Science.gov

Sample records for active laser medium

  1. Envelope evolution of a laser pulse in an active medium

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.L.; Tajima, T.; Downer, M.C.; Siders, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    The authors show that the envelope velocity, v{sub env}, of a short laser pulse can, via propagation in an active medium, be made less than, equal to, or even greater than c, the vacuum phase velocity of light. Simulation results, based on moving frame propagation equations coupling the laser pulse, active medium and plasma, are presented, as well as equations that determines the design value of super- and sub-luminous v{sub env}. In this simulation the laser pulse evolves in time in a moving frame as opposed to their earlier work where the profile was fixed. The elimination of phase slippage and pump depletion effects in the laser wakefield accelerator is discussed as a particular application. Finally they discuss media properties necessary for an experimental realization of this technique.

  2. ACTIVE MEDIA: Dynamics of growth of inhomogeneities in the active medium of a liquid laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barikhin, B. A.; Ivanov, A. Yu; Kudryavkin, E. V.; Nedolugov, V. I.

    1991-07-01

    Fast cinematography of holograms and of shadow and interference patterns was combined with an acoustic method in a study of the dynamics of growth of inhomogeneities in the active medium of a coaxially pumped dye laser. The main mechanism of the formation of these inhomogeneities was related to acoustic waves created by the deformation of the walls of a dye cell created by electrical pulses applied to the pump flashlamp. Multipulse operation of this laser could be achieved and the off-duty factor could be reduced if the active medium was excited by the strongest possible pump pulses.

  3. Light-induced cooling of active medium of CW TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azharonok, Viktor V.; Filatova, Irina I.; Shimanovich, Vladimir D.

    2003-10-01

    In the present paper a gas kinetic temperature change of active medium of high-power TEA CO2 laser that is conditioned by a self-influence of laser radiation on plasma parameters, is investigated. The active medium was pumped by a self-sustained transverse glow discharge. The gas kinetic temperature Tg of plasma has been deduced from the half-width of rotationally unresolved spectral bands of the (2+)N2. It is shown that the laser radiation propagation through the inverse medium causes a cooling of the active medium. The degree of the gas mixture cooling δTg~5K at W~2.2 W/2.2 W/cm3 and δTg~60 K at W~4.4 W/cm3. We suppose that the effect of the active medium cooling is connected with the change of a kinetic of V-T relaxation in asymmetrical mode of the active medium cooling is connected with the change of a kinetic of V-T relaxation in asymmetrical mode of the active medium cooling is connected with with the change of a kinetic of V-T relaxation in asymmetrical mode of vibrationally-excited CO2 molecule when the lasing takes place in the laser resonator. Analytical estimation of light-induced temperature change δT*g of fast-flow TEA CO2-laser active medium are compared with the experimental ones.

  4. Gas dynamics of the active medium of a supersonic cw HF chemical laser

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Igor' A; Rotinyan, Mikhail A; Krivitskii, A M

    2000-12-31

    Gas-dynamic characteristics of a 5-kW supersonic cw HF chemical laser with a nozzle array of size 25 cm x 2.8 cm and the nozzle - nozzle mixing scheme were experimentally studied. The distributions of Mach numbers, static pressure, total pressure behind the normal shock, and the loss of total pressure were measured in the flow of an active medium in wide ranges of variation of the flow rate of secondary fuel (hydrogen) and pressure in the atomic-fluorine generator. The energy parameters of the laser were found to be interrelated with the gas dynamics and the optical quality of the active laser medium. (lasers)

  5. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, Stanley E.

    1989-01-01

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chormium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  6. Synthetic laser medium

    DOEpatents

    Stokowski, S.E.

    1987-10-20

    A laser medium is particularly useful in high average power solid state lasers. The laser medium includes a chromium dopant and preferably neodymium ions as codopant, and is primarily a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet, or an analog thereof. Divalent cations inhibit spiral morphology as large boules from which the laser medium is derived are grown, and a source of ions convertible between a trivalent state and a tetravalent state at a low ionization energy are in the laser medium to reduce an absorption coefficient at about one micron wavelength otherwise caused by the divalent cations. These divalent cations and convertible ions are dispersed in the laser medium. Preferred convertible ions are provided from titanium or cerium sources.

  7. Active-medium inhomogeneities and optical quality of radiation of supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Boreysho, A S; Druzhinin, S L; Lobachev, V V; Savin, A V; Strakhov, S Yu; Trilis, A V

    2007-09-30

    Optical inhomogeneities of the active medium of a supersonic chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) and their effect on the radiation parameters are studied in the case when an unstable resonator is used. Classification of optical inhomogeneities and the main factors affecting the quality of COIL radiation are considered. The results of numerical simulation of a three-dimensional gas-dynamic active medium and an unstable optical resonator in the diffraction approximation are presented. The constraints in the fabrication of large-scale COILs associated with a deterioration of the optical quality of radiation are determined. (lasers)

  8. Study on the activation of styrene-based shape memory polymer by medium-infrared laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Leng Jinsong; Yu Kai; Lan Xin; Zhang Dawei; Liu Yanju

    2010-03-15

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of shape memory polymer (SMP) activation by medium-infrared laser light. Medium-infrared light is transmitted by an optical fiber embedded in the SMP matrix, and the shape recovery process and temperature distribution are recorded by an infrared camera. Light-induced SMP exhibits potential applications in biomedicines and flexible displays.

  9. PicoGreen dye as an active medium for plastic lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, C.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2015-08-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid lipid complex thin films are used as a host material for laser dyes. We tested PicoGreen dye, which is commonly used for the quantification of single and double stranded DNA, for its applicability as lasing medium. PicoGreen dye exhibits enhanced fluorescence on intercalation with DNA. This enormous fluorescence emission is amplified in a planar microcavity to achieve yellow lasing. Here the role of DNA is not only a host medium, but also as a fluorescence dequencher. With the obtained results we have ample reasons to propose PicoGreen dye as a lasing medium, which can lead to the development of DNA based bio-lasers.

  10. Efficiency of the unstable resonator of a high-power laser with stochastic phase inhomogeneities in the active medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobachev, V V; Strakhov, S Yu

    2006-02-28

    The specific features of operation of the unstable optical resonator of a large gas laser with an active medium containing stochastic phase inhomogeneities are considered. The output power of the laser, the Strehl number, the angular divergence and average far-field radiation intensity are studied as functions of the spatial scale and structure of random inhomogeneities of the refractive index of the active medium. Physical effects related to the deformation of the radiation pattern caused by a change in the spatial frequency of stochastic perturbations are analysed. (resonators, modes, beams)

  11. The aqueous-polyelectrolyte dye solution as an active laser medium

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, A I; Saletskii, A M

    2000-11-30

    The spectral, luminescent, and lasing properties of aqueous solutions of a cationic dye rhodamine 6G with additions of anion polyelectrolytes - polyacrylic and polymethacrylic acids - are studied. It is found that the energy and spectral properties of lasing of these solutions depend on the ratio of concentrations of polyelectrolyte and molecules. It is also found that the lasing parameters of aqueous-polyelectrolyte dye solutions can be controlled by changing the structure of the molecular system. The variation in the structure of aqueous-polyelectrolyte dye solutions of rhodamine 6G resulted in an almost five-fold increase in the lasing efficiency compared to that in aqueous dye solutions. (lasers, active media)

  12. Mechanism of dark decomposition of iodine donor in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, A I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2002-06-30

    A scheme is proposed that describes the dark decomposition of iodide - the donor of iodine - and the relaxation of singlet oxygen in the chlorine-containing active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen - iodine laser (COIL). For typical compositions of the active media of pulsed COILs utilising CH{sub 3}I molecules as iodine donors, a branching chain reaction of the CH{sub 3}I decomposition accompanied by the efficient dissipation of singlet oxygen is shown to develop even at the stage of filling the active volume. In the active media with CF{sub 3}I as the donor, a similar chain reaction is retarded due to the decay of CF{sub 3} radicals upon recombination with oxygen. The validity of this mechanism is confirmed by a rather good agreement between the results of calculations and the available experimental data. The chain decomposition of alkyliodides accompanied by an avalanche production of iodine atoms represents a new way of efficient chemical production of iodine for a COIL. (active media)

  13. Dissociation and regeneration kinetics of carbon dioxide in the active medium of sealed-off transverse RF-excited CO{sub 2} lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Vesnov, I G

    2010-06-23

    An improved mathematical model describing the dissociation and regenerations kinetics of carbon dioxide in the active medium of sealed-off transverse RF-excited CO{sub 2} lasers is presented. It is shown that the calculation of the active medium composition of such lasers requires the equations of the gas-mixture kinetics to take into account the diffuse flow of oxygen atoms on metal electrodes and on the surface of heterogeneous catalysts used to reduce the degree of the carbon dioxide dissociation. The rate constants of the heterogeneous recombination reaction CO + O {yields} CO{sub 2} on the surface of alumina ceramics and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are determined. (active media)

  14. Effect of the solution temperature in a singlet-oxygen generator on the formation of active medium in an ejector oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zagidullin, M V; Nikolaev, V D; Svistun, M I; Khvatov, N A; Palina, N Yu

    2002-02-28

    The influence of the solution temperature in a singlet-oxygen generator on the formation of the active medium in the ejector oxygen - iodine laser is investigated. The following parameters of the active medium at the solution temperature -20{sup 0}C are obtained: the gain is 7.2 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup -1}, the Mach number is M=2, the temperature is 205 K, and the static pressure is 9.3 mmHg. As the solution temperature is increased to -4{sup 0}C, the gain decreases to 5 x 10{sup 3} cm{sup -1}, the Mach number decreases to 1.78, while the temperature and the static pressure increase to 241 K and 10.7 mmHg, respectively. As the solution temperature increases from -20 to -4{sup 0}C, the losses in O{sub 2}({sup 1}{Delta}) increase by less than 20%, while the dissociation efficiency of molecular iodine decreases by less than 21%. (lasers, active media)

  15. Enhanced antibacterial activity of copper/copper oxide nanowires prepared by pulsed laser ablation in water medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swarnkar, R. K.; Pandey, J. K.; Soumya, K. K.; Dwivedi, P.; Sundaram, S.; Prasad, Sanjay; Gopal, R.

    2016-07-01

    Copper/copper oxide nanowires (NWs) are well known for its antibacterial activity against various pathogens. In the present study, we have shown the enhanced antibacterial activity of the NWs against gram-negative bacterial strains ( Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella typhi) and gram-positive bacterial strains ( Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus). The increase in the activity is because of the shape and size of the colloidal NWs which were prepared at room temperature in a one-step process by pulsed laser ablation of copper metal target. The purity, shape and size of the colloidal NWs were well characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The NWs were of diameters in the range of 15-30 nm and lengths ranging from 200 to 600 nm. The dose-dependent antibacterial activity of these NWs was found to be more effective against gram-negative bacteria compared to gram-positive bacteria. As gram-negative bacteria have thinner layer of cell wall made up of peptidoglycan possibly which makes them more susceptible to Cu/Cu2O NWs, Cu/Cu2O NWs can be a potent candidate to be used as bactericidal or as growth inhibitor.

  16. Analytic study of the chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides - atomic iodine donors - in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser: 1. Criteria for the development of the branching chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, Aleksandr I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2009-02-28

    The scheme of chemical processes proceeding in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is analysed. Based on the analysis performed, the complete system of differential equations corresponding to this scheme is replaced by a simplified system of equations describing in dimensionless variables the chain dark decomposition of iodides - atomic iodine donors, in the COIL active medium. The procedure solving this system is described, the basic parameters determining the development of the chain reaction are found and its specific time intervals are determined. The initial stage of the reaction is analysed and criteria for the development of the branching chain decomposition reaction of iodide in the COIL active medium are determined. (active media)

  17. ACTIVE MEDIA: Chromium-activated forsterite crystal as the passive Q switch in the cavity of an Nd:YAG laser and as the active medium in an Nd:YAG—Cr:forsterite laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripko, G. A.; Tarazevich, I. G.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation was made of the generation and self-modulation of the λ = 1.064 and 1.25 μm radiation in an Nd:YAG—Cr:forsterite laser system. The advantages of this system over those with traditional methods were demonstrated. The feasibility of self-control of the rate of pumping of the Cr:forsterite crystal was revealed and recommendations on optimisation of the system were developed.

  18. Pulsed operation of a TEA CO{sub 2} laser under the conditions of the growth of an optical inhomogeneity of the active medium at high specific pump energies

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, K N; Roerich, V C; Satov, Yu A; Stepanov, A E; Khomenko, S V

    2000-04-30

    A CO{sub 2} laser system with self-modulation of the intracavity losses was developed. This system was capable of generating efficiently pulses free of a radiation 'tail' typical for CO{sub 2} lasers. A simple method was used to detect the optical inhomogeneity of the medium of a gas-discharge TEA module. The results of the measurements are presented. (lasers)

  19. Laser ablation of a turbid medium: Modeling and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Brygo, F.; Semerok, A.; Weulersse, J.-M.; Thro, P.-Y.; Oltra, R.

    2006-08-01

    Q-switched Nd:YAG laser ablation of a turbid medium (paint) is studied. The optical properties (absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and its anisotropy) of a paint are determined with a multiple scattering model (three-flux model), and from measurements of reflection-transmission of light through thin layers. The energy deposition profiles are calculated at wavelengths of 532 nm and 1.064 {mu}m. They are different from those described by a Lambert-Beer law. In particular, the energy deposition of the laser beam is not maximum on the surface but at some depth inside the medium. The ablated rate was measured for the two wavelengths and compared with the energy deposition profile predicted by the model. This allows us to understand the evolution of the ablated depth with the wavelength: the more the scattering coefficient is higher, the more the ablated depth and the threshold fluence of ablation decrease.

  20. Photonuclear activation of pure isotopic mediums.

    SciTech Connect

    Grohman, Mark A.; Lukosi, Eric Daniel

    2010-06-01

    This work simulated the response of idealized isotopic U-235, U-238, Th-232, and Pu-239 mediums to photonuclear activation with various photon energies. These simulations were conducted using MCNPX version 2.6.0. It was found that photon energies between 14-16 MeV produce the highest response with respect to neutron production rates from all photonuclear reactions. In all cases, Pu-239 responds the highest, followed by U-238. Th-232 produces more overall neutrons at lower photon energies then U-235 when material thickness is above 3.943 centimeters. The time it takes each isotopic material to reach stable neutron production rates in time is directly proportional to the material thickness and stopping power of the medium, where thicker mediums take longer to reach stable neutron production rates and thinner media display a neutron production plateau effect, due to the lack of significant attenuation of the activating photons in the isotopic mediums. At this time, no neutron sensor system has time resolutions capable of verifying these simulations, but various indirect methods are possible and should be explored for verification of these results.

  1. Return Echoes from Medium-Large Footprint Laser Altimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Hofton, Michelle A.; Rabine, David L.

    1999-01-01

    For just over 10 years, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has been at the forefront of developing return echo laser altimeters and analysis techniques for a variety of both space and airborne applications. In 1991, the Laser Remote Sensing Branch began investigating the use of medium-large diameter footprint return waveforms for measuring vegetation height and structure and sub-canopy topography. Over the last 8 years, using a variety of profiling and scanning laser altimeters (i.e. ATLAS, SLICER, SLA, and LVIS), we have collected return waveforms over a variety of terrestrial surface types. We describe the effects of instrument characteristics and within-footprint surface structure on the shape of the return waveform and suggest several techniques for extracting this information. Specifically for vegetation returns, we describe the effects of canopy parameters such as architecture and closure on the shape of the return waveform. Density profiles, statistics, and examples from a variety of vegetation types will be presented, as well as comparisons with small-footprint laser altimeter data.

  2. Pulsar activation by the interstellar medium?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1987-01-01

    Recent work suggests that rotating magnetized neutron stars (i.e., pulsar models) trap plasma instead of emitting it. The trapping arises because nonneutral plasma can be stably trapped within such a magnetosphere provided the overall system charge is nonzero. It has been argued that particles from the interstellar medium would discharge this system, thereby presumably reactivating the system as a pulsar. However, radiation pressure either precludes such discharging (requiring an alternative source of ionization) or pulsar magnetic moments must be almost perfectly aligned with the spin axis (a revolutionary alternative). Indeed, the pulsars for which particles could reach the neutron star are those with periods of at least 3 sec. But those periods are where pulsars become inactive, not active. Conceivably, nulling might represent intermittent accretion of the interstellar medium.

  3. Tunable spectral singularities: coherent perfect absorber and laser in an atomic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang; Konotop, Vladimir V.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a scheme for a coherent perfect absorber (CPA) and a laser in an atomic medium with gain and loss, obeying simultaneously a spectral singularity and a time-reversed spectral singularity, both occurring at different wavevectors (or frequencies). We term this system a CPA-and-laser and investigate its features allowing to obtain asymmetric lasing and absorbing properties, switches, etc. We show that the CPA-and-laser can be obtained by modifying characteristics of a CPA-laser of an initial {\\boldsymbol{ Q }}{\\boldsymbol{ T }}-symmetric configuration, provided there are at least three tunable parameters. The physical mechanism of emergence of a CPA-and-laser in this way, is based on splitting of a self-dual spectral singularity of the {\\boldsymbol{ Q }}{\\boldsymbol{ T }}-symmetric CPA-laser into the spectral singularity and time-reversed spectral singularity. After the discussion of a particular example of a bilayer consisting of one active and one passive slabs, we suggest a realistic physical system for implementing a CPA-and-laser. It consists of two adjacent atomic cells filled with isotopes of Λ-type three-level rubidium atoms interacting with probe and control fields, allowing for the required number of tunable parameters.

  4. Effect of solvent viscosity on the anisotropy of distribution of excited centers in an active medium of a dye laser at a pump power near the threshold value

    SciTech Connect

    Yartsev, A.I.; Sechkarev, A.V.

    1995-03-01

    Dependences of the anisotropy of the distribution of excited centers (A) in rhodamine 6G and 6-aminophenolenon solutions in organic solvents of different viscosity are studied. Relying on the character of the dependence of A on the viscosity, the conclusion is made that it is possible to employ a relation similar to the Levshin-Perrin formula for polarized luminescence in the threshold excitation mode. Experimental data are used to calculate angles between absorption and emission dipoles of electron auxochrome groups of molecules for the dyes under investigation and to estimate the effective volume of activator molecules for the ethanol solution of rhodamine 6G. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Propagation of the ultrashort laser pulses through the quantum nonlinear medium with resonant properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, A. V.; Tikhonova, O. V.

    2010-05-01

    The propagation of ultrashort few-cycle laser pulses through a quantum nonlinear medium with resonant properties is studied using the method of slowly varying amplitudes with allowance for dispersion effects. A self-consistent system of nonlinear wave equation for the evolution of laser field and the nonstationary Schrödinger equation that determines the material polarization response is numerically solved. Specific features of the propagation of laser pulse caused by a relatively large spectral width and the nonadiabatic character of the laser pulse are established. The rise of the slowly dumping polarization at the eigenfrequency of the medium and the consequent stretching of the laser pulse are observed. The role of the resonant absorption of the laser energy in the medium is analyzed. The nonlinear spectral broadening is demonstrated for the laser pulse propagating through the medium.

  6. Laser based on dye-activated silica gel

    SciTech Connect

    Altshuler, G.B.; Bakhanov, V.A.; Dulneva, E.G.; Erofeev, A.V.; Mazurin, O.V.; Roskova, G.P.; Tsekhomskaya, T.S.

    1987-06-01

    Silica gel activated by a dye is used as a new laser medium. The lasin characteristics of rhodamine 6G in silica gel are reported. An important characteristic of the dye laser is its long service life, which is determined by the photostability of the dye in silic gel.(AIP)

  7. An active solid state ring laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Valle, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of an active, solid state ring laser gyroscope were investigated. Two laser diode pumped monolithic nonplanar ring oscillators (NPRO), forced to lase in opposite directions, formed the NPRO-Gyro. It was unique in being an active ring laser gyroscope with a homogeneously broadened gain medium. This work examined sources of technical and fundamental noise. Associated calculations accounted for aspects of the NPRO-Gyro performance, suggested design improvements, and outlined limitations. The work brought out the need to stabilize the NPRO environment in order to achieve performance goals. Two Nd:YAG NPROs were mounted within an environment short term stabilized to microdegrees Celsius. The Allan variance of the NPRO-Gyro beat note was 500 Hz for a one second time delay. Unequal treatment of the NPROs appeared as noise on the beat frequency, therefore reducing its rotation sensitivity. The sensitivity to rotation was limited by technical noise sources.

  8. Medium Repetition Rate TEA Laser For Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Bruno

    1987-09-01

    The design and performance of an inexpensive compact repetitively pulsed TEA CO2 laser is described. The device uses a modified corona preionization technique and a fast transverse gas flow to achieve high repetition rates. An output energy of 500 mJ per pulse and an out-put power of 6.2W at 40Hz have been obtained. Due to the small energy needed for preionization, the efficiency of the device is high, whereas the gas dissociation is low when compared with commercial laser systems. This results in the relatively small fresh laser gas exchange of 20 ltr h-1 for long term operation.

  9. The study of the structural stability of the spiral laser beams propagation through inhomogeneous phase medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchik, Alexander A.; Muzychenko, Yana B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper discusses theoretical and experimental results of the investigation of light beams that retain their intensity structure during propagation and focusing. Spiral laser beams are a family of laser beams that preserve the structural stability up to scale and rotation with the propagation. Properties of spiral beams are of practical interest for laser technology, medicine and biotechnology. Researchers use a spiral beams for movement and manipulation of microparticles. Functionality laser manipulators can be significantly enhanced by using spiral beams whose intensity remains invariable. It is well known, that these beams has non-zero orbital angular momentum. Spiral beams have a complicated phase distribution in cross section. In this paper we investigate the structural stability of the laser beams having a spiral phase structure by passing them through an inhomogeneous phase medium. Laser beam is passed through a medium is characterized by a random distribution of phase in the range 0..2π. The modeling was performed using VirtualLab 5.0 (manufacturer LightTrans GmbH). Compared the intensity distribution of the spiral and ordinary laser beam after the passage of the inhomogeneous medium. It is shown that the spiral beams exhibit a significantly better structural stability during the passage phase heterogeneous environments than conventional laser beams. The results obtained in the simulation are tested experimentally. Experimental results show good agreement with the theoretical results.

  10. Higher order mode laser beam scintillations in oceanic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykal, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    In a horizontal oceanic optical wireless communication link, the scintillation index (the measure for the intensity fluctuations) of the received intensity caused by the oceanic turbulence is formulated and evaluated when the source is a higher order mode laser. Variations in the scintillation index vs. the underwater turbulence parameters, size of the higher order mode laser source, link length, and the wavelength are examined. Underwater turbulence parameters are the ratio that determines the relative strength of temperature and salinity in driving the index fluctuations, the rate of dissipation of the mean squared temperature, the rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy, and the Kolmogorov microscale length.

  11. Microemboli Characterization in Whole Blood Medium by Laser Scattering Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungkuk

    The current light scattering method to detect the thromboemboli generated inside blood vessels or by direct contact of biomaterials has been a powerful method because of its advantages: continuous real time measurement, non-ionizing radiation, practically unlimited aggregate size distribution, no disturbance of blood flow, and low cost. But this method only detects the number and size of thromboemboli that is assumed to be known. If there are air bubbles or foreign particles, this method can not distinguish them from the thromboemboli. An improved light scattering detection method that can characterize emboli, air bubbles, or any foreign particles, their number and size and also their nature, will be proposed by finding coefficients of a Legendre polynomial expansion of phase functions for a microembolus, air bubble, or a foreign particle. The scattered light distribution in whole blood medium is obtained by deriving and solving a multiple order scattering transport approximation of the radiative transport equation. This approximation will be derived on the basis of the fact that blood cells are highly anisotropic scatterers and applied to detect and characterize the microemboli mentioned above. Also a more practical method is devised. This method uses three different scattering angles that produce maximum differences in scattering phase function of microemboli according to their nature. This method is tested for a cylindrical whole blood medium with several kinds of known inhomogeneous particles: polystyrene spheres, air bubbies, and clots. The results produced an excellent agreement with theoretical calculations.

  12. Diode laser anastemoses of medium-size arteries with indocyanine green dye-enhanced albumine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Guo-Xing; Williamson, Warren; Aretz, H. Thomas

    1998-11-01

    In order to achieve a better long-term patency result and solve the problem of tensile strength in laser artery anastomoses, diode laser and Indocyanine Green (ICG) enhanced albumin were applied to medium-size artery anastomoses with three different methods, that is, direct laser vascular anastomoses, direct method enforced with ICG albumin, and laser welding with ICG albumin as 'solder'. Internal mammary artery (IMA) harvested from patients undergoing coronary bypass procedures, in vivo rat abdominal artery, and in vitro swine heart and IMA were chosen as the experimental materials. The results revealed that only 3.15 +/- 0.36 minutes were required for each anastomosis; the bursting pressure and tensile strength were greater in the groups enforced with ICG albumin and laser welding than that with direct laser anastomoses. In the laser soldering group, the thermal damage was limited in the adventitial layer, only at a depth of 200 micrometers . There was also a satisfied result in the in vivo laser welding rat's abdominal adventitial layer, only at a depth of 200 micrometers . There was also a satisfied result in the in vivo laser welding rat's abdominal arteries. However, end-to-side laser welding of IMA soronary artery with ICG albumin needs further investigation about its tensile strength in an in vivo model.

  13. Research on ablation process of constant elastic alloy with femtosecond laser in solution medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Guilin; Su, Wenyi; Duan, Ji'an; Fan, Nannan; Sun, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Jianying; Wang, Cong; Yin, Kai; Dong, Xinran; Hu, Youwang

    2016-09-01

    Constant elastic alloy is widely used material with high applied performance. In order to develop the application of constant elastic alloy, laser ablation of constant elastic alloy in different ablation mediums was investigated with different femtosecond lasers. Constant elastic alloy was ablated in solution with different ethanol contents and different thicknesses of the liquid layer above the target material and for comparison, in air. Also, the effects of laser energy and laser pulses of femtosecond laser on the morphology are studied. The effects of the position of the laser focus relative to the target surface were also discussed. The experimental results indicate that larger laser-induced area and smaller depth of craters tend to be obtained in solution than in air. The laser-induced area firstly increases and then decreases, and depths of craters decrease at first and increase later with the increase in ethanol content. Furthermore, the larger were energy of laser pulses, the larger were laser-induced area and deeper craters made in all different ablation solutions.

  14. Excited states in the active media of oxygen - iodine lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Azyazov, V N

    2009-11-30

    A review of investigations of kinetic processes in active media oxygen - iodine lasers (OILs) performed in the last decade is presented. The mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited O{sub 2} and I{sub 2} molecules are considered, and dissociation mechanisms of I{sub 2} in the active medium of the OIL are analysed. The values of kinetic constants of processes proceeding in the active media of OILs are recommended. (review)

  15. Linear analysis of active-medium two-beam accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voin, Miron; Schächter, Levi

    2015-07-01

    We present detailed development of the linear theory of wakefield amplification by active medium and its possible application to a two-beam accelerator (TBA) is discussed. A relativistic train of triggering microbunches traveling along a vacuum channel in an active medium confined by a cylindrical waveguide excites Cherenkov wake in the medium. The wake is a superposition of azimuthally symmetric transverse magnetic modes propagating along a confining waveguide, with a phase velocity equal to the velocity of the triggering bunches. The structure may be designed in such a way that the frequency of one of the modes is close to active-medium resonant frequency, resulting in amplification of the former and domination of a single mode far behind the trigger bunches. Another electron bunch placed in proper phase with the amplified wakefield may be accelerated by the latter. Importantly, the energy for acceleration is provided by the active medium and not the drive bunch as in a traditional TBA. Based on a simplified model, we analyze extensively the impact of various parameters on the wakefield amplification process.

  16. Modeling and Calculation of Optical Amplification in One Dimensional Case of Laser Medium Using Finite Difference Time Domain Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryana, Okky Fajar Tri; Hidayat, Rahmat

    2016-08-01

    Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method has been much employed for studying light propagation in various structures, from simple one-dimensional structures up to three-dimensional complex structures. One of challenging problems is to implement this method for the case of light propagation in amplifying medium or structures, such as optical amplifier and lasers. The implementation is hindered by the fact that the dielectric constant becomes a complex number when optical gain parameter is involved in the calculation. In general, complex dielectric constant is related to complex susceptibility, in which the imaginary part is related to optical gain. Here, we then modify the formulation for updating electric field in the calculation algorithm. Using this approach, we then finally can calculate light amplification in laser active medium of Nd3+ ion doped glass. The calculation result shows an agreement with the result from the calculation using differential equation for intensity. Although this method is more time consuming, the method seem promising for optical complex micro- and nano-structures, such quantum dot lasers, micro-ring lasers, etc.

  17. Backscattering amplification of laser radiation in a medium with fluctuations of the imaginary part of permittivity

    SciTech Connect

    Almaev, R Kh; Suvorov, A A

    2001-04-30

    The effect of backscattering amplification of laser radiation with respect to the radiation intensity reflected from an ordinary mirror in a medium with fluctuations of the real (refractive index) and the imaginary (absorption or amplification coefficient) parts of the permittivity is considered. Formulas for the backscattering amplification coefficient and the variance of the intensity fluctuations of the reflected wave propagating in a random dissipative (amplifying) medium are derived. Asymptotic expressions derived for the saturation region of intensity fluctuations take into account the effect of fluctuations of the refractive index and absorption (amplification) coefficient, as well as their correlation. The contribution of fluctuations of the complex permittivity parts and the characteristic spatial scale of the problem to the backscattering amplification coefficient is analysed. It is shown that for uncorrelated fluctuations of the real and imaginary parts of the permittivity of a random medium, the backscattering amplification coefficient in the region of strong fluctuations is larger than in a transparent random medium. It is also found that the correlation of pulsations of the real and imaginary parts of the permittivity suppresses the backscattering amplification effect in an absorbing medium and increases this effect in an amplifying medium. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  18. High Average Power Laser Gain Medium With Low Optical Distortion Using A Transverse Flowing Liquid Host

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Ault, Earl R.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    2005-07-05

    A high average power, low optical distortion laser gain media is based on a flowing liquid media. A diode laser pumping device with tailored irradiance excites the laser active atom, ion or molecule within the liquid media. A laser active component of the liquid media exhibits energy storage times longer than or comparable to the thermal optical response time of the liquid. A circulation system that provides a closed loop for mixing and circulating the lasing liquid into and out of the optical cavity includes a pump, a diffuser, and a heat exchanger. A liquid flow gain cell includes flow straighteners and flow channel compression.

  19. Yb:FAP and related materials, laser gain medium comprising same, and laser systems using same

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.; Payne, Stephen A.; Chase, Lloyd L.; Smith, Larry K.

    1994-01-01

    An ytterbium doped laser material remarkably superior to all others, including Yb:YAG, comprises Ytterbium doped apatite (Yb:Ca.sub.5 (PO.sub.4).sub.3 F) or Yb:FAP, or ytterbium doped crystals that are structurally related to FAP. The new laser material is used in laser systems pumped by diode pump sources having an output near 0.905 microns or 0.98 microns, such as InGaAs and AlInGaAs, or other narrowband pump sources near 0.905 microns or 0.98 microns. The laser systems are operated in either the conventional or ground state depletion mode.

  20. Active microwave remote sensing of an anisotropic random medium layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. K.; Kong, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A two-layer anisotropic random medium model has been developed to study the active remote sensing of the earth. The dyadic Green's function for a two-layer anisotropic medium is developed and used in conjunction with the first-order Born approximation to calculate the backscattering coefficients. It is shown that strong cross-polarization occurs in the single scattering process and is indispensable in the interpretation of radar measurements of sea ice at different frequencies, polarizations, and viewing angles. The effects of anisotropy on the angular responses of backscattering coefficients are also illustrated.

  1. Plasma-activated medium induced apoptosis on tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masaru; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kano, Hiroyuki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2013-09-01

    The non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) has attracted attention in cancer therapy. In this study, the fresh medium was treated with our developed NEAPP, ultra-high electron density (approximately 2 × 1016 cm-3). The medium called the plasma-activated medium (PAM) killed not normal cells but tumor cells through induction of apoptosis. Cell proliferation assays showed that the tumor cells were selectively killed by the PAM. Those cells induced apoptosis using an apoptotic molecular marker, cleaved Caspase3/7. The molecular mechanisms of PAM-mediated apoptosis in the tumor cells were also found that the PAM downregulated the expression of AKT kinase, a marker molecule in a survival signal transduction pathway. These results suggest that PAM may be a promising tool for tumor therapy by downregulating the survival signals in cancers.

  2. Laser utilizing a gaseous lasing medium and method for operating the same

    DOEpatents

    Zerr, B.A.

    1983-10-18

    The invention relates to an improvement in gas lasers and a method of operating the same. In one aspect, the invention is an improved method for operating a high-power gas laser. The improvement comprises introducing the gas lasing medium tangentially to the laser tube at a pressure establishing a forced vortex in the tube. The vortex defines an axially extending core region characterized by a low pressure and temperature relative to the gas inlet and the exterior of the vortex. An electrical discharge is established in the core region to initiate lasing of the gas. The gas discharge from the tube is passed through a diffuser. As in conventional gas lasers, firing results in a very abrupt increase in gas temperature and in severe disruption of the gas. However, the gas vortex, almost immediately restores the gas to its prefiring condition. That is, almost all of the waste heat is transferred radially to the laser wall, and the original gas-flow pattern is restored. As a result, the power output of the laser is increased significantly, and the laser firing repetition rate is markedly increased.

  3. Laser utilizing a gaseous lasing medium and method for operating the same

    DOEpatents

    Zerr, Bruce A.

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to an improvement in gas lasers and a method of operating the same. In one aspect, the invention is an improved method for operating a high-power gas laser. The improvement comprises introducing the gas lasing medium tangentially to the laser tube at a pressure establishing a forced vortex in the tube. The vortex defines an axially extending core region characterized by a low pressure and temperature relative to the gas inlet and the exterior of the vortex. An electrical discharge is established in the core region to initiate lasing of the gas. The gas discharge from the tube is passed through a diffuser. As in conventional gas lasers, firing results in a very abrupt increase in gas temperature and in severe disruption of the gas. However, the gas vortex almost immediately restores the gas to its pre-firing condition. That is, almost all of the waste heat is transferred radially to the laser wall, and the original gas-flow pattern is restored. As a result, the power output of the laser is increased significantly, and the laser firing repetition rate is markedly increased.

  4. Postionization medium evolution in a laser filament: A uniquely nonplasma response.

    PubMed

    Romanov, D A; Levis, R J

    2012-10-01

    Theoretical consideration of the optical response of nascent free electrons in the process of laser filamentation reveals that the initial microscopically inhomogeneous charge distribution causes a transient electromagnetic response of the medium that differs drastically from that of a homogeneous plasma with the same degree of ionization. An analytical model, describing the forced oscillations of virtually isolated and expanding electron clouds, predicts considerable enhancement of these oscillations caused by transient resonance with the laser field. The transient resonance processes should play a role in the currently accepted picture of filament formation dynamics.

  5. Specific features of propagation of femtosecond laser pulses through a molecular gaseous medium under conditions of efficient alignment of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gulyaev, A V; Tikhonova, O V

    2013-07-31

    The propagation of femtosecond laser pulses in a molecular gaseous medium is studied with the rotational dynamics of molecules under the action of these pulses taken into account. Based on the simultaneous numerical solution of the wave equation describing the laser pulse evolution and the Schroedinger equation that determines the quantum state evolution of the medium molecules, the rotational dynamics of molecules in the laser field and the laser pulse evolution are analysed with their mutual influence taken into account. Efficient dynamic alignment of molecules along the direction of laser radiation polarisation is observed, which causes variation in the spatiotemporal pulse profile, as well as significant broadening and deformation of its spectrum in the course of propagation through the medium. The physical mechanisms of the observed phenomena are analysed by using the approximate analytical solution of the problem, derived for the case of preliminary excitation of the medium by a pump pulse (the pump-probe scheme). (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  6. Yb:FAP and related materials, laser gain medium comprising same, and laser systems using same

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.; Payne, S.A.; Chase, L.L.; Smith, L.K.

    1994-01-18

    An ytterbium doped laser material remarkably superior to all others, including Yb:YAG, comprises ytterbium doped apatite (Yb:Ca[sub 5](PO[sub 4])[sub 3]F) or Yb:FAP, or ytterbium doped crystals that are structurally related to FAP. The new laser material is used in laser systems pumped by diode pump sources having an output near 0.905 microns or 0.98 microns, such as InGaAs and AlInGaAs, or other narrowband pump sources near 0.905 microns or 0.98 microns. The laser systems are operated in either the conventional or ground state depletion mode. 9 figures.

  7. Method and apparatus for producing laser radiation following two-photon excitation of a gaseous medium

    DOEpatents

    Bischel, W.K.; Jacobs, R.R.; Prosnitz, D.P.; Rhodes, C.K.; Kelly, P.J.

    1979-02-20

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for producing laser radiation by two-photon optical pumping of an atomic or molecular gaseous medium and subsequent lasing action. A population inversion is created as a result of two-photon absorption of the gaseous species. Stark tuning is utilized, if necessary, in order to tune the two-photon transition into exact resonance. In particular, gaseous ammonia (NH[sub 3]) or methyl fluoride (CH[sub 3]F) is optically pumped by a pair of CO[sub 2] lasers to create a population inversion resulting from simultaneous two-photon excitation of a high-lying vibrational state, and laser radiation is produced by stimulated emission of coherent radiation from the inverted level. 3 figs.

  8. Method and apparatus for producing laser radiation following two-photon excitation of a gaseous medium

    DOEpatents

    Bischel, William K. [Menlo Park, CA; Jacobs, Ralph R. [Livermore, CA; Prosnitz, Donald [Hamden, CT; Rhodes, Charles K. [Palo Alto, CA; Kelly, Patrick J. [Fort Lewis, WA

    1979-02-20

    Method and apparatus for producing laser radiation by two-photon optical pumping of an atomic or molecular gaseous medium and subsequent lasing action. A population inversion is created as a result of two-photon absorption of the gaseous species. Stark tuning is utilized, if necessary, in order to tune the two-photon transition into exact resonance. In particular, gaseous ammonia (NH.sub.3) or methyl fluoride (CH.sub.3 F) is optically pumped by a pair of CO.sub.2 lasers to create a population inversion resulting from simultaneous two-photon excitation of a high-lying vibrational state, and laser radiation is produced by stimulated emission of coherent radiation from the inverted level.

  9. Optical Features of Spherical Gold Nanoparticle-Doped Solid-State Dye Laser Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, D. Q.; Lien, N. T. H.; Duong, V. T. T.; Duong, V.; An, N. T. M.

    2016-05-01

    The development of a new laser medium based on gold nanoparticle/dye-doped polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) has been investigated. In particular, gold nanoparticles with small (16 nm diameter) spherical shape strongly influenced the absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of [2-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]ethenyl]-6-methyl-4 H-pyran-4-ylidene]-propanedinitrile (DCM) laser dye. Fluorescence quenching and enhancement of DCM emission were observed for various concentrations of gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Fluorescence intensity enhancement was recorded for the sample containing 1.5 × 1010 par/mL GNPs and doped with 3 × 10-5 mol/L DCM. Thermal photodegradation was significantly decreased by using low pump energy for laser emission.

  10. Dynamics of radiation from a wide-aperture laser under conditions of coherent interaction of the radiation with a medium

    SciTech Connect

    Zaikin, A P

    1999-11-30

    The dynamics of the radiation from a wide-aperture laser is investigated taking account of the finite response time of the polarisation of the active medium. This radiation is described by the Maxwell - Bloch equations, which are simplified for the case of fast relaxation of the polarisation. The methods of a qualitative theory of nonlinear dynamics systems are used to find the conditions for instability of the steady-state homogeneous laser radiation field in a Fabry - Perot cavity. It is shown that, as a rule, the system becomes unstable via an Andronov - Hopf bifurcation and the transverse profile of the optical field is modulated by a travelling self-wave. The main parameters of these self-waves are determined and their growth increment is found. It is shown that each of the roots of the characteristic equation of the system can be used to estimate the stability range of the self-wave solutions. The laser equations are also solved numerically and the results obtained are in good agreement with the conclusions of the qualitative theory. The numerical results predict harmonic and quasi-harmonic self-waves (with multiplication of their period) and also behaviour resembling chaos. (lasers)

  11. Improving the forming capability of laser dynamic forming by using rubber as a forming medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zongbao; Liu, Huixia; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Cuntang

    2016-04-01

    Laser dynamic forming (LDF) is a novel high velocity forming technique, which employs laser-generated shock wave to load the sample. The forming velocity induced by the high energy laser pulse may exceed the critical forming velocity, resulting in the occurrence of premature fracture. To avoid the above premature fracture, rubber is introduced in LDF as a forming medium to prolong the loading duration in this paper. Laser induced shock wave energy is transferred to the sample in different forming stages, so the forming velocity can be kept below the critical forming velocity when the initial laser energy is high for fracture. Bulge forming experiments with and without rubber were performed to study the effect of rubber on loading duration. The experimental results show that, the shock wave energy attenuates during the propagation through the rubber layer, the rubber can avoid the premature fracture. So the plastic deformation can continue, the forming capability of LDF is improved. Due to the severe plastic deformation under rubber compression, adiabatic shear bands (ASB) occur in LDF with rubber. The material softening in ASB leads to the irregular fracture, which is different from the premature fracture pattern (regular fracture) in LDF without rubber. To better understand this deformation behavior, Johnson-Cook model is used to simulate the dynamic response and the evolution of ASB of copper sample. The simulation results also indicate the rubber can prolong the loading duration.

  12. Laser and optics activities at CREOL

    SciTech Connect

    Stickley, C.M.

    1995-06-01

    CREOL is an interdisciplinary institute with a mission to foster and support research and education in the optical and laser sciences and engineering. CREOL`s principal members are its 21-strong faculty. The faculty are encouraged and supported in developing, maintaining, and expanding innovative and sponsored research programs, especially ones that are coupled to industry`s needs. The CREOL Director and Assistant Director, through empowerment by the CREOL faculty, coordinate and oversee the interactive, interdisciplinary projects of the faculty, the 85 graduate students and the 39 research staff. CREOL integrates these research efforts with the general educational mission and goals of the university, develops comprehensive course work in the optical and laser sciences and engineering, provides guidance and instruction to graduate students, administers MS and PhD programs, and provides facilities, funds, and administrative support to assist the faculty in carrying out CREOL`s mission and obtaining financial support for the research projects. CREOL`s specific areas of research activity include the following: IR systems; nonlinear optics; crystal growth; nonlinear integrated optics; new solid-state lasers; tunable far-infrared lasers; thin-film optics; theory; semiconductor lasers; x-ray/optical scattering; laser-induced damage; free-electron lasers; solid-state spectroscopy; x-ray sources and applications; laser propagation; laser processing of materials; optical design; optical limiting/sensor protection; diffractive optics; quantum well optoelectronics; dense plasmas/high-field physics; laser radar and remote sensing; diode-based lasers; and glass science.

  13. Cross modulation method of transformation of the spatial coherence of pulsed laser radiation in a nonlinear medium

    SciTech Connect

    Kitsak, M A; Kitsak, A I

    2008-04-30

    The cross modulation method of transformation of the spatial coherence of low-power pulsed laser radiation in a nonlinear medium is proposed. The method is realised experimentally in a multimode optical fibre. The estimates of the degree of spatial coherence of radiation subjected to the phase cross modulation demonstrated the high efficiency of this radiation decorrelation mechanism. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  14. Axial and diffusion models of the laser pulse propagation in a highly-scattering medium

    SciTech Connect

    Tereshchenko, Sergei A; Danilov, Arsenii A; Podgaetskii, Vitalii M; Vorob'ev, Nikolai S

    2004-06-30

    The propagation of laser radiation through a layer of a highly-scattering medium (HSM) is considered on the basis of two theoretical models: a nonstationary axial (two-flux) model and a nonstationary diffusion model. Analytic expressions for the temporal distributions of the photons of an ultrashort laser pulse transmitted through the HSM are presented. Experimental temporal distributions are used to obtain the parameters of models corresponding to an HSM, to determine the theoretical temporal distributions, and to compare them with the experimental curves. These two theoretical models are compared quantitatively for the first time. Their advantages and drawbacks that must be considered in the development of HSM transmission optical tomography are pointed out. (light scattering)

  15. Effect of medium range order on pulsed laser crystallization of amorphous germanium thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Li, T. T.; Bayu Aji, L. B.; Heo, T. W.; Santala, M. K.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Campbell, G. H.

    2016-06-03

    Sputter deposited amorphous Ge thin films had their nanostructure altered by irradiation with high-energy Ar+ ions. The change in the structure resulted in a reduction in medium range order (MRO) characterized using fluctuation electron microscopy. The pulsed laser crystallization kinetics of the as-deposited versus irradiated materials were investigated using the dynamic transmission electron microscope operated in the multi-frame movie mode. In conclusion, the propagation rate of the crystallization front for the irradiated material was lower; the changes were correlated to the MRO difference and formation of a thin liquid layer during crystallization.

  16. Phase Segregation of Passive Advective Particles in an Active Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit; Polley, Anirban; Rao, Madan

    2016-02-01

    Localized contractile configurations or asters spontaneously appear and disappear as emergent structures in the collective stochastic dynamics of active polar actomyosin filaments. Passive particles which (un)bind to the active filaments get advected into the asters, forming transient clusters. We study the phase segregation of such passive advective scalars in a medium of dynamic asters, as a function of the aster density and the ratio of the rates of aster remodeling to particle diffusion. The dynamics of coarsening shows a violation of Porod behavior; the growing domains have diffuse interfaces and low interfacial tension. The phase-segregated steady state shows strong macroscopic fluctuations characterized by multiscaling and intermittency, signifying rapid reorganization of macroscopic structures. We expect these unique nonequilibrium features to manifest in the actin-dependent molecular clustering at the cell surface.

  17. Silver nanoparticles generated by pulsed laser ablation in supercritical CO2 medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machmudah, Siti; Sato, Takayuki; Wahyudiono; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2012-03-01

    Pulsed laser ablation (PLA) has been widely employed in industrial and biological applications and in other fields. The environmental conditions in which PLA is conducted are important parameters that affect both the solid particle cloud and the deposition produced by the plume. In this work, the generation of nanoparticles (NPs) has been developed by performing PLA of silver (Ag) plates in a supercritical CO2 medium. Ag NPs were successfully generated by allowing the selective generation of clusters. Laser ablation was performed with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm under various pressures and temperatures of CO2 medium. On the basis of the experimental result, both surface of the irradiated Ag plate and structure of Ag NPs were significantly affected by the changes in supercritical CO2 pressure and temperature. With increasing irradiation pressure, plume deposited in the surrounding crater created by the ablation was clearly observed. In Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) the image of the generated Ag NPs on the silicon wafer and the morphology of Ag particles were basically a sphere-like structure. Ag particles contain NPs with large-varied diameter ranging from 5 nm to 1.2 μm. The bigger Ag NPs melted during the ablation process and then ejected smaller spherical Ag NPs, which formed nanoclusters attached on the molten Ag NPs. The smaller Ag NPs were also formed around the bigger Ag NPs. Based on the results, this new method can also be used to obtain advanced nano-structured materials.

  18. INFLUENCE OF GROWTH MEDIUM ON ASSIMILATORY ACTIVITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, C. E.

    1963-01-01

    Clifton, C. E. (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.). Influence of growth medium on assimilatory activities of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 85:1371–1377. 1963.—Nutrient agargrown cells assimilate about 50% of the glucose added to washed suspensions (phosphate buffer, pH 7.2, 30 C), as indicated by O2 consumption or C14-uptake from uniformly labeled glucose. Most of the nonassimilated glucose is oxidized, but a small portion remains in forms other than glucose in the suspension medium. Cells from glucose agar, however, assimilate only about 20 to 30% of the U-glucose and ferment a considerable portion of the remainder, the extent of each being determined in part at least by growth conditions. Evidence is presented that this behavior is the result of metabolic controls induced during growth. C14 from U-glucose appeared in all fractions of either agar- or glucose agar-grown cells, the highest percentage being present in cellular matter insoluble in hot 5% trichloroacetic acid. Data on the distribution of C14 from 1-, 2-, and 6-glucose, and from acetate and pyruvate, are also presented. PMID:14047232

  19. Detecting relative speed changes of moving objects through scattering medium by using wavefront shaping and laser speckle contrast analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yangyang; Liu, Rui; Wang, Yang; Wen, Dong; Meng, Liangwei; Lu, Jinling; Li, Pengcheng

    2016-04-18

    Imaging through a scattering medium has been a main challenge in modern optical imaging field. Recently, imaging through scattering medium based on wavefront shaping has been reported. However, it has not been clearly investigated to apply the optical memory effect based iterative wavefront shaping technique in speed estimation of a moving object through scattering medium. Here, we proposed to combine the iterative wavefront shaping technique with laser speckle contrast analysis method to detect the relative speed changes of moving objects through scattering medium. Phantom experiments were performed to validate our method.

  20. Field-Testing of an Active Laser Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, V.; Khiznyak, A.; Woll, D.; Liu, S.

