-traditional, photonic enabled, compact transmitter device for tunable, ultrawide band (UWB) radiation. This device is a centimeter scale, continuous, thin film superconducting ring supporting a persistent super-current. An ultrafast laser pulse (required) illuminates the ring (either at a point or uniformly around the ring) and perturbs the super-current by the de-pairing and recombination of Cooper pairs. This generates a microwave pulse where both ring and laser pulse geometry dictates the radiated spectrum's shape. The transmitting device is self contained and completely isolated from conductive components that are observed to interfere with the generated signal. A rich spectrum is observed that extends beyond 30 GHz (equipment limited) and illustrates the complex super-current dynamics bridging optical, THz, and microwave wavelengths. PMID:26659022

  6. Tunable Broadband Radiation Generated Via Ultrafast Laser Illumination of an Inductively Charged Superconducting Ring

    PubMed Central

    Bulmer, John; Bullard, Thomas; Dolasinski, Brian; Murphy, John; Sparkes, Martin; Pangovski, Krste; O’Neill, William; Powers, Peter; Haugan, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    An electromagnetic transmitter typically consists of individual components such as a waveguide, antenna, power supply, and an oscillator. In this communication we circumvent complications associated with connecting these individual components and instead combine them into a non-traditional, photonic enabled, compact transmitter device for tunable, ultrawide band (UWB) radiation. This device is a centimeter scale, continuous, thin film superconducting ring supporting a persistent super-current. An ultrafast laser pulse (required) illuminates the ring (either at a point or uniformly around the ring) and perturbs the super-current by the de-pairing and recombination of Cooper pairs. This generates a microwave pulse where both ring and laser pulse geometry dictates the radiated spectrum’s shape. The transmitting device is self contained and completely isolated from conductive components that are observed to interfere with the generated signal. A rich spectrum is observed that extends beyond 30 GHz (equipment limited) and illustrates the complex super-current dynamics bridging optical, THz, and microwave wavelengths. PMID:26659022

  7. Intravascular low-power laser light illumination: a new method in restenosis prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derkacz, Arkadiusz; Bialy, Dariusz; Protasiewicz, Marcin; Beres-Pawlik, Elzbieta M.; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2004-07-01

    The procedure of percutaneous coronary intervention is associated with the 30% risk of restenosis in the dilatated coronary artery. in order to minimize its occurrence we developed the method of intracoronary low power laser irradiation and called it the photoremodling. We developed and constructed at total set-up for the intravascular illumination. It consists of the laser diode connected with a multimode step-index silica fiber 200/270 μm terminated with a special fiber diffuser, which allows to irradiate homogeneously a coronary vessel in the place of dilatation. The diffuser is inserted into the coronary vessel by a modificated angioplasty catheter. Till now PTCA plus photoremodeling procedures have been carried out in 40 patients (28 with stent implantation and 12 with balloon angioplasty). We did not observed any side effects and complications of the procedure. All patients were qualified for 6 months follow-up, which was terminated in 19 cases with a control coronarography. We did not find any case of restenosis in the stent group. In the group of patients after balloon angioplasty restenosis rate was 25%. The new method of treatment is safe. The preliminary results seem to be beneficial especially in the case of stent implantation.

  8. Spectral content of buried Ag foils at 10(16) W/cm(2) laser illumination.

    PubMed

    Huntington, C M; Maddox, B R; Park, H-S; Prisbrey, S; Remington, B A

    2014-11-01

    Sources of 5-12 keV thermal Heα x-rays are readily generated by laser irradiation of mid-Z foils at intensities >10(14) W/cm(2), and are widely used as probes for inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density experiments. Higher energy 17-50 keV x-ray sources are efficiently produced from "cold" Kα emission using short pulse, petawatt lasers at intensities >10(18) W/cm(2) [H.-S. Park, B. R. Maddox et al., "High-resolution 17-75 keV backlighters for high energy density experiments," Phys. Plasmas 15(7), 072705 (2008); B. R. Maddox, H. S. Park, B. A. Remington et al., "Absolute measurements of x-ray backlighter sources at energies above 10 keV," Phys. Plasmas 18(5), 056709 (2011)]. However, when long pulse (>1 ns) lasers are used with Z > 30 elements, the spectrum contains contributions from both K shell transitions and from ionized atomic states. Here we show that by sandwiching a silver foil between layers of high-density carbon, the ratio of Kα:Heα in the x-ray spectrum is significant increased over directly illuminated Ag foils, with narrower lines from K-shell transitions. Additionally, the emission volume is more localized for the sandwiched target, producing a more planar x-ray sheet. This technique may be useful for generating probes requiring spectral purity and a limited spatial extent, for example, in incoherent x-ray Thomson scattering experiments. PMID:25430207

  9. Safety Guidelines for Laser Illumination on Exposed High Explosives and Metals in Contact with High Explosives with Calculational Results

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J; Roeske, F; Wilkins, P; Carpenter, K H

    2002-04-17

    Experimental tests have been undertaken to determine safe levels of laser exposure on bare high explosive (HE) samples and on common metals used in intimate contact with HE. Laser light is often focused on bare HE and upon metals in contact with HE during alignment procedures and experimental metrology experiments. This paper looks at effects caused by focusing laser beams at high energy densities directly onto the surface of various bare HE samples. Laser energy densities (fluence) exceeding 19 kilowatts/cm{sup 2} using a 5-milliwatt, 670 nm, cw laser diode were generated by focusing the laser down to a spot size diameter of 4 microns. Upon careful inspection, no laser damage was observed in any of the HE samples illuminated at this fluence level. Direct laser exposure of metals directly contacting HE surfaces was also tested. Laser energy densities (fluence) varying from 188 Watts/cm{sup 2} to 12.7 KW/cm{sup 2} were generated using an 11-Watt, 532 nm frequency-doubled Nd:YAG cw laser with focal spot size diameters as small as 100 microns. These measurements look at the temperature rise of the surface of the metal in contact with HE when laser energy is incident on the opposite side of the metal. The temperature rise was experimentally measured as a function of incident laser power, spot size, metal composition and metal thickness. Numerical simulations were also performed to solve the two-dimensional heat flow problem for this experimental geometry. In order to simplify the numerical simulation to allow representation of a large number of physical cases, the equations used in the simulation are expressed in terms of dimensionless variables. The normalized numerical solutions are then compared to the various experimental configurations utilized. Calculations and experiment agree well over the range measured. Safety guidelines for alignment laser illumination upon bare HE are outlined.

  10. Active illumination using a digital micromirror device for quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, Jonghee; Park, YongKeun

    2015-11-15

    We present a powerful and cost-effective method for active illumination using a digital micromirror device (DMD) for quantitative phase-imaging techniques. Displaying binary illumination patterns on a DMD with appropriate spatial filtering, plane waves with various illumination angles are generated and impinged onto a sample. Complex optical fields of the sample obtained with various incident angles are then measured via Mach-Zehnder interferometry, from which a high-resolution 2D synthetic aperture phase image and a 3D refractive index tomogram of the sample are reconstructed. We demonstrate the fast and stable illumination-control capability of the proposed method by imaging colloidal spheres and biological cells. The capability of high-speed optical diffraction tomography is also demonstrated by measuring 3D Brownian motion of colloidal particles with the tomogram acquisition rate of 100 Hz. PMID:26565886

  11. Track analysis of laser-illuminated etched track detectors using an opto-digital imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eghan, Moses J.; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Oppon, Osborne C.

    2007-11-01

    An opto-digital imaging system for counting and analysing tracks on a LR-115 detector is described. One batch of LR-115 track detectors was irradiated with Am-241 for a determined period and distance for linearity test and another batch was exposed to radon gas. The laser-illuminated etched track detector area was imaged, digitized and analysed by the system. The tracks that were counted on the opto-digital system with the aid of media cybernetics software as well as spark gap counter showed comparable track density results ranging between 1500 and 2750 tracks cm-2 and 65 tracks cm-2 in the two different batch detector samples with 0.5% and 1% track counts, respectively. Track sizes of the incident alpha particles from the radon gas on the LR-115 detector demonstrating different track energies are statistically and graphically represented. The opto-digital imaging system counts and measures other track parameters at an average process time of 3-5 s.

  12. Widefield imaging of upconverting nanoparticles on epifluorescence microscopes adapted for laser illumination with top-hat profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrazek, Jiri; Pospisilova, Martina; Svozil, Vit; Cadek, Ondrej; Nesporova, Kristina; Sulakova, Romana; Brandejsova, Martina; Vranova, Jana; Velebny, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    We describe a modification of epifluorescence microscopes that allows quantitative widefield imaging of samples labeled by upconverting nanoparticles (UCNP). A top-hat illumination profile on the sample was achieved with a 980-nm laser diode by using tandem microlens arrays, a moving diffuser and a telescope, which adjusts the top-hat area to the field of view. Illumination homogeneity is a critical factor for imaging of UCNP since the intensity of their luminescence typically scales with the second power of the excitation intensity. Our illuminator is combined with the epifluorescence attachment of the microscope, allowing easy switching between observation of UCNP and traditional fluorescent dyes. Illumination profile homogeneity of about 98% was measured for objectives with magnification from 4× to 100×, and the top-hat profile was also obtained with phase contrast objectives. We demonstrate capability of the illuminator by evaluating in vitro uptake of UCNP encapsulated in oleyl-hyaluronan micelles into breast cancer cells. Micelles bearing the targeting peptide were about an order of magnitude more efficient than nontargeted micelles.

  13. An active lighting module with natural light guiding system and solid state source for indoor illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chi-An; Chen, Yi-Yung; Whang, Allen Jong-Woei

    2009-08-01

    Recently, many researches focus on healthy lighting with sunlight. A Natural Light Guiding System includes collecting, transmitting, and lighting parts. In general, the lighting module of the Natural Light Guiding System only uses scattering element, such as diffuser, to achieve uniform illumination. With the passive lighting module, the application of the Natural Light Guiding System is limited because sunlight is dynamic source. When the sunlight is weak at morning, at evening, or on cloudy day, the illumination system is fail. In this paper, we provide an active lighting module that includes the lighting part of Natural Light Guiding System, LED auxiliary sources, optical elements, and optical detector. We use optical simulation tool to design and simulate the efficiency of the active module. The optical element can redistribute the sunlight only, LED light only, or sunlight with LED light to achieve uniform illumination. With the feedback of the detector, the active lighting module will adjust the intensity of LED to provide a steady illumination. Moreover, the module could replace the backlight module of LCD TV when the house has Natural Light Guiding System for saving energy and higher performance of image.

  14. UV-laser-based longitudinal illuminated diffuser (LID) incorporating diffractive and Lambertian reflectance for the disinfection of beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd

    2010-08-01

    A novel laser beam shaping system was designed to demonstrate the potential of using high power UV laser sources for large scale disinfection of liquids used in the production of food products, such as juices, beer, milk and other beverage types. The design incorporates a patented assembly of optical components including a diffractive beam splitting/shaping element and a faceted pyramidal or conically shaped Lambertian diffuser made from a compression molded PTFE compounds. When properly sintered to an appropriate density, as an example between 1.10 and 1.40 grams per cubic centimeter, the compressed PTFE compounds show a ~99% reflectance at wavelengths ranging from 300 nm to 1500 nm, and a ~98.5% refection of wavelengths from 250 nm to 2000 nm [1]. The unique diffuser configuration also benefits from the fact that the PTFE compounds do not degrade when exposed to ultraviolet radiation as do barium sulfate materials and silver or aluminized mirror coatings [2]. These components are contained within a hermetically sealed quartz tube. Once assembled a laser beam is directed through one end of the tube. This window takes the form of a computer generated diffractive splitter or other diffractive shaper element to split the laser beam into a series of spot beamlets, circular rings or other geometric shapes. As each of the split beamlets or rings cascade downward, they illuminate various points along the tapered PTFE cone or faceted pyramidal form. As they strike the surface they each diffuse in a Lambertian reflectance pattern creating a pseudo-uniform circumferential illuminator along the length of the quartz tube enclosing the assembly. The compact tubular structure termed Longitudinal Illuminated Diffuser (LID) provides a unique UV disinfection source that can be placed within a centrifugal reactor or a pipe based reactor chamber. This paper will review the overall design principle, key component design parameters, preliminary analytic and bench operational testing

  15. Turbulence-induced scintillation on Gaussian-beam waves: theoretical predictions and observations from a laser-illuminated satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, John D.

    1995-10-01

    Expressions for the variance and the power spectral density of turbulence-induced log-amplitude fluctuations are derived for Gaussian-beam waves in the regime of weak scattering. This formulation includes effects that are due to turbulence strength variations along the propagation path, offset of the observation point from the beam axis, and sensitivity to focus and beam diameter. Comparison of theoretical results with observed scintillation during experiments with a laser-illuminated satellite reveals good agreement. Copyright (c) 1995 Optical Society of America

  16. Illuminating Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Through the support of the NASA SBIR program, Control Vision, Inc. developed novel video techniques for clear, high resolution, real-time imaging of high temperature, high-energy industrial processes, such as welding, plasma arc spraying (coating), arc furnaces, metal casting and refractories (ceramics) melting. The Control Vision systems use reflected laser or strobe illumination, combined with ultra-short exposure times to create video, including the allowance of particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) of fast moving powder particles buried within a plasma stream.

  17. Background illumination simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Towry, E.R.

    1992-05-12

    This patent describes a testing apparatus for testing and evaluating the performance of laser seeking warheads for missiles, under simulated weather conditions. It comprises support means for supporting a warhead seeker; laser means for generating a laser beam and for directing a laser beam towards the seeker; a diffusion screen interposed between the seeker support means and the laser means for diffusing the laser beam; a collimating lens interposed between the diffusion screen and the seeker support means for collimating the diffused laser beam and for directing the collimated laser beam onto a warhead seeker, supported in the seeker support; background illuminator means for illuminating the seeker support and a seeker disposed therein, supported for movement into and out of an operating position between the diffusion means and the collimating lens for providing background lighting in simulation of weather lighting conditions; and control means for controlling the intensity of the light provided by the illuminator means to simulate various weather conditions.

  18. Single-shot, volumetrically illuminated, three-dimensional, tomographic laser-induced-fluorescence imaging in a gaseous free jet.

    PubMed

    Halls, Benjamin R; Thul, Daniel J; Michaelis, Dirk; Roy, Sukesh; Meyer, Terrence R; Gord, James R

    2016-05-01

    Single-shot, tomographic imaging of the three-dimensional concentration field is demonstrated in a turbulent gaseous free jet in co-flow using volumetrically illuminated laser-induced fluorescence. The fourth-harmonic output of an Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm is formed into a collimated 15 × 20 mm2 beam to excite the ground singlet state of acetone seeded into the central jet. Subsequent fluorescence is collected along eight lines of sight for tomographic reconstruction using a combination of stereoscopes optically coupled to four two-stage intensified CMOS cameras. The performance of the imaging system is evaluated and shown to be sufficient for recording instantaneous three-dimensional features with high signal-to-noise (130:1) and nominal spatial resolution of 0.6-1.5 mm at x/D = 7-15.5. PMID:27137614

  19. X-ray characterization of short-pulse laser illuminated hydrogen storage alloys having very high performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daido, Hiroyuki; Abe, Hiroshi; Shobu, Takahisa; Shimomura, Takuya; Tokuhira, Shinnosuke; Takenaka, Yusuke; Furuyama, Takehiro; Nishimura, Akihiko; Uchida, Hirohisa; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen storage alloys become more and more important in the fields of electric energy production and stage and automobiles such as Ni-MH batteries. The vacancies introduced in hydrogen absorption alloy by charged particle beams were found to be positive effect on the increase in the initial hydrogen absorption reaction rate in the previous study. The initial reaction rates of hydrogen absorption and desorption of the alloy are one of the important performances to be improved. Here, we report on the characterization of the hydrogen absorption reaction rate directly illuminated by a femtosecond and nanosecond lasers instead of particle beam machines. A laser illuminates the whole surface sequentially on a tip of a few cm square LaNi4.6Al0.4 alloy resulting in significant improvement in the hydrogen absorption reaction rate. For characterization of the surface layer, we perform an x-ray diffraction experiment using a monochromatized intense x-ray beam from SPring-8 synchrotoron machine.

  20. Estimation of the cooling times for a metallic tip under laser illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Vurpillot, F.; Gault, B.; Vella, A.; Bouet, M.; Deconihout, B.

    2006-02-27

    The temperature evolution at the apex of a sharply pointed needle submitted to ultrafast pulsed-laser irradiation was determined using a pump-probe method. The laser pulse acts as a pump pulse whereas the probe pulse is a fast high-voltage pulse. Then cooling times are consistent with a heating zone of a few microns with a laser beam polarized along the tip axis and a spot size of 0.8 mm.

  1. Laser ablative nanostructuring of Au in liquid ambience in continuous wave illumination regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherik, A. O.; Kutrovskaya, S. V.; Arakelyan, S. M.; Ryabchikov, Y. V.; Al-Kattan, A.; Kabashin, A. V.; Itina, T. E.

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) attract particular attention because of their unique size-dependent chemical, physicochemical and optical properties and, hence, their potential applications in catalysis, nanoelectronics, photovoltaics and medicine. In particular, laser-produced colloidal nanoparticles are not only biocompatible, but also reveal unique chemical properties. Different laser systems can be used for synthesis of these colloids, varying from continuous wave (CW) to ultra-short femtosecond lasers. The choice of an optimum laser system is still a challenge in application development. To bring more light at this issue, we investigate an influence of laser parameters on nanoparticle formation from a gold target immersed in deionized water. First, an optical diagnostics of laser-induced hydrodynamic processes taking place near the gold surface is performed. Then, gold nanoparticle colloids with average particle sizes smaller than 10 nm and a very narrow dispersion are shown to be formed by CW laser ablation. The obtained results are compared with the ones obtained by using the second harmonics and with previous results obtained by using femtosecond laser systems.

  2. Remote Bridge Deflection Measurement Using an Advanced Video Deflectometer and Actively Illuminated LED Targets.

    PubMed

    Tian, Long; Pan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    An advanced video deflectometer using actively illuminated LED targets is proposed for remote, real-time measurement of bridge deflection. The system configuration, fundamental principles, and measuring procedures of the video deflectometer are first described. To address the challenge of remote and accurate deflection measurement of large engineering structures without being affected by ambient light, the novel idea of active imaging, which combines high-brightness monochromatic LED targets with coupled bandpass filter imaging, is introduced. Then, to examine the measurement accuracy of the proposed advanced video deflectometer in outdoor environments, vertical motions of an LED target with precisely-controlled translations were measured and compared with prescribed values. Finally, by tracking six LED targets mounted on the bridge, the developed video deflectometer was applied for field, remote, and multipoint deflection measurement of the Wuhan Yangtze River Bridge, one of the most prestigious and most publicized constructions in China, during its routine safety evaluation tests. Since the proposed video deflectometer using actively illuminated LED targets offers prominent merits of remote, contactless, real-time, and multipoint deflection measurement with strong robustness against ambient light changes, it has great potential in the routine safety evaluation of various bridges and other large-scale engineering structures. PMID:27563901

  3. Laser controlled deposition of metal microstructures via nondiffracting Bessel beam illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drampyan, Rafael; Leonov, Nikita; Vartanyan, Tigran

    2016-04-01

    The technique of the laser controlled deposition of sodium and rubidium deposits on the sapphire substrate is presented. The metals were deposited on the clean sapphire substrate from the vapor phase contained in the evacuated and sealed cell. We use an axicon to produce a non-diffracting Bessel beam out of the beam got from the cw diode laser with 200 mW power at the wavelength of 532 nm. After 30 minutes of the laser-controlled deposition the substrates were examined in the optical microscope. The obtained metal deposits form the sharp-cut circles with the pitch of 10 μm, coincident with the tens of dark rings of the Bessel beam. Reduction of the laser power leads to the build up of the continuous metal film over the whole substrate.

  4. Laser-driven phosphor-converted white light source for solid-state illumination.

    PubMed

    George, Anthony F; Al-waisawy, Sara; Wright, Jason T; Jadwisienczak, Wojciech M; Rahman, Faiz

    2016-03-10

    Energy efficiency and lighting quality considerations are driving research into laser-pumped white light sources. Laser diodes as pump sources for downconversion phosphors promise freedom from "droop" that adversely affects the efficiency of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). High-intensity laser diode-pumped light sources for applications such as search lights and automobile headlights have been demonstrated recently. Our paper describes the design and construction of a domestic/office-type solid-state luminaire driven by light from an integrated violet laser-diode module. A trichromatic phosphor made from a blend of separate europium-containing rare-earth phosphors was used as the downconversion medium. Mechanical and optical design of the reflector and the phosphor plate are described. Characteristics of both the pump light and the downconverted light are also described. Our studies also looked at the variation of chromaticity coordinates with variation in pump power and the effect of laser speckle on the lamp's light output. Finally, there is a brief discussion of energy conversion efficiency and longevity considerations, comparing pumping with LEDs versus pumping with laser diodes. PMID:26974780

  5. Post shot analysis of plasma conditions of Gold Spheres illuminated by the URLLE Omega laser, as measured via Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, M. D.; Ross, J. S.; Scott, H. A.; Landen, N.; Froula, D.; Dewald, E.; May, M.; Widmann, K.

    2013-10-01

    Recently there was a follow up to the 2006 campaign to illuminate 1 mm diameter gold spheres using the Omega laser at LLE. The 2013 campaign uses Thomson scattering to diagnose the plasma conditions as a function of time, at various radial positions in the coronal, laser heated, blow-off region. Laser irradiances were 1, 5, and 10 × 1014 W/sqcm, usually in a 1 ns pulse duration. Depleted uranium and Ag spheres were also tested. We compare the predictions of plasma conditions using various non-LTE computational models of atomic physics and electron transport (as implemented into the rad-hydro code Lasnex) to this data. The ``high flux model (HFM)'' (DCA atomic physics and non local transport) compares well for some of experiments, while an intermediate model that radiates a bit less total x-ray fluence than the HFM, does better on other experiments. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Reflection of illumination laser from gas metal arc weld pool surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoji; Zhang, Yu Ming

    2009-11-01

    The weld pool is the core of the welding process where complex welding phenomena originate. Skilled welders acquire their process feedback primarily from the weld pool. Observation and measurement of the three-dimensional weld pool surface thus play a fundamental role in understanding and future control of complex welding processes. To this end, a laser line is projected onto the weld pool surface in pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and an imaging plane is used to intercept its reflection from the weld pool surface. Resultant images of the reflected laser are analyzed and it is found that the weld pool surface in GMAW does specularly reflect the projected laser as in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Hence, the weld pool surface in GMAW is also specular and it is in principle possible that it may be observed and measured by projecting a laser pattern and then intercepting and imaging the reflection from it. Due to high frequencies of surface fluctuations, GMAW requires a relatively short time to image the reflected laser.

  7. Active debris removal: Aspects of trajectories, communication and illumination during final approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloo, J. A. F.; Mooij, E.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate a debris-remediation technique where a chaser performs a rendezvous with the debris, establishes a rigid-link connection, and actively de-orbits the debris. ESA's satellite Envisat has been used as a design case. The research assessed passive safety aspects of the final-approach manoeuvres by analysing the resulting trajectories after thrust inhibit. Next, the research explored the possibility for continuous ground communication by considering the chain of European space tracking (ESTRACK) ground stations (located mainly in Europe). Furthermore, obstruction of the communication signal by the target was studied. Last, the research studies the illumination conditions encountered by the chaser, where obscuration of the Sun by the target was taken into account. Each of these elements are studied for the final approach only. In the topic of passive safety, the results confirm that manoeuvres on H-bar are passively unsafe, and indicate this also for the fly-around manoeuvres along the natural orbital motion. It can be concluded from the communication analysis that the maximum duration of the uninterrupted window varies between 22 and 32 min, using the chain of core ESTRACK ground stations. However, the study on communication blockage shows that frequent communication gaps can occur, with the longest gaps being in the order of one minute in duration. In the field of illumination, it can be concluded that correct target illumination and sensor visibility cannot be guaranteed. Furthermore, the average solar-array area available during final approach varies between 35% and 75%, due to both incorrect pointing of the solar array by the chaser and obscuration by the target.

  8. Influence of UV illumination on the cold temperature operation of a LiNbO(3) Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brian; Goldberg, Lew; King, Vernon; Leach, Jeff

    2010-04-26

    UV illumination of a lithium niobate Q-switch was demonstrated as an effective means to eliminate a loss in hold-off and associated prelasing that occurs under cold temperature operation of Q-switched lasers. This degradation occurs due to the pyroelectric effect, where an accumulation of charge on crystal faces results in a reduction in the Q-switch hold-off and a spatially variable loss of the Q-switch in its high-transmission state, both resulting in lowering of the maximum Q-switched pulse energy. With UV illumination, the resulting creation of photo-generated carriers was shown to be effective in eliminating both of these effects. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser utilizing UV-illuminated LiNbO(3) was shown to operate under cold temperatures without prelasing or spatially variable loss. PMID:20588809

  9. Dynamics of Light-Absorption Variations Induced in a Bismuth Silicate Crystal by Visible Laser Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudyakova, E. S.; Kisteneva, M. G.; Shandarov, S. M.; Kornienko, T. A.; Tolstik, A. L.; Kargin, Yu. F.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of experimental studies of the dynamics of the photoinduced optical absorption in a bismuth silicate crystal subject to continuous laser irradiation with wavelengths of 532 and 655 nm. The semiconductor-laser light beam with the wavelength λ = 655 nm causes the crystal bleaching at this wavelength, whereas its exposure to a shorter-wavelength irradiation from the optical-spectrum green region with a wavelength of 532 nm increases the optical absorption at both wavelengths, of 532 and 655 nm. The experimental results are interpreted using the theoretical model which assumes that the crystal has deep defect centers of two types so that an electron at each of these centers can be in one of the states characterized by different photoionization cross sections.

  10. Impact of a distance estimation error inducing a visualized zone gap on the target illuminance in range-gated active imaging.

    PubMed

    Matwyschuk, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Some stand-alone airborne systems of target reconnaissance such as a missile seeker head use range-gated laser active imaging to visualize a target in the scene. To center the visualized zone on the target, it is important to know the distance between the active imaging system and the target. However, as this exact distance is not known before the detection of the target, it can be only estimated. This estimated distance can be erroneous (max≈500  m) with some technological drifts (gyrometric drift, accelerometric drift, missile position error, etc.). To be able to evaluate the impact of a distance estimation error on target illuminance in active imaging, the expressions of the illuminance attenuation ratio according to the decentered target position with regard to the visualized zone were determined. These different equations will be used to determine, in future stand-alone reconnaissance systems, the target signal-to-noise ratio as a function of the localization error. Generally speaking, two modes of visualization were used: first by using a fixed width of the visualized zone, and second by increasing the width of the visualized zone as a function of the distance. The defined different expressions allowed us to study the illuminance behavior of the target with regard to the value of the gap (difference between the estimated distance and the real distance) for each mode of visualization. The results showed that from a target distance of about 1 km, the visualization mode with variable zone width allowed us to decrease the target illuminance less during a gap caused by an estimation error of the target distance. PMID:24513988

  11. 2PE-STED microscopy with a single Ti:sapphire laser for reduced illumination.

    PubMed

    Li, Qifeng; Wang, Yang; Chen, Da; Wu, Sherry S H

    2014-01-01

    We reported a new effective approach to carry out two-photon excitation stimulated emission depletion (2PE-STED) microscopy using a single Ti:sapphire laser system. With an acoustic-optic Bragg cell, the modulated-CW 2PE STED microscope had the benefits of both CW and pulse approaches: lower input power, simple optical scheme and no complicated synchronization. Additionally, it also took advantages of fluorescence yield increasing. The sub-diffraction-limit resolution was demonstrated using ATTO 425-tagged clathrin-coated vesicles. PMID:24516661

  12. Spectral content of buried Ag foils at 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Huntington, C. M. Maddox, B. R.; Park, H.-S.; Prisbrey, S.; Remington, B. A.

    2014-11-15

    Sources of 5–12 keV thermal Heα x-rays are readily generated by laser irradiation of mid-Z foils at intensities >10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, and are widely used as probes for inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density experiments. Higher energy 17–50 keV x-ray sources are efficiently produced from “cold” Kα emission using short pulse, petawatt lasers at intensities >10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} [H.-S. Park, B. R. Maddox et al., “High-resolution 17–75 keV backlighters for high energy density experiments,” Phys. Plasmas 15(7), 072705 (2008); B. R. Maddox, H. S. Park, B. A. Remington et al., “Absolute measurements of x-ray backlighter sources at energies above 10 keV,” Phys. Plasmas 18(5), 056709 (2011)]. However, when long pulse (>1 ns) lasers are used with Z > 30 elements, the spectrum contains contributions from both K shell transitions and from ionized atomic states. Here we show that by sandwiching a silver foil between layers of high-density carbon, the ratio of Kα:Heα in the x-ray spectrum is significant increased over directly illuminated Ag foils, with narrower lines from K-shell transitions. Additionally, the emission volume is more localized for the sandwiched target, producing a more planar x-ray sheet. This technique may be useful for generating probes requiring spectral purity and a limited spatial extent, for example, in incoherent x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

  13. Cylindrically distributing optical fiber tip for uniform laser illumination of hollow organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; Burke, T.; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Hill, P. D.; Essenpreis, Matthias; Mills, Timothy N.

    1993-05-01

    To predict the outcome of laser therapy it is important to possess, among other things, an accurate knowledge of the intensity and distribution of the laser light incident on the tissue. For irradiation of the internal surfaces of hollow organs, modified fiber tips can be used to shape the light distribution to best suit the treatment geometry. There exist bulb-tipped optical fibers emitting a uniform isotropic distribution of light suitable for the treatment of organs which approximate a spherical geometry--the bladder, for example. For the treatment of organs approximating a cylindrical geometry--e.g. the oesophagus--an optical fiber tip which emits a uniform cylindrical distribution of light is required. We report on the design, development and testing of such a device, the CLD fiber tip. The device was made from a solid polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) rod, 27 mm in length and 4 mm in diameter. One end was shaped and 'silvered' to form a mirror which reflected the light emitted from the delivery fiber positioned at the other end of the rod. The shape of the mirror was such that the light fell with uniform intensity on the circumferential surface of the rod. This surface was coated with BaSO4 reflectance paint to couple the light out of the rod and onto the surface of the tissue.

  14. Short-wavelength infrared imaging using low dark current InGaAs detector arrays and vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser illuminators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdougal, Michael; Geske, Jon; Wang, Chad; Follman, David

    2011-06-01

    We describe the factors that go into the component choices for a short wavelength IR (SWIR) imager, which include the SWIR sensor, the lens, and the illuminator. We have shown the factors for reducing dark current, and shown that we can achieve well below 1.5 nA/cm2 for 15 μm devices at 7 °C. In addition, we have mated our InGaAs detector arrays to 640×512 readout integrated integrated circuits to make focal plane arrays (FPAs). The resulting FPAs are capable of imaging photon fluxes with wavelengths between 1 and 1.6 μm at low light levels. The dark current associated with these FPAs is extremely low, exhibiting a mean dark current density of 0.26 nA/cm2 at 0 °C. Noise due to the readout can be reduced from 95 to 57 electrons by using off-chip correlated double sampling. In addition, Aerius has developed laser arrays that provide flat illumination in scenes that are normally light-starved. The illuminators have 40% wall-plug efficiency and provide low-speckle illumination, and provide artifact-free imagery versus conventional laser illuminators.

  15. Study of Fast-Electron Transport in Laser-Illuminated Spherical Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakobi, B.; Gotchev, O.V.; Betti, R.; Stoeckl, C.

    2009-10-22

    The transport and scattering of fast electrons created by the two-plasmon-decay instability are studied by comparing the hard x-ray signal from two identically irradiated targets: a 1-mm-diam solid Cu sphere and a 1-mm-diam solid CH sphere, both coated with a 15 um layer of CH. Comparing the results with Monte Carlo code simulations shows the role of scattering in the higher-Z Cu target. We find evidence that the fast electrons are created with a wide angular divergence and that higher-energy electrons transmitted through the target are reflected back into the target. Because of scattering, the fast-electron energy deposition (preheat) in Cu is about half that in CH, namely, ~0.15% of the laser energy for Cu as compared with ~0.30% for CH. Embedded high-Z layers in imploding fusion targets, because of the scattering, could provide protection against preheat.

  16. Value added cleaning and disinfection of the root canal: laser-activated irrigation and laser-induced photoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Moor, Roeland J. G.; Meire, Maarten A.

    2016-03-01

    Among present-day marketed systems ultrasonic activation appears to be the best way to activate and potentiate endodontic irrigants. An alternative for ultrasonic activation of irrigants is laser activated irrigation (LAI) or photoninitiated acoustic streaming. Based on present-day research it appears that LAI (especially with Erbium lasers) can be more efficient for debris removal out of root canals and interaction with the endodontic biofilms thanks to the induction of specific cavitation phenomena and acoustic streaming. Other wavelengths are now explored to be used for LAI. Another way to interact with biofilms is to rely on laser-induced photoporation in combination with gold nanoparticles ( AuNPs). The latter is an alternative physical method for delivering macromolecules in cells. Nanosized membrane pores can be created upon pulsed laser illumination. Depending on the laser energy, pores are created through either direct heating of the AuNPs or by vapour nanobubbles that can emerge around the AuNPs.

  17. Compact laser sources for laser designation, ranging and active imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Lew; Nettleton, John; Schilling, Brad; Trussel, Ward; Hays, Alan

    2007-04-01

    Recent advances in compact solid sate lasers for laser designation, eye-safe range finding and active imaging are described. Wide temperature operation of a compact Nd:YAG laser was achieved by end pumping and the use of multi-λ diode stacks. Such lasers enabled construction of fully operational 4.7 lb laser designator prototypes generating over 50 mJ at 10-20 Hz PRF. Output pulse energy in excess of 100 mJ was demonstrated in a breadboard version of the end-pumped laser. Eye-safe 1.5 μm lasers based on flash-pumped, low PRF, Monoblock lasers have enabled compact STORM laser range finders that have recently been put into production. To achieve higher optical and electrical efficiency needed for higher PRF operation, Monoblock lasers were end-pumped by a laser diode stack. Laser diode end-pumped Monoblock lasers were operated at 10-20 Hz PRF over a wide temperature range (-20 to +50 °C). Compared with bulk compact solid state lasers, fiber lasers are characterized by lower pulse energy, higher PRF's, shorter pulses and higher electrical efficiency. An example of fiber lasers suitable for LIDAR, and atmospheric measurement applications is described. Eye-safe, low intensity diode pumped solid state green warning laser developed for US Army checkpoint and convoy applications is also described.

  18. Transparent selective illumination means suitable for use in optically activated electrical switches and optically activated electrical switches constructed using same

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1991-09-10

    A planar transparent light conducting means and an improved optically activated electrical switch made using the novel light conducting means are disclosed. The light conducting means further comprise light scattering means on one or more opposite planar surfaces thereof to transmit light from the light conducting means into adjacent media and reflective means on other surfaces of the light conducting means not containing the light scattering means. The optically activated electrical switch comprises at least two stacked photoconductive wafers, each having electrodes formed on both surfaces thereof, and separated by the planar transparent light conducting means. The light scattering means on the light conducting means face surfaces of the wafers not covered by the electrodes to transmit light from the light conducting means into the photoconductive wafers to uniformly illuminate and activate the switch. 11 figures.

  19. Transparent selective illumination means suitable for use in optically activated electrical switches and optically activated electrical switches constructed using same

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1991-01-01

    A planar transparent light conducting means and an improved optically activated electrical switch made using the novel light conducting means are disclosed. The light conducting means further comprise light scattering means on one or more opposite planar surfaces thereof to transmit light from the light conducting means into adjacent media and reflective means on other surfaces of the light conducting means not containing the light scattering means. The optically activated electrical switch comprises at least two stacked photoconductive wafers, each having electrodes formed on both surfaces thereof, and separated by the planar transparent light conducting means. The light scattering means on the light conducting means face surfaces of the wafers not covered by the electrodes to transmit light from the light conducting means into the photoconductive wafers to uniformly illuminate and activate the switch.

  20. Elimination of speckle and target orientation requirements in millimeter-wave active imaging by modulated multimode mixing illumination.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Mark A; Holt, Jennifer A; Joye, Colin D; De Lucia, Frank C

    2012-12-01

    Active imaging can provide significantly larger signal margins in the millimeter-wave spectral region than passive imaging, especially indoors-an important application for which there is no cold sky illumination. However, coherent effects, such as speckle, negate much of this advantage by destroying image clarity and target recognition. Moreover, active imaging demonstrations often use strategically chosen target orientations to optimally reflect power from the active illuminator back to the imaging receiver. In this paper we will discuss and show experimental results for a new active imaging approach that largely eliminates coherent effects and the need for optimized target orientation. The work described uses a synthesized harmonic multiplier chain to drive a 5 W extended interaction klystron at 218.4 GHz, a mechanical mode mixer to illuminate and modulate many modes, and a heterodyne receiver coupled into a 60 cm scanning mirror. Large signal margins were obtained in this ~50 m range work, showing paths to imaging at ~1 km, imaging with considerably less powerful illuminators, and the use of focal plane arrays. PMID:23455915

  1. Deep trap, laser activated image converting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    Receiving an optical image on the surface of a photoconducting semiconductor is presented, storing the image in deep traps of the semiconductor, and later scanning the semiconductor with a laser beam to empty the deep traps, thereby producing a video signal. The semiconductor is illuminated with photons of energy greater than the band gap producing electron-hole pairs in the semiconductor which subsequently fill traps in energy from the band edges. When the laser beam of low energy photons excites the trapped electrons and holes out of the traps into the conduction and valence bands, a photoconductivity can be observed.

  2. Carrier Illumination as a tool to probe implant dose and electrical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandervorst, W.; Clarysse, T.; Brijs, B.; Loo, R.; Peytier, Y.; Pawlak, B. J.; Budiarto, E.; Borden, P.

    2003-09-01

    The Carrier Illumination™ (CI) method is an optical technique for non-destructive in-line monitoring of post-anneal junction depth, pre-anneal pre-amorphisation implant (PAI) depth, and dose. This work describes the sensitivity of the CI-signal to the as-implant dose and demonstrates that a universal response function can be derived for doses below the amorphisation limit. For the implants where the elements/doses cause amorphisation, the CI-signal reflects directly the thickness of the amorphous depth. In the case of annealed structures, it is shown that CI provides important information on the electrical activation of the dopant. This is illustrated by the analysis of CVD-layers subsequently annealed and of junction profiles produced by laser annealing. In both cases nearly identical dopant profiles are observed with secondary ion mass spectrometry while the electrical activation as derived from sheet resistance measurements is very different. This very different activation level is clearly reflected in the CI-signal. This indicates that the CI-signal is not solely related to the junction depth and the profile abruptness but also to the electrical activation of the dopants.

  3. Hotsphere illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Bahar S.; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Soils are the most heterogeneous parts of the biosphere, with an extremely high differentiation of properties and processes at all spatial and temporal scales. Importance of the hotspheres such as rhizosphere, detritusphere, porosphere (including drilosphere and biopores), hyphasphere and spermosphere, calls for spatially explicit methods to illuminate distribution of microbial activities in these hotspheres (Kuzyakov and Blagodatskaya, 2015). Zymography technique has previously been adapted to visualize the spatial dynamics of enzyme activities in rhizosphere (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2014). Here, we further developed soil zymography to obtain a higher resolution of enzyme activities by enabling direct contact of substrate-saturated membranes with soil. For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in various hotspheres. We calculated and compared percentage of enzymatic hotspots of five hotspheres: spermosphere, rhizosphere, detritusphere, drilosphere and biopores. Spatial distribution of activities of two enzymes: β-glucosidase and leucine amino peptidase were analyzed in the spermosphere, rhizosphere and detritusphere of maize and lentil. Zymography has been done 3 days (spermosphere), 14 days (rhizosphere) after sowing and 21 days after cutting plant (detritusphere). Spatial resolution of fluorescent images was improved by direct application fluorogenically labelled substrates on the soil surface. Such improvement enabled to visualize enzyme distribution of mycorrhiza hypha on the rhizobox surface. Further, to visualize the 2D distribution of the enzyme activities in porosphere, we placed earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris), (drilosphere) and ground beetle species Platynus dorsalis Pont. (Coleoptera; Carabidae), (biopore), in transparent boxes for 2weeks. The developed in situ zymography visualized the heterogeneity of enzyme activities along and across the roots. Spatial patterns of enzyme activities as a function of distance along the

  4. ESR detection of 1O2 reveals enhanced redox activity in illuminated cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Ronit; Sinyakov, Michael; Samuni, Amram; Shatz, Smadar; Friedmann, Harry; Shainberg, Asher; Breitbart, Haim; Lubart, Rachel

    2004-09-01

    Low-energy visible light (LEVL) has previously been found to modulate various processes in different biological systems. One explanation for the stimulatory effect of LEVL is light-induced reactive oxygen species formation. In the present study, both sperm and skin cells were illuminated with LEVL and were found to generate singlet oxygen (1O2). The detection of 1O2 was performed using a trapping probe, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidone, coupled with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition, we have shown that, together with O2 generation, LEVL illumination increases the reductive capacity of the cells, which explains the difficulties encountered in 1O2 detection. The potential of visible light to change the cellular redox state may explain the recently observed biostimulative effects exerted by LEVL. PMID:15621706

  5. Feature-specific imaging: Extensions to adaptive object recognition and active illumination based scene reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baheti, Pawan K.

    Computational imaging (CI) systems are hybrid imagers in which the optical and post-processing sub-systems are jointly optimized to maximize the task-specific performance. In this dissertation we consider a form of CI system that measures the linear projections (i.e., features) of the scene optically, and it is commonly referred to as feature-specific imaging (FSI). Most of the previous work on FSI has been concerned with image reconstruction. Previous FSI techniques have also been non-adaptive and restricted to the use of ambient illumination. We consider two novel extensions of the FSI system in this work. We first present an adaptive feature-specific imaging (AFSI) system and consider its application to a face-recognition task. The proposed system makes use of previous measurements to adapt the projection basis at each step. We present both statistical and information-theoretic adaptation mechanisms for the AFSI system. The sequential hypothesis testing framework is used to determine the number of measurements required for achieving a specified misclassification probability. We demonstrate that AFSI system requires significantly fewer measurements than static-FSI (SFSI) and conventional imaging at low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We also show a trade-off, in terms of average detection time, between measurement SNR and adaptation advantage. Experimental results validating the AFSI system are presented. Next we present a FSI system based on the use of structured light. Feature measurements are obtained by projecting spatially structured illumination onto an object and collecting all of the reflected light onto a single photodetector. We refer to this system as feature-specific structured imaging (FSSI). Principal component features are used to define the illumination patterns. The optimal LMMSE operator is used to generate object estimates from the measurements. We demonstrate that this new imaging approach reduces imager complexity and provides improved image

  6. High speed video shooting with continuous-wave laser illumination in laboratory modeling of wind - wave interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandaurov, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Caulliez, Guillemette; Sergeev, Daniil; Vdovin, Maxim

    2014-05-01

    Three examples of usage of high-speed video filming in investigation of wind-wave interaction in laboratory conditions is described. Experiments were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS (length 10 m, cross section of air channel 0.4 x 0.4 m, wind velocity up to 24 m/s) and at the Large Air-Sea Interaction Facility (LASIF) - MIO/Luminy (length 40 m, cross section of air channel 3.2 x 1.6 m, wind velocity up to 10 m/s). A combination of PIV-measurements, optical measurements of water surface form and wave gages were used for detailed investigation of the characteristics of the wind flow over the water surface. The modified PIV-method is based on the use of continuous-wave (CW) laser illumination of the airflow seeded by particles and high-speed video. During the experiments on the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS Green (532 nm) CW laser with 1.5 Wt output power was used as a source for light sheet. High speed digital camera Videosprint (VS-Fast) was used for taking visualized air flow images with the frame rate 2000 Hz. Velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave profile. The mean wind velocity profiles were retrieved using conditional in phase averaging like in [1]. In the experiments on the LASIF more powerful Argon laser (4 Wt, CW) was used as well as high-speed camera with higher sensitivity and resolution: Optronics Camrecord CR3000x2, frame rate 3571 Hz, frame size 259×1696 px. In both series of experiments spherical 0.02 mm polyamide particles with inertial time 7 ms were used for seeding airflow. New particle seeding system based on utilization of air pressure is capable of injecting 2 g of particles per second for 1.3 - 2.4 s without flow disturbance. Used in LASIF this system provided high particle density on PIV-images. In combination with high-resolution camera it allowed us to obtain momentum fluxes directly from

  7. Laser-Induced Nuclear Activation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Andrew; Gardner, Matthew; Thompson, Peter; Allwork, Christopher; Rubery, Michael; Clarke, Robert

    2009-10-01

    A series of experimental campaigns, each designed to activated carefully selected materials, have been conducted with high- power short-pulse laser systems. These relatively new CPA laser systems can produce large bursts of X-rays, electrons, protons and other ions. Characterising the nature of these mixed radiation fields is neccessary for both physics experiments and facility safety. Three campaigns, two with the HELEN laser faility at AWE and one with the Vulcan Petawatt laser at the Rutherford Appleton laboratory, were designed to accelerate protons. These protons irradiated secondary activation targets of pure foils and various optical glasses, typically those used in target chamber environments such as those found at NIF, Omega and AWE's Orion laser facility. This talk discusses these experiments and covers the production of laser-produced radiation fields, the selection of activation targets, the interpretation the radioactive decay signals, the current status of the analysis and the future applications of this research.