    Comprehensive space surveillance demands a more accurate technique in tracking multi-dimensional state vector (3D coordinate, velocity, vibration, etc.) of the space objects. RF radiometric techniques typically can not provide the needed accuracy, while passive optical (and laser) tracking systems can provide distance to the object and its angular position, but not a direct reading of velocity, the parameter of primary importance for space object tracking and characterization. Addressing this problem with active optical tracking techniques is challenging because of the great distances involved, the high velocity of the satellites, and the optical aberrations induced by the atmosphere. We have proposed a phase conjugation based laser tracking concept, and accomplished the first version of design and engineering of a prototype for an Active Laser Tracking System (ALTS). In its current state the ALTS is capable to demonstrate the very basics operational principles of the proposed active tracking technique. We then performed a number of experiments to prove operational capabilities of this prototype both at MetroLaser's lab environment and at Edwards AFB Test Range. In its current architecture the ALTS is comprised of two laser cavities, Master and Slave that are coupled through a Phase Conjugate Mirror (PCM) formed in a non-linear medium (NLM) set at Master laser cavity. By pumping NLM and forming PCM, Master laser establishes the cavities coupling mode and injects the photons in the slave cavity. It is essential that the specific features of the PCM not only serve to couple ALTS cavities, but also serves to compensate optical aberrations of the ALTS (gain media and optical elements of the laser resonator). Due to its ability to compensate optical aberrations, phase conjugate resonators are capable of sustaining oscillation with a remote target as an output coupler. The entire system comprises of several modules, including a laser, emitting/receiving telescope, gimbal

  1. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  2. Propagation of hypergeometric laser beams in a medium with a parabolic refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyar, V. V.; Kovalev, A. A.; Nalimov, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    An expression to describe the complex amplitude of a family of paraxial hypergeometric laser beams propagating in a parabolic-index fiber is proposed. A particular case of a Gaussian optical vortex propagating in a parabolic-index fiber is studied. Under definite parameters, the Gaussian optical vortices become the modes of the medium. This is a new family of paraxial modes derived for the parabolic-index medium. A wide class of solutions of nonparaxial Helmholtz equations that describe modes in a parabolic refractive index medium is derived in the cylindrical coordinate system. As the solutions derived are proportional to Kummer’s functions, only those of them which are coincident with the nonparaxial Laguerre-Gaussian modes possess a finite energy, meaning that they are physically implementable. A definite length of the graded-index fiber is treated as a parabolic lens, and expressions for the numerical aperture and the focal spot size are deduced. An explicit expression for the radii of the rings of a binary lens approximating a parabolic-index lens is derived. Finite-difference time-domain simulation has shown that using a binary parabolic-index microlens with a refractive index of 1.5, a linearly polarized Gaussian beam can be focused into an elliptic focal spot which is almost devoid of side-lobes and has a smaller full width at half maximum diameter of 0.45 of the incident wavelength.

  3. Production of He-like light and medium mass ions in laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashev, S.; Mescheryakov, N.; Sharkov, B.; Shumshurov, A.; Khomenko, S.; Makarov, K.; Satov, Yu.; Smakovskii, Yu.

    2000-03-01

    Operation of the laser ion source of He-like light ions designed for the first stage of the ITEP Terra Watt Accumulator (TWAC) project is discussed. A 5 J/0.5 Hz rep-rate CO2 laser was used for generation of highly charged light ions. The absolute number of ions with different charge states for carbon and aluminum ion beams has been measured. The obtained number of C+4 ions (˜1011ions/pulse) is sufficient to start the experimental proof of the accelerator scheme of the TWAC project. The investigation of shot to shot stability indicates significant increasing (˜2-3 times) of highly charged ion yield for the first shot onto the fresh target surface with respect to the next shots onto the same spot of aluminum target. This effect was not observed for the carbon target. Experimental results for highly charged light and medium mass (F, Mg, Al, Ca, Ti) ions produced by of 75 J single pulse CO2 laser consisting of a master oscillator and power amplifier are also presented.

  4. Laser activated diffuse discharge switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    The invention is a gas mixture for a diffuse discharge switch which is capable of changing from a conducting state to an insulating state in the presence of electrons upon the introduction of laser light. The mixture is composed of a buffer gas such as nitrogen or argon and an electron attaching gas such as C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SH, C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SCH.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CHO and CF.sub.3 CHO wherein the electron attachment is brought on by indirect excitation of molecules to long-lived states by exposure to laser light.

  5. Novel core-shell (TiO2@Silica) nanoparticles for scattering medium in a random laser: higher efficiency, lower laser threshold and lower photodegradation.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Villar, Ernesto; Mestre, Valdeci; de Oliveira, Paulo C; de Sá, Gilberto F

    2013-12-21

    There has been growing interest in scattering media in recent years, due to their potential applications as solar collectors, photocatalyzers, random lasers and other novel optical devices. Here, we have introduced a novel core-shell scattering medium for a random laser composed of TiO2@Silica nanoparticles. Higher efficiency, lower laser threshold and long photobleaching lifetime in random lasers were demonstrated. This has introduced a new method or parameter (fraction of absorbed pumping), which opens a new avenue to characterize and study the scattering media. Optical chemical and colloidal stabilities were combined by coating a suitable silica shell onto TiO2 nanoparticles.

  6. Effect of laser irradiation of nanoparticles in aqueous uranium salt solutions on nuclide activity

    SciTech Connect

    Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2011-07-31

    This paper presents an experimental study of the effect of laser irradiation of aqueous uranyl chloride solutions containing gold nanoparticles on the activity of the uranium series radionuclides {sup 234}Th, {sup 234m}Pa, and {sup 235}U. The solutions were exposed to femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses and to the second or third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (150-ps pulses) at a peak intensity in the medium of {approx}10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2}. The activities of the radionuclides in the irradiated solutions were shown to differ markedly from their equilibrium values. The sign of the deviation depends on the laser wavelength. The measured activity deviations can be interpreted as evidence that laser exposure of nanoparticles accelerates the alpha and beta decays of the radionuclides. The observed effects are accounted for in terms of a mechanism that involves resonant enhancement of optical waves by metallic nanoparticles. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  7. Tissue As A Medium For Laser Light Transport-Implications For Photoradiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, L. E.; Bolin, F. P.; Cain, B. W.

    1982-12-01

    An important medical laser application is in the emerging field of photoradiation therapy (PRT). PRT is the process in which malignant tissue is destroyed by administration of light to a specific photosensitized site. Filtered arcs, incandescents and dye lasers have been used as sources of activating light. We have carried out light experiments in tissue to study such PRT light distributions. The results of this research have shown that a number of important optical phenomena occurring within illuminated tissue must be accounted for in order to make good predictions of tumor light dosage. Among these are; tissue type, interface effects and anomalies due to composition. These effects substantially influence light levels in PRT and, thus, the therapeutic effect. The uniqueness of tissue as a medium for light transport presents special problems for optics research and instrumentation. Successful solutions necessarily will involve collaboration between the life sciences and optic specialists. Attempts at treatment of human disease using non-ionizing radiation have a history archaeologically traceable to archaic societies (in which the sun's photons were used and often worshipped).1 Western medicine in the past, has used visible light beneficially, albeit empirically, on a few ailments. However, in this century, a significant development in the understanding and in the therapeutic use of this electromagnetic radiation in the UV, visible and IR has occurred, based on scientific study. This utilization of radiation in the visible and ultraviolet can be by two distinct processes. One is through the direct action of the photons which serve as the sole treatment agent. In this case the photon interacts with the cell, or its components, in a single step, to produce a desired effect. An example is the successful use of blue light for treatment of bilirubinemia in newborns. The second process is a biological effect produced through the combination of electromagnetic radiation

  8. Dynamical medium depletion in high-order above-threshold ionization with few-cycle laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Altucci, C.; Velotta, R.; Tosa, V.; Nam, C.H.

    2004-12-01

    The influence of dynamical medium depletion in high-order above-threshold ionization (ATI) in left/right asymmetry of photoelectron energy spectra is analyzed. Based on a classical analysis of high-order ATI electrons produced by few-cycle laser pulses, calculated asymmetry maps of electron spectra reproduce very well the experimental results reported in Lindner et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 113001 (2004)], utilized for determining the Guoy phase shift of few-cycle laser pulses. The anomalous behavior of the high-energy part of the ATI electron spectra is, then, fully understood in terms of earlier medium depletion occurring in the leading edge of the laser pulse. In order to correctly reproduce the experimental findings a physical temporal envelope of the laser pulse, which only vanishes at the infinity, plays a crucial role.

  9. Laser remote monitoring of plant photosynthetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbini, Roberto; Colao, Francesco; Fantoni, Roberta; Palucci, Antonio; Ribezzo, Sergio

    1995-11-01

    Laboratory measurements of laser induced chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics (Kautsky effect) on dark-adapted vegetation targets (maize, pine-tree) have been performed with a lidar fluorosensor by superimposing probe pulses upon an actinic light. The collected induction curves (fast rise and slow decline) have been used to reveal the occurrence of stresses and the damage produced by a pine-tree parasite. A new two-pulse LIF (laser induced fluorescence) methodology has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally, in view of remotely monitoring the plant photosynthetic activity. This technique may yield information upon the in-vivo photosynthetic processes of plants, revealing a possible stress status (nutrients depletion, presence of herbicides, photoinhibition, etc.). The lidar apparatus used contains two laser sources in order to differentially measure the chlorophyll fluorescence by means of a laser pump-and-probe technique. In fact LIF signals in the red chlorophyll band 690 nm may provide in-vivo information upon photosynthesis process in high order plants and algae. Laser pump-and-probe experimental tests, with excitation 355 nm or 532 nm, already detect the presence of herbicides, and the effects of plant exposure to thermal stresses and to low levels of gaseous pollutants. Laser measured fluorescence yields (Y) have been found to be consistent with those obtained by an in-situ fluorimeter (PAM). With proper choices of experimental parameters (pump and probe laser intensities), Y approaches the theoretical value expected for a healthy dark-adapted plant.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann method for short-pulsed laser transport in a multi-layered medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Yi, Hong-Liang; Tan, He-Ping

    2015-04-01

    We construct a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for transient radiative transfer in one-dimensional multi-layered medium with distinct refractive index in each layer. The left boundary is irradiated normally by a short-pulsed laser. The Fresnel interfaces conditions, which incorporate reflection and refraction, are used at the boundaries and the interfaces. Based on the Fresnel's law and Snell's law, the interfacial intensity formulas are introduced. The collimated and diffuse intensities are treated individually. At a transient time step, the collimated component is first solved by LBM and then embedded into the transient radiative transfer equation as a source term. To keep the consistency of the directions in all the layers, angular interpolation of the intensities at the interfaces is adopted. The transient radiative transfer in a two-layer medium is first investigated, and the time-resolved results are validated by comparing with those by the Monte Carlo method (MCM). Of particular interest, the angular intensities along the slab at different times are presented to illustrate a variety of interesting phenomena, and the discontinuous nature of the intensity at the interfaces is discussed. The effects of various parameters on the time-resolved signals are examined.

  11. Use of a polyol liquid collection medium to obtain ultrasmall magnetic nanoparticles by laser pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Martínez, G; Malumbres, A; Mallada, R; Hueso, J L; Irusta, S; Bomatí-Miguel, O; Santamaría, J

    2012-10-26

    The present work addresses the main bottleneck in the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles by laser pyrolysis. Since the introduction of laser pyrolysis for the production of nanoparticles nearly three decades ago, this method has been repeatedly presented as a highly promising alternative, on account of two main characteristics: (i) its flexibility, since nanoparticles can be formed from a wide variety of precursors in both gas and liquid phase, and (ii) its continuous nature, avoiding the intrinsic variability of batch processing. However, the results reported to date invariably show considerable aggregation of the obtained nanoparticles, which strongly limits their application in most fields. In this work, we have been able to circumvent this problem by collecting the particles in a polyol liquid medium. This method prevents the formation of aggregates and renders a uniform distribution of well dispersed ultrasmall nanoparticles (<4 nm) in a water-compatible solvent. We consider that the effectiveness of this novel collection method for the production of well-dispersed magnetic nanoparticles will be of high interest to a wide range of scientists working in the nanoparticle synthesis field and may enable new applications wherever there is a strict requirement for non-agglomerated nanoparticles.

  12. Two-phase flow in a chemically active porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Darmon, Alexandre Dauchot, Olivier; Benzaquen, Michael; Salez, Thomas

    2014-12-28

    We study the problem of the transformation of a given reactant species into an immiscible product species, as they flow through a chemically active porous medium. We derive the equation governing the evolution of the volume fraction of the species, in a one-dimensional macroscopic description, identify the relevant dimensionless numbers, and provide simple models for capillary pressure and relative permeabilities, which are quantities of crucial importance when tackling multiphase flows in porous media. We set the domain of validity of our models and discuss the importance of viscous coupling terms in the extended Darcy’s law. We investigate numerically the steady regime and demonstrate that the spatial transformation rate of the species along the reactor is non-monotonous, as testified by the existence of an inflection point in the volume fraction profiles. We obtain the scaling of the location of this inflection point with the dimensionless lengths of the problem. Eventually, we provide key elements for optimization of the reactor.

  13. Development of a low debris x-ray backlighter source via laser irradiation of a cluster gas medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Hazel; Patankar, Siddarth; Giltrap, Samuel; Stuart, Nicholas; Robinson, Timothy; Gumbrell, Edward; Smith, Roland; Imperial College Team; AWE Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    X-ray backlighter sources, typically based on laser irradiated solid targets, are of great importance for radiography of transient plasmas produced in high power laser-target interactions. Here we report on the development of an atomic cluster gas based x-ray source and assess its viability for x-ray point projection imaging motivated by the debris free, high repetition rate nature of laser-cluster gas interactions. The dependence on cluster size and atomic number of the anisotropic radial x-ray distribution, 100 μm x-ray source size and multi-keV free electron temperatures produced by the interaction of a 1TW short pulse (500fs), high contrast laser system operating at 1054nm with high density Ar, Kr and Xe cluster gas media have been investigated. Previously, when propagated through a large (10mm) volume cluster gas medium at 1017 atoms/cc, >95% of the laser energy contained in a short pulse was absorbed launching a strong, radiative cylindrical blast wave. At 1019 atoms/cc, the absorption of the laser energy by the cluster gas medium was high (>85%). However, optical probing at 2 ω showed that the laser energy was predominantly absorbed at the edge of the gas volume where the energy absorbed per unit length rapidly changed over a scale length of 2mm launching a radiative, elliptical blast wave.

  14. The doppler frequency shift caused by the inhomogeneities of a medium induced by pulses of intense laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, N. N.; Kiselev, Al. S.; Kiselev, An. S.

    2008-08-01

    Self-reflection of pulses of intense laser radiation from an inhomogeneity induced by them in a medium with fast optical nonlinearity is analyzed. The reflected radiation is characterized by a considerable Doppler shift and by a signal magnitude that is sufficient for experimental detection.

  15. Medium performance effect on the high output energy from a xenon lamp-pumped pyrromethene-567 solid-state dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Chen, De-Ying; Fan, Rong-Wei; He, Wei-Ming

    2012-04-01

    In order to obtain a high output energy from a xenon lamp-pumped solid-state dye laser, homogeneities of laser mediums and flatnesses of medium faces with different processing treatments are discussed in the paper. The mediums without aging treatment, which are prepared by using a prepolymer process and have diamond-machined end faces to produce the required optical finish, give a highest laser output of 281.9 mJ with 0.215% slope efficiency at 2.0 × 10-4 mol/L. The best medium lifetime is 21 shots to 50% of original output equating 74.6 kJ/liter.

  16. Resonant activation in bistable semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, Stefano; Giacomelli, Giovanni

    2007-08-15

    We theoretically investigate the possibility of observing resonant activation in the hopping dynamics of two-mode semiconductor lasers. We present a series of simulations of a rate-equation model under random and periodic modulation of the bias current. In both cases, for an optimal choice of the modulation time scale, the hopping times between the stable lasing modes attain a minimum. The simulation data are understood by means of an effective one-dimensional Langevin equation with multiplicative fluctuations. Our conclusions apply to both edge-emitting and vertical cavity lasers, thus opening the way to several experimental tests in such optical systems.

  17. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking. PMID:26367642

  18. APPLICATION OF LASERS AND LASER-OPTICAL METHODS IN LIFE SCIENCES On the problem of local tissue hyperthermia control: multiscale modelling of pulsed laser radiation action on a medium with embedded nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avetisyan, A. Yu; Yakunin, A. N.; Tuchin, Valerii V.

    2011-01-01

    Methods for solving analytically and numerically the problem of multiscale modelling of the laser hyperthermia processes in a medium with nanoparticles are developed with regard to composite spherical nanoparticles (nanoshells). The features of the laser radiation field localisation on nanoscale inhomogeneities are investigated. Issues related to the control of the tissue hyperthermia processes by choosing the parameters of spatiotemporal localisation of the laser beam and of the absorbing nanoparticles are discussed.

  19. Scintillations of higher-order laser beams in non-Kolmogorov medium.

    PubMed

    Baykal, Yahya

    2014-04-01

    In an atmospheric medium that shows a non-Kolmogorov turbulence behavior, the variation of the on-axis scintillation index is evaluated when higher-order laser modes are used as the excitation. The Rytov method is employed together with the equivalent structure constant, which makes our results valid in weak turbulence. In the limiting case, our solution correctly reduces to the known scintillation index of the Gaussian beam in Kolmogorov turbulence. For all the higher-order even modes, increase in the power law exponent, α of the non-Kolmogorov spectrum is found to increase the scintillations. When the source size of the higher-order modes is large, higher-order even modes attain almost the same scintillation index values for all α. However, for small source sizes, being valid for any realization of the non-Kolmogorov spectrum, the scintillations decrease as the mode order becomes large. The changes in the propagation distance, structure constant, and the wavelength do not vary these trends.

  20. Research of the quenched dye lasers pumped by excimer lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Shaolin; Lou Qihong

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, the quenched dye lasers pumped by XeCl and KrF excimer lasers were investigated theoretically and experimentally. Dye laser pulses with duration of 0.8 ns for XeCl laser pumping and 2 ns for KrF laser pumping were obtained. The dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved in methyl was used as the active medium in the quenched dye laser. When the pump laser was KrF and the active medium was Coumarin 498 the quenched dye laser emitted pulse with duration of about 2 ns. The characteristics of the quenched dye laser was also investigated in detail.

  1. Direct nuclear pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Miley, George H.; Wells, William E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

  2. Active optics, adaptive optics, and laser guide stars.

    PubMed

    Hubin, N; Noethe, L

    1993-11-26

    Optical astronomy is crucial to our understanding of the universe, but the capabilities of ground-based telescopes are severely limited by the effects of telescope errors and of the atmosphere on the passage of light. Recently, it has become possible to construct inbuilt corrective devices that can compensate for both types of degradations as observations are conducted. For full use of the newly emerged class of 8-meter telescopes, such active corrective capabilities, known as active and adaptive optics, are essential. Some physical limitations in the adaptive optics field can be overcome by artificially created reference stars, called laser guide stars. These new technologies have lately been applied with success to some medium and very large telescopes. PMID:17736819

  3. Parametric amplification-assisted cascaded four-wave mixing for ultrabroad laser sideband generation in a thin transparent medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Liu, W.; Wang, L.; Fang, C.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate distinct sets of broadband up-converted multicolor array (BUMA) signals in a thin transparent medium with an intense 800 nm fundamental pulse (FP) and a weak, unfiltered super-continuum white light (SCWL) in a crossing geometry. Upon varying the time delay between the two incident laser pulses, continuously tunable BUMA signals in the visible to near-IR range sequentially emerge on either side of the FP, in both BBO crystal and BK7 glass. Through numerical calculations at intrinsic phase-matching conditions, the BUMA signals on the SCWL side are shown to arise from the interaction mainly between χ(3)-based four-wave optical parametric amplification and cascaded four-wave mixing processes. The temporally controllable broadband BUMA signals with amplification and tunability all in one thin transparent medium are highly suitable for ultrafast laser spectroscopy and optical communication networks.

  4. Study of the influence of glucose on diffuse reflection of ultrashort laser pulses from a medium simulating a biological tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, A V; Indukaev, A K; Priezzhev, A V; Myllylae, R

    2008-05-31

    The influence of glucose on the diffuse reflection of near-IR femtosecond laser radiation from single- and three-layer media simulating biological tissues is studied experimentally. Based on a 800-nm femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser emitting 40-fs pulses and a VUV Agat streak camera, a setup is built for time and spatially resolved detection of radiation diffusely reflected from the volume of a strongly scattering medium. A multichannel fibreoptic system is developed for detecting pulses simultaneously at several fixed distances between a radiation source and detector. It is shown that the peak intensity and total energy of detected pulses are sensitive to variations in the glucose concentration in the medium under study from 0 to 1000 mg dL{sup -1}. The relative sensitivity in our experiments achieved 0.030% mg dL{sup -1}. (biophotonics)

  5. Orbital angular momentum of a laser beam in a turbulent medium: preservation of the average value and variance of fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, V. P.; Kolosov, V. V.; Filimonov, G. A.; Pogutsa, C. E.

    2016-05-01

    The process of the propagation of vortex laser beams in a turbulent atmosphere with recording of the total orbital angular momentum (OAM) and determination of the beam’s statistical characteristics, such as the average over realizations of the turbulent medium and the variance of fluctuations, has been simulated numerically. The dependences of OAM fluctuations on the turbulence intensity and the initial topological charge of the beam have been obtained. Numerical results are compared with the earlier asymptotic estimates.

  6. Acceleration of electrons by a laser pulse at its output onto an optical surface of the vacuum – transparent medium interface. Laser synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovskiy, M. Yu

    2016-05-01

    We consider the electron dynamics in the field of an electromagnetic wave produced at the vacuum – transparent medium interface upon reflection from the boundary, close to total internal reflection. The propagation velocity of a constant phase of the electromagnetic wave along the interface can vary from c/n to infinity (c is the speed of light in vacuum, and n is the refractive index of the medium at the interface). In this case, there emerge regions of positive and negative phases of the field with wavelengths, approximately equal to half the wavelength of the original laser beam, which can propagate at a speed close to that of light in vacuum. If a beam of relativistic electrons propagates along the surface, they can gain energy and accelerate, as well as radiate. With closed trajectories of electron motion, a laser synchrotron will be implemented as a result of many acceleration cycles.

  7. Acceleration of electrons by a laser pulse at its output onto an optical surface of the vacuum - transparent medium interface. Laser synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovskiy, M. Yu

    2016-05-01

    We consider the electron dynamics in the field of an electromagnetic wave produced at the vacuum - transparent medium interface upon reflection from the boundary, close to total internal reflection. The propagation velocity of a constant phase of the electromagnetic wave along the interface can vary from c/n to infinity (c is the speed of light in vacuum, and n is the refractive index of the medium at the interface). In this case, there emerge regions of positive and negative phases of the field with wavelengths, approximately equal to half the wavelength of the original laser beam, which can propagate at a speed close to that of light in vacuum. If a beam of relativistic electrons propagates along the surface, they can gain energy and accelerate, as well as radiate. With closed trajectories of electron motion, a laser synchrotron will be implemented as a result of many acceleration cycles.

  8. Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO) activities in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1994-01-01

    This technical report presents the summary of the 2nd NASA Aerospace Pyrotechnic Systems Workshop's discussion on Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO). Laser initiated ordnance benefits, applications, advantage of laser ordnance, and disadvantage of laser diode initiated ordnance are discussed. In addition, the three LIO programs: NASA standard laser diode safe and arm, NASA standard laser detonators, and laser diode safe/arm performance are reviewed. Steps for the LIO implementation are also presented.

  9. Active laser tweezers microrheometry of microbial biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterman, N.; Slapar, V.; Boric, M.; Stopar, D.; Babič, D.; Poberaj, I.

    2010-08-01

    Microbial biofilms are present on biotic and abiotic surfaces and have a significant impact on many fields in industry, health care and technology. Thus, a better understanding of processes that lead to development of biofilms and their chemical and mechanical properties is needed. In the following paper we report the results of active laser tweezers microrheology study of optically inhomogeneous extracellular matrix secreted by Visbrio sp. bacteria. One particle and two particle active microrheology were used in experiments. Both methods exhibited high enough sensitivity to detect viscosity changes at early stages of bacterial growth. We also showed that both methods can be used in mature samples where optical inhomogeneity becomes significant.

  10. 2D Self-Similar Profile for Laser Beam Propagation in Medium with Saturating Multi-Photon Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Lysak, Tatiana M.; Zakharova, Irina G.

    2016-02-01

    We study a self-similar mode of 2D laser beam propagation in media with multiphoton absorption (MA) taking into account a resonant nonlinearity and nonlinear absorption saturating. An analytical solution of the corresponding equations describing the problems under consideration is derived using an eigenvalue problem method generalization for soliton- like solution finding. The developed solution is used as incident beam profile and phase front for computer simulation of the 2D laser beam propagation. In particular, we demonstrate numerically that the laser beam propagation in a self-similar mode occurs within a certain distance, which depends on medium properties. Under certain relations between the nonlinear absorption and resonant nonlinearity, and cubic nonlinear response, we observe the super long distance of the beam propagation without any beam profile distributions.

  11. Plasma-activated medium suppresses choroidal neovascularization in mice: a new therapeutic concept for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fuxiang; Kaneko, Hiroki; Nagasaka, Yosuke; Ijima, Ryo; Nakamura, Kae; Nagaya, Masatoshi; Takayama, Kei; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Senga, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the main pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which leads to severe vision loss in many aged patients in most advanced country. CNV compromises vision via hemorrhage and retinal detachment on account of pathological neovascularization penetrating the retina. Plasma medicine represents the medical application of ionized gas "plasma" that is typically studied in the field of physical science. Here we examined the therapeutic ability of plasma-activated medium (PAM) to suppress CNV. The effect of PAM on vascularization was assessed on the basis of human retinal endothelial cell (HREC) tube formation. In mice, laser photocoagulation was performed to induce CNV (laser-CNV), followed by intravitreal injection of PAM. N-Acetylcysteine was used to examine the role of reactive oxygen species in PAM-induced CNV suppression. Fundus imaging, retinal histology examination, and electroretinography (ERG) were also performed to evaluate PAM-induced retinal toxicity. Interestingly, HREC tube formation and laser-CNV were both reduced by treatment with PAM. N-acetylcysteine only partly neutralized the PAM-induced reduction in laser-CNV. In addition, PAM injection had no effect on regular retinal vessels, nor did it show retinal toxicity in vivo. Our findings indicate the potential of PAM as a novel therapeutic agent for suppressing CNV.

  12. Transport of biologically active material in laser cutting.

    PubMed

    Frenz, M; Mathezloic, F; Stoffel, M H; Zweig, A D; Romano, V; Weber, H P

    1988-01-01

    The transport of biologically active material during laser cutting with CO2 and Er lasers is demonstrated. This transport mechanism removes particles from the surface of gelatin, agar, and liver samples into the depth of the laser-formed craters. The transport phenomenon is explained by a contraction and condensation of enclosed hot water vapor. We show by cultivating transported bacteria in agar that biological particles can survive the shock of the transport. Determination of the numbers of active cells evidences a more pronounced activity of the cultivated bacteria after impact with an Er laser than with a CO2 laser.

  13. development of a medium repetition rate (10 Hz - 500 Hz) diode pumped laser transmitter for airborne scanning altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry; Lindauer, Steven J., II; Kay, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA has developed several small, all-solid state lasers of low repetition rates for use as transmitters in prototype LIDAR and raster scanned altimetry retrieval systems. Our early laser transmitters were developed for high resolution airborne altimetry which employed cavity dumping techniques to produce a pulse shape with a 1 ns rise time. The first such laser was the SUMR (Sub-millimeter resolution) transmitter which used a side pumped, D-shaped half-rod of Nd:YAG for the oscillator active media and produced approximately 3 ns pulses of 100 micro-J energy at a 40 Hz repetition rate. (Coyle and Blair, 1993; Coyle et al., 1995) After several upgrades to improve rep rate and pulse energy, the final version produced 1.2 mJ pulses at 120 Hz with a 3.7 ns pulse width. The laser has become known as SPLT (Sharp Pulsed Laser Transmitter), and has flown successfully on a variety of airborne altimetry missions. (Coyle and Blair, 1995; Blair et al., 1994) From building these systems, we have accrued valuable experience in delivering field-deployable lasers and have become aware of the advantages and disadvantages of employing new technologies. For example, even though the laser's main operating environment is in a "cold" aircraft during flight, the laser must still operate in very warm temperatures. This is important if the mission is based in the desert or a tropical climate since ground calibration data from stationary targets must be gathered before and after each data flight. Because conductive cooling is much more convenient than closed loop water flow, achieving the highest possible laser efficiency is becoming a high priority when designing a flight laser. This is especially true for lasers with higher pulse energies and repetition rates which are needed for high altitude scanning altimeters and LIDARs.

  14. Wakefields Generated by Electron Beams Passing through a Waveguide Loaded with an Active Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Tyukhtin, Andrey; Kanareykin, Alexei; Schoessow, Paul

    2006-11-27

    The wakefields of a relativistic electron beam passing through a waveguide loaded with an active medium with weak resonant dispersion have been considered. For the calculations in this paper the parameters of the medium are those of a solution of fullerene (C60) in a nematic liquid crystal that exhibits activity in the X-band. It was shown that several of the TM accelerating modes can be amplified for the geometries under consideration; structures in which higher order modes are amplified exhibit essential advantages as PASERs. In particular, the amplification of the highest mode occurs in a structure loaded with a rather thick active medium layer that maximizes the energy stored by the active medium.

  15. CONTROLLING THE CHARACTERISTICS OF LASER LIGHT: Effect of a resonant medium on the polarization of a light pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abesadze, T. Sh; Tsikoridze, Z. A.

    1993-07-01

    The propagation of a 2π pulse in an ensemble of paramagnetic ions in a magnetic field is analyzed. The paramagnetic part of the magnetooptic activity of the medium contributes to the rotation of the polarization of the light pulse. The Faraday-rotation angle for a 2π pulse which has passed through the medium can be controlled by varying the saturation of the magnetic resonance.

  16. Comparative bactericidal activities of lasers operating at seven different wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Ian A.; Ward, Glenn D.; Wang, RuiKang K.; Sharp, James H.; Budgett, David M.; Stewart-Tull, Duncan E.; Wardlaw, Alastair C.; Chatwin, Christopher R.

    1996-10-01

    Seven laser instruments, delivering radiation at a selection of wavelengths in the range of 0.355 to 118 micrometers , we investigated for their ability to kill Escherichia coli as a lawn of the bacteria on nutrient agar culture plates. Easily the most effective was a 600-W CO2 laser operating at 10.6 micrometers , which produced 1.2-cm2 circular zones of sterilization at energy densities of around 8 J cm-2 in a 30-msec exposure. Circular zones with an area of 0.7 cm2 were achieved with 200 W from a Nd:YAG laser delivering 8-ms, 10-J pulses of 1.06 micrometers radiation at 20 Hz. The exposure time, however, was 16 s and the energy density was more than 240 times higher than with the CO2 laser. This difference is believed to be partly due to the much higher absorption of radiation at 10.6 micrometers , by water in the bacterial cells and the surrounding medium. Sterilization was observed after exposure to frequency- tripled Nd:YAG laser radiation at 355 nm. Lasers that were totally ineffective in killing Escherichia coli were the far infrared laser, the laser diode array, and the argon ion laser. The speed at which laser sterilization can be achieved is particularly attractive to the medical and food industries.

  17. Development of active porous medium filters based on plasma textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Rasipuram, Srinivasan; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Brown, Alan; Jasper, Warren

    2012-05-15

    Inexpensive, flexible, washable, and durable materials that serve as antimicrobial filters and self-decontaminating fabrics are needed to provide active protection to people in areas regularly exposed to various biohazards, such as hospitals and bio research labs working with pathogens. Airlines and cruise lines need such material to combat the spread of infections. In households these materials can be used in HVAC filters to fight indoor pollution, which is especially dangerous to people suffering from asthma. Efficient filtering materials are also required in areas contaminated by other types of hazardous dust particulates, such as nuclear dust. The primary idea that guided the undertaken study is that a microplasma-generating structure can be embedded in a textile fabric to generate a plasma sheath (''plasma shield'') that kills bacterial agents coming in contact with the fabric. The research resulted in the development of a plasma textile that can be used for producing new types of self-decontaminating garments, fabrics, and filter materials, capable of activating a plasma sheath that would filter, capture, and destroy any bacteriological agent deposited on its surface. This new material relies on the unique antimicrobial and catalytic properties of cold (room temperature) plasma that is benign to people and does not cause thermal damage to many polymer textiles, such as Nomex and polypropylene. The uniqueness of cold plasma as a disinfecting agent lies in the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to plasma exposure, as they can for antibiotics. Plasma textiles could thus be utilized for microbial destruction in active antimicrobial filters (for continuous decontamination and disinfection of large amounts of air) as well as in self-decontaminating surfaces and antibacterial barriers (for example, for creating local antiseptic or sterile environments around wounds and burns).

  18. Development of active porous medium filters based on plasma textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Rasipuram, Srinivasan; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Brown, Alan; Jasper, Warren

    2012-05-01

    Inexpensive, flexible, washable, and durable materials that serve as antimicrobial filters and self-decontaminating fabrics are needed to provide active protection to people in areas regularly exposed to various biohazards, such as hospitals and bio research labs working with pathogens. Airlines and cruise lines need such material to combat the spread of infections. In households these materials can be used in HVAC filters to fight indoor pollution, which is especially dangerous to people suffering from asthma. Efficient filtering materials are also required in areas contaminated by other types of hazardous dust particulates, such as nuclear dust. The primary idea that guided the undertaken study is that a microplasma-generating structure can be embedded in a textile fabric to generate a plasma sheath ("plasma shield") that kills bacterial agents coming in contact with the fabric. The research resulted in the development of a plasma textile that can be used for producing new types of self-decontaminating garments, fabrics, and filter materials, capable of activating a plasma sheath that would filter, capture, and destroy any bacteriological agent deposited on its surface. This new material relies on the unique antimicrobial and catalytic properties of cold (room temperature) plasma that is benign to people and does not cause thermal damage to many polymer textiles, such as Nomex and polypropylene. The uniqueness of cold plasma as a disinfecting agent lies in the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to plasma exposure, as they can for antibiotics. Plasma textiles could thus be utilized for microbial destruction in active antimicrobial filters (for continuous decontamination and disinfection of large amounts of air) as well as in self-decontaminating surfaces and antibacterial barriers (for example, for creating local antiseptic or sterile environments around wounds and burns).

  19. Zeno inhibition of polarization rotation in an optically active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalo, Isabel; Porras, Miguel A.; Luis, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experiment in which the rotation of the polarization of light propagating in an optically active water solution of D-fructose tends to be inhibited by frequent monitoring whether the polarization remains unchanged. This is an example of the Zeno effect that has remarkable pedagogical interest because of its conceptual simplicity, easy implementation, low cost, and because the same the Zeno effect holds at classical and quantum levels. An added value is the demonstration of the Zeno effect beyond typical idealized assumptions in a practical setting with real polarizers.

  20. Analytical model of optical field distribution of thin disk laser with thermal-optical aberration gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangzhi; Qiu, Yuli; Wang, Zexiong; Zhu, Xiao; Zhu, Changhong

    2016-08-01

    An analytical model is developed to analyze the optical field distribution of thin disk laser with a thermal-optical aberration gain medium. The fundamental mode field distribution is calculated by using the eigenvector method of the resonator transit matrix for different pumping parameters. The analytical results show that the uniformity of the pumping spot is an important factor that impacts the beam quality of thin disk laser. The uniform pumping spot is beneficial to decrease thermal aberration and Optical Path Difference (OPD) of thin disk crystal, and to improve the beam quality. However, the beam quality still decreases slightly with the increasing of pumping intensity under the uniform pumping condition. The main reason for degradation of beam quality is the aspherical part of OPD which leads to diffraction losses of the resonator and wavefront deformation.

  1. Active-mirror-laser-amplifier thermal management with tunable helium pressure at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Lucianetti, Antonio; Albach, Daniel; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-06-20

    We illustrate the benefits of a thin, low pressure helium cell for efficient and safe heat removal in cryogenically-cooled active mirror laser amplifiers operating in the [100 J-1 kJ]/[1-10 Hz] range. A homogeneous gain medium temperature distribution averaging 160 K is obtained with a sub-mm helium-filled gap between the gain medium and a copper plate at 77 K. A significant degree of flexibility for tuning the temperature in the amplifier can be achieved by varying the pressure of the helium gas in the 10(2) to 10(5) Pa range. PMID:21716519

  2. Green laser light activates the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Gentiana I.; Balster, Sven; Zhang, Kaiyin; Lim, Hubert H.; Reich, Uta; Massow, Ole; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Guenter

    2009-07-01

    The hearing performance with conventional hearing aids and cochlear implants is dramatically reduced in noisy environments and for sounds more complex than speech (e. g. music), partially due to the lack of localized sensorineural activation across different frequency regions with these devices. Laser light can be focused in a controlled manner and may provide more localized activation of the inner ear, the cochlea. We sought to assess whether visible light with parameters that could induce an optoacoustic effect (532 nm, 10-ns pulses) would activate the cochlea. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded preoperatively in anesthetized guinea pigs to confirm normal hearing. After opening the bulla, a 50-μm core-diameter optical fiber was positioned in the round window niche and directed toward the basilar membrane. Optically induced ABRs (OABRs), similar in shape to those of acoustic stimulation, were elicited with single pulses. The OABR peaks increased with energy level (0.6 to 23 μJ/pulse) and remained consistent even after 30 minutes of continuous stimulation at 13 μJ, indicating minimal or no stimulation-induced damage within the cochlea. Our findings demonstrate that visible light can effectively and reliably activate the cochlea without any apparent damage. Further studies are in progress to investigate the frequency-specific nature and mechanism of green light cochlear activation.

  3. Modification of Earth-satellite orbits using medium-energy pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Claude R.

    1993-05-01

    Laser impulse space propulsion (LISP) has become an attractive concept, due to recent advances in gas laser technology, high-speed segmented mirrors, and improved coefficients for momentum coupling to targets in pulsed laser ablation. There are numerous specialized applications of the basic concept to space science -- ranging from far-future and high capital cost to the immediate and inexpensive, such as: LEO-LISP (launch of massive objects into low-Earth-orbit at dramatically improved cost-per-kg relative to present practice); LEGO-LISP (LEO to geosynchronous transfers); LO-LISP (periodic re-boost of decaying LEO orbits); and LISK (geosynchronous satellite station-keeping). It is unlikely that one type of laser will be best for all scenarios. In this paper, we discuss these most immediate applications, leaving LEO-LISP -- the application requiring the longest reach -- for another venue.

  4. Modification of earth-satellite orbits using medium-energy pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, C.R.

    1992-10-01

    Laser Impulse Space Propulsion (LISP) has become an attractive concept, due to recent advances in gas laser technology, high-speed segmented mirrors and improved coeffici-ents for momentum coupling to targets in pulsed laser ablation. There are numerous specialized applications of the basic concept to space science-ranging from far-future and high capital cost to the immediate and inexpensive, such as: LEO-LISP (launch of massive objects into low-Earth-Orbit at dramatically improved cost-per-kg relative to present practice); LEGO-LISP (LEO to geosynchronous transfers); LO-LISP) (periodic re-boost of decaying LEO orbits); and LISK (geosynchronous satellite station-keeping). It is unlikely that one type of laser will be best for all scenarios. In this paper, we will focus on the last two applications.

  5. Modification of earth-satellite orbits using medium-energy pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Laser Impulse Space Propulsion (LISP) has become an attractive concept, due to recent advances in gas laser technology, high-speed segmented mirrors and improved coeffici-ents for momentum coupling to targets in pulsed laser ablation. There are numerous specialized applications of the basic concept to space science-ranging from far-future and high capital cost to the immediate and inexpensive, such as: LEO-LISP (launch of massive objects into low-Earth-Orbit at dramatically improved cost-per-kg relative to present practice); LEGO-LISP (LEO to geosynchronous transfers); LO-LISP) (periodic re-boost of decaying LEO orbits); and LISK (geosynchronous satellite station-keeping). It is unlikely that one type of laser will be best for all scenarios. In this paper, we will focus on the last two applications.

  6. Modification of Earth-satellite orbits using medium-energy pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, C. R.

    Laser Impulse Space Propulsion (LISP) has become an attractive concept, due to recent advances in gas laser technology, high-speed segmented mirrors and improved coefficients for momentum coupling to targets in pulsed laser ablation. There are numerous specialized applications of the basic concept to space science - ranging from far-future and high capital cost to the immediate and inexpensive, such as: LEO-LISP (launch of massive objects into low-Earth-Orbit at dramatically improved cost-per-kg relative to present practice); LEGO-LISP (LEO to geosynchronous transfers); LO-LISP (periodic re-boost of decaying LEO orbits); and LISK (geosynchronous satellite station-keeping). It is unlikely that one type of laser will be best for all scenarios. In this paper, we will focus on the last two applications.

  7. Tumor-selective mitochondrial network collapse induced by atmospheric gas plasma-activated medium.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kosuke; Asai, Tomohiko; Fujiwara, Kyoko; Sahara, Junki; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Fukuda, Noboru; Suzuki-Karasaki, Miki; Soma, Masayoshi; Suzuki-Karasaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-12

    Non-thermal atmospheric gas plasma (AGP) exhibits cytotoxicity against malignant cells with minimal cytotoxicity toward normal cells. However, the mechanisms of its tumor-selective cytotoxicity remain unclear. Here we report that AGP-activated medium increases caspase-independent cell death and mitochondrial network collapse in a panel of human cancer cells, but not in non-transformed cells. AGP irradiation stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in AGP-activated medium, and in turn the resulting stable ROS, most likely hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), activated intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial ROS (mROS) accumulation. Culture in AGP-activated medium resulted in cell death and excessive mitochondrial fragmentation and clustering, and these responses were inhibited by ROS scavengers. AGP-activated medium also increased dynamin-related protein 1-dependent mitochondrial fission in a tumor-specific manner, and H2O2 administration showed similar effects. Moreover, the vulnerability of tumor cells to mitochondrial network collapse appeared to result from their higher sensitivity to mROS accumulation induced by AGP-activated medium or H2O2. The present findings expand our previous observations on death receptor-mediated tumor-selective cell killing and reinforce the importance of mitochondrial network remodeling as a powerful target for tumor-selective cancer treatment.

  8. Chemically defined medium enhances bioelectric activity in mouse spinal cord-dorsal root ganglion cultures.

    PubMed

    Habets, A M; Baker, R E; Brenner, E; Romijn, H J

    1981-02-23

    Co-cultures of mouse spinal cord with dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures were grown either in horse serum (HS)-supplemented medium or in a serum-free, chemically defined medium (CDM). The cytoarchitecture of cord--DRG explants was fully retained in CDM, with little or no distortion due to flattening of the explant, as is invariably observed in HS-supplemented cultures. Functional properties such as bioelectric activity and DRG--spinal cord interconnectivity were well sustained in CDM.

  9. Muscle activity characterization by laser Doppler Myography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, Lorenzo; Casaccia, Sara; Marchionni, Paolo; Ercoli, Ilaria; Primo Tomasini, Enrico

    2013-09-01

    Electromiography (EMG) is the gold-standard technique used for the evaluation of muscle activity. This technique is used in biomechanics, sport medicine, neurology and rehabilitation therapy and it provides the electrical activity produced by skeletal muscles. Among the parameters measured with EMG, two very important quantities are: signal amplitude and duration of muscle contraction, muscle fatigue and maximum muscle power. Recently, a new measurement procedure, named Laser Doppler Myography (LDMi), for the non contact assessment of muscle activity has been proposed to measure the vibro-mechanical behaviour of the muscle. The aim of this study is to present the LDMi technique and to evaluate its capacity to measure some characteristic features proper of the muscle. In this paper LDMi is compared with standard superficial EMG (sEMG) requiring the application of sensors on the skin of each patient. sEMG and LDMi signals have been simultaneously acquired and processed to test correlations. Three parameters has been analyzed to compare these techniques: Muscle activation timing, signal amplitude and muscle fatigue. LDMi appears to be a reliable and promising measurement technique allowing the measurements without contact with the patient skin.

  10. Actively Q-switched Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. G.; Podivilov, E. V.; Babin, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    A new scheme providing actively Q-switched operation of a Raman fiber laser (RFL) has been proposed and tested. The RFL consists of a 1 km single-mode fiber with a switchable loop mirror at one end and an angled cleaved output end. An 1080 nm pulse with microsecond duration is generated at the output by means of acousto-optic switching of the mirror at ~30 kHz in the presence of 6 W backward pumping at 1030 nm. In the proposed scheme, the generated pulse energy is defined by the pump energy distributed along the passive fiber, which amounts to 30 μJ in our case. The available pump energy may be increased by means of fiber lengthening. Pulse shortening is also expected.

  11. Optodynamic Phenomena During Laser-Activated Irrigation Within Root Canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukač, Nejc; Gregorčič, Peter; Jezeršek, Matija

    2016-07-01

    Laser-activated irrigation is a powerful endodontic treatment for smear layer, bacteria, and debris removal from the root canal. In this study, we use shadow photography and the laser-beam-transmission probe to examine the dynamics of laser-induced vapor bubbles inside a root canal model and compare ultrasonic needle irrigation to the laser method. Results confirm important phenomenological differences in the two endodontic methods with the laser method resulting in much deeper irrigation. Observations of simulated debris particles show liquid vorticity effects which in our opinion represents the major cleaning mechanism.

  12. High resolution ALMA observations of dense molecular medium in the central regions of active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Kotaro

    2015-08-01

    I will present recent ALMA results on the dense molecular gas in the central regions of local active galaxies, including NGC 1068, NGC 1097, and NGC 7469, hosting both AGN and circumnuclear starburst regions. Impact of X-ray radiation, outflows, and shocks from active nuclei on the physical and chemical properties of the surrouding dense molecular medium will be discussed.

  13. Effect of citrate ions on laser ablation of Ag foil in aqueous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisková, K.; Vlcková, B.; Turpin, P.-Y.; Fayet, C.; Hromádková, J.; Slouf, M.

    2007-04-01

    Promoting effect of citrate in 1 × 10-5-1×10-2 M concentrations on laser ablation (LA) of a Ag foil in aqueous solution performed by ns laser pulses at 1064 nm is reported. Furthermore, adsorption of citrate ions was found to increase markedly the stability of the resulting LA-Ag hydrosol. The results are discussed on the basis of comparison of surface plasmon extinction spectral characteristics, transmission electron microscopy images, nanoparticle size distributions and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectral tests of hydrosols resulting from LA in neutral and acidic aqueous citrate solutions and in pure water.

  14. Toward the realization of erbium-doped GaN bulk crystals as a gain medium for high energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. Y.; Li, J.; Zhao, W. P.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2016-08-01

    Er-doped GaN (Er:GaN) is a promising candidate as a gain medium for solid-state high energy lasers (HELs) at the technologically important and eye-safe 1.54 μm wavelength window, as GaN has superior thermal properties over traditional laser gain materials such as Nd:YAG. However, the attainment of wafer-scale Er:GaN bulk or quasi-bulk crystals is a prerequisite to realize the full potential of Er:GaN as a gain medium for HELs. We report the realization of freestanding Er:GaN wafers of 2-in. in diameter with a thickness on the millimeter scale. These freestanding wafers were obtained via growth by hydride vapor phase epitaxy in conjunction with a laser-lift-off process. An Er doping level of 1.4 × 1020 atoms/cm3 has been confirmed by secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. The freestanding Er:GaN wafers exhibit strong photoluminescent emission at 1.54 μm with its emission intensity increasing dramatically with wafer thickness under 980 nm resonant excitation. A low thermal quenching of 10% was measured for the 1.54 μm emission intensity between 10 K and 300 K. This work represents a significant step in providing a practical approach for producing Er:GaN materials with sufficient thicknesses and dimensions to enable the design of gain media in various geometries, allowing for the production of HELs with improved lasing efficiency, atmosphere transmission, and eye-safety.

  15. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M.; Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  16. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M. Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H.

    2015-12-15

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  17. Magnetic plasmonic metamaterials in actively pumped host medium and plasmonic nanolaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, Andrey K.; Tartakovsky, Gennady

    2006-08-01

    We consider plasmonic nanoantennas immersed in active host medium. Specifically shaped metal nanoantennas can exhibit strong magnetic properties in the optical spectral range due to the excitation of Magnetic Resonance Plasmons (MRP). A case when a metamaterial comprising such nanoantennas can demonstrate both "left-handiness" and negative permeability in the optical range is considered. We show that high losses predicted for optical "left-handed" materials can be compensated in the gain medium. Gains required to achieve local generation in such magnetic active metamaterials are calculated for real metals

  18. Deep saturation of a Cerenkov wakefield amplified by an active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toroker, Z.; Schächter, L.

    2015-07-01

    A trigger bunch of electrons traveling inside or in the vicinity of a dielectric medium generates a Cerenkov wake. If the dielectric medium is active, a small fraction of the spectrum of the wake is amplified and far behind the trigger bunch where the active medium is fully depleted, the amplitude and the phase of the wake are virtually constant. In this range, a second bunch of electrons trailing behind the trigger bunch can be accelerated. For optimal operation, the trigger bunch should be density modulated at the resonant frequency of the medium. However, we demonstrate that even if the bunch is uniform along many wavelengths we may still take advantage of the saturation characteristics to obtain conditions adequate for acceleration. Further we demonstrate that for large enough number of electrons it is possible to have a coherent amplified wake after a saturation length which is determined analytically and tested numerically. In addition, we show that almost 100% of the stored energy in the active medium can be transferred to the acceleration of the trailing bunch electrons. The relatively large energy spread due to the beam loading is well suited to a medical accelerator. When the beam loading is weak, the gradient is virtually constant but the acceleration efficiency drops to about 2% for typical parameters.

  19. Frequency discriminating laser

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.D.

    1987-10-20

    A laser is described for discriminating between a higher gain transition and a lower gain transition to permit the laser to lase at the lower gain transition. It consists of: a laser cavity, including more than two mirrors each of which is highly transmissive at the frequency of the higher gain transition, one of which is partially reflective at the frequency of the lower gain transition, and all but the one of which are highly reflective at the frequency of the lower gain transition; an active laser medium disposed within the cavity; and means for pumping the active laser medium.

  20. Linearly tapered discharge capillary waveguides as a medium for a laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Abuazoum, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Ersfeld, B.; Hart, K.; Vieux, G.; Yang, X.; Welsh, G. H.; Issac, R. C.; Reijnders, M. P.; Jones, D. R.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2012-01-02

    Gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are commonly used as media for plasma wakefield accelerators. We show that effective waveguides can be manufactured using a femtosecond laser micromachining technique to produce a linearly tapered plasma density, which enables the energy of the accelerator to be enhanced significantly. A laser guiding efficiency in excess of 82% at sub-relativistic intensities has been demonstrated in a 40 mm long capillary with a diameter tapering from 320 {mu}m to 270 {mu}m, which gives rise to an on-axis, time-averaged plasma density that varies from 1.0 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} to 1.6 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}.

  1. Efficiency of an unstable resonator with an active medium containing small-scale phase inhomogeneities

    SciTech Connect

    Lobachev, V V; Strakhov, S Yu

    2004-01-31

    Properties of an unstable resonator with small-scale periodic inhomogeneities of the refractive index in an active medium are considered. It is shown that the parameters of output radiation depend on the structure of a phase inhomogeneity. The methods for increasing the resonator efficiency are analysed. (resonators. interferometers)

  2. Predictions for the energy loss of light ions in laser-generated plasmas at low and medium velocities.

    PubMed

    Cayzac, W; Bagnoud, V; Basko, M M; Blažević, A; Frank, A; Gericke, D O; Hallo, L; Malka, G; Ortner, A; Tauschwitz, An; Vorberger, J; Roth, M

    2015-11-01

    The energy loss of light ions in dense plasmas is investigated with special focus on low to medium projectile energies, i.e., at velocities where the maximum of the stopping power occurs. In this region, exceptionally large theoretical uncertainties remain and no conclusive experimental data are available. We perform simulations of beam-plasma configurations well suited for an experimental test of ion energy loss in highly ionized, laser-generated carbon plasmas. The plasma parameters are extracted from two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, and a Monte Carlo calculation of the charge-state distribution of the projectile ion beam determines the dynamics of the ion charge state over the whole plasma profile. We show that the discrepancies in the energy loss predicted by different theoretical models are as high as 20-30%, making these theories well distinguishable in suitable experiments.

  3. Formation and propagation of laser-driven plasma jets in an ambient medium studied with X-ray radiography and optical diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Dizière, A.; Pelka, A.; Ravasio, A.; Yurchak, R.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Morita, T.; Pikuz, S.; Koenig, M.

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, we present experimental results obtained on the LULI2000 laser facility regarding structure and dynamics of astrophysical jets propagating in interstellar medium. The jets, generated by using a cone-shaped target, propagate in a nitrogen gas that mimics the interstellar medium. X-ray radiography as well as optical diagnostics were used to probe both high and low density regions. In this paper, we show how collimation of the jets evolves with the gas density.

  4. Active-region designs in quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zasavitskii, I I

    2012-10-31

    This paper analyses the development of active-region designs in quantum cascade lasers. Active-region designs have been demonstrated to date that employ various radiative transitions (vertical, diagonal, interminiband and interband). The lower laser level is depopulated through nonradiative transitions, such as one- or two-phonon (and even three-phonon) relaxation or bound state {yields} continuum transitions. Advances in active-region designs and energy diagram optimisation in the past few years have led to significant improvements in important characteristics of quantum cascade lasers, such as their output power, emission bandwidth, characteristic temperature and efficiency. (invited paper)

  5. Microscopic analysis of non-equilibrium dynamics in the semiconductor-laser gain medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.

    2014-04-14

    Fully microscopic many-body calculations are used to analyze the carrier dynamics in situations where a strong sub-picosecond pulse interacts with an inverted semiconductor quantum well. Electron-electron and electron-phonon scatterings are calculated on a second Born-Markov level. Intra-subband scatterings on a scale of tens of femtoseconds are shown to quickly re-fill the kinetic holes created in the carrier distributions during the pulse amplification. Even for sub-100 fs pulses, this significantly influences the pulse amplification as well as its spectral dependence. Interband scatterings on a few picosecond timescale limit the possibly achievable repetition rate in pulsed semiconductor lasers.

  6. Laser-induced surface modification of metals and alloys in liquid argon medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakevich, V. S.; Kazakevich, P. V.; Yaresko, P. S.; Kamynina, D. A.

    2016-08-01

    Micro and nanostructuring of metals and alloys surfaces (Ti, Mo, Ni, T30K4) was considered by subnanocosecond laser radiation in stationary and dynamic mode in the liquid argon, ethanol and air. Depending of structures size on the samples surface from the energy density and the number of pulses were built. Non-periodic (NSS) and periodic (PSS) surface structures with periods about λ-λ/2 were obtained. PSS formation took place as at the target surface so at the NSS surface.

  7. Optimized geometric configuration of active ring laser gyroscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormley, John; Salloum, Tony

    2016-05-01

    We present a thorough derivation of the Sagnac effect for a ring laser gyroscope of any arbitrary polygonal configuration. We determine optimized alternative geometric configurations for the mirrors. The simulations incur the implementation of a lasing medium with the standard square system, triangular, pentagonal, and oblongated square configuration (diamond). Simulations of possible new geometric configurations are considered, as well as the possibility of adjusting the concavity of the mirrors.

  8. Low-frequency wiggler modes in the free-electron laser with a dusty magnetoplasma medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, S.

    2015-07-01

    An advanced incremental scheme for generating tunable coherent radiation in a free-electron laser has been presented: the basic concept is the use of a relativistic electron beam propagating through a magnetized dusty plasma channel where dust helicon, dust Alfven and coupled dust cyclotron-Alfven waves can play a role as a low-frequency wiggler, triggering coherent emissions. The wiggler wavelength at the sub-mm level allows one to reach the wavelength range from a few nm down to a few Å with moderately relativistic electrons of kinetic energies of a few tens/hundreds of MeV. The laser gain and the effects of beam self-electric and self-magnetic fields on the gain have been estimated and compared with findings of the helical magnetic and electromagnetic wigglers in vacuum. To study the chaotic regions of the electron motion in the dusty plasma wave wiggler, a time independent Hamiltonian has been obtained. The Poincare surface of a section map has been used numerically to analyze the nonintegrable system where chaotic regions in phase-space emerge. This concept opens a path toward a new generation of synchrotron sources based on compact plasma structures.

  9. Frequency Conversion Activation on the Mercury Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A J; Beach, R J; Bibeau, C; Campbell, R; Ebbers, C A; Freitas, B L; Kent, R; Van Lue, D; Liao, Z; Landron, T; Payne, S A; Schaffers, K I; Sutton, S; Fei, Y; Chai, B

    2004-09-24

    High efficiency frequency conversion while operating at average power is critical for the Mercury laser. We will demonstrate average power frequency conversion of face-cooled DKDP and YCOB crystals using a sapphire heat spreader approach.

  10. High-energy laser activities at MBDA Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohring, Bernd; Dietrich, Stephan; Tassini, Leonardo; Protz, Rudolf; Geidek, Franz; Zoz, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    At MBDA Germany a concept for a high-energy laser weapon system is investigated, which is based on existing industrial laser sources. Due to the enormous progress in the field of high-power fiber lasers, commercial industrial fiber lasers are now available delivering a nearly-diffraction limited beam quality with power levels of up to 10 kW. By using a geometric beam coupling scheme, a number of individual high-power fiber laser beams are combined together using one common beam director telescope. A total laser beam power of more than 100 kW can be achieved, which is sufficient for an operational laser weapon system. The individual beams from the different lasers are steered by servo-loops using fast tip-tilt mirrors. This principle enables the concentration of the total laser beam power at one common focal point on a distant target, also allowing fine tracking of target movements and first-order compensation of turbulence effects on laser beam propagation. The proposed beam combination concept was demonstrated by using different experimental set-ups. A number of experiments were performed successfully to investigate laser beam target interaction and target fine tracking, also at large distances and at moving targets. Content and results of these investigations are reported, which demonstrate the complete engagement sequence for a C-RAM scenario. This includes subsequent steps of target acquisition by radar and IR optics, followed by large angle coarse tracking, active fine tracking and destruction of the target by the laser system. This successful implementation of geometric beam combining is an important step for the realization of a laser weapon system in the near future.

  11. Continuous cultivation of Arthrospira platensis using exhausted medium treated with granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morocho-Jácome, Ana Lucía; Mascioli, Guilherme Favaro; Sato, Sunao; Carvalho, João Carlos Monteiro de

    2015-03-01

    Reusing culture medium of Arthrospira platensis is quite important in large scale production because its inappropriate disposal could exacerbate problems of environmental pollution. This study evaluates the suitability of using different quantities of exhausted Schlösser medium after continuous treatment using granular activated carbon (GAC) with a residence time (T) of 2 h for A. platensis growth in continuous cultivation. A tubular photobioreactor (PBR) and urea as cheap nitrogen source were used, taking as response variables kinetic parameters and biomass composition. The removal of both organic matter and pigment (OMR and PgR, respectively) was measured to evaluate the efficiency of the treatment process. This treatment process yielded high values of OMR (73.7 ± 0.1%) and PgR (52.4 ± 0.4%) using 75% treated medium, thereby A. platensis biomass with high protein content (42.0 ± 0.6%), 1568 ± 15 mg/L cell concentration under steady-state conditions and 941 mg/L d cell productivity. This alternative to simultaneous treatment with GAC for reuse of Schlösser medium in continuous cultivation could ensure no diminution in either cell productivity or protein content in A. platensis cultivation using tubular PBR with 65% reduction in medium culture costs.

  12. Experimental Reduction of Laser Imprinting and Rayleigh--Taylor Growth in Spherically Compressed, Medium-Z--Doped Plastic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiksel, G.; Hu, S. X.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Yaakobi, B.; Bonino, M. J.; Jungquist, R. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of medium-Z doping of plastic ablators on laser imprinting and Rayleigh-- Taylor (RT) instability growth was studied using spherical direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA Laser System. The targets were spherical plastic (CH) shells, with an outer diameter of 860 μm and a thickness of 22 μm, doped with a varied concentration of Si (4.3% and 7.4%) and Ge (3.9%). The targets were imploded with 48 beams with a low-adiabat, triple-picket laser shape pulse with a peak intensity of 4 x 10^14 W/cm^2 and a pulse duration of 2.5 ns. The shells were x-ray radiographed through a 400-μm opening in the side of the target. The results show that impurity doping strongly reduces the shell-density modulation and the instability growth rate. The amplitude of the initial imprint is reduced by a factor of 2.5±0.5 for CH[4.3% Si] targets and a factor of 3±0.5 for CH[7.4% Si] and CH[3.9% Ge] targets. At the end of the acceleration phase, the reduction factor becomes 3±0.5 and 5±0.5, correspondingly. The RT instability growth rate in doped targets is reduced by a factor of 1.5 compared to undoped ones. Simulations using the 2-D radiation--hydrodynamics code DRACO show good agreement with the measurements. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  13. Experimental reduction of laser imprinting and Rayleigh-Taylor growth in spherically compressed, medium-Z-doped plastic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiksel, G.; Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Yaakobi, B.; Bonino, M. J.; Jungquist, R.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of medium-Z doping of plastic ablators on laser imprinting and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth was studied using spherical direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1977)]. The targets were spherical plastic (CH) shells, with an outer diameter of 860 μm and a thickness of 22 μm, volume doped with a varied concentration of Si (4.3% and 7.4%) and Ge (3.9%). The targets were imploded with 48 beams with a low-adiabat, triple-picket laser shape pulse with a peak intensity of 4×1014W/cm2, and a pulse duration of 2.5 ns. The shells were x-ray radiographed through a 400 -μm opening in the side of the target. The results show that volumetric impurity doping strongly reduces the shell density modulation and the instability growth rate. The amplitude of the initial imprint is reduced by a factor of 2.5 ± 0.5 for CH[4.3% Si] targets and by a factor of 3 ± 0.5 for CH[7.4% Si] and CH[3.9% Ge] targets. At the end of the acceleration phase, the reduction factor becomes 3 ± 0.5 and 5 ± 0.5, correspondingly. The RT instability growth rate in doped targets is reduced by a factor of 1.5 compared to undoped ones. Simulations using the two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamics code draco show good agreement with the measurements.

  14. Combined effects of low-level laser therapy and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell conditioned medium on viability of human dermal fibroblasts cultured in a high-glucose medium.

    PubMed

    Hendudari, Farzane; Piryaei, Abbas; Hassani, Seyedeh-Nafiseh; Darbandi, Hasan; Bayat, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) exhibited biostimulatory effects on fibroblasts viability. Secretomes can be administered to culture mediums by using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium (BM-MSCs CM). This study investigated the combined effects of LLLT and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell conditioned medium (hBM-MSCs CM) on the cellular viability of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), which was cultured in a high-glucose (HG) concentration medium. The HDFs were cultured either in a concentration of physiologic (normal) glucose (NG; 5.5 mM/l) or in HG media (15 mM/l) for 4 days. LLLT was performed with a continuous-wave helium-neon laser (632.8 nm, power density of 0.00185 W/cm(2) and energy densities of 0.5, 1, and 2 J/cm(2)). About 10% of hBM-MSCs CM was added to the HG HDF culture medium. The viability of HDFs was evaluated using dimethylthiazol-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. A significantly higher cell viability was observed when laser of either 0.5 or 1 J/cm(2) was used to treat HG HDFs, compared to the control groups. The cellular viability of HG-treated HDFs was significantly lower compared to the LLLT + HG HDFs, hBM-MSCs CM-treated HG HDFs, and LLLT + hBM-MSCs CM-treated HG HDFs. In conclusion, hBM-MSCs CM or LLLT alone increased the survival of HG HDFs cells. However, the combination of hBM-MSCs CM and LLLT improved these results in comparison to the conditioned medium. PMID:26984346

  15. Combined effects of low-level laser therapy and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell conditioned medium on viability of human dermal fibroblasts cultured in a high-glucose medium.

    PubMed

    Hendudari, Farzane; Piryaei, Abbas; Hassani, Seyedeh-Nafiseh; Darbandi, Hasan; Bayat, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) exhibited biostimulatory effects on fibroblasts viability. Secretomes can be administered to culture mediums by using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells conditioned medium (BM-MSCs CM). This study investigated the combined effects of LLLT and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell conditioned medium (hBM-MSCs CM) on the cellular viability of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), which was cultured in a high-glucose (HG) concentration medium. The HDFs were cultured either in a concentration of physiologic (normal) glucose (NG; 5.5 mM/l) or in HG media (15 mM/l) for 4 days. LLLT was performed with a continuous-wave helium-neon laser (632.8 nm, power density of 0.00185 W/cm(2) and energy densities of 0.5, 1, and 2 J/cm(2)). About 10% of hBM-MSCs CM was added to the HG HDF culture medium. The viability of HDFs was evaluated using dimethylthiazol-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. A significantly higher cell viability was observed when laser of either 0.5 or 1 J/cm(2) was used to treat HG HDFs, compared to the control groups. The cellular viability of HG-treated HDFs was significantly lower compared to the LLLT + HG HDFs, hBM-MSCs CM-treated HG HDFs, and LLLT + hBM-MSCs CM-treated HG HDFs. In conclusion, hBM-MSCs CM or LLLT alone increased the survival of HG HDFs cells. However, the combination of hBM-MSCs CM and LLLT improved these results in comparison to the conditioned medium.

  16. Use of a laser beam with an oblique angle of incidence to measure the reduced scattering coefficient of a turbid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong; Jacques, Steven L.

    1995-05-01

    A simple and quick approach is used to measure the reduced scattering coefficient ( mu s `) of a semi-infinite turbid medium having a much smaller absorption coefficient than mu s`. A laser beam with an oblique angle of incidence to the medium causes the center of the diffuse reflectance that is several transport mean-free paths away from the incident point to shift away from the point of incidence by an amount Delta x. This amount is used to compute mu s` by mu s` = sin( alpha i)/(n Delta x), where n is the refractive index of the turbid medium divided by that of the incident medium and alpha i is the angle of incidence measured from the surface normal. For a turbid medium having an absorption coefficient comparable with mu s `, a revision to the above formula is made. This method is tested theoretically by Monte Carlo simulations and experimentally by a video reflectometer.

  17. Neutron-induced nucleation inside bubble chambers using Freon 115 as the active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghilea, M. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.

    2011-08-01

    Neutron imaging is used in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments to measure the core symmetry of imploded targets. Liquid bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. Due to the fact that nucleation models used in gel detectors research cannot always give correct estimates for the neutron-induced bubble density inside a liquid bubble chamber, an improved theoretical model to describe the mechanism of bubble formation for Freon 115 as the active medium has been developed. It shows that the size of the critical radius for the nucleation process determines the mechanism of bubble formation and the sensitivity of the active medium to the 14.1-MeV incident neutrons resulting from ICF implosions. The bubble-growth mechanism is driven by the excitation of the medium electronic levels and not by electrons ejected from the medium's atoms as happens for the bubble chambers used to detect charged particles. The model accurately predicts the neutron-induced bubble density measured on OMEGA with both liquid bubble chambers and gel detectors.

  18. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yisen; Lan, Bei; He, Hao; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-10-01

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca2+ dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  19. Laser stimulation can activate autophagy in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue; Lan, Bei; Cao, Youjia; He, Hao

    2014-10-27

    For decades, lasers have been a daily tool in most biological research for fluorescent excitation by confocal or multiphoton microscopy. More than 20 years ago, cell photodamage caused by intense laser stimulation was noticed by generating reactive oxygen species, which was then thought as the main damage effect by photons. In this study, we show that laser stimulation can induce autophagy, an important cell lysosomal pathway responding to immune stimulation and starvation, without any biochemical treatment. Two different types of laser stimulations are found to be capable of activating autophagy: continuous scanning by continuous-wave visible lasers and a short-time flash of femtosecond laser irradiation. The autophagy generation is independent from wavelength, power, and scanning duration of the visible lasers. In contrast, the power of femtosecond laser is very critical to autophagy because the multiphoton excited Ca{sup 2+} dominates autophagy signaling. In general, we show here the different mechanisms of autophagy generation by such laser stimulation, which correspond to confocal microscopy and cell surgery, respectively. Those results can help further understanding of photodamage and autophagy signaling.

  20. Deep trap, laser activated image converting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    Receiving an optical image on the surface of a photoconducting semiconductor is presented, storing the image in deep traps of the semiconductor, and later scanning the semiconductor with a laser beam to empty the deep traps, thereby producing a video signal. The semiconductor is illuminated with photons of energy greater than the band gap producing electron-hole pairs in the semiconductor which subsequently fill traps in energy from the band edges. When the laser beam of low energy photons excites the trapped electrons and holes out of the traps into the conduction and valence bands, a photoconductivity can be observed.

  1. Time-dependent theory for random lasers in the presence of an inhomogeneous broadened gain medium such as PbSe quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Ardakani, Abbas Ghasempour; Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Bahrampour, Ali Reza

    2013-02-20

    Time-dependent model is presented to simulate random lasers in the presence of an inhomogeneous gain medium. PbSe quantum dots (QDs) with an arbitrary size distribution are treated as an inhomogeneous gain medium. By introducing inhomogeneity of the PbSe QDs in polarization, rate, and Maxwell's equations, our model is constructed for a one-dimensional disordered system. By employing the finite difference time-domain method, the governing equations are numerically solved and lasing spectra and spatial distribution of the electric field are calculated. The effect of increasing the pumping rate on the laser characteristics is investigated. The results show that the number of lasing modes and their intensities increase with pumping rate. It is also demonstrated that the emission spectra depend on the standard deviation of the Gaussian distribution function. Increasing the standard deviation leads to reduction of the laser intensity.

  2. Conditioned medium from alternatively activated macrophages induce mesangial cell apoptosis via the effect of Fas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuan; Luo, Fangjun; Li, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Nong

    2013-11-15

    During inflammation in the glomerulus, the proliferation of myofiroblast-like mesangial cells is commonly associated with the pathological process. Macrophages play an important role in regulating the growth of resident mesangial cells in the glomeruli. Alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) is a subset of macrophages induced by IL-13/IL-4, which is shown to play a repair role in glomerulonephritis. Prompted by studies of development, we performed bone marrow derived macrophage and rat mesangial cell co-culture study. Conditioned medium from IL-4 primed M2 macrophages induced rat mesangial cell apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic effect of M2 macrophages was demonstrated by condensed nuclei stained with Hoechst 33258, increased apoptosis rates by flow cytometry analysis and enhanced caspase-3 activation by western blot. Fas protein was up-regulated in rat mesangial cells, and its neutralizing antibody ZB4 partly inhibited M2 macrophage-induced apoptosis. The up-regulated arginase-1 expression in M2 macrophage also contributed to this apoptotic effect. These results indicated that the process of apoptosis triggered by conditioned medium from M2 macrophages, at least is partly conducted through Fas in rat mesangial cells. Our findings provide compelling evidence that M2 macrophages control the growth of mesangial cells in renal inflammatory conditions. - Highlights: • Conditioned-medium from M2 macrophages induces rat mesangial cell (MsC) apoptosis. • M2 macrophage conditioned medium exerts its pro-apoptotic effects via Fas ligand. • Arginase-1 activity in M2 macrophages plays a role in inducing apoptosis in rat MsC.

  3. Substrate-emitting semiconductor laser with a trapezoidal active region

    SciTech Connect

    Dikareva, N V; Nekorkin, S M; Karzanova, M V; Zvonkov, B N; Aleshkin, V Ya; Dubinov, A A; Afonenko, A A

    2014-04-28

    Semiconductor lasers with a narrow (∼2°) directional pattern in the planes both parallel and perpendicular to the p–n junction are fabricated. To achieve a low radiation divergence in the p–n junction plane, the active region in this plane was designed in the form of a trapezium. The narrow directional pattern in the plane perpendicular to the p–n junction was ensured by the use of a leaky mode, through which more than 90% of laser power was coupled out. (lasers)

  4. Electrochemical assay of α-glucosidase activity and the inhibitor screening in cell medium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Liu, Ying; Wang, Xiaonan; Chen, Yangyang; Li, Genxi

    2015-12-15

    An electrochemical method is established in this work for the assay of α-glucosidase activity and the inhibitor screening through one-step displacement reaction, which can be directly used in cell medium. The displacement reaction can be achieved via strong binding of 4-aminophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (pAPG)/magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to pyrene boric acid (PBA) immobilized on the surface of graphite electrode (GE), compared to that of dopamine (DA)/sliver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Since α-glucosidase can specifically catalyze MNPs/pAPG into MNPs/pAP which has no binding capacity with PBA, the activity of both isolated and membrane bound enzyme can be well evaluated by using this proposed method. Meanwhile, signal amplification can be accomplished via the immobilization of DA at the outer layer of AgNPs, and the accuracy can be strengthened through magnetic separation. Moreover, this method can also be utilized for inhibitor screening not only in the medium containing the enzyme but also in cell medium. With good precision and accuracy, it may be extended to other proteases and their inhibitors as well. PMID:26201984

  5. Lasers. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the materials required for presenting an 8-day competency-based technology learning activity (TLA) designed to introduce students in grades 6-10 to advances and career opportunities in the field of laser technology. The guide uses a series of hands-on exploratory experiences into which activities to help students develop…

  6. Activation of cells using femtosecond laser beam (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Study of communication in cellular systems requires precise activation of targeted cell(s) in the network. In contrast to chemical, electrical, thermal, mechanical stimulation, optical stimulation is non-invasive and is better suited for stimulation of targeted cells. As compared to visible lasers, the near infrared (NIR) microsecond/nanosecond pulsed laser beams are being used as preferred stimulation tool as they provide higher penetration depth in tissues. Femotosecond (FS) laser beams in NIR are also being used for direct and indirect (i.e. via two-photon optogenetics) stimulation of cells. Here, we present a comparative evaluation of efficacy of NIR FS laser beam for direct (no optogenetic sensitization) and 2ph optogenetic stimulation of cells. Further, for the first time, we demonstrate the use of blue (~450 nm, obtained by second harmonic generation) FS laser beam for stimulation of cells with and without Channelrhodopisn-2 (ChR2) expression. Comparative analysis of photocurrent generated by blue FS laser beam and continuous wave blue light for optogenetics stimulation of ChR2 transfected HEK cells will be presented. The use of ultrafast laser micro-beam for focal, non-contact, and repeated stimulation of single cells in a cellular circuitry allowed us to study the communication between different cell types.

  7. PHYSICAL BASIS OF QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Role of a high gain of the medium in superradiance generation and in observation of coherent effects in semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, Petr P.

    1999-10-01

    A theoretical model of superradiant pulse generation in semiconductor laser structures is developed. It is shown that a high optical gain of the medium can overcome phase relaxation and results in a built-up superradiant state (macroscopic dipole) in an assembly of electron—hole pairs on a time scale much longer than the characteristic polarisation relaxation time T2. A criterion of the superradiance generation is the condition αcmT2>1, where α is the gain coefficient and cm is the speed of light in the medium. The theoretical model describes both qualitatively and quantitatively the author's own experimental results.

  8. Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO) activities in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman R.

    1994-01-01

    Laser initiated ordnance appears to offer the advantages of greater reliability, enhanced safety, lighter, less costly products, and improvements in spacecraft system designs which can lead to higher operational efficiency. But the lack of flight demonstrations has prevented the application of this new technology into new programs. Hence, a three-phase technology program was initiated by NASA to provide flight proof of their technical and programmatic feasibility: flight demonstration aboard an unmanned commercial vehicle (Pegasus), use as a Space Shuttle payload, and the most demanding of applications, namely, solid rocket motor vehicle ignition and flight termination. The programs investigate, via flight demonstrations the use of fully solid state laser diode systems to reduce potential hazards imposed by stray electrical signals. Inadvertent ignition has proven to cause serious problems. While the current electromechanical have been made safe, the result has been complex systems. Now is the time to take advantage of this new technology to further enhance safety and reliability of spacecraft systems. Two of the three phases are underway; an announcement of opportunity for the third, a sounding rocket flight demonstration, was made at the workshop.

  9. High-efficient diode-pumped actively Q-switched Nd:YAG/KTP Raman laser at 1096 nm wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Fufang; Zhang, Xingyu; Wang, Weitao; Cong, Zhenhua; Shi, Men; Yang, Xiuqin; Kong, Weijin; Ma, Lili; Wu, Wendi

    2013-09-01

    With Nd:YAG as the gain medium and KTP crystal as the Raman medium, the characteristics of an LD pumped intracavity actively Q-switched Nd:YAG/KTP Raman laser at 1096 nm wavelength were studied. The output characteristics of 1096 nm were investigated. At a pulse repetition rate of 30 kHz an average power up to 1.97 W was obtained with the incident pump power of 11.75 W, corresponding to a diode-to-Stokes conversion efficiency of 16.8%.

  10. Short- and medium-chain fatty acids exhibit antimicrobial activity for oral microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chifu B.; Altimova, Yelena; Myers, Taylor M.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the antibacterial activity of short-, medium-, and long-chain fatty acids against various oral microorganisms. Methods The short-chain fatty acids [formic acid (C1), acetic acid (C2), propionic acid (C3), butyric acid (C4), isobutyric acid (C4), isovaleric acid (C5), hexanoic acid (C6)], medium-chain fatty acids [octanoic acid (C8), capric acid (C10), lauric acid (12)], and long-chain fatty acids [myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16)], were investigated for antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, S. gordonii, S. sanguis, Candida albicans, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Results The data demonstrated that the fatty acids exhibited patterns of inhibition against oral bacteria with some specificity that appeared related more to the bacterial species that the general structural characteristics of the microorganism. As a group the fatty acids were much less effective against C. albicans than the oral bacteria, with effectiveness limited to hexanoic, octanoic, and lauric acids. Formic acid, capric, and lauric acids were broadly inhibitory for the bacteria. Interestingly, fatty acids that are produced at metabolic end-products by a number of these bacteria, were specifically inactive against the producing species, while substantially inhibiting the growth of other oral microorganisms. Conclusions The results indicate that the antimicrobial activity of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs), long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) could influence the microbial ecology in the oral cavity via at least 2 potential pathways. First, the agents delivered exogenously as therapeutic adjuncts could be packaged to enhance a microbial-regulatory environment in the subgingival sulcus. Second, it would be the intrinsic nature of these fatty acid inhibitors in contributing to the characteristics of the microbial biofilms, their evolution, and emergence of

  11. Chemical Bond Activation Observed with an X-ray Laser.

    PubMed

    Beye, Martin; Öberg, Henrik; Xin, Hongliang; Dakovski, Georgi L; Dell'Angela, Martina; Föhlisch, Alexander; Gladh, Jörgen; Hantschmann, Markus; Hieke, Florian; Kaya, Sarp; Kühn, Danilo; LaRue, Jerry; Mercurio, Giuseppe; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan P; Ng, May Ling; Nilsson, Anders; Nordlund, Dennis; Nørskov, Jens; Öström, Henrik; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Persson, Mats; Schlotter, William F; Sellberg, Jonas A; Wolf, Martin; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Pettersson, Lars G M; Wurth, Wilfried

    2016-09-15

    The concept of bonding and antibonding orbitals is fundamental in chemistry. The population of those orbitals and the energetic difference between the two reflect the strength of the bonding interaction. Weakening the bond is expected to reduce this energetic splitting, but the transient character of bond-activation has so far prohibited direct experimental access. Here we apply time-resolved soft X-ray spectroscopy at a free-electron laser to directly observe the decreased bonding-antibonding splitting following bond-activation using an ultrashort optical laser pulse. PMID:27584914

  12. Self-propulsion and interactions of catalytic particles in a chemically active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward J.; Marko, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic "machines," such as catalytic rods or colloids, can self-propel and interact by generating gradients of their substrates. We theoretically investigate the behaviors of such machines in a chemically active environment where their catalytic substrates are continuously synthesized and destroyed, as occurs in living cells. We show how the kinetic properties of the medium modulate self-propulsion and pairwise interactions between machines, with the latter controlled by a tunable characteristic interaction range analogous to the Debye screening length in an electrolytic solution. Finally, we discuss the effective force arising between interacting machines and possible biological applications, such as partitioning of bacterial plasmids.

  13. Longevity of U cells of differentiated yeast colonies grown on respiratory medium depends on active glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Čáp, Michal; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2015-01-01

    Colonies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains pass through specific developmental phases when growing on solid respiratory medium. During entry into the so-called alkali phase, in which ammonia signaling is initiated, 2 prominent cell types are formed within the colonies: U cells in upper colony regions, which have a longevity phenotype and activate the expression of a large number of metabolic genes, and L cells in lower regions, which die more quickly and exhibit a starvation phenotype. Here, we performed a detailed analysis of the activities of enzymes of central carbon metabolism in lysates of both cell types and determined several fermentation end products, showing that previously reported expression differences are reflected in the different enzymatic capabilities of each cell type. Hence, U cells, despite being grown on respiratory medium, behave as fermenting cells, whereas L cells rely on respiratory metabolism and possess active gluconeogenesis. Using a spectrum of different inhibitors, we showed that glycolysis is essential for the formation, and particularly, the survival of U cells. We also showed that β-1,3-glucans that are released from the cell walls of L cells are the most likely source of carbohydrates for U cells.

  14. Nanocrystals of medium soluble actives--novel concept for improved dermal delivery and production strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-08-15

    After use in oral pharmaceutical products, nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to improve the dermal penetration of cosmetic actives (e.g. rutin, hesperidin) and of drugs. By now, nanocrystals are only dermally applied made from poorly soluble actives. The novel concept is to formulate nanocrystals also from medium soluble actives, and to apply a dermal formulation containing additionally nanocrystals. The nanocrystals should act as fast dissolving depot, increase saturation solubility and especially accumulate in the hair follicles, to further increase skin penetration. Caffeine was used as model compound with relevance to market products, and a particular process was developed for the production of caffeine nanocrystals to overcome the supersaturation related effect of crystal growth and fiber formation - typical with medium soluble compounds. It is based on low energy milling (pearl milling) in combination with low dielectric constant dispersion media (water-ethanol or ethanol-propylene glycol mixtures) and optimal stabilizers. Most successful was Carbopol(®) 981 (e.g. 20% caffeine in ethanol-propylene glycol 3:7 with 2% Carbopol, w/w). Nanocrystals with varied sizes can now be produced in a controlled process e.g. 660 nm (optimal for hair follicle accumulation) to 250 nm (optimal for fast dissolution). The short term test proved stability over 2 months of the present formulation being sufficient to perform in vivo testing of the novel concept.

  15. Medium chain fatty acid ethyl esters - activation of antimicrobial effects by Malassezia enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mayser, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Free medium and short chain fatty acids are known to have broad antimicrobial activity. However, their practical use in topical therapy is limited by their intensive smell and acidity. Surprisingly, a nearly identical antimicrobial effect was found with the ethyl ester derivatives of these fatty acids, but only against Malassezia (M.) yeast, not against Candida spp. Obviously, these esters are hydrolysed by M. enzymes, thus generating a selective activation of antimicrobial activity especially in areas well populated with these yeast ('targeting'). Octanoic acid ethyl ester (CAS 106-32-1) was found to be most suitable. In an agar dilution test, the minimal inhibitory concentrations against M. globosa, M. pachydermatis and M. sympodialis, respectively, ranged between ~5 and 10 mmol l(-1) after 10 days of incubation. The effect started immediately and was not delayed by other lipid sources applied simultaneously. Based on these data, fatty acid monoesters may represent a new therapeutic concept in M.-associated diseases. PMID:25676074

  16. Lasing properties of active medium based on sulforhodamine 101 incorporated into commercial polyurethane compound

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, S V; Pozhar, V V; Dzyubenko, M I

    2011-01-24

    The lasing properties of polymer matrices based on commercial polyurethane compound activated by sulforhodamine 101 dye are studied. Lasing with an efficiency of 26 % and pulse energy of 76 mJ is obtained using microsecond transverse pumping at a wavelength of 587 nm. The service life (time of operation to a decrease in the output energy by 50 % upon excitation by 0.3 J cm{sup -2} pulses) amounts to 2500 pulses. A particular attention is given to the bichromatic lasing spectra of the samples tested. Based on the experimental data a model explaining the two-band emission spectrum is proposed and discussed. (lasers and amplifiers)

  17. Effects of Near-Infrared Laser on Neural Cell Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki-Oda, Noriko; Kataoka, Yosky; Yamada, Hisao; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-08-01

    Near-infrared laser has been used to relieve patients from various kinds of pain caused by postherpetic neuralgesia, myofascial dysfunction, surgical and traumatic wound, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis. Clinically, He-Ne (λ=632.8 nm, 780 nm) and Ga-Al-As (805 ± 25 nm) lasers are used to irradiate trigger points or nerve ganglion. However the precise mechanisms of such biological actions of the laser have not yet been resolved. Since laser therapy is often effective to suppress the pain caused by hyperactive excitation of sensory neurons, interactions with laser light and neural cells are suggested. As neural excitation requires large amount of energy liberated from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), we examined the effect of 830-nm laser irradiation on the energy metabolism of the rat central nervous system and isolated mitochondria from brain. The diode laser was applied for 15 min with irradiance of 4.8 W/cm2 on a 2 mm-diameter spot at the brain surface. Tissue ATP content of the irradiated area in the cerebral cortex was 19 % higher than that of the non-treated area (opposite side of the cortex), whereas the ADP content showed no significant difference. Irradiation at another wavelength (652 nm) had no effect on either ATP or ADP contents. The temperature of the brain tissue was increased 4.5 - 5.0 °C during the irradiation of both 830-nm and 652-nm laser light. Direct irradiation of the mitochondrial suspension did not show any wavelength-dependent acceleration of respiration rate nor ATP synthesis. These results suggest that the increase in tissue ATP content did not result from the thermal effect, but from specific effect of the laser operated at 830 nm. Electrophysiological studies showed the hyperpolarization of membrane potential of isolated neurons and decrease in membrane resistance with irradiation of the laser, suggesting an activation of potassium channels. Intracellular ATP is reported to regulate some kinds of potassium channels. Possible mechanisms

  18. Overview of the laser activities at Rheinmetall Waffe Munition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewigt, Klaus; Riesbeck, Thomas; Schünemann, B.; Graf, A.; Jung, Markus; Schreiber, Th.; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, A.

    2012-11-01

    The paper will give an overview over the laser weapon activities at RWM (Rheinmetall Waffe Munition) over the last years. Starting from the actual scenarios for laser weapon applications as: CRAM (Counter Rocket Artillery Mortar), Air Defence and UXO (unexploded ordnance) clearing. The basic requirements of a future laser weapon as beam diameter, beam quality, tracking capability, adaptive optics were deduced. For the UXO scenario a mobile directed energy laser demonstrator for humanitarian mine and UXO clearing based on fiber lasers is presented. Based on the parameters the system concept including the cooling system, power supply and the integration into the armoured vehicle TM 170 are explained. The contribution show first experiments of UXO and IED clearing. Different technical approaches to achieve laser power in the 100 kW regime combined with very good beam quality are discussed to fulfil the requirements of the CRAM and Air Defence scenario. Spectral coupling and the beam superimposing both are performed by Rheinmetall Waffe Munition. At the spectral coupling the basic technology parameters for the fiber laser and the dielectric grating as the latest results were put into context with the power levels reached at other groups. For the beam super imposing technology the basic experiments regarding the tracking capability and compensation of the atmosphere on the test range at Unterlüß will be explained. A generic 10 kW Laser Weapon Demonstrator based on 2 Laser Weapon Modules (LWM) from RWM each 5 kW fiber Laser with beam forming and tracking integrate by the team of RWM and RAD (Rheinmetall Air Defense) into a Ground based Air Defend system consisting of Skyguard and Millenium turret are presented. The flight path of the UAV within the valley of the life firing range at Ochsenboden Switzerland is shown. Selected results of the successful tests against UAV's are presented. It shows the capability of the generic 10 kW Laser Weapon Demonstrator to track and

  19. Active annular-beam laser autocollimator system.

    PubMed

    Yoder, P R; Schlesinger, E R; Chickvary, J L

    1975-08-01

    An autocollimator using an axicon and a beam expander telescope to generate a 12.5-cm. o.d. annular beam of helium-neon laser light with high (25:1) diameter-to-width ratio has been developed. It is used with a two-axis, electromagnetically actuated mirror assembly to acquire automatically and maintain dynamically autocollimation from a nearby but separately mounted annular mirror. The servo system controls beam alignment even though angular vibratory motions of the annular mirror make it appear to tilt relative to the autocollimator as much as 7 mrad at frequencies below 300 Hz. This paper describes the optical system and the alignment sensing and control system.

  20. Self-imaging of transparent objects and structures in focusing of spatially phase-modulated laser radiation into a weakly absorbing medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bubis, E L

    2011-06-30

    Self-imaging of transparent objects and structures in focusing of a spatially phase-modulated laser beam into an extended weakly absorbing medium is described. The laser power level that is necessary for effective imaging corresponds to the illuminating beam power when thermal self-defocusing starts evolving in the medium. The effect can be described in terms of the ideology of Zernike's classical phase-contrast method. Edge enhancement in visualised images of transparent objects is experimentally demonstrated. Self-imaging of a microscopic object in the form of transparent letters and long-lived refractive-index fluctuations in liquid glycerol is shown. Due to the adaptivity of the process under consideration, unlike the classical case, self-imaging occurs also in the situations where a beam is displaced (undergoes random walk) as a whole in the Fourier plane, for example, in the presence of thermal flows. (image processing)

  1. Organic solid-state lasers based on sexiphenyl as active chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D.; Rabe, T.; Riedl, T.; Dobbertin, T.; Kröger, M.; Becker, E.; Johannes, H.-H.; Kowalsky, W.; Weimann, T.; Wang, J.; Hinze, P.

    2005-08-01

    We report on various sexiphenyl derivatives as gain media in organic solid-state lasers. The molecules involved in this research are simple p-sexiphenyl, the laser dye molecule 2,5,2""',5""'-tetra-t-butyl-p-sexiphenyl (TBS) and the spirolinked sexiphenyl-derivative 2,7-bis(biphenyl-4-yl)-2',7'-di-tert-butyl-9,9'-spirobifluorene. It appears that the morphology of vacuum-deposited thin films is highly dependent on the sterical dimensions of the respective molecules. Whereas thin films based on simple p-sexiphenyl comprise large clusters which significantly deteriorate their waveguiding properties; films formed by TBS, and the spiroderivative show a dramatically improved morphology with reduced surface roughness. Therefore amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and lasing are demonstrated in both of the last but not in films based on p-sexiphenyl. Second-order distributed-feedback lasers with TBS as the active medium have been prepared with an emission between 390 and 435 nm depending on the grating period of the Bragg reflector. While the ASE characteristics are similar in films formed by TBS and the spiroderivative, TBS exhibits even superior laser threshold densities which are as low as 45μJ/cm2 at a wavelength of 396 nm.

  2. Different synchronization characteristics of distinct types of traveling waves in a model of active medium with periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepelev, Igor A.; Slepnev, Andrei V.; Vadivasova, Tatiana E.

    2016-09-01

    The model of a one-dimensional active medium, which cells are the FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators, is studied for periodical boundary conditions. The medium possesses three different regimes in dependence on the parameter values. The regimes correspond to the self-sustained oscillations, excitable dynamics or bistability of the medium cells. Periodic boundary conditions provide the existence of traveling wave modes in all mentioned cases without any deterministic or stochastic excitation. The spatial waveforms and the character of oscillations in time can be similar in the different cases, but the properties of wave modes depend considerably on the medium regime. So, the dispersion characteristics and the synchronization phenomena are essentially different for bistable and excitable media on the one hand, and for the self-sustained oscillatory medium on the other hand. The local and distributed periodic influence on the medium are studied. The phenomenon of the traveling wave frequency locking is observed for all three regimes of the active medium. The comparison of synchronization effects in self-oscillatory, excitable and bistable regimes of the active medium is carried out.

  3. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fugui; Li, Ming; Gao, Lidan; Sheng, Weifan; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-06-15

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as the subnanometer scale and that the variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a one-dimensional surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach toward effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques.

  4. Stories from Laser Camp: outreach activities for kids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourangeau, Derek; Simoneau, James

    2010-08-01

    Often in the ever-expanding community of Optics and Photonics, what we do remains a mystery to the outside world. The technology created by our community permeates the lives of every citizen yet is taken for granted due to unfamiliarity. At Three Rivers Community College (TRCC), we have taken steps to rectify that situation. The college's Laser and Fiber Optic Technology program (LFOT) and the TRCC student chapter of SPIE run many outreach activities, the most successful of which is Laser Camp. This paper will present a comprehensive overview of Laser Camp from the students' aspect with testimonials, discussion of the optics themed activities and provide a view of the SPIE members' journey.

  5. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fugui; Li, Ming; Gao, Lidan; Sheng, Weifan; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-06-15

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as the subnanometer scale and that the variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a one-dimensional surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach toward effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques. PMID:27304296

  6. Lasers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schewe, Phillip F.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the nature of laser light. Topics include: (1) production and characteristics of laser light; (2) nine types of lasers; (3) five laser techniques including holography; (4) laser spectroscopy; and (5) laser fusion and other applications. (SK)

  7. Cell Motility Is Decreased in Macrophages Activated by Cancer Cell-Conditioned Medium

    PubMed Central

    Go, Ahreum; Ryu, Yun-Kyoung; Lee, Jae-Wook; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages play a role in innate immune responses to various foreign antigens. Many products from primary tumors influence the activation and transmigration of macrophages. Here, we investigated a migration of macrophages stimulated with cancer cell culture-conditioned medium (CM). Macrophage activation by treatment with CM of B16F10 cells were judged by the increase in protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). The location where macrophages were at 4 h-incubation with control medium or CM was different from where they were at 5 h-incubation in culture dish. Percentage of superimposed macrophages at every 1 h interval was gradually increased by CM treatment as compared to control. Total coverage of migrated track expressed in coordinates was smaller and total distance of migration was shorter in CM-treated macrophages than that in control. Rac1 activity in CM-treated macrophages was also decreased as compared to that in control. When macrophages were treated with CM in the presence of dexamethasone (Dex), an increase in COX2 protein levels, and a decrease in Rac1 activity and total coverage of migration were reversed. In the meanwhile, biphasic changes were detected by Dex treatment in section distance of migration at each time interval, which was more decreased at early time and then increased at later time. Taken together, data demonstrate that macrophage motility could be reduced in accordance with activation in response to cancer cell products. It suggests that macrophage motility could be a novel marker to monitor cancer-associated inflammatory diseases and the efficacy of anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:24404340

  8. Comparison of Alexandrite and Diode Lasers for Hair Removal in Dark and Medium Skin: Which is Better?

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Farhad Hamad; Jaafar, Mohamad Suhimi; Ismail, Asaad Hamid; Mutter, Kussay Nugamesh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To improve laser hair removal (LHR) for dark skin, the fluence rate reaching the hair follicle in LHR is important. This paper presents the results of a comparative study examining the function of wavelength on dark skin types using 755 nm alexandrite and 810 nm diode lasers. Methods: The structure of the skin was created using a realistic skin model by the Advanced Systems Analysis Program. Result: In this study, the alexandrite laser (755 nm) and diode laser (810 nm) beam–skin tissue interactions were simulated. The simulation results for both lasers differed. The transmission ratio of the diode laser to the dark skin dermis was approximately 4% more than that of the alexandrite laser for the same skin type. For the diode laser at skin depth z = 0.67 mm, the average transmission ratios of both samples were 36% and 27.5%, but those for the alexandrite laser at the same skin depth were 32% and 25%. Conclusion: Both lasers were suitable in LHR for dark skin types, but the diode laser was better than the alexandrite laser because the former could penetrate deeper into the dermis layer. PMID:25653820

  9. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications. PMID:27036765

  10. Development of a compact vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser end-pumped actively Q-switched laser for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuo; Liu, Lei; Chen, Rongzhang; Nelsen, Bryan; Huang, Xi; Lu, Yongfeng; Chen, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a compact and portable actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and its applications in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The laser was end-pumped by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The cavity lases at a wavelength of 1064 nm and produced pulses of 16 ns with a maximum pulse energy of 12.9 mJ. The laser exhibits a reliable performance in terms of pulse-to-pulse stability and timing jitter. The LIBS experiments were carried out using this laser on NIST standard alloy samples. Shot-to-shot LIBS signal stability, crater profile, time evolution of emission spectra, plasma electron density and temperature, and limits of detection were studied and reported in this paper. The test results demonstrate that the VCSEL-pumped solid-state laser is an effective and compact laser tool for laser remote sensing applications.

  11. Dual-wavelength polymer laser based on an active/inactive/active sandwich-like structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Tianrui; Wu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Meng; Tong, Fei; Li, Songtao; Ma, Yanbin; Deng, Jinxiang; Zhang, Xinping

    2016-09-01

    Dual-wavelength laser emission is achieved by using an active/inactive/active sandwich-like structure, which can be conveniently fabricated using spin coating technique. Poly [(9, 9-dioctylfluorenyl-2, 7-diyl)-alt-co-(1, 4-benzo-(2, 1', 3) -thiadiazole)] and polyvinyl alcohol are employed as the active and the inactive materials, respectively. Two laser wavelengths are simultaneously observed, which are attributed to the difference of the surrounding refractive index of two active waveguides in the sandwich-like structure. Each wavelength is controlled by the respective waveguide structure, meaning that multi-wavelength laser can be designed by stacking the active/inactive layer pair. These results provide more flexibility to design compact laser sources.

  12. Frequency signature of water activity by biospeckle laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Rafael Rodrigues; Costa, Anderson Gomide; Nobre, Cassia Marques Batista; Braga, Roberto Alves

    2011-04-01

    Biospeckle laser technique has become an important tool to investigate biological activity in several areas of science. However, due to the complexity of biological materials it is necessary to develop research processes that ensure greater efficiency in isolating areas of different activities in the same material using the biospeckle. Thus, alternative techniques, such as those related to spectral domain, allow approaches that provide a means for frequency and isolation marking of various observed phenomena. The possibility of creating frequency markers related to physical or chemical phenomena under biospeckle laser monitoring opens the way for important applications in the analysis of biological materials. In seeds, for example, one research challenge is the creation of a methodology to analyze their vigor undermining the influence of water activity. This study aimed to use wavelet transform to create maps in frequency of biological material, particularly from maize and bean seeds, seeking to isolate water activity. Wavelet transform was used in conjunction with traditional biospeckle laser methods, Fujii, Generalized Differences and Time History Speckle Patterns. The data analysis allowed access of information in different frequencies, making it possible to map activities that only occur at certain frequencies in the seeds associated to particular areas they operate, as in the case of activities present in the embryo as well as those present in the endosperm. Thus the work enabled the identification of frequency bands where water activity may be operating creating a signature useful in further works.