  8. Finite element model of the temperature increase in excised porcine cadaver iris during direct illumination by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Kurtz, Ronald M.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2012-07-01

    In order to model the thermal effect of laser exposure of the iris during laser corneal surgery, we simulated the temperature increase in porcine cadaver iris. The simulation data for the 60 kHz FS60 Laser showed that the temperature increased up to 1.23°C and 2.45°C (at laser pulse energy 1 and 2 µJ, respectively) by the 24 second procedure time. Calculated temperature profiles show good agreement with data obtained from ex vivo experiments using porcine cadaver iris. Simulation results of different types of femtosecond lasers indicate that the Laser in situ keratomileusis procedure does not present a safety hazard to the iris.

  9. Simulation of the temperature increase in human cadaver retina during direct illumination by 150-kHz femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hui; Hosszufalusi, Nora; Mikula, Eric R.; Juhasz, Tibor

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a two-dimensional computer model to predict the temperature increase of the retina during femtosecond corneal laser flap cutting. Simulating a typical clinical setting for 150-kHz iFS advanced femtosecond laser (0.8- to 1-μJ laser pulse energy and 15-s procedure time at a laser wavelength of 1053 nm), the temperature increase is 0.2°C. Calculated temperature profiles show good agreement with data obtained from ex vivo experiments using human cadaver retina. Simulation results obtained for different commercial femtosecond lasers indicate that during the laser in situ keratomileusis procedure the temperature increase of the retina is insufficient to induce damage.

  10. Theoretical modeling of photocatalytic active species on illuminated TiO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belelli, Patricia G.; Ferullo, Ricardo M.; Branda, María M.; Castellani, Norberto J.

    2007-10-01

    A theoretical study of the H 2O and O 2 adsorption on an illuminated TiO 2 anatase surface is presented. The electronic structure and the spin distribution were examined by employing the DFT formalism and the BHandHLYP functional. The adsorbates geometries were fully optimized, including the cluster relaxation. Our results show the dissociative adsorption of the H 2O molecule on the photoactivated TiO 2 (0 0 1) surface. This reaction produces one hydroxyl group with radical character (OH rad ) and an unpaired electron localized in the 5c-Ti atom. In case of the O 2 molecule, the non-dissociative chemisorption was obtained. This molecule shows one unpaired electron and a negative charge. In these sense, the adsorbed O 2 acts as a superoxide species (O 2rad -).

  11. An automated airplane detection system for the safeguard against airplane illumination from the laser guide star beacons at the MMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Miguel; Lloyd-Hart, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Laser beams for guide star generation are a potential hazard for aircraft. At the MMT telescope located on Mt. Hopkins in Southern Arizona, a constellation of five Rayleigh guide stars is created with a total of 25 W of projected power at 532 nm wavelength. We report operational results from an automatic system deployed at the MMT that is designed to detect aircraft and shut down the lasers if a collision with the beams appears likely. The system, building on a previous prototype, uses a wide-angle CCD camera mounted with a minimally unobstructed view to the optical support structure at the top of the telescope. A computer program reads the camera once every two seconds and calculates the difference between adjacent image pairs. The anti-collision beacons required on all aircraft by the Federal Aviation Administration appear as streaks in the field. If an airplane is detected, it is located in the field relative to the laser beam and its path is projected. If aircraft are detected near or appear that they will approach the beam, the laser's safety shutter is closed and warning messages are sent to the laser operator. Failsafe operation is assured by a "heart beat" signal continuously sent from the detection system to the laser controller, and by the fact that the safety shutter must be energized to open. In the event of a power failure, the system must be manually reset by the Laser Safety Officer before the laser beam can again be propagated.

  12. Shadowgraph illumination techniques for framing cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.M.; Flurer, R.L.; Frogget, B.C.; Sorenson, D.S.; Holmes, V.H.; Obst, A.W.

    1997-12-31

    Many pulse power applications in use at the Pegasus facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory require specialized imaging techniques. Due to the short event duration times, visible images are recorded by high-speed electronic framing cameras. Framing cameras provide the advantages of high speed movies of back light experiments. These high-speed framing cameras require bright illumination sources to record images with 10 ns integration times. High-power lasers offer sufficient light for back illuminating the target assemblies; however, laser speckle noise lowers the contrast in the image. Laser speckle noise also limits the effective resolution. This discussion focuses on the use of telescopes to collect images 50 feet away. Both light field and dark field illumination techniques are compared. By adding relay lenses between the assembly target and the telescope, a high-resolution magnified image can be recorded. For dark field illumination, these relay lenses can be used to separate the object field from the illumination laser. The illumination laser can be made to focus onto the opaque secondary of a Schmidt telescope. Thus, the telescope only collects scattered light from the target assembly. This dark field illumination eliminates the laser speckle noise and allows high-resolution images to be recorded. Using the secondary of the telescope to block the illumination laser makes dark field illumination an ideal choice for the framing camera.

  13. Shadowgraph illumination techniques for framing cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.M.; Flurer, R.L.; Frogget, B.C.; Sorenson, D.S.; Holmes, V.H.; Obst, A.W.

    1997-06-01

    Many pulse power applications in use at the Pegasus facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory require specialized imaging techniques. Due to the short event duration times, visible images are recorded by high speed electronic framing cameras. Framing cameras provide the advantages of high speed movies of back light experiments. These high speed framing cameras require bright illumination sources to record images with 10 ns integration times. High power lasers offer sufficient light for back illuminating the target assemblies; however, laser speckle noise lowers the contrast in the image. Laser speckle noise also limits the effective resolution. This discussion focuses on the use of telescopes to collect images 50 feet away. Both light field and dark field illumination techniques are compared. By adding relay lenses between the assembly target and the telescope, a high resolution magnified image can be recorded. For dark field illumination, these relay lenses can be used to separate the object field from the illumination laser. The illumination laser can be made to focus onto the opaque secondary of a Schmidt telescope. Thus, the telescope only collects scattered light from the target assembly. This dark field illumination eliminates the laser speckle noise and allows high resolution images to be recorded. Using the secondary of the telescope to block the illumination laser makes dark field illumination an ideal choice for the framing camera.

  14. [Illumination's effect on the growth and nitrate reductase activity of typical red-tide algae in the East China Sea].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-mei; Shi, Xiao-yong; Ding, Yan-yan; Tang, Hong-jie

    2013-09-01

    Two typical red-tide algae, Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense were selected as studied objects. The nitrate reductase activity (NRA) and the growth of the two algae under different illuminations through incubation experiment were studied. The illumination condition was consistent with in situ. Results showed that P. donghaiense and S. costatum could grow normally in the solar radiation ranged from 30-60 W x m(-2), and the growth curve was "S" type. However, when solar radiation was below 9 W x m(-2), the two alga could hardly grow. In the range of 0-60 W x m(-2), three parameters (NRAmax, micro(max), Bf) increased with the increasing of light intensity, indicating that the light intensity can influence the grow of alga indirectly through influencing the nitrate reductase activity. The micro(max) and NRAmax in unite volume of Skeletonema costatum were higher than those of Prorocentrum donghaiense, indicating that Skeletonema costatum can better utilize the nitrate than Prorocentrum donghaiense. PMID:24288981

  15. Distinguished Lectureship Award on the Applications of Physics: Illuminating My Career - From Flash Gordon to Laser Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynne, James

    2015-03-01

    As a child, I was fascinated by television programs about Flash Gordon. His partner in conquering the universe was Dr. Alexis Zarkov, a physicist, who had invented, among other things, a death ray gun. My personal ``death ray'' was a magnifying glass, focusing sunlight on unsuspecting insects, like crawling ants. I also practiced sneaking up on resting, flying, stinging insects and burning their wings before they could take off and attack me. So I understood something about the power of sunlight. In my senior year of high school, I had a fabulous physics teacher, Lewis E. Love, and I knew after one week that I wanted to be a physicist, not a medical doctor, which is the career my parents wanted me to pursue. It turns out that the first laser functioned on May 16, 1960, just one month before I graduated from high school, and it was inevitable that I would pursue a career working with lasers. My first job as a physicist, during the summer of 1963, was working with lasers at TRG, Inc. a small company whose guru was Gordon Gould, now recognized as the inventor of the laser. After three summers at TRG, I spent three years working on nonlinear optics for my PhD thesis, under the guidance of Prof. Nicolaas Bloembergen, who later won the Nobel Prize in Physics for codifying nonlinear optics. Following completion of my PhD research in 1969, I joined IBM Research, where I have worked ever since. Upon joining the Quantum Electronics group in the Physical Sciences Dept. of the T.J. Watson Research Center, my management told me to ``do something great'' with lasers. After working on atomic spectroscopy with dye lasers through the 1970s, I had the inspiration to acquire an excimer laser for the Laser Physics and Chemistry group. Using this laser, my colleagues and I discovered excimer laser surgery, capable of removing human and animal tissue with great precision, while leaving the underlying and adjacent tissue free of collateral damage. This discovery laid the foundation for

  16. Appearance of radial breathing modes in Raman spectra of multi-walled carbon nanotubes upon laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Padmnabh; Mohapatra, Dipti R.; Hazra, K. S.; Misra, D. S.; Ghatak, Jay; Satyam, P. V.

    2008-03-01

    The Raman spectra of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes are studied with the laser power of 5-20 mW. We observe the Raman bands at ˜1352, 1581, 1607, and 2700 cm -1 with 5 mW laser power. As the laser power is increased to 10, 15 and 20 mW, the radial breathing modes (RBMs) of the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) appear in the range 200-610 cm -1. The diameter corresponding to the highest RBM is ˜0.37 nm, the lowest reported so far. The RBMs are attributed to the local synthesis of the SWNTs at the top surface of the samples at higher laser power.

  17. Study of timing properties of multi-pixel-photon-counter's illuminated by 630 nm and 405 nm PiLas laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Ronzhin, Anatoly; Demarteau, Marcel; Los, Sergey; Ramberg, Erik; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    Timing measurements of Multy-Pixel-Photon Counters (MPPC's) at the picosecond level were performed at Fermilab. The core timing resolution of the amplifiers, discriminators and TAC/ADC combination to perform these measurements is approximately 2 picoseconds. The single photoelectron time resolution (SPTR) was measured for the signals coming from the MPPC's. An SPTR of about one hundred picoseconds was obtained for MPPC's illuminated by picosecond laser pulses. The SPTR depends on applied bias voltage and on the wavelength of the light. A simple model is proposed to explain the difference in the SPTR for blue and red light. Finally, requirements for the MPPC's temperature and bias voltage stability to maintain the time resolution are discussed.

  18. [Methods for Reducing Laser Speckles to Achieve Even Illumination of the Microscope Field of View in Biophysical Studies].

    PubMed

    Barsky, V E; Lysov, Yu P; Yegorov, E E; Yurasov, D A; Mamaev, D D; Yurasov, R A; Cherepanov, A V; Chudinov, A V; Smoldovskaya, O V; Arefieva, A S; Rubina, A Yu; Zasedatelev, A S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare different speckle reduction techniques. It was shown that the use of devices based on liquid crystals only leads to partial reduction of speckle contrast. In quantitative luminescent microscopy an application of the mechanical devices when a laser beam is spread within the field of view turned out to be more efficient. Laser speckle noise was virtually eliminated with the developed and manufactured mechanical device comprising a fiber optic ring light guide and the vibrator that permits movement of optical fiber ends towards the laser diode during measurements. The method developed for the analysis of microarrays was successfully applied to the problem of speckle reduction. PMID:26841517

  19. Laser activated diffuse discharge switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    The invention is a gas mixture for a diffuse discharge switch which is capable of changing from a conducting state to an insulating state in the presence of electrons upon the introduction of laser light. The mixture is composed of a buffer gas such as nitrogen or argon and an electron attaching gas such as C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SH, C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SCH.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CHO and CF.sub.3 CHO wherein the electron attachment is brought on by indirect excitation of molecules to long-lived states by exposure to laser light.

  20. Enhanced photocatalytic activity of ZnO/CuO nanocomposite for the degradation of textile dye on visible light illumination.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, R; Karthikeyan, S; Gupta, V K; Sekaran, G; Narayanan, V; Stephen, A

    2013-01-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes such as methylene blue and methyl orange in the presence of various percentages of composite catalyst under visible light irradiation was carried out. The catalyst ZnO nanorods and ZnO/CuO nanocomposites of different weight ratios were prepared by new thermal decomposition method, which is simple and cost effective. The prepared catalysts were characterized by different techniques such as X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. Further, the most photocatalytically active composite material was used for degradation of real textile waste water under visible light illumination. The irradiated samples were analysed by total organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand. The efficiency of the catalyst and their photocatalytic mechanism has been discussed in detail. PMID:25428048

  1. Research on range-gated laser active imaging seeker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Mu; Wang, PengHui; Tan, DongJie

    2013-09-01

    Compared with other imaging methods such as millimeter wave imaging, infrared imaging and visible light imaging, laser imaging provides both a 2-D array of reflected intensity data as well as 2-D array of range data, which is the most important data for use in autonomous target acquisition .In terms of application, it can be widely used in military fields such as radar, guidance and fuse. In this paper, we present a laser active imaging seeker system based on range-gated laser transmitter and sensor technology .The seeker system presented here consist of two important part, one is laser image system, which uses a negative lens to diverge the light from a pulse laser to flood illuminate a target, return light is collected by a camera lens, each laser pulse triggers the camera delay and shutter. The other is stabilization gimbals, which is designed to be a rotatable structure both in azimuth and elevation angles. The laser image system consists of transmitter and receiver. The transmitter is based on diode pumped solid-state lasers that are passively Q-switched at 532nm wavelength. A visible wavelength was chosen because the receiver uses a Gen III image intensifier tube with a spectral sensitivity limited to wavelengths less than 900nm.The receiver is image intensifier tube's micro channel plate coupled into high sensitivity charge coupled device camera. The image has been taken at range over one kilometer and can be taken at much longer range in better weather. Image frame frequency can be changed according to requirement of guidance with modifiable range gate, The instantaneous field of views of the system was found to be 2×2 deg. Since completion of system integration, the seeker system has gone through a series of tests both in the lab and in the outdoor field. Two different kinds of buildings have been chosen as target, which is located at range from 200m up to 1000m.To simulate dynamic process of range change between missile and target, the seeker system has

  2. Photocatalytic activity of titania coatings synthesised by a combined laser/sol–gel technique

    SciTech Connect

    Adraider, Y.; Pang, Y.X.; Nabhani, F.; Hodgson, S.N.; Sharp, M.C.; Al-Waidh, A.

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Sol–gel method was used to prepare titania coatings. • Titania thin films were coated on substrate surface by dip coating. • Fibre laser was employed to irradiate the titania coated surfaces. • Photocatalytic efficiency of titania coatings was significantly improved after laser processing. - Abstract: Titania coatings were prepared using sol–gel method and then applied on the substrate surface by dip coating. Fibre laser (λ = 1064 nm) in continuous wave mode was used to irradiate the titania coated surfaces at different specific energies. The ATR-FTIR, XRD, SEM, EDS and contact angle measurement were employed to analyse surface morphology, phase composition and crystalline structure of laser-irradiated titania coatings, whilst the photocatalytic activity was evaluated by measuring the decomposition of methylene blue (MB) after exposure to the visible light for various illumination times. Results showed that the laser-irradiated titania coatings demonstrate significant different composition and microstructure in comparison with the as-coated from the same sol–gel titania. Photocatalytic efficiency of titania coatings was significantly improved after laser processing. The photocatalytic activity of laser-irradiated titania coatings was higher than that of the as-coated titania. The titania coating processed at laser specific energy of 6.5 J/mm{sup 2} exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity among all titania samples.

  3. Characterization of a Low-Cost Optical Flow Sensor When Using an External Laser as a Direct Illumination Source

    PubMed Central

    Font, Davinia; Tresanchez, Marcel; Pallejà, Tomàs; Teixidó, Mercè; Palacín, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a low cost optical flow sensor is combined with an external laser device to measure surface displacements and mechanical oscillations. The measurement system is based on applying coherent light to a diffuser surface and using an optical flow sensor to analyze the reflected and transferred light to estimate the displacement of the surface or the laser spot. This work is focused on the characterization of this measurement system, which can have the optical flow sensor placed at different angles and distances from the diffuser surface. The results have shown that the displacement of the diffuser surface is badly estimated when the optical mouse sensor is placed in front of the diffuser surface (angular orientation >150°) while the highest sensitivity is obtained when the sensor is located behind the diffuser surface and on the axis of the laser source (angular orientation 0°). In this case, the coefficient of determination of the measured displacement, R2, was very high (>0.99) with a relative error of less than 1.29%. Increasing the distance between the surface and the sensor also increased the sensitivity which increases linearly, R2 = 0.99. Finally, this measurement setup was proposed to measure very low frequency mechanical oscillations applied to the laser device, up to 0.01 Hz in this work. The results have shown that increasing the distance between the surface and the optical flow sensor also increases the sensitivity and the measurement range. PMID:22247696

  4. The illuminating role of laser scanning digital elevation models in precision agriculture experimental designs - an agro-ecology perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser scanning data streams, when linked with multi-spectral, hyperspectral, apparent soil electro-conductivity (ECa), or other kinds of geo-referenced data streams, aid in the creation of maps that allow useful applications in agricultural systems. These combinations of georeferenced information p...

  5. First-Hand Participation: Illuminating Teachers' Self-Perceptions of Physical Activity Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Till, Jude; Ferkins, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    The study examines school-based physical activity in investigating teachers' perceptions of a physical activity-related professional development (PD) intervention in New Zealand primary schools. Eighteen semi-structured interviews with six teachers from two schools was the primary data collection method. Using a selected programme,…

  6. Study Illuminates K-Ras4B Activation, Which May Help Predict Drug Resistance | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Until recently, researchers studying RAS, a family of proteins involved in transmitting signals within cells, believed that the exchange of guanosine 5’-diphosphate (GDP) by guanosine triphosphate (GTP) was sufficient to activate the protein. Once activated, RAS can cause unintended and overactive signaling in cells, which can lead to cell division and, ultimately, cancer.

  7. Laser line illumination scheme allowing the reduction of background signal and the correction of absorption heterogeneities effects for fluorescence reflectance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, Frédéric; Hervé, Lionel; Poher, Vincent; Gioux, Sylvain; Mars, Jérôme I; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence imaging in reflectance geometry is an attractive imaging modality as it allows to noninvasively monitor the fluorescence targeted tumors located below the tissue surface. Some drawbacks of this technique are the background fluorescence decreasing the contrast and absorption heterogeneities leading to misinterpretations concerning fluorescence concentrations. We propose a correction technique based on a laser line scanning illumination scheme. We scan the medium with the laser line and acquire, at each position of the line, both fluorescence and excitation images. We then use the finding that there is a relationship between the excitation intensity profile and the background fluorescence one to predict the amount of signal to subtract from the fluorescence images to get a better contrast. As the light absorption information is contained both in fluorescence and excitation images, this method also permits us to correct the effects of absorption heterogeneities. This technique has been validated on simulations and experimentally. Fluorescent inclusions are observed in several configurations at depths ranging from 1 mm to 1 cm. Results obtained with this technique are compared with those obtained with a classical wide-field detection scheme for contrast enhancement and with the fluorescence by an excitation ratio approach for absorption correction. PMID:26442963

  8. Re-examining our inhibitions: A speculative re-analysis of data from gold spheres illuminated by the URLLE Omega laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Mordecai; Ross, Steven; Thomas, Cliff

    2015-11-01

    A 2006 campaign, that illuminated 1 mm diameter gold spheres using the Omega laser at LLE, required the simulations to use a ``liberal'' flux limiter of f =0.15 (or equivalently a non-local model) in order to match the high levels of measured x-ray emission. In 2013, Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnosed the plasma conditions in the Au sphere's laser heated corona at various radial positions as a function of time. The simulation model using non-local transport compared well for some of the TS data (for ZTe) but not for all of it. Meanwhile, using this model for hohlraums, led to discrepancies with data (such as drive) when applied to some hohlraums, though less-so for others. As a result, hohlraum models with a more restrictive flux limiter, including a ``two-stream-instability (TSI)'' flux limit model (which, when operative, is effectively f =0.015) are being considered. Here we invoke the possibility that the same ion acoustic turbulence (an outgrowth of the TSI), which acts like an effective scatterer to inhibit electron transport, can, by the same token, also increase absorption. This increase in absorption, applied (speculatively) close by the critical surface, can begin to match the Au sphere x-ray emission, as well as a preponderance of the ZTe data. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Microwave accelerated synthesis of zinc oxide nanoplates and their enhanced photocatalytic activity under UV and solar illuminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anas, S.; Rahul, S.; Babitha, K. B.; Mangalaraja, R. V.; Ananthakumar, S.

    2015-11-01

    Photoactive zinc based nanoplates were developed through a rapid microwave synthesis. A low temperature thermolysis reaction in a surfactant medium was initially performed for producing microwave active zinc based polar precursors. Using these precursors, the zinc oxide nanopowder having platelet morphologies were prepared. The nanoplatelets exhibited random growth with non-polar (1 0 1) surface as the major growth plane. The structural and functional features of the resultant zinc oxide samples were monitored using XRD, FTIR, TEM and PL. The photocatalytic activities of the samples were investigated through the standard photoreduction kinetics using the methylene blue dye. The catalytic efficiencies of the samples were checked both under UV and sunlight. A comparative study was also performed with the standard TiO2 sample. The analyses revealed that the microwave derived zinc oxide have higher catalytic efficiency, than the standard titania samples, both under UV and sunlight illuminations. The unique nature of the zinc oxide non-polar surfaces can be attributed due to the presence of more active two dimensional open surfaces and the higher content of oxygen defect concentrations.

  10. Demand illumination control apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Carl (Inventor); Arline, Jimmie (Inventor); LaPalme, Julius (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Solar illuminating compensating apparatus is disclosed whereby the interior of a building is illuminated to a substantially constant, predetermined level of light intensity by a combination of natural illumination from the sun and artificial illumination from electricity wherein the intensity of said artificial illumination is controlled by fully electronic means which increases the level of artificial illumination when the natural illumination is inadequate and vice versa.

  11. Actively mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.E.; Morton, P.A.; Mar, A.; Corzine, S.W.

    1989-06-01

    Measurements of actively mode-locked semiconductor lasers are described and compared to calculations of the mode-locking process using three coupled traveling wave rate equations for the electron and photon densities. The dependence of pulse width on the modulation current and frequency are described. A limitation to minimum achievable pulse widths in mode-locked semiconductor lasers is shown to be dynamic detuning due to gain saturation. Techniques to achieve subpicosecond pulses are described, together with ways to reduce multiple pulse outputs. The amplitude and phase noise of linear and ring cavity semiconductor lasers were measured and found to be tens of dB smaller than YAG and argon lasers and limited by the noise from the microwave oscillator. High-frequency phase noise is only measurable in detuned cavities, and is below -110 dBc (1 Hz) in optimally tuned cavities. The prospects for novel ways to achieve even shorter pulses are discussed.

  12. X-ray structures of AMPA receptor-cone snail toxin complexes illuminate activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Dürr, Katharina L; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-08-29

    AMPA-sensitive glutamate receptors are crucial to the structural and dynamic properties of the brain, to the development and function of the central nervous system, and to the treatment of neurological conditions from depression to cognitive impairment. However, the molecular principles underlying AMPA receptor activation have remained elusive. We determined multiple x-ray crystal structures of the GluA2 AMPA receptor in complex with a Conus striatus cone snail toxin, a positive allosteric modulator, and orthosteric agonists, at 3.8 to 4.1 angstrom resolution. We show how the toxin acts like a straightjacket on the ligand-binding domain (LBD) "gating ring," restraining the domains via both intra- and interdimer cross-links such that agonist-induced closure of the LBD "clamshells" is transduced into an irislike expansion of the gating ring. By structural analysis of activation-enhancing mutants, we show how the expansion of the LBD gating ring results in pulling forces on the M3 helices that, in turn, are coupled to ion channel gating. PMID:25103405

  13. Ultrafast Dynamics of a Nucleobase Analogue Illuminated by a Short Intense X-ray Free Electron Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, K.; Motomura, K.; Kukk, E.; Fukuzawa, H.; Wada, S.; Tachibana, T.; Ito, Y.; Mondal, S.; Sakai, T.; Matsunami, K.; Koga, R.; Ohmura, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Kanno, M.; Rudenko, A.; Nicolas, C.; Liu, X.-J.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, J.; Anand, M.; Jiang, Y. H.; Kim, D.-E.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; Kono, H.; Miron, C.; Yao, M.; Ueda, K.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding x-ray radiation damage is a crucial issue for both medical applications of x rays and x-ray free-electron-laser (XFEL) science aimed at molecular imaging. Decrypting the charge and fragmentation dynamics of nucleobases, the smallest units of a macro-biomolecule, contributes to a bottom-up understanding of the damage via cascades of phenomena following x-ray exposure. We investigate experimentally and by numerical simulations the ultrafast radiation damage induced on a nucleobase analogue (5-iodouracil) by an ultrashort (10 fs) high-intensity radiation pulse generated by XFEL at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free electron Laser (SACLA). The present study elucidates a plausible underlying radiosensitizing mechanism of 5-iodouracil. This mechanism is independent of the exact composition of 5-iodouracil and thus relevant to other such radiosensitizers. Furthermore, we found that despite a rapid increase of the net molecular charge in the presence of iodine, and of the ultrafast release of hydrogen, the other atoms are almost frozen within the 10-fs duration of the exposure. This validates single-shot molecular imaging as a consistent approach, provided the radiation pulse used is brief enough.

  14. Discovery of an Active RAG Transposon Illuminates the Origins of V(D)J Recombination.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengfeng; Tao, Xin; Yuan, Shaochun; Zhang, Yuhang; Li, Peiyi; Beilinson, Helen A; Zhang, Ya; Yu, Wenjuan; Pontarotti, Pierre; Escriva, Hector; Le Petillon, Yann; Liu, Xiaolong; Chen, Shangwu; Schatz, David G; Xu, Anlong

    2016-06-30

    Co-option of RAG1 and RAG2 for antigen receptor gene assembly by V(D)J recombination was a crucial event in the evolution of jawed vertebrate adaptive immunity. RAG1/2 are proposed to have arisen from a transposable element, but definitive evidence for this is lacking. Here, we report the discovery of ProtoRAG, a DNA transposon family from lancelets, the most basal extant chordates. A typical ProtoRAG is flanked by 5-bp target site duplications and a pair of terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) resembling V(D)J recombination signal sequences. Between the TIRs reside tail-to-tail-oriented, intron-containing RAG1-like and RAG2-like genes. We demonstrate that ProtoRAG was recently active in the lancelet germline and that the lancelet RAG1/2-like proteins can mediate TIR-dependent transposon excision, host DNA recombination, transposition, and low-efficiency TIR rejoining using reaction mechanisms similar to those used by vertebrate RAGs. We propose that ProtoRAG represents a molecular "living fossil" of the long-sought RAG transposon. PMID:27293192

  15. Highly active WO3-Ag-ZnO photocatalyst driven by day light illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subash, B.; Krishnakumar, B.; Sreedhar, B.; Swaminathan, M.; Shanthi, M.

    2013-02-01

    The WO3 loaded Ag-ZnO (WO3-Ag-ZnO) was successfully synthesized by precipitation-decomposition method. The catalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) images, energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), photoluminescence spectra (PL), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and BET surface area measurements. The photocatalytic activity of WO3-Ag-ZnO was investigated for the degradation of Naphthol Blue Black (NBB) in aqueous solution using solar light. WO3-Ag-ZnO is found to be more efficient than Ag-ZnO, WO3-ZnO, Ag-WO3, WO3, commercial ZnO, bare ZnO, TiO2-P25 and TiO2 (Merck) at pH 9 for the mineralization of NBB dye. The effects of operational parameters such as the amount of photocatalyst, dye concentration, initial pH on photo mineralization of NBB dye have been analyzed. The mineralization of NBB has been confirmed by Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) measurements. A degradation mechanism is proposed for the degradation of NBB under solar light. This catalyst is found to be reusable.

  16. Fiber optic illumination of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) sheath flow cuvette for diode laser induced fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Cameron D

    2015-02-01

    A Tee configuration sheath flow cuvette with square cross-section channels has been produced in PDMS for CE detection. The output of a 1.4 W laser diode operating at 450 nm was focused onto the 300 μm core of a 370 μm od fiber optic whose end was inserted into one arm of the Tee for LIF. The optimal configuration had the fiber optic positioned 500 μm downstream from the intersection and the end of the 35 cm 50 μm id 365 μm od capillary just outside the intersection and in the leg of the Tee, resulting in a 90° configuration. Detection limits of 50 and 3 pM and linear calibrations of at least three orders of magnitude were obtained for Lucifer Yellow and fluorescein, respectively. PMID:25363636

  17. Optical trapping/modification of nano-(micro)particles by gradient and photorefractive forces during laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukhtarev, N.; Kukhtareva, T.; Okafor, F.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper we describe photo-induced trapping/redistribution of silver nano-(micro) particles near the surface of photorefractive crystal LiNbO3:Fe. This type of optical trapping is due to combined forces of direct gradient-force trapping and asymmetric photorefractive forces of electro-phoresis and dielectro-phoresis. The silver nanoparticles were produced through extracellular biosynthesis on exposure to the fungus, Fusarium oxysporum (FO) and to the plant extracts. Pulsed and CW visible laser radiation lead to significant modification of nanoparticle clusters. This study indicates that extracellular biosynthesis can constitute a possible viable alternative method for the production of nanoparticles. In addition, the theoretical modeling of asymmetric photorefractive electric field grating has been presented and compared with the experimental results.

  18. Activation of solgel titanium nanofilm by UV illumination for NOM removal.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, L; Uyguner, C S; Selcuk, H; Bekbolet, M; Anderson, M

    2007-01-01

    The control of natural organic matter (NOM) in drinking water treatment plants is required in order to control (i) the formation of potentially harmful disinfection byproducts (DBPs), (ii) the regrowth of bacteria and (iii) pipe corrosion in the distribution system. Photocatalysis is a promising advanced oxidation technology due to its ability to mineralise chlorinated byproduct precursors such as humic acids (HAs) to carbon dioxide and water. In this study, the efficiency of HAs and NOM removal in terms of UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254) was tested by means of a new photocatalytic reactor made of stacked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) rings coated by TiO2 nanofilm. Three different sets of rings were coated with TiO2 gel one, two and three times respectively to optimise the coating thickness according to UV254 removal efficiency. The titania sol was immobilised on the substrate by a low temperature procedure and after 8 months the reactors were reactivated by means of UV radiation before the experiments. The photocatalytic removal efficiency of humic acid in terms of UV254 was significantly higher after 1 hour for the reactor employed with high thickness TiO2 nanofilm (around 20%) compared to middle and low thickness reactors (6 and 1.4%, respectively). However, during the same reaction time only 10% of UV254 was removed with high thickness TiO2 nanofilm using raw surface water, probably owing to ionic species naturally occurring in the raw water sample. Finally, the activation of the TiO2 nanofilm may be effectively accomplished by means of UV radiation where calcination cannot be applied (e.g. thermally sensitive substrates). PMID:17674836

  19. Hα Emission in Post-Common-Envelope Binaries: White Dwarf Illumination vs. Chromospheric Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiewak, Renée; Pomerantz, B.; Strelnitski, V.; Walker, G. E.; Krajci, T.

    2013-01-01

    We revisit and augment the narrow-band photometry of two post-common-envelope close binary systems, V471 Tau and DE CVn, composed of a white dwarf (WD) and a red dwarf (RD). The photometry was accomplished using the 24-inch telescope of the Maria Mitchell Observatory and the 0.35-m telescope of the Astrokolkhoz Observatory. The filters allowed us to separate the temporal behavior of the Hα emission and the adjacent continuum. The latter shows in both binaries the well-known double wave with maxima around phases 0.25 and 0.75 and with an amplitude of several percent, which has been ascribed to the ellipsoidal shape of the red dwarf. We confirm our previous, preliminary conclusion that the phase curves of Hα emission in these two stars are different: in DE CVn, it is similar to the two-peak curve of the continuum, whereas in V471 Tau it has only one maximum - at phase 0.5. We interpret this difference by the difference in the WD temperature, previously determined as 34,500 and 8,000 K, for V471 Tau and DE CVn respectively. We show that the sub-WD area of the RD in V471 Tau intercepts enough ionizing photons from the hot WD to produce the observed Hα luminosity, whereas the relatively cold WD in DE CVn lacks several orders of magnitude in UV luminosity to create the observed Hα luminosity, which therefore should be ascribed to the chromospheric activity of the RD. This project was supported by NSF/REU grant AST-0851892 and the Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association.

  20. Ranging performance of active laser detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Huayan; Xiong, Fei; Gu, Suolin

    2006-06-01

    Ranging performance is described for photoelectric equipment reconnaissance using an active laser detection system that is based on the 'cat's eyes' effect of optical windows. Active laser detection systems have an advantage over passive systems because they can measure target velocity and spatial coordinates. However, there are several challenging problems here because of the great distances involved, the low returned power of the uncooperative target, and the optical aberrations induced by the atmosphere. In the design of this system, the principle of detection is based on the 'cat's eyes' effect according to which the optical windows of photoelectric equipments have a strong reflect character towards incident laser beam. With 'cat's eyes' effect, the detection of uncooperative target can be translated into one of a cooperative target, so the ratio of returned laser can be increased. In this paper, the ranging performance presented here takes into account all the various elements of the system, from the laser emission, target, atmospheric propagation to the detector. The characteristics of back-reflected laser and an estimate of the laser Cross Section (LCS) from 'cat's eyes target' are investigated in theory and simulation. The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) is calculated by combining the probability of detection of the system for given electronic characteristics of the system and for a given probability of false alarms. On the basis of analysis of SNR, minimum detectable signal power, operating distance of the system and factors affecting the ranging performance is analyzed. Results indicate that system has characters of long range, and high sensitivity. It can be used to detect the aerial targets such as reconnaissance drone, navigate missile, reconnaissance satellite etc.

  1. Operational specifications of the L.I.T.E.S. (Laser Illuminated Track Etch Scattering) dosemeter reader.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M. E.; Devine, R. T.; Gepford, H. J.; McKeever, R. J.; Hoffman, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Personnel Dosimetry Operations Team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has accepted the LITES dosimeter reader into its suite of radiation dose measurement instruments. The LITES instrument transmits coherent light from a HeNe laser through the pertinent track etch foil and a photodiode measures the amount of light scattered by the etched tracks. A small beam stop blocks the main laser light, while a lens refocuses the scattered light into the photodiode. Three stepper motors in the current LITES system are used to position a carousel that holds 36 track etch dosimeters. Preliminary work with the LITES system demonstrated the device had a linear response in counting foils subjected to exposures up to 50 mSv (5.0 rem). The United States Department of Energy requires that annual general employee dose not exceed 50 mSv (5.0 rem). On a regular basis, LANL uses the Autoscan 60 reader system (Thermo Electron Corp.) for counting track etch dosimeters. However, LANL uses a 15 hour etch process for CR39 dosimeters, and this produces more and larger track etch pits than the 6 hour etch used by many institutions. Therefore, LANL only uses the Autoscan 60 for measuring neutron dose equivalent up to exposure levels of about 3 mSv (300 mrem). The LITES system has a measured lower limit of detection (LLD) of about 0.6 mSv (60 mrem), and it has a correlation coefficient of R{sup 2} = 0.99 over an exposure range up to 500 mSv (50.0 rem). A series of blind studies were done using three methods: the Autoscan 60 system, manual counting by optical microscope, and the LITES instrument. A collection of track etch dosimeters of unknown NDE (neutron dose equivalent) were analyzed using the three methods, and the (PC) performance coefficient was calculated when the NDE became known. The Autoscan 60 and optical microscope methods had a combined PC = 0.171, and the LITES instrument had a PC = 0.194, where a PC less than or equal to 0.300 is considered satisfactory.

  2. Resonant activation in bistable semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, Stefano; Giacomelli, Giovanni

    2007-08-15

    We theoretically investigate the possibility of observing resonant activation in the hopping dynamics of two-mode semiconductor lasers. We present a series of simulations of a rate-equation model under random and periodic modulation of the bias current. In both cases, for an optimal choice of the modulation time scale, the hopping times between the stable lasing modes attain a minimum. The simulation data are understood by means of an effective one-dimensional Langevin equation with multiplicative fluctuations. Our conclusions apply to both edge-emitting and vertical cavity lasers, thus opening the way to several experimental tests in such optical systems.

  3. A novel optical apparatus for the study of rolling contact wear/fatigue based on a high-speed camera and multiple-source laser illumination.

    PubMed

    Bodini, I; Sansoni, G; Lancini, M; Pasinetti, S; Docchio, F

    2016-08-01

    Rolling contact wear/fatigue tests on wheel/rail specimens are important to produce wheels and rails of new materials for improved lifetime and performance, which are able to operate in harsh environments and at high rolling speeds. This paper presents a novel non-invasive, all-optical system, based on a high-speed video camera and multiple laser illumination sources, which is able to continuously monitor the dynamics of the specimens used to test wheel and rail materials, in a laboratory test bench. 3D macro-topography and angular position of the specimen are simultaneously performed, together with the acquisition of surface micro-topography, at speeds up to 500 rpm, making use of a fast camera and image processing algorithms. Synthetic indexes for surface micro-topography classification are defined, the 3D macro-topography is measured with a standard uncertainty down to 0.019 mm, and the angular position is measured on a purposely developed analog encoder with a standard uncertainty of 2.9°. The very small camera exposure time enables to obtain blur-free images with excellent definition. The system will be described with the aid of end-cycle specimens, as well as of in-test specimens. PMID:27587125

  4. A novel optical apparatus for the study of rolling contact wear/fatigue based on a high-speed camera and multiple-source laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodini, I.; Sansoni, G.; Lancini, M.; Pasinetti, S.; Docchio, F.

    2016-08-01

    Rolling contact wear/fatigue tests on wheel/rail specimens are important to produce wheels and rails of new materials for improved lifetime and performance, which are able to operate in harsh environments and at high rolling speeds. This paper presents a novel non-invasive, all-optical system, based on a high-speed video camera and multiple laser illumination sources, which is able to continuously monitor the dynamics of the specimens used to test wheel and rail materials, in a laboratory test bench. 3D macro-topography and angular position of the specimen are simultaneously performed, together with the acquisition of surface micro-topography, at speeds up to 500 rpm, making use of a fast camera and image processing algorithms. Synthetic indexes for surface micro-topography classification are defined, the 3D macro-topography is measured with a standard uncertainty down to 0.019 mm, and the angular position is measured on a purposely developed analog encoder with a standard uncertainty of 2.9°. The very small camera exposure time enables to obtain blur-free images with excellent definition. The system will be described with the aid of end-cycle specimens, as well as of in-test specimens.

  5. Photo-induced optical bleaching in Ge12Sb25S63 amorphous chalcogenide thin films: effect of 532 nm laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Ramakanta; Jena, Shuvendu; Ganesan, R.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2015-03-01

    The photo-induced effects of Ge12Sb25S63 films illuminated with 532 nm laser light are investigated from transmission spectra measured by FTIR spectroscopy. The material exhibits photo-bleaching (PB) when exposed to band gap light for a prolonged time in a vacuum. The PB is ascribed to structural changes inside the film as well as surface photo-oxidation. The amorphous nature of thin films was detected by x-ray diffraction. The chemical composition of the deposited thin films was examined by energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDAX). The refractive indices of the films were obtained from the transmission spectra based on an inverse synthesis method and the optical band gaps were derived from optical absorption spectra using the Tauc plot. The dispersion of the refractive index is discussed in terms of the single-oscillator Wemple-DiDomenico model. It was found that the mechanism of the optical absorption follows the rule of the allowed non-direct transition. Raman and x-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) were measured and decomposed into several peaks that correspond to the different structural units which support the optical changes.

  6. Laser activated MTOS microwave device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A light-activated semiconductor device usable as an optoelectronic switch, pulse generator or optical detector is provided. A semiconductor device is disclosed which provides back-to-back metal-thin oxide-silicon (MTOS) capacitors. Each capacitor includes a thin, light-absorptive aluminum electrode which overlies a thin oxide layer and a lightly doped region implanted in an intrinsic silicon substrate.

  7. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking. PMID:26367642

  8. 29 CFR 1917.123 - Illumination. 9

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR 126.15(1) and (n), and 33 CFR 154.570 sets out requirements for illumination at “designated... illuminated. Unless conditions described in the regulations of the United States Coast Guard (33 CFR 126.15(1) and (n), and 33 CFR 154.570) exist in the case of specific operations, illumination in active...

  9. 29 CFR 1917.123 - Illumination. 9

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR 126.15(1) and (n), and 33 CFR 154.570 sets out requirements for illumination at “designated... illuminated. Unless conditions described in the regulations of the United States Coast Guard (33 CFR 126.15(1) and (n), and 33 CFR 154.570) exist in the case of specific operations, illumination in active...

  10. 29 CFR 1917.123 - Illumination. 9

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR 126.15(1) and (n), and 33 CFR 154.570 sets out requirements for illumination at “designated... illuminated. Unless conditions described in the regulations of the United States Coast Guard (33 CFR 126.15(1) and (n), and 33 CFR 154.570) exist in the case of specific operations, illumination in active...

  11. 29 CFR 1917.123 - Illumination. 9

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CFR 126.15(1) and (n), and 33 CFR 154.570 sets out requirements for illumination at “designated... illuminated. Unless conditions described in the regulations of the United States Coast Guard (33 CFR 126.15(1) and (n), and 33 CFR 154.570) exist in the case of specific operations, illumination in active...

  12. 29 CFR 1917.123 - Illumination. 9

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR 126.15(1) and (n), and 33 CFR 154.570 sets out requirements for illumination at “designated... illuminated. Unless conditions described in the regulations of the United States Coast Guard (33 CFR 126.15(1) and (n), and 33 CFR 154.570) exist in the case of specific operations, illumination in active...

  13. Rapid High Spatial Resolution Chemical Characterization of Soil Structure to Illuminate Nutrient Distribution Mechanisms Related to Carbon Cycling Using Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, R. K.; Alexander, M. L. L.; Newburn, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Soils contain approximately half of Earth's terrestrial carbon. As such, it is important to understand the factors that control the cycling of this soil organic carbon between the land and the atmosphere. Models that attribute the persistence of soil organic carbon to the intrinsic properties of the molecules themselves are inconsistent with recent observations— for example, materials that are more thermodynamically stable have been found to have a shorter lifetime in soils than ones that are less stable, and vice versa. A new explanation has therefore been posited that invokes ecosystem properties as a whole, and not just intrinsic molecular properties, as the kinetic factor controlling soil carbon dynamics. Because soil dynamics occur on a small scale, techniques with high spatial resolution are required for their study. Existing techniques such as TOF-SIMS require preparation of the sample and introduction into a high vacuum system, and do not address the need to examine large numbers of sample systems without perturbation of chemical and physical properties. To address this analytical challenge, we have coupled a laser ablation (LA) module to an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), thereby enabling sample introduction and subsequent measurement of small amounts of soil organic matter by the laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometer (LA-AMS). Due to the adjustable laser beam width, the LA-AMS can probe spot sizes ranging from 1-150 μm in diameter, liberating from 10-100 ng/pulse. With a detection limit of 1 pM, the AMS allows for chemical characterization of the ablated material in terms of elemental ratios, compound classes, and TOC/TOM ratios. Furthermore, the LA-AMS is capable of rapid, in-situ sampling under ambient conditions, thereby eliminating the need for sample processing or transport before analysis. Here, we will present the first results from systematic studies aimed at validating the LA-AMS method as well as results from initial measurements

  14. Illuminating Engineering Research Institute Annual Report 1967. A Review of Project Activities and a Roundup of IERI Research Interests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illuminating Engineering Research Inst., New York, NY.

    Presented in this report are the Illuminating Engineering Research Institute's fundamental scientific concepts in a new frame of realism while relating them to an up-to-date accounting of the search for new basic knowledge. In addition to being an annual accounting, it is also intended to provide orientation. Its presented in dramatic and…

  15. Conformational dynamics of the active site loop of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase illuminated by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John C; Markham, George D

    2003-07-15

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase, methionine adenosyltransferase, a.k.a. MAT) is one of numerous enzymes that have a flexible polypeptide loop that moves to gate access to the active site in a motion that is closely coupled to catalysis. Crystallographic studies of this tetrameric enzyme have shown that the loop is closed in the absence of bound substrates. However, the loop must open to allow substrate binding and a variety of data indicate that the loop is closed during the catalytic steps. Previous kinetic studies indicate that during turnover loop motion occurs on a time scale of 10(-2)s, ca. 10-fold faster than chemical transformations and turnover. Site-directed spin labeling has been used to introduce nitroxide groups at two positions in the loop to illuminate how the motion of the loop is affected by substrate binding. The two loop mutants constructed, G105C and D107C, retain wild type levels of MAT activity; attachment of a methanethiosulfonate spin label to convert the cysteine to the "R1" residue reduced the k(cat) only for the labeled D107R1 form (7-fold). The K(m) value for methionine increased 2- to 4-fold for the cysteine mutants and 2- to 7-fold for the labeled proteins, whereas the K(m) for ATP was changed by at most 2-fold. EPR spectra for both labeled proteins are nearly identical and show the presence of two major spin label environments with rotational diffusion rates differing by approximately 10-fold; the slower rate is ca. 4-fold faster than the estimated protein rotational rate. The spectra are not altered by addition of substrates or products. At both positions the less mobile conformation constitutes ca. 65% of the total species, indicating an equilibrium that only slightly favors one form, that in which the label is more immobilized. The equilibrium constant that relates the two forms is comparable to the equilibrium constant of 1.5 for a conformational change that was previously deduced from the

  16. Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO) activities in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1994-01-01

    This technical report presents the summary of the 2nd NASA Aerospace Pyrotechnic Systems Workshop's discussion on Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO). Laser initiated ordnance benefits, applications, advantage of laser ordnance, and disadvantage of laser diode initiated ordnance are discussed. In addition, the three LIO programs: NASA standard laser diode safe and arm, NASA standard laser detonators, and laser diode safe/arm performance are reviewed. Steps for the LIO implementation are also presented.