  13. Tetravalent chromium (Cr(4+)) as laser-active ion for tunable solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    Generation of femtosecond pulses from a continuous-wave mode-locked chromium-doped forsterite (Cr(4+):Mg2SiO4) laser has been accomplished. The forsterite laser was actively mode-locked using an acousto-optic modulator operating at 78 MHz with two Brewster high-dispersion glass prisms for intra-cavity chirp compensation. Transform-limited sub-100-fs pulses were routinely generated in the TEM(sub 00) mode with 85 mW of continuous power (with 1 percent output coupler), tunable over 1230-1280 nm. The shortest pulses of 60-fs pulsewidth were measured.

  14. Active media for tunable lasers based on hybrid polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Kopylova, T N; Eremina, N S; Vaitulevich, E A; Samsonova, L G; Maier, G V; Tel'minov, E N; Solodova, T A; Solodov, A M

    2008-02-28

    The lasing properties of rhodamine 6G (chloride and perchlorate) in synthesised hybrid polymers based on an organic polymer (methyl methacrylate with hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and an inorganic precursor (tetraethoxysilane) are studied. Rhodamine 6G samples were transversely pumped by the second harmonic of a Nd{sup 3+}:YAG laser. It is found that the active media based on hybrid polymers have a considerably longer service life compared to the active media based on organic polymers. The structure of the hybrid polymer is studied by the methods of IR Fourier spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetry. It is shown that the longer service life of hybrid-polymer active media is explained by the formation of an inorganic nanostructure network in them, which improves the thermooptic properties of the material and reduces the efficiency of thermal decomposition of active molecules. (lasers. amplifiers)

  15. Active Wavelength Control of an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tracy; Wysocki, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    We present an active wavelength control system for grating-based external cavity lasers that increases the accuracy of predicting the lasing wavelength based on the grating equation and significantly improves scan-to-scan wavelength/frequency repeatability. The ultimate 3σ precision of a frequency scan is determined by the scan-to-scan repeatability of 0.042 cm−1. Since this control method can be applied to any external cavity laser with little to no modification, such a precision provides an excellent opportunity for spectroscopic applications that target molecular absorption lines at standard atmospheric conditions. PMID:23483850

  16. Dissipative soliton in actively mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixin; Dai, Yitang; Yan, Li; Wu, Jian; Xu, Kun; Li, Yan; Lin, Jintong

    2012-03-12

    A dissipative soliton in an all-normal-dispersion actively mode-locked ytterbium-doped fiber laser is reported for the first time. Pulses with 10-ps duration and edge-to-edge bandwidth of 9 nm are generated, and then extra-cavity compressed down to 560 fs due to the large chirp. Widely wavelength tuning between 1031 and 1080 nm is achieved by adjusting the driving frequency only. Our simulation shows that the proposed laser operates in the dissipative soliton shaping regime.

  17. Taming random lasers through active spatial control of the pump.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, N; Andreasen, J; Gigan, S; Sebbah, P

    2012-07-20

    Active control of the spatial pump profile is proposed to exercise control over random laser emission. We demonstrate numerically the selection of any desired lasing mode from the emission spectrum. An iterative optimization method is employed, first in the regime of strong scattering where modes are spatially localized and can be easily selected using local pumping. Remarkably, this method works efficiently even in the weakly scattering regime, where strong spatial overlap of the modes precludes spatial selectivity. A complex optimized pump profile is found, which selects the desired lasing mode at the expense of others, thus demonstrating the potential of pump shaping for robust and controllable single mode operation of a random laser.

  18. Taming Random Lasers through Active Spatial Control of the Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelard, N.; Andreasen, J.; Gigan, S.; Sebbah, P.

    2012-07-01

    Active control of the spatial pump profile is proposed to exercise control over random laser emission. We demonstrate numerically the selection of any desired lasing mode from the emission spectrum. An iterative optimization method is employed, first in the regime of strong scattering where modes are spatially localized and can be easily selected using local pumping. Remarkably, this method works efficiently even in the weakly scattering regime, where strong spatial overlap of the modes precludes spatial selectivity. A complex optimized pump profile is found, which selects the desired lasing mode at the expense of others, thus demonstrating the potential of pump shaping for robust and controllable single mode operation of a random laser.

  19. Dependence of synchronized bursting activity on medium stirring and the perfusion rate in a cultured network of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Ryoun; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2016-05-01

    A cultured network of neurons coupled with a multi-electrode-array (MEA) recording system has been a useful platform for investigating various issues in neuroscience and engineering. The neural activity supported by the system can be sensitive to environmental fluctuations, for example, in the medium's nutrient composition, ph, and temperature, and to mechanical disturbances, yet this issue has not been the subject. Especially, a normal practice in maintaining neuronal cell cultures involves an intermittent sequence of medium exchanges, typically at a time interval of a few days, and one such sudden medium exchange is unavoidably accompanied by many unintended disturbances. Here, based on a quantitative time-series analysis of synchronized bursting events, we explicitly demonstrate that such a medium exchange can, indeed, bring a huge change in the existing neural activity. Subsequently, we develop a medium perfusion-stirring system and an ideal protocol that can be used in conjunction with a MEA recording system, providing long-term stability. Specifically, we systematically evaluate the effects of medium stirring and perfusion rates. Unexpectedly, even some vigorous mechanical agitations do not have any impacts on neural activity. On the other hand, too much replenishment ( e.g., 1.8 ml/day for a 1.8-ml dish) of neurobasal medium results in an excitotoxicity.

  20. Laser active thermography for non-destructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semerok, A.; Grisolia, C.; Fomichev, S. V.; Thro, P.-Y.

    2013-11-01

    Thermography methods have found their applications in different fields of human activity. The non-destructive feature of these methods along with the additional advantage by automated remote control and tests of nuclear installations without personnel attendance in the contaminated zone are of particular interest. Laser active pyrometry and laser lock-in thermography for in situ non-destructive characterization of micrometric layers on graphite substrates from European tokamaks were under extensive experimental and theoretical studies in CEA (France). The studies were aimed to obtain layer characterization with cross-checking the layer thermal contact coefficients determined by active laser pyrometry and lock-in thermography. The experimental installation comprised a Nd-YAG pulsed repetition rate laser (1 Hz - 10 kHz repetition rate frequency, homogeneous spot) and a home-made pyrometer system based on two pyrometers for the temperature measurements in 500 - 2600 K range. For both methods, the layer characterization was provided by the best fit of the experimental results and simulations. The layer thermal contact coefficients determined by both methods were quite comparable. Though there was no gain in the measurements accuracy, lock-in measurements have proved their advantage as being much more rapid. The obtained experimental and theoretical results are presented. Some practical applications and possible improvements of the methods are discussed.

  1. Antitumor effect of synergistic contribution of nitrite and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma activated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurake, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Mizuno, Masaaki; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas (NEAPP) have been attracted attention in the noble application of cancer therapy. Although good effects of the Plasma-Activated-Medium (PAM) such as the selective antitumor effect and killing effect for the anticancer agent resistant cells were reported, a mechanism of this effect has not been still clarified yet. In this study, we have investigated a contribution of the reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNOS) generated in PAM such as hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. Those species generated in the PAM quantitatively measured by light absorbance of commercial regent. Moreover, viable cell count after cell culture with those RNOS intentionally added medium or PAM were also measured by MTS assay. Our NEAPP source generated hydrogen peroxide and nitrite with the generation ratio of 0.35 μM/s and 9.8 μM/s. In those RNOS, hydrogen peroxide has respective antitumor effect. On the other hands, nitrite has no antitumor effect singly. But, synergistically enhance the antitumor effect of hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, this effect of those RNOS also contribute for the selectively cancer killing effect of PAM.

  2. Dermal nanocrystals from medium soluble actives - physical stability and stability affecting parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to increase the dermal penetration of drugs, but were applied by now only to poorly soluble drugs (e.g. 1-10 μg/ml). As a new concept nanocrystals from medium soluble actives were produced, using caffeine as model compound (solubility 16 mg/ml at 20 °C). Penetration should be increased by (a) further increase in solubility and (b) mainly by increased hair follicle targeting of nanocrystals compared to pure solution. Caffeine nanocrystal production in water lead to pronounced crystal growth. Therefore the stability of nanocrystals in water-ethanol (1:9) and ethanol-propylene glycol (3:7) mixtures with lower dielectric constant D was investigated, using various stabilizers. Both mixtures in combination with Carbopol 981 (non-neutralized) yielded stable nanosuspensions over 2 months at 4 °C and room temperature. Storage at 40 °C lead to crystal growth, attributed to too strong solubility increase, supersaturation and Ostwald ripening effects. Stability of caffeine nanocrystals at lower temperatures could not only be attributed to lower solubility, because the solubilities of caffeine in mixtures and in water are not that much different. Other effects such as quantified by reduced dielectric constant D, and specific interactions between dispersion medium and crystal surface seem to play a role. With the 2 mixtures and Carbopol 981, a basic formulation composition for this type of nanocrystals has been established, to be used in the in vivo proof of principle of the new concept.

  3. Dermal nanocrystals from medium soluble actives - physical stability and stability affecting parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xuezhen; Lademann, Jürgen; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2014-09-01

    Nanocrystals are meanwhile applied to increase the dermal penetration of drugs, but were applied by now only to poorly soluble drugs (e.g. 1-10 μg/ml). As a new concept nanocrystals from medium soluble actives were produced, using caffeine as model compound (solubility 16 mg/ml at 20 °C). Penetration should be increased by (a) further increase in solubility and (b) mainly by increased hair follicle targeting of nanocrystals compared to pure solution. Caffeine nanocrystal production in water lead to pronounced crystal growth. Therefore the stability of nanocrystals in water-ethanol (1:9) and ethanol-propylene glycol (3:7) mixtures with lower dielectric constant D was investigated, using various stabilizers. Both mixtures in combination with Carbopol 981 (non-neutralized) yielded stable nanosuspensions over 2 months at 4 °C and room temperature. Storage at 40 °C lead to crystal growth, attributed to too strong solubility increase, supersaturation and Ostwald ripening effects. Stability of caffeine nanocrystals at lower temperatures could not only be attributed to lower solubility, because the solubilities of caffeine in mixtures and in water are not that much different. Other effects such as quantified by reduced dielectric constant D, and specific interactions between dispersion medium and crystal surface seem to play a role. With the 2 mixtures and Carbopol 981, a basic formulation composition for this type of nanocrystals has been established, to be used in the in vivo proof of principle of the new concept. PMID:25016978

  4. Laser activated nanothermolysis of leukemia cells monitored by photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova, Ekaterina; Shnip, Alexander; Zheltov, George; Potapnev, Michail; Savitsky, Valeriy; Klimovich, Olga; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2005-04-01

    We are developing new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies for leukemia based on selective targeting of leukemia cells with gold nanoparticles and thermomechanical destruction of the tumor cells with laser-induced microbubbles. Clusters of spherical gold nanoparticles that have strong optical absorption of laser pulses at 532 nm served as nucleation sites of vapor microbubbles. The nanoparticles were targeted selectively to leukemia cells using leukemia-specific surface receptors and a set of two monoclonal antibodies. Application of a primary myeloid-specific antibody to tumor cells followed by targeting the cells with 30-nm nanoparticles conjugated with a secondary antibody (IgG) resulted in formation of nanoparticulate clusters due to aggregation of IgGs. Formation of clusters resulted in substantial decrease of the damage threshold for target cells. The results encourage development of Laser Activated Nanothermolysis as a Cell Elimination Therapy (LANCET) for leukemia. The proposed technology can be applied separately or in combination with chemotherapy for killing leukemia cells without damage to other blood cells. Potential applications include initial reduction of concentration of leukemia cells in blood prior to chemotherapy and treatment of residual tumor cells after the chemotherapy. Laser-induced bubbles in individual cells and cell damage were monitored by analyzing profile of photothermal response signals over the entire cell after irradiation with a single 10-ns long laser pulse. Photothermal microscopy was utilized for imaging formation of microbubbles around nanoparticulate clusters.

  5. Is excessive online usage a function of medium or activity? An empirical pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Mark D.; Szabo, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Aims: The purpose of the study was to seek a better insight into whether the online medium or the online activity was more important in relation to excessive online use. It is not clear whether those people who spend excessive amounts of time on the Internet are engaged in general Internet or whether excessive Internet use is linked to specific activities. Methods: Perceived changes in Internet use habits as function of hypothetical accessibility of favorite sites were investigated in young adults. University students (n = 130, mean age = 20.6 years) who had (on average) spent over 20 hours a week on the Internet for at least nine years completed a survey. The most favored online activities and expected quality of life without Internet access were also investigated. Results: Findings revealed that social networking was by far the most popular online activity, and that lack of access to their preferred online activities would drop by 65% (as measured by perceived Internet usage). Approximately one in six participants (16%) claimed they would not even switch on the computer if access to their favorite online activities were unavailable. In relation to a hypothetical question about the quality of life without Internet access, the responses were normally distributed (rather than skewed). Conclusions: These results show that time spent with Internet activity is not random and/or generalized, but appears more focused. Attraction or addiction on Internet to one or more specific behavior(s) may be a better way forward in the quest for better understanding excessive human behavior in the online environment. PMID:25215216

  6. Enhancement of Cellulase Activity from a New Strain of Bacillus subtilis by Medium Optimization and Analysis with Various Cellulosic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Deka, Deepmoni; Bhargavi, P.; Sharma, Ashish; Goyal, Dinesh; Jawed, M.; Goyal, Arun

    2011-01-01

    The cellulase activity of Bacillus subtilis AS3 was enhanced by optimizing the medium composition by statistical methods. The enzyme activity with unoptimised medium with carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) was 0.07 U/mL and that was significantly enhanced by CMC, peptone, and yeast extract using Placket-Burman design. The combined effects of these nutrients on cellulase activity were studied using 22 full factorial central composite design. The optimal levels of medium components determined were CMC (1.8%), peptone (0.8%), and yeast extract (0.479%). The maximum enzyme activity predicted by the model was 0.49 U/mL which was in good agreement with the experimental value 0.43 U/mL showing 6-fold increase as compared to unoptimised medium. The enzyme showed multisubstrate specificity, showing significantly higher activity with lichenan and β-glucan and lower activity with laminarin, hydroxyethylcellulose, and steam exploded bagasse. The optimised medium with lichenan or β-glucan showed 2.5- or 2.8-fold higher activity, respectively, at same concentration as of CMC. PMID:21637325

  7. Variable susceptibility of ovarian cancer cells to non-thermal plasma-activated medium

    PubMed Central

    UTSUMI, FUMI; KAJIYAMA, HIROAKI; NAKAMURA, KAE; TANAKA, HIROMASA; MIZUNO, MASAAKI; TOYOKUNI, SHINNYA; HORI, MASARU; KIKKAWA, FUMITAKA

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma has been widely studied in recent years in many fields, including cancer treatment. However, its efficiency for inducing apoptosis sometimes varies depending on the cell species and experimental conditions. The aim of this study was to elucidate what causes these differences in responses to plasma treatment. Using four ovarian cancer cell lines, the cell density had a markedly negative impact on the proliferation inhibition rate (PIR) and it was more obvious in OVCAR-3 and NOS2 cells. Furthermore, TOV21G and ES-2 cells were drastically sensitive to plasma-activated medium (PAM) compared with the other two cell lines. We demonstrated that the proportion of reactive oxygen species and cell number had a marked impact on the effect of PAM against ovarian cancer cells. Additionally it was suggested that the morphological features of cells were also closely related PMID:27035127

  8. Chemical properties and antioxidant activity of exopolysaccharides fractions from mycelial culture of Inonotus obliquus in a ground corn stover medium.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuling; Xu, Xiangqun; Li, Juan

    2012-10-15

    The medicinal mushroom Inonotus obliquus has been a folk remedy for a long time in East-European and Asian countries. We first reported the enhancement in production and antioxidant activity of exopolysaccharides by I. obliquus culture under lignocellulose decomposition. In this study, the two different sources of exopolysaccharides from the control medium and the lignocellulose (corn stover) containing medium by I. obliquus in submerged fermentation were fractionated and purified by chromatography. The exopolysaccharides from the corn stover-containing medium presented significantly stronger hydroxyl and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity than the control. Three fractions from the control medium and the corn stover-containing medium were isolated respectively. The fraction of DEPL3 from the corn stover-containing medium with the highest protein content (38.3%), mannose content (49.6%), and the lowest molecular weight (29 kDa) had the highest antioxidant activity with the lowest IC50 values. In conclusion, lignocellulose decomposition changed the chemical characterisation and significantly enhanced the antioxidant activity of exopolysaccharide fractions.

  9. Assessment of highly active dune mobility in the medium, short and very short term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Marina; Muñoz-Pérez, Juan J.; Román-Sierra, Jorge; Tsoar, Haim; Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Gómez-Pina, Gregorio

    2011-06-01

    Dune activity or stability has usually been studied over long time periods; however, this may not reflect changes that occur in the short term, especially for highly active dunefields. Extreme wind conditions that are generated near the Strait of Gibraltar (SW Spain) have given rise to the transgressive Valdevaqueros dunefield. The current work focuses on analyzing the sand drift potential and the evolution of the dune profile in the medium term (months), the short term (days) and the very short term (hours). Topographic data, which were collected with a differential GPS, were interpreted from reconstructed empirical orthogonal functions (EOF). The results showed that generally the dune profile presented shifting morphologies, especially around the crest and brink, and a trend towards migration to a gentler steady state. As a result, the leeward side adopted continuous slope variations during the different survey periods, whereas the windward slope did not undergo any significant change. Lateral and vertical displacements were analyzed during a severe easterly sandstorm, when the dune brink experienced an advance migration rate of 1.75 m in 24 h. Sand transport rates of 25.5-36.5 m 3 m - 1 month - 1 , 22.52 m 3 m - 1 day - 1 and 0.93 m 3 m - 1 h - 1 were measured for the medium term, short term and very short term, respectively. These values were compared to the theoretical sand transport rate for Valdevaqueros dune, based on the classic Bagnold equation as well other more recent formulae, to obtain a ratio between the real and the theoretical rates for each study period. These results together with the sand drift potential (up to 10,000 vector units) demonstrate that Valdevaqueros (Tarifa) is a dunefield with one of the highest sand transport capacities in Europe.

  10. Laser light triggered-activated carbon nanosystem for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Maoquan; Peng, Jinliang; Zhao, Jiajia; Liang, Shanlu; Shao, Yuxiang; Wu, Qiang

    2013-02-01

    Among carbon-based nanomaterials, activated carbon (AC) may be an ideal candidate as a carrier for tumor therapeutic agents. Here we found a new property of nanoscale activated carbon (NAC) with narrow size distribution, namely the rapid conversion of light to thermal energy both in vitro and in vivo. An aqueous suspension of 200 μL of NAC (1 mg/mL) exhibited a rapid temperature increase of more than 35 °C after irradiation for 20 min with a 655-nm laser; this was within the temperature range for effective tumor treatment. We demonstrated that lung cancer cells (H-1299) incubated with bamboo nano-AC (BNAC) were killed with high efficiency after laser irradiation. In addition, mouse tumors with sizes smaller than the laser spot that had been injected with BNAC disappeared after irradiation. For tumors larger than the laser spot area, the incorporation of the photosensitizer ZnPc obviously increased the tumor growth inhibition efficiency of BNAC. BNAC-ZnPc was found to exhibit a synergistic effect when photothermal and photodynamic therapies were administered in combination. These results indicated that NAC can be used for high efficiency cancer phototherapy.

  11. Kinetics of an oxygen - iodine active medium with iodine atoms optically pumped on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, M. V.; Malyshev, M. S.; Azyazov, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    The kinetics of the processes occurring in an O2 - I2 - He - H2O gas flow in which photodissociation of molecular iodine at a wavelength close to 500 nm and excitation of atomic iodine on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition by narrow-band radiation near 1315 nm are implemented successively has been analysed. It is shown that implementation of these processes allows one to form an oxygen - iodine medium with a high degree of dissociation of molecular iodine and a relative content of singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ) exceeding 10%. Having formed a supersonic gas flow with a temperature ~100 K from this medium, one can reach a small-signal gain of about 10-2 cm-1 on the 2P1/2 - 2P3/2 transition in iodine atoms. The specific power per unit flow cross section in the oxygen - iodine laser with this active medium may reach ~100 W cm-2.

  12. Coupled-resonator vertical-cavity lasers with two active gain regions

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-05-20

    A new class of coupled-resonator vertical-cavity semiconductor lasers has been developed. These lasers have multiple resonant cavities containing regions of active laser media, resulting in a multi-terminal laser component with a wide range of novel properties.

  13. GABAA receptor activity shapes the formation of inhibitory synapses between developing medium spiny neurons

    PubMed Central

    Arama, Jessica; Abitbol, Karine; Goffin, Darren; Fuchs, Celine; Sihra, Talvinder S.; Thomson, Alex M.; Jovanovic, Jasmina N.

    2015-01-01

    Basal ganglia play an essential role in motor coordination and cognitive functions. The GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) account for ~95% of all the neurons in this brain region. Central to the normal functioning of MSNs is integration of synaptic activity arriving from the glutamatergic corticostriatal and thalamostriatal afferents, with synaptic inhibition mediated by local interneurons and MSN axon collaterals. In this study we have investigated how the specific types of GABAergic synapses between the MSNs develop over time, and how the activity of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) influences this development. Isolated embryonic (E17) MSNs form a homogenous population in vitro and display spontaneous synaptic activity and functional properties similar to their in vivo counterparts. In dual whole-cell recordings of synaptically connected pairs of MSNs, action potential (AP)-activated synaptic events were detected between 7 and 14 days in vitro (DIV), which coincided with the shift in GABAAR operation from depolarization to hyperpolarization, as detected indirectly by intracellular calcium imaging. In parallel, the predominant subtypes of inhibitory synapses, which innervate dendrites of MSNs and contain GABAAR α1 or α2 subunits, underwent distinct changes in the size of postsynaptic clusters, with α1 becoming smaller and α2 larger over time, while both the percentage and the size of mixed α1/α2-postsynaptic clusters were increased. When activity of GABAARs was under chronic blockade between 4–7 DIV, the structural properties of these synapses remained unchanged. In contrast, chronic inhibition of GABAARs between 7–14 DIV led to reduction in size of α1- and α1/α2-postsynaptic clusters and a concomitant increase in number and size of α2-postsynaptic clusters. Thus, the main subtypes of GABAergic synapses formed by MSNs are regulated by GABAAR activity, but in opposite directions, and thus appear to be driven by different molecular mechanisms. PMID

  14. Tetravalent chromium (Cr(4+)) as laser-active ion for tunable solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1993-01-01

    Major accomplishments under NASA grant NAG-1-1346 are summarized. (1) numerical modeling of the four mirror astigmatically compensated, Z-fold cavity was performed and several design parameters to be used for the construction of a femtosecond forsterite laser were revealed by simulation. (2) femtosecond pulses from a continuous wave mode-locked chromium doped forsterite laser were generated. The forsterite laser was actively mode-locked using an acousto-optic modulator operating at 78 MHz with two Brewster high dispersion glass prisms for intra-cavity chirp compensation. Transform-limited sub-100-fs pulses were routinely generated in the TEM(sub 00) mode with 85 mW of continuous power tunable over 1230-1280 nm. The shortest pulses of 60-fs pulsewidth were measured. (3) Self-mode-locked operation of the Cr:forsterite laser was achieved. Synchronous pumping was used to mode lock the forsterite laser resulting in picosecond pulses, which in turn provided the starting mechanism for self-mode-locking. The pulses generated had an FWHM of 105 fs and were tunable between 1230-1270 nm. (4) Numerical calculations indicated that the pair of SF 14 prisms used in the cavity compensated for quadratic phase but introduced a large cubic phase term. Further calculations of other optical glasses indicated that a pair of SFN 64 prisms can introduce the same amount of quadratic phase as SF 14 prisms but introduce a smaller cubic phase. When the SF 14 prisms were replaced by SFN 64 prisms the pulsewidth was reduced to 50 fs. Great improvement was observed in the stability of the self mode-locked forsterite laser and in the ease of achieving mode locking. Using the same experimental arrangement and a new forsterite crystal with improved FOM the pulse width was reduced to 36 fs.

  15. Effects of cultural medium on the formation and antitumor activity of polysaccharides by Cordyceps gunnii.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen-Yuan; Liu, Xiao-Cui; Tang, Ya-Li; Dong, Feng-Ying; Sun, Hui-Qing; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Yong-Min

    2016-10-01

    The effects of culture medium composition (i.e., carbon and nitrogen sources) on the growth of mycelia, molecular weight distribution and antitumor activity of intracellular polysaccharides (IPS) from Cordyceps gunnii were investigated. Sucrose and peptone were proved to be the best carbon and nitrogen sources for mycelia growth and remarkably improved IPS production. When the sucrose concentration was 2.0%, the mycelium yield reached up to 15.94±1.26 g/L, but with lower IPS yield; whereas the sucrose concentration was 4.5%, IPS yield reached to a maximum of 138.78±3.89 mg/100 mL. The effects of different carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios with equal amounts of carbon source matter on the mycelia and IPS formation were optimized. It found that the yield of mycelia and IPS were both reached to the highest at a C/N ratio of 10:3. In addition, the IPS had the highest macro molecular polysaccharide content and antitumor activity when sucrose concentration was 3.5% and the C/N ratio was 10:1.5. Thus, there was a positive correlation between molecular weight distribution and antitumor activity of IPS by C. gunnii. PMID:27074949

  16. Serratia marcescens Quinoprotein Glucose Dehydrogenase Activity Mediates Medium Acidification and Inhibition of Prodigiosin Production by Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Fender, James E.; Bender, Cody M.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Lahr, Roni M.; Kalivoda, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is a model organism for the study of secondary metabolites. The biologically active pigment prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodiginine), like many other secondary metabolites, is inhibited by growth in glucose-rich medium. Whereas previous studies indicated that this inhibitory effect was pH dependent and did not require cyclic AMP (cAMP), there is no information on the genes involved in mediating this phenomenon. Here we used transposon mutagenesis to identify genes involved in the inhibition of prodigiosin by glucose. Multiple genetic loci involved in quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) activity were found to be required for glucose inhibition of prodigiosin production, including pyrroloquinoline quinone and ubiquinone biosynthetic genes. Upon assessing whether the enzymatic products of GDH activity were involved in the inhibitory effect, we observed that d-glucono-1,5-lactone and d-gluconic acid, but not d-gluconate, were able to inhibit prodigiosin production. These data support a model in which the oxidation of d-glucose by quinoprotein GDH initiates a reduction in pH that inhibits prodigiosin production through transcriptional control of the prodigiosin biosynthetic operon, providing new insight into the genetic pathways that control prodigiosin production. Strains generated in this report may be useful in large-scale production of secondary metabolites. PMID:22752173

  17. High-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of four active galaxies - Probing the intercloud medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lum, Kenneth S. K.; Canizares, Claude R.; Markert, Thomas H.; Arnaud, Keith A.

    1990-07-01

    The focal plane crystal spectrometer (FPCS) on the Einstein Observatory has been used to perform a high-resolution spectroscopic search for oxygen X-ray line emission from four active galaxies: Fairall 9, Mrk 421, Mrk 501, and PKS 0548 - 322. Specifically, O VIII Ly-alpha and Ly-beta, whose unredshifted energies are 653 and 775 eV, respectively, were sought. No narrow-line emission was detected within the energy bands searched. Upper limits are calculated on the line flux from these sources of 30 eV equivalent width and use a photoionization model to place corresponding upper limits on the densities of diffuse gas surrounding the active nuclei. The upper limits on gas density range from about 0.02-50/cu cm and probe various radial distances from the central source. This is the first time high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy has been used to place constraints on the intercloud medium in active galaxies.

  18. Serratia marcescens quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase activity mediates medium acidification and inhibition of prodigiosin production by glucose.

    PubMed

    Fender, James E; Bender, Cody M; Stella, Nicholas A; Lahr, Roni M; Kalivoda, Eric J; Shanks, Robert M Q

    2012-09-01

    Serratia marcescens is a model organism for the study of secondary metabolites. The biologically active pigment prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodiginine), like many other secondary metabolites, is inhibited by growth in glucose-rich medium. Whereas previous studies indicated that this inhibitory effect was pH dependent and did not require cyclic AMP (cAMP), there is no information on the genes involved in mediating this phenomenon. Here we used transposon mutagenesis to identify genes involved in the inhibition of prodigiosin by glucose. Multiple genetic loci involved in quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) activity were found to be required for glucose inhibition of prodigiosin production, including pyrroloquinoline quinone and ubiquinone biosynthetic genes. Upon assessing whether the enzymatic products of GDH activity were involved in the inhibitory effect, we observed that d-glucono-1,5-lactone and d-gluconic acid, but not d-gluconate, were able to inhibit prodigiosin production. These data support a model in which the oxidation of d-glucose by quinoprotein GDH initiates a reduction in pH that inhibits prodigiosin production through transcriptional control of the prodigiosin biosynthetic operon, providing new insight into the genetic pathways that control prodigiosin production. Strains generated in this report may be useful in large-scale production of secondary metabolites.

  19. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-01-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc.

  20. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I.; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-01-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc. PMID:27461819

  1. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I.; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-07-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc.

  2. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-01-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc. PMID:27461819

  3. Enhanced esterification activity through interfacial activation and cross-linked immobilization mechanism of Rhizopus oryzae lipase in a nonaqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Funda

    2016-07-01

    Interfacial activation via surfactant (Tween 80, Triton X-100) treatment was conducted to improve the esterification activity of Rhizopus oryzae lipase that had undergone immobilization through cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEA®) technique. Surfactant pretreated immobilized enzymes exhibited better esterification activity compared to free and non-pretreated immobilized enzyme (Control CLEAs) since higher conversion rates were obtained within shorter times. The superiority of surfactant pretreated CLEAs, especially Tween 80 pretreated CLEAs (T 80 PT CLEAs), were clearly pronounced when longer alcohols were used as substrates. Conversion values exceeded 90% for octyl octanoate, oleyl octanoate and oleyl oleate synthesis with T 80 PT CLEAs whereas Control CLEAs and free enzyme showed no activity. Maximum conversions were achieved in the case equal molars of the substrates or in the case excess of the alcohol to acid in cyclohexane. In solvent free medium containing equal molars of substrates the conversion rates were 85% and 87% with T 80 PT CLEAs respectively for octyl octanoate and oleyl oleate within 2 hours. T 80 PT CLEAs showed 59% of its original activity after 7 consecutive usage for oleyl oleate synthesis. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:899-904, 2016. PMID:27111483

  4. Use of dyes in solid medium for screening ligninolytic activity of selective actinomycetes

    SciTech Connect

    Chahal, D.S.; Kluepfel, D.; Morosoli, R.

    1995-12-31

    Lignin, a three-dimensional biopolymer, not only encrusts the cellulose microfibrils in a sheath-like manner, but is also bonded physically and chemically to the plant polysaccharides. Unless the lignin is depolymerized, solubilized, or removed, the cellulose and hemicelluloses cannot be easily hydrolyzed by respective enzymes for their bioconversion into biofuels and chemicals. By now it has been established that lignin peroxidase (LiP) of white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium is responsible for degradation of lignin. It has been reported that LiP is produced during secondary metabolism under carbon or nitrogen limitation by this organism. In literature, usually low yields (per unit volume) of LiP with P. chrysosporium have been reported. The reasons for low yields may be attributed to insufficient nitrogen in production media, which ultimately affects the synthesis of LiP protein. Therefore, it necessitated a search for an organism that can produce a ligninolytic enzyme system during its primary metabolism, without any effect of nitrogen limitation in the fermentation medium and without supply of extra oxygen to the cultures. Glenn and Gold were the first to report that decolorization of polymeric dyes in liquid cultures is related to the lignin degradation system. They demonstrated that like lignin degradation, the decolorization of polymeric dyes by the white-rot basidiomycete P. chrysosporium occurred during secondary metabolism, was suppressed in cultures grown in the presence of high levels of nitrogen, and was strongly dependent on the oxygen concentration in the cultures. The present study was undertaken to establish if certain dyes in solid media could be used to screen ligninolytic activity of selective actinomycetes during their primary metabolism without the limitation of nitrogen in the medium.

  5. Optical filter finesses enhancement based on nested coupled cavities and active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adib, George A.; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-04-01

    Optical filters with relatively large FSR and narrow linewidth are simultaneously needed for different applications. The ratio between the FSR and the 3-dB linewidth is given by finesse of the filter, which is solely determined by the different energy loss mechanisms limited by the technology advancement. In this work, we present a novel coupled-cavity configuration embedding an optical filter and a gain medium; allowing an overall finesse enhancement and simultaneous FSR and 3-dB linewidth engineering beyond the technological limits of the filter fabrication method. The configuration consists of two resonators. An active ring resonator comprises an optical gain medium and a passive resonator. In one configuration, the optical filter is the passive resonator itself. In a second configuration, the passive resonator is another ring resonator that embeds the optical filter. The presented configurations using a semiconductor optical amplifier are applied one time to a mechanically Fabry-Perot filter in the first presented configuration; and a second time to a fiber ring filter in the second presented configuration. The mechanical filter has an original 3-dB linewidth of 1nm and an FSR that is larger than 100nm while the enhanced linewidth is about 0.3nm. The fiber ring filter length is 4 m and directional coupler ratios of 90/10corresponding to a 3-dBlinewidth of about 4MHz and an FSR of 47 MHz. The enhanced 3- dBlinewidth of the overall filter configuration is 200kHz, demonstrating finesse enhancement up to20 times the original finesse of the filter.

  6. Research on range-gated laser active imaging seeker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Mu; Wang, PengHui; Tan, DongJie

    2013-09-01

    Compared with other imaging methods such as millimeter wave imaging, infrared imaging and visible light imaging, laser imaging provides both a 2-D array of reflected intensity data as well as 2-D array of range data, which is the most important data for use in autonomous target acquisition .In terms of application, it can be widely used in military fields such as radar, guidance and fuse. In this paper, we present a laser active imaging seeker system based on range-gated laser transmitter and sensor technology .The seeker system presented here consist of two important part, one is laser image system, which uses a negative lens to diverge the light from a pulse laser to flood illuminate a target, return light is collected by a camera lens, each laser pulse triggers the camera delay and shutter. The other is stabilization gimbals, which is designed to be a rotatable structure both in azimuth and elevation angles. The laser image system consists of transmitter and receiver. The transmitter is based on diode pumped solid-state lasers that are passively Q-switched at 532nm wavelength. A visible wavelength was chosen because the receiver uses a Gen III image intensifier tube with a spectral sensitivity limited to wavelengths less than 900nm.The receiver is image intensifier tube's micro channel plate coupled into high sensitivity charge coupled device camera. The image has been taken at range over one kilometer and can be taken at much longer range in better weather. Image frame frequency can be changed according to requirement of guidance with modifiable range gate, The instantaneous field of views of the system was found to be 2×2 deg. Since completion of system integration, the seeker system has gone through a series of tests both in the lab and in the outdoor field. Two different kinds of buildings have been chosen as target, which is located at range from 200m up to 1000m.To simulate dynamic process of range change between missile and target, the seeker system has

  7. Insight in the Chemistry of Laser-Activated Dental Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect. PMID:25874251

  8. Insight in the chemistry of laser-activated dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Verheyen, Jeroen; Diachuk, Andrii; Verheyen, Peter; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Keulemans, Filip; De Bruyne, Mieke; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect.

  9. Activities of developing high-power KrF lasers and studying laser plasmas interaction physics at CIAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Naiyan; Shan, Yusheng; Ma, Weiyi; Yang, Dawei; Kun, Gong; Wang, Xiaojun; Tang, Xiuzhang; Tao, Yezheng; Ma, Jinglong; Jiang, Xingdong

    2002-01-01

    This report reviews the scientific activities on high power laser and laser plasma physics at CIAE. A 6-beam KrF excimer laser system (100 J/23 ns/248 nm/1013 W/cm2, 15 min/shot) has been built, the Raman technologies used to upgrade it to 1014 W/cm2 has been studied. A UV femtosecond Ti:sapphire/KrF hybrid laser (50 mJ/220 fs/248 nm/1017 W/cm2) has been developed also, hot electron generation research has been carried out in the fs laser. In the near future, the fs laser will be amplified in six-beam laser system to produce ultra-high intensity to do fundamental researches on Fast Ignition of ICF.

  10. Investigation on femto-second laser irradiation assisted shock peening of medium carbon (0.4% C) steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta; Gurevich, Evgeny L.; Kumari, Renu; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, the effect of femtosecond laser irradiation on the peening behavior of 0.4% C steel has been evaluated. Laser irradiation has been conducted with a 100 μJ and 300 fs laser with multiple pulses under varied energy. Followed by laser irradiation, a detailed characterization of the processed zone was undertaken by scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction technique. Finally, the residual stress distribution, microhardness and wear resistance properties of the processed zone were also evaluated. Laser processing leads to shock peening associated with plasma formation and its expansion, formation of martensite and ferrito-pearlitic phase in the microstructure. Due to laser processing, there is introduction of residual stress on the surface which varies from high tensile (140 MPa) to compressive (-335 MPa) as compared to 152 MPa of the substrate. There is a significant increase in microhardness to 350-500 VHN as compared to 250 VHN of substrate. The fretting wear behavior against hardened steel ball shows a significant reduction in wear depth due to laser processing. Finally, a conclusion of the mechanism of wear has been established.

  11. Influence of Saline on Temperature Profile of Laser Lithotripsy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Igor N.; Donalisio da Silva, Rodrigo; Gustafson, Diedra; Sehrt, David; Kim, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: We established an ex vivo model to evaluate the temperature profile of the ureter during laser lithotripsy, the influence of irrigation on temperature, and thermal spread during lithotripsy with the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: Two ex vivo models of Ovis aries urinary tract and human calcium oxalate calculi were used. The Open Ureteral Model was opened longitudinally to measure the thermal profile of the urothelium. On the Clinical Model, anterograde ureteroscopy was performed in an intact urinary system. Temperatures were measured on the external portion of the ureter and the urothelium during lithotripsy and intentional perforation. The lithotripsy group (n=20) was divided into irrigated (n=10) and nonirrigated (n=10), which were compared for thermal spread length and values during laser activation. The intentional perforation group (n=10) was evaluated under saline flow. The Ho:YAG laser with a 365 μm laser fiber and power at 10W was used (1J/Pulse at 10 Hz). Infrared Fluke Ti55 Thermal Imager was used for evaluation. Maximum temperature values were recorded and compared. Results: On the Clinical Model, the external ureteral wall obtained a temperature of 37.4°C±2.5° and 49.5°C±2.3° (P=0.003) and in the Open Ureteral Model, 49.7°C and 112.4°C with and without irrigation, respectively (P<0.05). The thermal spread along the external ureter wall was not statically significant with or without irrigation (P=0.065). During intentional perforation, differences in temperatures were found between groups (opened with and without irrigation): 81.8°±8.8° and 145.0°±15.0°, respectively (P<0.005). Conclusion: There is an increase in the external ureteral temperature during laser activation, but ureteral thermal values decreased when saline flow was applied. Ureter thermal spread showed no difference between irrigated and nonirrigated subgroups. This is the first laser lithotripsy thermography study

  12. Effects of chemically defined medium on early development of porcine embryos derived from parthenogenetic activation and cloning.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zubing; Sui, Liucai; Li, Yunsheng; Ji, Suofei; Zhang, Xiaorong; Zhang, Yunhai

    2012-08-01

    The present study was to investigate if a completely chemically defined medium (PZM-4) could support the early development of porcine embryos derived from parthenogenetic activation (PA) and cloning (somatic cell nuclear transfer, SCNT), and to lay the foundation for determining the physiological roles of certain supplements in this medium. Porcine embryos derived from PA and SCNT were cultured in media: PZM-3 (a chemically semi-defined medium), PZM-4 (a fully defined medium), and PZM-5 (an undefined medium). Early embryo development was observed. We found that the three medium groups (PZM-3, PZM-4 and PZM-5) exhibited no significant differences in cleavage rates of PA embryos (p > 0.05), while the blastocyst rate in PZM-3 was significantly higher than in PZM-4 and PZM-5 (78.9% vs. 36.0% and 52.3%) (p < 0.05). Moreover, total cell number per blastocyst in PZM-3 was clearly higher than in PZM-5 but similar to that in PZM-4. As for SCNT embryos, no significant differences were observed for the cleavage rates or the blastocyst rates among the three groups (p > 0.05). However, total cell number per blastocyst in PZM-3 was notably higher than in PZM-5, but was similar to that in PZM-4. In conclusion, our results suggested that the completely chemically defined medium PZM-4 can be used to efficiently support the early development of porcine PA and SCNT embryos.

  13. Sutureless cataract incision closure using laser-activated tissue glues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Alexander M.; Bass, Lawrence S.; Libutti, Steven K.; Schubert, Herman D.; Treat, Michael R.

    1991-06-01

    With the advent of phacoemulsification and foldable intraocular lenses, there is renewed interest in sutureless cataract wound. We report the use of laser activated tissue glues for the closure of scleral tunnel cataract incisions. Two glue mixtures were tested in enucleated porcine eyes. Glue A was composed of hyaluronic acid, human albumin, and indocyanine green dye. Glue B contained hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, human albumin, and indocyanine green dye. A Spectra Physics diode laser (808 nm) with a power density of 7-1 1 watts/cm2 was used for glue activation. Wound bursting pressures, as determined by the presence of fluid at the wound margin, was significantly higher with both glue combinations than without the glue (Plaser activated tissue glues may be an alternative to suture closure of scleral tunnel cataract incisions.

  14. MHD SIMULATIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS IN A DYNAMIC GALAXY CLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Mendygral, P. J.; Jones, T. W.; Dolag, K.

    2012-05-10

    We present a pair of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of intermittent jets from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a galaxy cluster extracted from a high-resolution cosmological simulation. The selected cluster was chosen as an apparently relatively relaxed system, not having undergone a major merger in almost 7 Gyr. Despite this characterization and history, the intracluster medium (ICM) contains quite active 'weather'. We explore the effects of this ICM weather on the morphological evolution of the AGN jets and lobes. The orientation of the jets is different in the two simulations so that they probe different aspects of the ICM structure and dynamics. We find that even for this cluster, which can be characterized as relaxed by an observational standard, the large-scale, bulk ICM motions can significantly distort the jets and lobes. Synthetic X-ray observations of the simulations show that the jets produce complex cavity systems, while synthetic radio observations reveal bending of the jets and lobes similar to wide-angle tail radio sources. The jets are cycled on and off with a 26 Myr period using a 50% duty cycle. This leads to morphological features similar to those in 'double-double' radio galaxies. While the jet and ICM magnetic fields are generally too weak in the simulations to play a major role in the dynamics, Maxwell stresses can still become locally significant.

  15. Iron stimulates plasma-activated medium-induced A549 cell injury

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Tetsuo; Nonomura, Saho; Horiba, Minori; Hirayama, Tasuku; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hara, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is applicable to living cells and has emerged as a novel technology for cancer therapy. Plasma has recently been shown to affect cells not only by direct irradiation, but also by indirect treatments with previously prepared plasma-activated medium (PAM). Iron is an indispensable element but is also potentially toxic because it generates the hydroxyl radical (•OH) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) via the Fenton reaction. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the contribution of iron to PAM-induced A549 adenocarcinoma cell apoptosis. We detected the generation of •OH and elevation of intracellular ferrous ions in PAM-treated cells and found that they were inhibited by iron chelator. The elevations observed in ferrous ions may have been due to their release from the intracellular iron store, ferritin. Hydroxyl radical-induced DNA injury was followed by the activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, depletion of NAD+ and ATP, and elevations in intracellular Ca2+. The sensitivities of normal cells such as smooth muscle cells and keratinocytes to PAM were less than that of A549 cells. These results demonstrated that H2O2 in PAM and/or •OH generated in the presence of iron ions disturbed the mitochondrial-nuclear network in cancer cells. PMID:26865334

  16. Calculation of a mirror asymmetric effect in electron scattering from chiral targets. [in optically active medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, A.; Van House, J.; Hegstrom, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    A dynamical calculation is presented of the helicity induced in an initially unpolarized electron beam after elastic scattering from an optically active medium, a process analogous to the circular polarization induced in unpolarized light following Rayleigh scattering from chiral targets. The calculation is based on the bound helical electron model of a chiral molecule, according to which the major contribution to the helicity is provided by the perturbation of the electron bound state by the spin-orbit interaction of the bound electrons moving in the electric field of the molecular core. The net helicity acquired is found to depend directly on a molecular asymmetry factor and the square of the atomic number of the heaviest atom in an asymmetric environment. For the case of carbon, the induced helicity is on the order of 0.00001, which would account for its lack of observation in a recent experiment. Results may have implications for the origin of optical activity in biological molecules by the differential ionization of D and L isomers by beta-decay electrons.

  17. Medium-scale gravity wave activity in the thermosphere inferred from GOCE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Raphael F.; Bruinsma, Sean; Massarweh, Lotfi; Doornbos, Eelco

    2016-08-01

    This study is focused on the effect of solar flux conditions on the dynamics of gravity waves (GWs) in the thermosphere. Air density and crosswind in situ estimates from the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometers are analyzed for the whole mission duration. The analysis is performed in the Fourier spectral domain averaging spectral results over periods of 2 months close to solstices. A new GW marker (called Cf3) is introduced here to characterize GWs activity under low, medium, and high solar flux conditions, showing a clear solar damping effect on GW activity. Most GW signal is found in a spectral range above 8 mHz in GOCE data, meaning a maximum horizontal wavelength of around 1000 km. The level of GW activity at GOCE altitude is strongly decreasing with increasing solar flux. Furthermore, a shift in the dominant frequency with solar flux conditions has been noted, leading to larger horizontal wavelengths (from 200 to 500 km) during high solar flux conditions. The correlation between air density variability and GW marker allows to identify most of the large-amplitude perturbations below 67° latitudes as due to GWs. The influence of correlated error sources, between air density and crosswinds, is discussed. Consistency of the spectral domain results is verified in the time domain with a global mapping of high-frequency air density perturbations along the GOCE orbit. This analysis shows a clear dependence with geomagnetic latitude with strong perturbations at magnetic poles and an extension to lower latitudes favored by low solar activity conditions. These results are consistent with previous Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) data analysis and with general circulation models.

  18. Value added cleaning and disinfection of the root canal: laser-activated irrigation and laser-induced photoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Moor, Roeland J. G.; Meire, Maarten A.

    2016-03-01

    Among present-day marketed systems ultrasonic activation appears to be the best way to activate and potentiate endodontic irrigants. An alternative for ultrasonic activation of irrigants is laser activated irrigation (LAI) or photoninitiated acoustic streaming. Based on present-day research it appears that LAI (especially with Erbium lasers) can be more efficient for debris removal out of root canals and interaction with the endodontic biofilms thanks to the induction of specific cavitation phenomena and acoustic streaming. Other wavelengths are now explored to be used for LAI. Another way to interact with biofilms is to rely on laser-induced photoporation in combination with gold nanoparticles ( AuNPs). The latter is an alternative physical method for delivering macromolecules in cells. Nanosized membrane pores can be created upon pulsed laser illumination. Depending on the laser energy, pores are created through either direct heating of the AuNPs or by vapour nanobubbles that can emerge around the AuNPs.

  19. Coherent interaction of laser pulses in a resonant optically dense extended medium under the regime of strong field-matter coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, V.S.; Lebedev, V.N.; Mekhov, I.B.; Moroshkin, P.V.; Chekhonin, I.A.; Bagayev, S.N.

    2004-03-01

    The nonstationary pump-probe interaction between short laser pulses propagating in a resonant optically dense coherent medium is considered. Special attention is paid to the case where the density of two-level particles is high enough that a considerable part of the energy of relatively weak external laser fields can be coherently absorbed and reemitted by the medium. Thus, the field of the medium reaction plays a key role in the interaction processes, which leads to collective behavior of an atomic ensemble in the strongly coupled light-matter system. Such behavior results in fast excitation interchanges between the field and a medium in the form of optical ringing, which is analogous to polariton beating in solid-state optics. This collective oscillating response, which can be treated as successive beats between light wave packets of different group velocities, is shown to significantly affect the propagation and amplification of the probe field under its nonlinear interaction with a nearly copropagating pump pulse. Depending on the probe-pump time delay, the probe transmission spectra show the appearance of either a specific doublet or coherent dip. The widths of these features are determined by the density-dependent field-matter coupling coefficient and increase during the propagation. Besides that, the widths of the coherent features, which appear close to resonance in the broadband probe spectrum, exceed the absorption-line width, since under the strong-coupling regime, the frequency of optical ringing exceeds the rate of incoherent relaxation. Contrary to stationary strong-field effects, the density- and coordinate-dependent transmission spectra of the probe manifest the importance of collective oscillations and cannot be obtained in the framework of a single-atom model.

  20. Vegetation mapping from medium-density discrete echo Airborne Laser Scanning data: a case study of the Lake Balaton wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlinszky, A.; Mücke, W.; Lehner, H.; Briese, C.; Pfeifer, N.

    2012-04-01

    Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) is mainly used for collecting information on geomorphology, but the high spatial resolution and accuracy and especially the sensitivity to vertical structure are also proven to be valuable in vegetation mapping. Point cloud datasets acquired for regional or country-wide ALS surveys have strong potential as an easily accessible basis for consistent automatic vegetation mapping across large areas. However, automatized classification on the basis of multivariate analysis algorithms is not widely applied to moderate resolution discrete echo point clouds that these surveys typically produce. The number of relevant independent variables that can be derived from these datasets is often considered insufficient for multivariate classification-based detection of species or vegetation health, but in some cases it can be enhanced to a level sufficient for vegetation mapping. Although in conventional (single-wavelength) ALS the radiometric information produced is restricted to a single band, the differences of the radiometric parameters of the surveyed vegetation can considerably aid discrimination. In most cases, the horizontal distribution of the scanned points holds no information as this is governed by the sensor scan pattern. However, the horizontal distribution of points with specific radiometric intensity can add to the number of independent variables. In our case study of a lake shore and wetland area (ca. 100 km2 of wetlands distributed in a surveyed area of 1000 km2) a raster-based approach was used to average vertical structural parameters across cells occupied by several points. The information present in the position of the points relative to each other was thus exploited. Radiometric calibration of the echo amplitude also provided valuable information on vegetation type. Given a sufficient amount of pre-surveyed ground truth areas, a straightforward decision tree classification of LIDAR data mapped not only land cover categories, but

  1. Fiber distributed feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G. A.; Yeh, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Utilizing round optical fibers as communication channels in optical communication networks presents the problem of obtaining a high efficiency coupling between the optical fiber and the laser. A laser is made an integral part of the optical fiber channel by either diffusing active material into the optical fiber or surrounding the optical fiber with the active material. Oscillation within the active medium to produce lasing action is established by grating the optical fiber so that distributed feedback occurs.

  2. A Nd:MgO:LiTaO3 crystal as a gain medium for 1083 nm lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P. X.; Gong, J.; Hang, Y.; Li, Hongqiang; Zhang, Rui; Xu, Jianqiu

    2013-04-01

    The growth, spectroscopic properties, laser parameters, and laser performance of a Nd3+/Mg2+ co-doped congruent LiTaO3 crystal were investigated. Continuous-wave (cw) laser operation at a wavelength of about 1083 nm with a slope efficiency of nearly 12% was achieved. The maximum cw output power obtained was 615 mW, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the highest output power obtained for this crystal thus far. We propose that Nd:MgO:LiTaO3 lasers could be an excellent source for the optical pumping of helium, and may achieve second harmonic generation and optical parametric oscillation in the same crystal.

  3. Laser-induced damage in biological tissue: Role of complex and dynamic optical properties of the medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Elharith M.

    Since its invention in the early 1960's, the laser has been used as a tool for surgical, therapeutic, and diagnostic purposes. To achieve maximum effectiveness with the greatest margin of safety it is important to understand the mechanisms of light propagation through tissue and how that light affects living cells. Lasers with novel output characteristics for medical and military applications are too often implemented prior to proper evaluation with respect to tissue optical properties and human safety. Therefore, advances in computational models that describe light propagation and the cellular responses to laser exposure, without the use of animal models, are of considerable interest. Here, a physics-based laser-tissue interaction model was developed to predict the spatial and temporal temperature and pressure rise during laser exposure to biological tissues. Our new model also takes into account the dynamic nature of tissue optical properties and their impact on the induced temperature and pressure profiles. The laser-induced retinal damage is attributed to the formation of microbubbles formed around melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and the damage mechanism is assumed to be photo-thermal. Selective absorption by melanin creates these bubbles that expand and collapse around melanosomes, destroying cell membranes and killing cells. The Finite Element (FE) approach taken provides suitable ground for modeling localized pigment absorption which leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution within pigmented cells following laser pulse exposure. These hot-spots are sources for localized thermo-elastic stresses which lead to rapid localized expansions that manifest themselves as microbubbles and lead to microcavitations. Model predictions for the interaction of lasers at wavelengths of 193, 694, 532, 590, 1314, 1540, 2000, and 2940 nm with biological tissues were generated and comparisons were made with available experimental data for the retina

  4. Three-dimensional imaging simulation of active laser detection based on DLOS method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanxin; Zhou, Honghe; Chen, Xiang; Yuan, Yuan; Shuai, Yong; Tan, Heping

    2016-07-01

    The technology of active laser detection is widely used in many different fields nowadays. With the development of computer technology, programmable software simulation can provide reference for the design of active laser detection. The characteristics of the active laser detecting systems also can be judged more visual. Based on the features of the active laser detection, an improved method of radiative transfer calculation (Double Line Of Sight) was developed, and the simulation models of complete active laser detecting imaging were founded. Compared with the results calculated by the Monte Carlo method, the correctness of the improved method was verified. The results of active laser detecting imaging of complex three-dimensional targets in different atmospheric scenes were compared. The influence of different atmospheric dielectric property were analyzed, which provides effective reference for the design of active laser detection.

  5. Laser beam active brazing of metal ceramic joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haferkamp, Heinz; Bach, Friedrich W.; von Alvensleben, Ferdinand; Kreutzburg, K.

    1996-04-01

    The use of engineering ceramics is becoming more and more important. Reasons for this are the specific properties of these materials, such as high strength, corrosion resistance and wear resistance. To apply the advantages of ceramics, joining techniques of metal ceramic parts are required. In this paper, joining of metal ceramic joints by laser beam brazing is presented. This joining technique is characterized by local heat input, and the minimal thermal stress of the brazed components. During the investigations, an Nd:YAG laser and a vacuum chamber were applied. The advantages of Nd:YAG lasers are the simple mechanical construction, and laser beam guidance via quartz glass fibers, which leads to high handling flexibility. In addition, most of the materials show a high absorption rate for this kind of radiation. As materials, ceramic Al2O3 with a purity of 99.4% and metals such as X5CrNi189 and Fe54Ni29Co17 were used. As a filler material, commercially available silver and silver- copper brazes with chemically active elements like titanium were employed. During this study, the brazing wetting behavior and the formation of diffusion layers in dependence on processing parameters were investigated. The results have shown that high brazing qualities can be achieved by means of the laser beam brazing process. Crack-free joining of metal ceramic parts is currently only possible by the use of metals such as Fe54Ni29Co17 because of its low thermal expansion coefficient, which reduces thermal stresses within the joining zone.

  6. Graphene active plasmonic metamaterials for new types of terahertz lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuji, Taiichi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Satou, Akira; Popov, Vyacheslav; Ryzhii, Victor

    2013-05-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in graphene active plasmonic metamaterials for new types of terahertz lasers. We theoretically discovered that when the population of Dirac Fermionic carriers in graphene are inverted by optical or electrical pumping the excitation of graphene plasmons by the THz photons results in propagating surface plasmon polaritons with giant gain in a wide THz range. Furthermore, when graphene is patterned in a micro- or nano-ribbon array by grating gate metallization, the structure acts as an active plasmonic metamaterial, providing a super-radiant plasmonic lasing with giant gain at the plasmon modes in a wide THz frequency range.

  7. THz quantum cascade lasers with wafer bonded active regions.

    PubMed

    Brandstetter, M; Deutsch, C; Benz, A; Cole, G D; Detz, H; Andrews, A M; Schrenk, W; Strasser, G; Unterrainer, K

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate terahertz quantum-cascade lasers with a 30 μm thick double-metal waveguide, which are fabricated by stacking two 15 μm thick active regions using a wafer bonding process. By increasing the active region thickness more optical power is generated inside the cavity, the waveguide losses are decreased and the far-field is improved due to a larger facet aperture. In this way the output power is increased by significantly more than a factor of 2 without reducing the maximum operating temperature and without increasing the threshold current.

  8. Opto-acoustic measurement of the local light absorption coefficient in turbid media: 1. Monte-Carlo simulation of laser fluence distribution at the beam axis beneath the surface of a turbid medium

    SciTech Connect

    Pelivanov, Ivan M; Barskaya, M I; Podymova, N B; Khokhlova, Tanya D; Karabutov, Aleksander A

    2009-09-30

    A new method for measuring the local light absorption coefficient in turbid media, for example, biological tissues, is proposed. The method is based on the fact that the amplitude of the excited opto-acoustic (OA) signal is proportional to the absorbed laser power density (the product of the light absorption coefficient and the laser fluence) at the medium interface. In the first part of the paper, the influence of the laser beam diameter, the light absorption and reduced scattering coefficients on the maximal amplitude of the laser fluence at the laser beam axis in the near-surface layer of the turbid medium is studied by using the Monte-Carlo simulation. The conditions are predicted under which the amplitude of the OA signal detected in a transparent medium in contact with the scattering medium should remain proportional to the light absorption coefficient of the medium under study, when the scattering coefficient in it changes more than twice. The results of the numerical simulation are used for the theoretical substantiation of the OA method being proposed. (measurement of parametrs of laser radiation)

  9. High-dose irradiation of bone chips preserves the in vitro activity of bone-conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Kosaku; Miron, Richard J; Leiser, Dominic; Caballé-Serrano, Jordi; Bosshardt, Dieter D; Schaller, Benoit; Buser, Daniel; Gruber, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal irradiation sterilizes resected tumor bone used as autografts in reconstruction surgery. Therapeutic irradiation is a standard technique in head and neck cancer therapy that aims to preserve organ function. Bone irradiation has a complex, mostly inhibitory, effect on remodeling and regeneration, although the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. It remains unclear if extracorporeal irradiation affects the paracrine-like activity of the corresponding autografts. We recently reported that bone-conditioned medium from autogenous bone chips contains a number of factors that might affect cell activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of extracorporeal irradiation of porcine cortical bone chips on the activity of the corresponding bone-conditioned medium. The effects of bone-conditioned medium on the expressions of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) target genes in oral fibroblasts were assessed. Bone-conditioned medium from bone chips exposed to a total radiation dose up to 120 Gy did not affect expressions of TGF-β target genes, including adrenomedullin, BTB/POZ domain-containing protein 11, proteoglycan 4, NADPH oxidase 4, and interleukin 11, in oral fibroblasts. In conclusion, bone irradiation does not alter the capability of the corresponding bone-conditioned medium to provoke a robust fibroblastic cell response in vitro. (J Oral Sci 58, 325-331, 2016). PMID:27665970

  10. Disruption of cell membranes via laser-activated, acoustically active, carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holguin, Stefany; Prausnitz, Mark; Thadhani, Naresh

    2015-06-01

    Physical drug delivery methods provide an avenue to overcome the selectivity of the cell membrane via physical forces that disrupt cell membranes and drive drug molecules into the cytosol. When carbon black nanoparticles in suspension with cells and drug molecules are exposed to nanosecond-pulsed laser light, high uptake and cell viability are observed. This laser-carbon nanoparticle interaction causes thermal expansion and local vaporization that results in the release of acoustic waves into the surrounding medium. These combined energy transduction mechanisms, phenomena called transient nanoparticle energy transduction (TNET), are responsible for disruption of the cell membrane and subsequent efficient intracellular drug uptake while maintaining high cell viability. The overall objective of this work is to investigate TNET and the bioeffects associated with physical disruption of cell membranes for drug delivery via laser-carbon nanoparticle interactions. For example, varying and quantifying energy input to carbon nanoparticles by way of laser beam manipulation, assists in the understanding and assessment of subsequent bioeffects. Results of work performed to date will be presented. National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. 0946809, Georgia Tech University Center of Exemplary Mentoring (UCEM) & the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

  11. Analysis of the restricting factors of laser countermeasure active detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufa; Sun, Xiaoquan

    2016-07-01

    The detection effect of laser active detection system is affected by various kinds of factors. In view of the application requirement of laser active detection, the influence factors for laser active detection are analyzed. The mathematical model of cat eye target detection distance has been built, influence of the parameters of laser detection system and the environment on detection range and the detection efficiency are analyzed. Various parameters constraint detection performance is simulated. The results show that the discovery distance of laser active detection is affected by the laser divergence angle, the incident angle and the visibility of the atmosphere. For a given detection range, the laser divergence angle and the detection efficiency are mutually restricted. Therefore, in view of specific application environment, it is necessary to select appropriate laser detection parameters to achieve optimal detection effect.

  12. Hydrous iron oxide modified diatomite as an active filtration medium for phosphate capture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Lin, Yan; Wu, Deyi; Kong, Hainan

    2016-02-01

    A simple method to functionalize diatomite with hydrous iron oxide was attempted and its performance as a new active filtration material to remove and recover phosphate from water was investigated under varying solution conditions. The Langmuir phosphate adsorption capacity increased from 0.6 mgP/g for raw diatomite to 4.89, 14.71, 25.02 mgP/g for hydrous iron oxide modified diatomite (HIOMD), depending on the amount of iron loaded. Loading of hydrous iron oxide caused the increase in true and bulk density and a decline in filtration rate, but to a lesser extent. It was shown that the HIOMD product with suitable iron content could retain a good filtration performance with a greatly increased adsorption capacity for phosphate. The phosphate adsorption increased by decreasing pH and by increasing ionic strength at high pH levels. The adsorption process was interpreted by ligand exchange. Coexisting oxyanions of sulfate, nitrate, citrate, carbonate, silicate and humic acid showed different effects on phosphate fixation but it was presumed that their influence at their concentrations and pH levels commonly encountered in effluent or natural waters was limited, i.e., HIOMD had a reasonably good selectivity. Results in repeated adsorption, desorption and regeneration experiment showed that the adsorbed phosphate could be recovered and the material could be reused after regeneration. The column test showed that HIOMD could be potentially utilized as an adsorption filtration medium for phosphate removal and recovery from water.

  13. Superconducting quantum metamaterials as an active lasing medium: Effects of disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppenhöfer, Martin; Marthaler, Michael; Schön, Gerd

    2016-06-01

    A metamaterial formed by superconducting circuits or quantum dots can serve as an active lasing medium when coupled to a microwave resonator. For these artificial atoms, in contrast to real atoms, variations in their parameters cannot be avoided. In this paper, we examine the influence of disorder on such a multiatom lasing setup. We find that the lasing process evolves into a self-organized stationary state that is quite robust against disorder. The reason is that photons created by those atoms which are in or close to resonance with the resonator stimulate the emission also of more detuned atoms. Not only the number of photons grows with the number of atoms but also the width of the resonance as a function of the detuning. Similar properties are found for other types of disorder such as variations in the individual coupling. We present relations on how the allowed disorder scales with the number of atoms and confirm it by a numerical analysis. We also provide estimates for the sample-to-sample variations to be expected for setups with moderate numbers of atoms.

  14. Water activity and temperature effects on growth of Alternaria arborescens on tomato medium.

    PubMed

    Vaquera, Sandra; Patriarca, Andrea; Fernández Pinto, Virginia

    2014-08-18

    Alternaria arborescens is the causal agent of tomato stem canker, a disease frequently responsible of substantial economic losses. A. arborescens can produce several mycotoxins, such as alternariol, alternariol monomethyl ether and tenuazonic acid and phytotoxins such as the AAL toxins. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of water activity (aw, 0.950, 0.975, 0.995) and temperature (6, 15, 20, 25 and 30°C) on the germination and radial growth rate of A. arborescens on a synthetic tomato medium. Germination followed by growth was observed at all temperatures and aw levels analyzed. The shortest germination time (0.5 days) was observed at 0.995 aw, both at 25°C and at 30°C. The germination time increased with a reduction of aw and temperature. The highest growth rate was registered at 0.995 aw and 30°C (7.21 mm/day) while the lowest occurred at 0.950 aw and 6°C (0.52 mm/day), conditions at which the longest lag phase was observed (8 days). Growth rates increased with aw and temperature. Knowledge of the ecophysiology of the fungus in this substrate is necessary to formulate future strategies to prevent its development and evaluate the consumer health risk posed by potential exposure to the toxins. PMID:24964391

  15. Quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers: comparison to quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Stephan; Chow, Weng W.; Schneider, Hans Christian

    2016-03-01

    We review a microscopic laser theory for quantum dots as active material for quantum cascade lasers, in which carrier collisions are treated at the level of quantum kinetic equations. The computed characteristics of such a quantum-dot active material are compared to a state-of-the-art quantum-well quantum cascade laser. We find that the current requirement to achieve a comparable gain-length product is reduced compared to that of the quantum-well quantum cascade laser.

  16. Generation of polarization singularities in the self-focusing of an elliptically polarized laser beam in an isotropic Kerr medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panov, N. A.; Makarov, V. A.; Grigoriev, K. S.; Yatskevitch, M. S.; Kosareva, O. G.

    2016-10-01

    We have numerically and analytically shown that polarization singularities can emerge when a homogeneously elliptically polarized light beam undergoes self-focusing in an isotropic third-order Kerr medium without frequency and spatial dispersion (fused silica, liquids, gases etc.) In the case of axially symmetric beam the emerging C-lines have the shape of circumference with the center at the beam's axis and they are located in the separate transversal planes in the medium. If the axial symmetry of the incident beam is broken then the even number of C-points with opposite topological charges are nucleated in the medium. They exist in a certain propagation coordinate range and then they collide and annihilate each other.

  17. Medium chain fatty acids are selective peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ activators and pan-PPAR partial agonists.

    PubMed

    Liberato, Marcelo Vizoná; Nascimento, Alessandro S; Ayers, Steven D; Lin, Jean Z; Cvoro, Aleksandra; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Martínez, Leandro; Souza, Paulo C T; Saidemberg, Daniel; Deng, Tuo; Amato, Angela Angelica; Togashi, Marie; Hsueh, Willa A; Phillips, Kevin; Palma, Mário Sérgio; Neves, Francisco A R; Skaf, Munir S; Webb, Paul; Polikarpov, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) act through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) γ to increase insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes (T2DM), but deleterious effects of these ligands mean that selective modulators with improved clinical profiles are needed. We obtained a crystal structure of PPARγ ligand binding domain (LBD) and found that the ligand binding pocket (LBP) is occupied by bacterial medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs). We verified that MCFAs (C8-C10) bind the PPARγ LBD in vitro and showed that they are low-potency partial agonists that display assay-specific actions relative to TZDs; they act as very weak partial agonists in transfections with PPARγ LBD, stronger partial agonists with full length PPARγ and exhibit full blockade of PPARγ phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5), linked to reversal of adipose tissue insulin resistance. MCFAs that bind PPARγ also antagonize TZD-dependent adipogenesis in vitro. X-ray structure B-factor analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that MCFAs weakly stabilize C-terminal activation helix (H) 12 relative to TZDs and this effect is highly dependent on chain length. By contrast, MCFAs preferentially stabilize the H2-H3/β-sheet region and the helix (H) 11-H12 loop relative to TZDs and we propose that MCFA assay-specific actions are linked to their unique binding mode and suggest that it may be possible to identify selective PPARγ modulators with useful clinical profiles among natural products.

  18. Plasma channel produced by femtosecond laser pulses as a medium for amplifying electromagnetic radiation of the subterahertz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Bogatskaya, A V; Volkova, E A; Popov, A M

    2013-12-31

    The electron energy distribution function in the plasma channel produced by a femtosecond laser pulse with a wavelength of 248 nm in atmospheric-pressure gases was considered. Conditions were determined whereby this channel may be employed for amplifying electromagnetic waves up to the terahertz frequency range over the energy spectrum relaxation time ∼10{sup -7} s. Gains were calculated as functions of time and radiation frequency. The effect of electron – electron collisions on the rate of relaxation processes in the plasma and on its ability to amplify the electromagnetic radiation was investigated. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  19. Submicron-sized boron carbide particles encapsulated in turbostratic graphite prepared by laser fragmentation in liquid medium.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yoshie; Sasaki, Takeshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2010-08-01

    Submicron-sized B4C spherical particles were obtained by laser fragmentation of large B4C particles dispersed in ethyl acetate. The irradiated surface of large B4C raw particles was heated and melted by laser energy absorption. B4C droplets were then cooled down, and finally B4C spherical particles were obtained. Moreover, each B4C particle obtained was encapsulated in a graphitic layer that is useful for medical functionalization of particles. Thus, obtained B4C particles encapsulated in graphitic layer may have potential uses in boron neutron capture therapy.

  20. Peculiarities of the optimisation of optical resonators with regular small-scale inhomogeneities of an active medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lobachev, V V; Strakhov, S Yu

    2005-10-31

    The peculiarities of parametric optimisation of resonators containing small-scale inhomogeneities are considered. The two most important practical cases are studied in detail: an unstable resonator with small-scale phase inhomogeneities in the active medium and a stable resonator with small-scale amplitude modulations caused by the use of a perforated output mirror. (resonators)

  1. Effects of Growth Medium on Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption–Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectra: a Case Study of Acetic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wieme, Anneleen D.; Spitaels, Freek; Aerts, Maarten; De Bruyne, Katrien; Van Landschoot, Anita

    2014-01-01

    The effect of the growth medium used on the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectra generated and its consequences for species and strain level differentiation of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) were determined by using a set of 25 strains. The strains were grown on five different culture media that yielded a total of more than 600 mass spectra, including technical and biological replicates. The results demonstrate that the culture medium can have a profound effect on the mass spectra of AAB as observed in the presence and varying signal intensities of peak classes, in particular when culture media do not sustain optimal growth. The observed growth medium effects do not disturb species level differentiation but strongly affect the potential for strain level differentiation. The data prove that a well-constructed and robust MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry identification database should comprise mass spectra of multiple reference strains per species grown on different culture media to facilitate species and strain level differentiation. PMID:24362425

  2. Acoustic Plasma Effects in the Diffusion-Cooled Working Medium of an Electric-Discharge CO2 CW Laser*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azharonok, V. V.; Abrahamyan, A. S.; Goncharik, S. V.; Mkrtchyan, A. R.; Filatova, I. I.; Chubrik, N. I.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the effect of shallow modulation of the discharge current on the burning regime and the plasma parameters of a diffusion-cooled glow discharge in CO2/N2/He laser gas mixtures. We have established that modulation of the discharge current leads to excitation in the discharge of pulsations in the acoustic pressure, the electric current, and the intensity of the generated laser radiation, with the frequency of standing acoustic waves arising in the discharge tube and also with the frequencies of the current modulation, its harmonics, and combinations of all these frequencies with the frequency of the current pulsations in the power supply. We have shown that when self-sustaining resonant oscillations in the discharge current are excited or when the current is modulated, the IR luminescence intensity from the upper laser level of the CO2 molecule and the power of the radiation generated by the laser vary because of plasma heating in the positive column of the discharge, due to its contraction in the acoustic wave field initiated by the current pulsations.

  3. Study of the effect introduced by an integrating sphere on the temporal profile characterization of short laser pulses propagating through a turbid medium.

    PubMed

    Morales-Cruzado, Beatriz; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Francisco G; de Lange, Dirk Frederik; Romero-Méndez, Ricardo

    2015-03-20

    When a nanosecond laser pulse is transmitted through a highly scattering material, its irradiance decreases as it propagates; this is because of the spatial and temporal pulse profile stretching owing to multiple scattering events. Although the effect of temporal distortion is much less significant than that of the spatial distortion for applications where the laser beam is focused on a subsurface target (writing of waveguides, for example), it becomes significant for applications where the laser pulse must attain certain temporal width after the beam propagated is collimated through a turbid medium (photoacoustic tomography, for example). The objective of this work is to determine the transfer function associated to an integrating sphere measurement of the temporal intensity profile involving turbid media samples. The transfer function is found to be related to the geometrical characteristics of the integrating sphere and the optical properties of the turbid media. This procedure opens a new possibility for optical property characterization and enables the use of an integrating sphere for time-dependent intensity measurements. PMID:25968525

  4. Study on a compact and adaptable Thomson Spectrometer for laser-initiated 11B(p,α)8Be reactions and low-medium energy particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, F.; De Angelis, R.; Bonasera, A.; Sura, J.; Andreoli, P.; Cristofari, G.; Cipriani, M.; Di Giorgio, G.; Ingenito, F.; Barbarino, M.; Labaune, C.; Baccou, C.; Depierreux, S.; Goyon, C.; Yahia, V.

    2016-05-01

    Thomson Spectrometers are of primary importance in the discrimination of particles produced by laser-plasma interaction, according to their energy and charge-mass ratio. We describe here a detailed study on a set of Thomson Spectrometers, adaptable to different experimental situations, with the aim of being placed directly within the experimental chamber, rather than in additional extensions, in order to increase the solid angle of observation. These instruments are suitable for detection of low-medium energy particles and can be effectively employed in laser-plasma experiments of 11B(p,α)8Be fusion. They are provided with permanent magnets, have small dimensions and compact design. In these small configurations electric and magnetic fringing fields play a primary role for particle deflection, and their accurate characterization is required. It was accomplished by means of COMSOL electromagnetic solver coupled to an effective analytical model, very suitable for practical use of the spectrometers. Data from experimental measurements of the magnetic fields have been also used. We describe the application of the spectrometers to an experiment of laser-plasma interaction, coupled to Imaging Plate detectors. Data analysis for spectrum and yield of the detected radiation is discussed in detail.

  5. Fungicidal activity of fluconazole against Candida albicans in a synthetic vagina-simulative medium.

    PubMed

    Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S; Sobel, Jack D; Elhalis, Hussain; Du, Wenjin; Akins, Robert A

    2004-01-01

    Fluconazole (FLZ) has emerged as a highly successful agent in the management of systemic infections of Candida. Cure rates for symptomatic candidiasis following single 150-mg FLZ dose therapy exceed 90%. In vitro, however, FLZ is fungistatic only in a narrow pH range and is not effective at vaginal pH, 4.2. This study evaluated the effect of FLZ on Candida albicans under in vitro conditions resembling the vaginal microenvironment, using vagina-simulative medium (VS). We found that FLZ was fungicidal for C. albicans in VS, but not in other media at the same pH, 4.2. In VS, FLZ was fungicidal at concentrations of >/=8 micro g/ml and reduced viability by greater than 99.9%. Analysis of the components of VS indicated that 17 mM acetic acid, a concentration achieved in the vagina, was responsible for the synergistic, fungicidal effect. This effect was not seen at neutral pH. Other substrates were not effective substitutes for acetic acid; however, short-chained carboxylic acids, glyoxylate and malonate, were effective. Most strains of C. albicans that were resistant to FLZ under standard conditions were killed by FLZ plus acetate. Other species of Candida were also killed, except C. krusei and C. glabrata. This study shows that FLZ has fungicidal activity for Candida species under in vitro conditions that mimic the vaginal microenvironment. This raises the possibility that FLZ may also have fungicidal effects during treatment of vaginal candidiasis. Elucidating the mechanism by which FLZ and acetate interact may disclose vulnerable pathways that could be exploited in drug development. PMID:14693534

  6. An active alignment method for post launch co-alignment of laser beam combiner systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, A. W.; Green, J. W.; Maynard, W. L.; Minott, P. O.; Krainak, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    A laser transmitter for high bandwidth geosynchronous satellite communications is described. High optical power is achieved by combining semiconductor laser diodes. An active alignment scheme is proposed for achieving the +/- 20 microrad post launch multiple laser angular co-alignment requirement.

  7. Low level laser therapy reduces inflammation in activated Achilles tendinitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjordal, Jan M.; Iversen, Vegard; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro B.

    2006-02-01

    Objective: Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been forwarded as therapy for osteoarthritis and tendinopathy. Results in animal and cell studies suggest that LLLT may act through a biological mechanism of inflammatory modulation. The current study was designed to investigate if LLLT has an anti-inflammatory effect on activated tendinitis of the Achilles tendon. Methods: Seven patients with bilateral Achilles tendonitis (14 tendons) who had aggravated symptoms by pain-inducing activity immediately prior to the study. LLLT (1.8 Joules for each of three points along the Achilles tendon with 904nm infrared laser) and placebo LLLT were administered to either Achilles tendons in a random order to which patients and therapist were blinded. Inflammation was examined by 1) mini-invasive microdialysis for measuring the concentration of inflammatory marker PGE II in the peritendinous tissue, 2) ultrasound with Doppler measurement of peri- and intratendinous blood flow, 3) pressure pain algometry and 4) single hop test. Results: PGE 2- levels were significantly reduced at 75, 90 and 105 minutes after active LLLT compared both to pre-treatment levels (p=0.026) and to placebo LLLT (p=0.009). Changes in pressure pain threshold (PPT) were significantly different (P=0.012) between groups. PPT increased by a mean value of 0.19 kg/cm2 [95%CI:0.04 to 0.34] after treatment in the active LLLT group, while pressure pain threshold was reduced by -0.20 kg/cm2 [95%CI:-0.45 to 0.05] after placebo LLLT. Conclusion: LLLT can be used to reduce inflammatory musculskeletal pain as it reduces inflammation and increases pressure pain threshold levels in activity-induced pain episodes of Achilles tendinopathy.

  8. The effects of low-level laser irradiation on cellular viability and proliferation of human skin fibroblasts cultured in high glucose mediums.

    PubMed

    Esmaeelinejad, Mohammad; Bayat, Mohammad; Darbandi, Hasan; Bayat, Mehrnoush; Mosaffa, Nariman

    2014-01-01

    Delayed wound healing is one of the most challenging complications of diabetes mellitus (DM) in clinical medicine. This study has aimed to evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on human skin fibroblasts (HSFs) cultured in a high glucose concentration. HSFs were cultured either in a concentration of physiologic glucose (5.5 mM/l) or high glucose media (11.1 and 15 mM/l) for either 1 or 2 weeks after which they were subsequently cultured in either the physiologic glucose or high concentration glucose media during laser irradiation. LLLT was carried out with a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser unit at energy densities of 0.5, 1, and 2 J/cm(2), and power density of 0.66 mW/cm(2) on 3 consecutive days. HSFs' viability and proliferation rate were evaluated with the dimethylthiazol-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The LLLT at densities of 0.5 and 1 J/cm(2) had stimulatory effects on the viability and proliferation rate of HSFs cultured in physiologic glucose (5.5 mM/l) medium compared to their control cultures (p = 0.002 and p = 0.046, respectively). All three doses of 0.5, 1, and 2 J/cm(2) had stimulatory effects on the proliferation rate of HSFs cultured in high glucose concentrations when compared to their control cultures (p = 0.042, p = 0.000, and p = 0.000, respectively). This study showed that HSFs originally cultured for 2 weeks in high glucose concentration followed by culture in physiologic glucose during laser irradiation showed enhanced cell viability and proliferation. Thus, LLLT had a stimulatory effect on these HSFs. PMID:23455657

  9. Laser Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  10. Frequency Tunable Wire Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention provides frequency tunable solid-state radiation-generating devices, such as lasers and amplifiers, whose active medium has a size in at least one transverse dimension (e.g., its width) that is much smaller than the wavelength of radiation generated and/or amplified within the active medium. In such devices, a fraction of radiation travels as an evanescent propagating mode outside the active medium. It has been discovered that in such devices the radiation frequency can be tuned by the interaction of a tuning mechanism with the propagating evanescent mode.

  11. The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS): A Medium-Altitude, Digitization-Only, Airborne Laser Altimeter for Mapping Vegetation and Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, J. Bryan; Rabine, David L.; Hofton, Michelle A.

    1999-01-01

    The Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) is an airborne, scanning laser altimeter designed and developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. LVIS operates at altitudes up to 10 km above ground, and is capable of producing a data swath up to 1000 m wide nominally with 25 m wide footprints. The entire time history of the outgoing and return pulses is digitized, allowing unambiguous determination of range and return pulse structure. Combined with aircraft position and attitude knowledge, this instrument produces topographic maps with decimeter accuracy and vertical height and structure measurements of vegetation. The laser transmitter is a diode-pumped Nd:YAG oscillator producing 1064 nm, 10 nsec, 5 mJ pulses at repetition rates up to 500 Hz. LVIS has recently demonstrated its ability to determine topography (including sub-canopy) and vegetation height and structure on flight missions to various forested regions in the U.S. and Central America. The LVIS system is the airborne simulator for the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mission (a NASA Earth remote sensing satellite due for launch in 2000), providing simulated data sets and a platform for instrument proof-of-concept studies. The topography maps and return waveforms produced by LVIS provide Earth scientists with a unique data set allowing studies of topography, hydrology, and vegetation with unmatched accuracy and coverage.

  12. High power continuous wave injection-locked solid state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nabors, C.D.; Byer, R.L.

    1991-06-25

    This patent describes an injection locked laser system. It comprises a master laser, the master laser including a solid state gain medium and having a continuous wave, single frequency output; a slave laser including a solid state gain medium located in a resonant cavity and having a continuous wave output at a power at least ten times greater than the master laser, with the output of the master laser being injected into the slave laser in order to cause the slave laser to oscillate at the same frequency as the output of the master laser; and means for actively stabilizing the slave laser so that its output frequency remains locked with the output frequency of the master laser.

  13. Effects of novel auto-inducible medium on growth, activity and CO₂ capture capacity of Escherichia coli expressing carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Watson, Stuart K; Kan, Eunsung

    2015-10-01

    A glucose-based auto-inducible medium (glucose-AIM) has been developed to enhance both growth and expression of lac operon-linked carbonic anhydrase (CA) expression in a recombinant strain of Escherichia coli. When the E. coli expressing CA was grown on various media, the glucose-based auto-inducible medium (glucose AIM) resulted in a CA activity of 1022 mU OD(600 nm)(-1) mL(-1) at 24 h and a specific growth rate of 0.082 h(-1). The CA activity was four to fourteen times higher than those by LB-IPTG. The E. coli expressing CA grown on the glucose-AIM showed highest activity at pH8.5 while it kept high stability up to 40°C and an inlet CO2 concentration of 6%. These findings indicate that the glucose-AIM would be a cost-effective medium to support high cell growth, CA activity and stability for effective CO2 capture. PMID:26264623

  14. Monolithically, widely tunable quantum cascade lasers based on a heterogeneous active region design

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenjia; Bandyopadhyay, Neelanjan; Wu, Donghai; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have become important laser sources for accessing the mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral range, achieving watt-level continuous wave operation in a compact package at room temperature. However, up to now, wavelength tuning, which is desirable for most applications, has relied on external cavity feedback or exhibited a limited monolithic tuning range. Here we demonstrate a widely tunable QCL source over the 6.2 to 9.1 μm wavelength range with a single emitting aperture by integrating an eight-laser sampled grating distributed feedback laser array with an on-chip beam combiner. The laser gain medium is based on a five-core heterogeneous QCL wafer. A compact tunable laser system was built to drive the individual lasers within the array and produce any desired wavelength within the available spectral range. A rapid, broadband spectral measurement (520 cm−1) of methane using the tunable laser source shows excellent agreement to a measurement made using a standard low-speed infrared spectrometer. This monolithic, widely tunable laser technology is compact, with no moving parts, and will open new opportunities for MIR spectroscopy and chemical sensing. PMID:27270634

  15. Monolithically, widely tunable quantum cascade lasers based on a heterogeneous active region design.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjia; Bandyopadhyay, Neelanjan; Wu, Donghai; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2016-06-08

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have become important laser sources for accessing the mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral range, achieving watt-level continuous wave operation in a compact package at room temperature. However, up to now, wavelength tuning, which is desirable for most applications, has relied on external cavity feedback or exhibited a limited monolithic tuning range. Here we demonstrate a widely tunable QCL source over the 6.2 to 9.1 μm wavelength range with a single emitting aperture by integrating an eight-laser sampled grating distributed feedback laser array with an on-chip beam combiner. The laser gain medium is based on a five-core heterogeneous QCL wafer. A compact tunable laser system was built to drive the individual lasers within the array and produce any desired wavelength within the available spectral range. A rapid, broadband spectral measurement (520 cm(-1)) of methane using the tunable laser source shows excellent agreement to a measurement made using a standard low-speed infrared spectrometer. This monolithic, widely tunable laser technology is compact, with no moving parts, and will open new opportunities for MIR spectroscopy and chemical sensing.

  16. Monolithically, widely tunable quantum cascade lasers based on a heterogeneous active region design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenjia; Bandyopadhyay, Neelanjan; Wu, Donghai; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2016-06-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have become important laser sources for accessing the mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral range, achieving watt-level continuous wave operation in a compact package at room temperature. However, up to now, wavelength tuning, which is desirable for most applications, has relied on external cavity feedback or exhibited a limited monolithic tuning range. Here we demonstrate a widely tunable QCL source over the 6.2 to 9.1 μm wavelength range with a single emitting aperture by integrating an eight-laser sampled grating distributed feedback laser array with an on-chip beam combiner. The laser gain medium is based on a five-core heterogeneous QCL wafer. A compact tunable laser system was built to drive the individual lasers within the array and produce any desired wavelength within the available spectral range. A rapid, broadband spectral measurement (520 cm‑1) of methane using the tunable laser source shows excellent agreement to a measurement made using a standard low-speed infrared spectrometer. This monolithic, widely tunable laser technology is compact, with no moving parts, and will open new opportunities for MIR spectroscopy and chemical sensing.

  17. Monolithically, widely tunable quantum cascade lasers based on a heterogeneous active region design.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjia; Bandyopadhyay, Neelanjan; Wu, Donghai; McClintock, Ryan; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) have become important laser sources for accessing the mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral range, achieving watt-level continuous wave operation in a compact package at room temperature. However, up to now, wavelength tuning, which is desirable for most applications, has relied on external cavity feedback or exhibited a limited monolithic tuning range. Here we demonstrate a widely tunable QCL source over the 6.2 to 9.1 μm wavelength range with a single emitting aperture by integrating an eight-laser sampled grating distributed feedback laser array with an on-chip beam combiner. The laser gain medium is based on a five-core heterogeneous QCL wafer. A compact tunable laser system was built to drive the individual lasers within the array and produce any desired wavelength within the available spectral range. A rapid, broadband spectral measurement (520 cm(-1)) of methane using the tunable laser source shows excellent agreement to a measurement made using a standard low-speed infrared spectrometer. This monolithic, widely tunable laser technology is compact, with no moving parts, and will open new opportunities for MIR spectroscopy and chemical sensing. PMID:27270634

  18. Second malignancies in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma treated with low and medium activities of radioactive I-131

    PubMed Central

    PICIU, DOINA; PESTEAN, CLAUDIU; BARBUS, ELENA; LARG, MARIA IULIA; PICIU, ANDRA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim This study aimed at determining whether there is a risk regarding the development of second primary malignancies after patient exposure to the low and medium radioiodine activity used during the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC). Methods Second primary malignancies that occurred after DTC were detected in 1,990 patients treated between 1970 and 2003. The mean long-term follow-up period was 182 months. Results Radioiodine I-131was administrated at a mean dose of 63.2 mCi. There were 93 patients with at least one second primary malignancy. The relative risk of development of second malignancy in DTC patients was increased (p<0.0001) for breast, uterine and ovarian cancers compared with the general population. Conclusions The overall risk concerning the development of second primary malignancies was related to the presence of DTC, but not to exposure to the low and medium activities of radioiodine administered as adjuvant therapy. PMID:27547058

  19. Backward reflection analysis of transmitting channel of active laser ranging optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jinsuk; Koh, Hae Seog

    2013-09-01

    The designed Active LDR(Laser Detection and Ranging) System contains high-power Laser and its diameter is approximately 24mm. Although the laser transmitting channel and receiving optic channel are completely separated from each other and doesn't share any of the optical components in design, each channel shares 4 wedge scanners, which are to overcome the narrow FOV(Field of View) of the optical system. Any backward reflection back to the fiber laser end must be carefully studied since it can damage the LD(Laser Diodes), the inner components of the laser unit because of the high amplification factor of the laser unit. In this study, the stray light caused by the transmitting channel's laser and inner reflection by optical components were analyzed by ASAP(Advanced System Analysis Program) software. We also can confirm the operability and stability of the system by more than 6 months of operation of the system.

  20. Active Laser Guide Star refocusing system for EAGLE instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Madec, Fabrice; Vives, Sébastien; Chardin, Elodie; Ferrari, Marc; Le Mignant, David; Gimenez, Jean Luc; Mazzanti, Silvio; Vola, Pascal; Cuby, Jean Gabriel

    We detail the study of a laser guide star (LGS) refocusing system based on an variable curvature mirror (VCM) of high dynamic, in the frame of the EAGLE instrument for the E-ELT. From the top level requirements, an on axis optical design based on an active component is optimised to ensure maximal performance in terms of encircled energy. The refocusing is operated by the VCM, which shape varies with the distance of the sodium layer to the telescope. The VCM system concept is based on an embedded metrology. We detail the finite element analysis (FEA) of the VCM, allowing an optimization of the thickness profile to get an optical quality better than λ/5 RMS at each curvature. Mechanical design and manufacturing of prototypes are also presented.

  1. On the modified active region design of interband cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, M.; Ryczko, K.; Dyksik, M.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Weih, R.; Dallner, M.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2015-02-28

    Type II InAs/GaInSb quantum wells (QWs) grown on GaSb or InAs substrates and designed to be integrated in the active region of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the mid infrared have been investigated. Optical spectroscopy, combined with band structure calculations, has been used to probe their electronic properties. A design with multiple InAs QWs has been compared with the more common double W-shaped QW and it has been demonstrated that it allows red shifting the emission wavelength and enhancing the transition oscillator strength. This can be beneficial for the improvements of the ICLs performances, especially when considering their long-wavelength operation.

  2. Active/passive mode-locked laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Fountain, William D.; Johnson, Bertram C.

    1977-01-01

    A Q-switched/mode-locked Nd:YAG laser oscillator employing simultaneous active (electro-optic) and passive (saturable absorber) loss modulation within the optical cavity is described. This "dual modulation" oscillator can produce transform-limited pulses of duration ranging from about 30 psec to about 5 nsec with greatly improved stability compared to other mode-locked systems. The pulses produced by this system lack intrapulse frequency or amplitude modulation, and hence are idealy suited for amplification to high energies and for other applications where well-defined pulses are required. Also, the pulses of this system have excellent interpulse characteristics, wherein the optical noise between the individual pulses of the pulse train has a power level well below the power of the peak pulse of the train.

  3. Efficient active depth sensing by laser speckle projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xuanwu; Wang, Guijin; Shi, Chenbo; Liao, Qingmin

    2014-01-01

    An active depth sensing approach by laser speckle projection system is proposed. After capturing the speckle pattern with an infrared digital camera, we extract the pure speckle pattern using a direct-global separation method. Then the pure speckles are represented by Census binary features. By evaluating the matching cost and uniqueness between the real-time image and the reference image, robust correspondences are selected as support points. After that, we build a disparity grid and propose a generative graphical model to compute disparities. An iterative approach is designed to propagate the messages between blocks and update the model. Finally, a dense depth map can be obtained by subpixel interpolation and transformation. The experimental evaluations demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach.

  4. Low-power laser irradiation enhance macrophage phagocytic capacity through Src activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shengnan; Zhou, Feifan; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Phagocytosis and subsequent degradation of pathogens by macrophages play a pivotal role in host innate immunity in mammals. Laser irradiation has been found to produce photobiological effects with evidence of interference with organic functions. In this study, we focused our attention on the effects of He-Ne laser on the phagocytic activity of macrophages, the regulation mechanism of phagocytosis was also discussed. Our results indicated that Low-power laser irradiation can enhance the phagocytosis of macrophage through activation of Src.

  5. Influence of the finite linewidth of the laser radiation spectrum on the shape of the coherent population trapping resonance line in an optically dense medium with a buffer gas

    SciTech Connect

    Barantsev, K. A. Popov, E. N.; Litvinov, A. N.

    2015-11-15

    The theory of coherent population trapping resonance is developed for the finite linewidth of the laser radiation spectrum in an optically dense medium of Λ atoms in a cell with a buffer gas. Equations are derived for the atomic density matrix and laser emission spectrum transfer in a cell with working and buffer gases at a finite temperature. The dependence of the quality factor of coherent population trapping resonance on the linewidth of the laser radiation spectrum is studied by measuring transmitted radiation and fluorescence signals.

  6. Subwavelength micropillar array terahertz lasers.

    PubMed

    Krall, Michael; Brandstetter, Martin; Deutsch, Christoph; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried; Unterrainer, Karl

    2014-01-13

    We report on micropillar-based terahertz lasers with active pillars that are much smaller than the emission wavelength. These micropillar array lasers correspond to scaled-down band-edge photonic crystal lasers forming an active photonic metamaterial. In contrast to photonic crystal lasers which use significantly larger pillar structures, lasing emission is not observed close to high-symmetry points in the photonic band diagram, but in the effective medium regime. We measure stimulated emission at 4 THz for micropillar array lasers with pillar diameters of 5 µm. Our results not only demonstrate the integration of active subwavelength optics in a terahertz laser, but are also an important step towards the realization of nanowire-based terahertz lasers.

  7. Temperature activated absorption during laser-induced damage: The evolution of laser-supported solid-state absorption fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Bude, J D; Shen, N; Demange, P

    2010-10-26

    Previously we have shown that the size of laser induced damage sites in both KDP and SiO{sub 2} is largely governed by the duration of the laser pulse which creates them. Here we present a model based on experiment and simulation that accounts for this behavior. Specifically, we show that solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts are generated during a damage event and that these fronts propagate at constant velocities for laser intensities up to 4 GW/cm{sup 2}. It is the constant absorption front velocity that leads to the dependence of laser damage site size on pulse duration. We show that these absorption fronts are driven principally by the temperature-activated deep sub band-gap optical absorptivity, free electron transport, and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15,000K and pressures < 15GPa. In addition to the practical application of selecting an optimal laser for pre-initiation of large aperture optics, this work serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

  8. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity and molecular docking of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized oxygen heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Dongamanti, Ashok; Aamate, Vikas Kumar; Devulapally, Mohan Gandhi; Gundu, Srinivas; Kotni, Meena Kumari; Manga, Vijjulatha; Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Ernala, Prasad

    2015-02-15

    A convenient approach for the synthesis of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized heterocyclic rings (eight-, nine-, ten- and eleven-membered rings) containing two oxygen atoms from flavonols through alkylation using different dibromoalkanes was described. The synthesized compounds were established based on the spectral data and X-ray crystal structure for 6c. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Docking studies were carried out for most active two compounds 6f and 6i. PMID:25592711

  9. Synthesis, antimicrobial activity and molecular docking of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized oxygen heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Dongamanti, Ashok; Aamate, Vikas Kumar; Devulapally, Mohan Gandhi; Gundu, Srinivas; Kotni, Meena Kumari; Manga, Vijjulatha; Balasubramanian, Sridhar; Ernala, Prasad

    2015-02-15

    A convenient approach for the synthesis of novel tetracyclic scaffolds incorporating a flavonoid framework with medium sized heterocyclic rings (eight-, nine-, ten- and eleven-membered rings) containing two oxygen atoms from flavonols through alkylation using different dibromoalkanes was described. The synthesized compounds were established based on the spectral data and X-ray crystal structure for 6c. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Docking studies were carried out for most active two compounds 6f and 6i.

  10. Creating a flipbook as a medium of instruction based on the research on activity test of kencur extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monika, Icha; Yeni, Laili Fitri; Ariyati, Eka

    2016-02-01

    This research aimed to reveal the validity of the flipbook as a medium of learning for the sub-material of environmental pollution in the tenth grade based on the results of the activity test of kencur (Kaempferia galanga) extract to control the growth of the Fusarium oxysporum fungus. The research consisted of two stages. First, testing the validity of the medium of flipbook through validation by seven assessors and analyzed based on the total average score of all aspects. Second, testing the activity of the kencur extract against the growth of Fusarium oxysporum by using the experimental method with 10 treatments and 3 repetitions which were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. The making of the flipbook medium was done through the stages of analysis for the potential and problems, data collection, design, validation, and revision. The validation analysis on the flipbook received an average score of 3.7 and was valid to a certain extent, so it could be used in the teaching and learning process especially in the sub-material of environmental pollution in the tenth grade of the senior high school.

  11. The effect of medium on selected life-history traits in three clones of Lecane inermis (Rotifera) from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Pajdak-Stós, Agnieszka; Kocerba, Wioleta; Fiałkowska, Edyta; Klimek, Beata; Fyda, Janusz

    2011-01-01

    We tested the effect of various culture media on life-history traits in three clones of the rotifer Lecane inermis, a potential bulking control agent. Four types of media were tested: a filtrate of activated sludge, mineral water, and each of these media enriched with molasses. The number of live and dead individuals and the number of amictic eggs were counted during the 14-day experiment, and the egg ratio (ER) and mortality rate were calculated. We found that the rotifers were well adapted to the changes in chemical composition of the medium and that the addition of molasses resulted in a significant increase in rotifer abundance. The highest ER was noted after two days, reaching a maximum of 4 eggs per female in treatments with filtrate and molasses-enriched filtrate. The life-history traits varied depending on the clone and the medium, but all of the clones were able to survive and proliferate, even after 14 days of starvation.

  12. Laser with a transmitting window.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, M. B.; Lamb, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of transmission of radiation through one mirror of a laser is investigated. For a laser oscillator the result is to change the effective resonance frequency and Q of the cavity. Using the same model for the cavity, a signal is injected into the active medium through the transmitting window, and its effect on the system studied. When the external signal is strong enough and sufficiently close to the natural frequency of the laser oscillator, the laser locks its frequency to the input signal. The equations describing the system are solved over the range of input frequencies where the laser is locked, and the resulting gain found. In the high-intensity limit the medium saturates, and the gain tends to that of a lossy cavity. As the input intensity vanishes, the gain approaches infinity and the system tends to a laser oscillator.