  17. Active laser tweezers microrheometry of microbial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, N.; Slapar, V.; Boric, M.; Stopar, D.; Babič, D.; Poberaj, I.

    2010-08-01

    Microbial biofilms are present on biotic and abiotic surfaces and have a significant impact on many fields in industry, health care and technology. Thus, a better understanding of processes that lead to development of biofilms and their chemical and mechanical properties is needed. In the following paper we report the results of active laser tweezers microrheology study of optically inhomogeneous extracellular matrix secreted by Visbrio sp. bacteria. One particle and two particle active microrheology were used in experiments. Both methods exhibited high enough sensitivity to detect viscosity changes at early stages of bacterial growth. We also showed that both methods can be used in mature samples where optical inhomogeneity becomes significant.

  18. Optics, illumination and image sensing for machine vision

    SciTech Connect

    Svetkoff, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents papers given at a conference on optics, illumination and image sensing for machine vision. Topics included the following; computer vision in industry; mathematical models of human vision for machines; laser light for machine vision illuminations; illumination methods for machine vision; supercomputers and interferometry; and, computers and depth perception.

  19. Optical pumping of generalized laser active materials.

    PubMed

    Fry, F H

    1967-11-01

    Results are presented of a computer-based study on the rate of excitation in the active cores of two types of optically pumped lasers as a function of a number of parameters of the active core. The absorption bands of the active materials are generated by Lorentzian and Gaussian functions. The excitation rate of the active core is proportional to the width of the absorption band at all depths of penetration. The plots of excitation rate as a function of frequency show curves similar to line reversal spectra and emphasize the importance of excitation some distance from the center of the absorption band in the slab model. In the cylindrical model, this wing pumping is even more important due to focusing. The effect of refractive index on the excitation rate is also described. PMID:20062337

  20. Photosensitization with anticancer agents. 17. EPR studies of photodynamic action of hypericin: formation of semiquinone radical and activated oxygen species on illumination.

    PubMed

    Diwu, Z; Lown, J W

    1993-02-01

    When hypericin was illuminated with 580 nm light in aqueous solution, the semiquinone radical, singlet oxygen, and superoxide anion radical were detected. The formation of the semiquinone radical and activated oxygen species and the transformation and competition between them depend on the quinone and oxygen concentrations, irradiation time and intensity, and the nature of substrate. In anaerobic solution containing a high concentration of the quinone, the semiquinone radical was predominantly photoproduced. In contrast, in aerobic solution, singlet oxygen is the principal product in the photosensitization of hypericin. Besides singlet oxygen, superoxide anion radical is generated by the quinone on illumination in aerobic solution via the reduction of oxygen by the semiquinone radical, but to a lesser extent than singlet oxygen. The generation of superoxide anion radical is significantly enhanced by the presence of electron donors. PMID:8381107

  1. Lunar South Pole Illumination

    NASA Video Gallery

    Simulated illumination conditions over the lunar South Pole region, from ~80°S to the pole. The movie runs for 28 days, centered on the LCROSS impact date on October 9th, 2009. The illumination ca...

  2. Active Vibration Control For Lasers And Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Jerome

    1983-12-01

    The Active Control of Space Structures (ACOSS) program of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has identified problems in active vibration control of structural modes in extremely flexible space structures and in precisely pointed optics. The Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories programs are an outgrowth of the ACOSS program. They are aimed at the problems of sensors, actuators, and their dynamic interactions with the structure to be controlled, and at the problem of system identification by one-g laboratory experiments. The VCOSS-1 and VCOSS-2 programs (Vibration Control of Space Structures) address the dynamic interactions of the sensor-actuator-structure; the Benchless Laser program and the Airborne Laser Mirror-Control program address the active control of HEL mirrors; the Experimental Modal Analysis and Component Synthesis and the Large Space Structure Dynamics programs address the problems of system identification and testing. Closer coordination with NASA and DARPA is being sought in support of on-orbit dynamic testing using the Space Shuttle and in the development of a national facility for one-g dynamics testing of large space structures.

  3. Lights illuminate surfaces superluminally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroff, Robert J.; Zhong, Qi; Lilleskov, Elias

    2016-07-01

    When a light bulb is turned on, light moves away from it at speed c, by definition. When light from this bulb illuminates a surface, however, this illumination front is not constrained to move at speed c. A simple proof is given that this illumination front always moves faster than c. Generalized, when any compact light source itself varies, this information spreads across all of the surfaces it illuminates at speeds faster than light.

  4. Illumination pupilgram control using an intelligent illuminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayanagi, Noriyuki; Mizuno, Yasushi; Mori, Masakazu; Kita, Naonori; Matsui, Ryota; Matsuyama, Tomoyuki

    2013-04-01

    Nikon's Intelligent Illuminator, a freeform pupilgram generator, realizes a high flexibility for pupilgram control by using more than 10,000 degrees-of-freedom for pupilgram adjustment. In this work, an Intelligent Illuminator was integrated into an ArF scanner, the Nikon NSR-S621D. We demonstrate the pupilgram setting accuracy by direct correlation between on-body measured pupilgram and desired target pupilgram. We show that the Intelligent Illuminator is used for fine tuning of the pupilgram to match optical proximity effect (OPE) characteristics. We experimentally confirmed that a global source optimization software realized an improvement of lithographic process window without changing OPE characteristics by using optimized pupilgram made by Intelligent Illuminator.

  5. Active laser system for sea ice control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtikhiev, Nickolay N.; Gaponov, Alexandr E.; Kuluba, Yury N.; Matous, Vladislav I.; Radominov, Oleg E.; Tuzikov, Vladimir Z.; Vargaftic, Vasiliy N.

    1997-01-01

    The airborne systems are used for complex investigations of coastline very successfully, for example it can be used to measure the depth of the sea, to discover the reefs and so on. Such information may be used in navigation too. The specific conditions of navigation in the North and Pole seas defines the necessity of exact knowledge about the ice cracks in order to find the possible direction of the ship movement. The active optical system, working in the near IR region, has many advantages before the passive one, especially if it is necessary to work during the polar night and at bad weather conditions. In this article we discuss the demands to the laser active airborne systems, that given the accurate picture of the ice with high resolution in the daytime and nighttime conditions. Such system based on the laser, mechanical scanner and avalanche photodiode is very compact, reliable and informative. The picture of the ice surface can be shown on the TV monitor, can be written to the memory and can be delivered to the processing center by the radiochannel. The experimental results are shown together with results of this system probing in the conditions of the North Pole Ocean.

  6. Multiple-illumination photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Quinn M.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    Previously we described the potential for multiple illumination photoacoustic tomography to provide quantitative reconstructions, however this work used only simulated data. We have developed a custom photoacoustic-ultrasound tomography system capable of multiple illuminations and parallel acquisition from a 256 element 5 MHz transducer ring array with 8-cm diameter. The multiple illumination scheme uses a free-space light delivery geometry where a rotational stage scans a pulsed laser beam onto different incident locations around the sample. For each illumination location a photoacoustic image is reconstructed using a modified backprojection algorithm. Images from different source locations have the potential to be combined to form an improved deep-tissue image using our previously developed iterative algorithms. We complement the photoacoustic imaging data with unique ultrasound imaging data. Most previous ultrasound tomography methods have used migration algorithms, iterative ray-based analysis, wave-equation modeling, or frequency-based algorithms that all demand large amounts of data and computational power. We propose a new UST method that offers isotropic resolution, provides scattering contrast, as well as the potential for measuring ultrasound scattering anisotropy and decoupling density and compressibility contributions. The imaging system is driven by a Verasonics scan engine and programmed for both ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging modes. Resolution has been measured to be 150 μm for ultrasound and 200 μm for photoacoustic images. Imaging capabilities are demonstrated on phantoms with custom-tailored ultrasound scattering and optical properties, as well as in murine models.

  7. Light intensity independence during dynamic laser speckle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Renan Oliveira; Rabal, Hector J.; Braga, Roberto A.

    2016-05-01

    We explore some different normalizations of current dynamic laser speckle activity measures searching for their performance with respect to the illumination inhomogeneity of the samples. Inertia Moment and Average Value of Differences of the co-occurrence matrix are compared using a paint-drying case study on a uniform sample where attenuation in a portion of the illuminated area is introduced using a neutral density filter. In this way, all environmental conditions being equal but non-uniform illumination permits the comparison on a better approximation to objectivity. The results presented show that it is possible to mitigate the effects of the illumination in the activities measured by the dynamic laser speckle.

  8. Green laser light activates the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Gentiana I.; Balster, Sven; Zhang, Kaiyin; Lim, Hubert H.; Reich, Uta; Massow, Ole; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Guenter

    2009-07-01

    The hearing performance with conventional hearing aids and cochlear implants is dramatically reduced in noisy environments and for sounds more complex than speech (e. g. music), partially due to the lack of localized sensorineural activation across different frequency regions with these devices. Laser light can be focused in a controlled manner and may provide more localized activation of the inner ear, the cochlea. We sought to assess whether visible light with parameters that could induce an optoacoustic effect (532 nm, 10-ns pulses) would activate the cochlea. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded preoperatively in anesthetized guinea pigs to confirm normal hearing. After opening the bulla, a 50-μm core-diameter optical fiber was positioned in the round window niche and directed toward the basilar membrane. Optically induced ABRs (OABRs), similar in shape to those of acoustic stimulation, were elicited with single pulses. The OABR peaks increased with energy level (0.6 to 23 μJ/pulse) and remained consistent even after 30 minutes of continuous stimulation at 13 μJ, indicating minimal or no stimulation-induced damage within the cochlea. Our findings demonstrate that visible light can effectively and reliably activate the cochlea without any apparent damage. Further studies are in progress to investigate the frequency-specific nature and mechanism of green light cochlear activation.

  9. NASA'S Earth Science Enterprise Embraces Active Laser Remote Sensing from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luther, Michael R.; Paules, Granville E., III

    1999-01-01

    Several objectives of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise are accomplished, and in some cases, uniquely enabled by the advantages of earth-orbiting active lidar (laser radar) sensors. With lidar, the photons that provide the excitation illumination for the desired measurement are both controlled and well known. The controlled characteristics include when and where the illumination occurs, the wavelength, bandwidth, pulse length, and polarization. These advantages translate into high signal levels, excellent spatial resolution, and independence from time of day and the sun's position. As the lidar technology has rapidly matured, ESE scientific endeavors have begun to use lidar sensors over the last 10 years. Several more lidar sensors are approved for future flight. The applications include both altimetry (rangefinding) and profiling. Hybrid missions, such as the approved Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) sensor to fly on the ICESat mission, will do both at the same time. Profiling applications encompass aerosol, cloud, wind, and molecular concentration measurements. Recent selection of the PICASSO Earth System Science Pathfinder mission and the complementary CLOUDSAT radar-based mission, both flying in formation with the EOS PM mission, will fully exploit the capabilities of multiple sensor systems to accomplish critical science needs requiring such profiling. To round out the briefing a review of past and planned ESE missions will be presented.

  10. Muscle activity characterization by laser Doppler Myography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, Lorenzo; Casaccia, Sara; Marchionni, Paolo; Ercoli, Ilaria; Primo Tomasini, Enrico

    2013-09-01

    Electromiography (EMG) is the gold-standard technique used for the evaluation of muscle activity. This technique is used in biomechanics, sport medicine, neurology and rehabilitation therapy and it provides the electrical activity produced by skeletal muscles. Among the parameters measured with EMG, two very important quantities are: signal amplitude and duration of muscle contraction, muscle fatigue and maximum muscle power. Recently, a new measurement procedure, named Laser Doppler Myography (LDMi), for the non contact assessment of muscle activity has been proposed to measure the vibro-mechanical behaviour of the muscle. The aim of this study is to present the LDMi technique and to evaluate its capacity to measure some characteristic features proper of the muscle. In this paper LDMi is compared with standard superficial EMG (sEMG) requiring the application of sensors on the skin of each patient. sEMG and LDMi signals have been simultaneously acquired and processed to test correlations. Three parameters has been analyzed to compare these techniques: Muscle activation timing, signal amplitude and muscle fatigue. LDMi appears to be a reliable and promising measurement technique allowing the measurements without contact with the patient skin.

  11. Actively Q-switched Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. G.; Podivilov, E. V.; Babin, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    A new scheme providing actively Q-switched operation of a Raman fiber laser (RFL) has been proposed and tested. The RFL consists of a 1 km single-mode fiber with a switchable loop mirror at one end and an angled cleaved output end. An 1080 nm pulse with microsecond duration is generated at the output by means of acousto-optic switching of the mirror at ~30 kHz in the presence of 6 W backward pumping at 1030 nm. In the proposed scheme, the generated pulse energy is defined by the pump energy distributed along the passive fiber, which amounts to 30 μJ in our case. The available pump energy may be increased by means of fiber lengthening. Pulse shortening is also expected.

  12. Optodynamic Phenomena During Laser-Activated Irrigation Within Root Canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukač, Nejc; Gregorčič, Peter; Jezeršek, Matija

    2016-07-01

    Laser-activated irrigation is a powerful endodontic treatment for smear layer, bacteria, and debris removal from the root canal. In this study, we use shadow photography and the laser-beam-transmission probe to examine the dynamics of laser-induced vapor bubbles inside a root canal model and compare ultrasonic needle irrigation to the laser method. Results confirm important phenomenological differences in the two endodontic methods with the laser method resulting in much deeper irrigation. Observations of simulated debris particles show liquid vorticity effects which in our opinion represents the major cleaning mechanism.

  13. Effect of illumination on the content of melatonin, phenolic compounds, and antioxidant activity during germination of lentils (Lens culinaris L.) and kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Yolanda; Liébana, Rosa; Herrera, Teresa; Rebollo-Hernanz, Miguel; Sanchez-Puelles, Carlos; Benítez, Vanesa; Martín-Cabrejas, María A

    2014-11-01

    This study reports the effects of two different illumination conditions during germination (12 h light/12 h dark vs 24 h dark) in lentils (Lens culinaris L.) and kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) on the content of melatonin and phenolic compounds, as well as the antioxidant activity. Germination led to relative increase in melatonin content and significant antioxidant activity, while the content of phenolic compounds decreased. The highest melatonin content was obtained after 6 days of germination under 24 h dark for both legumes. These germinated legume seeds with improved levels of melatonin might play a protective role against free radicals. Thus, considering the potent antioxidant activity of melatonin, these sprouts can be consumed as direct foods and be offered as preventive food strategies in combating chronic diseases through the diet. PMID:25310717

  14. The reversal of the laser-beam-induced-current contrast with varying illumination density in a Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} thin-film solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiong; Zhang, Yong

    2013-12-09

    We apply an array of correlated spatially-resolved techniques, including μ-Raman/photoluminescence/reflectance/laser-beam-induced-current in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, to study the impact of the microscopic-scale thickness inhomogeneity of CdS layer in a Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} thin-film solar cell. Thicker CdS regions are found to cause more light reflecting loss thus yield lower external quantum efficiencies and energy conversion efficiencies than the general area. However, these regions show much less efficiency degradation at high illumination intensity, leading to an inversion of laser-beam-induced-current contrast in the area mapping. While improving the CdS layer uniformity can boost the device performance, the finding further points out the possibility of operating thin-film photovoltaic devices based on the similar materials (such as CuInGaSe{sub 2}, CdTe, Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4}) under a substantially higher illumination density for concentrated photovoltaic and photo-detection.

  15. Illumination Under Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N

    2002-08-19

    This paper is a survey of the author's work on illumination and shadows under trees, including the effects of sky illumination, sun penumbras, scattering in a misty atmosphere below the trees, and multiple scattering and transmission between leaves. It also describes a hierarchical image-based rendering method for trees.

  16. Active coherent laser spectrometer for remote detection and identification of chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Neil A.; Weidmann, Damien

    2012-10-01

    Currently, there exists a capability gap for the remote detection and identification of threat chemicals. We report here on the development of an Active Coherent Laser Spectrometer (ACLaS) operating in the thermal infrared and capable of multi-species stand-off detection of chemicals at sub ppm.m levels. A bench top prototype of the instrument has been developed using distributed feedback mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers as spectroscopic sources. The instrument provides active eye-safe illumination of a topographic target and subsequent spectroscopic analysis through optical heterodyne detection of the diffuse backscattered field. Chemical selectivity is provided by the combination of the narrow laser spectral bandwidth (typically < 2 MHz) and frequency tunability that allows the recording of the full absorption spectrum of any species within the instrument line of sight. Stand-off detection at distances up to 12 m has been demonstrated on light molecules such as H2O, CH4 and N2O. A physical model of the stand-off detection scenario including ro-vibrational molecular absorption parameters was used in conjunction with a fitting algorithm to retrieve quantitative mixing ratio information on multiple absorbers.

  17. Post-illumination activity of SnO2 nanoparticle-decorated Cu2O nanocubes by H2O2 production in dark from photocatalytic “memory”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lingmei; Sun, Wuzhu; Yang, Weiyi; Li, Qi; Shang, Jian Ku

    2016-02-01

    Most photocatalysts only function under illumination, while many potential applications require continuous activities in dark. Thus, novel photocatalysts should be developed, which could store part of their photoactivity in “memory” under illumination and then be active from this “memory” after the illumination is turned off for an extended period of time. Here a novel composite photocatalyst of SnO2 nanoparticle-decorated Cu2O nanocubes is developed. Their large conduction band potential difference and the inner electrostatic field formed in the p-n heterojunction provide a strong driving force for photogenerated electrons to move from Cu2O to SnO2 under visible light illumination, which could then be released to react with O2 in dark to produce H2O2 for its post-illumination activity. This work demonstrates that the selection of decoration components for photocatalysts with the post-illumination photocatalytic “memory” could be largely expanded to semiconductors with conduction band potentials less positive than the two-electron reduction potential of O2.

  18. Post-illumination activity of SnO2 nanoparticle-decorated Cu2O nanocubes by H2O2 production in dark from photocatalytic “memory”

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lingmei; Sun, Wuzhu; Yang, Weiyi; Li, Qi; Shang, Jian Ku

    2016-01-01

    Most photocatalysts only function under illumination, while many potential applications require continuous activities in dark. Thus, novel photocatalysts should be developed, which could store part of their photoactivity in “memory” under illumination and then be active from this “memory” after the illumination is turned off for an extended period of time. Here a novel composite photocatalyst of SnO2 nanoparticle-decorated Cu2O nanocubes is developed. Their large conduction band potential difference and the inner electrostatic field formed in the p-n heterojunction provide a strong driving force for photogenerated electrons to move from Cu2O to SnO2 under visible light illumination, which could then be released to react with O2 in dark to produce H2O2 for its post-illumination activity. This work demonstrates that the selection of decoration components for photocatalysts with the post-illumination photocatalytic “memory” could be largely expanded to semiconductors with conduction band potentials less positive than the two-electron reduction potential of O2. PMID:26879006

  19. Laser based on dye-activated silica gel

    SciTech Connect

    Altshuler, G.B.; Bakhanov, V.A.; Dulneva, E.G.; Erofeev, A.V.; Mazurin, O.V.; Roskova, G.P.; Tsekhomskaya, T.S.

    1987-06-01

    Silica gel activated by a dye is used as a new laser medium. The lasin characteristics of rhodamine 6G in silica gel are reported. An important characteristic of the dye laser is its long service life, which is determined by the photostability of the dye in silic gel.(AIP)

  20. Selective plane illumination microscopy on a chip.

    PubMed

    Paiè, Petra; Bragheri, Francesca; Bassi, Andrea; Osellame, Roberto

    2016-04-26

    Selective plane illumination microscopy can image biological samples at a high spatiotemporal resolution. Complex sample preparation and system alignment normally limit the throughput of the method. Using femtosecond laser micromachining, we created an integrated optofluidic device that allows obtaining continuous flow imaging, three-dimensional reconstruction and high-throughput analysis of large multicellular spheroids at a subcellular resolution. PMID:27030116

  1. Exploring a new phenomenon in the bactericidal response of TiO2 thin films by Fe doping: Exerting the antimicrobial activity even after stoppage of illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghibi, Sanaz; Vahed, Shohreh; Torabi, Omid; Jamshidi, Amin; Golabgir, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-02-01

    Antibacterial properties of Fe-doped TiO2 thin films prepared on glass by the sol-gel hot-dipping technique were studied. The films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activities were evaluated by measuring the decomposition rate of methylene blue under ultra violet and visible light. The antibacterial properties of the coatings were investigated against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisia and Aspergillus niger. The principle of incubation methods was also discussed. The results indicated that Fe doping of thin films eventuated in high antibacterial properties under visible light and this performance remained even after stoppage of illumination. This article tries to provide some explanation for this fact.

  2. High-energy laser activities at MBDA Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohring, Bernd; Dietrich, Stephan; Tassini, Leonardo; Protz, Rudolf; Geidek, Franz; Zoz, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    At MBDA Germany a concept for a high-energy laser weapon system is investigated, which is based on existing industrial laser sources. Due to the enormous progress in the field of high-power fiber lasers, commercial industrial fiber lasers are now available delivering a nearly-diffraction limited beam quality with power levels of up to 10 kW. By using a geometric beam coupling scheme, a number of individual high-power fiber laser beams are combined together using one common beam director telescope. A total laser beam power of more than 100 kW can be achieved, which is sufficient for an operational laser weapon system. The individual beams from the different lasers are steered by servo-loops using fast tip-tilt mirrors. This principle enables the concentration of the total laser beam power at one common focal point on a distant target, also allowing fine tracking of target movements and first-order compensation of turbulence effects on laser beam propagation. The proposed beam combination concept was demonstrated by using different experimental set-ups. A number of experiments were performed successfully to investigate laser beam target interaction and target fine tracking, also at large distances and at moving targets. Content and results of these investigations are reported, which demonstrate the complete engagement sequence for a C-RAM scenario. This includes subsequent steps of target acquisition by radar and IR optics, followed by large angle coarse tracking, active fine tracking and destruction of the target by the laser system. This successful implementation of geometric beam combining is an important step for the realization of a laser weapon system in the near future.

  3. Design of a back-illuminated, crystallographically etched, silicon-on-sapphire avalanche photodiode with monolithically integrated microlens, for dual-mode passive & active imaging arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Alvin G.; Cole, Daniel C.

    2008-12-01

    There is a growing need in space and environmental research applications for dual-mode, passive and active 2D and 3D ladar imaging methods. To fill this need, an advanced back-illuminated avalanche photodiode (APD) design is presented based on crystallographically etched (100) epitaxial silicon on R-plane sapphire (SOS), enabling single photon sensitive, solid-state focal plane arrays (FPAs) with wide dynamic range, supporting passive and active imaging capability in a single FPA. When (100) silicon is properly etched with KOH:IPA:H2O solution through a thermally grown oxide mask, square based pyramidal frustum or mesa arrays result with the four mesa sidewalls of the APD formed by (111) silicon planes that intersect the (100) planes at a crystallographic angle, Φc = 54.7°. The APD device is fabricated in the mesa using conventional silicon processing technology. Detectors are back-illuminated through light focusing microlenses fabricated in the thinned, AR-coated sapphire substrate. The APDs share a common, front-side anode contact, made locally at the base of each device mesa. A low resistance (Al) or (Cu) metal anode grid fills the space between pixels and also inhibits optical cross-talk. SOS-APD arrays are indium bump-bonded to CMOS readout ICs to produce hybrid FPAs. The quantum efficiency for the square 27 µm pixels exceeds 50% for 250 nm < λ < 400 nm and exceeds 80% for 400 nm < λ < 700 nm. The sapphire microlenses compensate detector quantum efficiency loss resulting from the mesa geometry and yield 100% sensitive-area-fill-factor arrays, limited in size only by the wafer diameter.

  4. Shackleton Crater Illumination

    NASA Video Gallery

    Simulated illumination conditions near the lunar South Pole. The 30km x 30km region highlights the Shackleton crater. The movie runs for 28 days, centered on the LCROSS impact date on October 9th, ...

  5. Wood's lamp illumination (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A Wood's lamp emits ultraviolet light and can be a diagnostic aid in determining if someone has a fungal ... is an infection on the area where the Wood's lamp is illuminating, the area will fluoresce. Normally ...

  6. Illuminating black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Ian A.; Bull, Anne; O’Brien, Eileen; Drillsma-Milgrom, Katy A.; Milgrom, Lionel R.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional shadows formed by illuminating vortices are shown to be visually analogous to the gravitational action of black holes on light and surrounding matter. They could be useful teaching aids demonstrating some of the consequences of general relativity.

  7. Illumination in diverse codimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, David C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper derives a model of diffuse and specular illumination in arbitrarily large dimensions, based on a few characteristics of material and light in three-space. It then describes how to adjust for the anomaly of excess brightness in large codimensions. If a surface is grooved or furry, it can be illuminated with a hybrid model that incorporates both the one dimensional geometry (the grooves or fur) and the two dimensional geometry (the surface).

  8. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue; Lan, Bei; Cao, Youjia; He, Hao

    2014-10-27

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca{sup 2+} dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  9. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yisen; Lan, Bei; He, Hao; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-10-01

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca2+ dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  10. Toward a Descriptive Science of Teaching: How the TDOP Illuminates the Multidimensional Nature of Active Learning in Postsecondary Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hora, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed accounts of teaching can shed light on the nature and prevalence of active learning, yet common approaches reduce teaching to unidimensional descriptors or binary categorizations. In this paper, I use the instructional systems-of-practice framework and the Teaching Dimensions Observation Protocol (TDOP) to advance an approach to thinking…

  11. Illumination from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) disrupts pathological cytokines expression and activates relevant signal pathways in primary human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ye; Xie, Chen; Gu, Yangshun; Li, Xiuyi; Tong, Jianping

    2016-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the aged people. The latest systemic review of epidemiological investigations revealed that excessive light exposure increases the risk of AMD. With the drastically increasing use of high-energy light-emitting diodes (LEDs) light in our domestic environment nowadays, it is supposed to pose a potential oxidative threat to ocular health. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is the major ocular source of pathological cytokines, which regulate local inflammation and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that high-energy LED light might disrupt the pathological cytokine expression of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD. Primary human RPE cells were isolated from eyecups of normal eye donors and seeded into plate wells for growing to confluence. Two widely used multichromatic white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with correlated color temperatures (CCTs) of 2954 and 7378 K were used in this experiment. The confluent primary RPE cells were under white LEDs light exposure until 24 h. VEGF-A, IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 proteins and mRNAs were measured using an ELISA kit and RT-PCR, respectively. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), Akt, Janus kinase (JAK)2 and Nuclear factor (NF)-κB signal pathways after LEDs illumination were evaluated by western blotting analysis. The level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) using chloromethyl- 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Inhibitors of relevant signal pathways and anti-oxidants were added to the primary RPE cells before LEDs illumination to evaluate their biological functions. We found that 7378 K light, but not 2954 K upregulated the VEGF-A, IL-6, IL-8 and downregulated MCP-1 proteins and mRNAs levels in a time-dependent manner. In parallel, initial activation of MAPKs and NF-κB signal pathways were also observed after 7378 K light exposure. Mechanistically, antioxidants for eliminating reactive oxygen

  12. Active diaphragm rupture with laser beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, T.; Torikai, H.; Yang, Q. S.; Watanabe, K.; Sasoh, A.

    We performed shock tube operations with a layer of diaphragm being ruptured by laser beam irradiation. Mylar or Cellophane was examined as the diaphragm material. It has been demonstrated that shock tube can be operated with this new technique. The absorbed energy depends on the material and thickness of the diaphragm and is an important control parameter.

  13. Research on long-range laser active imaging system applied in adverse weather conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Zhi-gang; Liu, Meng-de; Yang, Li; Kabanov, V. V.; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Jie; Chu, Shi-bo; Yang, Jun-xian; Zhou, Yang

    2013-09-01

    A low-light level night vision device or thermal infrared imager belonging to passive imaging system is generally used in daily target detection and identification. But in adverse weather conditions of dark of night, poor atmospheric transmission characteristics or strong backscattering (fog, dust, rain, snow, etc.), even the most sensitive low-light level night vision could not provide enough image resolution for detecting and identifying targets, and the thermal infrared imager is also limited by low temperature contrast. A long-range laser active imaging system, in combination with high-power semiconductor pulsed lasers with collimation technology, receiving objective lens of large diameter, long focal length and narrow viewing angle, high-gain image intensifier CCD (ICCD) camera and range-gated synchronization control technology, is developed for long distance target detection and high resolution imaging in adverse weather conditions. The system composition and operating principle are introduced. The extremely powerful and efficient illuminators with collimation technology are able to deliver uniform beams, which are essential for illuminating targets at a distance and generating high-quality images. The particular receiving objective lens, ICCD camera and range-gated synchronization control technology could reduce strong backscattering signal and improve imaging signal-to-noise ratio. The laboratory and outfield experiments have been done to validate imaging effect and imaging quality. The results show that the minimum resolution is about 3-5cm, 10cm, and greater than 20 cm for target far from 1100m, 4700m, and 6700m respectively in dark of night. Furthermore, the minimum resolution could reach to 10cm and 20cm for target far from 2500m and 4800m respectively and the image is too blurred to accurately identify the target when observing the target far from 7200m in rainy condition.

  14. Bright field illumination system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Edward D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A Bright Field Illumination system for inspecting a range of characteristically different kinds of defects, depressions, and ridges in a selected material surface. The system has an illumination source placed near a first focus of an elliptical reflector. In addition, a camera facing the inspected area is placed near the illumination source and the first focus. The second focus of the elliptical reflector is located at a distance approximately twice the elliptical reflector's distance above the inspected surface. The elliptical reflector directs the light from the source onto the inspected surface. Due to the shape of the elliptical reflector, light that is specularly reflected from the inspected surface is directed into the camera is which located at the position of the reflected second focus of the ellipse. This system creates a brightly lighted background field against which damage sites appear as high contrast dark objects which can be easily detected by a person or an automated inspection system. In addition, the Bright Field Illumination system and method can be used in combination with a vision inspection system providing for multiplexed illumination and data handling of multiple kinds of surface characteristics including abrupt and gradual surface variations and differences between measured characteristics of different kinds and prior instruments.

  15. Optics, illumination, and image sensing for machine vision III; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cambridge, MA, Nov. 8, 9, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Svetkoff, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on optics, illumination, and image sensing for machine vision are presented. Some of the optics discussed include: illumination and imaging of moving objects, strobe illumination systems for machine vision, optical collision timer, new electrooptical coordinate measurement system, flexible and piezoresistive touch sensing array, selection of cameras for machine vision, custom fixed-focal length versus zoom lenses, performance of optimal phase-only filters, minimum variance SDF design using adaptive algorithms, Ho-Kashyap associative processors, component spaces for invariant pattern recognition, grid labeling using a marked grid, illumination-based model of stochastic textures, color-encoded moire contouring, noise measurement and suppression in active 3-D laser-based imaging systems, structural stereo matching of Laplacian-of-Gaussian contour segments for 3D perception, earth surface recovery from remotely sensed images, and shape from Lambertian photometric flow fields.

  16. Envelope evolution of a laser pulse in an active medium

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.L.; Tajima, T.; Downer, M.C.; Siders, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    The authors show that the envelope velocity, v{sub env}, of a short laser pulse can, via propagation in an active medium, be made less than, equal to, or even greater than c, the vacuum phase velocity of light. Simulation results, based on moving frame propagation equations coupling the laser pulse, active medium and plasma, are presented, as well as equations that determines the design value of super- and sub-luminous v{sub env}. In this simulation the laser pulse evolves in time in a moving frame as opposed to their earlier work where the profile was fixed. The elimination of phase slippage and pump depletion effects in the laser wakefield accelerator is discussed as a particular application. Finally they discuss media properties necessary for an experimental realization of this technique.

  17. Substrate-emitting semiconductor laser with a trapezoidal active region

    SciTech Connect

    Dikareva, N V; Nekorkin, S M; Karzanova, M V; Zvonkov, B N; Aleshkin, V Ya; Dubinov, A A; Afonenko, A A

    2014-04-28

    Semiconductor lasers with a narrow (∼2°) directional pattern in the planes both parallel and perpendicular to the p–n junction are fabricated. To achieve a low radiation divergence in the p–n junction plane, the active region in this plane was designed in the form of a trapezium. The narrow directional pattern in the plane perpendicular to the p–n junction was ensured by the use of a leaky mode, through which more than 90% of laser power was coupled out. (lasers)

  18. OLED area illumination source

    DOEpatents

    Foust, Donald Franklin; Duggal, Anil Raj; Shiang, Joseph John; Nealon, William Francis; Bortscheller, Jacob Charles

    2008-03-25

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  19. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1998-10-06

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference lines a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  20. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1996-12-17

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source, a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference line as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  1. Probing Planetary Bodies for Subsurface Volatiles: GEANT4 Models of Gamma Ray, Fast, Epithermal, and Thermal Neutron Response to Active Neutron Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Su, J. J.; Murray, J.

    2014-12-01

    Using an active source of neutrons as an in situ probe of a planetary body has proven to be a powerful tool to extract information about the presence, abundance, and location of subsurface volatiles without the need for drilling. The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument on Curiosity is an example of such an instrument and is designed to detect the location and abundance of hydrogen within the top 50 cm of the Martian surface. DAN works by sending a pulse of neutrons towards the ground beneath the rover and detecting the reflected neutrons. The intensity and time of arrival of the reflection depends on the proportion of water, while the time the pulse takes to reach the detector is a function of the depth at which the water is located. Similar instruments can also be effective probes at the polar-regions of the Moon or on asteroids as a way of detecting sequestered volatiles. We present the results of GEANT4 particle simulation models of gamma ray, fast, epithermal, and thermal neutron responses to active neutron illumination. The results are parameterized by hydrogen abundance, stratification and depth of volatile layers, versus the distribution of neutron and gamma ray energy reflections. Models will be presented to approximate Martian, lunar, and asteroid environments and would be useful tools to assess utility for future NASA exploration missions to these types of planetary bodies.

  2. Illumination-compensated non-contact imaging photoplethysmography via dual-mode temporally coded illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelard, Robert; Scharfenberger, Christian; Wong, Alexander; Clausi, David A.

    2015-03-01

    Non-contact camera-based imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG) is useful for measuring heart rate in conditions where contact devices are problematic due to issues such as mobility, comfort, and sanitation. Existing iPPG methods analyse the light-tissue interaction of either active or passive (ambient) illumination. Many active iPPG methods assume the incident ambient light is negligible to the active illumination, resulting in high power requirements, while many passive iPPG methods assume near-constant ambient conditions. These assumptions can only be achieved in environments with controlled illumination and thus constrain the use of such devices. To increase the number of possible applications of iPPG devices, we propose a dual-mode active iPPG system that is robust to changes in ambient illumination variations. Our system uses a temporally-coded illumination sequence that is synchronized with the camera to measure both active and ambient illumination interaction for determining heart rate. By subtracting the ambient contribution, the remaining illumination data can be attributed to the controlled illuminant. Our device comprises a camera and an LED illuminant controlled by a microcontroller. The microcontroller drives the temporal code via synchronizing the frame captures and illumination time at the hardware level. By simulating changes in ambient light conditions, experimental results show our device is able to assess heart rate accurately in challenging lighting conditions. By varying the temporal code, we demonstrate the trade-off between camera frame rate and ambient light compensation for optimal blood pulse detection.

  3. Comparison of laser-activated tissue solders and thrombin-activated cryoprecipitate for wound closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayton, Mark L.; Libutti, Steven K.; Bessler, Marc; Allendorf, John D. F.; Eiref, Simon D.; Marx, Gerard; Mou, Xiaode; Morales, Alfredo M.; Treat, Michael R.; Nowygrod, Roman

    1994-09-01

    To determine the relative strengths of various biologic adhesives at several timepoints, we compared thrombin-activated SD (solvent-detergent treated) cryoprecipitate with laser- activated SD cryoprecipitate and a laser-activated, albumin-based glue. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n equals 79) received four, 3-cm, dorsal skin incisions which were closed with either laser- activated cryoprecipitate, laser-activated albumin solder, thrombin-activated cryoprecipitate, or standard skin staples. The cryoprecipitate was derived from pooled human plasma and was treated with a solvent-detergent process, rendering it free of envelope-coated viruses (i.e., HBV, HIV). An 808-nm diode laser was used to activate each solder with an average duration of exposure of 75 seconds per incision. Animals were sacrificed for evaluation of wound tensile strength and histology at 0 hours, 2 hours, 4 hours, and 4 days. At all timepoints tested, laser-activated solders were significantly stronger than thrombin-activated cryoprecipitate (p < 0.03) and control wounds (p < 0.003). There was no significant difference in tensile strength between the two types of laser-activated solder at any timepoint.

  4. Predicting Ground Illuminance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesniak, Michael V.; Tregoning, Brett D.; Hitchens, Alexandra E.

    2015-01-01

    Our Sun outputs 3.85 x 1026 W of radiation, of which roughly 37% is in the visible band. It is directly responsible for nearly all natural illuminance experienced on Earth's surface, either in the form of direct/refracted sunlight or in reflected light bouncing off the surfaces and/or atmospheres of our Moon and the visible planets. Ground illuminance, defined as the amount of visible light intercepting a unit area of surface (from all incident angles), varies over 7 orders of magnitude from day to night. It is highly dependent on well-modeled factors such as the relative positions of the Sun, Earth, and Moon. It is also dependent on less predictable factors such as local atmospheric conditions and weather.Several models have been proposed to predict ground illuminance, including Brown (1952) and Shapiro (1982, 1987). The Brown model is a set of empirical data collected from observation points around the world that has been reduced to a smooth fit of illuminance against a single variable, solar altitude. It provides limited applicability to the Moon and for cloudy conditions via multiplicative reduction factors. The Shapiro model is a theoretical model that treats the atmosphere as a three layer system of light reflectance and transmittance. It has different sets of reflectance and transmittance coefficients for various cloud types.In this paper we compare the models' predictions to ground illuminance data from an observing run at the White Sands missile range (data was obtained from the United Kingdom's Meteorology Office). Continuous illuminance readings were recorded under various cloud conditions, during both daytime and nighttime hours. We find that under clear skies, the Shapiro model tends to better fit the observations during daytime hours with typical discrepancies under 10%. Under cloudy skies, both models tend to poorly predict ground illuminance. However, the Shapiro model, with typical average daytime discrepancies of 25% or less in many cases

  5. Activation of cells using femtosecond laser beam (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Study of communication in cellular systems requires precise activation of targeted cell(s) in the network. In contrast to chemical, electrical, thermal, mechanical stimulation, optical stimulation is non-invasive and is better suited for stimulation of targeted cells. As compared to visible lasers, the near infrared (NIR) microsecond/nanosecond pulsed laser beams are being used as preferred stimulation tool as they provide higher penetration depth in tissues. Femotosecond (FS) laser beams in NIR are also being used for direct and indirect (i.e. via two-photon optogenetics) stimulation of cells. Here, we present a comparative evaluation of efficacy of NIR FS laser beam for direct (no optogenetic sensitization) and 2ph optogenetic stimulation of cells. Further, for the first time, we demonstrate the use of blue (~450 nm, obtained by second harmonic generation) FS laser beam for stimulation of cells with and without Channelrhodopisn-2 (ChR2) expression. Comparative analysis of photocurrent generated by blue FS laser beam and continuous wave blue light for optogenetics stimulation of ChR2 transfected HEK cells will be presented. The use of ultrafast laser micro-beam for focal, non-contact, and repeated stimulation of single cells in a cellular circuitry allowed us to study the communication between different cell types.

  6. Fission-activated laser as primary power for CW laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, D.K.

    1993-12-31

    Recent advances in the development of reactor-pumped lasers (RPL`s) have stimulated renewed interest in the concept of laser-powered propulsion. This paper surveys a number of laser propulsion concepts and identifies the one that is most promising from the standpoint of practicality. It is proposed that a ground-based FALCON (Fission-Activated Laser CONcept) RPL can provide primary for this launch vehicle design. The laser-vehicle system could launch small payloads into low-earth orbit (LEO) with high repetition rates and at low costs per kilogram. For the favored design, thruster efficiencies are currently estimated to be about 50%, with 80% being seen as a potentially realizable goal after further design refinements. Laser launch system simulations indicate that with a buy-in laser power of 10 MW, it will be possible to obtain specific impulses in the range of 600 to 800 seconds and payload-to-power ratios of 1 to 3 kg/MW.

  7. Fission-activated laser as primary power for CW laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, D.K.

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in the development of reactor-pumped lasers (RPL`s) have stimulated renewed interest in the concept of laser-powered propulsion. This paper surveys a number of laser propulsion concepts and identifies the one that is most promising from the standpoint of practicality. It is proposed that a ground-based FALCON (Fission-Activated Laser CONcept) RPL can provide primary power for this launch vehicle design. The laser-vehicle system could launch small payloads into low-earth orbit (LEO) with high repetition rates and at low costs per kilogram. For the favored design, thruster efficiencies are currently estimated to be about 500%, with 800% being seen as a potentially realizable goal after further design refinements. Laser launch system simulations indicate that, with a buy-in laser power of 10 MW, it will be possible to obtain specific impulses in the range of 600 to 800 seconds and payload-to-power ratios of 1 to 3 kg/MW.

  8. Activity of respiratory system during laser irradiation of brain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, N. A.; Sergeyeva, L. I.

    1984-06-01

    The performance of one of the principal links of the respiratory system, the respiratory center, was studied as a function of the exposure of the medulla oblongata and the sensomotor zone of the cerebral hemisphere cortex to low level laser irradiation in the red wavelength of the spectrum. Experiments were done on white rats under barbital anesthesia. Under such conditions a substantial effect was observed on the activity of the respiratory center. Laser light may display activating or inhibitory influences, in some cases the bilateral symmetry of the activity of the respiratory center is affected indicating deep changes in the integrative mechanism of the functioning of the right and left sides of the hemispheres. The laser beam effect depends on many factors: specific light properties, duration of the exposure, repetition of exposures, initial functional state of the CNS, etc.

  9. Efficient Illumination for Microsecond Tracking Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dulin, David; Barland, Stephane; Hachair, Xavier; Pedaci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The possibility to observe microsecond dynamics at the sub-micron scale, opened by recent technological advances in fast camera sensors, will affect many biophysical studies based on particle tracking in optical microscopy. A main limiting factor for further development of fast video microscopy remains the illumination of the sample, which must deliver sufficient light to the camera to allow microsecond exposure times. Here we systematically compare the main illumination systems employed in holographic tracking microscopy, and we show that a superluminescent diode and a modulated laser diode perform the best in terms of image quality and acquisition speed, respectively. In particular, we show that the simple and inexpensive laser illumination enables less than s camera exposure time at high magnification on a large field of view without coherence image artifacts, together with a good hologram quality that allows nm-tracking of microscopic beads to be performed. This comparison of sources can guide in choosing the most efficient illumination system with respect to the specific application. PMID:25251462

  10. High-average-power actively-mode-locked Tm3+ fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckerle, Michael; Kieleck, Christelle; Hübner, Philipp; Świderski, Jacek; Jackson, Stuart D.; Mazé, Gwenael; Eichhorn, Marc

    2012-02-01

    Fiber lasers emitting in the 2 μm wavelength range doped with thulium ions can be used as highly efficient pump sources for nonlinear converters to generate mid-infrared radiation. For spectroscopic purposes, illumination and countermeasures, a broad mid-infrared emission spectrum is advantageous. This can be reached by supercontinuum generation in fibers, e.g. fluoride fibers, which up to now has, however, only been presented with either low average power, complex Raman-shifted 1.55 μm pump sources or multi-stage amplifier pump schemes. Here we present recent results of a new actively-mode-locked single-oscillator scheme that can provide the high-repetition rate sub-ns pump pulses needed for pumping supercontinuum generators. A thulium-doped silica fiber laser is presented that provides > 11 W of average power CW-mode-locked pulses at 38 MHz repetition rate at ~ 38 ps pulse width. Upgrading the setup to allow Q-switched mode-locked operation yields mode-locked 40 MHz pulses arranged in 60 kHz bunched Q-switch envelopes and thus increases further the available peak power. In this Q-switched mode-locked regime over 5 W of average power has been achieved.

  11. Quantitative phase imaging with programmable illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Edwards, Chris; Goddard, Lynford L.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    Even with the recent rapid advances in the field of microscopy, non-laser light sources used for light microscopy have not been developing significantly. Most current optical microscopy systems use halogen bulbs as their light sources to provide a white-light illumination. Due to the confined shapes and finite filament size of the bulbs, little room is available for modification in the light source, which prevents further advances in microscopy. By contrast, commercial projectors provide a high power output that is comparable to the halogen lamps while allowing for great flexibility in patterning the illumination. In addition to their high brightness, the illumination can be patterned to have arbitrary spatial and spectral distributions. Therefore, commercial projectors can be adopted as a flexible light source to an optical microscope by careful alignment to the existing optical path. In this study, we employed a commercial projector source to a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM), which is an outside module for an existing phase contrast (PC) microscope. By replacing the ring illumination of PC with a ring-shaped pattern projected onto the condenser plane, we were able to recover the same result as the original SLIM. Furthermore, the ring illumination is replaced with multiple dots aligned along the same ring to minimize the overlap between the scattered and unscattered fields. This new method minimizes the halo artifact of the imaging system, which allows for a halo-free high-resolution quantitative phase microscopy system.