  13. Experimental studies on output, spatial, and spectral characteristics of a microdroplet dye laser containing intralipid as a highly scattering medium

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Tanosaki, Shinji; Tsujita, Kazuhiro; Inaba, Humio

    1996-11-01

    Lasing characteristics of Rhodamine 6G dye-doped microdroplets containing highly scattering fat emulsion Intralipid-10% are studied experimentally. Noteworthy findings are that well-defined lasing threshold can be observed and one order or more magnitude enhancement of emission intensity with suitable (optimum) conditions of the Intralipid mixing ratio, in comparison with original neat-dye lasing microdroplets. The authors present and discuss the measured results of input-output intensities for different dye concentrations and dye-Intralipid mixing ratios in this high-gain laser dye-soft scatterer system and microscope images of spatial distribution of light emission from both the microdroplets containing neat-dye and dye-Intralipid mixture. It was found that almost no-lasing neat-dye microdroplets, which have either much higher or much lower dye concentration, can achieve lasing by substituting suitably certain amounts of the Intralipid, causing multiple light scattering. Spectral measurements of lasing outputs from the Rhodamine 6G dye-Intralipid microdroplets show the tendency of the disappearance of the well-known mode structures, owing to the morphology-dependent resonances of this microspherical cavity inherent to the neat-dye microdroplets. It is their belief that the present results make this novel method of dye-Intralipid microsystem very attractive for a variety of future applications, including diagnostic tools for highly sensitive detection and identification of small quantity objects and species embedded or hidden in highly scattering media.

  14. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Sukhov, I A; Lepekhin, N M; Priseko, Yu S; Filippov, V G; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2013-06-30

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg; George, E. Victor; Krupke, William F.; Sooy, Walter; Sutton, Steven B.

    1996-01-01

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

  16. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

    1996-06-11

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

  17. Thermally activated decomposition of (Ga,Mn)As thin layer at medium temperature post growth annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikhov, Y.; Konstantynov, P.; Domagala, J.; Sadowski, J.; Chernyshova, M.; Wojciechowski, T.; Syryanyy, Y.; Demchenko, I. N.

    2016-05-01

    The redistribution of Mn atoms in Ga1-xMnxAs layer during medium-temperature annealing, 250-450 oC, by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) recorded at ALBA facility, was studied. For this purpose Ga1-xMnxAs thin layer with x=0.01 was grown on AlAs buffer layer deposited on GaAs(100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) followed by annealing. The examined layer was detached from the substrate using a “lift-off” procedure in order to eliminate elastic scattering in XAFS spectra. Fourier transform analysis of experimentally obtained EXAFS spectra allowed to propose a model which describes a redistribution/diffusion of Mn atoms in the host matrix. Theoretical XANES spectra, simulated using multiple scattering formalism (FEFF code) with the support of density functional theory (WIEN2k code), qualitatively describe the features observed in the experimental fine structure.

  18. Quantitative structure activity relationships of some pyridine derivatives as corrosion inhibitors of steel in acidic medium.

    PubMed

    El Ashry, El Sayed H; El Nemr, Ahmed; Ragab, Safaa

    2012-03-01

    Quantum chemical calculations using the density functional theory (B3LYP/6-31G DFT) and semi-empirical AM1 methods were performed on ten pyridine derivatives used as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in acidic medium to determine the relationship between molecular structure and their inhibition efficiencies. Quantum chemical parameters such as total negative charge (TNC) on the molecule, energy of highest occupied molecular orbital (E (HOMO)), energy of lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E (LUMO)) and dipole moment (μ) as well as linear solvation energy terms, molecular volume (Vi) and dipolar-polarization (π) were correlated to corrosion inhibition efficiency of ten pyridine derivatives. A possible correlation between corrosion inhibition efficiencies and structural properties was searched to reduce the number of compounds to be selected for testing from a library of compounds. It was found that theoretical data support the experimental results. The results were used to predict the corrosion inhibition of 24 related pyridine derivatives.

  19. Reduction of methylene green by EDTA: a relation between dielectric constant of medium and activated state.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Noshab; Azmat, Rafia; Naz, Raheela

    2013-01-01

    Kinetics of an alkaline reduction of the methylene green with ethylenediaminetetraaceticacid (EDTA) as a role of dielectric constant of the medium with anecdotal ionic strength in a diverse solvent system (aqueous mixtures of methanol) (10-30%) was studied by measuring the specific rate constant of the reaction spectrophotometrically at λ (max) = 660nm. An effort has been made to give an elucidation of vital role of dielectric constant of the medium captivating into reflection of single sphere and double sphere complex in reaction assortment. This investigation leads to disclose that single sphere complex of the dye and reductant was found to be the most suitable complex existed in a varied organic solvent. The deviation of the theoretical values from experimental results for single sphere and double sphere complex model in the presence of an alkali and nitrate ions were justified through HPLC analysis. HPLC analysis recommended that a considerable amount of the dye degrades in the existence of nitrate ion and alkali and additional peaks which may be of by-product were obtained. This leads to confirm the non identical values of single sphere and double sphere model in the occurrence of nitrate and an alkali. Rate of deletion of color showed a linear liaison with respect to water content below 30% and temperature between 20-40(o)C whereas an increase in the concentration of organic solvent showed the inhibition of dye decoloration at given optimum condition. Therefore study was restricted up to 30% of methanol binary mixtures. A mechanism of reduction of dye has been proposed based on verdict.

  20. Order of Activity of Nitrogen, Iron Oxide, and FeNx Complexes towards Oxygen Reduction in Alkaline Medium.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yansong; Zhang, Bingsen; Wang, Da-Wei; Su, Dang Sheng

    2015-12-01

    In alkaline medium, it seems that both metal-free and iron-containing carbon-based catalysts, such as nitrogen-doped nanocarbon materials, FeOx -doped carbon, and Fe/N/C catalysts, are active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, the order of activity of these different active compositions has not been clearly determined. Herein, we synthesized nitrogen-doped carbon black (NCB), Fe3 O4 /CB, Fe3 O4 /NCB, and FeN4 /CB. Through the systematic study of the ORR catalytic activity of these four catalysts in alkaline solution, we confirmed the difference in the catalytic activity and catalytic mechanism for nitrogen, iron oxides, and Fe-N complexes, respectively. In metal-free NCB, nitrogen can improve the ORR catalytic activity with a four-electron pathway. Fe3 O4 /CB catalyst did not exhibit improved activity over that of NCB owing to the poor conductivity and spinel structure of Fe3 O4 . However, FeN4 coordination compounds as the active sites showed excellent ORR catalytic activity.

  1. Comparative study of LiMn 2O 4 thin film cathode grown at high, medium and low temperatures by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, S. B.; Lai, M. O.; Lu, L.; Tripathy, S.

    2006-12-01

    LiMn 2O 4 thin films with different crystallizations were respectively grown at high, medium and low temperatures by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Structures, morphologies and electrochemical properties of these three types of thin films were comparatively studied. Films grown at high temperature (⩾873 K) possessed flat and smooth surfaces and were highly crystallized with different textures and crystal sizes depending on the deposition pressure of oxygen. However, films deposited at low temperature (473 K) had rough surfaces with amorphous characteristics. At medium temperature (673 K), the film was found to consist mainly of nano-crystals less than 100 nm with relatively loose and rough surfaces, but very dense as observed from the cross-section. The film deposited at 873 K and 100 mTorr of oxygen showed an initial discharge capacity of 54.3 μAh/cm 2 μm and decayed at 0.28% per cycle, while the amorphous film had an initial discharge capacity of 20.2 μAh/cm 2 μm and a loss rate of 0.29% per cycle. Compared with the highly crystallized and the amorphous films, nano-crystalline film exhibited higher potential, more capacity and much better cycling stability. As high as 61 μAh/cm 2 μm of discharge capacity can be achieved with an average decaying rate of only 0.032% per cycle up to 500 cycles. The excellent performance of nano-crystalline film was correlated to its microstructures in the present study.

  2. Laser-activated protein solder for peripheral nerve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickett, Rodney I.; Lauto, Antonio; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1995-05-01

    A 100 micrometers core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the albumin based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 +/- 5 min. (n equals 20) compared to 23 +/- 9 min. (n equals 10) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 +/- 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 +/- 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study is under way comparing laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. At the time of submission 15 laser soldered nerves and 7 sutured nerves were characterized at 3 months and showed successful regeneration with compound muscle action potentials of 27 +/- 8 mV and 29 +/- 8 mW respectively. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  3. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  4. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock.

    PubMed

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed.

  5. Active stabilization of a diode laser injection lock.

    PubMed

    Saxberg, Brendan; Plotkin-Swing, Benjamin; Gupta, Subhadeep

    2016-06-01

    We report on a device to electronically stabilize the optical injection lock of a semiconductor diode laser. Our technique uses as discriminator the peak height of the laser's transmission signal on a scanning Fabry-Perot cavity and feeds back to the diode current, thereby maintaining maximum optical power in the injected mode. A two-component feedback algorithm provides constant optimization of the injection lock, keeping it robust to slow thermal drifts and allowing fast recovery from sudden failures such as temporary occlusion of the injection beam. We demonstrate the successful performance of our stabilization method in a diode laser setup at 399 nm used for laser cooling of Yb atoms. The device eases the requirements on passive stabilization and can benefit any diode laser injection lock application, particularly those where several such locks are employed. PMID:27370428

  6. Optical Properties of Active Regions in Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyksik, M.; Motyka, M.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Pucicki, D.; Kosiel, K.; Sankowska, I.; Kubacka-Traczyk, J.; Bugajski, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, AlGaAs/GaAs superlattice, with layers' sequence and compositions imitating the active and injector regions of a quantum cascade laser designed for emission in the terahertz spectral range, was investigated. Three independent absorption-like optical spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to study the band structure of the minibands formed within the conduction band. Photoreflectance measurements provided information about interband transitions in the investigated system. Common transmission spectra revealed, in the target range of intraband transitions, mainly a number of lines associated with the phonon-related processes, including two-phonon absorption. In contrast, differential transmittance realized by means of Fourier-transform spectroscopy was utilized to probe the confined states of the conduction band. The obtained energy separation between the second and third confined electron levels, expected to be predominantly contributing to the lasing, was found to be ~9 meV. The optical spectroscopy measurements were supported by numerical calculations performed in the effective mass approximation and XRD measurements for layers' width verification. The calculated energy spacings are in a good agreement with the experimental values.

  7. Laser-activated remote phosphor conversion with ceramic phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenef, Alan; Kelso, John; Tchoul, Maxim; Mehl, Oliver; Sorg, Jörg; Zheng, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Direct laser activation of a remote phosphor, or LARP, is a highly effective approach for producing very high luminance solid-state light sources. Such sources have much smaller étendue than LEDs of similar power, thereby greatly increasing system luminous fluxes in projection and display applications. While several commercial products now employ LARP technology, most current configurations employ phosphor powders in a silicone matrix deposited on rotating wheels. These provide a low excitation duty cycle that helps limit quenching and thermal overload. These systems already operate close to maximum achievable pump powers and intensities. To further increase power scaling and eliminate mechanical parts to achieve smaller footprints, OSRAM has been developing static LARP systems based on high-thermal conductivity monolithic ceramic phosphors. OSRAM has recently introduced a static LARP product using ceramic phosphor for endoscopy and also demonstrated a LARP concept for automotive forward lighting1. We first discuss the basic LARP concept with ceramic phosphors, showing how their improved thermal conductivity can achieve both high luminous fluxes and luminance in a static configuration. Secondly, we show the importance of scattering and low optical losses to achieving high overall efficiency and light extraction. This is shown through experimental results and radiation transport calculations. Finally, we discuss some of the fundamental factors which limit the ultimate luminance achievable with ceramic converted LARP, including optical pumping effects and thermal quenching.

  8. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  9. Frequency stabilization of diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Sunlite program is to fly two diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers on the space shuttle and while doing so to perform a measurement of their frequency stability and temporal coherence. These measurements will be made by combining the outputs of the two lasers on an optical radiation detector and spectrally analyzing the beat note. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers have several characteristics that will make them useful in space borne experiments. First, this laser has high electrical efficiency. Second, it is of a technology that enables scaling to higher powers in the future. Third, the laser can be made extremely reliable, which is crucial for many space based applications. Fourth, they are frequency and amplitude stable and have high temporal coherence. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are inherently efficient. Recent results have shown 59 percent slope efficiency for a diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser. As for reliability, the laser proposed should be capable of continuous operation. This is possible because the diode lasers can be remote from the solid state gain medium by coupling through optical fibers. Diode lasers are constructed with optical detectors for monitoring their output power built into their mounting case. A computer can actively monitor the output of each diode laser. If it sees any variation in the output power that might indicate a problem, the computer can turn off that diode laser and turn on a backup diode laser. As for stability requirements, it is now generally believed that any laser can be stabilized if the laser has a frequency actuator capable of tuning the laser frequency as far as it is likely to drift in a measurement time.

  10. Effects of Solid-Medium Type on Routine Identification of Bacterial Isolates by Use of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Neil W.; Buchan, Blake W.; Riebe, Katherine M.; Parsons, Lauren N.; Gnacinski, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a rapid method for the identification of bacteria. Factors that may alter protein profiles, including growth conditions and presence of exogenous substances, could hinder identification. Bacterial isolates identified by conventional methods were grown on various media and identified using the MALDI Biotyper (Bruker Daltonics, Billerica, MA) using a direct smear method and an acid extraction method. Specimens included 23 Pseudomonas isolates grown on blood agar, Pseudocel (CET), and MacConkey agar (MAC); 20 Staphylococcus isolates grown on blood agar, colistin-nalidixic acid agar (CNA), and mannitol salt agar (MSA); and 25 enteric isolates grown on blood agar, xylose lysine deoxycholate agar (XLD), Hektoen enteric agar (HE), salmonella-shigella agar (SS), and MAC. For Pseudomonas spp., the identification rate to genus using the direct method was 83% from blood, 78% from MAC, and 94% from CET. For Staphylococcus isolates, the identification rate to genus using the direct method was 95% from blood, 75% from CNA, and 95% from MSA. For enteric isolates, the identification rate to genus using the direct method was 100% from blood, 100% from MAC, 100% from XLD, 92% from HE, and 87% from SS. Extraction enhanced identification rates. The direct method of MALDI-TOF analysis of bacteria from selective and differential media yields identifications of varied confidence. Notably, Staphylococci spp. from CNA exhibit low identification rates. Extraction enhances identification rates and is recommended for colonies from this medium. PMID:22162546

  11. Diode-pumped medium-aperture-size square Nd,Y:CaF2 rod amplifier for Inertial Confinement Fusion laser drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiongxin; Qiu, Jisi; Fan, Zhongwei; Su, Liangbi; Wang, Haocheng

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, an 12 mm × 12 mm 0.5%Nd,5% Y:CaF2 crystal rod having a uniformly-distributed fluorescence spectrum and capable of operating as an amplifying medium at high repetition frequencies. A small gain of 2.7 is experimentally achieved at repetition frequency of 10 Hz for a pump center wavelength of 802 nm, power and absorption efficiency, 61.2 kW and 63.7%, respectively. Spatial-uniformity degradation of the output near-field beam distribution is observed, which should be attributed to the inhomogeneity of Nd,Y:CaF2 crystal. For a pump power of 61.2 kW, the stored energy of Nd,Y:CaF2 amplifier is 3.73 J. When the input energy is 50 mJ, the output laser energy is 1.4 J of extraction efficiency up to 37.53% after four-pass amplification.

  12. Laser-activated protein bands for peripheral nerve repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Malik, Richard; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1996-01-01

    A 100 micrometer core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the protein based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 plus or minus 5 min. (n equals 24) compared to 23 plus or minus 9 min (n equals 13) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 plus or minus 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 plus or minus 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study, with a total of fifty-seven adult male wistar rats, compared laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. Twenty-four laser soldered nerves and thirteen sutured nerves were characterized at three months and showed successful regeneration with average compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) of 2.4 plus or minus 0.7 mV and 2.7 plus or minus 0.8 mV respectively. Histopathology of the in vivo study, confirmed the comparable regeneration of axons in laser and suture operated nerves. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  13. Changes of electric cochlea activity of guinea pigs during argon laser stapedotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalski, Wojciech; Pres, Krzysztof; Dziewiszek, Wojciech; Pospiech, Lucyna

    2000-11-01

    Small electric signals appear on surface of a cochlea when the ear is stimulated by sound. A level of the signals can be measured of the electric activity of cochlea. The aim of the experiments was recording of changes of the cochlear potentials during argon laser stapedotomy. On the base of the recording the limits of the safe argon laser stapedotomy have been preliminary estimated. The series of argon laser pulses lasting 0.2-0.5 s and of 16 s interval between the pulses are preferable for safety of argon laser stapedotomy. The pulse peak power should be below 1 W.

  14. Activated macrophage conditioned medium: identification of the soluble factors inducing cytotoxicity and the L-arginine dependent effector mechanism.

    PubMed

    Amber, I J; Hibbs, J B; Parker, C J; Johnson, B B; Taintor, R R; Vavrin, Z

    1991-06-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from cultures of cytotoxic activated macrophages causes inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, DNA synthesis, and aconitase activity in murine EMT-6 mammary adenocarcinoma cells by an L-arginine dependent effector mechanism. CM induces cytotoxicity and nitrite synthesis in EMT-6 cells in a dose dependent manner. We have identified the soluble factors in CM that induce cytotoxicity and synthesis of inorganic nitrogen oxides from L-arginine by EMT-6 cells. Using functional inhibition experiments, the activity of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), and interferon gamma (IFN gamma) in CM was investigated. The LPS inhibitor polymyxin B and TNF alpha antibody produced a modest decrease in nitrite production, while IFN gamma antibody markedly inhibited both nitrite production and cytostasis. Simultaneous treatment with polymyxin B, TNF alpha antibody, and IFN gamma antibody reduced EMT-6 cell nitrite production by 81%, and cytostasis by 74%. By Western blot, IFN gamma and TNF alpha were shown to be present in CM. When CM was subjected to hydrophobic interaction chromatography, a single peak of activity was eluted, and Western blot showed that the active fractions contained IFN gamma. Furthermore, IFN gamma antibody neutralized the activity in these chromatographic fractions. We conclude that induction of inorganic nitrogen oxide synthesis from L-arginine by the synergistic combination of IFN gamma, TNF alpha, and LPS accounts for most of the biologic activity of CM, and that IFN gamma is the major priming factor. PMID:1902865

  15. generation of picosecond pulses in solid-state lasers using new active media

    SciTech Connect

    Lisitsyn, V.N.; Matrosov, V.N.; Pestryakov, E.V.; Trunov, V.I.

    1986-07-01

    Results are reported of investigations aimed at generating nanosecond radiation pulses in solid-state lasers using new active media having broad gain lines. Passive mode locking is accomplished for the first time in a BeLa:Nd/sup 3/ laser at a wavelength 1.354 microm, and in a YAG:Nd/sup 3/ laser on a 1.32-microm transition. The free lasing and mode-locking regimes were investigated in an alexandrite (BeA1/sub 2/O/sub 4/:Cr/sup 3/) laser in the 0.72-0.78-microm range and in a synchronously pumped laser on F/sub 2//sup -/ centers in LiF in the 1.12-1.24-microm region. The features of nonlinear perception of IR radiation by the eye, using a developed picosecond laser on F/sub 2//sup -/ centers, are investigated for the first time.

  16. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity.

    PubMed

    Revin, D G; Hemingway, M; Wang, Y; Cockburn, J W; Belyanin, A

    2016-05-05

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents.

  17. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    PubMed Central

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents. PMID:27147409

  18. Active mode locking of quantum cascade lasers in an external ring cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revin, D. G.; Hemingway, M.; Wang, Y.; Cockburn, J. W.; Belyanin, A.

    2016-05-01

    Stable ultrashort light pulses and frequency combs generated by mode-locked lasers have many important applications including high-resolution spectroscopy, fast chemical detection and identification, studies of ultrafast processes, and laser metrology. While compact mode-locked lasers emitting in the visible and near infrared range have revolutionized photonic technologies, the systems operating in the mid-infrared range where most gases have their strong absorption lines, are bulky and expensive and rely on nonlinear frequency down-conversion. Quantum cascade lasers are the most powerful and versatile compact light sources in the mid-infrared range, yet achieving their mode-locked operation remains a challenge, despite dedicated effort. Here we report the demonstration of active mode locking of an external-cavity quantum cascade laser. The laser operates in the mode-locked regime at room temperature and over the full dynamic range of injection currents.

  19. INEFFICIENT DRIVING OF BULK TURBULENCE BY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN A HYDRODYNAMIC MODEL OF THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Balbus, Steven A.; Schekochihin, Alexander A.

    2015-12-10

    Central jetted active galactic nuclei (AGNs) appear to heat the core regions of the intracluster medium (ICM) in cooling-core galaxy clusters and groups, thereby preventing a cooling catastrophe. However, the physical mechanism(s) by which the directed flow of kinetic energy is thermalized throughout the ICM core remains unclear. We examine one widely discussed mechanism whereby the AGN induces subsonic turbulence in the ambient medium, the dissipation of which provides the ICM heat source. Through controlled inviscid three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we verify that explosive AGN-like events can launch gravity waves (g-modes) into the ambient ICM, which in turn decays to volume-filling turbulence. In our model, however, this process is found to be inefficient, with less than 1% of the energy injected by the AGN activity actually ending up in the turbulence of the ambient ICM. This efficiency is an order of magnitude or more too small to explain the observations of AGN-feedback in galaxy clusters and groups with short central cooling times. Atmospheres in which the g-modes are strongly trapped/confined have an even lower efficiency since, in these models, the excitation of turbulence relies on the g-modes’ ability to escape from the center of the cluster into the bulk ICM. Our results suggest that, if AGN-induced turbulence is indeed the mechanism by which the AGN heats the ICM core, its driving may rely on physics beyond that captured in our ideal hydrodynamic model.

  20. Inefficient Driving of Bulk Turbulence By Active Galactic Nuclei in a Hydrodynamic Model of the Intracluster Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Balbus, Steven A.; Schekochihin, Alexander A.

    2015-12-01

    Central jetted active galactic nuclei (AGNs) appear to heat the core regions of the intracluster medium (ICM) in cooling-core galaxy clusters and groups, thereby preventing a cooling catastrophe. However, the physical mechanism(s) by which the directed flow of kinetic energy is thermalized throughout the ICM core remains unclear. We examine one widely discussed mechanism whereby the AGN induces subsonic turbulence in the ambient medium, the dissipation of which provides the ICM heat source. Through controlled inviscid three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we verify that explosive AGN-like events can launch gravity waves (g-modes) into the ambient ICM, which in turn decays to volume-filling turbulence. In our model, however, this process is found to be inefficient, with less than 1% of the energy injected by the AGN activity actually ending up in the turbulence of the ambient ICM. This efficiency is an order of magnitude or more too small to explain the observations of AGN-feedback in galaxy clusters and groups with short central cooling times. Atmospheres in which the g-modes are strongly trapped/confined have an even lower efficiency since, in these models, the excitation of turbulence relies on the g-modes’ ability to escape from the center of the cluster into the bulk ICM. Our results suggest that, if AGN-induced turbulence is indeed the mechanism by which the AGN heats the ICM core, its driving may rely on physics beyond that captured in our ideal hydrodynamic model.

  1. Pochonia chlamydosporia fungal activity in a solid medium and its crude extract against eggs of Ascaridia galli.

    PubMed

    Braga, F R; Araújo, J V; Araujo, J M; Frassy, L N; Tavela, A O; Soares, F E F; Carvalho, R O; Queiroz, L M; Queiroz, J H

    2012-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the ovicidal activity (type 3 effect) of VC1 and VC4 isolates of Pochonia chlamydosporia in a solid medium and the action of a crude extract of P. chlamydosporia against eggs of Ascaridia galli. To evaluate ovicidal activity in culture medium, 1000 A. galli eggs were plated on Petri dishes containing 2% water-agar with grown fungal isolates (VC1 or VC4) and without fungus (control group) and were examined at 1, 3 and 5 days post-inoculation (assay A). Then, to test the action of crude extracts of P. chlamydosporia (VC1 or VC4), 500 eggs of A. galli were plated on Petri dishes of 4.5 cm diameter with 5 ml of fungal filtrate from each tested isolate. The control group consisted of 500 eggs of A. galli with 10 ml of distilled water on each Petri dish (assay B). Fungal isolates were effective (P < 0.01) at destroying these eggs, showing a type 3 effect at the studied intervals. On the other hand, the crude extract of isolates (VC1 or VC4) reduced the number of A. galli eggs in the treated group compared with the control group by 64.1% and 56.5%, respectively. The results of the present study show that P. chlamydosporia is effective at destroying eggs of A. galli and could therefore be used in the biological control of nematodes. PMID:21838959

  2. NEW ACTIVE MEDIA AND ELEMENTS OF LASER SYSTEMS: Laser with resonators coupled by a dynamic hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, V. B.; Golyanov, A. V.; Luk'yanchuk, B. S.; Ogluzdin, Valerii E.; Rubtsova, I. L.; Sugrobov, V. A.; Khizhnyak, A. I.

    1987-11-01

    The nature of operation of a laser with a phase-conjugate mirror utilizing multibeam interaction was found to have a considerable influence on the coupling of its resonator to the resonator of a laser used to pump the mirror. A system of this kind with resonators coupled by a dynamic hologram exhibited "soft" lasing in the presence of a self-pumped phase-conjugate mirror.

  3. Tetravalent Chromium (Cr(4+)) as Laser-Active Ion for Tunable Solid-State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1993-01-01

    During 10/31/92 - 3/31/93, the following summarizes our major accomplishments: (1) the self-mode-locked operation of the Cr:forsterite laser was achieved; (2) synchronous pumping was used to mode lock the forsterite laser resulting in picosecond pulses, which in turn provided the starting mechanism for self-mode-locking; and (3) the pulses generated had a FWHW of 105 fs and were tunable between 1230 - 1270 nm.

  4. Laser ion source activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro

    2015-07-31

    In Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we have been developing laser ion sources for diverse accelerators. Tabletop Nd:YAG lasers with up to several Joules of energy are mainly used to create ablation plasmas for stable operations. The obtained charge states depend on laser power density and target species. Two types of ion extraction schemes, Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) and conventional static extraction, are used depending on application. We optimized and select a suitable laser irradiation condition and a beam extraction scheme to meet the requirement of the following accelerator system. We have demonstrated to accelerate more than 5 x 1010more » of C6+ ions using the DPIS. We successfully commissioned low charge ion beam provider to the user facilities in BNL. As a result, to achieve higher current, higher charge state and lower emittance, further studies will continue.« less

  5. Laser ion source activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro

    2015-07-31

    In Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we have been developing laser ion sources for diverse accelerators. Tabletop Nd:YAG lasers with up to several Joules of energy are mainly used to create ablation plasmas for stable operations. The obtained charge states depend on laser power density and target species. Two types of ion extraction schemes, Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) and conventional static extraction, are used depending on application. We optimized and select a suitable laser irradiation condition and a beam extraction scheme to meet the requirement of the following accelerator system. We have demonstrated to accelerate more than 5 x 1010 of C6+ ions using the DPIS. We successfully commissioned low charge ion beam provider to the user facilities in BNL. As a result, to achieve higher current, higher charge state and lower emittance, further studies will continue.

  6. Ultrafast vapourization dynamics of laser-activated polymeric microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajoinie, Guillaume; Gelderblom, Erik; Chlon, Ceciel; Böhmer, Marcel; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; de Jong, Nico; Manohar, Srirang; Versluis, Michel

    2014-04-01

    Precision control of vapourization, both in space and time, has many potential applications; however, the physical mechanisms underlying controlled boiling are not well understood. The reason is the combined microscopic length scales and ultrashort timescales associated with the initiation and subsequent dynamical behaviour of the vapour bubbles formed. Here we study the nanoseconds vapour bubble dynamics of laser-heated single oil-filled microcapsules using coupled optical and acoustic detection. Pulsed laser excitation leads to vapour formation and collapse, and a simple physical model captures the observed radial dynamics and resulting acoustic pressures. Continuous wave laser excitation leads to a sequence of vapourization/condensation cycles, the result of absorbing microcapsule fragments moving in and out of the laser beam. A model incorporating thermal diffusion from the capsule shell into the oil core and surrounding water reveals the mechanisms behind the onset of vapourization. Excellent agreement is observed between the modelled dynamics and experiment.

  7. Passive and Active Protective Clothing against High-Power Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennigs, C.; Hustedt, M.; Kaierle, S.; Wenzel, D.; Markstein, S.; Hutter, A.

    The main objective of the work described in this paper was the development of passive and active protective clothing for the protection of the human skin against accidental laser irradiation and of active protective curtains. Here, the passive systems consist of functional multi-layer textiles, providing a high level of passive laser resistance. In addition, the active functional multi-layer textiles incorporate sensors that detect laser exposure and are, by means of a safety control, able to deactivate the laser beam automatically.Due to the lack of regulations for testing and qualifying textiles to be used as laser PPE, test methods were defined and validated. Additionally, corresponding testing set-ups were developed.Finally, the gap with respect to standardization was bridged by the definition of a test procedure and the requirements with respect to laser PPE.The developments were demonstrated by a set of tailored functional passive and active laser-protective clothing prototypes (gloves, jackets, aprons, trousers) and active curtains as well as by a prototype testing rig, providing the possibility to perform the specified low-power and high-power textile test procedure.

  8. Photocatalytic activity of titania coatings synthesised by a combined laser/sol–gel technique

    SciTech Connect

    Adraider, Y.; Pang, Y.X.; Nabhani, F.; Hodgson, S.N.; Sharp, M.C.; Al-Waidh, A.

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Sol–gel method was used to prepare titania coatings. • Titania thin films were coated on substrate surface by dip coating. • Fibre laser was employed to irradiate the titania coated surfaces. • Photocatalytic efficiency of titania coatings was significantly improved after laser processing. - Abstract: Titania coatings were prepared using sol–gel method and then applied on the substrate surface by dip coating. Fibre laser (λ = 1064 nm) in continuous wave mode was used to irradiate the titania coated surfaces at different specific energies. The ATR-FTIR, XRD, SEM, EDS and contact angle measurement were employed to analyse surface morphology, phase composition and crystalline structure of laser-irradiated titania coatings, whilst the photocatalytic activity was evaluated by measuring the decomposition of methylene blue (MB) after exposure to the visible light for various illumination times. Results showed that the laser-irradiated titania coatings demonstrate significant different composition and microstructure in comparison with the as-coated from the same sol–gel titania. Photocatalytic efficiency of titania coatings was significantly improved after laser processing. The photocatalytic activity of laser-irradiated titania coatings was higher than that of the as-coated titania. The titania coating processed at laser specific energy of 6.5 J/mm{sup 2} exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity among all titania samples.

  9. Plasma-activated medium induces A549 cell injury via a spiral apoptotic cascade involving the mitochondrial-nuclear network.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nonomura, Saho; Hara, Hirokazu; Kondo, Shin-ichi; Hori, Masaru

    2015-02-01

    Plasma medicine is a rapidly expanding new field of interdisciplinary research that combines physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma can be applied to living cells and tissues and has emerged as a novel technology for cancer therapy. Plasma has recently been shown to affect cells not only directly, but also by indirect treatment with previously prepared plasma-activated medium (PAM). The objective of this study was to demonstrate the inhibitory effects of PAM on A549 cell survival and elucidate the signaling mechanisms responsible for cell death. PAM maintained its ability to suppress cell viability for at least 1 week when stored at -80°C. The severity of PAM-triggered cell injury depended on the kind of culture medium used to prepare the PAM, especially that with or without pyruvate. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and/or its derived or cooperating reactive oxygen species reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential, downregulated the expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl2, activated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, and released apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria with endoplasmic reticulum stress. However, the activation of caspase 3/7 and attenuation of cell viability by the addition of caspase inhibitor were not observed. The accumulation of adenine 5'-diphosphoribose as a product of the above reactions activated transient receptor potential melastatin 2, which elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels and subsequently led to cell death. These results demonstrated that H2O2 and/or other reactive species in PAM disturbed the mitochondrial-nuclear network in cancer cells through a caspase-independent apoptotic pathway. Moreover, damage to the plasma membrane by H2O2-cooperating charged species not only induced apoptosis, but also increased its permeability to extracellular reactive species. These phenomena were also detected in PAM-treated HepG2 and MCF-7 cells. PMID:25433364

  10. Influence of the active nucleus on the multiphase interstellar medium in NGC 1068

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland-Hawthorn, Jonathan; Weisheit, Jon; Cecil, Gerald; Sokolowski, James

    1993-01-01

    The luminous spiral NGC 1068 has now been imaged from x-ray to radio wavelengths at comparably high resolution (approximately less than 5 in. FWHM). The bolometric luminosity of this well-known Seyfert is shared almost equally between the active nucleus and an extended 'starburst' disk. In an ongoing study, we are investigating the relative importance of the nucleus and the disk in powering the wide range of energetic activity observed throughout the galaxy. Our detailed analysis brings together a wealth of data: ROSAT HRI observations, VLA lambda lambda 6-20 cu cm and OVRO interferometry, lambda lambda 0.4-10.8 micron imaging, and Fabry-Perot spectrophotometry.

  11. Actively mode-locked all fiber laser with cylindrical vector beam output.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Sun, Biao; Xu, Lixin; Li, Feng; Chung, Dick; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated an all fiber actively mode-locked laser that emits a cylindrical vector beam. An intra-cavity few-mode fiber Bragg grating inscribed in a short section of four-mode fiber is employed to provide mode selection and spectrum filtering functions. Mode coupling is achieved by offset splicing between the single-mode fiber and the four-mode fiber in the laser cavity. A LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator is used to achieve active mode-locking in the laser. The laser operates at 1547 nm with 30 dB spectrum width of 0.2 nm. The mode-locked pulses have a duration of 2 ns and repetition of 12.06 MHz. Through adjusting the polarization state in the laser cavity, both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with high mode purity.

  12. Actively mode-locked all fiber laser with cylindrical vector beam output.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Sun, Biao; Xu, Lixin; Li, Feng; Chung, Dick; Zhan, Qiwen

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrated an all fiber actively mode-locked laser that emits a cylindrical vector beam. An intra-cavity few-mode fiber Bragg grating inscribed in a short section of four-mode fiber is employed to provide mode selection and spectrum filtering functions. Mode coupling is achieved by offset splicing between the single-mode fiber and the four-mode fiber in the laser cavity. A LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator is used to achieve active mode-locking in the laser. The laser operates at 1547 nm with 30 dB spectrum width of 0.2 nm. The mode-locked pulses have a duration of 2 ns and repetition of 12.06 MHz. Through adjusting the polarization state in the laser cavity, both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with high mode purity. PMID:26907420

  13. All fiber actively mode-locked fiber laser emitting cylindrical vector beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anting; Gu, Chun; Xu, Lixin; Zhan, Qiwen

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrated an all fiber actively mode-locked laser emitting cylindrical vector beam. A few-mode fiber Bragg grating is adopted to achieve mode selecting and spectrum filtering. An offset splicing of single-mode fiber with fourmode fiber is utilized as a mode coupler in the laser cavity. A LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator is used to achieve active mode locking in the laser. The laser operates at 1547nm with 30 dB spectrum width of 0.3nm. The emitted modelocked pulses have a duration of 1ns and repetition of 12.06MHz. Both radially and azimuthally polarized beams have been obtained with very good modal symmetry by adjusting the polarization in the laser cavity.

  14. Students' Network Project Activities in the Context of the Information Educational Medium of Higher Education Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samerkhanova, Elvira K.; Krupoderova, Elena P.; Krupoderova, Klimentina R.; Bahtiyarova, Lyudmila N.; Ponachugin, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the research is justifying didactic possibilities of the use of network services for the organization of information for the learning environment of college, where students carry out their project activities, and where effective networking between students and teachers takes place. The authors consider didactic possibilities of…

  15. Comparative study of chromatographic medium-associated mass and potential antitumor activity loss with bioactive extracts.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandipan; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G

    2013-04-26

    Natural product drug discovery programs often rely on the use of silica (Si) gel, reversed-phase media, or size-exclusion resins (e.g., RP-C18, Sephadex LH-20) for compound purification. The synthetic polymer-based sorbent Diaion HP20SS (cross-linked polystyrene matrix) is used as an alternative to prepare purified natural product libraries. To evaluate the impact of chromatographic media on the isolation of biologically active, yet chromatographically unstable natural products, Diaion HP20SS was evaluated side-by-side with normal-phase sorbents for irreversible binding of extract constituents and their effects on bioactivity. An array of chemically diverse natural product-rich extracts was selected as a test panel, and a cell-based reporter assay for hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) was employed to monitor potential change(s) in bioactivity. Silica gel caused significant irreversible binding of three out of 10 extracts. Curcuma longa, Saururus cernuus, and Citrus reticulata extracts showed decreased HIF-1 inhibitory activity after elution through Si gel. An additional nonpolar column wash of HP20SS with EtOAc retained considerable bioactivities of active extracts. In general, Si gel produced the greatest loss of bioactivity. However, HP20SS elution reduced significantly HIF-1 inhibitory activity of certain extracts (e.g., Asimina triloba). PMID:23441686

  16. [Characteristics of laser light].

    PubMed

    Takac, S; Stojanović, S

    1999-01-01

    Laser is one of the greatest technical discoveries of the 20th century. It is important in basic sciences, but particularly in diagnosis and therapy of various pathologic conditions of human organism. It is electromagnetic radiation, not X-irradiation and, as such, it is not expected to produce new generation of iatrogenic malignancies. Laser falls between infrared and ultraviolet on the spectrum mainly in the visible light spectrum. Properties of laser light are: monochromacity (the same color), coherence (all of the light waves are in phase both spatially and temporally), collimation (all rays are parallel to each other and do not diverge significantly even over long distances). Lasers were first conceived by Einstein in 1917 when he wrote his "Zur Quantum Theorie der Strahlung" (the quantum theory of radiation) which enumerated concepts of stimulated and spontaneous emission and absorption. Drs. Arthur Schawlow and Charles Townes, in 1956, extended lasers into the optical frequency range and Maiman, in 1960, operated the first laser using ruby as the active medium (ruby laser). Laser is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. To understand the acronym, it is necessary to understand the basic physics of the atom. However, if the atom that is in the excited state is struck by another photon of energy before it returns to the ground state, two photons of equal frequency and energy, travelling in the same direction and in perfect spatial and temporal harmony, are produced. This phenomenon is termed stimulated emission of radiation. An external power source hyperexcites the atoms in the laser medium so that the number of atoms possessing upper energy levels exceeds the number of atoms in a power energy level, a condition termed a population inversion. This "pumping system" which imparts additional energy to the atoms may be optical, mechanical, or chemical. These atoms in a hyperexcited state spontaneously emit photons of light. The

  17. Effects of drying on nitrification activity in zeoponic medium used for long-term space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    One component of a proposed life support system is the use of zeoponic substrates, which slowly release NH4+ into "soil" solution, for the production of plants. Nitrifying bacteria that convert NH4+ to NO3- are among the important microbial components of these systems. Survival of nitrifying bacteria in dry zeoponic substrates is needed, because the substrate would likely be stored in an air-dry state between croppings. Substrate was enriched for nitrifying bacteria and allowed to air-dry in a laminar flow hood. Stored substrate was analyzed for nitrifier survivability by measuring nitrifier activity at the beginning, 3 days, 1, 2, and 3 weeks. After rewetting, activity was approximately 9 micrograms N g-1 h-1 regardless of storage time. Nitrification rates did not decrease during storage. It seems unlikely that drying between plantings would result in practical reductions in nitrification, and reinoculation with nitrifying bacteria would not be necessary.

  18. Investigating Informatics Activity, Control, and Training Needs in Large, Medium, and Small Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Ryan; Yang, Biru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A recent National Association of City & County Health Officials survey shed light on informatics workforce development needs. Local health departments (LHDs) of various jurisdictional sizes and control over informatics may differ on training needs and activity. Understanding the precise nature of this variation will allow stakeholders to appropriately develop workforce development tools to advance the field. Objective: To understand the informatics training needs for LHDs of different jurisdictional sizes. Methods: Survey responses were analyzed by comparing training needs and LHD population size. Results: Larger health departments consistently reported having greater informatics-related capacity and informatics-related training needs. Quantitative data analysis was identified as a primary need for large LHDs. In addition, LHDs that report higher control of informatics/information technology were able to engage in more informatics activities. Conclusion: Smaller LHDs need additional resources to improve informatics-related capacity and engagement with the field. PMID:27684621

  19. Generation of unipolar optical pulses in a Raman-active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, R. M.; Arkhipov, M. V.; Belov, P. A.; Tolmachev, Yu A.; Babushkin, I.

    2016-04-01

    Response of a Raman-active media (RAM) to the excitation by a series of ultrashort (few-cycle) optical pulses propagating at a superluminal velocity is studied theoretically. It is shown that under certain conditions rectangular unipolar pulses (video-pulses) can be generated as the RAM response. The duration, shape and amplitude of these video-pulses can be widely tuned by modifying the pump pulse parameters.

  20. Active waveguides written by femtosecond laser irradiation in an erbium-doped phospho-tellurite glass.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, T Toney; Della Valle, G; Osellame, R; Jose, G; Chiodo, N; Jha, A; Laporta, P

    2008-09-15

    We report on fs-laser micromachining of active waveguides in a new erbium-doped phospho-tellurite glass by means of a compact cavity-dumped Yb-based writing system. The spectroscopic properties of the glass were investigated, and the fs-laser written waveguides were characterized in terms of passive as well as active performance. In particular, internal gain was demonstrated in the whole C+L band of optical communications (1530- 1610 nm).

  1. Effect of the active-ion concentration on the lasing dynamics of holmium fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-12-09

    The lasing dynamics of fibre lasers with a core based on quartz glass doped with holmium ions to concentrations in the range of 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} is investigated. It is shown that fibre lasers with a high concentration of active holmium ions generate pulses, but a decrease in the holmium concentration changes the lasing from pulsed to cw regime. At the same time, a decrease in the active-ion concentration and the corresponding increase in the fibre length in the cavity reduce the lasing efficiency. (lasers)

  2. Monolithically integrated active waveguides and lasers using rare-earth doped spin-on glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Sullivan, C.T.; Vawter, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    This LDRD program No. 3505.230 explored a new approach to monolithic integration of active waveguides and rare-earth solid state lasers directly onto III-V substrates. It involved selectively incorporating rare-earth ions into spin-on glasses (SOGs) that could be solvent cast and then patterned with conventional microelectronic processing. The patterned, rare-earth spin-on glasses (RESOGs) were to be photopumped by laser diodes prefabricated on the wafer and would serve as directly integrated active waveguides and/or rare-earth solid state lasers.

  3. Clinical and Spectrophotometric Evaluation of LED and Laser Activated Teeth Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Lo Giudice, R.; Pantaleo, G.; Lizio, A.; Romeo, U.; Castiello, G.; Spagnuolo, G.; Giudice, G. Lo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Auxiliary power sources (LED and laser) are used in in-office teeth bleaching techniques to accelerate the redox reaction of the whitening gel to increase ease of use, to improve comfort and safety, and to decrease the procedure time. Objective: The aim this study is to evaluate the efficiency of the teeth whitening procedures performed with hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide, LED or Laser activated. Method: 18 patients, affected by exogenous dyschromia, were treated with a bleaching agent composed by 35% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide. They were divided into two groups: in the first group the bleaching agent was activated by a LED lamp; in the second group it was activated by a Laser diode lamp. Both groups were subjected to 3 bleaching cycle of 15’ each. The chromatic evaluations were performed before and after one week from the treatment, using a chromatic scale and a spectrophotometer. The mean value of pre, post bleaching and follow-up were analyzed using a T-test, with results statistically significant for P<0,05. Results: Results showed that the variations in brightness, chroma and hue are significantly influenced by the interaction between the whitening agent and the original colour of the teeth. Laser-activation has marginally improved the bleaching effectiveness. All patients treated with laser activation complained an increase in dental sensitivity. Conclusion: The use of laser-activating systems did not improve the efficacy of bleaching. PMID:27386010

  4. Biological activity of photoproducts of merocyanine 540 generated by laser-light activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Chanh, Tran C.; Pervaiz, Shazib; Harriman, Anthony; Matthews, James Lester

    1992-08-01

    Controlled exposure of photoactive compounds to light prior to their use in biological targets results in the formation of heretofore unknown photoproducts. This process of photoproduct generation, termed "preactivation," renders the photactive compound capable of systemic use without further dependence on light. Preactivation of mercyanin 540 (MC540) and several other photoactive compounds is achievable by exposure to CW and pulse laser radiation. The singlet oxygen generated at excited states attacks the dye molucule itself, resulting in the formation of biologically active photoproducts. For preactivated MC540 (photoproducts of MC540) generated by exposure to argon laser light (514 nm) and light from free-electron laser, we have demonstrated its effectiveness in selective killing of certain types of cultured tumor cells as well as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with very low, if any, damage to normal cells and tisues. For example, approximately 90% of the Burkitt's lymphoma Daudi cells and HL-60 leukemic cells are killed by preactivated MC540 at a concentration of 120 μg/ml. A two-hour treatment of cultured cells with buthionine sulfoxamine followed by the treatement with preactivated MC540 reults in 99.99% inhibition of clonogenic tumor stem cell growth. We also have demonstrated that preactivated MC540 is very effective in killing cell-free and cell-associated HIV-1. It also is very effective in killing HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in virus-infected blood in vitro as determined by reverse transcriptase, P24, P17, core antigen expression and synctium formation. Treatment of HIV-1 with preactivated MC540 renders the treated HIV-1 incapable of binding to CD4 target molecules on T cells as determined by immunofluorescence and radioimmunoprecipitation assays. In vivo toxicology studies show that preactivated MC540 is very well tolerated and does not produce any signs of adverse reaction at the therapeutic doses, as determined by

  5. Deformation of partially pumped active mirrors for high average-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Albach, Daniel; LeTouzé, Geoffroy; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-04-25

    We discuss the deformation of a partially pumped active mirror amplifier as a free standing disk, as implemented in several laser systems. We rely on the Lucia laser project to experimentally evaluate the analytical and numerical deformation models. PMID:21643092

  6. Influence of liquid medium on the activity of a low-alpha Fischer-Tropsch catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, R.J.; Zarochak, M.F.; Deffenbaugh, P.W.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to measure activity, selectivity, and the maintenance of these properties in slurry autoclave experiments with a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalyst that was used in the {open_quotes}FT II{close_quotes} bubble-column test, conducted at the Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas during May 1994. The catalyst contained iron, copper, and potassium and was formulated to produce mainly hydrocarbons in the gasoline range with lesser production of diesel-range products and wax. The probability of chain growth was thus deliberately kept low. Principal goals of the autoclave work have been to find the true activity of this catalyst in a stirred tank reactor, unhindered by heat or mass transfer effects, and to obtain a steady conversion and selectivity over the approximately 15 days of each test. Slurry autoclave testing of the catalyst in heavier waxes also allows insight into operation of larger slurry bubble column reactors. The stability of reactor operation in these experiments, particularly at loadings exceeding 20 weight %, suggests the likely stability of operations on a larger scale.

  7. Laser micromachining of through via interconnects in active die for 3-D multichip module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, D.; Miller, W. D.

    One method to increase density in integrated circuits (IC) is to stack die to create a 3-D multichip module (MCM). In the past, special post wafer processing was done to bring interconnects out to the edge of the die. The die were sawed, glued, and stacked. Special processing was done to create interconnects on the edge to provide for interconnects to each of the die. These processes require an IC type fabrication facility (fab) and special processing equipment. In contrast, we have developed packaging assembly methods to create vertical through vias in bond pads of active silicon die, isolate these vias, and metal fill these vias without the use of a special IC fab. These die with through vias can then be joined and stacked to create a 3-D MCM. Vertical through vias in active die are created by laser micromachining using a Nd:YAG laser. Besides the fundamental 1064 nm (infrared) laser wavelength of a Nd:YAG laser, modifications to our Nd:YAG laser allowed us to generate the second harmonic 532 nm (green) laser wavelength and fourth harmonic 266 nm (ultraviolet) laser wavelength in laser micromachining for these vias. Experiments were conducted to determine the best laser wavelengths to use for laser micromachining of vertical through vias in order to minimize damage to the active die. Via isolation experiments were done in order to determine the best method in isolating the bond pads of the die. Die thinning techniques were developed to allow for die thickness as thin as 50 microns. This would allow for high 3-D density when the die are stacked. A method was developed to metal fill the vias with solder using a wire bonder with solder wire.

  8. Laser micromachining of through via interconnects in active die for 3-D multichip module

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.; Miller, W.D.