  12. Preparation and characterization of mesoporous N-doped and sulfuric acid treated anatase TiO 2 catalysts and their photocatalytic activity under UV and Vis illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Robert; Tarján, Sándor; Oszkó, Albert; Seemann, Torben; Zöllmer, Volker; Busse, Matthias; Dékány, Imre

    2009-11-01

    Nitrogen-doped TiO 2 catalysts were prepared by a precipitation method. The samples were calcined at 400 °C for 4 h in air. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low temperature N 2-adsorption was used for structural characterization and UV-diffuse reflectance (UV-DR) was applied to investigate the optical properties of the as-prepared samples. It was found that microporous N-doped catalysts have solely anatase crystalline structure. Acidic treatment of the calcined samples was performed using sulfuric acid agitation. The crystalline structure remained unchanged due to surface treatment, while the porosity and the surface areas (aBETS) were decreased dramatically. Optical characterization of the doped catalysts showed that they could be excited by visible light photons in the 400-500 nm wavelength range ( λ g,1=˜390 nm, λ g,2=˜510 nm). It was also established that surface treatment enhances the Vis-light absorption of the N-TiO 2 powders. Finally the catalysts were tested in the photocatalytic degradation of phenol in aqueous suspensions. Two different light sources were used; one of them was a UV-rich high pressure Hg-lamp, while the other was a tubular visible light source. We found that using visible light illumination N-doped, acid treated TiO 2 samples were more catalytically active than non-doped TiO 2 catalysts.

  13. Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO) activities in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1994-01-01

    Laser initiated ordnance appears to offer the advantages of greater reliability, enhanced safety, lighter, less costly products, and improvements in spacecraft system designs which can lead to higher operational efficiency. But the lack of flight demonstrations has prevented the application of this new technology into new programs. Hence, a three-phase technology program was initiated by NASA to provide flight proof of their technical and programmatic feasibility: flight demonstration aboard an unmanned commercial vehicle (Pegasus), use as a Space Shuttle payload, and the most demanding of applications, namely, solid rocket motor vehicle ignition and flight termination. The programs investigate, via flight demonstrations the use of fully solid state laser diode systems to reduce potential hazards imposed by stray electrical signals. Inadvertent ignition has proven to cause serious problems. While the current electromechanical have been made safe, the result has been complex systems. Now is the time to take advantage of this new technology to further enhance safety and reliability of spacecraft systems. Two of the three phases are underway; an announcement of opportunity for the third, a sounding rocket flight demonstration, was made at the workshop.

  14. Reflective optics system for uniform spherical illumination.

    PubMed

    Phipps, C R; Bodner, S E; Shearer, J W

    1975-04-01

    A reflective optical system is described that permits nearly uniform illumination of a small sphere with one or two laser beams. The primary application of this device is to studies of laser-driven implosion of small targets. Other applications include the production of plasma by optical breakdown of gases for spectroscopic studies and for optimum light collection in intensity-limited plasma diagnostics. Simple calculations show that the intensity mapping properties of this system are not excessively sensitive to variations in the radial intensity distribution nor to departures from diffraction-limited propagation in the input beams. Optical damage and the illuminated solid angle required at the focus determine the size of the device. PMID:20135009

  15. Excited states in the active media of oxygen - iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N

    2009-11-30

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen - iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O{sub 2} and I{sub 2} molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I{sub 2} in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended. (review)

  16. Predicting Ground Illuminance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesniak, Michael V.

    2014-01-01

    Our Sun outputs 3.85 × 1026 W of radiation, of which ≈37% is in the visible band. It is directly responsible for nearly all natural illuminance experienced on Earth's surface, either in the form of direct/refracted sunlight or in reflected light bouncing off the surfaces and/or atmospheres of our Moon and the visible planets. Ground illuminance, defined as the amount of visible light intercepting a unit area of surface (from all incident angles), varies over 7 orders of magnitude from day to night. It is highly dependent on well-modeled factors such as the relative positions of the Sun, Earth, and Moon. It is also dependent on less predictable factors such as local atmospheric conditions and weather. Several models have been proposed to predict ground illuminance, including Brown (1952) and Shapiro (1982, 1987). The Brown model is a set of empirical data collected from observation points around the world that has been reduced to a smooth fit of illuminance against a single variable, solar altitude. It provides limited applicability to the Moon and for cloudy conditions via multiplicative reduction factors. The Shapiro model is a theoretical model that treats the atmosphere as a three layer system of light reflectance and transmittance. It has different sets of reflectance and transmittance coefficients for various cloud types. Ground illuminance data from an observing run at the White Sands missile range were obtained from the United Kingdom Meteorology Office. Based on available weather reports, five days of clear sky observations were selected. These data are compared to the predictions of the two models. We find that neither of the models provide an accurate treatment during twilight conditions when the Sun is at or a few degrees below the horizon. When the Sun is above the horizon, the Shapiro model straddles the observed data, ranging between 90% and 120% of the recorded illuminance. During the same times, the Brown model is between 70% and 90% of the

  17. A study of the feasibility and performance of an active/passive imager using silicon focal plane arrays and incoherent continuous wave laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmerhausen, Richard H.

    This dissertation describes an active/passive imager (API) that provides reliable, nighttime, target acquisition in a man-portable package with effective visual range of about 4 kilometers. The reflective imagery is easier to interpret than currently used thermal imagery. Also, in the active mode, the API provides performance equivalent to the big-aperture, thermal systems used on weapons platforms like tanks and attack helicopters. This dissertation describes the research needed to demonstrate both the feasibility and utility of the API. Part of the research describes implementation of a silicon focal plane array (SFPA) capable of both active and passive imaging. The passive imaging mode exceeds the nighttime performance of currently fielded, man-portable sensors. Further, when scene illumination is insufficient for passive imaging, the low dark current of SFPA makes it possible to use continuous wave laser diodes (CWLD) to add an active imaging mode. CWLD have advantages of size, efficiency, and improved eye safety when compared to high peak-power diodes. Because of the improved eye safety, the API provides user-demanded features like video output and extended range gates in the active as well as passive imaging modes. Like any other night vision device, the API depends on natural illumination of the scene for passive operation. Although it has been known for decades that "starlight" illumination is actually from diffuse airglow emissions, the research described in this dissertation provides the first estimates of the global and temporal variation of ground illumination due to airglow. A third related element of the current research establishes the impact of atmospheric aerosols on API performance. We know from day experience that atmospheric scattering of sunlight into the imager line-of-sight can blind the imager and drastically degrade performance. Atmospheric scattering of sunlight is extensively covered in the literature. However, previous literature did not

  18. Effects of Near-Infrared Laser on Neural Cell Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki-Oda, Noriko; Kataoka, Yosky; Yamada, Hisao; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-08-01

    Near-infrared laser has been used to relieve patients from various kinds of pain caused by postherpetic neuralgesia, myofascial dysfunction, surgical and traumatic wound, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis. Clinically, He-Ne (λ=632.8 nm, 780 nm) and Ga-Al-As (805 ± 25 nm) lasers are used to irradiate trigger points or nerve ganglion. However the precise mechanisms of such biological actions of the laser have not yet been resolved. Since laser therapy is often effective to suppress the pain caused by hyperactive excitation of sensory neurons, interactions with laser light and neural cells are suggested. As neural excitation requires large amount of energy liberated from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), we examined the effect of 830-nm laser irradiation on the energy metabolism of the rat central nervous system and isolated mitochondria from brain. The diode laser was applied for 15 min with irradiance of 4.8 W/cm2 on a 2 mm-diameter spot at the brain surface. Tissue ATP content of the irradiated area in the cerebral cortex was 19 % higher than that of the non-treated area (opposite side of the cortex), whereas the ADP content showed no significant difference. Irradiation at another wavelength (652 nm) had no effect on either ATP or ADP contents. The temperature of the brain tissue was increased 4.5 - 5.0 °C during the irradiation of both 830-nm and 652-nm laser light. Direct irradiation of the mitochondrial suspension did not show any wavelength-dependent acceleration of respiration rate nor ATP synthesis. These results suggest that the increase in tissue ATP content did not result from the thermal effect, but from specific effect of the laser operated at 830 nm. Electrophysiological studies showed the hyperpolarization of membrane potential of isolated neurons and decrease in membrane resistance with irradiation of the laser, suggesting an activation of potassium channels. Intracellular ATP is reported to regulate some kinds of potassium channels. Possible mechanisms

  19. Overview of the laser activities at Rheinmetall Waffe Munition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewigt, Klaus; Riesbeck, Thomas; Schünemann, B.; Graf, A.; Jung, Markus; Schreiber, Th.; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, A.

    2012-11-01

    The paper will give an overview over the laser weapon activities at RWM (Rheinmetall Waffe Munition) over the last years. Starting from the actual scenarios for laser weapon applications as: CRAM (Counter Rocket Artillery Mortar), Air Defence and UXO (unexploded ordnance) clearing. The basic requirements of a future laser weapon as beam diameter, beam quality, tracking capability, adaptive optics were deduced. For the UXO scenario a mobile directed energy laser demonstrator for humanitarian mine and UXO clearing based on fiber lasers is presented. Based on the parameters the system concept including the cooling system, power supply and the integration into the armoured vehicle TM 170 are explained. The contribution show first experiments of UXO and IED clearing. Different technical approaches to achieve laser power in the 100 kW regime combined with very good beam quality are discussed to fulfil the requirements of the CRAM and Air Defence scenario. Spectral coupling and the beam superimposing both are performed by Rheinmetall Waffe Munition. At the spectral coupling the basic technology parameters for the fiber laser and the dielectric grating as the latest results were put into context with the power levels reached at other groups. For the beam super imposing technology the basic experiments regarding the tracking capability and compensation of the atmosphere on the test range at Unterlüß will be explained. A generic 10 kW Laser Weapon Demonstrator based on 2 Laser Weapon Modules (LWM) from RWM each 5 kW fiber Laser with beam forming and tracking integrate by the team of RWM and RAD (Rheinmetall Air Defense) into a Ground based Air Defend system consisting of Skyguard and Millenium turret are presented. The flight path of the UAV within the valley of the life firing range at Ochsenboden Switzerland is shown. Selected results of the successful tests against UAV's are presented. It shows the capability of the generic 10 kW Laser Weapon Demonstrator to track and

  20. Single-Event-Upset Laser Scanner With Optical Bias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Quiesup

    1992-01-01

    Light-assisted microelectronic advanced laser scanner (LAMEALS) is augmented version of microelectronic advanced laser scanner (MEALS) described in article, "Laser Scanner Tests For Single-Event Upsets", (NPO-18216). Only major difference, steady illumination from helium/neon laser, argon-ion laser, and/or other source(s) combined with pulsed dye-laser illumination of MEALS into single illuminating beam.

  1. Photocatalytic degradation of phenol in natural seawater using visible light active carbon modified (CM)-n-TiO2 nanoparticles under UV light and natural sunlight illuminations.

    PubMed

    Shaban, Yasser A; El Sayed, Mohamed A; El Maradny, Amr A; Al Farawati, Radwan Kh; Al Zobidi, Mousa I

    2013-04-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of phenol in seawater was investigated under UV and natural sunlight using visible light active carbon modified (CM)-n-TiO2 nanoparticles, synthesized via a sol-gel method. Carbon modification of n-TiO2 was performed using titanium butoxide, carbon-containing precursor, as a source of both carbon and titanium. For comparison, unmodified n-TiO2 was also synthesized by hydrolysis and oxidation of titanium trichloride in the absence of any carbon source. The presence of carbon in CM-n-TiO2 nanoparticles was confirmed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. Carbon modification was found to be responsible for lowering the bandgap energy from 3.14eV for n-TiO2 to 1.86eV for CM-n-TiO2 which in turn enhanced the photocatalytic activity of CM-n-TiO2 towards the degradation of phenol in seawater under illumination of UV light as well as natural sunlight. This enhanced photoresponse of CM-n-TiO2 is in agreement with the UV-Vis spectroscopic results that showed higher absorption of light in both UV and visible regions. The effects of catalyst dose, initial concentration of phenol, and pH were studied. The highest degradation rate was obtained at pH 3 and catalyst dose of 1.0gL(-1). The data photocatalytic degradation of phenol in seawater using CM-n-TiO2 were successfully fitted to Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, and can be described by pseudo-first order kinetics. PMID:23261126

  2. Preparation and characterization of mesoporous N-doped and sulfuric acid treated anatase TiO{sub 2} catalysts and their photocatalytic activity under UV and Vis illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Kun, Robert; Tarjan, Sandor; Oszko, Albert; Seemann, Torben; Zoellmer, Volker; Busse, Matthias; Dekany, Imre

    2009-11-15

    Nitrogen-doped TiO{sub 2} catalysts were prepared by a precipitation method. The samples were calcined at 400 deg. C for 4 h in air. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low temperature N{sub 2}-adsorption was used for structural characterization and UV-diffuse reflectance (UV-DR) was applied to investigate the optical properties of the as-prepared samples. It was found that microporous N-doped catalysts have solely anatase crystalline structure. Acidic treatment of the calcined samples was performed using sulfuric acid agitation. The crystalline structure remained unchanged due to surface treatment, while the porosity and the surface areas (a{sub BET}{sup S}) were decreased dramatically. Optical characterization of the doped catalysts showed that they could be excited by visible light photons in the 400-500 nm wavelength range (lambda{sub g,1}={approx}390 nm, lambda{sub g,2}={approx}510 nm). It was also established that surface treatment enhances the Vis-light absorption of the N-TiO{sub 2} powders. Finally the catalysts were tested in the photocatalytic degradation of phenol in aqueous suspensions. Two different light sources were used; one of them was a UV-rich high pressure Hg-lamp, while the other was a tubular visible light source. We found that using visible light illumination N-doped, acid treated TiO{sub 2} samples were more catalytically active than non-doped TiO{sub 2} catalysts. - Graphical abstract: The effect of the acid treatment on the visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity of the N-doped, anatase TiO{sub 2} catalysts.

  3. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Ries, Harald

    2000-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  4. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Ries, Harald

    1998-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  5. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Ries, Harald

    1996-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  6. Nonimaging Optical Illumination System

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1994-02-22

    A nonimaging illumination or concentration optical device. An optical device is provided having a light source, a light reflecting surface with an opening and positioned partially around the light source which is opposite the opening of the light reflecting surface. The light reflecting surface is disposed to produce a substantially uniform intensity output with the reflecting surface defined in terms of a radius vector R.sub.i in conjunction with an angle .phi..sub.i between R.sub.i, a direction from the source and an angle .theta..sub.i between direct forward illumination and the light ray reflected once from the reflecting surface. R.sub.i varies as the exponential of tan (.phi..sub.i -.theta..sub.i)/2 integrated over .phi..sub.i.

  7. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fugui; Li, Ming; Gao, Lidan; Sheng, Weifan; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-06-15

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as the subnanometer scale and that the variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a one-dimensional surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach toward effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques. PMID:27304296

  8. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.

    1993-04-13

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  9. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.

    1993-01-01

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  10. Scaling of strontium-vapor laser active volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Polunin, Yu. P.

    2008-01-01

    Variations in the energy performance of a self-terminating Sr-vapor laser (SrVL) are examined. The active laser volume is varied between 20 and 650 cm 3. A linear relation is revealed between the average power delivered by the SrVL and its active volume. The SrVL efficiency is found to increase with active volume and to be comparable with that of a copper-vapor laser for an active volume V = 650 cm 3 (0.45 %). As the volume is increased, the total lasing pulse duration increases from 30 to 120 ns. The beam divergence problems associated with the use of a Fabry-Perot cavity or an unstable resonator of the telescopic type are discussed. A total average power of 13.5 W is obtained from V = 650 cm 3 at a lasing PRR F = 19 kHz. The output power generated at different laser wavelengths is as follows: 10.4 W at λ = 6.456 μm, 2.6 W at λ = 3 μm, and 0.5 W at λ = 1 μm. The wavelength dependence of the lasing pulse duration is considered.

  11. Thermally stimulated third-order optical nonlinearity in Cd-doped CuO-PVA thin films under cw laser illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamgadge, Y. S.; Pahurkar, V. G.; Talwatkar, S. S.; Sunatkari, A. L.; Muley, G. G.

    2015-08-01

    We report synthesis, linear and third-order nonlinear optical properties of Cd-doped CuO-PVA nanocomposite thin films. Cd-doped CuO nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained by chemical synthesis method, and spin coating technique was used to obtain thin films in polyvinyl alcohol matrix. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows formation of crystalline CuO having monoclinic phase with average particle size of 10 nm. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy attests formation of NPs by witnessing strong blue shift in the excitonic absorption. Absorption wavelength of CuO NPs shifts from 365 to 342 nm for Cd doping of 1-5 wt%. Both XRD and UV-Vis data confirm decrease in particle size with increase in Cd-doping concentration. Thin films have been characterized by Z-scan technique under continuous-wave He-Ne laser, and enhanced values of nonlinear refractive index n 2 and nonlinear absorption coefficient β have been obtained. Enhancements in the nonlinear optical properties have been attributed to the thermal effect due to strong linear absorption coefficient combined with increased thermo-optic coefficient. Contributing mechanisms such as photoacoustic effect, surface states effect and dielectric effect due to dopant and thin film structure have been discussed.

  12. Active media for tunable lasers based on hybrid polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Kopylova, T N; Eremina, N S; Vaitulevich, E A; Samsonova, L G; Maier, G V; Tel'minov, E N; Solodova, T A; Solodov, A M

    2008-02-28

    The lasing properties of rhodamine 6G (chloride and perchlorate) in synthesised hybrid polymers based on an organic polymer (methyl methacrylate with hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and an inorganic precursor (tetraethoxysilane) are studied. Rhodamine 6G samples were transversely pumped by the second harmonic of a Nd{sup 3+}:YAG laser. It is found that the active media based on hybrid polymers have a considerably longer service life compared to the active media based on organic polymers. The structure of the hybrid polymer is studied by the methods of IR Fourier spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetry. It is shown that the longer service life of hybrid-polymer active media is explained by the formation of an inorganic nanostructure network in them, which improves the thermooptic properties of the material and reduces the efficiency of thermal decomposition of active molecules. (lasers. amplifiers)

  13. Image Correlation Microscopy for Uniform Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Gaborski, Thomas R.; Sealander, Michael N.; Ehrenberg, Morton; Waugh, Richard E.; McGrath, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Image cross-correlation microscopy (ICM) is a technique that quantifies the motion of fluorescent features in an image by measuring the temporal autocorrelation function decay in a time-lapse image sequence. ICM has traditionally employed laser-scanning microscopes because the technique emerged as an extension of laser-based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In this work, we show that image correlation can also be used to measure fluorescence dynamics in uniform illumination or wide-field imaging systems and we call our new approach uniform illumination image correlation microscopy (UI-ICM). Wide-field microscopy is not only a simpler, less expensive imaging modality, but it offers the capability of greater temporal resolution over laser-scanning systems. In traditional laser-scanning ICM, lateral mobility is calculated from the temporal de-correlation of an image, where the characteristic length is the illuminating laser beam width. In wide-field microscopy, the diffusion length is defined by the feature size using the spatial autocorrelation function (SACF). Correlation function decay in time occurs as an object diffuses from its original position. We show that theoretical and simulated comparisons between Gaussian and uniform features indicate the temporal autocorrelation function (TACF) depends strongly on particle size and not particle shape. In this report, we establish the relationships between the SACF feature size, TACF characteristic time and the diffusion coefficient for UI-ICM using analytical, Monte-Carlo and experimental validation with particle tracking algorithms. Additionally, we demonstrate UI-ICM analysis of adhesion molecule domain aggregation and diffusion on the surface of human neutrophils. PMID:20055917

  14. Subpicosecond solitons in an actively mode-locked fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. J.; Haus, H. A.; Ippen, E. P.

    1996-11-01

    Experimental results are presented for a study of the stability regime of an actively mode-locked polarization-maintaining fiber ring laser used as a memory. Observations indicate that the pulse widths in the memory can be reduced (by soliton effects) by a factor of approximately 4.4 below the pulse widths predicted by standard active mode-locking theory. Stability regions for the solitons are mapped and compared with theoretical predictions.

  15. Active Wavelength Control of an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tracy; Wysocki, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    We present an active wavelength control system for grating-based external cavity lasers that increases the accuracy of predicting the lasing wavelength based on the grating equation and significantly improves scan-to-scan wavelength/frequency repeatability. The ultimate 3σ precision of a frequency scan is determined by the scan-to-scan repeatability of 0.042 cm−1. Since this control method can be applied to any external cavity laser with little to no modification, such a precision provides an excellent opportunity for spectroscopic applications that target molecular absorption lines at standard atmospheric conditions. PMID:23483850

  16. Tetravalent chromium (Cr(4+)) as laser-active ion for tunable solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    Generation of femtosecond pulses from a continuous-wave mode-locked chromium-doped forsterite (Cr(4+):Mg2SiO4) laser has been accomplished. The forsterite laser was actively mode-locked using an acousto-optic modulator operating at 78 MHz with two Brewster high-dispersion glass prisms for intra-cavity chirp compensation. Transform-limited sub-100-fs pulses were routinely generated in the TEM(sub 00) mode with 85 mW of continuous power (with 1 percent output coupler), tunable over 1230-1280 nm. The shortest pulses of 60-fs pulsewidth were measured.

  17. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications. PMID:27036765

  18. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications.

  19. An actively mode-locked Ho: YAG solid laser pumped by a Tm: YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. Q.; Cui, Z.; Wang, J.; Duan, X. M.; Dai, T. Y.; Du, Y. Q.; Yuan, J. H.; Liu, W.

    2015-02-01

    A continuous wave mode-locked (CWML) Ho: YAG laser based on an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) pumped by a 1.9 μm Tm: YLF laser is demonstrated. This is the first time a report on an active CWML Ho: YAG laser has been published. A maximum output power of 1.04 W at 2097.25 nm in the CWML regime is obtained at a pump power of 13.2 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 13.3%. The mode-locked pulse repetition frequency is 82.76 MHz and the single pulse energy is 12.57 nJ. The mode-locked pulse width is 102 ps measured through a no-background second harmonic autocorrelation with KTP as the nonlinear crystal. Furthermore, the M2 factor is calculated to be 1.146.

  20. Nonimaging Optical Illumination System

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1994-08-02

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing selected intensity output over an angular range. The device includes a light reflecting surface (24, 26) around a light source (22) which is disposed opposite the aperture opening of the light reflecting surface (24, 26). The light source (22) has a characteristic dimension which is small relative to one or more of the distance from the light source (22) to the light reflecting surface (24, 26) or the angle subtended by the light source (22) at the light reflecting surface (24, 26).

  1. ILLUMINATION RESPONSE OF CDZNTE

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, L.; Washington, A.; Duff, M.

    2011-08-02

    CdZnTe (CZT) semiconducting crystals are of interest for use as room temperature X- and {gamma}-ray spectrometers. Several studies have focused on understanding the various electronic properties of these materials, such as the surface and bulk resistivities and the distribution of the electric field within the crystal. Specifically of interest is how these properties are influenced by a variety of factors including structural heterogeneities, such as secondary phases (SPs) and line defects as well as environmental effects. Herein, we report the bulk current, surface current, electric field distribution and performance of a spectrometer-grade CZT crystal exposed to above band-gap energy illumination.

  2. Laser activated nanothermolysis of leukemia cells monitored by photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova, Ekaterina; Shnip, Alexander; Zheltov, George; Potapnev, Michail; Savitsky, Valeriy; Klimovich, Olga; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2005-04-01

    We are developing new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies for leukemia based on selective targeting of leukemia cells with gold nanoparticles and thermomechanical destruction of the tumor cells with laser-induced microbubbles. Clusters of spherical gold nanoparticles that have strong optical absorption of laser pulses at 532 nm served as nucleation sites of vapor microbubbles. The nanoparticles were targeted selectively to leukemia cells using leukemia-specific surface receptors and a set of two monoclonal antibodies. Application of a primary myeloid-specific antibody to tumor cells followed by targeting the cells with 30-nm nanoparticles conjugated with a secondary antibody (IgG) resulted in formation of nanoparticulate clusters due to aggregation of IgGs. Formation of clusters resulted in substantial decrease of the damage threshold for target cells. The results encourage development of Laser Activated Nanothermolysis as a Cell Elimination Therapy (LANCET) for leukemia. The proposed technology can be applied separately or in combination with chemotherapy for killing leukemia cells without damage to other blood cells. Potential applications include initial reduction of concentration of leukemia cells in blood prior to chemotherapy and treatment of residual tumor cells after the chemotherapy. Laser-induced bubbles in individual cells and cell damage were monitored by analyzing profile of photothermal response signals over the entire cell after irradiation with a single 10-ns long laser pulse. Photothermal microscopy was utilized for imaging formation of microbubbles around nanoparticulate clusters.

  3. Laser and spectroscopic properties of chromium-activated forsterite

    SciTech Connect

    Petricevic, V.; Gayen, S.K.; Alfano, R.R. )

    1989-10-20

    Room-temperature pulsed laser action has been obtained in chromium-activated forsterite (Cr:Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) for both 532-nm and 1064-nm pumping. Free running laser emission in both cases is centered at 1235 nm and has bandwidth of {similar to}20 nm. Slope efficiency as high as 22% has been measured. Using different sets of output mirrors and a single birefringent plate as the intracavity wavelength-selecting element tunability over the 1167--1268 nm spectral range has been demonstrated. Continuous-wave laser operation at room temperature has been obtained for 1064-nm pumping from a cw Nd:YAG laser. The output power slope efficiency is 6.8%. The gain cross section is estimated to be 1.1{times}10{sup {minus}19} cm{sup 2}. Spectroscopic studies suggest that the laser action is due to a center' other than the trivalent chromium (Cr{sup 3+}), presumably the tetravalent chromium (Cr{sup 4+}) in a tetrahedrally coordinated site.

  4. Critical illumination condenser for x-ray lithography

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Simon J.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1998-01-01

    A critical illumination condenser system, particularly adapted for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The system uses three spherical mirrors and is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. The angles of radiation incident upon each mirror of the critical illumination condenser vary by less than eight (8) degrees. For example, the imaging system in which the critical illumination condenser is utilized has a 200 .mu.m source and requires a magnification of 26.times.. The three spherical mirror system constitutes a two mirror inverse Cassegrain, or Schwarzschild configuration, with a 25% area obstruction (50% linear obstruction). The third mirror provides the final pupil and image relay. The mirrors include a multilayer reflective coating which is reflective over a narrow bandwidth.

  5. Critical illumination condenser for x-ray lithography

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.J.; Seppala, L.G.

    1998-04-07

    A critical illumination condenser system is disclosed, particularly adapted for use in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The system uses three spherical mirrors and is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. The angles of radiation incident upon each mirror of the critical illumination condenser vary by less than eight (8) degrees. For example, the imaging system in which the critical illumination condenser is utilized has a 200 {micro}m source and requires a magnification of 26. The three spherical mirror system constitutes a two mirror inverse Cassegrain, or Schwarzschild configuration, with a 25% area obstruction (50% linear obstruction). The third mirror provides the final pupil and image relay. The mirrors include a multilayer reflective coating which is reflective over a narrow bandwidth. 6 figs.

  6. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  7. Talbot holographic illumination nonscanning (THIN) fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jui-Chang; Yu, Sung-Liang; Chen, Hsi-Hsun; Wong, Jau-Min; Matsudaira, Paul; So, Peter T. C.; Barbastathis, George

    2015-01-01

    Optical sectioning techniques offer the ability to acquire three-dimensional information from various organ tissues by discriminating between the desired in-focus and out-of-focus (background) signals. Alternative techniques to confocal, such as active structured illumination, exist for fast optically sectioned images, but they require individual axial planes to be imaged consecutively. In this article, an imaging technique (THIN), by utilizing active Talbot illumination in 3D and multiplexed holographic Bragg filters for depth discrimination, is demonstrated for imaging in vivo 3D biopsy without mechanical or optical axial scanning. PMID:25678936

  8. LASERS: Efficient chemical oxygen — iodine laser with a high total pressure of the active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, M. V.; Nikolaev, V. D.; Svistun, M. I.; Khvatov, N. A.; Heiger, G. D.; Madden, T. J.

    2001-01-01

    A new concept of obtaining a high total pressure of the active medium of a chemical oxygen — iodine laser (OIL) is proposed and verified. The nozzle unit of the laser consists of the alternating vertical arrays of cylindrical nozzles to produce high-pressure nitrogen jets, plane slotted nozzles for the flow of O2(1Δ) oxygen, and vertical arrays of cylindrical nozzles to inject the N2 — I2 mixture between the first two streams. For a molar chlorine flow rate of 39.2 mmol s-1, the output power was 700 W and the chemical efficiency was 19.7 %. The combined use of the ejector nozzle unit proposed to obtain the active medium and a super-sonic diffuser allows a significant simplification of the ejection system for the exhaust active medium of the OIL.

  9. Pulsed laser linescanner for a backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Reichardt, Thomas A.; Schmitt, Randal L.; Bambha, Ray P.

    2004-02-10

    An active (laser-illuminated) imaging system is described that is suitable for use in backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI). A BAGI imager operates by imaging a scene as it is illuminated with radiation that is absorbed by the gas to be detected. Gases become "visible" in the image when they attenuate the illumination creating a shadow in the image. This disclosure describes a BAGI imager that operates in a linescanned manner using a high repetition rate pulsed laser as its illumination source. The format of this system allows differential imaging, in which the scene is illuminated with light at least 2 wavelengths--one or more absorbed by the gas and one or more not absorbed. The system is designed to accomplish imaging in a manner that is insensitive to motion of the camera, so that it can be held in the hand of an operator or operated from a moving vehicle.

  10. Microwave quantum illumination.

    PubMed

    Barzanjeh, Shabir; Guha, Saikat; Weedbrook, Christian; Vitali, David; Shapiro, Jeffrey H; Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-02-27

    Quantum illumination is a quantum-optical sensing technique in which an entangled source is exploited to improve the detection of a low-reflectivity object that is immersed in a bright thermal background. Here, we describe and analyze a system for applying this technique at microwave frequencies, a more appropriate spectral region for target detection than the optical, due to the naturally occurring bright thermal background in the microwave regime. We use an electro-optomechanical converter to entangle microwave signal and optical idler fields, with the former being sent to probe the target region and the latter being retained at the source. The microwave radiation collected from the target region is then phase conjugated and upconverted into an optical field that is combined with the retained idler in a joint-detection quantum measurement. The error probability of this microwave quantum-illumination system, or quantum radar, is shown to be superior to that of any classical microwave radar of equal transmitted energy. PMID:25768743

  11. Parallel hierarchical global illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Q.O.

    1997-10-08

    Solving the global illumination problem is equivalent to determining the intensity of every wavelength of light in all directions at every point in a given scene. The complexity of the problem has led researchers to use approximation methods for solving the problem on serial computers. Rather than using an approximation method, such as backward ray tracing or radiosity, the authors have chosen to solve the Rendering Equation by direct simulation of light transport from the light sources. This paper presents an algorithm that solves the Rendering Equation to any desired accuracy, and can be run in parallel on distributed memory or shared memory computer systems with excellent scaling properties. It appears superior in both speed and physical correctness to recent published methods involving bidirectional ray tracing or hybrid treatments of diffuse and specular surfaces. Like progressive radiosity methods, it dynamically refines the geometry decomposition where required, but does so without the excessive storage requirements for ray histories. The algorithm, called Photon, produces a scene which converges to the global illumination solution. This amounts to a huge task for a 1997-vintage serial computer, but using the power of a parallel supercomputer significantly reduces the time required to generate a solution. Currently, Photon can be run on most parallel environments from a shared memory multiprocessor to a parallel supercomputer, as well as on clusters of heterogeneous workstations.

  12. Laser light triggered-activated carbon nanosystem for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Maoquan; Peng, Jinliang; Zhao, Jiajia; Liang, Shanlu; Shao, Yuxiang; Wu, Qiang

    2013-02-01

    Among carbon-based nanomaterials, activated carbon (AC) may be an ideal candidate as a carrier for tumor therapeutic agents. Here we found a new property of nanoscale activated carbon (NAC) with narrow size distribution, namely the rapid conversion of light to thermal energy both in vitro and in vivo. An aqueous suspension of 200 μL of NAC (1 mg/mL) exhibited a rapid temperature increase of more than 35 °C after irradiation for 20 min with a 655-nm laser; this was within the temperature range for effective tumor treatment. We demonstrated that lung cancer cells (H-1299) incubated with bamboo nano-AC (BNAC) were killed with high efficiency after laser irradiation. In addition, mouse tumors with sizes smaller than the laser spot that had been injected with BNAC disappeared after irradiation. For tumors larger than the laser spot area, the incorporation of the photosensitizer ZnPc obviously increased the tumor growth inhibition efficiency of BNAC. BNAC-ZnPc was found to exhibit a synergistic effect when photothermal and photodynamic therapies were administered in combination. These results indicated that NAC can be used for high efficiency cancer phototherapy. PMID:23228422

  13. Coupled-resonator vertical-cavity lasers with two active gain regions

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-05-20

    A new class of coupled-resonator vertical-cavity semiconductor lasers has been developed. These lasers have multiple resonant cavities containing regions of active laser media, resulting in a multi-terminal laser component with a wide range of novel properties.

  14. Tetravalent chromium (Cr(4+)) as laser-active ion for tunable solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1993-01-01

    Major accomplishments under NASA grant NAG-1-1346 are summarized. (1) numerical modeling of the four mirror astigmatically compensated, Z-fold cavity was performed and several design parameters to be used for the construction of a femtosecond forsterite laser were revealed by simulation. (2) femtosecond pulses from a continuous wave mode-locked chromium doped forsterite laser were generated. The forsterite laser was actively mode-locked using an acousto-optic modulator operating at 78 MHz with two Brewster high dispersion glass prisms for intra-cavity chirp compensation. Transform-limited sub-100-fs pulses were routinely generated in the TEM(sub 00) mode with 85 mW of continuous power tunable over 1230-1280 nm. The shortest pulses of 60-fs pulsewidth were measured. (3) Self-mode-locked operation of the Cr:forsterite laser was achieved. Synchronous pumping was used to mode lock the forsterite laser resulting in picosecond pulses, which in turn provided the starting mechanism for self-mode-locking. The pulses generated had an FWHM of 105 fs and were tunable between 1230-1270 nm. (4) Numerical calculations indicated that the pair of SF 14 prisms used in the cavity compensated for quadratic phase but introduced a large cubic phase term. Further calculations of other optical glasses indicated that a pair of SFN 64 prisms can introduce the same amount of quadratic phase as SF 14 prisms but introduce a smaller cubic phase. When the SF 14 prisms were replaced by SFN 64 prisms the pulsewidth was reduced to 50 fs. Great improvement was observed in the stability of the self mode-locked forsterite laser and in the ease of achieving mode locking. Using the same experimental arrangement and a new forsterite crystal with improved FOM the pulse width was reduced to 36 fs.

  15. Insight in the Chemistry of Laser-Activated Dental Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect. PMID:25874251

  16. Sutureless cataract incision closure using laser-activated tissue glues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Alexander M.; Bass, Lawrence S.; Libutti, Steven K.; Schubert, Herman D.; Treat, Michael R.

    1991-06-01

    With the advent of phacoemulsification and foldable intraocular lenses, there is renewed interest in sutureless cataract wound. We report the use of laser activated tissue glues for the closure of scleral tunnel cataract incisions. Two glue mixtures were tested in enucleated porcine eyes. Glue A was composed of hyaluronic acid, human albumin, and indocyanine green dye. Glue B contained hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, human albumin, and indocyanine green dye. A Spectra Physics diode laser (808 nm) with a power density of 7-1 1 watts/cm2 was used for glue activation. Wound bursting pressures, as determined by the presence of fluid at the wound margin, was significantly higher with both glue combinations than without the glue (Plaser activated tissue glues may be an alternative to suture closure of scleral tunnel cataract incisions.

  17. Influence of Saline on Temperature Profile of Laser Lithotripsy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Igor N.; Donalisio da Silva, Rodrigo; Gustafson, Diedra; Sehrt, David; Kim, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: We established an ex vivo model to evaluate the temperature profile of the ureter during laser lithotripsy, the influence of irrigation on temperature, and thermal spread during lithotripsy with the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: Two ex vivo models of Ovis aries urinary tract and human calcium oxalate calculi were used. The Open Ureteral Model was opened longitudinally to measure the thermal profile of the urothelium. On the Clinical Model, anterograde ureteroscopy was performed in an intact urinary system. Temperatures were measured on the external portion of the ureter and the urothelium during lithotripsy and intentional perforation. The lithotripsy group (n=20) was divided into irrigated (n=10) and nonirrigated (n=10), which were compared for thermal spread length and values during laser activation. The intentional perforation group (n=10) was evaluated under saline flow. The Ho:YAG laser with a 365 μm laser fiber and power at 10W was used (1J/Pulse at 10 Hz). Infrared Fluke Ti55 Thermal Imager was used for evaluation. Maximum temperature values were recorded and compared. Results: On the Clinical Model, the external ureteral wall obtained a temperature of 37.4°C±2.5° and 49.5°C±2.3° (P=0.003) and in the Open Ureteral Model, 49.7°C and 112.4°C with and without irrigation, respectively (P<0.05). The thermal spread along the external ureter wall was not statically significant with or without irrigation (P=0.065). During intentional perforation, differences in temperatures were found between groups (opened with and without irrigation): 81.8°±8.8° and 145.0°±15.0°, respectively (P<0.005). Conclusion: There is an increase in the external ureteral temperature during laser activation, but ureteral thermal values decreased when saline flow was applied. Ureter thermal spread showed no difference between irrigated and nonirrigated subgroups. This is the first laser lithotripsy thermography study

  18. A Quantitative Measure of Field Illumination.

    PubMed

    Brown, Claire M; Reilly, Andrew; Cole, Richard W

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we describe a statistically based algorithm to quantify the uniformity of illumination in an optical light microscopy imaging system that outputs a single quality factor (QF) score. The importance of homogeneous field illumination in quantitative light microscopy is well understood and often checked. However, there is currently no standard automatic quantitative measure of the uniformity of the field illumination. Images from 89 different laser-scanning confocal microscopes (LSCMs), which were collected as part of an international study on microscope quality assessment, were used as a "training" set to build the algorithm. To validate the algorithm and verify its robustness, images from 33 additional microscopes, including LSCM and wide-field (WF) microscopes, were used. The statistical paradigm used for developing the quality scoring scale was a regression approach to supervised learning. Three intensity profiles across each image-2 corner-to-corner diagonals and a center horizontal-were used to generate pixel-intensity data. All of the lines passed through the center of the image. The intensity profile data then were converted into a single-field illumination QF score in the range of 0-100, with 0 having extreme variation, and therefore, essentially unusable, and 100 having no deviation, i.e., straight lines with a constant uniform intensity. Empirically, a QF ≥ 83 was determined to be the minimum acceptable value based on manufacturer acceptance tests and reasonably achievable values. This new QF is an invaluable metric to ascertain objectively and easily the uniformity of illumination quality, provide a traceable reference for monitoring field uniformity over time, and make a direct comparison among different microscopes. The QF can also be used as an indicator of system failure and the need for alignment or service of the instrument. PMID:25802488

  19. A Quantitative Measure of Field Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Claire M.; Reilly, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a statistically based algorithm to quantify the uniformity of illumination in an optical light microscopy imaging system that outputs a single quality factor (QF) score. The importance of homogeneous field illumination in quantitative light microscopy is well understood and often checked. However, there is currently no standard automatic quantitative measure of the uniformity of the field illumination. Images from 89 different laser-scanning confocal microscopes (LSCMs), which were collected as part of an international study on microscope quality assessment, were used as a “training” set to build the algorithm. To validate the algorithm and verify its robustness, images from 33 additional microscopes, including LSCM and wide-field (WF) microscopes, were used. The statistical paradigm used for developing the quality scoring scale was a regression approach to supervised learning. Three intensity profiles across each image—2 corner-to-corner diagonals and a center horizontal—were used to generate pixel-intensity data. All of the lines passed through the center of the image. The intensity profile data then were converted into a single-field illumination QF score in the range of 0–100, with 0 having extreme variation, and therefore, essentially unusable, and 100 having no deviation, i.e., straight lines with a constant uniform intensity. Empirically, a QF ≥ 83 was determined to be the minimum acceptable value based on manufacturer acceptance tests and reasonably achievable values. This new QF is an invaluable metric to ascertain objectively and easily the uniformity of illumination quality, provide a traceable reference for monitoring field uniformity over time, and make a direct comparison among different microscopes. The QF can also be used as an indicator of system failure and the need for alignment or service of the instrument. PMID:25802488

  20. Critical illumination condenser for extreme ultraviolet projection lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, S. J.; Seppala, L. G.

    1995-03-01

    A condenser system couples a radiation source to an imaging system. The authors have designed a critical illumination condenser system which meets the technical challenges of extreme ultraviolet projection lithography based on a ring field imaging system and a laser produced plasma source. The optical system, a three spherical mirror optical design, is capable of illuminating the extent of the mask plane by scanning either the primary mirror or the laser plasma source. This type of condenser optical design is sufficiently versatile to be employed with two distinct systems, one from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and one from AT and T/Sandia.

  1. Split-illumination electron holography

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigaki, Toshiaki; Aizawa, Shinji; Suzuki, Takahiro; Park, Hyun Soon; Inada, Yoshikatsu; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Taniyama, Akira; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2012-07-23

    We developed a split-illumination electron holography that uses an electron biprism in the illuminating system and two biprisms (applicable to one biprism) in the imaging system, enabling holographic interference micrographs of regions far from the sample edge to be obtained. Using a condenser biprism, we split an electron wave into two coherent electron waves: one wave is to illuminate an observation area far from the sample edge in the sample plane and the other wave to pass through a vacuum space outside the sample. The split-illumination holography has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of applications of electron holography.

  2. Graphene active plasmonic metamaterials for new types of terahertz lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuji, Taiichi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Satou, Akira; Popov, Vyacheslav; Ryzhii, Victor

    2013-05-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in graphene active plasmonic metamaterials for new types of terahertz lasers. We theoretically discovered that when the population of Dirac Fermionic carriers in graphene are inverted by optical or electrical pumping the excitation of graphene plasmons by the THz photons results in propagating surface plasmon polaritons with giant gain in a wide THz range. Furthermore, when graphene is patterned in a micro- or nano-ribbon array by grating gate metallization, the structure acts as an active plasmonic metamaterial, providing a super-radiant plasmonic lasing with giant gain at the plasmon modes in a wide THz frequency range.

  3. Three-dimensional imaging simulation of active laser detection based on DLOS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanxin; Zhou, Honghe; Chen, Xiang; Yuan, Yuan; Shuai, Yong; Tan, Heping

    2016-07-01

    The technology of active laser detection is widely used in many different fields nowadays. With the development of computer technology, programmable software simulation can provide reference for the design of active laser detection. The characteristics of the active laser detecting systems also can be judged more visual. Based on the features of the active laser detection, an improved method of radiative transfer calculation (Double Line Of Sight) was developed, and the simulation models of complete active laser detecting imaging were founded. Compared with the results calculated by the Monte Carlo method, the correctness of the improved method was verified. The results of active laser detecting imaging of complex three-dimensional targets in different atmospheric scenes were compared. The influence of different atmospheric dielectric property were analyzed, which provides effective reference for the design of active laser detection.

  4. Improved catalytic activity of laser generated bimetallic and trimetallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rina; Soni, R K

    2014-09-01

    We report synthesis of silver nanoparticles, bimetallic (Al2O3@Ag) nanoparticles and trimetallic (Al2O3@AgAu) nanoparticles by nanosecond pulse laser ablation (PLA) in deionized water. Two-step laser ablation methodologies were adopted for the synthesis of bi- and tri-metallic nanoparticles. In this method a silver or gold target was ablated in colloidal solution of γ-alumina nanoparticles prepared by PLA. The TEM image analysis of bimetallic and trimetallic particles reveals deposition of fine silver particles and Ag-Au alloy particles, respectively, on large alumina particles. The laser generated nanoparticles were tested for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol and showed excellent catalytic behaviour. The catalytic rate was greatly improved by incorporation of additional metal in silver nanoparticles. The catalytic efficiency of trimetallic Al2O3@AgAu for reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol was remarkably enhanced and the catalytic reaction was completed in just 5 sec. Even at very low concentration, both Al2O3@Ag nanoparticles and Al2O3@AgAu nanoparticles showed improved rate of catalytic reduction than monometallic silver nanoparticles. Our results demonstrate that alumina particles in the solution not only provide the active sites for particle dispersion but also improve the catalytic activity. PMID:25924343

  5. Analysis of the restricting factors of laser countermeasure active detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufa; Sun, Xiaoquan

    2016-07-01

    The detection effect of laser active detection system is affected by various kinds of factors. In view of the application requirement of laser active detection, the influence factors for laser active detection are analyzed. The mathematical model of cat eye target detection distance has been built, influence of the parameters of laser detection system and the environment on detection range and the detection efficiency are analyzed. Various parameters constraint detection performance is simulated. The results show that the discovery distance of laser active detection is affected by the laser divergence angle, the incident angle and the visibility of the atmosphere. For a given detection range, the laser divergence angle and the detection efficiency are mutually restricted. Therefore, in view of specific application environment, it is necessary to select appropriate laser detection parameters to achieve optimal detection effect.

  6. Solar illumination device

    SciTech Connect

    Eijadi, D.; Bennett, D.J.

    1986-06-10

    A solar concentrator is described for illuminating the interior of a building through a side wall thereof. The concentrator consists of: a stationary reflective collector located to view the sky and having discrete planar collector surfaces mounted in abutting relationship, the collector surface installed at an angle with respect to the vertical different from the angle of installation of the abutting collector surfaces; a stationary reflective reflector positioned to receive direct solar energy reflected by the collector and oriented to reflect such energy toward a target within the building, the reflector having a plurality of discrete planar reflector surfaces the reflector surface mounted in abutting relationship, the reflector surface installed at an angle with respect to the vertical different from the angle of installation of the abutting reflector surfaces; a low angle shield means for preventing direct solar rays from entering unreflected into the building between the collector and the reflector and penetrating a horizontal plane above the floor of the building, the horizontal plane spaced from the floor a distance substantially equal to the height of the eye of an occupant standing on the floor of the building, the low angle shield means including an opaque material and being affixed to the reflector; and a shield means for preventing rays reflected by the collector and the reflector from penetrating the horizontal plane, the shield means affixed to the building and extending in a generally horizontal direction.

  7. Quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers: comparison to quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng W.; Schneider, Hans Christian

    2016-03-01

    We review a microscopic laser theory for quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers, in which carrier collisions are treated at the level of quantum kinetic equations. The computed characteristics of such a quantum-dot active material are compared to a state-of-the-art quantum-well quantum cascade laser. We find that the current requirement to achieve a comparable gain-length product is reduced compared to that of the quantum-well quantum cascade laser.

  8. ACTIVE MEDIA: Dynamics of growth of inhomogeneities in the active medium of a liquid laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barikhin, B. A.; Ivanov, A. Yu; Kudryavkin, E. V.; Nedolugov, V. I.

    1991-07-01

    Fast cinematography of holograms and of shadow and interference patterns was combined with an acoustic method in a study of the dynamics of growth of inhomogeneities in the active medium of a coaxially pumped dye laser. The main mechanism of the formation of these inhomogeneities was related to acoustic waves created by the deformation of the walls of a dye cell created by electrical pulses applied to the pump flashlamp. Multipulse operation of this laser could be achieved and the off-duty factor could be reduced if the active medium was excited by the strongest possible pump pulses.

  9. Illuminated push-button switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwagiri, T.

    1983-01-01

    An illuminated push-button switch is described. It is characterized by the fact that is consists of a switch group, an operator button opening and closing the switch group, and a light-emitting element which illuminates the face of the operator button.

  10. Do humans discount the illuminant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, John J.

    2005-03-01

    In constancy experiments, humans report very small changes in appearance with substantial illumination changes. Hermann von Helmholtz introduced the term "discounting the illuminant" to describe 19th century thinking about underlying mechanisms of constancy. It uses an indirect approach. Since observers see objects as constant, observers "must" be able to detect the spatial and spectral changes in illumination and automatically compensate by altering the signals from the quanta catches of retinal receptors. Instead of solving the problem directly by calculating an object"s reflectance from the array of scene radiances, Helmholtz chose to solve the problem of identifying the illumination. Twentieth century experiments by Hubel and Wiesel, Campbell, Land, and Gibson demonstrate the power of mechanisms using spatial comparisons. This paper analyses a series of different experiments looking for unequivocal evidence that either supports "discounting the illuminant" or supports spatial comparisons as the underlying mechanism of constancy.

  11. On-axis non-linear effects with programmable Dammann lenses under femtosecond illumination.

    PubMed

    Pérez Vizcaíno, Jorge; Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Borrego-Varillas, Rocío; Mínguez-Vega, Gladys; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R; Láncis, Jesús

    2013-05-15

    We demonstrate the utilization of Dammann lenses codified onto a spatial light modulator (SLM) for triggering non-linear effects. With continuous wave illumination Dammann lenses are binary phase optical elements that generate a set of equal intensity foci. We theoretically calculate the influence of ultrashort pulse illumination on the uniformity of the generated pattern, which is affected by chromatic aberration for pulses with temporal widths lower than 100 fs. The simulations also indicate that acceptable uniformity can be achieved for pulses of several fs by shortening the distance among foci which can be easily modified with the SLM. Multifocal second-harmonic generation (SHG) and on-axis multiple filamentation are produced and actively controlled in β-BaB2O4 (BBO) and fused silica samples, respectively, with an amplified Ti: Sapphire femtosecond laser of 30 fs pulse duration. Experimental results are in very good agreement with theoretical calculations. PMID:23938889

  12. Photonic crystal lasers using wavelength-scale embedded active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Shinji; Sato, Tomonari; Takeda, Koji; Shinya, Akihiko; Nozaki, Kengo; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya; Fujii, Takuro; Hasebe, Koichi; Kakitsuka, Takaaki

    2014-01-01

    Lasers with ultra-low operating energy are desired for use in chip-to-chip and on-chip optical interconnects. If we are to reduce the operating energy, we must reduce the active volume. Therefore, a photonic crystal (PhC) laser with a wavelength-scale cavity has attracted a lot of attention because a PhC provides a large Q-factor with a small volume. To improve this device's performance, we employ an embedded active region structure in which the wavelength-scale active region is buried with an InP PhC slab. This structure enables us to achieve effective confinement of both carriers and photons, and to improve the thermal resistance of the device. Thus, we have obtained a large external differential quantum efficiency of 55% and an output power of -10 dBm by optical pumping. For electrical pumping, we use a lateral p-i-n structure that employs Zn diffusion and Si ion implantation for p-type and n-type doping, respectively. We have achieved room-temperature continuous-wave operation with a threshold current of 7.8 µA and a maximum 3 dB bandwidth of 16.2 GHz. The results of an experimental bit error rate measurement with a 10 Gbit s-1 NRZ signal reveal the minimum operating energy for transferring a single bit of 5.5 fJ. These results show the potential of this laser to be used for very short reach interconnects. We also describe the optimal design of cavity quality (Q) factor in terms of achieving a large output power with a low operating energy using a calculation based on rate equations. When we assume an internal absorption loss of 20 cm-1, the optimized coupling Q-factor is 2000.

  13. Structured light illumination for extended resolution in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosseev, R.; Belyaev, Y.; Frohn, J.; Stemmer, A.

    2005-03-01

    During the last two decades fluorescence microscopy has become a powerful experimental tool in modern biology. Resolution of optical microscopes is limited by the diffraction nature of light and amounts to approximately 200 nm for point objects imaged with green light and high-NA objectives. Recently, several successful attempts have been made to break the resolution limit of microscopes. One of them is the so-called harmonic excitation light microscopy. 2D structured illumination produced by four interfering laser beams improves the lateral resolution by a factor of 2 to reach 100 nm. Structured illumination extends optical resolution since spatial frequencies beyond the classical cut-off frequency are brought into the passband of the optical microscope by frequency mixing. The extended passband is reconstructed computationally from several images acquired with shifted illumination patterns. Here we discuss an extension towards high resolution imaging of thick specimens by combining 2D structured illumination with deconvolution techniques.

  14. Insulator Surface Flashover Due to UV Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Javedani, J B; Houck, T L; Lahowe, D A; Vogtlin, G E; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    The surface of an insulator under vacuum and under electrical charge will flashover when illuminated by a critical dose of ultra-violet (UV) radiation - depending on the insulator size and material, insulator cone angle, the applied voltage and insulator shot-history. A testbed comprised of an excimer laser (KrF, 248 nm, {approx}16 MW, 30 ns FWHM,), a vacuum chamber, and a negative polarity dc high voltage power supply ({le} -60 kV) were assembled to test 1.0 cm thick angled insulators for surface-flashover. Several candidate insulator materials, e.g. High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Rexolite{reg_sign} 1400, Macor{trademark} and Mycalex, of varying cone angles were tested against UV illumination. Commercial energy meters were used to measure the UV fluence of the pulsed laser beam. In-house designed and fabricated capacitive probes (D-dots, >12 GHz bandwidth) were embedded in the anode electrode underneath the insulator to determine the time of UV arrival and time of flashover. Of the tested insulators, the +45 degree Rexolite insulator showed more resistance to UV for surface flashover; at UV fluence level of less than 13 mJ/cm{sup 2}, it was not possible to induce a flashover for up to -60 kV of DC potential across the insulator's surface. The probes also permitted the electrical charge on the insulator before and after flashover to be inferred. Photon to electron conversion efficiency for the surface of Rexolite insulator was determined from charge-balance equation. In order to understand the physical mechanism leading to flashover, we further experimented with the +45 degree Rexolite insulator by masking portions of the UV beam to illuminate only a section of the insulator surface; (1) the half nearest the cathode and subsequently, (2) the half nearest the anode. The critical UV fluence and time to flashover were measured and the results in each case were then compared with the base case of full-beam illumination. It was discovered that the time for the

  15. Optimizing ultrafast illumination for multiphoton-excited fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-05-01

    We study the optimal conditions for high throughput two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) and three-photon excited fluorescence (3PEF) imaging using femtosecond lasers. We derive relations that allow maximization of the rate of imaging depending on the average power, pulse repetition rate, and noise characteristics of the laser, as well as on the size and structure of the sample. We perform our analysis using ~100 MHz, ~1 MHz and 1 kHz pulse rates and using both a tightly-focused illumination beam with diffraction-limited image resolution, as well loosely focused illumination with a relatively low image resolution, where the latter utilizes separate illumination and fluorescence detection beam paths. Our theoretical estimates agree with the experiments, which makes our approach especially useful for optimizing high throughput imaging of large samples with a field-of-view up to 10x10 cm(2). PMID:27231620

  16. Optimizing ultrafast illumination for multiphoton-excited fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    We study the optimal conditions for high throughput two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) and three-photon excited fluorescence (3PEF) imaging using femtosecond lasers. We derive relations that allow maximization of the rate of imaging depending on the average power, pulse repetition rate, and noise characteristics of the laser, as well as on the size and structure of the sample. We perform our analysis using ~100 MHz, ~1 MHz and 1 kHz pulse rates and using both a tightly-focused illumination beam with diffraction-limited image resolution, as well loosely focused illumination with a relatively low image resolution, where the latter utilizes separate illumination and fluorescence detection beam paths. Our theoretical estimates agree with the experiments, which makes our approach especially useful for optimizing high throughput imaging of large samples with a field-of-view up to 10x10 cm2. PMID:27231620

  17. Biological Effects Of Artificial Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corth, Richard

    1980-10-01

    We are increasingly being warned of the possible effects of so called "polluted" light, that is light that differs in spectral content from that of sunlight. We should be concerned, we are told, because all animals and plants have evolved under this natural daylight and therefore any difference between that illuminant and the artificial illuminants that are on the market today, is suspect. The usual presentation of the differences between the sunlight and the artificial illuminants are as shown in Figure 1. Here we are shown the spectral power distribution of sunlight and Cool White fluorescent light. The spectral power distributions of each have been normalized to some convenient wavelength so that each can be seen and easily compared on the same figure. But this presentation is misleading for one does not experience artificial illuminants at the same intensity as one experiences sunlight. Sunlight intensities are ordinarily found to be in the 8000 to 10,000 footcandle range whereas artificial illuminants are rarely experienced at intensity levels greater than 100 footcandles. Therefore a representative difference between the two types of illumination conditions is more accurately represented as in Figure 2. Thus if evolutionary adaptations require that humans and other animals be exposed to sunlight to ensure wellbeing, it is clear that one must be exposed to sunlight intensities. It is not feasible to expect that artificially illuminated environments will be lit to the same intensity as sunlight

  18. Low level laser therapy reduces inflammation in activated Achilles tendinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjordal, Jan M.; Iversen, Vegard; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been forwarded as therapy for osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. Results in animal and cell studies suggest that LLLT may act through a biological mechanism of inflammatory modulation. The current study was designed to investigate if LLLT has an anti-inflammatory effect on activated tendinitis of the Achilles tendon. Methods: Seven patients with bilateral Achilles tendonitis (14 tendons) who had aggravated symptoms by pain-inducing activity immediately prior to the study. LLLT (1.8 Joules for each of three points along the Achilles tendon with 904nm infrared laser) and placebo LLLT were administered to either Achilles tendons in a random order to which patients and therapist were blinded. Inflammation was examined by 1) mini-invasive microdialysis for measuring the concentration of inflammatory marker PGE II in the peritendinous tissue, 2) ultrasound with Doppler measurement of peri- and intratendinous blood flow, 3) pressure pain algometry and 4) single hop test. Results: PGE 2- levels were significantly reduced at 75, 90 and 105 minutes after active LLLT compared both to pre-treatment levels (p=0.026) and to placebo LLLT (p=0.009). Changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT) were significantly different (P=0.012) between groups. PPT increased by a mean value of 0.19 kg/cm2 [95%CI:0.04 to 0.34] after treatment in the active LLLT group, while pressure pain threshold was reduced by -0.20 kg/cm2 [95%CI:-0.45 to 0.05] after placebo LLLT. Conclusion: LLLT can be used to reduce inflammatory musculskeletal pain as it reduces inflammation and increases pressure pain threshold levels in activity-induced pain episodes of Achilles tendinopathy.

  19. Structured illumination temporal compressive microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Pang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    We present a compressive video microscope based on structured illumination with incoherent light source. The source-side illumination coding scheme allows the emission photons being collected by the full aperture of the microscope objective, and thus is suitable for the fluorescence readout mode. A 2-step iterative reconstruction algorithm, termed BWISE, has been developed to address the mismatch between the illumination pattern size and the detector pixel size. Image sequences with a temporal compression ratio of 4:1 were demonstrated. PMID:27231586

  20. Diffuse-Illumination Systems for Growing Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, George; Ryan, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Agriculture in both terrestrial and space-controlled environments relies heavily on artificial illumination for efficient photosynthesis. Plant-growth illumination systems require high photon flux in the spectral range corresponding with plant photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) (400 700 nm), high spatial uniformity to promote uniform growth, and high energy efficiency to minimize electricity usage. The proposed plant-growth system takes advantage of the highly diffuse reflective surfaces on the interior of a sphere, hemisphere, or other nearly enclosed structure that is coated with highly reflective materials. This type of surface and structure uniformly mixes discrete light sources to produce highly uniform illumination. Multiple reflections from within the domelike structures are exploited to obtain diffuse illumination, which promotes the efficient reuse of photons that have not yet been absorbed by plants. The highly reflective surfaces encourage only the plant tissue (placed inside the sphere or enclosure) to absorb the light. Discrete light sources, such as light emitting diodes (LEDs), are typically used because of their high efficiency, wavelength selection, and electronically dimmable properties. The light sources are arranged to minimize shadowing and to improve uniformity. Different wavelengths of LEDs (typically blue, green, and red) are used for photosynthesis. Wavelengths outside the PAR range can be added for plant diagnostics or for growth regulation

  1. An active alignment method for post launch co-alignment of laser beam combiner systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, A. W.; Green, J. W.; Maynard, W. L.; Minott, P. O.; Krainak, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    A laser transmitter for high bandwidth geosynchronous satellite communications is described. High optical power is achieved by combining semiconductor laser diodes. An active alignment scheme is proposed for achieving the +/- 20 microrad post launch multiple laser angular co-alignment requirement.

  2. Hourly Illumination of Shackleton Crater

    NASA Video Gallery

    Illumination of Shackleton crater, a 21-km-diameter (12.5 mile-diameter) structure situated adjacent to the Moon’s south pole. The resolution is 30 meters (approximately 100 feet) per pixel. Fra...

  3. Binary complementary white LED illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John K.

    2001-12-01

    For widespread adoption in general-purpose illumination applications, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) must reliably produce a substantial amount of white light at a reasonable cost. While several white LED technologies appear capable of meeting the implicit technical requirements for illumination, their high purchase price (relative to traditional light sources) has heretofore impeded their market advancement. Binary complementary white (BCW) LED illuminators, first introduced commercially in late 1997, appear to offer great potential for addressing the commercial and technical demands of general-purpose illumination applications. Many properties of BCW LED systems derive from AlInGaP LED chips, the source of up to 80% of the luminous flux projected from BCW devices. This configuration yields a number of benefits, relative to other white LED approaches, including high luminous efficacy, low cost per lumen, and high luminous flux per discrete component. This document describes BCW illumination systems in detail, beginning with a review of generic LED attributes, basic illumination requirements and applied photometric and colorimetric techniques.

  4. Image plane sweep volume illumination.

    PubMed

    Sundén, Erik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ropinski, Timo

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, many volumetric illumination models have been proposed, which have the potential to simulate advanced lighting effects and thus support improved image comprehension. Although volume ray-casting is widely accepted as the volume rendering technique which achieves the highest image quality, so far no volumetric illumination algorithm has been designed to be directly incorporated into the ray-casting process. In this paper we propose image plane sweep volume illumination (IPSVI), which allows the integration of advanced illumination effects into a GPU-based volume ray-caster by exploiting the plane sweep paradigm. Thus, we are able to reduce the problem complexity and achieve interactive frame rates, while supporting scattering as well as shadowing. Since all illumination computations are performed directly within a single rendering pass, IPSVI does not require any preprocessing nor does it need to store intermediate results within an illumination volume. It therefore has a significantly lower memory footprint than other techniques. This makes IPSVI directly applicable to large data sets. Furthermore, the integration into a GPU-based ray-caster allows for high image quality as well as improved rendering performance by exploiting early ray termination. This paper discusses the theory behind IPSVI, describes its implementation, demonstrates its visual results and provides performance measurements. PMID:22034331

  5. Secure communication via quantum illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Zhang, Zheshen; Wong, Franco N. C.

    2014-10-01

    In the quantum illumination protocol for secure communication, Alice prepares entangled signal and idler beams via spontaneous parametric downconversion. She sends the signal beam to Bob, while retaining the idler. Bob imposes message modulation on the beam he receives from Alice, amplifies it, and sends it back to her. Alice then decodes Bob's information by making a joint quantum measurement on the light she has retained and the light she has received from him. The basic performance analysis for this protocol—which demonstrates its immunity to passive eavesdropping, in which Eve can only listen to Alice and Bob's transmissions—is reviewed, along with the results of its first proof-of-principle experiment. Further analysis is then presented, showing that secure data rates in excess of 1 Gbps may be possible over 20-km-long fiber links with technology that is available or under development. Finally, an initial scheme for thwarting active eavesdropping, in which Eve injects her own light into Bob's terminal, is proposed and analyzed.

  6. Illuminating the life of GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Böhme, Ilka; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2009-01-01

    The investigation of biological systems highly depends on the possibilities that allow scientists to visualize and quantify biomolecules and their related activities in real-time and non-invasively. G-protein coupled receptors represent a family of very dynamic and highly regulated transmembrane proteins that are involved in various important physiological processes. Since their localization is not confined to the cell surface they have been a very attractive "moving target" and the understanding of their intracellular pathways as well as the identified protein-protein-interactions has had implications for therapeutic interventions. Recent and ongoing advances in both the establishment of a variety of labeling methods and the improvement of measuring and analyzing instrumentation, have made fluorescence techniques to an indispensable tool for GPCR imaging. The illumination of their complex life cycle, which includes receptor biosynthesis, membrane targeting, ligand binding, signaling, internalization, recycling and degradation, will provide new insights into the relationship between spatial receptor distribution and function. This review covers the existing technologies to track GPCRs in living cells. Fluorescent ligands, antibodies, auto-fluorescent proteins as well as the evolving technologies for chemical labeling with peptide- and protein-tags are described and their major applications concerning the GPCR life cycle are presented. PMID:19602276

  7. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  8. Platelet-activating factor and laser trauma of the iris

    SciTech Connect

    Verbey, N.L.; Van Delft, J.L.; Van Haeringen, N.J.; Braquet, P.

    1989-06-01

    Local application of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on the rabbit eye caused a dose-dependent significant increase in intraocular pressure (IOP). After laser irradiation of the iris the IOP showed a hypertensive phase of about 3 hr. Prophylactic treatment with the PAF antagonist BN 52021 but not with indomethacin abolished the hypertensive phase. Elevated levels of protein (10.6 +/- 0.9 g/l) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 1.7 +/- 0.2 ng/ml) were measured in the aqueous humor 2 hr after laser irradiation of the iris. Prophylactic treatment with BN 52021 showed lower levels of protein (6.1 +/- 0.7) and PGE2 (1.1 +/- 0.02); with indomethacin pretreatment the level of protein was 3.4 +/- 0.7 g/l and of PGE2 0.10 +/- 0.02 ng/ml. A role of PAF as a mediator in ocular inflammatory response is suggested.

  9. Laser acupuncture induced specific cerebral cortical and subcortical activations in humans.

    PubMed

    Siedentopf, Christian M; Koppelstaetter, Florian; Haala, Ilka Anna; Haid, Veronika; Rhomberg, Paul; Ischebeck, Anja; Buchberger, Waltraud; Felber, Stephan; Schlager, Andreas; Golaszewski, Stefan M

    2005-09-01

    As recent studies demonstrated, acupuncture can elicit activity in specific brain areas. This study aims to explore further the central effect using laser acupuncture. We investigated the cerebral effects of laser acupuncture at both acupoints GB43 with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). As a control condition the laser was mounted at the same acupoints but without application of laser stimulation. The group results showed significant brain activations within the thalamus, nucleus subthalamicus, nucleus ruber, the brainstem, and the Brodmann areas 40 and 22 for the acupuncture condition. No significant brain activations were observed within the placebo condition. The activations we observed were laser acupuncture-specific and predominantly ipsilateral. This supports the assumption that acupuncture is mediated by meridians, since meridians do not cross to the other side. Furthermore, we could show that laser acupuncture allows one to design a pure placebo condition. PMID:15990948

  10. Patterning of nanostructured thin films by structured light illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Haro-Poniatowski, E.; Fort, E.; Lacharme, J.P.; Ricolleau, C.

    2005-10-03

    Light-induced reshaping of silver nanostructured films near the percolation threshold are investigated using a KrF excimer laser emitting at 248 nm. Depending on the laser intensity and the number of pulses, striking effects are observed for which the irregular particles melt and transform into spherical shaped particles. We show that the laser-induced modifications can be spatially designed by irradiating through masks and gratings taking advantage of their respective diffractive properties. This permits an easy and well controlled way to produce a variety of submicron patterning. The induced patterns accurately coincide with the intensity variations of the illumination field.

  11. Active beam shaping in multiple laser guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Katharine J.

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive beam shaping is a critical part of multiple Laser Guide Stars (LGS) for Multiple Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) for ground-based astronomical telescopes. There are two kinds of Laser Guide Stars: Na Laser Guide Stars (at 589 nm and 92 km altitude) and Rayleigh Laser Guide Stars (at 532 nm and 20 km altitude). Multiple Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) corrects for each "layer" of atmosphere independently. Multiple Laser Guide Stars are being developed to achieve a measure of tilt and increase the isoplanatic patch. Multiple Laser Guide Stars are being combined with Multiple Conjugate Optics in the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT): more than one Laser Guide Star (4-5) and two different wavelengths: 589 nm and 532 nm. Other observatories have multiple Laser Guide Stars but only one wavelength: 589 nm or 532 nm. Because Laser Guide Stars are launched into the atmosphere, adaptive beam shaping will be carried out before the laser is launched and will be different depending on which laser is being used, presumably to effect the tightest beam which can be achieved at the power level which is required to provide the requisite return to gound-based wavefront sensors. A complete range of devices are used. Beam attenuation and divergnece will take place. Multiple Laser Guide Stars of major observatories (SOR, LBT, MMT, ESO VLT and Gemini South) will be evaluated for effective adaptive beam shaping and impact on performance

  12. Active/passive mode-locked laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Fountain, William D.; Johnson, Bertram C.

    1977-01-01

    A Q-switched/mode-locked Nd:YAG laser oscillator employing simultaneous active (electro-optic) and passive (saturable absorber) loss modulation within the optical cavity is described. This "dual modulation" oscillator can produce transform-limited pulses of duration ranging from about 30 psec to about 5 nsec with greatly improved stability compared to other mode-locked systems. The pulses produced by this system lack intrapulse frequency or amplitude modulation, and hence are idealy suited for amplification to high energies and for other applications where well-defined pulses are required. Also, the pulses of this system have excellent interpulse characteristics, wherein the optical noise between the individual pulses of the pulse train has a power level well below the power of the peak pulse of the train.

  13. On the modified active region design of interband cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, M.; Ryczko, K.; Dyksik, M.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Weih, R.; Dallner, M.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2015-02-28

    Type II InAs/GaInSb quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaSb or InAs substrates and designed to be integrated in the active region of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the mid infrared have been investigated. Optical spectroscopy, combined with band structure calculations, has been used to probe their electronic properties. A design with multiple InAs QWs has been compared with the more common double W-shaped QW and it has been demonstrated that it allows red shifting the emission wavelength and enhancing the transition oscillator strength. This can be beneficial for the improvements of the ICLs performances, especially when considering their long-wavelength operation.

  14. Active laser ranging with frequency transfer using frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongyuan; Wei, Haoyun; Yang, Honglei; Li, Yan

    2016-05-01

    A comb-based active laser ranging scheme is proposed for enhanced distance resolution and a common time standard for the entire system. Three frequency combs with different repetition rates are used as light sources at the two ends where the distance is measured. Pulse positions are determined through asynchronous optical sampling and type II second harmonic generation. Results show that the system achieves a maximum residual of 379.6 nm and a standard deviation of 92.9 nm with 2000 averages over 23.6 m. Moreover, as for the frequency transfer, an atom clock and an adjustable signal generator, synchronized to the atom clock, are used as time standards for the two ends to appraise the frequency deviation introduced by the proposed system. The system achieves a residual fractional deviation of 1.3 × 10-16 for 1 s, allowing precise frequency transfer between the two clocks at the two ends.

  15. Specimen illumination apparatus with optical cavity for dark field illumination

    DOEpatents

    Pinkel, Daniel; Sudar, Damir; Albertson, Donna

    1999-01-01

    An illumination apparatus with a specimen slide holder, an illumination source, an optical cavity producing multiple reflection of illumination light to a specimen comprising a first and a second reflective surface arranged to achieve multiple reflections of light to a specimen is provided. The apparatus can further include additional reflective surfaces to achieve the optical cavity, a slide for mounting the specimen, a coverslip which is a reflective component of the optical cavity, one or more prisms for directing light within the optical cavity, antifading solutions for improving the viewing properties of the specimen, an array of materials for analysis, fluorescent components, curved reflective surfaces as components of the optical cavity, specimen detection apparatus, optical detection equipment, computers for analysis of optical images, a plane polarizer, fiberoptics, light transmission apertures, microscopic components, lenses for viewing the specimen, and upper and lower mirrors above and below the specimen slide as components of the optical cavity. Methods of using the apparatus are also provided.

  16. Active compensation of large dispersion of femtosecond pulses for precision laser ranging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Lee, Keunwoo; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2011-02-28

    We describe an active way of compensation for large dispersion induced in the femtosecond light pulses travelling in air for laser ranging. The pulse duration is consistently regulated at 250 fs by dispersion control, allowing sub-micrometer resolution in measuring long distances by means of time-of-flight measurement. This method could facilitate more reliable applications of femtosecond pulses for satellite laser ranging, laser altimetry and active LIDAR applications. PMID:21369227

  17. Modeling and optimization of actively Q-switched Nd-doped quasi-three-level laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Renpeng; Yu, Xin; Li, Xudong; Chen, Deying; Gao, Jing

    2013-09-01

    The energy transfer upconversion and the ground state absorption are considered in solving the rate equations for an active Q-switched quasi-three-level laser. The dependence of output pulse characters on the laser parameters is investigated by solving the rate equations. The influence of the energy transfer upconversion on the pulsed laser performance is illustrated and discussed. By this model, the optimal parameters could be achieved for arbitrary quasi-three-level Q-switched lasers. An acousto-optical Q-switched Nd:YAG 946 nm laser is constructed and the reliability of the theoretical model is demonstrated.

  18. Short-pulse actively Q-switched Er:YAG lasers.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, David J; Harris, Lachlan; Veitch, Peter J

    2016-07-11

    We report the shortest duration pulses obtained to date from an actively Q-switched Er:YAG laser pumped by a low spectral and spatial brightness laser diode. The 14.5 ns, 6 mJ pulses were obtained using a 1470 nm laser diode end-pumped co-planar folded zigzag slab architecture. We also present an analytical model that accurately predicts the pulse energy-duration product achievable from virtually all Q-switched Er:YAG lasers and high repetition rate quasi-three-level Q-switched lasers in general. PMID:27410810

  19. Prismatic louver active façades for natural illumination and thermal energy gain in high-rise and commercial buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachokostas, A.; Volkmann, C.; Madamopoulos, N.

    2013-06-01

    High-rise and commercial buildings in urban centers present a great challenge in terms of their energy consumption. Due to maximization of rentable square footage, the preferred urban façade system over the past 50 years has been the "curtain wall", only a few inches thick and comprised of modular steel or aluminum framing and predominant glass infills. The perceived Achilles heel of these modern glass façade systems is their thermal inefficiency: They are inadequate thermal barriers and exhibit excessive solar gain. The excessive solar gain has a negative impact on lighting and cooling loads of the entire building. This negative impact will be further exacerbated with rising energy costs. However, rather than view the glass façade's uncontrolled solar gain merely as a weakness contributing to higher energy consumption, the condition could indeed be considered as related to an energy solution. These glass façades can be retrofitted to operate as a provider of daylight and energy for the rest of the building, taking advantage of the overexposure to the sun. With today's technology, the sun's abundant renewable energy can be the driving force for the energy transition of these building envelopes. Illumination, thermal energy, and electricity production can be directly supplied from the sun, and when correctly and efficiently managed, they can lead to a significantly less energy-intensive building stock. We propose a multi-purpose, prismatic, louver-based façade to perform both daylight and thermal energy harvesting with a goal of offering a better daylight environment for the occupants, and reduce the energy consumption and carbon footprint of the building. While decentralized air-conditioning units are commonly accepted as façade "plug-ins", such decentralization could be utilized with more benefits by passively managing the interior space conditions, without using any extra power. Just as living organisms respond and adapt to the environmental changes in

  20. Actively mode-locked GaInAsP laser with subpicosecond output

    SciTech Connect

    Corzine, S.W.; Bowers, J.E.; Przybylek, G.; Koren, U.; Miller, B.I.; Soccolich, C.E.

    1988-02-01

    We actively mode lock a high-frequency GaInAsP laser at a rate of 16 GHz to obtain nearly transform-limited hyperbolic secant pulses with a pulse width of 0.58 ps. This is the shortest pulse width yet demonstrated for either passively or actively mode-locked semiconductor lasers.

  1. Diode laser threshold current density and lasing wavelength as functions of active region thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Streifer, W.; Scifres, D.R.; Burnham, R.D.

    1983-03-01

    Based on a simple model of the band-to-band absorption of a diode laser active region, we formulatean expression for modal gain as a function of pumping current. Using this result yields expressions for threshold current density and lasing photon energy which depend on device parameters including active region thickness, laser length, internal losses, facet reflectivity, etc.

  2. Effect of laser irradiation of nanoparticles in aqueous uranium salt solutions on nuclide activity

    SciTech Connect

    Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2011-07-31

    This paper presents an experimental study of the effect of laser irradiation of aqueous uranyl chloride solutions containing gold nanoparticles on the activity of the uranium series radionuclides {sup 234}Th, {sup 234m}Pa, and {sup 235}U. The solutions were exposed to femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses and to the second or third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (150-ps pulses) at a peak intensity in the medium of {approx}10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2}. The activities of the radionuclides in the irradiated solutions were shown to differ markedly from their equilibrium values. The sign of the deviation depends on the laser wavelength. The measured activity deviations can be interpreted as evidence that laser exposure of nanoparticles accelerates the alpha and beta decays of the radionuclides. The observed effects are accounted for in terms of a mechanism that involves resonant enhancement of optical waves by metallic nanoparticles. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  3. Temperature activated absorption during laser-induced damage: The evolution of laser-supported solid-state absorption fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Bude, J D; Shen, N; Demange, P

    2010-10-26

    Previously we have shown that the size of laser induced damage sites in both KDP and SiO{sub 2} is largely governed by the duration of the laser pulse which creates them. Here we present a model based on experiment and simulation that accounts for this behavior. Specifically, we show that solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts are generated during a damage event and that these fronts propagate at constant velocities for laser intensities up to 4 GW/cm{sup 2}. It is the constant absorption front velocity that leads to the dependence of laser damage site size on pulse duration. We show that these absorption fronts are driven principally by the temperature-activated deep sub band-gap optical absorptivity, free electron transport, and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15,000K and pressures < 15GPa. In addition to the practical application of selecting an optimal laser for pre-initiation of large aperture optics, this work serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

  4. Research on laser protection: an overview of 20 years of activities at Fraunhofer IOSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, G.; Walter, D.; Eberle, B.

    2013-10-01

    Since the advent of the laser in 1960, the protection of human eyes and sensors against intended or unintended damage by laser radiation is a hot research topic. As long as the parameters of a laser source such as the wavelength and the output power are known, adequate laser safety can be ensured simply by utilizing conventional laser protection filters which are based on absorption or interference effects. This is typically the case in cooperative environments like a laboratory or industrial facilities. A very different situation prevails in military defense or civil security. There, the parameters of encountering laser threats are usually unknown. Protection measures, helping against all types of laser threats, are the long desired objective of countless research activities. The biggest challenge in finding an effective measure arises from single laser pulses of unknown wavelength. The problem demands for a passive protection concept and may be based for example on intensity dependent effects. Moreover, the requested solutions shall comprise add-on possibilities like thin films to be put on existing optics, windshields or glasses. Unfortunately, such an all-embracing solution is still far out of reach. The Fraunhofer IOSB has been working on the evaluation and development of non-conventional laser protection methods for more than 20 years. An overview of the past and present research activities shall be presented, comprising protection measures against laser damaging and laser dazzling.

  5. ACTIVE MEDIA. LASERS: Study of a Nd3+:KGW crystal laser transversely pumped by laser diode bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazadze, Aleksandr Yu; Zverev, Georgii M.; Kolbatskov, Yurii M.; Ustimenko, N. S.

    2004-01-01

    A Nd3+:KGW crystal laser transversely pumped by laser diode bars is studied experimentally. The optimisation of the laser parameters provided the maximum slope efficiency of ~50 % at 1.067 μm in the free running regime. Using the SRS self-conversion in a Nd3+: KWG laser, lasing was obtained in the eye-safe spectral region at 1.538 nm with the energy up to 5 mJ and a pulse repetition rate up to 20 Hz.

  6. Comparative bactericidal activities of lasers operating at seven different wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Ian A.; Ward, Glenn D.; Wang, RuiKang K.; Sharp, James H.; Budgett, David M.; Stewart-Tull, Duncan E.; Wardlaw, Alastair C.; Chatwin, Christopher R.

    1996-10-01

    Seven laser instruments, delivering radiation at a selection of wavelengths in the range of 0.355 to 118 micrometers , we investigated for their ability to kill Escherichia coli as a lawn of the bacteria on nutrient agar culture plates. Easily the most effective was a 600-W CO2 laser operating at 10.6 micrometers , which produced 1.2-cm2 circular zones of sterilization at energy densities of around 8 J cm-2 in a 30-msec exposure. Circular zones with an area of 0.7 cm2 were achieved with 200 W from a Nd:YAG laser delivering 8-ms, 10-J pulses of 1.06 micrometers radiation at 20 Hz. The exposure time, however, was 16 s and the energy density was more than 240 times higher than with the CO2 laser. This difference is believed to be partly due to the much higher absorption of radiation at 10.6 micrometers , by water in the bacterial cells and the surrounding medium. Sterilization was observed after exposure to frequency- tripled Nd:YAG laser radiation at 355 nm. Lasers that were totally ineffective in killing Escherichia coli were the far infrared laser, the laser diode array, and the argon ion laser. The speed at which laser sterilization can be achieved is particularly attractive to the medical and food industries.

  7. Holography of incoherently illuminated 3D scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Rosen, Joseph

    2008-04-01

    We review several methods of generating holograms of 3D realistic objects illuminated by incoherent white light. Using these methods, it is possible to obtain holograms with a simple digital camera, operating in regular light conditions. Thus, most disadvantages characterizing conventional holography, namely the need for a powerful, highly coherent laser and meticulous stability of the optical system are avoided. These holograms can be reconstructed optically by illuminating them with a coherent plane wave, or alternatively by using a digital reconstruction technique. In order to generate the proposed hologram, the 3D scene is captured from multiple points of view by a simple digital camera. Then, the acquired projections are digitally processed to yield the final hologram of the 3D scene. Based on this principle, we can generate Fourier, Fresnel, image or other types of holograms. To obtain certain advantages over the regular holograms, we also propose new digital holograms, such as modified Fresnel holograms and protected correlation holograms. Instead of shifting the camera mechanically to acquire a different projection of the 3D scene each time, it is possible to use a microlens array for acquiring the entire projections in a single camera shot. Alternatively, only the extreme projections can be acquired experimentally, while the middle projections are predicted digitally by using the view synthesis algorithm. The prospective goal of these methods is to facilitate the design of a simple, portable digital holographic camera which can be useful for a variety of practical applications.

  8. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Sukhov, I A; Lepekhin, N M; Priseko, Yu S; Filippov, V G; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2013-06-30

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  9. Statistical characterization of real-world illumination.

    PubMed

    Dror, Ron O; Willsky, Alan S; Adelson, Edward H

    2004-09-28

    Although studies of vision and graphics often assume simple illumination models, real-world illumination is highly complex, with reflected light incident on a surface from almost every direction. One can capture the illumination from every direction at one point photographically using a spherical illumination map. This work illustrates, through analysis of photographically acquired, high dynamic range illumination maps, that real-world illumination possesses a high degree of statistical regularity. The marginal and joint wavelet coefficient distributions and harmonic spectra of illumination maps resemble those documented in the natural image statistics literature. However, illumination maps differ from typical photographs in that illumination maps are statistically nonstationary and may contain localized light sources that dominate their power spectra. Our work provides a foundation for statistical models of real-world illumination, thereby facilitating the understanding of human material perception, the design of robust computer vision systems, and the rendering of realistic computer graphics imagery. PMID:15493972

  10. Neurospora illuminates fungal photoreception.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Hui; Dunlap, Jay C; Loros, Jennifer J

    2010-11-01

    Light not only is indispensable as an energy source for life on earth but also serves as an essential environmental cue conveying the information of daily and seasonal time to organisms across different kingdoms. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying light responses are actively explored in various light-sensitive organisms, these studies are either hindered by the complexity of the systems or an incomplete familiarity with the light signaling components involved in the scheme. Therefore, study of a simple and well-characterized model system is desirable to expand our knowledge of basic properties underlying the regulation of biological light responses. This review will briefly introduce the basic light sensing machinery in Neurospora crassa, a filamentous fungus, and then focus on the most recent advances in employing Neurospora as a model to study light signaling cascades, photoadaptation, and circadian clock-modulated effects in eukaryotic cells. Also, we will summarize the functions of a number of putative photoreceptors in Neurospora, and discuss the implications of the study of Neurospora to the field of fungal photobiology and some challenges for future studies. PMID:20637887

  11. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  12. Synchronization of active/passive mode-locked erbium fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaechele, Walter; Haus, Joseph W.; Hayduk, Michael J.; Erdmann, Reinhard K.; Teegarden, Kenneth J.

    1997-07-01

    Injection seeding of a passively mode-locked fiber laser by an actively mode-locked fiber laser source is described. The passively mode-locked laser employs a multiple quantum well saturable absorber to establish pulsed operation. Mode-locked synchronized operation was maintained with average injection powers as low as 1.3 mW. Stable synchronized pulses were observed with pulse widths as narrow as 10 ps.

  13. Laser-activated protein solder for peripheral nerve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickett, Rodney I.; Lauto, Antonio; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1995-05-01

    A 100 micrometers core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the albumin based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 +/- 5 min. (n equals 20) compared to 23 +/- 9 min. (n equals 10) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 +/- 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 +/- 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study is under way comparing laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. At the time of submission 15 laser soldered nerves and 7 sutured nerves were characterized at 3 months and showed successful regeneration with compound muscle action potentials of 27 +/- 8 mV and 29 +/- 8 mW respectively. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  14. Illumination Conditions of the Lunar Polar Regions Using LOLA Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Torrence, M. H.

    2011-01-01

    We use high-resolution altimetry data obtained by the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter instrument onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to characterize present illumination conditions in the polar regions of the Moon. Compared to previous studies, both the spatial and temporal extent of the simulations are increased significantly, as well as the coverage (fill ratio) of the topographic maps used, thanks to the 28 Hz firing rate of the five-beam instrument. We determine the horizon elevation in a number of directions based on 240 m-resolution polar digital elevation models reaching down to 75 latitude. The illumination of both polar regions extending to 80 can be calculated for any geometry from those horizon longitudinal profiles. We validated our modeling with recent Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Wide-Angle Camera images. We assessed the extent of permanently shadowed regions (PSRs, defined as areas that never receive direct solar illumination), and obtained total areas generally larger than previous studies (12,866 and 16,055 km2, in the north and south respectively). We extended our direct illumination model to account for singly-scattered light, and found that every PSR does receive some amount of scattered light during the year. We conducted simulations over long periods (several 18.6-years lunar precession cycles) with a high temporal resolution (6 h), and identified the most illuminated locations in the vicinity of both poles. Because of the importance of those sites for exploration and engineering considerations, we characterized their illumination more precisely over the near future. Every year, a location near the Shackleton crater rim in the south polar region is sunlit continuously for 240 days, and its longest continuous period in total darkness is about 1.5 days. For some locations small height gains ( 10 m) can dramatically improve their average illumination and reduce the night duration, rendering some of those particularly attractive energy-wise as

  15. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock.

    PubMed

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed. PMID:27370428

  16. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  17. Optical Properties of Active Regions in Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyksik, M.; Motyka, M.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Pucicki, D.; Kosiel, K.; Sankowska, I.; Kubacka-Traczyk, J.; Bugajski, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, AlGaAs/GaAs superlattice, with layers' sequence and compositions imitating the active and injector regions of a quantum cascade laser designed for emission in the terahertz spectral range, was investigated. Three independent absorption-like optical spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to study the band structure of the minibands formed within the conduction band. Photoreflectance measurements provided information about interband transitions in the investigated system. Common transmission spectra revealed, in the target range of intraband transitions, mainly a number of lines associated with the phonon-related processes, including two-phonon absorption. In contrast, differential transmittance realized by means of Fourier-transform spectroscopy was utilized to probe the confined states of the conduction band. The obtained energy separation between the second and third confined electron levels, expected to be predominantly contributing to the lasing, was found to be ~9 meV. The optical spectroscopy measurements were supported by numerical calculations performed in the effective mass approximation and XRD measurements for layers' width verification. The calculated energy spacings are in a good agreement with the experimental values.

  18. Phase stabilization of an actively mode-locked ring laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Akira; Saika, Makoto; Nagano, Shigenori

    2015-03-01

    A phase-resolved system based on swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) has to incorporate a phase-stabilized wavelength-swept light source. The phase variation is induced by fluctuation of a beginning swept frequency. The conventional phase-sensitive SS-OCTs use a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) in order to avoid A-scan trigger fluctuations. However this method does not always solve the trigger fluctuation problem. In actively mode-locked ring lasers (AMLLs), the beginning swept frequency fluctuates by abrupt frequency change between the end of a sweep and the beginning of the subsequent one. To overcome this issue, we proposes a new phase stabilization method. By employing the method with an auxiliary reference configuration, the sweeping phase has successfully stabilized because the timing jitter is calculated by interference signals from the auxiliary reference path. In this research, we have proposed the phase stabilization method that has nanometer sensitivity with millisecond response. In addition, the method has successfully suppressed the depth dependence of phase instability.

  19. Laser-activated remote phosphor conversion with ceramic phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenef, Alan; Kelso, John; Tchoul, Maxim; Mehl, Oliver; Sorg, Jörg; Zheng, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Direct laser activation of a remote phosphor, or LARP, is a highly effective approach for producing very high luminance solid-state light sources. Such sources have much smaller étendue than LEDs of similar power, thereby greatly increasing system luminous fluxes in projection and display applications. While several commercial products now employ LARP technology, most current configurations employ phosphor powders in a silicone matrix deposited on rotating wheels. These provide a low excitation duty cycle that helps limit quenching and thermal overload. These systems already operate close to maximum achievable pump powers and intensities. To further increase power scaling and eliminate mechanical parts to achieve smaller footprints, OSRAM has been developing static LARP systems based on high-thermal conductivity monolithic ceramic phosphors. OSRAM has recently introduced a static LARP product using ceramic phosphor for endoscopy and also demonstrated a LARP concept for automotive forward lighting1. We first discuss the basic LARP concept with ceramic phosphors, showing how their improved thermal conductivity can achieve both high luminous fluxes and luminance in a static configuration. Secondly, we show the importance of scattering and low optical losses to achieving high overall efficiency and light extraction. This is shown through experimental results and radiation transport calculations. Finally, we discuss some of the fundamental factors which limit the ultimate luminance achievable with ceramic converted LARP, including optical pumping effects and thermal quenching.

  20. Quasi-Bessel beams from asymmetric and astigmatic illumination sources.

    PubMed

    Müller, Angelina; Wapler, Matthias C; Schwarz, Ulrich T; Reisacher, Markus; Holc, Katarzyna; Ambacher, Oliver; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2016-07-25

    We study the spatial intensity distribution and the self-reconstruction of quasi-Bessel beams produced from refractive axicon lenses with edge emitting laser diodes as asymmetric and astigmatic illumination sources. Comparing these to a symmetric mono-mode fiber source, we find that the asymmetry results in a transition of a quasi-Bessel beam into a bow-tie shaped pattern and eventually to a line shaped profile at a larger distance along the optical axis. Furthermore, we analytically estimate and discuss the effects of astigmatism, substrate modes and non-perfect axicons. We find a good agreement between experiment, simulation and analytic considerations. Results include the derivation of a maximal axicon angle related to astigmatism of the illuminating beam, impact of laser diode beam profile imperfections like substrate modes and a longitudinal oscillation of the core intensity and radius caused by a rounded axicon tip. PMID:27464190

  1. Study on illuminance and visual properties of flammable illumination.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, K; Nagai, Y

    1997-09-01

    In order to investigate the physical, economical, physiological and psychological aspects regarding ancient lighting, two series of experiment were performed. At first a darkroom (1.3 x 4.5 m, Ht: 2.7 m) was constructed. In experiment I, illuminance and consumption rate of fuel were measured. The Japanese classic candle, plant oil and animal fat yield 1.12, 0.30-0.62 and 0.05 lux at 1.0 m distance, respectively. The illuminance was reduced to about 50% by and on which was a lighting tool of folkcraft. The burning duration of plant oil was about two weeks to 180 ml when it burned 4 hours per one day. In experiment II, 15 young females were examined regarding the visual properties such as visual acuity, readability of newspaper and discrimination of color under the simulated illumination of candle. The visual acuity was 0.42 under 0.16 lux. It needed more than 1.44 lux to read a newspaper. In the color discrimination test, yellowish green was most difficult, silver or long wave range colors were easy. PMID:9431706

  2. Optical simulation of reduced retinal illuminance caused by senile miosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Taka-aki; Okajima, Katsunori; Funai, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    In order to simulate elderly vision for young observers, we developed an optical goggle using filters whose transmittance optically simulates the senile miosis: reduction in retinal illuminance as a function of ambient illuminance. First, we measured the pupil size of young and elderly subjects (mean age were 21.8 and 67.1 years, respectively) under six illuminance conditions (from 0.03 to 4850 lx), and formulated the relationship between illuminance and pupillary area functions in both age groups. Next, the transmittance formulae for the filter simulating the senile miosis were derived based on the properties of the pupillary area and visual functions of the elderly and the young subjects including the effect of mydriasis induced by the reduction of light due to the filter in young observers. Finally, we developed a goggle-type simulator using active optical devices which enables young people to experience senile miosis in any environment in real time.