    1995-09-01

    One method to increase density in integrated circuits (IC) is to stack die to create a 3-D multichip module (MCM). In the past, special post wafer processing was done to bring interconnects out to the edge of the die. The die were sawed, glued, and stacked. Special processing was done to create interconnects on the edge to provide for interconnects to each of the die. These processes require an IC type fabrication facility (fab) and special processing equipment. In contrast, we have developed packaging assembly methods to created vertical through vias in bond pads of active silicon die, isolate these vias, and metal fill these vias without the use of a special IC fab. These die with through vias can then be joined and stacked to create a 3-D MCM. Vertical through vias in active die are created by laser micromachining using a Nd:YAG laser. Besides the fundamental 1064 nm (infra-red) laser wavelength of a Nd:YAG laser, modifications to our Nd:YAG laser allowed us to generate the second harmonic 532 nm (green) laser wavelength and fourth harmonic 266nm (ultra violet) laser wavelength in laser micromachining for these vias. Experiments were conducted to determine the best laser wavelengths to use for laser micromachining of vertical through vias in order to minimize damage to the active die. Via isolation experiments were done in order to determine the best method in isolating the bond pads of the die. Die thinning techniques were developed to allow for die thickness as thin as 50 {mu}m. This would allow for high 3-D density when the die are stacked. A method was developed to metal fill the vias with solder using a wire bonder with solder wire.

  9. Medium-frequency impulsive-thrust-activated liquid hydrogen reorientation with Geyser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Efficient technique are studied for accomplishing propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage through impulsive thrust. A comparison between the use of constant-thrust and impulsive-thrust accelerations for the activation of propellant resettlement shows that impulsive thrust is superior to constant thrust for liquid reorientation in a reduced-gravity environment. This study shows that when impulsive thrust with 0.1-1.0-, and 10-Hz frequencies for liquid-fill levels in the range between 30-80 percent is considered, the selection of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive thrust over the other frequency ranges of impulsive thrust is the optimum. Characteristics of the slosh waves excited during the course of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive-thrust liquid reorientation were also analyzed.

  10. Active mode-locking of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers with short gain recovery time.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongrui; Belyanin, Alexey

    2015-02-23

    We investigate the dynamics of actively modulated mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) using space- and time-domain simulations of coupled density matrix and Maxwell equations with resonant tunneling current taken into account. We show that it is possible to achieve active mode locking and stable generation of picosecond pulses in high performance QCLs with a vertical laser transition and a short gain recovery time by bias modulation of a short section of a monolithic Fabry-Perot cavity. In fact, active mode locking in QCLs with a short gain recovery time turns out to be more robust to the variation of parameters as compared to previously studied lasers with a long gain recovery time. We investigate the effects of spatial hole burning and phase locking on the laser output.

  11. Laser research and development in the Northeast; Proceedings of the Meeting, Cambridge, MA, Sept. 16, 17, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Trainor, D.W.; Chicklis, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    The development and scaling of excimer lasers with emphasis on both electron-beam and discharge pumpings; a chemical means of generating laser action in the visible region; the use of stimulated Raman techniques to improve the beam quality output of systems employing excimer lasers; the research and development of CO/sub 2/ lasers; a CO/sub 2/ laser amplifier for radar applications; medical laser usage; and laser monitors for trace species in environmental and industrial processes are examined. Consideration is given to high power laser research and development for laser energetics; linear and nonlinear frequency converters; 450 nm laser operation in Tm(3+):YLF; alexandrite lasers and their applications; and the performance limitations of vibronic lasers. Topics discussed include the laser ignition of oil spills; the application of laser rangers to submunitions; the design and application of laser intensity stabilizers; and a 535 nm active atomic line filter that uses the Tl metastable state as an absorbing medium.

  12. Tetravalent Chromium (Cr(4+)) as Laser-Active Ion for Tunable Solid-State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    During 10/31/91 - 3/31/92, the following summarizes are major accomplishments: (1) numerical modeling of the four mirror astigmatically compensated, Z-fold cavity was performed; and (2) the simulation revealed several design parameters to be used for the construction of a femtosecond forsterite laser.

  13. Role of ROS-mediated TGF beta activation in laser photobiomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arany, Praveen R.; Chen, Aaron Chih-Hao; Hunt, Tristan; Mooney, David J.; Hamblin, Michael

    2009-02-01

    The ability of laser light to modulate specific biological processes has been well documented but the precise mechanism mediating these photobiological interactions remains an area of intense investigation. We recently published the results of our clinical trial with 30 patients in an oral tooth-extraction wound healing model using a 904nm GaAs laser (Oralaser 1010, Oralia, Konstnaz, Germany), assessing healing parameters using routine histopathology and immunostaining (Arany et al Wound Rep Regen 2007, 15, 866). We observed a better organized healing response in laser irradiated oral tissues that correlated with an increased expression of TGF-beta1 immediately post laser irradiation. Our data suggested the source of latent TGF-beta1 might be from the degranulating platelets in the serum, an abundant source of in vivo latent TGF-beta, in the freshly wounded tissues. Further, we also demonstrated the ability of the low power near-infrared laser irradiation to activate the latent TGF-beta complexes in vitro at varying fluences from 10sec (0.1 J/cm2) to 600secs (6 J/cm2). Using serum we observed two isoforms, namely TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta3, were capable of being activated by laser irradiation using an isoform-specific ELISA and a reporter based (p3TP) assay system. We are presently pursuing the precise photomolecular mechanisms focusing on potential chromophores, wavelength and fluence parameters affecting the Latent TGF-beta activation process in serum. As ROS mediated TGF-beta activation has been previously demonstrated and we are also exploring the role of Laser generated-ROS in this activation process. In summary, we present evidence of a potential molecular mechanism for laser photobiomodulation in its ability to activate latent TGF-beta complexes.

  14. Proton Reaction Data Library for Nuclear Activation (Medium Energy Nuclear Data Library.)

    2002-03-01

    Version 00 GROUPXS does file handling and processing of the double-differential continuum-emission cross sections stored in the new MF6 format of ENDF/VI. It treats the energy-angle data that are supposed to be represented by a Legendre-polynomial expansion in the center-of-mass system and can do the following: (1) Conversion of MF6 data from center-of-mass system to the laboratory system, with the possibility to continue the calculation with the options (2), (3), and (4). (2) Conversion ofmore » Legendre-polynomial representation into point-wise angular data, in MF6 format. (3) Conversion of data from MF6 into MF4 + MF5 (ENDF-V). (4) Calculation of group constants, scattering matrices and transfer matrices for arbitrary group structures with a fusion micro-flux weighting spectrum (PN-approximation). The code treats only continuum reaction types that are stored in the MF6 format with the restrictions as specified for the European Fusion File (EFF1). These restrictions are not inconvenient for the purpose of fusion neutronics calculations and they facilitate relatively simple processing . This neutron reaction data library can be used for nuclear activation and transmutation applications at energies up to 100 MeV.« less

  15. Liquid crystals with patterned molecular orientation as an electrolytic active medium.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chenhui; Guo, Yubing; Conklin, Christopher; Viñals, Jorge; Shiyanovskii, Sergij V; Wei, Qi-Huo; Lavrentovich, Oleg D

    2015-11-01

    Transport of fluids and particles at the microscale is an important theme in both fundamental and applied science. One of the most successful approaches is to use an electric field, which requires the system to carry or induce electric charges. We describe a versatile approach to generate electrokinetic flows by using a liquid crystal (LC) with surface-patterned molecular orientation as an electrolyte. The surface patterning is produced by photoalignment. In the presence of an electric field, the spatially varying orientation induces space charges that trigger flows of the LC. The active patterned LC electrolyte converts the electric energy into the LC flows and transport of embedded particles of any type (fluid, solid, gaseous) along a predesigned trajectory, posing no limitation on the electric nature (charge, polarizability) of these particles and interfaces. The patterned LC electrolyte exhibits a quadratic field dependence of the flow velocities; it induces persistent vortices of controllable rotation speed and direction that are quintessential for micro- and nanoscale mixing applications. PMID:26651712

  16. Chloroplast ultra structure, photosynthesis and enzyme activities in regenerated plants of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert.) Bertoni as influenced by copper sulphate in the medium.

    PubMed

    Jain, Pourvi; Kachhwaha, Sumita; Kothari, S L

    2014-09-01

    Stevia rebaudiana (Bert.) Bertoni is an important medicinal plant used as noncaloric commercial sweetener. Plants regenerated with higher levels of copper sulphate in the medium exhibited enhanced activity of peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) enzymes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed increase in size and number of electron dense inclusions in the chloroplasts of plants regenerated at optimised level of copper sulphate (0.5 microM) in the medium. There was decrease in chlorogenic acid (CGA) content. Chl-a-fluorescence transient pattern (OJIP) showed that the photosynthesis process was more efficient at 0.5 microM CuSO4 in the medium.

  17. Fiber optic illumination by laser activated remote phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Ulrich

    2012-10-01

    For some fiber optic applications, like high-end endoscopy, light sources with high luminance are necessary. Currently, short arc discharge lamps are being used. However, more and more LED solutions are trying to compete, but they can not yet reach the performance obtainable by 300 W Xenon short arc discharge lamps. To make this field of application accessible for solid state light sources, a new approach is necessary. Diode lasers have rapidly advanced in the past years. This is particularly true for multimode laser diodes emitting at around 445 nm wavelength. Single diodes emitting more than 1 W of optical power are already available. These laser sources exhibit extremely high radiance, thus they can be focused onto very small areas. Phosphors placed near the focus can result in high luminance sources. On the basis of this idea, a device has been developed to match the performance of a state of the art 300 W Xenon lamp system. An array of laser diodes is used to illuminate a phosphor plate which converts the blue pump light into yellow light. The converted light is collected and adapted to the application by a tapered TIR rod. To achieve a color point on the Planckian locus at 6000 K, the light of an LED emitting at around 460 nm is superimposed to the converted light.

  18. Laser Holography. High Tech with High Potential for Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlegel, Ronald D.

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses the procedure, historical development, and applications of holography, and discusses the feasibility and value of implementing a unit or course of study of laser holography into an existing photography laboratory and curriculum. An equipment and supplies list, giving supplies and cost, is included. (CT)

  19. Random lasing in a nanocomposite medium

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanin, Sergei N; Basiev, Tasoltan T

    2013-01-31

    The characteristics of a random laser based on a nanocomposite medium consisting of a transparent dielectric and scattering doped nanocrystals are calculated. It is proposed to use ytterbium laser media with a high concentration of active ions as nanocrystals and to use gases, liquids, or solid dielectrics with a refractive index lower than that of nanocrystals as dielectric matrices for nanocrystals. Based on the concept of nonresonant distributed feedback due to the Rayleigh scattering, an expression is obtained for the minimum length of a nanocomposite laser medium at which the random lasing threshold is overcome. Expressions are found for the critical (maximum) and the optimal size of nanocrystals, as well as for the optimal relative refractive index of nanocomposites that corresponds not only to the maximum gain but also to the minimum of the medium threshold length at the optimal size of nanocrystals. It is shown that the optimal relative refractive index of a nanocomposite increases with increasing pump level, but is independent of the other nanocomposite parameters. (nanocomposites)

  20. [Lasers].

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  1. Lasers.

    PubMed

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients.

  2. Activation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid by a 940 nm diode laser for enhanced removal of smear layer.

    PubMed

    Lagemann, Manfred; George, Roy; Chai, Lei; Walsh, Laurence J

    2014-08-01

    Laser enhancement of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid with cetrimide (EDTAC) has previously been shown to increase removal of smear layer, for middle-infrared erbium lasers. This study evaluated the efficiency of EDTAC activation using a near-infrared-pulsed 940 nm laser delivered by plain fibre tips into 15% EDTAC or 3% hydrogen peroxide. Root canals in 4 groups of 10 single roots were prepared using rotary files, with controls for the presence and absence of smear layer. After laser treatment (80 mJ pulse(-1) , 50 Hz, 6 cycles of 10 s), roots were split and the apical, middle and coronal thirds of the canal were examined using scanning electron microscopy, with the area of dentine tubules determined by a validated quantitative image analysis method. Lasing EDTAC considerably improved smear layer removal, while lasing into peroxide gave minimal smear layer removal. The laser protocol used was more effective for smear layer removal than the 'gold standard' protocol using EDTAC with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). In addition, lasers may also provide a benefit through photothermal disinfection. Further research is needed to optimise irrigant activation protocols using near-infrared diode lasers of other wavelengths.

  3. Effect of active-ion concentration on holmium fibre laser efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Sholokhov, E M; Marakulin, A V; Minashina, L A

    2010-08-03

    We have measured the fraction of holmium ions that relax nonradiatively to the ground level as a result of interaction at a metastable level in optical fibres with a silica-based core doped with holmium ions to 2 x 10{sup 19} - 2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The percentage of such ions has been shown to depend on the absolute active-ion concentration. The fibres have been used to make a number of 2.05-{mu}m lasers, and their slope efficiency has been measured. The laser efficiency decreases with increasing holmium concentration in the fibres (lasers)

  4. Direct laser writing for active and passive high-Q polymer microdisks on silicon.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Tobias; Schleede, Simone; Hauser, Mario; Beck, Torsten; Thiel, Michael; von Freymann, Georg; Mappes, Timo; Kalt, Heinz

    2011-06-01

    We report the fabrication of high-Q polymeric microdisks on silicon via direct laser writing utilizing two-photon absorption induced polymerization. The quality factors of the passive cavities are above 10(6) in the 1300 nm wavelength region. The flexible three-dimensional (3D) lithography method allows for the fabrication of different cavity thicknesses on the same substrate, useful for rapid prototyping of active and passive optical microcavities. Microdisk lasers are realized by doping the resist with dye, resulting in laser emission at visible wavelengths.

  5. Laser-ablated active doping technique for visible spectroscopy measurements on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Matthew Robert

    2013-09-01

    Visible spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic, allowing plasma parameters ranging from temperature and density to electric and magnetic fields to be measured. Spectroscopic dopants are commonly introduced to make these measurements. On Z, dopants are introduced passively (i.e. a salt deposited on a current-carrying surface); however, in some cases, passive doping can limit the times and locations at which measurements can be made. Active doping utilizes an auxiliary energy source to disperse the dopant independently from the rest of the experiment. The objective of this LDRD project was to explore laser ablation as a method of actively introducing spectroscopic dopants. Ideally, the laser energy would be delivered to the dopant via fiber optic, which would eliminate the need for time-intensive laser alignments in the Z chamber. Experiments conducted in a light lab to assess the feasibility of fibercoupled and open-beam laser-ablated doping are discussed.

  6. Pore size assessment during corneal endothelial cells permeabilization by femtosecond laser activated carbon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumelle, C.; Mauclair, C.; Houzet, J.; Bernard, A.; He, Z.; Piselli, S.; Perrache, C.; Egaud, G.; Baubeau, E.; Gain, P.; Thuret, G.

    2015-07-01

    Corneal therapeutic molecules delivery represents a promising solution to maintain human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) viability, but the difficulty is transport across cell membrane. A new delivery method published recently consists in ephemerally permeabilizing cell membranes using a photo-acoustic reaction produced by carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) and femtosecond laser (FsL). The aim of this work is to investigate the size of pores formed at cell membrane by this technique. To induce cell permeabilization, HCECs were put in contact with CNPs and irradiated with a 500 μm diameter Ti:Sa FsL focalized spot. Four sizes of marker molecules were delivered into HCECs to investigate pore sizes: calcein (1.2 nm), FITC-Dextran 4kDa (2.8 nm) and FITC-Dextran 70kDa (12 nm) and FITC-Dextran 2MDa (50 nm). Delivery of each molecule was assessed by flow cytometry, a technique able to measure their presence into cells. We showed that the delivery rate was dependent of their size. Calcein was delivered in 56.1±8.2% of HCECs, FITC-Dextran 4kDa in 42.2±3.5%, FITC-Dextran 70 kDa in 21.5±2.7% and finally FITC-Dextran 2MDa in 12.9±2.0%. It means that a large number of pores in the size ranging from 1.2 to 2.8 nm were formed. However, 12 nm and larger pores were almost half more infrequent. Pore sizes formed at cell membrane by the technique of cell permeabilization by FsL activated CNPs was investigated. The results indicated that the pore sizes are large enough for the efficient delivery of small, medium and big therapeutics molecules on HCECs by this technique.

  7. Waterproof active paper via laser surface micropatterning of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, G; Ziaie, B

    2012-09-26

    Paper is one of the oldest and most abundant materials known to man. Recently, there has been a considerable interest in creating paper devices by combining paper with other functional materials. In this letter, we demonstrate a simple fabrication technique to create water-resistant ferro-patterns on wax paper using CO(2) laser ablation. A resolution of about 100 μm is achieved which is mostly limited by the cellulose fiber size (~50 μm) in the wax paper and can be improved by using a smaller cellulose matrix. Laser ablation results in modification of surface morphology and chemistry, leading to a change in surface energy. We also present a 2D model for ferrofluid deposition relating the size of the pattern to the amount of ferroparticles deposited on the surface. Finally, a paper gripper is presented to demonstrate advantages of our technique, which allows microscale patterning and machining in a single step. PMID:22939525

  8. Laser-activated nano-biomaterials for tissue repair and controlled drug release

    SciTech Connect

    Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Rossi, F; Pini, R

    2014-07-31

    We present recent achievements of minimally invasive welding of biological tissue and controlled drug release based on laser-activated nano-biomaterials. In particular, we consider new advancements in the biomedical application of near-IR absorbing gold nano-chromophores as an original solution for the photothermal repair of surgical incisions and as nanotriggers of controlled drug release from hybrid biopolymer scaffolds. (laser biophotonics)

  9. Laser-activated remote phosphor light engine for projection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Martin; Mehl, Oliver; Hartwig, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Recent developments in blue emitting laser diodes enable attractive solutions in projection applications using phosphors for efficient light conversion with very high luminance levels. Various commercially available projectors incorporating this technology have entered the market in the past years. While luminous flux levels are still comparable to lamp-based systems, lifetime expectations of classical lamp systems are exceeded by far. OSRAM GmbH has been exploring this technology for several years and has introduced the PHASER® brand name (Phosphor + laser). State-of-the-art is a rotating phosphor wheel excited by blue laser diodes to deliver the necessary primary colors, either sequentially for single-imager projection engines, or simultaneously for 3-panel systems. The PHASER® technology enables flux and luminance scaling, which allows for smaller imagers and therefore cost-efficient projection solutions. The resulting overall efficiency and ANSI lumen specification at the projection screen of these systems is significantly determined by the target color gamut and the light transmission efficiency of the projection system. With increasing power and flux level demand, thermal issues, especially phosphor conversion related, dominate the opto-mechanical system design requirements. These flux levels are a great challenge for all components of an SSL-projection system (SSL:solid-state lighting). OSRAḾs PHASER® light engine platform is constantly expanded towards higher luminous flux levels as well as higher luminance levels for various applications. Recent experiments employ blue laser pump powers of multiple 100 Watts to excite various phosphors resulting in luminous flux levels of more than 40 klm.

  10. Laser Activated Flow Regulator for Glaucoma Drainage Devices

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Jeffrey L.; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Bhandari, Ramanath

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the capabilities of a new glaucoma drainage device regulator in controlling fluid flow as well as to demonstrate that this effect may be titratable by noninvasive means. Methods A rigid eye model with two main ports was used. On the first port, we placed a saline solution column. On the second, we placed a glaucoma shunt. We then measured the flow and flow rate through the system. After placing the regulator device on the tip of the tube, we measured again with the intact membrane and with the membrane open 50% and 100%. For the ex vivo testing we used a similar setting, using a cadaveric porcine eye, we measured again the flow and flow rate. However, this time we opened the membrane gradually using laser shots. A one-way analysis of variance and a Fisher's Least Significant Difference test were used for statistical significance. We also calculated the correlation between the numbers of laser shots applied and the main outcomes. Results The flow through the system with the glaucoma drainage device regulator (membrane intact and 50% open) was statistically lower than with the membrane open 100% and without device (P < 0.05). The flow was successfully controlled by the number of laser shots applied, and showed a positive correlation (+ 0.9). The flow rate was almost doubled every 10 shots and statistically lower than without device at all time (P < 0.05). Conclusions The glaucoma drainage device regulator can be controlled noninvasively with laser, and allows titratable control of aqueous flow. Translational Relevance Initial results and evidence from this experiment will justify the initiation of in vivo animal trials with the glaucoma drainage device regulator; which brings us closer to possible human trials and the chance to significantly improve the existing technology to treat glaucoma surgically. PMID:25374772

  11. Histone deacetylase inhibitors stimulate the susceptibility of A549 cells to a plasma-activated medium treatment.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Tetsuo; Kano, Ayame; Nonomura, Saho; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Hara, Hirokazu

    2016-09-15

    The number of potential applications of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTAPP) discharges in medicine, particularly in cancer therapy, has increased in recent years. NTAPP has been shown to affect cells not only by direct irradiation, but also by an indirect treatment with previously prepared plasma-activated medium (PAM). Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have the potential to enhance susceptibility to anticancer drugs and radiation. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate the advantage of the combined application of PAM and HDAC inhibitors on A549 cancer cell survival and elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Cell death with DNA breaks in the nucleus was greater using combined regimens of PAM and HDAC inhibitors such as trichostatin A (TSA) and valproic acid (VPA) than a single PAM treatment and was accompanied by the activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), depletion of ATP, and elevations in intracellular calcium levels. Moreover, the expression of Rad 51, a DNA repair factor in homologous recombination pathways, was significantly suppressed by the treatment with HDAC inhibitors. These results demonstrate that HDAC inhibitors may synergistically induce the sensitivity of cancer cells to PAM components. PMID:27470189

  12. Tunable semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Tunable semiconductor lasers are disclosed requiring minimized coupling regions. Multiple laser embodiments employ ring resonators or ring resonator pairs using only a single coupling region with the gain medium are detailed. Tuning can be performed by changing the phase of the coupling coefficient between the gain medium and a ring resonator of the laser. Another embodiment provides a tunable laser including two Mach-Zehnder interferometers in series and a reflector coupled to a gain medium.

  13. Technique for precise alignment of small diameter lasers

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes one technique used to obtain precise alignment of small diameter lasers. This procedure may be useful in the alignment of other lasers, but is especially valuable when aligning lasers that have a small diameter active medium and/or a curved mirror at one end of the laser cavity. The technique described in this report uses a He-Ne laser at one end of the laser being aligned and an autocollimator at the opposite end. These instruments are used to generate and observe the diffraction pattern and interference fringes caused by the limiting aperture of the lasing medium and the end mirrors of the cavity, respectively. These patterns and fringes are used both to establish a common optical axis between the active volume of the laser being aligned and the aligning instruments, and to set the end mirrors of the cavity normal to this axis.

  14. Design and simulation of two-section DFB lasers with short active-section lengths.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gongyuan; Sun, Junqiang; Xi, Yanping; Gao, Dingshan; Lu, Qiaoyin; Guo, Weihua

    2016-05-16

    Distributed feedback lasers comprised of a reflection section and an active section have been proposed for high direct-modulation bandwidth. The reflection section has the same core layer as the active section so butt-joint re-growth is avoided. Without current injection the reflection section will be pumped to near transparency by the emission from the laser itself so high reflection (> 0.75) can still be achieved as confirmed by the simulation. Therefore a short (150 µm) active section can be used, which enables a low threshold current (~5 mA) and a high direct modulation bandwidth (>30 GHz) as demonstrated by the simulation. PMID:27409881

  15. Influence of lasing parameters on the cleaning efficacy of laser-activated irrigation with pulsed erbium lasers.

    PubMed

    Meire, Maarten A; Havelaerts, Sophie; De Moor, Roeland J

    2016-05-01

    Laser-activated irrigation (LAI) using erbium lasers is an irrigant agitation technique with great potential for improved cleaning of the root canal system, as shown in many in vitro studies. However, lasing parameters for LAI vary considerably and their influence remains unclear. Therefore, this study sought to investigate the influence of pulse energy, pulse frequency, pulse length, irradiation time and fibre tip shape, position and diameter on the cleaning efficacy of LAI. Transparent resin blocks containing standardized root canals (apical diameter of 0.4 mm, 6% taper, 15 mm long, with a coronal reservoir) were used as the test model. A standardized groove in the apical part of each canal wall was packed with stained dentin debris. The canals were filled with irrigant, which was activated by an erbium: yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser (2940 nm, AT Fidelis, Fotona, Ljubljana, Slovenia). In each experiment, one laser parameter was varied, while the others remained constant. In this way, the influence of pulse energy (10-40 mJ), pulse length (50-1000 μs), frequency (5-30 Hz), irradiation time (5-40 s) and fibre tip shape (flat or conical), position (pulp chamber, canal entrance, next to groove) and diameter (300-600 μm) was determined by treating 20 canals per parameter. The amount of debris remaining in the groove after each LAI procedure was scored and compared among the different treatments. The parameters significantly (P < 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis) affecting debris removal from the groove were fibre tip position, pulse length, pulse energy, irradiation time and frequency. Fibre tip shape and diameter had no significant influence on the cleaning efficacy.

  16. Somatic proembryo production from excised, wounded zygotic carrot embryos on hormone-free medium: evaluation of the effects of pH, ethylene and activated charcoal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. L.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Wounded zygotic embryos of cultivated carrot produce somatic proembryos on hormone-free nutrient medium containing 1 mM NH4+ as the sole nitrogen source. Continued maintenance of proembryos on this medium leads to a "pure" culture of preglobular stage proembryos (PGSPs). Ethylene had no effect on this process. Also, somatic embryo production was not affected by growing cultures on activated charcoal-impregnated filter papers. However, somatic proembyros initiated on activated charcoal papers were not maintainable as PGSPs and developed into later embryo stages. Normally, medium pH dropped from 5.7 to 4 during each subculture period, but when using activated charcoal papers the pH endpoint was around 6 - 7 due to a leachable substance(s) within the filter papers. When powdered, activated charcoal was used in the medium as an adsorbent of products potentially released after wounding, pH dropped at the normal rate and to the expected levels; proembryos did not mature into later embryo stages and were maintainable exclusively as PGSPs. Low pH (approximately 4) is detrimental to proembyro production, but is essential to maintaining PGSPs on hormone-free nutrient medium, whereas a sustained pH > or = 5.7 allows continued development of PGSPs into later embryo stages.

  17. Laser technology and applications in gynaecology.

    PubMed

    Adelman, M R; Tsai, L J; Tangchitnob, E P; Kahn, B S

    2013-04-01

    The term 'laser' is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Lasers are commonly described by the emitted wavelength, which determines the colour of the light, as well as the active lasing medium. Currently, over 40 types of lasers have been developed with a wide range of both industrial and medical uses. Gas and solid-state lasers are frequently used in surgical applications, with CO2 and Ar being the most common examples of gas lasers, and the Nd:YAG and KTP:YAG being the most common examples of solid-state lasers. At present, it appears that the CO2, Nd:YAG, and KTP lasers provide alternative methods for achieving similar results, as opposed to superior results, when compared with traditional endoscopic techniques, such as cold-cutting monopolar and bipolar energy. This review focuses on the physics, tissue interaction, safety and applications of commonly used lasers in gynaecological surgery.

  18. In vivo carotid artery closure by laser activation of hyaluronan-embedded gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteini, Paolo; Ratto, Fulvio; Rossi, Francesca; Rossi, Giacomo; Esposito, Giuseppe; Puca, Alfredo; Albanese, Alessio; Maira, Giulio; Pini, Roberto

    2010-07-01

    We prove the first application of near-infrared-absorbing gold nanorods (GNRs) for in vivo laser closure of a rabbit carotid artery. GNRs are first functionalized with a biopolymeric shell and then embedded in hyaluronan, which gives a stabilized and handy laser-activable formulation. Four rabbits undergo closure of a 3-mm longitudinal incision performed on the carotid artery by means of a 810-nm diode laser in conjunction with the topical application of the GNRs composite. An effective surgery is obtained by using a 40-W/cm2 laser power density. The histological and electron microscopy evaluation after a 30-day follow-up demonstrates complete healing of the treated arteries with full re-endothelization at the site of GNRs application. The absence of microgranuloma formation and/or dystrophic calcification is evidence that no host reaction to nanoparticles interspersed through the vascular tissue occurred. The observation of a reshaping and associated blue shift of the NIR absorption band of GNRs after laser treatment supports the occurrence of a self-terminating process, and thus of additional safety of the minimally invasive laser procedure. This study underlines the feasibility of using GNRs for in vivo laser soldering applications, which represents a step forward toward the introduction of nanotechnology-based therapies in minimally invasive clinical practices.

  19. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.

    1993-04-13

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  20. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.

    1993-01-01

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  1. An infrared jet in Centaurus A (NGC 5128): Evidence for interaction between the active nucleus and the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joy, Marshall; Harvey, P. M.; Tollestrup, E. V.; Mcgregor, P. J.; Hyland, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    In the present study, higher resolution near infrared images of the visually-obscured central region of Centaurus A were obtained in order to investigate the effects of the active nucleus on the surrounding galaxy. Researchers present J(1.25 microns), H(1.65 microns), and K(2.2 microns) images of the central 40 seconds of the galaxy, taken with the Univ. of Texas InSb array camera on the Anglo Australian 3.9 meter telescope. These images reveal a jet extending approx. 10 arcseconds to the northeast of the nucleus at the same position angle as the x ray and radio jets. The infrared jet is most prominent at the shortest wavelength (1.25 microns), where its brightness surpasses that of the nucleus. The blue appearance of the infrared jet is remarkable considering the heavy obscuration that is evident at visual wavelengths. The amount of reddening in the vicinity of the jet is determined from the measured colors of the stellar core of the galaxy, and this value is used to generate an extinction-corrected energy distribution. In contrast to previously studied optical and infrared jets in active nuclei, the short-wavelength prominence of the Cen A jet indicates that it cannot be attributed to synchrotron emission from a beam of relativistic electrons. The remaining viable mechanisms involve an interaction between the interstellar medium and the active nucleus: the infrared radiation from the jet may be due to emission from interstellar gas that has been entrained and heated by the flow of relativistic particles from the nucleus; alternatively, luminous blue stars may have been created by compression of interstellar material by the relativistic plasma. To investigate these proposed mechanisms, near-infrared spectroscopic studies of Cen A are in progress to look for collisionally excited molecular hydrogen emission lines and recombination lines from ionized gas.

  2. Fibre laser based on tellurium-doped active fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Alyshev, S V; Ryumkin, K E; Shubin, A V; Medvedkov, O I; Dianov, E M; Khopin, V F; Gur'yanov, A N

    2014-02-28

    We have studied the lasing properties of tellurium-doped germanosilicate fibre, identified its gain and excited-state absorption bands, and assessed the effect of cooling to low temperature (77 K) on the bands. The excitation spectrum of the near-IR luminescence in the fibre has been measured. Lasing at 1.55 mm has been demonstrated for the first time in this gain medium at liquidnitrogen temperature and pump wavelengths of 1.064 and 1.085 mm. The measured Raman spectrum of the fibre provides some insight into the structure of the near-IR luminescence centre. (letters)

  3. Active lamp pulse driver circuit. [optical pumping of laser media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, K. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A flashlamp drive circuit is described which uses an unsaturated transistor as a current mode switch to periodically subject a partially ionized gaseous laser excitation flashlamp to a stable, rectangular pulse of current from an incomplete discharge of an energy storage capacitor. A monostable multivibrator sets the pulse interval, initiating the pulse in response to a flash command by providing a reference voltage to a non-inverting terminal of a base drive amplifier; a tap on an emitter resistor provides a feedback signal sensitive to the current amplitude to an inverting terminal of amplifier, thereby controlling the pulse amplitude. The circuit drives the flashlamp to provide a squarewave current flashlamp discharge.

  4. Fully automated hybrid diode laser assembly using high precision active alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, Gunnar; Weber, Daniel; Scholz, Friedemann; Schröder, Henning; Schneider-Ramelow, Martin; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Fraunhofer IZM, Technische Universität Berlin and eagleyard Photonics present various implementations of current micro-optical assemblies for high quality free space laser beam forming and efficient fiber coupling. The laser modules shown are optimized for fast and automated assembly in small form factor packages via state-of-the-art active alignment machinery, using alignment and joining processes that have been developed and established in various industrial research projects. Operational wavelengths and optical powers ranging from 600 to 1600 nm and from 1 mW to several W respectively are addressed, for application in high-resolution laser spectroscopy, telecom and optical sensors, up to the optical powers needed in industrial and medical laser treatment.

  5. The decoding system of semi-active laser guidance based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Chang; Feng, Longling; Feng, Yimin; Wang, Benguo; Chen, Bo; Luo, Xiong

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we describe a new design of semi-active laser guided decoding system based on FPGA. The system is designed to receive the echo pulse through a 4-qundrant laser sensor and process the digital laser pulses through analogdigital conversion, which are some fixed interval encoding signal reflected from the target. The decoding system improve the adjustment accuracy of the laser seeker, which reach 0.1us about 50 times in theory compared to current technology. State machine is used to address complicated laser signal, including how to hand of the identification and trapping of the correct laser pulses, how to hand of a state of anti-jamming, how to hand of capturing the laser pulses again after signal missing. And a real-time gate signal is adopted to enhance the ability of anti-interference[1]. Processed signal is used to monitor and control, the processed result is transmitted to a electric actuator and subsequently be sent to laser seeker as a guidance signal or to a PC to simulate and monitor or to be stored in Flash that can extract whenever needed. The whole performance of the system is oprated in laboratory and decoding model is simulated with Modelsim module in detail. The testing results show that the design can reduce the span of decoding time effectively, identify and track the echo pulses from target correctly even to the missed codes or interferential codes. The feasible technique wins the time for laser guidance, and has some theoretical and military value.

  6. Active laser radar (lidar) for measurement of corresponding height and reflectance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehlich, Christoph; Mettenleiter, M.; Haertl, F.

    1997-08-01

    For the survey and inspection of environmental objects, a non-tactile, robust and precise imaging of height and depth is the basis sensor technology. For visual inspection,surface classification, and documentation purposes, however, additional information concerning reflectance of measured objects is necessary. High-speed acquisition of both geometric and visual information is achieved by means of an active laser radar, supporting consistent 3D height and 2D reflectance images. The laser radar is an optical-wavelength system, and is comparable to devices built by ERIM, Odetics, and Perceptron, measuring the range between sensor and target surfaces as well as the reflectance of the target surface, which corresponds to the magnitude of the back scattered laser energy. In contrast to these range sensing devices, the laser radar under consideration is designed for high speed and precise operation in both indoor and outdoor environments, emitting a minimum of near-IR laser energy. It integrates a laser range measurement system and a mechanical deflection system for 3D environmental measurements. This paper reports on design details of the laser radar for surface inspection tasks. It outlines the performance requirements and introduces the measurement principle. The hardware design, including the main modules, such as the laser head, the high frequency unit, the laser beam deflection system, and the digital signal processing unit are discussed.the signal processing unit consists of dedicated signal processors for real-time sensor data preprocessing as well as a sensor computer for high-level image analysis and feature extraction. The paper focuses on performance data of the system, including noise, drift over time, precision, and accuracy with measurements. It discuses the influences of ambient light, surface material of the target, and ambient temperature for range accuracy and range precision. Furthermore, experimental results from inspection of buildings, monuments

  7. Investigation of selective induction of breast cancer cells to death with treatment of plasma-activated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nakamura, Kae; Kano, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Mizuno, Masaaki; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    The applications of plasma in medicine have much attention. We previously showed that plasma-activated medium (PAM) induced glioblastoma cells to apoptosis. However, it has not been elucidated the selectivity of PAM in detail. In this study, we investigated the selective effect of PAM on the death of human breast normal and cancer cells, MCF10A and MCF7, respectively, and observed the selective death with fluorescent microscopy. For the investigation of cell viability with PAM treatment, we prepared various PAMs according to the strengths, and treated each of cells with PAMs. Week PAM treatment only decreased the viability of MCF7 cells, while strong PAM treatment significantly affected both viabilities of MCF7 and MCF10A cells. For the fluorescent observation, we prepared the mixture of MCF7 and fluorescent-probed MCF10A cells, and seeded them. After the treatment of PAMs, the images showed that only MCF7 cells damaged in the mixture with week PAM treatment. These results suggested that a specific range existed with the selective effect in the strength of PAM. This work was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' Grant No. 24108002 and 24108008 from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  8. Radioactively contaminated electric arc furnace dust as an addition to the immobilization mortar in low- and medium-activity repositories.

    PubMed

    Castellote, Marta; Menéndez, Esperanza; Andrade, Carmen; Zuloaga, Pablo; Navarro, Mariano; Ordóñez, Manuel

    2004-05-15

    Electric arc furnace dust (EAFD), generated by the steel-making industry, is in itself an intrinsic hazardous waste; however, the case may also be that scrap used in the process is accidentally contaminated by radioactive elements such as cesium. In this case the resulting EAFD is to be handled as radioactive waste, being duly confined in low- and medium-activity repositories (LMAR). What this paper studies is the reliability of using this radioactive EAFD as an addition in the immobilization mortar of the containers of the LMAR, that is, from the point of view of the durability. Different mixes of mortar containing different percentages of EAFD have been subjected to flexural and compressive strength, initial and final setting time, XRD study, total porosity and pore size distribution, determination of the chloride diffusion coefficient, dimensional stability tests, hydration heat, workability of the fresh mix, and leaching behavior. What is deduced from the results is that for the conditions used in this research, (cement + sand) can be replaced by EAFD upto a ratio [EAFD/(cement + EAFD)] of 46% in the immobilization mortar of LMAR, apparently without any loss in the long-term durability properties of the mortar.

  9. Pore structure effects on Ca-based sorbent sulfation capacity at medium temperatures: activated carbon as sorbent/catalyst support.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hui-Hsin; Wey, Ming-Yen; Lin, Chiou-Liang; Chang, Yu-Chen

    2002-11-01

    The reaction between three different Ca-based sorbents and SO2 were studied in a medium temperature range (473-773 K). The largest SO2 capture was found with Ca(OH)2 at 773 K, 126.31 mg SO2 x g Ca(OH)2(-1), and the influence of SO2 concentration on the sorbent utilization was observed. Investigations of the internal porous structure of Ca-based sorbents showed that the initial reaction rate was controlled by the surface area, and once the sulfated products were produced, pore structure dominated. To increase the surface area of Ca-based sorbents available to interact with and retain SO2, one kind of CaO/ activated carbon (AC) sorbent/catalyst was prepared to study the effect of AC on the dispersion of Ca-based materials. The results indicated that the Ca-based material dispersed on high-surface-area AC had more capacities for SO2 than unsupported Ca-based sorbents. The initial reaction rates of the reaction between SO2 and Ca-based sorbents and the prepared CaO/AC sorbents/catalysts were measured. Results showed that the reaction rate apparently increased with the presence of AC. It was concluded that CaO/AC was the active material in the desulfurization reaction. AC acting as the support can play a role to supply O2 to increase the affinity to SO2. Moreover, when AC is acting as a support, the surface oxygen functional group formed on the surface of AC can serve as a new site for SO2 adsorption.

  10. Corneal aldehyde dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase activity after excimer laser keratectomy in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bilgihan, K.; Bilgihan, A.; Turkozkan, N.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The free radical balance of the eye may be changed by excimer laser keratectomy. Previous studies have demonstrated that excimer laser keratectomy increases the corneal temperature, decreases the superoxide dismutase activity of the aqueous, and induces lipid peroxidation in the superficial corneal stroma. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) are known to play an important role in corneal metabolism, particularly in detoxification of aldehydes, which are generated from free radical reactions.
METHODS—In three groups of guinea pigs mechanical corneal de-epithelialisation was performed in group I, superficial corneal photoablation in group II, and deep corneal photoablation in group III, and the corneal ALDH and GST activities measured after 48 hours.
RESULTS—The mean ALDH and GST activities of group I and II showed no differences compared with the controls (p>0.05). The corneal ALDH activities were found to be significantly decreased (p<0.05) and GST activities increased (p<0.05) in group III.
CONCLUSION—These results suggest that excimer laser treatment of high myopia may change the ALDH and GST activities, metabolism, and free radical balance of the cornea.

 Keywords: excimer laser keratectomy; aldehyde dehydrogenase; glutathione S-transferase PMID:9602629

  11. Bubble-cell interactions with laser-activated polymeric microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, Michel; Lajoinie, Guillaume; van Rooij, Tom; Skachkov, Ilya; Kooiman, Klazina; de Jong, Nico; Physics of Fluids Group, University of Twente Team; Biomedical Engineering, Erasmus MC Team

    2015-11-01

    Polymeric microcapsules that are made light-absorbing by the addition of a dye in their shell can generate cavitation microbubbles with spatiotemporal control when irradiated by a pulsed laser. These particles less than 3 μm in size can circulate through the body, bind to tissues and are expected to be readily detected, even if a single cavitation bubble is produced. In this paper, we study the impact of such cavitation bubbles on a cell monolayer and quantify it in terms of cell poration and cell viability. Two capsules formulations were used; the first one encapsulates a low boiling point oil and induced less cell damage than the second that was loaded with a high boiling point oil. We also report the generation of stable bubbles by the first capsule formulation that completely absorb the cells in their close vicinity. Physics of Fluid group MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology.

  12. Efficacy of laser-based irrigant activation methods in removing debris from simulated root canal irregularities.

    PubMed

    Deleu, Ellen; Meire, Maarten A; De Moor, Roeland J G

    2015-02-01

    In root canal therapy, irrigating solutions are essential to assist in debridement and disinfection, but their spread and action is often restricted by canal anatomy. Hence, activation of irrigants is suggested to improve their distribution in the canal system, increasing irrigation effectiveness. Activation can be done with lasers, termed laser-activated irrigation (LAI). The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the efficacy of different irrigant activation methods in removing debris from simulated root canal irregularities. Twenty-five straight human canine roots were embedded in resin, split, and their canals prepared to a standardized shape. A groove was cut in the wall of each canal and filled with dentin debris. Canals were filled with sodium hypochlorite and six irrigant activation procedures were tested: conventional needle irrigation (CI), manual-dynamic irrigation with a tapered gutta percha cone (manual-dynamic irrigation (MDI)), passive ultrasonic irrigation, LAI with 2,940-nm erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser with a plain fiber tip inside the canal (Er-flat), LAI with Er:YAG laser with a conical tip held at the canal entrance (Er-PIPS), and LAI with a 980-nm diode laser moving the fiber inside the canal (diode). The amount of remaining debris in the groove was scored and compared among the groups using non-parametric tests. Conventional irrigation removed significantly less debris than all other groups. The Er:YAG with plain fiber tip was more efficient than MDI, CI, diode, and Er:YAG laser with PIPS tip in removing debris from simulated root canal irregularities.

  13. Mirror with a variable amplitude - phase reflectance. 2. Modelling of a laser resonator with an active output mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Kiiko, V V; Kislov, V I; Ofitserov, Evgenii N

    2011-03-31

    We present the operator model of the laser resonator with an active output mirror based on the Fabry - Perot interferometer with nonflat (spherical and aspherical) mirrors and an adjustable gap. The results of numerical simulation of a microchip laser with a thermal lens and an active output interferometer-based mirror are given. It is shown that the use of an active interferometer as the output cavity mirror allows one to control the number of transverse modes of laser radiation and its power; in this case, the beam divergence can be reduced by a factor of 1.5 - 2.5. (laser resonators)

  14. Infrared Laser Activation of Soluble and Membrane Protein Assemblies in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, Victor A; Liko, Idlir; Mize, Todd H; Bush, Matthew F; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V

    2016-07-19

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) is the dominant method for probing intact macromolecular complexes in the gas phase by means of mass spectrometry (MS). The energy obtained from collisional activation is dependent on the charge state of the ion and the pressures and potentials within the instrument: these factors limit CID capability. Activation by infrared (IR) laser radiation offers an attractive alternative as the radiation energy absorbed by the ions is charge-state-independent and the intensity and time scale of activation is controlled by a laser source external to the mass spectrometer. Here we implement and apply IR activation, in different irradiation regimes, to study both soluble and membrane protein assemblies. We show that IR activation using high-intensity pulsed lasers is faster than collisional and radiative cooling and requires much lower energy than continuous IR irradiation. We demonstrate that IR activation is an effective means for studying membrane protein assemblies, and liberate an intact V-type ATPase complex from detergent micelles, a result that cannot be achieved by means of CID using standard collision energies. Notably, we find that IR activation can be sufficiently soft to retain specific lipids bound to the complex. We further demonstrate that, by applying a combination of collisional activation, mass selection, and IR activation of the liberated complex, we can elucidate subunit stoichiometry and the masses of specifically bound lipids in a single MS experiment.

  15. Semiclassical theory of coupled lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakir, S.A.; Chow, W.W.

    1985-08-01

    The semiclassical equations of motion for a system of coupled lasers are developed and the frequency locking of the lasers comprising the system is analyzed. It is shown that the frequency-coupling range, in terms of the coupled cavities' mismatch, is proportional to the coupling coefficient. For a system where the cavities are uniformally filled with the active medium, the coupling vanishes regardless of the transmittance of the coupling mirrors. Our theory is valid for all values of coupling and for any number of lasers in the array. It may also be adapted to study different types of coupling arrangements.

  16. Different Brain Network Activations Induced by Modulation and Nonmodulation Laser Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chang-Wei; Wu, Jih-Huah; Hsieh, Chao-Hsien; Wang, Qwa-Fun; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the distinct cerebral activation with continued wave (CW) and 10 Hz-modulated wave (MW) stimulation during low-level laser acupuncture. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies were performed to investigate the possible mechanism during laser acupuncture stimulation at the left foot's yongquan (K1) acupoint. There are 12 healthy right-handed volunteers for each type of laser stimulation (10-Hz-Modulated wave: 8 males and 4 females; continued wave: 9 males and 3 females). The analysis of multisubjects in this experiment was applied by random-effect (RFX) analysis. In CW groups, significant activations were found within the inferior parietal lobule, the primary somatosensory cortex, and the precuneus of left parietal lobe. Medial and superior frontal gyrus of left frontal lobe were also aroused. In MW groups, significant activations were found within the primary motor cortex and middle temporal gyrus of left hemisphere and bilateral cuneus. Placebo stimulation did not show any activation. Most activation areas were involved in the functions of memory, attention, and self-consciousness. The results showed the cerebral hemodynamic responses of two laser acupuncture stimulation modes and implied that its mechanism was not only based upon afferent sensory information processing, but that it also had the hemodynamic property altered during external stimulation. PMID:20953400

  17. Quantification of the activity of biomolecules in microarrays obtained by direct laser transfer.

    PubMed

    Dinca, V; Ranella, A; Farsari, M; Kafetzopoulos, D; Dinescu, M; Popescu, A; Fotakis, C

    2008-10-01

    The direct-writing technique laser-induced forward transfer has been employed for the micro-array printing of liquid solutions of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase and the protein Titin on nitrocellulose solid surfaces. The effect of two UV laser pulse lengths, femtosecond and nanosecond has been studied in relation with maintaining the activity of the transferred biomolecules. The quantification of the active biomolecules after transfer has been carried out using Bradford assay, quantitative colorimetric enzymatic assay and fluorescence techniques. Spectrophotometric measurements of the HRP and the Titin activity as well as chromatogenic and fluorescence assay studies have revealed a connection between the properties of the deposited, biologically active biomolecules, the experimental conditions and the target composition. The bioassays have shown that up to 78% of the biomolecules remained active after femtosecond laser transfer, while this value reduced to 54% after nanosecond laser transfer. The addition of glycerol in a percentage up to 70% in the solution to be transferred has contributed to the stabilization of the micro-array patterns and the increase of their resolution.

  18. Fabrication and In Vitro Deployment of a Laser-Activated Shape Memory Polymer Vascular Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, G M; Small IV, W; Wilson, T S; Benett, W J; Matthews, D L; Hartman, J; Maitland, D J

    2007-04-25

    Vascular stents are small tubular scaffolds used in the treatment of arterial stenosis (narrowing of the vessel). Most vascular stents are metallic and are deployed either by balloon expansion or by self-expansion. A shape memory polymer (SMP) stent may enhance flexibility, compliance, and drug elution compared to its current metallic counterparts. The purpose of this study was to describe the fabrication of a laser-activated SMP stent and demonstrate photothermal expansion of the stent in an in vitro artery model. A novel SMP stent was fabricated from thermoplastic polyurethane. A solid SMP tube formed by dip coating a stainless steel pin was laser-etched to create the mesh pattern of the finished stent. The stent was crimped over a fiber-optic cylindrical light diffuser coupled to an infrared diode laser. Photothermal actuation of the stent was performed in a water-filled mock artery. At a physiological flow rate, the stent did not fully expand at the maximum laser power (8.6 W) due to convective cooling. However, under zero flow, simulating the technique of endovascular flow occlusion, complete laser actuation was achieved in the mock artery at a laser power of {approx}8 W. We have shown the design and fabrication of an SMP stent and a means of light delivery for photothermal actuation. Though further studies are required to optimize the device and assess thermal tissue damage, photothermal actuation of the SMP stent was demonstrated.

  19. Axicon-based annular laser trap for studies on sperm activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Bing; Vinson, Jaclyn M.; Botvinick, Elliot L.; Esener, Sadik C.; Berns, Michael W.