  3. Illumination-redistribution lenses for non-circular spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkyn, William A.; Pelka, David G.

    2005-08-01

    The design of illumination lenses is far easier under the regime of the small-source approximation, whereby central rays are taken as representative of the entire source. This implies that the lens is much larger than the source's active emitter, and its entire interior surface is nowhere close to the source. Also, a given source luminance requires a minimum lens area to achieve the candlepower necessary for target illumination. We introduce two-surface aspheric lenses for specific illuminations tasks involving ceiling-mounted downlights, lenses that achieve uniform illuminance at the output aperture as well as at the target. This means that squared-off lenses will produce square spots. In particular, a semicircular lens and a vertical mirror will produce a semicircular spot suitable for gambling tables.

  4. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  5. Activation analysis of indium, KCl, and melamine by using a laser-induced neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungman; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2014-04-01

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source with a neutron yield of 4 × 105 n/pulse and a pulse repetition rate of 5 Hz, which was developed using a deuterated polystyrene film target and a 24-TW femtosecond laser, was applied for laser activation analyses of indium, KCl, and melamine samples. The nuclear reactions of the measured gamma spectra for the activated samples were identified as (n, γ), (n, n'), and (n, 2n) reactions. These indicate possible usage of the neutron source for practical activation analyses of various materials.

  6. Laser-activated protein bands for peripheral nerve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Malik, Richard; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1996-01-01

    A 100 micrometer core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the protein based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 plus or minus 5 min. (n equals 24) compared to 23 plus or minus 9 min (n equals 13) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 plus or minus 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 plus or minus 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study, with a total of fifty-seven adult male wistar rats, compared laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. Twenty-four laser soldered nerves and thirteen sutured nerves were characterized at three months and showed successful regeneration with average compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) of 2.4 plus or minus 0.7 mV and 2.7 plus or minus 0.8 mV respectively. Histopathology of the in vivo study, confirmed the comparable regeneration of axons in laser and suture operated nerves. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  7. Fiber-laser pumped actively Q-switched Er:LuYAG laser at 1648 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X. F.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, T.; Zhu, H. Y.; Shen, D. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated an acousto-optic Q-switched 1648 nm Er:LuYAG laser resonantly pumped by a cladding-pumped Er,Yb fiber laser at 1532 nm. Stable Q-switching operation was obtained with the pulse repetition rate (PRR) varying from 200 Hz to 10 kHz. At PRR of 200 Hz, the laser yielded Q-switched pulses with 3.3 mJ pulse energy and 65 ns pulse duration, corresponding to a peak power of 50.7 kW for 10.4 W of incident pump power.

  8. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Revin, D G; Hemingway, M; Wang, Y; Cockburn, J W; Belyanin, A

    2016-01-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents. PMID:27147409

  9. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-05-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents.

  10. generation of picosecond pulses in solid-state lasers using new active media

    SciTech Connect

    Lisitsyn, V.N.; Matrosov, V.N.; Pestryakov, E.V.; Trunov, V.I.

    1986-07-01

    Results are reported of investigations aimed at generating nanosecond radiation pulses in solid-state lasers using new active media having broad gain lines. Passive mode locking is accomplished for the first time in a BeLa:Nd/sup 3/ laser at a wavelength 1.354 microm, and in a YAG:Nd/sup 3/ laser on a 1.32-microm transition. The free lasing and mode-locking regimes were investigated in an alexandrite (BeA1/sub 2/O/sub 4/:Cr/sup 3/) laser in the 0.72-0.78-microm range and in a synchronously pumped laser on F/sub 2//sup -/ centers in LiF in the 1.12-1.24-microm region. The features of nonlinear perception of IR radiation by the eye, using a developed picosecond laser on F/sub 2//sup -/ centers, are investigated for the first time.

  11. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    PubMed Central

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents. PMID:27147409

  12. Structured illumination microscopy for superresolution.

    PubMed

    Allen, John R; Ross, Stephen T; Davidson, Michael W

    2014-03-17

    The ability to image beyond the diffraction limit is the central tenet of the burgeoning field of superresolution fluorescence microscopy, also referred to as optical nanoscopy. The advent of superresolution has revolutionized biological fluorescence microscopy and the field at large. However, much of that excitement has been tempered by prohibitive imaging requirements. Achieving superresolution entails certain sacrifices, namely imaging speed, choice of fluorophore, ease of multicolor and three-dimensional imaging, and generally more complex instrumentation as compared to standard widefield imaging techniques. Several techniques utilizing structured illumination occupy an intriguing middle ground between the ease of use associated with traditional fluorescence microscopies and the unprecedented resolving power of modern superresolution methods, resulting in undeniably robust imaging techniques. Presented here is a review of the conceptual basis of structured illumination and its implementation, including its performance in comparison to other nanoscopies and the most recent developments in the field. PMID:24497374

  13. DARK-FIELD ILLUMINATION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Norgren, D.U.

    1962-07-24

    A means was developed for viewing objects against a dark background from a viewing point close to the light which illuminates the objects and under conditions where the back scattering of light by the objects is minimal. A broad light retro-directing member on the opposite side of the objects from the light returns direct light back towards the source while directing other light away from the viewing point. The viewing point is offset from the light and thus receives only light which is forwardly scattered by an object while returning towards the source. The object is seen, at its true location, against a dark background. The invention is particularly adapted for illuminating and viewing nuclear particle tracks in a liquid hydrogen bubble chamber through a single chamber window. (AEC)

  14. Illumination box and camera system

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Kelly, Fredrick R.; Bushman, John F.; Wiefel, Michael H.; Jensen, Wayne A.; Klunder, Gregory L.

    2002-01-01

    A hand portable, field-deployable thin-layer chromatography (TLC) unit and a hand portable, battery-operated unit for development, illumination, and data acquisition of the TLC plates contain many miniaturized features that permit a large number of samples to be processed efficiently. The TLC unit includes a solvent tank, a holder for TLC plates, and a variety of tool chambers for storing TLC plates, solvent, and pipettes. After processing in the TLC unit, a TLC plate is positioned in a collapsible illumination box, where the box and a CCD camera are optically aligned for optimal pixel resolution of the CCD images of the TLC plate. The TLC system includes an improved development chamber for chemical development of TLC plates that prevents solvent overflow.

  15. Repetitively pulsed plasma illumination sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Root, Robert G.; Falkos, Paul

    1997-12-01

    The acoustic environment created by turbulence in aircraft flight tests demands that illumination sources for high speed photography of munitions drops be extremely rugged. A repetitive pulsed surface discharge system has been developed to provide wide angle illumination in a bomb bay for photography at 250 - 500 Hertz. The lamp has a simple construction suitable for adverse environments and produces 100 mJ of visible light per pulse. The discharge parameters were selected to minimize the size and complexity of the power supply. The system is also capable of operating at high repetition rates; preliminary tests demonstrated 1000 pulses at 1 kHz, 200 pulses at 1.5 kHz, and 13 pulses at 2 kHz. A simple power supply capable of providing several amperes at 450 V is being completed; it will be used to extend the run times and to explore extensions to higher repetition rate.

  16. Ultra-intense Laser Applications to the Industries at GPI

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, Yoneyoshi; Mori, Yoshitaka; Ootsuka, Shuji; Makino, Takahiro; Ohta, Mari; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Kuwabara, Hajime

    2009-01-22

    The laser accelerator provides us not only ultra high field, but also extremely short pulse radiation sources, the laser-produced X-rays. Using a 1.2 TW table-top Ti:sap laser, we are pursuing the activities for the industrial application. First we proposed a new injection acceleration scheme using the ultra short beat-wave accelerator for the economical radiation source. Then we proposed two applications both on the backward see-through vision of distant objects using the laser X-rays, and on the X-ray illumination on Aspergillus awamori spores, which is 100 times effective of the current X-ray tube cases.

  17. Laser ion source activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro

    2015-07-31

    In Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we have been developing laser ion sources for diverse accelerators. Tabletop Nd:YAG lasers with up to several Joules of energy are mainly used to create ablation plasmas for stable operations. The obtained charge states depend on laser power density and target species. Two types of ion extraction schemes, Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) and conventional static extraction, are used depending on application. We optimized and select a suitable laser irradiation condition and a beam extraction scheme to meet the requirement of the following accelerator system. We have demonstrated to accelerate more than 5 x 1010more » of C6+ ions using the DPIS. We successfully commissioned low charge ion beam provider to the user facilities in BNL. As a result, to achieve higher current, higher charge state and lower emittance, further studies will continue.« less

  18. Laser ion source activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro

    2015-07-31

    In Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we have been developing laser ion sources for diverse accelerators. Tabletop Nd:YAG lasers with up to several Joules of energy are mainly used to create ablation plasmas for stable operations. The obtained charge states depend on laser power density and target species. Two types of ion extraction schemes, Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) and conventional static extraction, are used depending on application. We optimized and select a suitable laser irradiation condition and a beam extraction scheme to meet the requirement of the following accelerator system. We have demonstrated to accelerate more than 5 x 1010 of C6+ ions using the DPIS. We successfully commissioned low charge ion beam provider to the user facilities in BNL. As a result, to achieve higher current, higher charge state and lower emittance, further studies will continue.

  19. Photovoltaic receivers for laser beamed power in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    There has recently been a resurgence of interest in the use of beamed power to support space exploration activities. One of the most promising beamed power concepts uses a laser beam to transmit power to a remote photovoltaic array. Large lasers can be located on cloud-free sites at one or more ground locations and illuminate solar arrays to a level sufficient to provide operating power. Issues involved in providing photovoltaic receivers for such applications are discussed.

  20. Passive and Active Protective Clothing against High-Power Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennigs, C.; Hustedt, M.; Kaierle, S.; Wenzel, D.; Markstein, S.; Hutter, A.

    The main objective of the work described in this paper was the development of passive and active protective clothing for the protection of the human skin against accidental laser irradiation and of active protective curtains. Here, the passive systems consist of functional multi-layer textiles, providing a high level of passive laser resistance. In addition, the active functional multi-layer textiles incorporate sensors that detect laser exposure and are, by means of a safety control, able to deactivate the laser beam automatically.Due to the lack of regulations for testing and qualifying textiles to be used as laser PPE, test methods were defined and validated. Additionally, corresponding testing set-ups were developed.Finally, the gap with respect to standardization was bridged by the definition of a test procedure and the requirements with respect to laser PPE.The developments were demonstrated by a set of tailored functional passive and active laser-protective clothing prototypes (gloves, jackets, aprons, trousers) and active curtains as well as by a prototype testing rig, providing the possibility to perform the specified low-power and high-power textile test procedure.

  1. Extraction and quantitation of coumarin from cinnamon and its effect on enzymatic browning in fresh apple juice: a bioinformatics approach to illuminate its antibrowning activity.

    PubMed

    Thada, Rajarajeshwari; Chockalingam, Shivashri; Dhandapani, Ramesh Kumar; Panchamoorthy, Rajasekar

    2013-06-01

    Enzymatic browning by polyphenoloxidase (PPO) affects food quality and taste in fruits and vegetables. Thus, the study was designed to reduce browning in apple juice by coumarin. The ethanolic extract of cinnamon was prepared and its coumarin content was quantitated by HPLC, using authentic coumarin (AC) as standard. The effect of cinnamon extract (CE) and AC on enzymatic browning, its time dependent effects, and the specific activity of PPO and peroxidase (POD) were studied in apple juice. The docking of coumarin with PPO and POD was also performed to elucidate its antibrowning mechanism. The CE (73%) and AC (82%) showed better reduction in browning, maintained its antibrowning effect at all time points, and significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the specific activity of PPO and POD when compared with controls. Coumarin showed strong interaction with binding pockets of PPO and POD, suggesting its potential use as inhibitor to enzyme mediated browning in apple juice. PMID:23683299

  2. Tetravalent Chromium (Cr(4+)) as Laser-Active Ion for Tunable Solid-State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1993-01-01

    During 10/31/92 - 3/31/93, the following summarizes our major accomplishments: (1) the self-mode-locked operation of the Cr:forsterite laser was achieved; (2) synchronous pumping was used to mode lock the forsterite laser resulting in picosecond pulses, which in turn provided the starting mechanism for self-mode-locking; and (3) the pulses generated had a FWHW of 105 fs and were tunable between 1230 - 1270 nm.

  3. Actively mode-locked all fiber laser with cylindrical vector beam output.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Sun, Biao; Xu, Lixin; Li, Feng; Chung, Dick; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated an all fiber actively mode-locked laser that emits a cylindrical vector beam. An intra-cavity few-mode fiber Bragg grating inscribed in a short section of four-mode fiber is employed to provide mode selection and spectrum filtering functions. Mode coupling is achieved by offset splicing between the single-mode fiber and the four-mode fiber in the laser cavity. A LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator is used to achieve active mode-locking in the laser. The laser operates at 1547 nm with 30 dB spectrum width of 0.2 nm. The mode-locked pulses have a duration of 2 ns and repetition of 12.06 MHz. Through adjusting the polarization state in the laser cavity, both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with high mode purity. PMID:26907420

  4. Continuous-wave and actively Q-switched Nd:LSO crystal lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, S.; Li, D.; Xu, X.; Wang, Z.; Yu, H.; Xu, J.; Chen, L.; Zhao, Y.; Guo, L.; Xu, X.

    2012-04-01

    With a fiber coupled laser diode array as the pump source, Nd-doped Lu2SiO5 (Nd:LSO) crystal lasers at 4F3/2→4I11/2 and 4F3/2→4I13/2 transitions were demonstrated. The active Q-switched dual-wavelength lasers at about 1.08 μm, as well as continuous-wave (CW) and active Q-switched lasers at 1357 nm are reported for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. Considering the small emission cross-sections and long fluorescence lifetime, this material possesses large energy storage ability and excellent Q-switched properties. The special emission wavelength at 1357 nm will have promising applications to be used in many fields, such as THz generation, pumping of Cr3+:LiSAF, repumping of strontium optical clock, laser Doppler velocimeter and distributed fiber sensor.

  5. Study of Shallow Backside Junctions for Backside Illumination of CMOS Image Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chung Seok; Yeo, Sang Chul; Kim, Dohwan; Kim, Jongchae; Yoo, Kyung Dong; Lee, Hyuck Mo

    2014-11-01

    Backside illumination complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensors (BSI CISs) represent an advanced technology that produces high-quality image sensors. However, BSI CISs are limited by high dark signals and noise signals on the backside. To address these problems, backside junctions are commonly used. High-dose backside junctions effectively reduce dark signals and noise signals. The depth of the implantation profile is a key factor in determining the junction depth. A laser thermal annealing process is conducted only near the surface to the activation, and thus broader doping profiles are limitations to be activation of dopants. Changing the dopant from B to BF2 can decrease the implant projected range. However, there are abnormal activation rates for BF2 in applications involving laser thermal annealing processes for shallow junctions. Although the need for BF2 is increasing, a mechanism for its slow activation and low activation rates has not yet been confirmed. Here, we identify the mechanism by which BF2 undergoes low activation after a melting threshold temperature and explain why this phenomenon occurs. In addition, we confirm a condition that provides high activation rates of BF2 and show the reduction of dark signals and noise signals at the high density BSI CISs.

  6. High illumination uniformity scheme with 32 beams configuration for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Gu, Chun; Xu, Lixin; Zhou, Shenlei

    2016-04-01

    The self-adapting algorithms are improved to optimize a beam configuration in the direct drive laser fusion system with the solid state lasers. A configuration of 32 laser beams is proposed for achieving a high uniformity illumination, with a root-mean-square deviation at 10-4 level. In our optimization, the parameters such as beam number, beam arrangement, and beam intensity profile are taken into account. The illumination uniformity robustness versus the parameters such as intensity profile deviations, power imbalance, intensity profile noise, the pointing error, and the target position error is also discussed. In this study, the model is assumed a solid-sphere illumination, and refraction effects of incident light on the corona are not considered. Our results may have a potential application in the design of the direct-drive laser fusion of the Shen Guang-II Upgrading facility (SG-II-U, China).

  7. Biological activity of photoproducts of merocyanine 540 generated by laser-light activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Chanh, Tran C.; Pervaiz, Shazib; Harriman, Anthony; Matthews, James Lester

    1992-08-01

    Controlled exposure of photoactive compounds to light prior to their use in biological targets results in the formation of heretofore unknown photoproducts. This process of photoproduct generation, termed "preactivation," renders the photactive compound capable of systemic use without further dependence on light. Preactivation of mercyanin 540 (MC540) and several other photoactive compounds is achievable by exposure to CW and pulse laser radiation. The singlet oxygen generated at excited states attacks the dye molucule itself, resulting in the formation of biologically active photoproducts. For preactivated MC540 (photoproducts of MC540) generated by exposure to argon laser light (514 nm) and light from free-electron laser, we have demonstrated its effectiveness in selective killing of certain types of cultured tumor cells as well as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with very low, if any, damage to normal cells and tisues. For example, approximately 90% of the Burkitt's lymphoma Daudi cells and HL-60 leukemic cells are killed by preactivated MC540 at a concentration of 120 μg/ml. A two-hour treatment of cultured cells with buthionine sulfoxamine followed by the treatement with preactivated MC540 reults in 99.99% inhibition of clonogenic tumor stem cell growth. We also have demonstrated that preactivated MC540 is very effective in killing cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1. It also is very effective in killing HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in virus-infected blood in vitro as determined by reverse transcriptase, P24, P17, core antigen expression and synctium formation. Treatment of HIV-1 with preactivated MC540 renders the treated HIV-1 incapable of binding to CD4 target molecules on T cells as determined by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoprecipitation assays. In vivo toxicology studies show that preactivated MC540 is very well tolerated and does not produce any signs of adverse reaction at the therapeutic doses, as determined by

  8. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmina, E. V.; Sukhov, I. A.; Lepekhin, N. M.; Priseko, Yu S.; Filippov, V. G.; Simakin, Aleksandr V.; Shafeev, Georgii A.

    2013-06-01

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed.

  9. Monolithically integrated active waveguides and lasers using rare-earth doped spin-on glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Sullivan, C.T.; Vawter, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    This LDRD program No. 3505.230 explored a new approach to monolithic integration of active waveguides and rare-earth solid state lasers directly onto III-V substrates. It involved selectively incorporating rare-earth ions into spin-on glasses (SOGs) that could be solvent cast and then patterned with conventional microelectronic processing. The patterned, rare-earth spin-on glasses (RESOGs) were to be photopumped by laser diodes prefabricated on the wafer and would serve as directly integrated active waveguides and/or rare-earth solid state lasers.

  10. Effect of the active-ion concentration on the lasing dynamics of holmium fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-12-09

    The lasing dynamics of fibre lasers with a core based on quartz glass doped with holmium ions to concentrations in the range of 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} is investigated. It is shown that fibre lasers with a high concentration of active holmium ions generate pulses, but a decrease in the holmium concentration changes the lasing from pulsed to cw regime. At the same time, a decrease in the active-ion concentration and the corresponding increase in the fibre length in the cavity reduce the lasing efficiency. (lasers)

  11. Chromaticity space for illuminant invariant recognition.

    PubMed

    Ratnasingam, Sivalogeswaran; McGinnity, T Martin

    2012-08-01

    In this paper an algorithm is proposed to extract two illuminant invariant chromaticity features from three image sensor responses. The algorithm extracts these chromaticity features at pixel level and therefore can perform well in scenes illuminated with non-uniform illuminant. An approach is proposed to use the algorithm with cameras of unknown sensitivity. The algorithm was tested for separability of perceptually similar colours under the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) standard illuminants and obtained a good performance. It was also tested for colour based object recognition by illuminating objects with typical indoor illuminants and obtained a better performance compared to other existing algorithms investigated in this paper. Finally, the algorithm was tested for skin detection invariant to illuminant, ethnic background and imaging device. In this investigation, daylight scenes under different weather conditions and scenes illuminated by typical indoor illuminants were used. The proposed algorithm gives a better skin detection performance compared to widely used standard colour spaces. Based on the results presented, the proposed illuminant invariant chromaticity space can be used for machine vision applications including illuminant invariant colour based object recognition and skin detection. PMID:22481826

  12. Active space debris removal by using laser propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezunkov, Yu. A.

    2013-03-01

    At present, a few projects on the space debris removal by using highpower lasers are developed. One of the established projects is the ORION proposed by Claude Phipps from Photonics Associates Company and supported by NASA (USA) [1]. But the technical feasibility of the concept is limited by sizes of the debris objects (from 1 to 10 cm) because of a small thrust impulse generated at the laser ablation of the debris materials. At the same time, the removal of rocket upper stages and satellites, which have reached the end of their lives, has been carried out only in a very small number of cases and most of them remain on the Low Earth Orbits (LEO). To reduce the amount of these large-size objects, designing of space systems allowing deorbiting upper rocket stages and removing large-size satellite remnants from economically and scientifically useful orbits to disposal ones is considered. The suggested system is based on high-power laser propulsion. Laser-Orbital Transfer Vehicle (LOTV) with the developed aerospace laser propulsion engine is considered as applied to the problem of mitigation of man-made large-size space debris in LEO.

  13. Clinical and Spectrophotometric Evaluation of LED and Laser Activated Teeth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Lo Giudice, R.; Pantaleo, G.; Lizio, A.; Romeo, U.; Castiello, G.; Spagnuolo, G.; Giudice, G. Lo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Auxiliary power sources (LED and laser) are used in in-office teeth bleaching techniques to accelerate the redox reaction of the whitening gel to increase ease of use, to improve comfort and safety, and to decrease the procedure time. Objective: The aim this study is to evaluate the efficiency of the teeth whitening procedures performed with hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide, LED or Laser activated. Method: 18 patients, affected by exogenous dyschromia, were treated with a bleaching agent composed by 35% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide. They were divided into two groups: in the first group the bleaching agent was activated by a LED lamp; in the second group it was activated by a Laser diode lamp. Both groups were subjected to 3 bleaching cycle of 15’ each. The chromatic evaluations were performed before and after one week from the treatment, using a chromatic scale and a spectrophotometer. The mean value of pre, post bleaching and follow-up were analyzed using a T-test, with results statistically significant for P<0,05. Results: Results showed that the variations in brightness, chroma and hue are significantly influenced by the interaction between the whitening agent and the original colour of the teeth. Laser-activation has marginally improved the bleaching effectiveness. All patients treated with laser activation complained an increase in dental sensitivity. Conclusion: The use of laser-activating systems did not improve the efficacy of bleaching. PMID:27386010

  14. Active and passive coherent beam combining of thulium-doped fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pu; Wang, Xiaolin; Ma, Yanxing; Ma, Haotong; Han, Kai; Xu, Xiaojun; Liu, Zejin

    2010-11-01

    Thulium-doped fiber laser (TFL), which emitted near 2 μm laser beam, has become the latest revolution in highpower fiber laser technology. Further increasing the output power will face great challenges induced by nonlinear effects; coherent beam combining of TFL can increase laser output power while simultaneously maintaining beam quality. In this manuscript, we will present our detailed investigation on coherent beam combining of TFLs. Three different approaches, i.e., interferometric array, mutual injection locking and active phasing based on multi-dithering technique, are employed. In the interferometric array scheme, coherent combining is realized by using an intracavity fiber coupler in an all-fiber laser array configuration. Efficient coherent combining can be achieved by providing sufficient loss discrimination. High combining efficiency of 85% for two fiber laser has been obtained. In mutual injection locking scheme, mutual coherence between the two fiber lasers is established by means of mutual coupling through two 3dB couplers. High combining efficiency of 99% for two fiber laser has been obtained, and the fringe contrast of the intensity pattern at the receiving plane is as high as 93%. In active phasing scheme, when the phase control system is in the closed loop, the fringe contrast of far-field intensity pattern is improved by more than 75 % from 10 % in open loop, and the residual phase error is less than λ/20.

  15. Development of mid-IR lasers for Laser Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soibel, Alexander; Mansour, Kamjou; Spiers, Gary; Forouhar, Siamak

    2005-01-01

    There is an existing need in JPL and in NASA for development of mid-IR lasers, such as Quantum Cascade (QC) lasers, for in-situ and remote laser spectrometers. Mid-IR, compact, low power consumption laser spectrometers have a great potential for detection and measurements of planetary gases and biological important biomarker molecules such as H20, H202, CH4, and many additional chemical species on Mars and other Solar system planets. Another potential application of QC lasers for future NASA mission is in high power remote Laser Reflectance Spectrometers (LRS). In LSR instrument, mid-infrared lasers will act as the illumination source for conducting active mid-IR reflectance spectroscopy of solid-surfaced objects in the outer Solar System. These spectrometers have the potential to provide an incredible amount of information about the compositions of surfaces in the outer Solar System. In this work, we will discuss our current effort at JPL to advance QC lasers to a level that the laser performance, operational requirements and reliability be compatible with the instruments demands for space exploration applications.

  16. Mid-infrared tunable laser based on the Cr:ZnSe active crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koranda, Petr; Jelínková, Helena; Nemec, Michal; Šulc, Jan; Doroshenko, Maxim E.; Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Komar, Vitaly K.; Gerasimenko, Andriy S.; Puzikov, Vyacheslav M.; Badikov, V. V.; Badikov, D. V.

    2008-02-01

    Broadly tunable mid-infrared laser sources operated at room-temperature are desired in many technological and medical applications. The aim of the project was to design and construct broadly tunable powerful Cr:ZnSe laser. The investigated Cr:ZnSe various shaped bulk crystals were grown by the Bridgman method or by the floating zone method. The absorption spectrum was measured to be from 1500 to 2000 nm and the emission spectrum was from 2100 to 2800 nm. Three different lasers were utilized for coherent longitudinal pumping of Cr:ZnSe laser, namely flashlamp-pumped Er:YAP laser (generated wavelength 1660 nm), diode-pumped Tm:YLF laser (generated wavelength 1912 nm) and diode-pumped Tm:YAP laser (generated wavelength 1980 nm). The constructed Cr:ZnSe laser operated in pulsed as well as in continuous-wave regime. In the first case the Cr:ZnSe crystal grown by the floating zone method was studied. The maximal output power in continuous-wave regime was 310 mW with the slope-efficiency 73% for the Tm:YAP laser pumping. In the second case the Cr:ZnSe prism grown by the Bridgman method which served simultaneously as laser active medium and intracavity dispersive element was investigated. For the Er:YAP laser pumping the maximal output energy was 20 mJ with the slope-efficiency 36%. The output radiation was tunable in the range from 2050 nm up to 2750 nm. For the Tm:YAP laser pumping the maximal output power in continuous-wave regime was 175 mW with the slope-efficiency 24%. The output radiation was tunable in the interval from 2220 nm up to 2680 nm. The generated radiation beam spatial structure was close to TEM00.

  17. Deformation of partially pumped active mirrors for high average-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Albach, Daniel; LeTouzé, Geoffroy; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-04-25

    We discuss the deformation of a partially pumped active mirror amplifier as a free standing disk, as implemented in several laser systems. We rely on the Lucia laser project to experimentally evaluate the analytical and numerical deformation models. PMID:21643092

  18. Low threshold, actively Q-switched Nd 3+:YVO 4 self-Raman laser and frequency doubled 588 nm yellow laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoshan; Tan, Huiming; Peng, Jiying; Miao, Jieguang; Gao, Lanlan

    2007-03-01

    We reported an actively Q-switched, intracavity Nd3+:YVO4 self-Raman laser at 1176 nm with low threshold and high efficiency. From the extracavity frequency doubling by use of LBO nonlinear crystal, over 3.5 mW, 588 nm yellow laser is achieved. The maximum Raman laser output at is 182 mW with 1.8 W incident pump power. The threshold is only 370 mW at a pulse repetition frequency of 5 kHz. The optical conversion efficiency from incident to the Raman laser is 10%, and 1.9% from Raman laser to the yellow.

  19. Laser micromachining of through via interconnects in active die for 3-D multichip module

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.; Miller, W.D.

    1995-09-01

    One method to increase density in integrated circuits (IC) is to stack die to create a 3-D multichip module (MCM). In the past, special post wafer processing was done to bring interconnects out to the edge of the die. The die were sawed, glued, and stacked. Special processing was done to create interconnects on the edge to provide for interconnects to each of the die. These processes require an IC type fabrication facility (fab) and special processing equipment. In contrast, we have developed packaging assembly methods to created vertical through vias in bond pads of active silicon die, isolate these vias, and metal fill these vias without the use of a special IC fab. These die with through vias can then be joined and stacked to create a 3-D MCM. Vertical through vias in active die are created by laser micromachining using a Nd:YAG laser. Besides the fundamental 1064 nm (infra-red) laser wavelength of a Nd:YAG laser, modifications to our Nd:YAG laser allowed us to generate the second harmonic 532 nm (green) laser wavelength and fourth harmonic 266nm (ultra violet) laser wavelength in laser micromachining for these vias. Experiments were conducted to determine the best laser wavelengths to use for laser micromachining of vertical through vias in order to minimize damage to the active die. Via isolation experiments were done in order to determine the best method in isolating the bond pads of the die. Die thinning techniques were developed to allow for die thickness as thin as 50 {mu}m. This would allow for high 3-D density when the die are stacked. A method was developed to metal fill the vias with solder using a wire bonder with solder wire.

  20. Interaction of the excited ions-activators in laser crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubenko, D. A.; Noginov, M. A.; Ostroumov, Vasiliy G.; Semenkov, S. G.; Smirnov, V. A.; Shcherbakov, Ivan A.

    1992-11-01

    Processes of interaction of excited ions are investigated in several laser crystals: Er-Er -- in YSGG:Cr, Er and GSAG:Cr,Er crystals; Ho-Ho -- in YSGG:Cr, Ho crystals; Tm-Tm -- in YSGG:Cr,Tm and YAG:Cr,Tm crystals; Tm-Ho -- in YSGG:Cr, Tm, Ho and YSAG:Cr, Tm, Ho crystals; Cr-Cr -- in 11 of different laser crystals (ruby, YAG, GSGG, YSGG, LICAF, et al.); Cr-TR (Er, Ho, Tb, Tm, Nd, -- TR) in YAG, YSGG, GSGG, GSAG crystals.

  1. Fast functional imaging of multiple brain regions in intact zebrafish larvae using selective plane illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Panier, Thomas; Romano, Sebastián A; Olive, Raphaël; Pietri, Thomas; Sumbre, Germán; Candelier, Raphaël; Debrégeas, Georges

    2013-01-01

    The optical transparency and the small dimensions of zebrafish at the larval stage make it a vertebrate model of choice for brain-wide in-vivo functional imaging. However, current point-scanning imaging techniques, such as two-photon or confocal microscopy, impose a strong limit on acquisition speed which in turn sets the number of neurons that can be simultaneously recorded. At 5 Hz, this number is of the order of one thousand, i.e., approximately 1-2% of the brain. Here we demonstrate that this limitation can be greatly overcome by using Selective-plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM). Zebrafish larvae expressing the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP3 were illuminated with a scanned laser sheet and imaged with a camera whose optical axis was oriented orthogonally to the illumination plane. This optical sectioning approach was shown to permit functional imaging of a very large fraction of the brain volume of 5-9-day-old larvae with single- or near single-cell resolution. The spontaneous activity of up to 5,000 neurons was recorded at 20 Hz for 20-60 min. By rapidly scanning the specimen in the axial direction, the activity of 25,000 individual neurons from 5 different z-planes (approximately 30% of the entire brain) could be simultaneously monitored at 4 Hz. Compared to point-scanning techniques, this imaging strategy thus yields a ≃20-fold increase in data throughput (number of recorded neurons times acquisition rate) without compromising the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The extended field of view offered by the SPIM method allowed us to directly identify large scale ensembles of neurons, spanning several brain regions, that displayed correlated activity and were thus likely to participate in common neural processes. The benefits and limitations of SPIM for functional imaging in zebrafish as well as future developments are briefly discussed. PMID:23576959

  2. Lightness constancy and illumination discounting.

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, Alexander D; Tokunaga, Rumi

    2011-08-01

    effect of articulation. This leads to the conclusion that inexperienced observers are unable to estimate both the brightness and the luminance contrast of the light reflected from real objects lit by real lights. None of our observers perceived illumination edges purely as illumination edges: A partial Gelb effect ("partial illumination discounting") always took place. The lightness inconstancy in our experiment resulted from this partial illumination discounting. We propose an account of our results based on the two-dimensionality of achromatic colour. We argue that large interindividual variations and the effect of articulation are caused by the large ambiguity of luminance ratios in the stimulus displays used in laboratory conditions. PMID:21688072

  3. Applications of TM polarized illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bruce; Zhou, Jianming; Xie, Peng

    2008-03-01

    The use of transverse electric (TE) polarization has dominated illumination schemes as selective polarization is used for high-NA patterning. The benefits of TE polarization are clear - the interference of diffracted beams remains absolute at oblique angles. Transverse magnetic (TM) polarization is usually considered less desirable as imaging modulation from interference at large angle falls off rapidly as the 1/cosθ. Significant potential remains, however, for the use of TM polarization at large angles when its reflection component is utilized. By controlling the resist/substrate interface reflectivity, high modulation for TM polarization can be maintained for angles up to 90° in the resist. This can potentially impact the design of illumination away from most recent TE-only schemes for oblique imaging angles (high NA). We demonstrate several cases of TM illumination combined with tuned substrate reflectivity for 0.93NA, 1.20NA, and 1.35NA and compare results to TE and unpolarized cases. The goal is to achieve a flat response through polarization at large imaging angles. An additional application of TM illumination is its potential use for double patterning. As double patterning and double exposure approaches are sought in order to meet the needs of 32nm device generations and beyond, materials and process engineering challenges become prohibitive. We have devised a method for frequency doubling in a single exposure using an unconventional means of polarization selection and by making use of the reflective component produced at the photoresist/substrate interface. In doing so, patterns can be deposited into a photoresist film with double density. As an example, using a projection system numerical aperture of 1.20, with water as an immersion fluid, and a conventional polyacrylate 193nm photoresist, pattern resolution at 20nm half-pitch are obtainable (which is 0.125lambda/NA). The process to transfer this geometry into a hardmask layer uses conventional materials

  4. IR Image upconversion using band-limited ASE illumination fiber sources.

    PubMed

    Maestre, H; Torregrosa, A J; Capmany, J

    2016-04-18

    We study the field-of-view (FOV) of an upconversion imaging system that employs an Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) fiber source to illuminate a transmission target. As an intermediate case between narrowband laser and thermal illumination, an ASE fiber source allows for higher spectral intensity than thermal illumination and still keeps a broad wavelength spectrum to take advantage of an increased non-collinear phase-matching angle acceptance that enlarges the FOV of the upconversion system when compared to using narrowband laser illumination. A model is presented to predict the angular acceptance of the upconverter in terms of focusing and ASE spectral width and allocation. The model is experimentally checked in case of 1550-630 nm upconversion. PMID:27137295

  5. Role of ROS-mediated TGF beta activation in laser photobiomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arany, Praveen R.; Chen, Aaron Chih-Hao; Hunt, Tristan; Mooney, David J.; Hamblin, Michael

    2009-02-01

    The ability of laser light to modulate specific biological processes has been well documented but the precise mechanism mediating these photobiological interactions remains an area of intense investigation. We recently published the results of our clinical trial with 30 patients in an oral tooth-extraction wound healing model using a 904nm GaAs laser (Oralaser 1010, Oralia, Konstnaz, Germany), assessing healing parameters using routine histopathology and immunostaining (Arany et al Wound Rep Regen 2007, 15, 866). We observed a better organized healing response in laser irradiated oral tissues that correlated with an increased expression of TGF-beta1 immediately post laser irradiation. Our data suggested the source of latent TGF-beta1 might be from the degranulating platelets in the serum, an abundant source of in vivo latent TGF-beta, in the freshly wounded tissues. Further, we also demonstrated the ability of the low power near-infrared laser irradiation to activate the latent TGF-beta complexes in vitro at varying fluences from 10sec (0.1 J/cm2) to 600secs (6 J/cm2). Using serum we observed two isoforms, namely TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta3, were capable of being activated by laser irradiation using an isoform-specific ELISA and a reporter based (p3TP) assay system. We are presently pursuing the precise photomolecular mechanisms focusing on potential chromophores, wavelength and fluence parameters affecting the Latent TGF-beta activation process in serum. As ROS mediated TGF-beta activation has been previously demonstrated and we are also exploring the role of Laser generated-ROS in this activation process. In summary, we present evidence of a potential molecular mechanism for laser photobiomodulation in its ability to activate latent TGF-beta complexes.

  6. Extraterrestrial applications of solar optics for interior illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eijadi, David A.; Williams, Kyle D.

    1992-01-01

    Solar optics is a terrestrial technology that has potential extraterrestrial applications. Active solar optics (ASO) and passive solar optics (PSO) are two approaches to the transmission of sunlight to remote interior spaces. Active solar optics is most appropriate for task illumination, while PSO is most appropriate for general illumination. Research into solar optics, motivated by energy conservation, has produced lightweight and low-cost materials, products that have applications to NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program and its lunar base studies. Specifically, prism light guides have great potential in these contexts. Several applications of solar optics to lunar base concepts are illustrated.

  7. Laser Holography. High Tech with High Potential for Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlegel, Ronald D.

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses the procedure, historical development, and applications of holography, and discusses the feasibility and value of implementing a unit or course of study of laser holography into an existing photography laboratory and curriculum. An equipment and supplies list, giving supplies and cost, is included. (CT)

  8. Synchrotron-based EUV lithography illuminator simulator

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2004-07-27

    A lithographic illuminator to illuminate a reticle to be imaged with a range of angles is provided. The illumination can be employed to generate a pattern in the pupil of the imaging system, where spatial coordinates in the pupil plane correspond to illumination angles in the reticle plane. In particular, a coherent synchrotron beamline is used along with a potentially decoherentizing holographic optical element (HOE), as an experimental EUV illuminator simulation station. The pupil fill is completely defined by a single HOE, thus the system can be easily modified to model a variety of illuminator fill patterns. The HOE can be designed to generate any desired angular spectrum and such a device can serve as the basis for an illuminator simulator.

  9. Advanced mask aligner lithography: new illumination system.

    PubMed

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Vogler, Uwe; Bich, Andreas; Pernet, Pascal; Weible, Kenneth J; Hornung, Michael; Zoberbier, Ralph; Cullmann, Elmar; Stuerzebecher, Lorenz; Harzendorf, Torsten; Zeitner, Uwe D

    2010-09-27

    A new illumination system for mask aligner lithography is presented. The illumination system uses two subsequent microlens-based Köhler integrators. The second Köhler integrator is located in the Fourier plane of the first. The new illumination system uncouples the illumination light from the light source and provides excellent uniformity of the light irradiance and the angular spectrum. Spatial filtering allows to freely shape the angular spectrum to minimize diffraction effects in contact and proximity lithography. Telecentric illumination and ability to precisely control the illumination light allows to introduce resolution enhancement technologies (RET) like customized illumination, optical proximity correction (OPC) and source-mask optimization (SMO) in mask aligner lithography. PMID:20940992

  10. Tetravalent Chromium (Cr(4+)) as Laser-Active Ion for Tunable Solid-State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    During 10/31/91 - 3/31/92, the following summarizes are major accomplishments: (1) numerical modeling of the four mirror astigmatically compensated, Z-fold cavity was performed; and (2) the simulation revealed several design parameters to be used for the construction of a femtosecond forsterite laser.

  11. Laser active imaging-guided anti-tank missile system small-scale integration design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mingliang; Shan, Xiangqian; Qu, Zhou

    2010-10-01

    At present, the domestic and international third-generation anti-tank missiles, laser-guided missiles are mostly divided into active laser-guided and laser semi-active guidance, this guidance system, there are vulnerable to electronic interference, can not be fully realized after launching deficiencies. Article based on this, an in-depth understanding of imaging-guided laser-active working principle, based on the pairs of third-generation anti-tank missile guidance system, boldly proposed to improve the anti-tank missiles, laser-active small-scale integration of imaging guidance system design, the main purpose is to improve a certain type of The optical target missile, TV angle measurement, laser-guided instruction transmission means, so that anti-tank missiles to achieve forward-looking, the next obstacle avoidance TV and multi-functional integration of the entire after launching smart missiles, and in theory be able to study the new antitank missiles play a certain reference.

  12. Possibilities of increasing the pumping efficiency of solid active medium laser generators by optimizing the pumping cavity profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dontu, O.; Ganatsios, S.; Alexandrescu, N.

    2008-03-01

    The paper presents some design elements concerning the optical pumping cavities of the laser generators with active solid medium, as well as the way of increasing their performance. We start from the fact that the laser cavity is a closed optical system, where the active laser medium and the pumping source are conjugated, in order to achieve a maximum concentration of the light flux of the pumping source towards the active medium. We discuss the simple elliptical section laser pumping cavities (with one pumping lamp) and triple elliptical (with three lamps), also presenting a series on calculus nomograms, very useful to those who design the laser generation optical pumping cavities.

  13. Micromilled optical elements for edge-lit illumination panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronny, Rahima Afrose; Knopf, George K.; Bordatchev, Evgueni; Nikumb, Suwas

    2013-04-01

    Edge-lit light guide panels (LGPs) with micropatterned surfaces represent a new technology for developing small- and medium-sized illumination sources for application such as automotive, residential lighting, and advertising displays. The shape, density, and spatial distribution of the micro-optical structures (MOSs) imprinted on the transparent LGP must be selected to achieve high brightness and uniform luminance over the active surface. We examine how round-tip cylindrical MOSs fabricated by precision micromilling can be used to create patterned surfaces on low-cost transparent polymethyl-methacrylate substrates for high-intensity illumination applications. The impact of varying the number, pitch, spatial distribution, and depth of the optical microstructures on lighting performance is initially investigated using LightTools™ simulation software. To illustrate the microfabrication process, several 100×100×6 mm3 LGP prototypes are constructed and tested. The prototypes include an "optimized" array of MOSs that exhibit near-uniform illumination (approximately 89%) across its active light-emitting surface. Although the average illumination was 7.3% less than the value predicted from numerical simulation, it demonstrates how LGPs can be created using micromilling operations. Customized MOS arrays with a bright rectangular pattern near the center of the panel and a sequence of MOSs that illuminate a predefined logo are also presented.

  14. Structured illumination diffraction phase microscopy for broadband, sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is an established technique that allows sub-diffraction resolution imaging by heterodyning high sample frequencies into the system’s passband via structured illumination. However, until now, SIM has been typically used to achieve sub-diffraction resolution for intensity-based imaging. Here, we present a novel optical setup that uses structured illumination with a broadband-light source to obtain noise-reduced, sub-diffraction resolution, quantitative-phase (QPM) imaging of cells. We compare this with a previous work for sub-diffraction QPM imaging via SIM that used a laser source, and was thus still corrupted by coherent noise. PMID:24562266

  15. Laser-ablated active doping technique for visible spectroscopy measurements on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Matthew Robert

    2013-09-01

    Visible spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic, allowing plasma parameters ranging from temperature and density to electric and magnetic fields to be measured. Spectroscopic dopants are commonly introduced to make these measurements. On Z, dopants are introduced passively (i.e. a salt deposited on a current-carrying surface); however, in some cases, passive doping can limit the times and locations at which measurements can be made. Active doping utilizes an auxiliary energy source to disperse the dopant independently from the rest of the experiment. The objective of this LDRD project was to explore laser ablation as a method of actively introducing spectroscopic dopants. Ideally, the laser energy would be delivered to the dopant via fiber optic, which would eliminate the need for time-intensive laser alignments in the Z chamber. Experiments conducted in a light lab to assess the feasibility of fibercoupled and open-beam laser-ablated doping are discussed.

  16. The power of the bubble: comparing ultrasonic and laser activated irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Moor, Roeland J. G.; Meire, Maarten A.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2014-01-01

    The major problem of irrigation is the fluid motion within the confined geometry of the root canal : efficient dispersion of the liquid is difficult, conventional irrigation is limited due to the absence of turbulence over much of the canal volume, vapour lock may limit apical cleaning and disinfection, there is also a stagnation plane beyond the needle tip. The best way to improve irrigant penetration and biofilm removal is achieved by means of the agitation of the fluid. Today ultrasonic activation appears to be the best way to activate and potentiate irrigants among the present-day used means and marketed systems. Another way to activate irrigation solutions is the use of lasers: laser activated irrigation or photon-initiated acoustic streaming have been investigated. Based on present-day research it appears that the efficacy of laser activation (especially with Erbium lasers) can be more efficient thanks to the induction of specific cavitation phenomena and acoustic streaming. Other wavelengths are now explored to be used for laser activated irrigation.

  17. Zig-zag active-mirror laser with cryogenic Yb3+:YAG/YAG composite ceramics.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Hiroaki; Kawanaka, Junji; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Saiki, Taku; Imasaki, Kazuo; Fujita, Masayuki; Takeshita, Kenji; Ishii, Shinya; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2011-01-31

    We report on a novel amplifier configuration concept for a 10 kW laser system using a zig-zag optical path based on a cryogenic Yb:YAG Total-Reflection Active-Mirror (TRAM) laser. The laser material is a compact composite ceramic, in which three Yb:YAG TRAMs are combined in series to increase the output power. Output powers of up to 214 W with a slope efficiency of 63% have been demonstrated for CW operation, even at a quite low pump intensity of less than 170 W/cm2. Further scaling could achieve output powers of more than 10 kW. PMID:21369064

  18. Thermal analysis on grad-doped active-mirror Yb:YAG ceramic lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaojin; Wang, Jianlei; Jiang, Benxue

    2015-11-01

    Heat conduction, temperature distribution, thermal stress, and thermally induced refractive index of a diode-pumped active-mirror grad-doped Yb:YAG ceramic laser are analyzed and compared to a uniform-doped Yb:YAG ceramic laser. It is found that a rationally designed grad-doped Yb:YAG ceramic has a smaller temperature gradient than a uniform-doped Yb:YAG ceramic with the same absorption pump power, which results in higher output energy in the grad-doped Yb:YAG ceramic laser.

  19. Effect of active-ion concentration on holmium fibre laser efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-08-03

    We have measured the fraction of holmium ions that relax nonradiatively to the ground level as a result of interaction at a metastable level in optical fibres with a silica-based core doped with holmium ions to 2 x 10{sup 19} - 2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The percentage of such ions has been shown to depend on the absolute active-ion concentration. The fibres have been used to make a number of 2.05-{mu}m lasers, and their slope efficiency has been measured. The laser efficiency decreases with increasing holmium concentration in the fibres (lasers)

  20. Waterproof active paper via laser surface micropatterning of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, G; Ziaie, B

    2012-09-26

    Paper is one of the oldest and most abundant materials known to man. Recently, there has been a considerable interest in creating paper devices by combining paper with other functional materials. In this letter, we demonstrate a simple fabrication technique to create water-resistant ferro-patterns on wax paper using CO(2) laser ablation. A resolution of about 100 μm is achieved which is mostly limited by the cellulose fiber size (~50 μm) in the wax paper and can be improved by using a smaller cellulose matrix. Laser ablation results in modification of surface morphology and chemistry, leading to a change in surface energy. We also present a 2D model for ferrofluid deposition relating the size of the pattern to the amount of ferroparticles deposited on the surface. Finally, a paper gripper is presented to demonstrate advantages of our technique, which allows microscale patterning and machining in a single step. PMID:22939525

  1. Polar direct drive illumination uniformity provided by the Orion facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temporal, Mauro; Canaud, Benoit; Garbett, Warren J.; Philippe, Franck; Ramis, Rafael

    2013-10-01

    The ten long-pulse laser beams of the Orion facility have been considered as a direct driver for the irradiation of a spherical capsule. The intrinsic root-mean-square illumination non-uniformity σ 0 has been evaluated assuming circular and elliptical super-Gaussian laser intensity profiles. Calculations accounting for nominal uncertainties in power imbalance, pointing error and target positioning have shown a degradation of the irradiation uniformity. Non-uniformity of the irradiation as a function of the capsule radius has been calculated and it has been shown that the use of the polar direct drive technique significantly improves the quality of the irradiation. Finally, it is found that an elliptical focal shape provides better symmetry results in comparison to circular ones, whilst the laser-capsule coupling is reduced.

  2. Laser Activated Flow Regulator for Glaucoma Drainage Devices

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Jeffrey L.; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Bhandari, Ramanath

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the capabilities of a new glaucoma drainage device regulator in controlling fluid flow as well as to demonstrate that this effect may be titratable by noninvasive means. Methods A rigid eye model with two main ports was used. On the first port, we placed a saline solution column. On the second, we placed a glaucoma shunt. We then measured the flow and flow rate through the system. After placing the regulator device on the tip of the tube, we measured again with the intact membrane and with the membrane open 50% and 100%. For the ex vivo testing we used a similar setting, using a cadaveric porcine eye, we measured again the flow and flow rate. However, this time we opened the membrane gradually using laser shots. A one-way analysis of variance and a Fisher's Least Significant Difference test were used for statistical significance. We also calculated the correlation between the numbers of laser shots applied and the main outcomes. Results The flow through the system with the glaucoma drainage device regulator (membrane intact and 50% open) was statistically lower than with the membrane open 100% and without device (P < 0.05). The flow was successfully controlled by the number of laser shots applied, and showed a positive correlation (+ 0.9). The flow rate was almost doubled every 10 shots and statistically lower than without device at all time (P < 0.05). Conclusions The glaucoma drainage device regulator can be controlled noninvasively with laser, and allows titratable control of aqueous flow. Translational Relevance Initial results and evidence from this experiment will justify the initiation of in vivo animal trials with the glaucoma drainage device regulator; which brings us closer to possible human trials and the chance to significantly improve the existing technology to treat glaucoma surgically. PMID:25374772

  3. UV laser activated digital etching of GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Meguro, T.; Aoyagi, Y.

    1996-12-31

    The self-limited etching characteristics of digital etching employing an UV laser/Cl{sub 2}/GaAs system are presented. The self-limiting nature is the key mechanism and plays an important role in digital etching for obtaining etch rates independent of etching parameters. Surface processes based on photodissociation of physisorbed chlorine on GaAs with diffusion of negatively charged Cl into GaAs are also discussed.

  4. Optimized geometric configuration of active ring laser gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormley, John; Salloum, Tony

    2016-05-01

    We present a thorough derivation of the Sagnac effect for a ring laser gyroscope of any arbitrary polygonal configuration. We determine optimized alternative geometric configurations for the mirrors. The simulations incur the implementation of a lasing medium with the standard square system, triangular, pentagonal, and oblongated square configuration (diamond). Simulations of possible new geometric configurations are considered, as well as the possibility of adjusting the concavity of the mirrors.

  5. Laser-activated remote phosphor light engine for projection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Martin; Mehl, Oliver; Hartwig, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Recent developments in blue emitting laser diodes enable attractive solutions in projection applications using phosphors for efficient light conversion with very high luminance levels. Various commercially available projectors incorporating this technology have entered the market in the past years. While luminous flux levels are still comparable to lamp-based systems, lifetime expectations of classical lamp systems are exceeded by far. OSRAM GmbH has been exploring this technology for several years and has introduced the PHASER® brand name (Phosphor + laser). State-of-the-art is a rotating phosphor wheel excited by blue laser diodes to deliver the necessary primary colors, either sequentially for single-imager projection engines, or simultaneously for 3-panel systems. The PHASER® technology enables flux and luminance scaling, which allows for smaller imagers and therefore cost-efficient projection solutions. The resulting overall efficiency and ANSI lumen specification at the projection screen of these systems is significantly determined by the target color gamut and the light transmission efficiency of the projection system. With increasing power and flux level demand, thermal issues, especially phosphor conversion related, dominate the opto-mechanical system design requirements. These flux levels are a great challenge for all components of an SSL-projection system (SSL:solid-state lighting). OSRAḾs PHASER® light engine platform is constantly expanded towards higher luminous flux levels as well as higher luminance levels for various applications. Recent experiments employ blue laser pump powers of multiple 100 Watts to excite various phosphors resulting in luminous flux levels of more than 40 klm.

  6. Thin-disk laser based on an Yb:YAG / YAG composite active element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, I. I.; Mukhin, I. B.; Vadimova, O. L.; Palashov, O. V.

    2015-03-01

    A thin-disk laser module based on an Yb:YAG / YAG composite active element is developed with a small-signal gain of 1.25 and a stored energy of 400 mJ under cw pumping. The gain and thermally induced phase distortions in the module are studied experimentally. Based on this module, a thin-disk laser with an average power of 300 W and a slope efficiency of 42% is designed.

  7. Widely tunable active Bragg reflector integrated lasers in InGaAsP-InP

    SciTech Connect

    Broberg, B.; Nilsson, S.

    1988-04-18

    Monolithic InGaAsP-InP lasers comprising an active Bragg reflector integrated with a separately pumped wide-band gain region have been developed. The lasers operate in a dynamic single mode in the 1.55 ..mu..m wavelength region. By adjusting the current through the Bragg reflector, the wavelength can be tuned. The maximum tuning range is 11.6 nm.

  8. Laser-activated nano-biomaterials for tissue repair and controlled drug release

    SciTech Connect

    Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Rossi, F; Pini, R

    2014-07-31

    We present recent achievements of minimally invasive welding of biological tissue and controlled drug release based on laser-activated nano-biomaterials. In particular, we consider new advancements in the biomedical application of near-IR absorbing gold nano-chromophores as an original solution for the photothermal repair of surgical incisions and as nanotriggers of controlled drug release from hybrid biopolymer scaffolds. (laser biophotonics)

  9. 3D fluorescence anisotropy imaging using selective plane illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hedde, Per Niklas; Ranjit, Suman; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-08-24

    Fluorescence anisotropy imaging is a popular method to visualize changes in organization and conformation of biomolecules within cells and tissues. In such an experiment, depolarization effects resulting from differences in orientation, proximity and rotational mobility of fluorescently labeled molecules are probed with high spatial resolution. Fluorescence anisotropy is typically imaged using laser scanning and epifluorescence-based approaches. Unfortunately, those techniques are limited in either axial resolution, image acquisition speed, or by photobleaching. In the last decade, however, selective plane illumination microscopy has emerged as the preferred choice for three-dimensional time lapse imaging combining axial sectioning capability with fast, camera-based image acquisition, and minimal light exposure. We demonstrate how selective plane illumination microscopy can be utilized for three-dimensional fluorescence anisotropy imaging of live cells. We further examined the formation of focal adhesions by three-dimensional time lapse anisotropy imaging of CHO-K1 cells expressing an EGFP-paxillin fusion protein. PMID:26368202

  10. 3D fluorescence anisotropy imaging using selective plane illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hedde, Per Niklas; Ranjit, Suman; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence anisotropy imaging is a popular method to visualize changes in organization and conformation of biomolecules within cells and tissues. In such an experiment, depolarization effects resulting from differences in orientation, proximity and rotational mobility of fluorescently labeled molecules are probed with high spatial resolution. Fluorescence anisotropy is typically imaged using laser scanning and epifluorescence-based approaches. Unfortunately, those techniques are limited in either axial resolution, image acquisition speed, or by photobleaching. In the last decade, however, selective plane illumination microscopy has emerged as the preferred choice for three-dimensional time lapse imaging combining axial sectioning capability with fast, camera-based image acquisition, and minimal light exposure. We demonstrate how selective plane illumination microscopy can be utilized for three-dimensional fluorescence anisotropy imaging of live cells. We further examined the formation of focal adhesions by three-dimensional time lapse anisotropy imaging of CHO-K1 cells expressing an EGFP-paxillin fusion protein. PMID:26368202

  11. Active and passive multispectral scanner for earth resources applications: An advanced applications flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasell, P. G., Jr.; Peterson, L. M.; Thomson, F. J.; Work, E. A.; Kriegler, F. J.

    1977-01-01

    The development of an experimental airborne multispectral scanner to provide both active (laser illuminated) and passive (solar illuminated) data from a commonly registered surface scene is discussed. The system was constructed according to specifications derived in an initial programs design study. The system was installed in an aircraft and test flown to produce illustrative active and passive multi-spectral imagery. However, data was not collected nor analyzed for any specific application.

  12. Photothermal and photoacoustic processes of laser activated nano-thermolysis of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova, Ekaterina; Mitskevich, Pavel; Smolnikova, Victoria; Potapnev, Michail; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2007-02-01

    Laser Activated Nano-Thermolysis was recently proposed for selective damage of individual target (cancer) cells by pulsed laser induced microbubbles around superheated clusters of optically absorbing nanoparticles (NP). One of the clinical applications of this technology is the elimination of residual tumor cells from human blood and bone marrow. Clinical standards for the safety and efficacy of such procedure require the development and verification of highly selective and controllable mechanisms of cell killing. Our previous experiments showed that laser-induced microbubble is the main damaging factor in the case cell irradiation by short laser pulses above the threshold. Our current aim was to study the cell damage mechanisms and analyze selectivity and efficacy of cell damage as a function of NP parameters, NP-cell interaction conditions, and conditions of bubble generation around NP and NP clusters in cells. Generation of laser-induced bubbles around gold NP with diameters 10-250 nm was studied in Acute Myeloblast Leukemia (AML) cultures, normal stem and model K562 human cells. Short laser pulses (10 ns, 532 nm) were applied to those cells in vitro and the processes in cells were investigated with photothermal, fluorescent and atomic force microscopies and also with fluorescence flow cytometry. We have found that the best selectivity of cell damage is achieved by (1) forming large clusters of optically absorbing NP in target cells and (2) irradiating the cells with single laser pulses with the lowest fluence that can generate microbubble only around large clusters but not around single NP. Laser microbubbles with the lifetime from 20 ns to 2000 ns generated in individual cells caused damage and lysis of the cellular membrane and consequently cell death. Laser microbubbles did not damage normal cells around the damaged target (tumor) cell. Laser irradiation with equal fluence did not cause any damage of cells without accumulated NP clusters.

  13. Status of MBI activities: Will a transient collisional x-ray laser with high repetition rate come soon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickles, Peter V.; Janulewicz, Karol A.; Priebe, Gerd; Lucianetti, Antonio; Kroemer, Robert K.; Gerlitzke, Anne-Kathrin; Sandner, Wolfgang

    2003-12-01

    Some prospects for development of collisional X-ray lasers with a high repetition rate based on the output characteristics of a transient Ni-like Ag soft X-ray laser pumped by a single picosecond laser pulse are analysed. Such problems as target technology, new driver development and the active medium parameters are discussed.

  14. Free-form illumination optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohedano, Rubén; Chaves, Julio; Hernández, Maikel

    2016-04-01

    In many illumination problems, the beam pattern needed and/or some geometrical constraints lead to very asymmetric design conditions. These asymmetries have been solved in the past by means of arrangements of rotationally symmetric or linear lamps aimed in different directions whose patterns overlap to provide the asymmetric prescriptions or by splitting one single lamp into several sections, each one providing a part of the pattern. The development of new design methods yielding smooth continuous free-form optical surfaces to solve these challenging design problems, combined with the proper CAD modeling tools plus the development of multiple axes diamond turn machines, give birth to a new generation of optics. These are able to offer the performance and other advanced features, such as efficiency, compactness, or aesthetical advantages, and can be manufactured at low cost by injection molding. This paper presents two examples of devices with free-form optical surfaces, a camera flash, and a car headlamp.

  15. Fully depleted back illuminated CCD

    DOEpatents

    Holland, Stephen Edward

    2001-01-01

    A backside illuminated charge coupled device (CCD) is formed of a relatively thick high resistivity photon sensitive silicon substrate, with frontside electronic circuitry, and an optically transparent backside ohmic contact for applying a backside voltage which is at least sufficient to substantially fully deplete the substrate. A greater bias voltage which overdepletes the substrate may also be applied. One way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is by physically connecting the voltage source to the ohmic contact. An alternate way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is to physically connect the voltage source to the frontside of the substrate, at a point outside the depletion region. Thus both frontside and backside contacts can be used for backside biasing to fully deplete the substrate. Also, high resistivity gaps around the CCD channels and electrically floating channel stop regions can be provided in the CCD array around the CCD channels. The CCD array forms an imaging sensor useful in astronomy.

  16. Transillumination spatially modulated illumination microscopy for human chromosome imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitris, Costas; Heracleous, Peter; Patsalis, Philippos

    2005-03-01

    Human chromosome analysis is an essential task in cytogenetics, especially in prenatal screening, genetic syndrome diagnosis, cancer pathology research and mutagen dosimetry. Chromosomal analysis begins with the creation of a karyotype, which is a layout of chromosome images organized by decreasing size in pairs. Both manual and automatic classification of chromosomes are limited by the resolution of the microscope and imaging system used. One way to improve the results of classification and even detect subtleties now remaining undetected, is to enhance the resolution of the images. It is possible to achieve lateral resolution beyond the classical limit, by using spatially modulated illumination (SMI) in a wide-field, non-confocal microscope. In this case, the sample is illuminated with spatially modulated light, which makes normally inaccessible high-resolution information visible in the observed image by shifting higher frequencies within the OTF limits of the microscope. Although, SMI microscopes have been reported in the past, this manuscript reports the development of a transillumination microscope for opaque, non-fluorescent samples. The illumination path consisted of a light source illuminating a ruled grating which was subsequently imaged on the sample. The grating was mounted on a rotating and translating stage so that the magnification and rotation of the pattern could be adjusted. The imaging lens was a 1.25 NA oil immersion objective. Test samples showed resolution improvement, as judged from a comparison of the experimentally obtained FWHM. Further studies using smaller fringe distance or laser interference pattern illumination will be evaluated to further optimize the SMI results.

  17. Influence of lasing parameters on the cleaning efficacy of laser-activated irrigation with pulsed erbium lasers.

    PubMed

    Meire, Maarten A; Havelaerts, Sophie; De Moor, Roeland J

    2016-05-01

    Laser-activated irrigation (LAI) using erbium lasers is an irrigant agitation technique with great potential for improved cleaning of the root canal system, as shown in many in vitro studies. However, lasing parameters for LAI vary considerably and their influence remains unclear. Therefore, this study sought to investigate the influence of pulse energy, pulse frequency, pulse length, irradiation time and fibre tip shape, position and diameter on the cleaning efficacy of LAI. Transparent resin blocks containing standardized root canals (apical diameter of 0.4 mm, 6 % taper, 15 mm long, with a coronal reservoir) were used as the test model. A standardized groove in the apical part of each canal wall was packed with stained dentin debris. The canals were filled with irrigant, which was activated by an erbium: yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser (2940 nm, AT Fidelis, Fotona, Ljubljana, Slovenia). In each experiment, one laser parameter was varied, while the others remained constant. In this way, the influence of pulse energy (10-40 mJ), pulse length (50-1000 μs), frequency (5-30 Hz), irradiation time (5-40 s) and fibre tip shape (flat or conical), position (pulp chamber, canal entrance, next to groove) and diameter (300-600 μm) was determined by treating 20 canals per parameter. The amount of debris remaining in the groove after each LAI procedure was scored and compared among the different treatments. The parameters significantly (P < 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis) affecting debris removal from the groove were fibre tip position, pulse length, pulse energy, irradiation time and frequency. Fibre tip shape and diameter had no significant influence on the cleaning efficacy. PMID:26861988

  18. Optics, illumination, and image sensing for machine vision VI; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Nov. 14, 15, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetkoff, Donald J.

    Recent advances in research on imaging technologies and practical application of numerous techniques are reported. Consideration is given to illumination and sensing methods and systems, image and instrument models, optical processing and data manipulation, and 3D imaging techniques and systems. Particular attention is given to light source design for machine vision, multisource and color lighting for detection of small protuberances, VLSI sensor/processor circuitry for autonomous robots, calibration of an active stereoscopic imaging system, image processor development with synthetic images, optical morphological processing of disordered structures, a high-speed coherent optical correlator based on two MOSLMs, 3D line-scan intensity ratio sensing, pulsed time-of-flight laser range-finding techniques for industrial applications, and a comparison of continuous-wave and pulsed time-of-flight laser range-finding techniques.

  19. In vivo carotid artery closure by laser activation of hyaluronan-embedded gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, Paolo; Ratto, Fulvio; Rossi, Francesca; Rossi, Giacomo; Esposito, Giuseppe; Puca, Alfredo; Albanese, Alessio; Maira, Giulio; Pini, Roberto

    2010-07-01

    We prove the first application of near-infrared-absorbing gold nanorods (GNRs) for in vivo laser closure of a rabbit carotid artery. GNRs are first functionalized with a biopolymeric shell and then embedded in hyaluronan, which gives a stabilized and handy laser-activable formulation. Four rabbits undergo closure of a 3-mm longitudinal incision performed on the carotid artery by means of a 810-nm diode laser in conjunction with the topical application of the GNRs composite. An effective surgery is obtained by using a 40-W/cm2 laser power density. The histological and electron microscopy evaluation after a 30-day follow-up demonstrates complete healing of the treated arteries with full re-endothelization at the site of GNRs application. The absence of microgranuloma formation and/or dystrophic calcification is evidence that no host reaction to nanoparticles interspersed through the vascular tissue occurred. The observation of a reshaping and associated blue shift of the NIR absorption band of GNRs after laser treatment supports the occurrence of a self-terminating process, and thus of additional safety of the minimally invasive laser procedure. This study underlines the feasibility of using GNRs for in vivo laser soldering applications, which represents a step forward toward the introduction of nanotechnology-based therapies in minimally invasive clinical practices.

  20. Automotive headlighting: effect of foreground illumination.

    PubMed

    Olson, P L; Sivak, M

    1983-12-01

    Described are studies of the relationship between the level of foreground illumination provided by automotive headlamps and the driver's eye-fixation pattern and ability to identify objects ahead of the car. Analysis indicates that the driver's eye fixations tended to move further from the car at high levels of foreground illumination. There were no differences in distance of target identification as a function of level of foreground illumination. PMID:6664782

  1. Active lamp pulse driver circuit. [optical pumping of laser media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, K. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A flashlamp drive circuit is described which uses an unsaturated transistor as a current mode switch to periodically subject a partially ionized gaseous laser excitation flashlamp to a stable, rectangular pulse of current from an incomplete discharge of an energy storage capacitor. A monostable multivibrator sets the pulse interval, initiating the pulse in response to a flash command by providing a reference voltage to a non-inverting terminal of a base drive amplifier; a tap on an emitter resistor provides a feedback signal sensitive to the current amplitude to an inverting terminal of amplifier, thereby controlling the pulse amplitude. The circuit drives the flashlamp to provide a squarewave current flashlamp discharge.

  2. PHYSICAL EFFECTS OCCURRING DURING GENERATION AND AMPLIFICATION OF LASER RADIATION: Kinetic model of the active medium of an XeCl laser pumped by an electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boĭchenko, A. M.; Derzhiev, V. I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Yakovlenko, Sergei I.

    1989-02-01

    Kinetic models of active media of an XeCl laser are developed for the case when these media are diluted by various buffer gases (helium, neon, argon) and the laser is pumped by an electron beam. The results of the calculations are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data.

  3. Polarimetric target detection under uneven illumination.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bingjing; Liu, Tiegen; Han, Jiahui; Hu, Haofeng

    2015-09-01

    In polarimetric imaging, the uneven illumination could cause the significant spatial intensity fluctuations in the scene, and thus hampers the target detection. In this paper, we propose a method of illumination compensation and contrast optimization for Stokes polarimetric imaging, which allows significantly increasing the performance of target detection under uneven illumination. We show with numerical simulation and real-world experiment that, based on the intensity information contained in the polarization information, the contrast can be effectively enhanced by proper approach, which is of particular importance in practical applications with spatial illumination fluctuations, such as remote sensing. PMID:26368458

  4. Delivery of molecules into cells using carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Prerona; Qian, Wei; El-Sayed, Mostafa A; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2010-08-01

    A major barrier to drug and gene delivery is crossing the cell's plasma membrane. Physical forces applied to cells via electroporation, ultrasound and laser irradiation generate nanoscale holes in the plasma membrane for direct delivery of drugs into the cytoplasm. Inspired by previous work showing that laser excitation of carbon nanoparticles can drive the carbon-steam reaction to generate highly controlled shock waves, we show that carbon black nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses can facilitate the delivery of small molecules, proteins and DNA into two types of cells. Our initial results suggest that interaction between the laser energy and carbon black nanoparticles may generate photoacoustic forces by chemical reaction to create transient holes in the membrane for intracellular delivery. PMID:20639882

  5. Fully automated hybrid diode laser assembly using high precision active alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, Gunnar; Weber, Daniel; Scholz, Friedemann; Schröder, Henning; Schneider-Ramelow, Martin; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Fraunhofer IZM, Technische Universität Berlin and eagleyard Photonics present various implementations of current micro-optical assemblies for high quality free space laser beam forming and efficient fiber coupling. The laser modules shown are optimized for fast and automated assembly in small form factor packages via state-of-the-art active alignment machinery, using alignment and joining processes that have been developed and established in various industrial research projects. Operational wavelengths and optical powers ranging from 600 to 1600 nm and from 1 mW to several W respectively are addressed, for application in high-resolution laser spectroscopy, telecom and optical sensors, up to the optical powers needed in industrial and medical laser treatment.

  6. High-power diode lasers with an aluminium-free active region at 915 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, N.; Hassiaoui, I.; Calligaro, M.; Lecomte, M.; Parillaud, O.; Krakowski, M.; Borruel, L.; García-Tijero, J.-M.; Esquivias, I.; Sukecki, S.; Larkins, E. C.

    2005-11-01

    We have developed high-power lasers, which are based on an Al-free active region at 915 nm. The laser structure has very low internal losses of 0.5 cm-1, a very low transparency current density of 86 A/cm2, and a high internal quantum efficiency of 86%. Based on these good results, we have realised narrow-aperture, index-guided tapered lasers which deliver 1 W CW with and M2 beam quality factor of 3.0 using both the 1/e2 and standard-deviation methods. We have also fabricated index-guided tapered lasers with a Clarinet shape, which deliver 0.65 W CW with an M2 beam quality factor of less than 1.5 at 1/e2, and less than 2.5 using the standard deviation method.

  7. Active laser radar (lidar) for measurement of corresponding height and reflectance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehlich, Christoph; Mettenleiter, M.; Haertl, F.

    1997-08-01

    For the survey and inspection of environmental objects, a non-tactile, robust and precise imaging of height and depth is the basis sensor technology. For visual inspection,surface classification, and documentation purposes, however, additional information concerning reflectance of measured objects is necessary. High-speed acquisition of both geometric and visual information is achieved by means of an active laser radar, supporting consistent 3D height and 2D reflectance images. The laser radar is an optical-wavelength system, and is comparable to devices built by ERIM, Odetics, and Perceptron, measuring the range between sensor and target surfaces as well as the reflectance of the target surface, which corresponds to the magnitude of the back scattered laser energy. In contrast to these range sensing devices, the laser radar under consideration is designed for high speed and precise operation in both indoor and outdoor environments, emitting a minimum of near-IR laser energy. It integrates a laser range measurement system and a mechanical deflection system for 3D environmental measurements. This paper reports on design details of the laser radar for surface inspection tasks. It outlines the performance requirements and introduces the measurement principle. The hardware design, including the main modules, such as the laser head, the high frequency unit, the laser beam deflection system, and the digital signal processing unit are discussed.the signal processing unit consists of dedicated signal processors for real-time sensor data preprocessing as well as a sensor computer for high-level image analysis and feature extraction. The paper focuses on performance data of the system, including noise, drift over time, precision, and accuracy with measurements. It discuses the influences of ambient light, surface material of the target, and ambient temperature for range accuracy and range precision. Furthermore, experimental results from inspection of buildings, monuments

  8. Influence of different illumination profiles on the on-state resistances of silicon carbide photoconductive semiconductor switches

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Langning Xun, Tao; Yang, Hanwu; Liu, Jinliang; Zhang, Yu

    2014-04-15

    Characteristics of a silicon-carbide (SiC) photoconductive switch under different illumination profiles are presented. We triggered a V-doped semi-insulated 6H-SiC switch with lateral geometry using a laser beam of 532-nm wavelength. Photoconductivity tests for different spot profiles and locations show that such switches achieve a minimum on-state resistance when the switching gap is illuminated. The differences between on-state resistances are small for various partial illuminations of the switching gap. Semiconductor modeling is used to simulate the electric field and current profiles for different partial illuminations. The simulation results show poor on-state switch performance when partially illuminated. Based on these results, a more revealing circuit model for the switch matches well with experimental results for partial illuminations.

  9. Illuminating Asset Value through New Seismic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandsberg-Dahl, S.

    2007-05-01

    evaluate technologies and subsequently encourage vendor activity to develop and deploy a commercial system. The 3D seismic method exploded into general usage in the 1990's. Our industry delivered 3D cheaper and faster, improving quality through improved acquisition specifications and new processing technology. The need to mitigate business risks in highly material subsalt plays led BP to explore the technical limits of the seismic method, testing novel acquisition techniques to improve illumination and signal to noise ratio. These were successful and are applicable to analogue seismic quality problems globally providing breakthroughs in illuminating previously hidden geology and hydrocarbon reservoirs. A focused business challenge, smart risk taking, investment in people and computing capability, partnerships, and rapid implementation are key themes that will be touched on through out the talk.

  10. Passively cooled 405 W ytterbium fibre laser utilising a novel metal coated active fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Jae M. O.; Simakov, Nikita; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W. Andrew; Haub, John

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel metal coated triple clad active fibre design, utilising an all glass inner cladding structure and aluminium outer coating. This metal coated active fibre enables a number of benefits to high power laser design, such as increase robustness and extended operating temperature range. As a demonstration of the advantages of this design a passively cooled ytterbium fibre laser is presented. A 20 m length of active fibre was coiled into a planar arrangement and mounted onto a high emissivity heatsink. Up to 405 W of output power was achieved without the need for active water or forced air cooling. The slope efficiency of this source was 74 % and maximum outer heat sink temperature was ~140°C. This arrangement allowed for significant weight and size savings to be achieved with the active fibre laser head weighing less than 100 g. We will discuss the design choices and trade-offs of metal coated active fibre on high power fibre laser systems as well as the prospects for further power scaling to the kW level.

  11. REVIEW: Excited states in the active media of oxygen — iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azyazov, V. N.

    2009-11-01

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen — iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O2 and I2 molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I2 in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended.

  12. Accuracy of 3d Reconstruction in AN Illumination Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Lindsay; Toschi, Isabella; Nocerino, Erica; Hess, Mona; Remondino, Fabio; Robson, Stuart

    2016-06-01

    The accuracy of 3D surface reconstruction was compared from image sets of a Metric Test Object taken in an illumination dome by two methods: photometric stereo and improved structure-from-motion (SfM), using point cloud data from a 3D colour laser scanner as the reference. Metrics included pointwise height differences over the digital elevation model (DEM), and 3D Euclidean differences between corresponding points. The enhancement of spatial detail was investigated by blending high frequency detail from photometric normals, after a Poisson surface reconstruction, with low frequency detail from a DEM derived from SfM.

  13. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Burlakov, V. M. Goriely, A.; Foulds, I.

    2013-12-16

    We show that a flat surface of a polymer in rubber state illuminated with intense electromagnetic radiation is unstable with respect to periodic modulation. Initial periodic perturbation is amplified due to periodic thermal expansion of the material heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore, it is not related to the well-known laser induced periodic structures on polymer surfaces but may contribute to their formation and to other phenomena of light-matter interaction.

  14. Bubble-cell interactions with laser-activated polymeric microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, Michel; Lajoinie, Guillaume; van Rooij, Tom; Skachkov, Ilya; Kooiman, Klazina; de Jong, Nico; Physics of Fluids Group, University of Twente Team; Biomedical Engineering, Erasmus MC Team

    2015-11-01

    Polymeric microcapsules that are made light-absorbing by the addition of a dye in their shell can generate cavitation microbubbles with spatiotemporal control when irradiated by a pulsed laser. These particles less than 3 μm in size can circulate through the body, bind to tissues and are expected to be readily detected, even if a single cavitation bubble is produced. In this paper, we study the impact of such cavitation bubbles on a cell monolayer and quantify it in terms of cell poration and cell viability. Two capsules formulations were used; the first one encapsulates a low boiling point oil and induced less cell damage than the second that was loaded with a high boiling point oil. We also report the generation of stable bubbles by the first capsule formulation that completely absorb the cells in their close vicinity. Physics of Fluid group MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology.

  15. Efficacy of laser-based irrigant activation methods in removing debris from simulated root canal irregularities.

    PubMed

    Deleu, Ellen; Meire, Maarten A; De Moor, Roeland J G

    2015-02-01

    In root canal therapy, irrigating solutions are essential to assist in debridement and disinfection, but their spread and action is often restricted by canal anatomy. Hence, activation of irrigants is suggested to improve their distribution in the canal system, increasing irrigation effectiveness. Activation can be done with lasers, termed laser-activated irrigation (LAI). The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of different irrigant activation methods in removing debris from simulated root canal irregularities. Twenty-five straight human canine roots were embedded in resin, split, and their canals prepared to a standardized shape. A groove was cut in the wall of each canal and filled with dentin debris. Canals were filled with sodium hypochlorite and six irrigant activation procedures were tested: conventional needle irrigation (CI), manual-dynamic irrigation with a tapered gutta percha cone (manual-dynamic irrigation (MDI)), passive ultrasonic irrigation, LAI with 2,940-nm erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser with a plain fiber tip inside the canal (Er-flat), LAI with Er:YAG laser with a conical tip held at the canal entrance (Er-PIPS), and LAI with a 980-nm diode laser moving the fiber inside the canal (diode). The amount of remaining debris in the groove was scored and compared among the groups using non-parametric tests. Conventional irrigation removed significantly less debris than all other groups. The Er:YAG with plain fiber tip was more efficient than MDI, CI, diode, and Er:YAG laser with PIPS tip in removing debris from simulated root canal irregularities. PMID:24091791

  16. Infrared Laser Activation of Soluble and Membrane Protein Assemblies in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, Victor A; Liko, Idlir; Mize, Todd H; Bush, Matthew F; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-07-19

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) is the dominant method for probing intact macromolecular complexes in the gas phase by means of mass spectrometry (MS). The energy obtained from collisional activation is dependent on the charge state of the ion and the pressures and potentials within the instrument: these factors limit CID capability. Activation by infrared (IR) laser radiation offers an attractive alternative as the radiation energy absorbed by the ions is charge-state-independent and the intensity and time scale of activation is controlled by a laser source external to the mass spectrometer. Here we implement and apply IR activation, in different irradiation regimes, to study both soluble and membrane protein assemblies. We show that IR activation using high-intensity pulsed lasers is faster than collisional and radiative cooling and requires much lower energy than continuous IR irradiation. We demonstrate that IR activation is an effective means for studying membrane protein assemblies, and liberate an intact V-type ATPase complex from detergent micelles, a result that cannot be achieved by means of CID using standard collision energies. Notably, we find that IR activation can be sufficiently soft to retain specific lipids bound to the complex. We further demonstrate that, by applying a combination of collisional activation, mass selection, and IR activation of the liberated complex, we can elucidate subunit stoichiometry and the masses of specifically bound lipids in a single MS experiment. PMID:27328020

  17. Illuminating dissertation supervision through reflection.

    PubMed

    Snowball, J; Ross, K; Murphy, K

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes a small research study designed to explore the role of the dissertation supervisor and to examine the potential of using reflection as a tool for learning and for enhancing professional educational practice. The authors met to discuss and reflect upon the processes of supervision and the role of the supervisor throughout the period of supervising three dissertation students. Each author maintained individual reflective written accounts of supervisory meetings with students. These accounts and the transcribed tape-recordings of the group meetings provided two sets of data which were analysed using qualitative techniques. From the data analysis the authors were able to identify various phases in dissertation supervision--partnership; setting the learning contract; signposting; ownership of the dissertation; letting go; the rush at the end; maintaining the balance--and also contextual issues of humanness; time; and energy, which were needed to sustain the supervisory processes. The role of the dissertation supervisor was illuminated and the potential of using reflection as a tool for developing professional educational practice was realized. The importance of constructive support while engaged in processes of reflection cannot be underestimated. PMID:7930105

  18. Mirror with a variable amplitude - phase reflectance. 2. Modelling of a laser resonator with an active output mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Kiiko, V V; Kislov, V I; Ofitserov, Evgenii N

    2011-03-31

    We present the operator model of the laser resonator with an active output mirror based on the Fabry - Perot interferometer with nonflat (spherical and aspherical) mirrors and an adjustable gap. The results of numerical simulation of a microchip laser with a thermal lens and an active output interferometer-based mirror are given. It is shown that the use of an active interferometer as the output cavity mirror allows one to control the number of transverse modes of laser radiation and its power; in this case, the beam divergence can be reduced by a factor of 1.5 - 2.5. (laser resonators)

  19. Selective photo-activation analysis with laser-driven x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Sudeep; Golovin, Grigory; Powers, Nathan; Liu, Cheng; Chen, Shouyuan; Petersen, Chad; Zhang, Jun; Ghebregziabher, Isaac; Zhao, Baozhen; Brown, Kevin; Mills, Jared; Umstadter, Donald; Haden, Dan; Silano, Jack; Karwowski, Hugon

    2013-04-01

    We discuss a technique for the identification of nuclear isotopes by selective photo-activation analysis. A narrow divergence beam of high-energy photons is produced when a laser driven electron beam Compton backscatters off a counter-propagating high-intensity laser pulse. The x-rays from this compact laser-driven synchrotron light source are MeV energy, narrow-bandwidth, tunable, polarized, and bright (10^8 photons s-1). Such characteristics make these x-rays well-suited for nuclear interrogation by means of triggering (γ,f) and (γ,xn) reactions. The narrow bandwidth of the x-ray light can be exploited to selectively activate nuclei with isotopic sensitivity, without causing unwanted background from collateral activation. Additionally, the polarized nature of the x-rays can be used to study anisotropy of neutron emission, for precise identification of isotopes. Activation by laser-driven synchrotron x-rays will be compared with activation by bremsstrahlung.

  20. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  1. 29 CFR 1926.56 - Illumination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Illumination. 1926.56 Section 1926.56 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Occupational Health and Environmental Controls § 1926.56 Illumination. (a) General....

  2. Reflectance and Illumination Recovery in the Wild.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Stephen; Nishino, Ko

    2016-01-01

    The appearance of an object in an image encodes invaluable information about that object and the surrounding scene. Inferring object reflectance and scene illumination from an image would help us decode this information: reflectance can reveal important properties about the materials composing an object; the illumination can tell us, for instance, whether the scene is indoors or outdoors. Recovering reflectance and illumination from a single image in the real world, however, is a difficult task. Real scenes illuminate objects from every visible direction and real objects vary greatly in reflectance behavior. In addition, the image formation process introduces ambiguities, like color constancy, that make reversing the process ill-posed. To address this problem, we propose a Bayesian framework for joint reflectance and illumination inference in the real world. We develop a reflectance model and priors that precisely capture the space of real-world object reflectance and a flexible illumination model that can represent real-world illumination with priors that combat the deleterious effects of image formation. We analyze the performance of our approach on a set of synthetic data and demonstrate results on real-world scenes. These contributions enable reliable reflectance and illumination inference in the real world. PMID:26656582

  3. Noninvasive diode laser activation of transient receptor potential proteins and nociceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Cooper, Brian Y.; Nemenov, Michael I.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated diode laser (980 nm) evoked activation of transient receptor potential proteins (TRPV1 and TRPV2). C and A-delta (Aδ) nociceptor families are primarily responsible for pain mediation in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 proteins have been associated with heat evoked pain in C fibers while Aδ fibers have been associated with TRPV2. Diode laser stimulation allows a margin of safety between non-invasive activation and damage 19, 22, 34. Laser pulses (20-50 ms, 0.1-10 W, 980 nm) were used to stimulate: A) in vitro: excised patches from HEK293 cells expressing TRPV1; B) in vitro: rat DRG nociceptors expressing either TRPV1 or TRPV2; and C) in vivo: C-fibers of the rat saphenous nerve (SN) trunk. Cell currents were recorded using standard patch clamp methods. The SN was also stimulated electrically with bipolar electrodes. Stimulation (20-50 ms) of HEK and DRG cells expressing TRPV1 was highly reproducible. Activation and peak currents were achieved at estimated peak temperatures of 55°C and 70°C. Threshold activation was also observed in DRG neurons expressing TRPV2. The conduction velocity for laser-activated saphenous nerve afferents was in the C fiber range (0.5-1 m/s). Electrically stimulated nerve contained stimulation artifacts and complex neural components with conduction velocities ranging from 0.3-30 m/s. Diode laser activation of TRPV1 protein is a reproducible and effective means to probe TRP activity in both in vivo and in vitro preparations

  4. Optical power of semiconductor lasers with a low-dimensional active region

    SciTech Connect

    Asryan, Levon V.; Sokolova, Zinaida N.

    2014-01-14

    A comprehensive analytical model for the operating characteristics of semiconductor lasers with a low-dimensional active region is developed. Particular emphasis is given to the effect of capture delay of both electrons and holes from a bulk optical confinement region into a quantum-confined active region and an extended set of rate equations is used. We derive a closed-form expression for the internal quantum efficiency as an explicit function of the injection current and parameters of a laser structure. Due to either electron or hole capture delay, the internal efficiency decreases with increasing injection current above the lasing threshold thus causing sublinearity of the light-current characteristic of a laser.

  5. Fabrication and In Vitro Deployment of a Laser-Activated Shape Memory Polymer Vascular Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, G M; Small IV, W; Wilson, T S; Benett, W J; Matthews, D L; Hartman, J; Maitland, D J

    2007-04-25

    Vascular stents are small tubular scaffolds used in the treatment of arterial stenosis (narrowing of the vessel). Most vascular stents are metallic and are deployed either by balloon expansion or by self-expansion. A shape memory polymer (SMP) stent may enhance flexibility, compliance, and drug elution compared to its current metallic counterparts. The purpose of this study was to describe the fabrication of a laser-activated SMP stent and demonstrate photothermal expansion of the stent in an in vitro artery model. A novel SMP stent was fabricated from thermoplastic polyurethane. A solid SMP tube formed by dip coating a stainless steel pin was laser-etched to create the mesh pattern of the finished stent. The stent was crimped over a fiber-optic cylindrical light diffuser coupled to an infrared diode laser. Photothermal actuation of the stent was performed in a water-filled mock artery. At a physiological flow rate, the stent did not fully expand at the maximum laser power (8.6 W) due to convective cooling. However, under zero flow, simulating the technique of endovascular flow occlusion, complete laser actuation was achieved in the mock artery at a laser power of {approx}8 W. We have shown the design and fabrication of an SMP stent and a means of light delivery for photothermal actuation. Though further studies are required to optimize the device and assess thermal tissue damage, photothermal actuation of the SMP stent was demonstrated.

  6. Axicon-based annular laser trap for studies on sperm activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Bing; Vinson, Jaclyn M.; Botvinick, Elliot L.; Esener, Sadik C.; Berns, Michael W.

    2005-08-01

    As a powerful and noninvasive tool, laser trapping has been widely applied for the confinement and physiological study of biological cells and organelles. Researchers have used the single spot laser trap to hold individual sperm and quantitatively evaluated the motile force generated by a sperm. Early studies revealed the relationship between sperm motility and swimming behavior and helped the investigations in medical aspects of sperm activity. As sperm chemotaxis draws more and more interest in fertilization research, the studies on sperm-egg communication may help to explain male or female infertility and provide exciting new approaches to contraception. However, single spot laser trapping can only be used to investigate an individual target, which has limits in efficiency and throughput. To study the chemotactic response of sperm to eggs and to characterize sperm motility, an annular laser trap with a diameter of several hundred microns is designed, simulated with ray tracing tool, and implemented. An axicon transforms the wavefront such that the laser beam is incident on the microscope objective from all directions while filling the back aperture completely for high efficiency trapping. A trapping experiment with microspheres is carried out to evaluate the system performance. The power requirement for annular sperm trapping is determined experimentally and compared with theoretical calculations. With a chemo-attractant located in the center and sperm approaching from all directions, the annular laser trapping could serve as a speed bump for sperm so that motility characterization and fertility sorting can be performed efficiently.

  7. Fabrication and in vitro deployment of a laser-activated shape memory polymer vascular stent

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Géraldine M; Small, Ward; Wilson, Thomas S; Benett, William J; Matthews, Dennis L; Hartman, Jonathan; Maitland, Duncan J

    2007-01-01

    Background Vascular stents are small tubular scaffolds used in the treatment of arterial stenosis (narrowing of the vessel). Most vascular stents are metallic and are deployed either by balloon expansion or by self-expansion. A shape memory polymer (SMP) stent may enhance flexibility, compliance, and drug elution compared to its current metallic counterparts. The purpose of this study was to describe the fabrication of a laser-activated SMP stent and demonstrate photothermal expansion of the stent in an in vitro artery model. Methods A novel SMP stent was fabricated from thermoplastic polyurethane. A solid SMP tube formed by dip coating a stainless steel pin was laser-etched to create the mesh pattern of the finished stent. The stent was crimped over a fiber-optic cylindrical light diffuser coupled to an infrared diode laser. Photothermal actuation of the stent was performed in a water-filled mock artery. Results At a physiological flow rate, the stent did not fully expand at the maximum laser power (8.6 W) due to convective cooling. However, under zero flow, simulating the technique of endovascular flow occlusion, complete laser actuation was achieved in the mock artery at a laser power of ~8 W. Conclusion We have shown the design and fabrication of an SMP stent and a means of light delivery for photothermal actuation. Though further studies are required to optimize the device and assess thermal tissue damage, photothermal actuation of the SMP stent was demonstrated. PMID:18042294

  8. Laser-activated solder weld repair of the inferior alveolar nerve in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Nigel J.; Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Owen, Earl R.; Walker, D. M.

    1997-05-01

    A new laser activated solder weld technique is described for the microsurgical repair of the inferior alveolar nerve in rats. The laser weld technique used an albumin based solder, containing indocyanine cardiogreen, plus an infrared diode laser. Seven animals had inferior alveolar nerve repairs performed using the laser weld technique and these were compared against corresponding unoperated controls plus three cases of nerve section without repair. Histochemical analysis was performed utilizing neuron counts and horseradish peroxidase tracer (HRP) uptake in the trigeminal ganglion following sacrifice and staining of frozen sections with cresyl violet and diaminobenzidene. The results of this analysis showed comparable mean neuron counts and mean HRP uptake by neurons for the unoperated control and laser weld groups with considerable reduction of mean values in cases of nerve section with no repair. Sections of the repaired inferior alveolar nerves, stained with Masson's trichrome, showed no adverse reactions by axons or epineurium to the coagulative repair with the solder and demonstrated regeneration of myelinated axons at the time of sacrifice. In summary a new technique of laser weld repair of the inferior alveolar nerve is described which, on initial analysis, appears to be a reliable alternative to traditional techniques.

  9. Masked illumination scheme for a galvanometer scanning high-speed confocal fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Uk; Moon, Sucbei; Song, Hoseong; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Kim, Dug Young

    2011-01-01

    High-speed beam scanning and data acquisition in a laser scanning confocal microscope system are normally implemented with a resonant galvanometer scanner and a frame grabber. However, the nonlinear scanning speed of a resonant galvanometer can generate nonuniform photobleaching in a fluorescence sample as well as image distortion near the edges of a galvanometer scanned fluorescence image. Besides, incompatibility of signal format between a frame grabber and a point detector can lead to digitization error during data acquisition. In this article, we introduce a masked illumination scheme which can effectively decrease drawbacks in fluorescence images taken by a laser scanning confocal microscope with a resonant galvanometer and a frame grabber. We have demonstrated that the difference of photobleaching between the center and the edge of a fluorescence image can be reduced from 26 to 5% in our confocal laser scanning microscope with a square illumination mask. Another advantage of our masked illumination scheme is that the zero level or the lowest input level of an analog signal in a frame grabber can be accurately set by the dark area of a mask in our masked illumination scheme. We have experimentally demonstrated the advantages of our masked illumination method in detail. PMID:21809349

  10. Low-level Ga-Al-As laser irradiation enhances osteoblast proliferation through activation of Hedgehog signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiushi; Qu, Zhou; Chen, Yingxin; Liu, Shujie; Zhou, Yanmin

    2014-12-01

    Low-level laser irradiation has been reported to promote bone formation, but the molecular mechanism is still unclear. Hedgehog signaling pathway has been reported to play an important role in promoting bone formation. The aim of the present study was to examine whether low-level Ga-Al-As laser (808 nm) irradiation could have an effect on Hedgehog signaling pathway during osteoblast proliferation in vitro. Mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 was cultured in vitro. The cultures after laser irradiation (3.75J/cm2) were treated with recombinant N-terminals Sonic Hedgehog (N-Shh)or Hedgehog inhibitor cyclopamine (cy). The experiment was divided into 4 group, group 1:laser irradiation, group 2: laser irradiation and N-Shh, group 3: laser irradiation and cy, group 4:control with no laser irradiation. On day 1,2 and 3,cell proliferation was determined by cell counting, Cell Counting Kit-8.On 12 h and 24 h, cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. Proliferation activity of laser irradiation and N-Shh group was remarkably increased compared with those of laser irradiation group. Proliferation activity of laser irradiation and cy group was remarkably decreased compared with those of laser irradiation group, however proliferation activity of laser irradiation and cy group was remarkably increased compared with those of control group. These results suggest that low-level Ga-Al-As laser irradiation activate Hedgehog signaling pathway during osteoblast proliferation in vitro. Hedgehog signaling pathway is one of the signaling pathways by which low-level Ga-Al-As laser irradiation regulates osteoblast proliferation.

  11. Lensless in-line holographic microscope with Talbot grating illumination.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shaodong; Wang, Mingjun; Wu, Jigang

    2016-07-15

    We have developed a wide field-of-view lensless in-line holographic microscope (LIHM) capable of acquiring microscopic images with a compact design. In our imaging system, a Ronchi grating was illuminated by a collimated laser beam to generate a Talbot self-imaging grating illumination on the sample, and the in-line holograms were recorded by a CMOS imaging sensor behind the sample. An iterative reconstruction algorithm was then applied to reconstruct the sample image while eliminating the twin-image background that appears in traditional in-line holography. In the algorithm, the dark areas of the illumination grating were used as a known constraint to define the sample support that led to convergence of the iteration. The whole-sample image can be acquired by laterally shifting the grating. We demonstrated the performance of our iteration algorithm and imaging system by successfully acquiring images of polystyrene microspheres with 5 μm diameter and the wing of a green lacewing. PMID:27420484

  12. Six-color solid state illuminator for cinema projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Junejei; Wang, Yuchang

    2014-09-01

    Light source for cinema projector requires reliability, high brightness, good color and 3D for without silver screens. To meet these requirements, a laser-phosphor based solid state illuminator with 6 primary colors is proposed. The six primary colors are divided into two groups and include colors of R1, R2, G1, G2, B1 and B2. Colors of B1, B2 and R2 come from lasers of wavelengths 440 nm, 465 nm and 639 nm. Color of G1 comes from G-phosphor pumped by B2 laser. Colors of G2 and R1 come from Y-phosphor pumped by B1 laser. Two groups of colors are combined by a multiband filter and working by alternately switching B1 and B2 lasers. The combined two sequences of three colors are sent to the 3-chip cinema projector and synchronized with frame rate of 120Hz. In 2D mode, the resulting 6 primary colors provide a very wide color gamut. In 3D mode, two groups of red, green and blue primary colors provide two groups of images that received by left and right eyes.

  13. Modification of graphene oxide by laser irradiation: a new route to enhance antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Maria A; D'Angelo, Daniele; Scalese, Silvia; Spanò, Simon F; Filice, Simona; Fazio, Enza; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Zimbone, Massimo; Brundo, Maria V; Pecoraro, Roberta; Alba, Anna; Sinatra, Fulvia; Rappazzo, Giancarlo; Privitera, Vittorio

    2016-06-17

    The antibacterial activity and possible toxicity of graphene oxide and laser-irradiated graphene oxide (iGO) were investigated. Antibacterial activity was tested on Escherichia coli and shown to be higher for GO irradiated for at least three hours, which seems to be correlated to the resulting morphology of laser-treated GO and independent of the kind and amount of oxygen functionalities. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show a reduction of the GO flakes size after visible laser irradiation, preserving considerable oxygen content and degree of hydrophilicity. SEM images of the bacteria after the exposure to the iGO flakes confirm membrane damage after interaction with the laser-modified morphology of GO. In addition, a fish embryo toxicity test on zebrafish displayed that neither mortality nor sublethal effects were caused by the different iGO solutions, even when the concentration was increased up to four times higher than the one effective in reducing the bacteria survival. The antibacterial properties and the absence of toxicity make the visible laser irradiation of GO a promising option for water purification applications. PMID:27158973

  14. Efficacy of LED versus KTP laser activation of photodynamic bleaching of tetracycline-stained dentine.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Zackary Y; Walsh, Laurence J

    2015-09-01

    In some well-established laser applications where large spot sizes are used, an array of high-intensity light emitting diodes (LED) emitting at similar wavelength could potentially replace the laser. This situation applies for the photodynamic bleaching of stains in teeth. This study compared the relative efficacy of an array of visible green LED (535 nm ± 15 nm) with a KTP laser in photodynamic bleaching of tetracycline-stained dentine in human tooth roots. After establishing consistent staining in 96 roots using a validated method, the roots were sectioned into 2-3-mm thick horizontal slices that were treated with gels containing rhodamine B (Smartbleach® or Smartbleach® 3LT). Colour changes were tracked up to 1 month after treatment. While both systems were effective in bleaching the tetracycline-stained dentine, KTP laser activation gave greater bleaching efficacy than LED activation, enhancing the action of the gel. Use of the KTP laser would be preferable over an LED system when confronted with tetracycline staining. Use of this photodynamic bleaching method offers valuable means to reduce the severity of tetracycline staining. PMID:25288264

  15. Activation of C-fiber nociceptors by low-power diode laser.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Eduardo; Silva, Andressa; Martins, Raquel; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Manzano, Gilberto M

    2016-03-01

    Objective The evaluation of selective activation of C-fibers to record evoked potentials using the association of low-power diode laser (810 nm), tiny-area stimulation and skin-blackening. Method Laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) were obtained from 20 healthy young subjects. An aluminum plate with one thin hole was attached to the laser probe to provide tiny-area stimulation of the hand dorsum and the stimulated area was covered with black ink. Results The mean intensity used for eliciting the ultra-late laser-evoked potential (ULEP) was 70 ± 32 mW. All subjects showed a clear biphasic potential that comprised a negative peak (806 ± 61 ms) and a positive deflection (1033 ± 60 ms), corresponding to the ULEP related to C-fiber activation. Conclusion C-fiber-evoked responses can be obtained using a very low-power diode laser when stimulation is applied to tiny areas of darkened skin. This strategy offers a non-invasive and easy methodology that minimizes damage to the tissue. PMID:27050852

  16. Modification of graphene oxide by laser irradiation: a new route to enhance antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccheri, Maria A.; D’Angelo, Daniele; Scalese, Silvia; Spanò, Simon F.; Filice, Simona; Fazio, Enza; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Zimbone, Massimo; Brundo, Maria V.; Pecoraro, Roberta; Alba, Anna; Sinatra, Fulvia; Rappazzo, Giancarlo; Privitera, Vittorio

    2016-06-01

    The antibacterial activity and possible toxicity of graphene oxide and laser-irradiated graphene oxide (iGO) were investigated. Antibacterial activity was tested on Escherichia coli and shown to be higher for GO irradiated for at least three hours, which seems to be correlated to the resulting morphology of laser-treated GO and independent of the kind and amount of oxygen functionalities. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show a reduction of the GO flakes size after visible laser irradiation, preserving considerable oxygen content and degree of hydrophilicity. SEM images of the bacteria after the exposure to the iGO flakes confirm membrane damage after interaction with the laser-modified morphology of GO. In addition, a fish embryo toxicity test on zebrafish displayed that neither mortality nor sublethal effects were caused by the different iGO solutions, even when the concentration was increased up to four times higher than the one effective in reducing the bacteria survival. The antibacterial properties and the absence of toxicity make the visible laser irradiation of GO a promising option for water purification applications.

  17. Wavelet Algorithms for Illumination Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroder, Peter

    One of the core problems of computer graphics is the computation of the equilibrium distribution of light in a scene. This distribution is given as the solution to a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind involving an integral over all surfaces in the scene. In the general case such solutions can only be numerically approximated, and are generally costly to compute, due to the geometric complexity of typical computer graphics scenes. For this computation both Monte Carlo and finite element techniques (or hybrid approaches) are typically used. A simplified version of the illumination problem is known as radiosity, which assumes that all surfaces are diffuse reflectors. For this case hierarchical techniques, first introduced by Hanrahan et al. (32), have recently gained prominence. The hierarchical approaches lead to an asymptotic improvement when only finite precision is required. The resulting algorithms have cost proportional to O(k^2 + n) versus the usual O(n^2) (k is the number of input surfaces, n the number of finite elements into which the input surfaces are meshed). Similarly a hierarchical technique has been introduced for the more general radiance problem (which allows glossy reflectors) by Aupperle et al. (6). In this dissertation we show the equivalence of these hierarchical techniques to the use of a Haar wavelet basis in a general Galerkin framework. By so doing, we come to a deeper understanding of the properties of the numerical approximations used and are able to extend the hierarchical techniques to higher orders. In particular, we show the correspondence of the geometric arguments underlying hierarchical methods to the theory of Calderon-Zygmund operators and their sparse realization in wavelet bases. The resulting wavelet algorithms for radiosity and radiance are analyzed and numerical results achieved with our implementation are reported. We find that the resulting algorithms achieve smaller and smoother errors at equivalent work.

  18. The relationship between ambient illumination and psychological factors in viewing of display Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwanami, Takuya; Kikuchi, Ayano; Kaneko, Takashi; Hirai, Keita; Yano, Natsumi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Tsumura, Norimichi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Miyake, Yoichi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we have clarified the relationship between ambient illumination and psychological factors in viewing of display images. Psychological factors were obtained by the factor analysis with the results of the semantic differential (SD) method. In the psychological experiments, subjects evaluated the impressions of displayed images with changing ambient illuminating conditions. The illumination conditions were controlled by a fluorescent ceiling light and a color LED illumination which was located behind the display. We experimented under two kinds of conditions. One was the experiment with changing brightness of the ambient illumination. The other was the experiment with changing the colors of the background illumination. In the results of the experiment, two factors "realistic sensation, dynamism" and "comfortable," were extracted under different brightness of the ambient illumination of the display surroundings. It was shown that the "comfortable" was improved by the brightness of display surroundings. On the other hand, when the illumination color of surroundings was changed, three factors "comfortable," "realistic sensation, dynamism" and "activity" were extracted. It was also shown that the value of "comfortable" and "realistic sensation, dynamism" increased when the display surroundings were illuminated by the average color of the image contents.

  19. High-efficiency high-energy Ka source for the critically-required maximum illumination of x-ray optics on Z using Z-petawatt-driven laser-breakout-afterburner accelerated ultrarelativistic electrons LDRD .

    SciTech Connect

    Sefkow, Adam B.; Bennett, Guy R.

    2010-09-01

    Under the auspices of the Science of Extreme Environments LDRD program, a <2 year theoretical- and computational-physics study was performed (LDRD Project 130805) by Guy R Bennett (formally in Center-01600) and Adam B. Sefkow (Center-01600): To investigate novel target designs by which a short-pulse, PW-class beam could create a brighter K{alpha} x-ray source than by simple, direct-laser-irradiation of a flat foil; Direct-Foil-Irradiation (DFI). The computational studies - which are still ongoing at this writing - were performed primarily on the RedStorm supercomputer at Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque site. The motivation for a higher efficiency K{alpha} emitter was very clear: as the backlighter flux for any x-ray imaging technique on the Z accelerator increases, the signal-to-noise and signal-to-background ratios improve. This ultimately allows the imaging system to reach its full quantitative potential as a diagnostic. Depending on the particular application/experiment this would imply, for example, that the system would have reached its full design spatial resolution and thus the capability to see features that might otherwise be indiscernible with a traditional DFI-like x-ray source. This LDRD began FY09 and ended FY10.

  20. Imaging of Phase Objects using Partially Coherent Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Ravizza, F. L.

    2013-01-01

    Screening high-power laser optics for light intensifying phase objects that cause laserinduced damage on downstream optics is critical to sustaining laser operation. Identifying such flaws on large-apertures is quite challenging since they are relatively small and invisible to conventional inspection methods. A Linescan Phase Differential Imaging (LPDI) system was developed to rapidly identify these flaws on large-aperture optics within a single full-aperture dark-field image. We describe a two-step production phase object screening process consisting of LPDI mapping and image analysis, followed by high-resolution interferometry and propagation based evaluation of the downstream damage potential of identified flaws. An image simulation code capable of modeling the LPDI partially coherent illumination was used to optimize its phase object sensitivity.

  1. Measurement of pressure changes during laser-activated irrigant by an erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet laser.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Harry Huiz; De Moor, Roeland J G

    2015-07-01

    The use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser to activate irrigants results in the creation of vapour bubbles and shockwaves. The present study evaluated the magnitude of pressure changes in the root canal during laser-activated irrigation. The root canal of a single extracted maxillary canine was enlarged to a size 40/0.06 file. A pressure sensor was inserted apically into the root canal. The tooth was processed as follows. In the EDTA condition, the tooth was irrigated with 17 % EDTA; in the NaOCl condition, the tooth was irrigated with 3 % NaOCl. In all conditions, the irrigants were activated at 0.75 and 1.75 W for 60 s using RFT2 and MZ2 tips; to analyse the effect of tip placement, the tip was activated at the orifice and after inserting the tip 5 mm deeper than the orifice. Data showed no significant difference between irrigation regimens (p > 0.05). There were no significant differences of the pressure between RFT2 and MZ2 tips (p > 0.05). The placement of tips closer to the apex resulted in significantly higher pressure than at the orifice (p < 0.001). The use of 1.75 W power resulted in a significantly higher increase of pressure compared to 0.75 W (p < 0.001), regardless either the type of solutions or tips used. The magnitude of the pressure changes in the root canal at 0.75 W was significantly lower than 1.75 W regardless of either type of tips or solutions used. The closer the insertion of the tip to the apex, the higher the pressure. PMID:24906483

  2. Chromatic Illumination Discrimination Ability Reveals that Human Colour Constancy Is Optimised for Blue Daylight Illuminations

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Bradley; Crichton, Stuart; Mackiewicz, Michal; Finlayson, Graham D.; Hurlbert, Anya

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of colour constancy in human visual perception keeps surface colours constant, despite changes in their reflected light due to changing illumination. Although colour constancy has evolved under a constrained subset of illuminations, it is unknown whether its underlying mechanisms, thought to involve multiple components from retina to cortex, are optimised for particular environmental variations. Here we demonstrate a new method for investigating colour constancy using illumination matching in real scenes which, unlike previous methods using surface matching and simulated scenes, allows testing of multiple, real illuminations. We use real scenes consisting of solid familiar or unfamiliar objects against uniform or variegated backgrounds and compare discrimination performance for typical illuminations from the daylight chromaticity locus (approximately blue-yellow) and atypical spectra from an orthogonal locus (approximately red-green, at correlated colour temperature 6700 K), all produced in real time by a 10-channel LED illuminator. We find that discrimination of illumination changes is poorer along the daylight locus than the atypical locus, and is poorest particularly for bluer illumination changes, demonstrating conversely that surface colour constancy is best for blue daylight illuminations. Illumination discrimination is also enhanced, and therefore colour constancy diminished, for uniform backgrounds, irrespective of the object type. These results are not explained by statistical properties of the scene signal changes at the retinal level. We conclude that high-level mechanisms of colour constancy are biased for the blue daylight illuminations and variegated backgrounds to which the human visual system has typically been exposed. PMID:24586299

  3. Chromatic illumination discrimination ability reveals that human colour constancy is optimised for blue daylight illuminations.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Bradley; Crichton, Stuart; Mackiewicz, Michal; Finlayson, Graham D; Hurlbert, Anya

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of colour constancy in human visual perception keeps surface colours constant, despite changes in their reflected light due to changing illumination. Although colour constancy has evolved under a constrained subset of illuminations, it is unknown whether its underlying mechanisms, thought to involve multiple components from retina to cortex, are optimised for particular environmental variations. Here we demonstrate a new method for investigating colour constancy using illumination matching in real scenes which, unlike previous methods using surface matching and simulated scenes, allows testing of multiple, real illuminations. We use real scenes consisting of solid familiar or unfamiliar objects against uniform or variegated backgrounds and compare discrimination performance for typical illuminations from the daylight chromaticity locus (approximately blue-yellow) and atypical spectra from an orthogonal locus (approximately red-green, at correlated colour temperature 6700 K), all produced in real time by a 10-channel LED illuminator. We find that discrimination of illumination changes is poorer along the daylight locus than the atypical locus, and is poorest particularly for bluer illumination changes, demonstrating conversely that surface colour constancy is best for blue daylight illuminations. Illumination discrimination is also enhanced, and therefore colour constancy diminished, for uniform backgrounds, irrespective of the object type. These results are not explained by statistical properties of the scene signal changes at the retinal level. We conclude that high-level mechanisms of colour constancy are biased for the blue daylight illuminations and variegated backgrounds to which the human visual system has typically been exposed. PMID:24586299

  4. Compact, efficient, scalable neodymium laser co-doped with activator ions and pumped by visible laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheps, Richard

    1994-02-01

    Efficient, low threshold laser emission from a laser crystal doped with chromium and neodymium ions is obtained when pumped by visible laser diodes in the range of 610 nm to 680 nm. A typical laser Cr,Nd:GSGG crystal having an extraordinarily broad absorption bandwidth allows high pump efficiencies when using visible laser diodes, particularly in comparison to the Nd:YAG laser. The broad absorption bandwidth tolerance of the Cr,Nd:GSGG crystal to the pumping wavelengths allows visible diode pumping of the neodymium transition without regard to the wavelength of the visible diodes. Longitudinal or end-pumping to take advantage of the emission properties of the visible laser diodes, a nearly hemispherical laser resonator configuration and other co-doped Cr,Nd laser host materials are disclosed.

  5. Short cavity active mode locking fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Han, Ga Hee; Jeong, Syung Won; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kim, Chang-Seok; Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Eom, Tae Joong

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate a highly linear wavenumber- swept active mode locking (AML) fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging without any wavenumber-space resampling process. In this all-electric AML wavenumber-swept mechanism, a conventional wavelength selection filter is eliminated and, instead, the suitable programmed electric modulation signal is directly applied to the gain medium. Various types of wavenumber (or wavelength) tunings can be implemented because of the filter-less cavity configuration. Therefore, we successfully demonstrate a linearly wavenumber-swept AML fiber laser with 26.5 mW of output power to obtain an in-vivo OCT image at the 100 kHz swept rate.

  6. Laser method of biological activity stimulation of cryoconserved hemopoietic tissue transplant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khyznyak, Anatoly I.; Lesnik, Svetlana A.; Kogut, Georgy I.; Glukhenkaya, Galina T.

    1994-02-01

    The biological activity of cryoconserved fetal liver cells of mice (FLM) having undergone the He-Ne laser action has been estimated by the efficiency of their transplantation to mice- recipients exposed to lethal x-ray dose. The survival rate 30 days after x-ray exposure for those mice was 75% in comparison with 70% for mice with cryoconserved nonirradiated graft. The trial animals' peripheral blood investigations have been made. The obtained results indicate that the laser method of cryoconserved cells stimulation can help to increase the therapeutic efficiency of mielotransplantation.

  7. Pulsed laser triggered high speed microfluidic fluorescence activated cell sorter†‡

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Chen, Yue; Park, Sung-Yong; Hong, Jason; Teslaa, Tara; Zhong, Jiang F.; Di Carlo, Dino; Teitell, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    We report a high speed and high purity pulsed laser triggered fluorescence activated cell sorter (PLACS) with a sorting throughput up to 20 000 mammalian cells s−1 with 37% sorting purity, 90% cell viability in enrichment mode, and >90% purity in high purity mode at 1500 cells s−1 or 3000 beads s−1. Fast switching (30 μs) and a small perturbation volume (~90 pL) is achieved by a unique sorting mechanism in which explosive vapor bubbles are generated using focused laser pulses in a single layer microfluidic PDMS channel. PMID:22361780

  8. Inflicting controlled nonthermal damage to subcellular structures by laser-activated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krpetić, Zeljka; Nativo, Paola; Sée, Violaine; Prior, Ian A; Brust, Mathias; Volk, Martin

    2010-11-10

    We show that low-intensity laser irradiation of cancer cells containing endosomal gold nanoparticles leads to endosome rupture and escape of the nanoparticles into the cytosol without affecting the cells' viability. The low light intensity of our experiments allows us to rule out photothermal effects as the underlying mechanism, and we present results that suggest photoinduced radicals as the photogenerated active species. This nonthermal mechanism may also be important in the context of cell death at higher laser intensities, which had been reported previously. PMID:20923168

  9. Measuring of object vibration using sinusoidal-modulation laser-diode active interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yong; Cao, Qinfeng; Lu, Su

    1996-09-01

    Using the character that the emitting optical frequency of the laser diode is controlled by the injected current, the ability of eliminating environmental disturbance of the sinusoidal modulation laser diode active interferometer will be raised by more than one hundred times through putting the disturbed interference signal produced by the environment into the interferometer. When vibrating frequency of objects is different from that of the sinusoidol modulation, 'beat- frequency' will be produced in the interfere signal, which can be analyzed to get the vibrating frequency of objects. This paper described the operation principle and theoretical delusion of the 'beat-frequency' method.

  10. A history of semi-active laser dome and window materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Roger M.

    2014-05-01

    Semi-Active Laser (SAL) guidance systems were developed starting in the mid-1960's and today form an important class of precision guided weapons. The laser wavelengths generally fall in the short wave infrared region of the spectrum. Relative to passive, image based, infrared seekers the optical demands placed on the domes or windows of SAL seekers is very modest, allowing the use of low cost, easily manufactured materials, such as polycarbonate. This paper will examine the transition of SAL window and dome science and technology from the laboratory to battlefield, with special emphasis on the story of polycarbonate domes.

  11. LED illuminant on the ambient light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Anqing; Sandipan, Mishra; Shur, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We develop an approach for combining illuminance and spectral power distribution of the LED and ambient light and apply our technique for developing an LED camera flashlight balancing the illuminance contrast between object and background. Our method uses the closed loop, multiobjective optimization comprising: (1) characterizing the lighting task by illuminance, correlated color temperature (CCT), and statistical color quality indices that include a set of Statistical Color Quality Metrics and the Color Rendition Index (CRI) implemented with indexes of S (saturation) or D (dulling); (2) measuring the illuminance and the spectrum of the ambient light on the target lighting surface, which might depend on all the sources proving illumination and on the reflected light; (3) determining the desired illuminance of the LED source on the target lighting surface; (4) calculating the desired luminous flux of the LED source according to the desired illuminance; (5) constituting the SPD of the LED source; (6) calculating the relative spectra counts of the LED source and the ambient light on the target lighting surface (7) calculating the CCT and statistical color quality indexes of the combined light; (8) repeating the above steps until the resulting SPD is close enough to the expectation. Using the above method, an LED camera flashlight has been designed, which works together with usual fluorescent ambient light and generates working lighting environment with high fidelity and high CCT (6000K). The spectrum and luminous flux of the LED lamp is automatically tunable with a change of the ambient light.

  12. Activators of photoluminescence in calcite: evidence from high-resolution, laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pedone, V.A.; Cercone, K.R.; Burruss, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy of a red-algal, biogenic calcite and a synthetic Mn-calcite can make the distinction between organic and trace-element activators of photoluminescence. Organic-activated photoluminescence in biogenic calcite is characterized by significant peak shifts and increasing intensity with shorter-wavelength excitation and by significant decreases in intensity after heating to ??? 400??C. In contrast, Mn-activated photoluminescence shows no peak shift, greatest intensity under green excitation and limited changes after heating. Examination of samples with a high-sensitivity spectrometer using several wavelengths of exciting light is necessary for identification of photoluminescence activators. ?? 1990.

  13. Broadband standoff detection of large molecules by mid-infrared active coherent laser spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Neil A; Molero, Francisco; Weidmann, Damien

    2015-01-26

    A widely tunable active coherent laser spectrometer (ACLaS) has been demonstrated for standoff detection of broadband absorbers in the 1280 to 1318 cm-1 spectral region using an external cavity quantum cascade laser as a mid-infrared source. The broad tuning range allows detection and quantification of vapor phase molecules, such as dichloroethane, ethylene glycol dinitrate, and tetrafluoroethane. The level of confidence in molecular mixing ratios retrieved from interfering spectral measurements is assessed in a quantitative manner. A first qualitative demonstration of condensed phase chemical detection on nitroacetanilide has also been conducted. Detection performances of the broadband ACLaS have been placed in the context of explosive detection and compared to that obtained using distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers. PMID:25835851

  14. Delivery of siRNA to ovarian cancer cells using laser-activated carbon nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Aritra; Mezencev, Roman; McDonald, John F; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Aim The RNAi-mediated knockdown of gene expression is an attractive tool for research and therapeutic purposes but its implementation is challenging. Here we report on a new method based on photoacoustic delivery of siRNA developed to address some of these challenges. Materials & methods Physical properties and photoacoustic emission of carbon black (CB) particles upon near-infrared laser irradiation were characterized. Next, ovarian cancer cells Hey A8-F8 were exposed to near-infrared nanosecond laser pulses in the presence of siRNA targeting EGFR gene and CB particles. The intracellular delivery of siRNA and silencing of the target gene were determined by specific qPCR assays. Results & conclusion Laser-activated CB nanoparticles generated photoacoustic emission and enabled intracellular delivery of siRNA and significant knockdown of its target EGFR mRNA. This physical method represents a new promising approach to targeted therapeutic delivery of siRNA. PMID:26080699

  15. Photothermal effects in connective tissues mediated by laser-activated gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Ratto, Fulvio; Matteini, Paolo; Rossi, Francesca; Menabuoni, Luca; Tiwari, Neha; Kulkarni, Sulabha K; Pini, Roberto

    2009-06-01

    We report a study on the application of laser-activated nanoparticles in the direct welding of connective tissues, which may become a valuable technology in biomedicine. We use colloidal gold nanorods as new near-infrared chromophores to mediate functional photothermal effects in the eye lens capsules. Samples obtained ex vivo from porcine eyes are treated to simulate heterotransplants with 810-nm diode laser radiation in association with a stain of gold nanorods of aspect ratio approximately 4. This stain is applied at the interface between a patch of capsule from a donor eye and the capsule of a recipient eye. Then, by administration of laser pulses of 40 msec and approximately 100-140 J/cm(2), we achieved the local denaturation of the endogenous collagen filaments, which reveals that the treated area reached temperatures above 50 degrees C. The thermal damage is confined within 50-70 mum in a radial distance from the irradiated area. PMID:19223241

  16. Generation of dissipative solitons in an actively mode-locked ultralong fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Koliada, N A; Nyushkov, B N; Ivanenko, A V; Kobtsev, Sergey M; Harper, Paul; Turitsyn, Sergei K; Denisov, Vladimir I; Pivtsov, V S

    2013-02-28

    A single-pulse actively mode-locked fibre laser with a cavity length exceeding 1 km has been developed and investigated for the first time. This all-fibre erbium-doped laser has a normal intracavity dispersion and generates dissipative 8-ns solitons with a fundamental repetition rate of 163.8 kHz; the energy per pulse reaches 34 nJ. The implemented mode locking, based on the use of intracavity intensity modulator, provides self-triggering and high stability of pulsed lasing. A possibility of continuous tuning of the centre lasing wavelength in the range of 1558 - 1560 nm without any tunable spectral selective elements in the cavity is demonstrated. The tuning occurs when controlling the modulation signal frequency due to the forced change in the pulse repetition time (group delay) under the conditions of intracavity chromatic dispersion. (laser optics 2012)

  17. Activity of retinal ganglion cells following intense, nanosecond laser flashes. Final report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of intense, but nonlesion-producing, laser exposures of 20-ns duration were determined on the light responses and spontaneous activity of retinal ganglion cells recorded in situ from the rhesus monkey. (Following a single, 20-ns exposure centered on its receptive field, a ganglion cell produced an 'afterdischarge' of maintained action potentials). The duration of the afterdischarge depended on the diameter of the laser beam on the retina and on the beam's intensity. Laser exposures subtending 0.5 to 2.0 deg, and delivering 45 to 60% of the maximum permissible exposure, elicited afterdischarges that lasted up to 80 s. When the beam diameter was decreased to 0.25 deg, the afterdischarge was reduced to 30 s, and to less than 5 s with the 0.12-deg beam. Light sensitivity after the laser exposure recovered rapidly during the first 10 s and then more slowly, but exponentially, until it reached the preflash level. Color-opponent ganglion cells exhibited a phenomenon called 'response-reversal' after the laser exposure, presumably due to selective adaptation of a mid-wavelength cone-input. Because a 20-ns exposure, regardless of intensity, is likely to photoregenerate more than half of the available visual pigment, the effects of ganglion cell response described here are not likely to be due solely to pigment bleaching.

  18. Rapid prototyping of reflectors for vehicle lighting using laser activated remote phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachmayer, Roland; Kloppenburg, Gerolf; Wolf, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Bright white light sources are of significant importance for automotive front lighting systems. Today's upper class vehicles mainly use HID or LED as light source. As a further step in this development laser diode based systems offer high luminance, efficiency and allow the realization of new styling concepts and new dynamic lighting functions. These white laser diode systems can either be realized by mixing different spectral sources or by combining diodes with specific phosphors. Based on the approach of generating light using a laser and remote phosphor, lighting modules are manufactured. Four blue laser diodes (450 nm) are used to activate a phosphor coating and thus to achieve white light. A segmented paraboloid reflector generates the desired light distribution for an additional car headlamp. We use high speed milling and selective laser melting to build the reflector system for this lighting module. We compare the spectral reflection grade of these materials. Furthermore the generated modules are analyzed regarding their efficiency and light distribution. The use of Rapid Prototyping technologies allows an early validation of the chosen concept and is supposed to reduce cost and time in the product development process significantly. Therefor we discuss costs and times of the applied manufacturing technologies.

  19. Lasers in aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, I. N.; Dezhin, V. N.; Kutakhov, V. P.; Petukhov, A. V.; Sidorin, V. M.; Sukhar, I. M.

    The way in which lasers are being incorporated into the military aircraft of the United States and the countries of Western Europe is discussed. Descriptions are given of laser weapons-guiding systems (including ranger finders and systems for target illumination), laser systems for navigation and flight-safety assurance (gyroscopes, velocity gauges, altimeters, systems providing meteorological data, proximity warning systems), and laser systems for air reconnaissance, communications, and control. Attention is also given to the Glissada laser guide path system, developed in the USSR. The physics of the systems is emphasized in the description and the principles underlying the operation of a laser are discussed in the introduction.

  20. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-01

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 × 105 n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He4 nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T3.

  1. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-15

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He{sup 4} nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T{sup 3}.

  2. Doubly active Q switching and mode locking of an all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Díez, Antonio; Cruz, Jose L; Andrés, Miguel V

    2009-09-15

    Simultaneous and independent active Q switching and active mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser is demonstrated using all-fiber modulation techniques. A magnetostrictive rod attached to the output fiber Bragg grating modulates the Q factor of the Fabry-Perot cavity, whereas active mode locking is achieved by amplitude modulation with a Bragg-grating-based acousto-optic device. Fully modulated Q-switched mode-locked trains of optical pulses were obtained for a wide range of pump powers and repetition rates. For a Q-switched repetition rate of 500 Hz and a pump power of 100 mW, the laser generates trains of 12-14 mode-locked pulses of about 1 ns each, within an envelope of 550 ns, an overall energy of 0.65 microJ, and a peak power higher than 250 W for the central pulses of the train. PMID:19756079

  3. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-01

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 × 10(5) n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He(4) nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T(3). PMID:23277984

  4. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Christy K.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone. PMID:26203370

  5. Wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as mode locker and tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenping; Chan, K. T.

    1999-07-01

    A wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium fiber ring laser was demonstrated using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as an intensity mode locker and a tunable optical filter. Very stable optical pulse trains at gigabit repetition rates were generated using harmonica mode locking. The supermode noise was suppressed to 60 dB below the signal level and the root-mean-square timing jitter (0.45 kHz-1 MHz) was found to be about 1% of the pulse duration. A continuous wavelength tuning range of 1.8 nm was achieved by changing the semiconductor laser temperature from 11.4 to 30 °C.

  6. Characterization and control of tunable quantum cascade laser beam parameters for stand-off spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furstenberg, Robert; Kendziora, Christopher A.; Papantonakis, Michael R.; Nguyen, Viet; McGill, R. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Infrared active stand-off detection techniques often employ high power tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) for target illumination. Due to the distances involved, any fluctuation of the laser beam direction and/or beam profile is amplified at the sample position. If not accounted for, this leads to diminished performance (both sensitivity and selectivity) of the detection technique as a direct result of uncertainties in laser irradiance at each imaged pixel of the sample. This is especially true for detection approaches which illuminate a relatively small footprint at the target since the laser beam profile spatial fluctuations are often comparable to the (focused) laser spot size. Also, there is often a necessary trade-off between high output QCL power and beam quality. Therefore, precise characterization of the laser beam profile and direction as a function of laser properties (tuning wavelength, current and operating mode: pulsed or CW) is imperative. We present detailed measurements of beam profiles, beam wander and power fluctuations and their reproducibility as function of laser wavelength and stand-off distance for a commercially available tunable quantum cascade laser. We present strategies for improving beam quality by compensating for fluctuations using a motorized mirror and a pair of motorized lenses. We also investigate QCL mode hops and how they affect laser beam properties at the sample. Detailed mode-hop stability maps were measured.

  7. Field trial of active remote sensing using a high-power short-wave infrared supercontinuum laser.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Vinay V; Shi, Zhennan; Islam, Mohammed N; Ke, Kevin; Kalinchenko, Galina; Freeman, Michael J; Ifarraguerri, Agustin; Meola, Joseph; Absi, Anthony; Leonard, James; Zadnik, Jerome A; Szalkowski, Anthony S; Boer, Gregory J

    2013-09-20

    Field trial results of a 5 W all-fiber broadband supercontinuum (SC) laser covering the short-wave infrared (SWIR) wavelength bands from ~1.55 to 2.35 μm are presented. The SC laser is kept on a 12 story tower at the Wright Patterson Air Force Base and propagated through the atmosphere to a target 1.6 km away. Beam quality of the SC laser after propagating through 1.6 km is studied using a SWIR camera and show a near diffraction limited beam with an M(2) value of <1.3. The SC laser is used as the illumination source to perform spectral reflectance measurements of various samples at 1.6 km, and the results are seen to be in good agreement with in-lab measurements using a conventional lamp source. Spectral stability measurements are performed after atmospheric propagation through 1.6 km and show a relative variability of ~4%-8% across the spectrum depending on the atmospheric turbulence effects. Spectral stability measurements are also performed in-lab and show a relative variability of <0.6% across the spectrum. PMID:24085183

  8. Illumination control apparatus for compensating solar light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An illumination control apparatus is presented for supplementing light from solar radiation with light from an artificial light source to compensate for periods of insufficient levels of solar light. The apparatus maintains a desired illumination level within an interior space comprising an artificial light source connected to an electrical power source with a switch means for selectively energizing said light source. An actuator means for controlling the on-off operation of the switch means is connected to a light sensor which responses to the illumination level of the interior space. A limit switch carried adjacent to the actuator limits the movement of the actuator within a predetermined range so as to prevent further movement thereof during detection of erroneous illumination conditions.

  9. Confocal imaging with orthogonally polarized illumination beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Ranjan; Boruah, Bosanta R.

    2016-03-01

    In confocal microscopy the polarization of the illumination beam plays an important role in determining the orientation of the fluorescent molecules being illuminated. The efficiency of the excitation depends on the angle between the excitation electric field and the direction of the molecular dipole. In order to determine the orientation of the fluorescent molecules in the focal plane the molecules are to be excited using two mutually orthogonal electric fields. In this paper we show how a computer generated holography technique can be implemented using a ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator to conveniently obtain two images of the same target once with an X polarized illumination beam and another with a Y polarized illumination beam.

  10. 29 CFR 1926.56 - Illumination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... work is in progress: Table D-3—Minimum Illumination Intensities in Foot-Candles Foot-candles Area or... underground work areas: (Exception: minimum of 10 foot-candles is required at tunnel and shaft heading...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.56 - Illumination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... work is in progress: Table D-3—Minimum Illumination Intensities in Foot-Candles Foot-candles Area or... underground work areas: (Exception: minimum of 10 foot-candles is required at tunnel and shaft heading...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.56 - Illumination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... work is in progress: Table D-3—Minimum Illumination Intensities in Foot-Candles Foot-candles Area or... underground work areas: (Exception: minimum of 10 foot-candles is required at tunnel and shaft heading...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.56 - Illumination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... work is in progress: Table D-3—Minimum Illumination Intensities in Foot-Candles Foot-candles Area or... underground work areas: (Exception: minimum of 10 foot-candles is required at tunnel and shaft heading...

  14. Color constancy by characterization of illumination chromaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkanen, Jarno T.

    2011-05-01

    Computational color constancy algorithms play a key role in achieving desired color reproduction in digital cameras. Failure to estimate illumination chromaticity correctly will result in invalid overall colour cast in the image that will be easily detected by human observers. A new algorithm is presented for computational color constancy. Low computational complexity and low memory requirement make the algorithm suitable for resource-limited camera devices, such as consumer digital cameras and camera phones. Operation of the algorithm relies on characterization of the range of possible illumination chromaticities in terms of camera sensor response. The fact that only illumination chromaticity is characterized instead of the full color gamut, for example, increases robustness against variations in sensor characteristics and against failure of diagonal model of illumination change. Multiple databases are used in order to demonstrate the good performance of the algorithm in comparison to the state-of-the-art color constancy algorithms.

  15. SERS activity of silver and gold nanostructured thin films deposited by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, N. R.; Tommasini, M.; Fazio, E.; Neri, F.; Ponterio, R. C.; Trusso, S.; Ossi, P. M.

    2014-10-01

    Nanostructured Au and Ag thin films were obtained by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in presence of a controlled Ar atmosphere. Keeping constant other deposition parameters such as target-to-substrate distance, incidence angle, laser wavelength and laser fluence, the film morphology, revealed by SEM, ranges from isolated NPs to island structures and sensibly depends on gas pressure (10-100 Pa) and on the laser pulse number (500-3 × 10). The control of these two parameters allows tailoring the morphology and correspondingly the optical properties of the films. The position and width of the surface plasmon resonance peak, in fact, can be varied with continuity. The films showed remarkable surface-enhanced Raman activity (SERS) that depends on the adopted deposition conditions. Raman maps were acquired on micrometer-sized areas of both silver and gold substrates selected among those with the strongest SERS activity. Organic dyes of interest in cultural heritage studies (alizarin, purpurin) have been also considered for bench marking the substrates produced in this work. Also the ability to detect the presence of biomolecules was tested using lysozyme in a label free configuration.

  16. Sutureless microvascular anastomoses by a biodegradable laser-activated solid protein solder.

    PubMed

    Maitz, P K; Trickett, R I; Dekker, P; Tos, P; Dawes, J M; Piper, J A; Lanzetta, M; Owen, E R

    1999-11-01

    A new sutureless technique to successfully anastomose the abdominal aorta of rats (1.3 mm in diameter) by using a fully biodegradable, laser-activated protein solder is presented. A total of 90 rats were divided into two groups randomly. In group one, the anastomoses were performed by using conventional microsuturing technique, whereas in group two, the anastomoses were performed by using a new laser welding technique. In addition, each of the two groups were divided into five subgroups and evaluated at different follow-up periods (10 minutes, 1 hour, 1 day, 1 week, and 6 weeks). At these intervals, the anastomoses were evaluated for patency and tensile strength. Three anastomoses in each subgroup were processed for light and electron microscopy. All anastomoses were found to be patent. The mean clamp time of the anastomoses performed with conventional suturing was 20.6 minutes compared with 7.2 minutes for the laser-activated welded anastomoses (p < 0.001). The strain measurements showed a stronger mechanical bond of the sutured anastomoses in the initial phase. However, at 6 weeks the tensile strength of the laser-welded anastomoses was higher compared with the conventional suture technique. Histologic evaluations revealed a near complete resorption of the solder after 6 weeks. The junction site of the vessel ends cannot be determined on the luminal side of the artery. In conclusion, a resorbable protein used as a solder, activated by a diode laser, can provide a reliable, safe, and rapid arterial anastomosis, which could be performed by any microsurgeon faster than conventional suturing after a short learning curve. PMID:10541175

  17. Emerging liquid crystal waveguide technology for low SWaP active short-wave infrared imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Sean D.; Uyeno, Gerald P.; Lynch, Ted; Davis, Scott R.; Rommel, Scott D.; Pino, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Raytheon's innovative active short wave infrared (SWIR) imager uses Vescent Photonic's emerging liquid crystal waveguide (LCWG) technology to continuously steer the illumination laser beam over the imager field of view (FOV). This approach instantly illuminates a very small fraction of the FOV, which significantly reduces the laser power compared to flash illumination. This reduced laser power directly leads to a reduction in the size, weight and power (SWaP) of the laser. The reduction in laser power reduces the input power and thermal rejection, which leads to additional reduction in the SWaP of the power supplies and thermal control. The high-speed steering capability of the LCWG enables the imager's SWaP reduction. The SWaP reduction is possible using either global or rolling shutter detectors. In both cases, the LCWG steers the laser beam over the entire FOV while the detector is integrating. For a rolling shutter detector, the LCWG synchronizes the steering with the rolling shutter to illuminate only regions currently integrating. Raytheon's approach enables low SWaP active SWIR imagers without compromising image quality. This paper presents the results of Raytheon's active SWIR imager demonstration including steering control and synchronization with the detector integration.

  18. Solar cells with distributed parameters: Current-voltage characteristics under uniform and nonuniform illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aripov, K. K.; Rumyantsev, V. D.

    1984-02-01

    A simple method of calculating the current voltage characteristics of solar cells, based on an equivalent resistance diode ladder network with stripline contacts, is applied to such cells with uniform thickness and various shapes of the active surface. Distributed resistance are represented by equivalent lumped ones. This procedure is applied first to the case of uniform illumination, using measured current voltage characteristics of cells and very precisely piecewise linearly approximated exponential current voltage characteristics of diodes. In the case of nonuniform illumination the latter is assumed to be axisymmetric, with the surface consisting of completely dark and uniformly bright segments. Numerical data is generated on this basis for GaAs cells of rectangular or sectoral shape uniformly illuminated and in the shape of circular disks either completely uniformly illuminated or with various configurations of concentric dark and bright zones. Nonuniform illumination is found to result in a flatter current voltage characteristic with a lower open circuit voltage.

  19. Illuminating a dialectical transformative activist stance in education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2008-07-01

    In this essay I comment on Stetsenko's (2008) essay that draws together the work of Vygotsky, Piaget and Dewey, as she attempts to counter the `new' reductionist synthesis in public educational policy. While this theoretical work is helpful, it could be enhanced further by illuminating everyday practices of learners. I pose some questions that might provoke ongoing discussions by researchers as they transform collaboratively cultural-historical activity theory.

  20. Surface color perception under two illuminants: the second illuminant reduces color constancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Joong Nam; Shevell, Steven K.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates color perception in a scene with two different illuminants. The two illuminants, in opposite corners, simultaneously shine on a (simulated) scene with an opaque dividing wall, which controls how much of the scene is illuminated by each source. In the first experiment, the height of the dividing wall was varied. This changed the amount of each illuminant reaching objects on the opposite side of the wall. Results showed that the degree of color constancy decreased when a region on one side of the wall had cues to both illuminants, suggesting that cues from the second illuminant are detrimental to color constancy. In a later experiment, color constancy was found to improve when the specular highlight cues from the second illuminant were altered to be consistent with the first illuminant. This corroborates the influence of specular highlights in surface color perception, and suggests that the reduced color constancy in the first experiment is due to the inconsistent, though physically correct, cues from the two illuminants.