    2005-08-01

    As a powerful and noninvasive tool, laser trapping has been widely applied for the confinement and physiological study of biological cells and organelles. Researchers have used the single spot laser trap to hold individual sperm and quantitatively evaluated the motile force generated by a sperm. Early studies revealed the relationship between sperm motility and swimming behavior and helped the investigations in medical aspects of sperm activity. As sperm chemotaxis draws more and more interest in fertilization research, the studies on sperm-egg communication may help to explain male or female infertility and provide exciting new approaches to contraception. However, single spot laser trapping can only be used to investigate an individual target, which has limits in efficiency and throughput. To study the chemotactic response of sperm to eggs and to characterize sperm motility, an annular laser trap with a diameter of several hundred microns is designed, simulated with ray tracing tool, and implemented. An axicon transforms the wavefront such that the laser beam is incident on the microscope objective from all directions while filling the back aperture completely for high efficiency trapping. A trapping experiment with microspheres is carried out to evaluate the system performance. The power requirement for annular sperm trapping is determined experimentally and compared with theoretical calculations. With a chemo-attractant located in the center and sperm approaching from all directions, the annular laser trapping could serve as a speed bump for sperm so that motility characterization and fertility sorting can be performed efficiently.

  20. Laser-activated solder weld repair of the inferior alveolar nerve in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Nigel J.; Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Owen, Earl R.; Walker, D. M.

    1997-05-01

    A new laser activated solder weld technique is described for the microsurgical repair of the inferior alveolar nerve in rats. The laser weld technique used an albumin based solder, containing indocyanine cardiogreen, plus an infrared diode laser. Seven animals had inferior alveolar nerve repairs performed using the laser weld technique and these were compared against corresponding unoperated controls plus three cases of nerve section without repair. Histochemical analysis was performed utilizing neuron counts and horseradish peroxidase tracer (HRP) uptake in the trigeminal ganglion following sacrifice and staining of frozen sections with cresyl violet and diaminobenzidene. The results of this analysis showed comparable mean neuron counts and mean HRP uptake by neurons for the unoperated control and laser weld groups with considerable reduction of mean values in cases of nerve section with no repair. Sections of the repaired inferior alveolar nerves, stained with Masson's trichrome, showed no adverse reactions by axons or epineurium to the coagulative repair with the solder and demonstrated regeneration of myelinated axons at the time of sacrifice. In summary a new technique of laser weld repair of the inferior alveolar nerve is described which, on initial analysis, appears to be a reliable alternative to traditional techniques.

  1. Fabrication and in vitro deployment of a laser-activated shape memory polymer vascular stent

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Géraldine M; Small, Ward; Wilson, Thomas S; Benett, William J; Matthews, Dennis L; Hartman, Jonathan; Maitland, Duncan J

    2007-01-01

    Background Vascular stents are small tubular scaffolds used in the treatment of arterial stenosis (narrowing of the vessel). Most vascular stents are metallic and are deployed either by balloon expansion or by self-expansion. A shape memory polymer (SMP) stent may enhance flexibility, compliance, and drug elution compared to its current metallic counterparts. The purpose of this study was to describe the fabrication of a laser-activated SMP stent and demonstrate photothermal expansion of the stent in an in vitro artery model. Methods A novel SMP stent was fabricated from thermoplastic polyurethane. A solid SMP tube formed by dip coating a stainless steel pin was laser-etched to create the mesh pattern of the finished stent. The stent was crimped over a fiber-optic cylindrical light diffuser coupled to an infrared diode laser. Photothermal actuation of the stent was performed in a water-filled mock artery. Results At a physiological flow rate, the stent did not fully expand at the maximum laser power (8.6 W) due to convective cooling. However, under zero flow, simulating the technique of endovascular flow occlusion, complete laser actuation was achieved in the mock artery at a laser power of ~8 W. Conclusion We have shown the design and fabrication of an SMP stent and a means of light delivery for photothermal actuation. Though further studies are required to optimize the device and assess thermal tissue damage, photothermal actuation of the SMP stent was demonstrated. PMID:18042294

  2. Activation energy study of electron transport in high performance short wavelengths quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Pflügl, Christian; Diehl, Laurent; Lyakh, Arkadiy; Wang, Qi Jie; Maulini, Richard; Tsekoun, Alexei; Patel, C Kumar N; Wang, Xiaojun; Capasso, Federico

    2010-01-18

    We present a method to study current paths through quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). The temperature dependence of the current is measured at a fixed voltage. At low temperatures we find activation energies that correspond to the energy difference between the injector ground state and the upper laser level. At higher temperatures additional paths with larger activation energies are found. Application of this method to high performance QCLs based on strained InGaAs/InAlAs quantum wells and barriers with different band-offsets allows us to identify individual parasitic current paths through the devices. The results give insight into the transport properties of quantum cascade lasers thus providing a useful tool for device optimization.

  3. Bandwidth enhancement of injection-locked distributed reflector lasers with wirelike active regions.

    PubMed

    Lee, SeungHun; Parekh, Devang; Shindo, Takahiko; Yang, Weijian; Guo, Peng; Takahashi, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J; Arai, Shigehisa

    2010-08-01

    The modulation bandwidth enhancement of distributed reflector (DR) lasers with wirelike active regions utilizing optical injection locking is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. By the rate equation analysis, it is shown that DR lasers with wirelike active regions realize a low optical injection power and a large bandwidth enhancement under small operation currents. Experimentally, the small-signal bandwidth is increased to >15 GHz at a bias current of 5 mA, which is 4 times smaller than that for conventional edge-emitting lasers. A large signal modulation at 10 Gbps is also performed at the same bias current of 5 mA and voltage swing of 0.4 V(pp), and error-free detection was confirmed under the low-power conditions.

  4. Noninvasive diode laser activation of transient receptor potential proteins and nociceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Cooper, Brian Y.; Nemenov, Michael I.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated diode laser (980 nm) evoked activation of transient receptor potential proteins (TRPV1 and TRPV2). C and A-delta (Aδ) nociceptor families are primarily responsible for pain mediation in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 proteins have been associated with heat evoked pain in C fibers while Aδ fibers have been associated with TRPV2. Diode laser stimulation allows a margin of safety between non-invasive activation and damage 19, 22, 34. Laser pulses (20-50 ms, 0.1-10 W, 980 nm) were used to stimulate: A) in vitro: excised patches from HEK293 cells expressing TRPV1; B) in vitro: rat DRG nociceptors expressing either TRPV1 or TRPV2; and C) in vivo: C-fibers of the rat saphenous nerve (SN) trunk. Cell currents were recorded using standard patch clamp methods. The SN was also stimulated electrically with bipolar electrodes. Stimulation (20-50 ms) of HEK and DRG cells expressing TRPV1 was highly reproducible. Activation and peak currents were achieved at estimated peak temperatures of 55°C and 70°C. Threshold activation was also observed in DRG neurons expressing TRPV2. The conduction velocity for laser-activated saphenous nerve afferents was in the C fiber range (0.5-1 m/s). Electrically stimulated nerve contained stimulation artifacts and complex neural components with conduction velocities ranging from 0.3-30 m/s. Diode laser activation of TRPV1 protein is a reproducible and effective means to probe TRP activity in both in vivo and in vitro preparations

  5. Non-invasive diode laser activation of transient receptor potential proteins in nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Cooper, Brian Y; Nemenov, Michael I

    2007-02-21

    We investigated diode laser (980 nm) evoked activation of transient receptor potential proteins (TRPV1 and TRPV2). C and A-delta (Aδ) nociceptor families are primarily responsible for pain mediation in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 proteins have been associated with heat evoked pain in C fibers while Aδ fibers have been associated with TRPV2. Diode laser stimulation allows a margin of safety between non-invasive activation and damage (19, 22, 34). Laser pulses (20-50 ms, 0.1-10 W, 980 nm) were used to stimulate: A) in vitro: excised patches from HEK293 cells expressing TRPV1; B) in vitro: rat DRG nociceptors expressing either TRPV1 or TRPV2; and C) in vivo: C-fibers of the rat saphenous nerve (SN) trunk. Cell currents were recorded using standard patch clamp methods. The SN was also stimulated electrically with bipolar electrodes. Stimulation (20-50 ms) of HEK and DRG cells expressing TRPV1 was highly reproducible. Activation and peak currents were achieved at estimated peak temperatures of 55°C and 70°C. Threshold activation was also observed in DRG neurons expressing TRPV2. The conduction velocity for laser-activated saphenous nerve afferents was in the C fiber range (0.5-1 m/s). Electrically stimulated nerve contained stimulation artifacts and complex neural components with conduction velocities ranging from 0.3-30 m/s. Diode laser activation of TRPV1 protein is a reproducible and effective means to probe TRP activity in both in vivo and in vitro preparations.

  6. Low-level Ga-Al-As laser irradiation enhances osteoblast proliferation through activation of Hedgehog signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiushi; Qu, Zhou; Chen, Yingxin; Liu, Shujie; Zhou, Yanmin

    2014-12-01

    Low-level laser irradiation has been reported to promote bone formation, but the molecular mechanism is still unclear. Hedgehog signaling pathway has been reported to play an important role in promoting bone formation. The aim of the present study was to examine whether low-level Ga-Al-As laser (808 nm) irradiation could have an effect on Hedgehog signaling pathway during osteoblast proliferation in vitro. Mouse osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1 was cultured in vitro. The cultures after laser irradiation (3.75J/cm2) were treated with recombinant N-terminals Sonic Hedgehog (N-Shh)or Hedgehog inhibitor cyclopamine (cy). The experiment was divided into 4 group, group 1:laser irradiation, group 2: laser irradiation and N-Shh, group 3: laser irradiation and cy, group 4:control with no laser irradiation. On day 1,2 and 3,cell proliferation was determined by cell counting, Cell Counting Kit-8.On 12 h and 24 h, cell cycle was detected by flow cytometry. Proliferation activity of laser irradiation and N-Shh group was remarkably increased compared with those of laser irradiation group. Proliferation activity of laser irradiation and cy group was remarkably decreased compared with those of laser irradiation group, however proliferation activity of laser irradiation and cy group was remarkably increased compared with those of control group. These results suggest that low-level Ga-Al-As laser irradiation activate Hedgehog signaling pathway during osteoblast proliferation in vitro. Hedgehog signaling pathway is one of the signaling pathways by which low-level Ga-Al-As laser irradiation regulates osteoblast proliferation.

  7. Effect of temperature and water activity on gene expression and aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus on almond medium.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Antonia; Solfrizzo, Michele; Epifani, Filomena; Panzarini, Giuseppe; Perrone, Giancarlo

    2016-01-18

    Almonds are among the commodities at risk of aflatoxin contamination by Aspergillus flavus. Temperature and water activity are the two key determinants in pre and post-harvest environments influencing both the rate of fungal spoilage and aflatoxin production. Varying the combination of these parameters can completely inhibit or fully activate the biosynthesis of aflatoxin, so it is fundamental to know which combinations can control or be conducive to aflatoxin contamination. Little information is available about the influence of these parameters on aflatoxin production on almonds. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of different combinations of temperature (20 °C, 28 °C, and 37 °C) and water activity (0.90, 0.93, 0.96, 0.99 aw) on growth, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) production and expression of the two regulatory genes, aflR and aflS, and two structural genes, aflD and aflO, of the aflatoxin biosynthetic cluster in A. flavus grown on an almond medium solidified with agar. Maximum accumulation of fungal biomass and AFB1 production was obtained at 28 °C and 0.96 aw; no fungal growth and AFB1 production were observed at 20 °C at the driest tested conditions (0.90 and 0.93 aw). At 20° and 37 °C AFB1 production was 70-90% lower or completely suppressed, depending on aw. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR showed that the two regulatory genes (aflR and aflS) were highly expressed at maximum (28 °C) and minimum (20 °C and 37 °C) AFB1 production. Conversely the two structural genes (aflD and aflO) were highly expressed only at maximum AFB1 production (28 °C and 0.96-0.99 aw). It seems that temperature acts as a key factor influencing aflatoxin production which is strictly correlated to the induction of expression of structural biosynthesis genes (aflD and aflO), but not to that of aflatoxin regulatory genes (aflR and aflS), whose functional products are most likely subordinated to other regulatory processes acting at post-translational level

  8. Effect of temperature and water activity on gene expression and aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus on almond medium.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Antonia; Solfrizzo, Michele; Epifani, Filomena; Panzarini, Giuseppe; Perrone, Giancarlo

    2016-01-18

    Almonds are among the commodities at risk of aflatoxin contamination by Aspergillus flavus. Temperature and water activity are the two key determinants in pre and post-harvest environments influencing both the rate of fungal spoilage and aflatoxin production. Varying the combination of these parameters can completely inhibit or fully activate the biosynthesis of aflatoxin, so it is fundamental to know which combinations can control or be conducive to aflatoxin contamination. Little information is available about the influence of these parameters on aflatoxin production on almonds. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of different combinations of temperature (20 °C, 28 °C, and 37 °C) and water activity (0.90, 0.93, 0.96, 0.99 aw) on growth, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) production and expression of the two regulatory genes, aflR and aflS, and two structural genes, aflD and aflO, of the aflatoxin biosynthetic cluster in A. flavus grown on an almond medium solidified with agar. Maximum accumulation of fungal biomass and AFB1 production was obtained at 28 °C and 0.96 aw; no fungal growth and AFB1 production were observed at 20 °C at the driest tested conditions (0.90 and 0.93 aw). At 20° and 37 °C AFB1 production was 70-90% lower or completely suppressed, depending on aw. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR showed that the two regulatory genes (aflR and aflS) were highly expressed at maximum (28 °C) and minimum (20 °C and 37 °C) AFB1 production. Conversely the two structural genes (aflD and aflO) were highly expressed only at maximum AFB1 production (28 °C and 0.96-0.99 aw). It seems that temperature acts as a key factor influencing aflatoxin production which is strictly correlated to the induction of expression of structural biosynthesis genes (aflD and aflO), but not to that of aflatoxin regulatory genes (aflR and aflS), whose functional products are most likely subordinated to other regulatory processes acting at post-translational level

  9. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  10. The research of multi-frame target recognition based on laser active imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can-jin; Sun, Tao; Wang, Tin-feng; Chen, Juan

    2013-09-01

    Laser active imaging is fit to conditions such as no difference in temperature between target and background, pitch-black night, bad visibility. Also it can be used to detect a faint target in long range or small target in deep space, which has advantage of high definition and good contrast. In one word, it is immune to environment. However, due to the affect of long distance, limited laser energy and atmospheric backscatter, it is impossible to illuminate the whole scene at the same time. It means that the target in every single frame is unevenly or partly illuminated, which make the recognition more difficult. At the same time the speckle noise which is common in laser active imaging blurs the images . In this paper we do some research on laser active imaging and propose a new target recognition method based on multi-frame images . Firstly, multi pulses of laser is used to obtain sub-images for different parts of scene. A denoising method combined homomorphic filter with wavelet domain SURE is used to suppress speckle noise. And blind deconvolution is introduced to obtain low-noise and clear sub-images. Then these sub-images are registered and stitched to combine a completely and uniformly illuminated scene image. After that, a new target recognition method based on contour moments is proposed. Firstly, canny operator is used to obtain contours. For each contour, seven invariant Hu moments are calculated to generate the feature vectors. At last the feature vectors are input into double hidden layers BP neural network for classification . Experiments results indicate that the proposed algorithm could achieve a high recognition rate and satisfactory real-time performance for laser active imaging.

  11. DRIVING OUTFLOWS WITH RELATIVISTIC JETS AND THE DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK EFFICIENCY ON INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM INHOMOGENEITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M.; Bicknell, G. V.

    2012-10-01

    We examine the detailed physics of the feedback mechanism by relativistic active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets interacting with a two-phase fractal interstellar medium (ISM) in the kpc-scale core of galaxies using 29 three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations. The feedback efficiency, as measured by the amount of cloud dispersal generated by the jet-ISM interactions, is sensitive to the maximum size of clouds in the fractal cloud distribution but not to their volume filling factor. Feedback ceases to be efficient for Eddington ratios P{sub jet}/L{sub edd} {approx}< 10{sup -4}, although systems with large cloud complexes {approx}> 50 pc require jets of Eddington ratio in excess of 10{sup -2} to disperse the clouds appreciably. Based on measurements of the bubble expansion rates in our simulations, we argue that sub-grid AGN prescriptions resulting in negative feedback in cosmological simulations without a multi-phase treatment of the ISM are good approximations if the volume filling factor of warm-phase material is less than 0.1 and the cloud complexes are smaller than {approx}25 pc. We find that the acceleration of the dense embedded clouds is provided by the ram pressure of the high-velocity flow through the porous channels of the warm phase, flow that has fully entrained the shocked hot-phase gas it has swept up, and is additionally mass loaded by ablated cloud material. This mechanism transfers 10% to 40% of the jet energy to the cold and warm gas, accelerating it within a few 10 to 100 Myr to velocities that match those observed in a range of high- and low-redshift radio galaxies hosting powerful radio jets.

  12. Causes of reduced survival of neonatal pigs by medium-chain triglycerides: blood metabolite and behavioral activity approaches.

    PubMed

    Lin, C L; Chiang, S H; Lee, H F

    1995-07-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the causes of the failure of orally dosed medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) in improving the survival of neonatal pigs. In Exp. 1, four litters consisting of 24 unsuckled neonatal pigs were either dosed with 6 mL/kg BW.75 of MCT or the dosing process was mimicked by inserting and withdrawing the feeding tube at 10 and 18 h after birth. Blood beta-hydroxybutyrate concentration was increased (P < .06) and the depletion of liver glycogen was reduced (P < .05) by MCT. Plasma octanoate (C8) concentration peaked at 1 h and was minimized at 4 to 8 h after each MCT dosage; decanoate (C10) concentration increased (P < .001) gradually after each dosage. Activity of pigs was decreased (P < .01) by MCT. In Exp. 2, 94 litters consisting of 887 neonatal pigs were dosed with either 6 mL/kg BW.75 of MCT, coconut oil (CO), or saline at 10 to 14 and 20 to 28 h after birth. Milk intake (P < .05) and weight gain were reduced (P < .01) in 1- to 2-d-old pigs dosed with MCT compared with intake and gain of pigs dosed with saline. Mortality of large pigs (> 1 kg) was increased (P < .05) but mortality of small pigs (< 1 kg) was not affected by MCT. Mortality of small pigs was reduced (P < .05) but mortality of large pigs (> 1 kg) was not affected by CO. Standing, walking, and suckling behaviors of pigs were not affected by MCT or CO. Coma was evident in 9.7% of pigs dosed with MCT.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7592086

  13. Effects of preincubation of eggs and activation medium on the percentage of eyed embryos in ide (Leuciscus idus), an externally fertilizing fish.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Mohammad Abdul Momin; Linhart, Otomar; Krejszeff, Sławomir; Żarski, Daniel; Król, Jarosław; Butts, Ian Anthony Ernest

    2016-03-15

    Standardization of fertilization protocols is crucial for improving reproductive techniques for externally fertilizing fish in captive breeding. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine the effects of preincubation of eggs and activation medium on the percentage of eyed embryos for ide (Leuciscus idus). Pooled eggs from five females were preincubated in three different activating media for 0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 seconds and then fertilized by pooled sperm from five males. At the eyed-egg stage, the percentage of viable embryos was later calculated. Results showed that preincubation time was significant for the freshwater activation medium (P < 0.001), such that the percentage of eyed embryos declined across the preincubation time gradient. Additionally, there was an effect on the percentage of eyed embryos when eggs were incubated with Woynarovich solution (P < 0.001), such that a decline was detected at 90 seconds, whereas no effect was detected for the saline water medium. Activating medium had a significant effect on the percentage of eyed embryos for each preincubation time (P < 0.05). More precisely, freshwater produced the lowest percentage of eyed embryos at all preincubation times (ranged from 1.9% at 120 seconds to 43.6% at 0 seconds), whereas saline water and Woynarovich solution produced the highest percentage of eyed embryos at 0 seconds and 30 seconds before incubation. Woynarovich solution produced the highest percentage of eyed embryos at 60 seconds (65.26%), whereas saline water produced the highest percentage at 90 seconds (68.37%). No difference was detected between saline water and Woynarovich solution at 120 seconds. Examination of sperm traits showed no impact of activating medium on computer assisted sperm analysis parameters. Together, these results suggest that saline water or Woynarovich solution improve fertilization rate in ide during IVF; thus, these media are useful for standardizing fertilization protocols and

  14. Modification of graphene oxide by laser irradiation: a new route to enhance antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccheri, Maria A.; D'Angelo, Daniele; Scalese, Silvia; Spanò, Simon F.; Filice, Simona; Fazio, Enza; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Zimbone, Massimo; Brundo, Maria V.; Pecoraro, Roberta; Alba, Anna; Sinatra, Fulvia; Rappazzo, Giancarlo; Privitera, Vittorio

    2016-06-01

    The antibacterial activity and possible toxicity of graphene oxide and laser-irradiated graphene oxide (iGO) were investigated. Antibacterial activity was tested on Escherichia coli and shown to be higher for GO irradiated for at least three hours, which seems to be correlated to the resulting morphology of laser-treated GO and independent of the kind and amount of oxygen functionalities. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show a reduction of the GO flakes size after visible laser irradiation, preserving considerable oxygen content and degree of hydrophilicity. SEM images of the bacteria after the exposure to the iGO flakes confirm membrane damage after interaction with the laser-modified morphology of GO. In addition, a fish embryo toxicity test on zebrafish displayed that neither mortality nor sublethal effects were caused by the different iGO solutions, even when the concentration was increased up to four times higher than the one effective in reducing the bacteria survival. The antibacterial properties and the absence of toxicity make the visible laser irradiation of GO a promising option for water purification applications.

  15. Modification of graphene oxide by laser irradiation: a new route to enhance antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Maria A; D'Angelo, Daniele; Scalese, Silvia; Spanò, Simon F; Filice, Simona; Fazio, Enza; Compagnini, Giuseppe; Zimbone, Massimo; Brundo, Maria V; Pecoraro, Roberta; Alba, Anna; Sinatra, Fulvia; Rappazzo, Giancarlo; Privitera, Vittorio

    2016-06-17

    The antibacterial activity and possible toxicity of graphene oxide and laser-irradiated graphene oxide (iGO) were investigated. Antibacterial activity was tested on Escherichia coli and shown to be higher for GO irradiated for at least three hours, which seems to be correlated to the resulting morphology of laser-treated GO and independent of the kind and amount of oxygen functionalities. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show a reduction of the GO flakes size after visible laser irradiation, preserving considerable oxygen content and degree of hydrophilicity. SEM images of the bacteria after the exposure to the iGO flakes confirm membrane damage after interaction with the laser-modified morphology of GO. In addition, a fish embryo toxicity test on zebrafish displayed that neither mortality nor sublethal effects were caused by the different iGO solutions, even when the concentration was increased up to four times higher than the one effective in reducing the bacteria survival. The antibacterial properties and the absence of toxicity make the visible laser irradiation of GO a promising option for water purification applications. PMID:27158973

  16. Measurement of pressure changes during laser-activated irrigant by an erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet laser.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Harry Huiz; De Moor, Roeland J G

    2015-07-01

    The use of Er,Cr:YSGG laser to activate irrigants results in the creation of vapour bubbles and shockwaves. The present study evaluated the magnitude of pressure changes in the root canal during laser-activated irrigation. The root canal of a single extracted maxillary canine was enlarged to a size 40/0.06 file. A pressure sensor was inserted apically into the root canal. The tooth was processed as follows. In the EDTA condition, the tooth was irrigated with 17 % EDTA; in the NaOCl condition, the tooth was irrigated with 3 % NaOCl. In all conditions, the irrigants were activated at 0.75 and 1.75 W for 60 s using RFT2 and MZ2 tips; to analyse the effect of tip placement, the tip was activated at the orifice and after inserting the tip 5 mm deeper than the orifice. Data showed no significant difference between irrigation regimens (p > 0.05). There were no significant differences of the pressure between RFT2 and MZ2 tips (p > 0.05). The placement of tips closer to the apex resulted in significantly higher pressure than at the orifice (p < 0.001). The use of 1.75 W power resulted in a significantly higher increase of pressure compared to 0.75 W (p < 0.001), regardless either the type of solutions or tips used. The magnitude of the pressure changes in the root canal at 0.75 W was significantly lower than 1.75 W regardless of either type of tips or solutions used. The closer the insertion of the tip to the apex, the higher the pressure.

  17. Evaluation of antimicrobial activity of probiotic bacteria against Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium 1344 in a common medium under different environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Marianelli, Cinzia; Cifani, Noemi; Pasquali, Paolo

    2010-10-01

    The importance of probiotics in human nutrition has been gaining recognition in recent years. These organisms have been shown to promote human health by enhancing immunological and digestive functions and fighting respiratory tract infections. We propose an improved in vitro model for the study of probiotic antimicrobial activity against enteropathogens, by attempting to re-create, in a common culture medium, environmental growth conditions comparable to those present in the small intestine. A preliminary experiment was carried out in order to find a culture medium able to support both probiotics and pathogens. This was done with the aim of obtaining correct assessment of the interaction under shared growth conditions. BHI medium was selected as the common culture medium and was therefore used in antimicrobial activity assays. The interactions between Salmonella 1344 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus reuteri were then assessed at different pH and oxygen availability conditions mimicking the small intestinal environment. L. rhamnosus GG ATCC 53103 (LGG) had the strongest antimicrobial effect, in particular under anaerobic conditions and at lower pH levels. Its antagonistic activity involved both lactic acid and secreted non-lactic acid molecules. Our findings suggest that each probiotic strain has an optimum range of action and should therefore be thoroughly investigated to optimize its use.

  18. Quantification of the atmospheric scintillation for laser illumination in active imaging.

    PubMed

    Poyet, Jean-Michel; Meyer, Olivier; Christnacher, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Most of the analytical scintillation models used by experts to simulate the illumination performances of active imaging systems are based on the use of monochromatic, punctual, and coherent sources. These analytical models seem pessimistic regarding lightpipe-based illumination techniques. Outdoor trials have been made with 1.57 μm laser illuminators with and without lightpipe to record illumination maps and associated refractive index structure parameter C(n)2 with a propagation distance of 1 km. Analysis shows a reduction of the scintillation by a factor of 2.5 comparing analytical models and laser illumination with lightpipe.

  19. A history of semi-active laser dome and window materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Roger M.

    2014-05-01

    Semi-Active Laser (SAL) guidance systems were developed starting in the mid-1960's and today form an important class of precision guided weapons. The laser wavelengths generally fall in the short wave infrared region of the spectrum. Relative to passive, image based, infrared seekers the optical demands placed on the domes or windows of SAL seekers is very modest, allowing the use of low cost, easily manufactured materials, such as polycarbonate. This paper will examine the transition of SAL window and dome science and technology from the laboratory to battlefield, with special emphasis on the story of polycarbonate domes.

  20. Measuring of object vibration using sinusoidal-modulation laser-diode active interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yong; Cao, Qinfeng; Lu, Su

    1996-09-01

    Using the character that the emitting optical frequency of the laser diode is controlled by the injected current, the ability of eliminating environmental disturbance of the sinusoidal modulation laser diode active interferometer will be raised by more than one hundred times through putting the disturbed interference signal produced by the environment into the interferometer. When vibrating frequency of objects is different from that of the sinusoidol modulation, 'beat- frequency' will be produced in the interfere signal, which can be analyzed to get the vibrating frequency of objects. This paper described the operation principle and theoretical delusion of the 'beat-frequency' method.

  1. Mechanism of spontaneous switching of polarisation in an ytterbium-doped fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, V G; Sya, Ya V; Nanii, Oleg E; Khlystov, V I

    2007-04-30

    The regime of polarisation switching in a double-clad ytterbium fibre laser is studied experimentally and explained theoretically. It is shown that polarisation switching appears in lasers with the long active medium (no less than 20 m) when the pump slightly exceeds the threshold. The experimentally observed properties of spontaneous polarisation switching in the ytterbium fibre laser are explained by the competition of modes with orthogonal polarisations taking into account the polarisation-dependent saturation of amplification and losses. (fibre lasers)

  2. Effects of Cr2O3 Activating Flux on the Plasma Plume in Pulsed Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Luo; Yunfei, Du; Xiaojian, Xie; Rui, Wan; Liang, Zhu; Jingtao, Han

    2016-08-01

    The effects of Cr2O3 activating flux on pulsed YAG laser welding of stainless steel and, particularly, on the behavior of the plasma plume in the welding process were investigated. According to the acoustic emission (AE) signals detected in the welding process, the possible mechanism for the improvement in penetration depth was discussed. The results indicated that the AE signals detected in the welding process reflected the behavior of the plasma plume as pulsed laser energy affecting the molten pool. The root-mean-square (RMS) waveform, AE count, and power spectrum of AE signals were three effective means to characterize the behavior of the plasma plume, which indicated the characteristics of energy released by the plasma plume. The activating flux affected by the laser beam helped to increase the duration and intensity of energy released by the plasma plume, which improved the recoil force and thermal effect transferred from the plasma plume to the molten pool. These results were the main mechanism for Cr2O3 activating flux addition improving the penetration depth in pulsed YAG laser welding.

  3. Effects of Cr2O3 Activating Flux on the Plasma Plume in Pulsed Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Luo; Yunfei, Du; Xiaojian, Xie; Rui, Wan; Liang, Zhu; Jingtao, Han

    2016-11-01

    The effects of Cr2O3 activating flux on pulsed YAG laser welding of stainless steel and, particularly, on the behavior of the plasma plume in the welding process were investigated. According to the acoustic emission (AE) signals detected in the welding process, the possible mechanism for the improvement in penetration depth was discussed. The results indicated that the AE signals detected in the welding process reflected the behavior of the plasma plume as pulsed laser energy affecting the molten pool. The root-mean-square (RMS) waveform, AE count, and power spectrum of AE signals were three effective means to characterize the behavior of the plasma plume, which indicated the characteristics of energy released by the plasma plume. The activating flux affected by the laser beam helped to increase the duration and intensity of energy released by the plasma plume, which improved the recoil force and thermal effect transferred from the plasma plume to the molten pool. These results were the main mechanism for Cr2O3 activating flux addition improving the penetration depth in pulsed YAG laser welding.

  4. High energy XeBr electric discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Sze, R.C.; Scott, P.B.

    A high energy XeBr laser for producing coherent radiation at 282 nm is disclosed. The XeBr laser utilizes an electric discharge as the excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HBr, is used as the halogen donor which undergoes harpooning reactions with Xe/sub M/ to form XeBr.

  5. High energy XeBr electric discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Scott, Peter B.

    1981-01-01

    A high energy XeBr laser for producing coherent radiation at 282 nm. The XeBr laser utilizes an electric discharge as the excitation source to minimize formation of molecular ions thereby minimizing absorption of laser radiation by the active medium. Additionally, HBr is used as the halogen donor which undergoes harpooning reactions with Xe.sub.M * to form XeBr*.

  6. Radiation-induced defects in Pr3+-activated LiYF4 laser host

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhoble, S. J.; Deshpande, S. P.; Pode, R. B.; Dhoble, N. S.; Gundurao, T. K.

    2004-11-01

    Rare earth doped fluorides have been used in laser applications. Not much is known about the effect of ionizing radiation on the lasing and other properties of fluorides. Therefore, in recent years much attention has been paid to the study of radiation-induced defects in laser materials, as they affect the optical and stimulated emission properties. The defect formation by gamma-ray irradiation in Pr3+ activated LiYF4, powder prepared by melt method, have been studied by thermoluminescence and electron spin resonance techniques and are reported in this paper. It is shown that LiYF4:Pr3+ is sensitive to gamma-ray radiation. Characterization of this laser material using ESR and photoluminescence techniques is also described.

  7. Broadband standoff detection of large molecules by mid-infrared active coherent laser spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Neil A; Molero, Francisco; Weidmann, Damien

    2015-01-26

    A widely tunable active coherent laser spectrometer (ACLaS) has been demonstrated for standoff detection of broadband absorbers in the 1280 to 1318 cm-1 spectral region using an external cavity quantum cascade laser as a mid-infrared source. The broad tuning range allows detection and quantification of vapor phase molecules, such as dichloroethane, ethylene glycol dinitrate, and tetrafluoroethane. The level of confidence in molecular mixing ratios retrieved from interfering spectral measurements is assessed in a quantitative manner. A first qualitative demonstration of condensed phase chemical detection on nitroacetanilide has also been conducted. Detection performances of the broadband ACLaS have been placed in the context of explosive detection and compared to that obtained using distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers.

  8. Generation of dissipative solitons in an actively mode-locked ultralong fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Koliada, N A; Nyushkov, B N; Ivanenko, A V; Kobtsev, Sergey M; Harper, Paul; Turitsyn, Sergei K; Denisov, Vladimir I; Pivtsov, V S

    2013-02-28

    A single-pulse actively mode-locked fibre laser with a cavity length exceeding 1 km has been developed and investigated for the first time. This all-fibre erbium-doped laser has a normal intracavity dispersion and generates dissipative 8-ns solitons with a fundamental repetition rate of 163.8 kHz; the energy per pulse reaches 34 nJ. The implemented mode locking, based on the use of intracavity intensity modulator, provides self-triggering and high stability of pulsed lasing. A possibility of continuous tuning of the centre lasing wavelength in the range of 1558 - 1560 nm without any tunable spectral selective elements in the cavity is demonstrated. The tuning occurs when controlling the modulation signal frequency due to the forced change in the pulse repetition time (group delay) under the conditions of intracavity chromatic dispersion. (laser optics 2012)

  9. Active protein and calcium hydroxyapatite bilayers grown by laser techniques for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Motoc, M M; Axente, E; Popescu, C; Sima, L E; Petrescu, S M; Mihailescu, I N; Gyorgy, E

    2013-09-01

    Active protein and bioceramic calcium hydroxyapatite (HA) bilayers were grown by combining conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) techniques. A pulsed UV KrF* excimer laser was used for the irradiations. The HA layers were grown by PLD. Proteins with antimicrobial action were attached to the bioceramic layers using MAPLE. The composite MAPLE targets were obtained by dissolving the proteins powder in distilled water. The crystalline status and chemical composition of the obtained structures were studied by X-ray diffractometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The layers were grown for the design of advanced future metal implants coatings, ensuring both enhanced bone formation and localized antimicrobial therapy. Our results demonstrated that protein coatings improve bone cell proliferation in vitro. Immunofluorescence experiments show that actin filaments stretch throughout bone cells and sustain their optimal spreading.

  10. Wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber ring laser using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as mode locker and tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenping; Chan, K. T.

    1999-07-01

    A wavelength-tunable actively mode-locked erbium fiber ring laser was demonstrated using a distributed feedback semiconductor laser as an intensity mode locker and a tunable optical filter. Very stable optical pulse trains at gigabit repetition rates were generated using harmonica mode locking. The supermode noise was suppressed to 60 dB below the signal level and the root-mean-square timing jitter (0.45 kHz-1 MHz) was found to be about 1% of the pulse duration. A continuous wavelength tuning range of 1.8 nm was achieved by changing the semiconductor laser temperature from 11.4 to 30 °C.

  11. Impact of substrates and cell immobilization on siderophore activity by Pseudomonads in a Fe and/or Cr, Hg, Pb containing-medium.

    PubMed

    Braud, Armelle; Jézéquel, Karine; Lebeau, Thierry

    2007-06-01

    To increase the amount of bioavailable metals in phytoextraction purposes, soil bioaugmentation with Pseudomonads, as siderophore producers with high metal complexation levels, could be relevant. Unfortunately, siderophore synthesis may be inhibited by soluble iron in soil and bacteria can suffer at the same time from the toxicity of some other metals, predation and oligotrophy. To overcome these drawbacks, we attempted to co-locate a carbon substrate and Pseudomonas aeruginosa or P. fluorescens in Ca-alginate beads. First, free-cell cultures showed that glycerol, fructose, mannitol and skim milk enhanced the siderophore activity which was the highest in the medium with neither Fe or TM (toxic metal) (Cr, Hg and Pb) and the lowest in the Fe-containing medium without TM. The negative effect of iron was partly offset when TM was added to the medium. In a second part, co-location of microorganisms and substrates was only feasible with skim milk. By comparison with free cells, siderophore activity by immobilized cells was higher in culture media containing Fe with or without TM (up to a ratio of 9), and varied in a narrow margin, according to the medium composition. PMID:17112663

  12. Activity of retinal ganglion cells following intense, nanosecond laser flashes. Final report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect

    Glickman, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of intense, but nonlesion-producing, laser exposures of 20-ns duration were determined on the light responses and spontaneous activity of retinal ganglion cells recorded in situ from the rhesus monkey. (Following a single, 20-ns exposure centered on its receptive field, a ganglion cell produced an 'afterdischarge' of maintained action potentials). The duration of the afterdischarge depended on the diameter of the laser beam on the retina and on the beam's intensity. Laser exposures subtending 0.5 to 2.0 deg, and delivering 45 to 60% of the maximum permissible exposure, elicited afterdischarges that lasted up to 80 s. When the beam diameter was decreased to 0.25 deg, the afterdischarge was reduced to 30 s, and to less than 5 s with the 0.12-deg beam. Light sensitivity after the laser exposure recovered rapidly during the first 10 s and then more slowly, but exponentially, until it reached the preflash level. Color-opponent ganglion cells exhibited a phenomenon called 'response-reversal' after the laser exposure, presumably due to selective adaptation of a mid-wavelength cone-input. Because a 20-ns exposure, regardless of intensity, is likely to photoregenerate more than half of the available visual pigment, the effects of ganglion cell response described here are not likely to be due solely to pigment bleaching.

  13. Rapid prototyping of reflectors for vehicle lighting using laser activated remote phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachmayer, Roland; Kloppenburg, Gerolf; Wolf, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Bright white light sources are of significant importance for automotive front lighting systems. Today's upper class vehicles mainly use HID or LED as light source. As a further step in this development laser diode based systems offer high luminance, efficiency and allow the realization of new styling concepts and new dynamic lighting functions. These white laser diode systems can either be realized by mixing different spectral sources or by combining diodes with specific phosphors. Based on the approach of generating light using a laser and remote phosphor, lighting modules are manufactured. Four blue laser diodes (450 nm) are used to activate a phosphor coating and thus to achieve white light. A segmented paraboloid reflector generates the desired light distribution for an additional car headlamp. We use high speed milling and selective laser melting to build the reflector system for this lighting module. We compare the spectral reflection grade of these materials. Furthermore the generated modules are analyzed regarding their efficiency and light distribution. The use of Rapid Prototyping technologies allows an early validation of the chosen concept and is supposed to reduce cost and time in the product development process significantly. Therefor we discuss costs and times of the applied manufacturing technologies.

  14. Laser optical disk position encoder with active heads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Eric P.

    1991-01-01

    An angular position encoder that minimizes the effects of eccentricity and other misalignments between the disk and the read stations by employing heads with beam steering optics that actively track the disk in directions along the disk radius and normal to its surface is discussed. The device adapts features prevalent in optical disk technology to the application of angular position sensing.

  15. Laser optical disk position encoder with active heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Eric P.

    An angular position encoder that minimizes the effects of eccentricity and other misalignments between the disk and the read stations by employing heads with beam steering optics that actively track the disk in directions along the disk radius and normal to its surface is discussed. The device adapts features prevalent in optical disk technology to the application of angular position sensing.

  16. Experimental and calculative estimation of femtosecond laser induced-impulsive force in culture medium solution with motion analysis of polymer micro-beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Takeshi; Maruyama, Akihiro; Uedan, Hirohisa; Iino, Takanori; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh

    2015-03-01

    A new methodology to estimate the dynamics of femtosecond laser-induced impulsive force generated into water under microscope was developed. In this method, the position shift of the bead in water before and after the femtosecond laser irradiation was investigated experimentally and compared with motion equation assuming stress wave propagation with expansion and collapse the cavitation bubble. In the process of the comparison, parameters of force and time of the stress wave were determined. From these results, dynamics of propagations of shock and stress waves, cavitation bubble generation, and these actions to micro-objects were speculated.

  17. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, S.; Kapteyn, H.C.; Murnane, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethrough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate. 7 figs.

  18. Laser amplifier and method

    DOEpatents

    Backus, Sterling; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Murnane, Margaret M.

    1997-01-01

    Laser amplifiers and methods for amplifying a laser beam are disclosed. A representative embodiment of the amplifier comprises first and second curved mirrors, a gain medium, a third mirror, and a mask. The gain medium is situated between the first and second curved mirrors at the focal point of each curved mirror. The first curved mirror directs and focuses a laser beam to pass through the gain medium to the second curved mirror which reflects and recollimates the laser beam. The gain medium amplifies and shapes the laser beam as the laser beam passes therethough. The third mirror reflects the laser beam, reflected from the second curved mirror, so that the laser beam bypasses the gain medium and return to the first curved mirror, thereby completing a cycle of a ring traversed by the laser beam. The mask defines at least one beam-clipping aperture through which the laser beam passes during a cycle. The gain medium is pumped, preferably using a suitable pumping laser. The laser amplifier can be used to increase the energy of continuous-wave or, especially, pulsed laser beams including pulses of femtosecond duration and relatively high pulse rate.

  19. Activators of photoluminescence in calcite: evidence from high-resolution, laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pedone, V.A.; Cercone, K.R.; Burruss, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-excited luminescence spectroscopy of a red-algal, biogenic calcite and a synthetic Mn-calcite can make the distinction between organic and trace-element activators of photoluminescence. Organic-activated photoluminescence in biogenic calcite is characterized by significant peak shifts and increasing intensity with shorter-wavelength excitation and by significant decreases in intensity after heating to ??? 400??C. In contrast, Mn-activated photoluminescence shows no peak shift, greatest intensity under green excitation and limited changes after heating. Examination of samples with a high-sensitivity spectrometer using several wavelengths of exciting light is necessary for identification of photoluminescence activators. ?? 1990.

  20. Coupling hydrologic and hydraulic modelling for reliable flood risk mitigation activities in the Upper-Medium Tiber River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berni, N.; Brocca, L.; Giustarini, L.; Pandolfo, C.; Stelluti, M.; Melone, F.; Moramarco, T.

    2009-04-01

    In view of the recent and serious flood events occurred in latest years in Italy, the interest towards accurate methodology for the evaluation of flood prone areas is continually increasing. In particular, this issue is related to urbanization planning activities, civil protection actions (e.g. hydraulic risk warning systems), and the assessment of hydraulic engineering structures behaviour during severe hydrometeorological conditions. In Italy, following the publishing in the late 90's of many laws and regulations concerning hydraulic risk assessment matters, a widespread flooding areas mapping have been carried out (Italian Basin Authorities "PAI" plans). In case of limited availability of historical peak flow data, the flood prone areas estimation was based on the application of hydrologic and hydraulic modelling separately. Moreover, the recent directive 2007/60/EC on the assessment and management of flood risks requires from each member state: preliminary flood risk assessment (within December 2011), flood hazard maps and flood risk maps (within December 2013), flood risk management plans (within December 2015). In order to prevent and control flood events in medium-small river basins (e.g. Upper Tiber River basin, Central Italy), the use of hydrologic models coupled with hydraulic ones can be a valuable tool also for real time applications, such as flood risk mitigation and warning activities of the Italian National Warning System Network (composed by regional "Functional Centres" coordinated by the National Civil Protection Department). In this context, two significant flood events occurred in November 2005 and December 2008 in the Umbria Region territory were considered. In this area a hydrometeorological network, characterized by a high temporal and spatial resolution, is operating in real time. Different coupled models were considered to reproduce the selected events, in order to test and compare their reliability and efficiency. Specifically, two semi

  1. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Christy K; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone.

  2. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-15

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He{sup 4} nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T{sup 3}.

  3. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-01

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 × 10(5) n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He(4) nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T(3). PMID:23277984

  4. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Christy K.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone. PMID:26203370

  5. Doubly active Q switching and mode locking of an all-fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Díez, Antonio; Cruz, Jose L; Andrés, Miguel V

    2009-09-15

    Simultaneous and independent active Q switching and active mode locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser is demonstrated using all-fiber modulation techniques. A magnetostrictive rod attached to the output fiber Bragg grating modulates the Q factor of the Fabry-Perot cavity, whereas active mode locking is achieved by amplitude modulation with a Bragg-grating-based acousto-optic device. Fully modulated Q-switched mode-locked trains of optical pulses were obtained for a wide range of pump powers and repetition rates. For a Q-switched repetition rate of 500 Hz and a pump power of 100 mW, the laser generates trains of 12-14 mode-locked pulses of about 1 ns each, within an envelope of 550 ns, an overall energy of 0.65 microJ, and a peak power higher than 250 W for the central pulses of the train.

  6. Laser optical disk position encoder with active heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Eric P.

    1992-04-01

    An angular position encoder is provided that minimizes the effects of eccentricity and other misalignments between the disk and the read stations by employing heads which incorporate beam steering optics with the ability to actively track the disk in directions along the disk radius and normal to its surface. The device adapts features prevalent in optical disk technology toward the application of angular position sensing. A reflective disk and the principles of interferometry are employed. The servo-controlled steering optics move so as to acquire a track on the disk lying at a predetermined radius and distance below the head, and then adjust position and orientation in order to maintain the view of the disk track as required. Thus, the device is actively self-aligning.

  7. Laser optical disk position encoder with active heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Eric P.

    1990-03-01

    An angular position encoder is provided that minimizes the effects of eccentricity and other misalignments between the disk and the read stations by employing heads which incorporate beam steering optics with the ability to actively track the disk in directions along the disk radius and normal to its surface. The device adapts features prevalent in optical disk technology toward the application of angular position sensing. A reflective disk and the principles of interferometry are employed. The servo-controlled steering optics move so as to acquire a track on the disk lying at a predetermined radius and distance below the head, and then adjust position and orientation in order to maintain the view of the disk track as required. Thus, the device is actively self-aligning.

  8. All-optical switching of localized surface plasmon resonance in single gold nanosandwich using GeSbTe film as an active medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hira, T.; Homma, T.; Uchiyama, T.; Kuwamura, K.; Kihara, Y.; Saiki, T.

    2015-01-19

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) switching was investigated in a Au/GeSbTe/Au nanosandwich as a key active element for plasmonic integrated circuits and devices. Near-infrared single-particle spectroscopy was conducted to examine the interaction of a Au nanorod (AuNR) and Au film, between which a GeSbTe layer was incorporated as an active phase-change media. Numerical calculation revealed that hybridized modes of the AuNR and Au film exhibit a significant change of scattering intensity with the phase change. In particular, the antisymmetric (magnetic resonance) mode can be modulated effectively by the extinction coefficient of GST, as well as its refractive index. Experimental demonstration of the switching operation was performed by alternate irradiation with a picosecond pulsed laser for amorphization and a continuous wave laser for crystallization. Repeatable modulation was obtained by monitoring the scattering light around the LSPR peak at λ = 1070 nm.

  9. Oscillation regimes of a solid-state ring laser with active beat-note stabilization: From a chaotic device to a ring-laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Sylvain; Feugnet, Gilles; Pocholle, Jean-Paul; Lariontsev, Evguenii

    2007-08-15

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of a rotating diode-pumped Nd-YAG ring laser with active beat-note stabilization. Our experimental setup is described in the usual Maxwell-Bloch formalism. We analytically derive a stability condition and some frequency response characteristics for the solid-state ring-laser gyroscope, illustrating the important role of mode coupling effects on the dynamics of such a device. Experimental data are presented and compared with the theory on the basis of realistic laser parameters, showing very good agreement. Our results illustrate the duality between the very rich nonlinear dynamics of the diode-pumped solid-state ring laser (including chaotic behavior) and the possibility to obtain a very stable beat note, resulting in a potentially new kind of rotation sensor.

  10. Active/passive scanning. [airborne multispectral laser scanners for agricultural and water resources applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodfill, J. R.; Thomson, F. J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with the design, construction, and applications of an active/passive multispectral scanner combining lasers with conventional passive remote sensors. An application investigation was first undertaken to identify remote sensing applications where active/passive scanners (APS) would provide improvement over current means. Calibration techniques and instrument sensitivity are evaluated to provide predictions of the APS's capability to meet user needs. A preliminary instrument design was developed from the initial conceptual scheme. A design review settled the issues of worthwhile applications, calibration approach, hardware design, and laser complement. Next, a detailed mechanical design was drafted and construction of the APS commenced. The completed APS was tested and calibrated in the laboratory, then installed in a C-47 aircraft and ground tested. Several flight tests completed the test program.

  11. Rapid laser nephelometric determination of amylase activity in serum and urine.

    PubMed

    Liu, T Z; Wei, J S

    1991-03-01

    We describe herein a rapid and sensitive laser nephelometric method for the determination of serum and urinary amylase activities. Our data showed that the change in relative light scattering (RLS) of an amylopectin substrate measured by a laser nephelometer related directly with amylolytic activity of amylase from 50 to 600 IU/L. Within-run variations at 293 and 769 IU/L sera showed CV's of 5.0% and 3.1%, respectively. Day-to-day variation for the same sera showed CV's of 7.2% and 4.7%, respectively. Correlation studies using the manual Phadebas dye-starch complex method and with the Roche amylochrome method showed correlation coefficients of 0.99 and 0.95, respectively. Using urine specimens, the correlation studies also showed a correlation coefficient of 0.98. These studies indicated that the proposed method was sensitive, fast, economical and easily adaptable to emergency and routine applications.

  12. Use of activated carbon as a support medium for H2S biofiltration and effect of bacterial immobilization on available pore surface.

    PubMed

    Ng, Y L; Yan, R; Chen, X G; Geng, A L; Gould, W D; Liang, D T; Koe, L C C

    2004-12-01

    The use of support media for the immobilization of microorganisms is widely known to provide a surface for microbial growth and a shelter that protects the microorganisms from inhibitory compounds. In this study, activated carbon is used as a support medium for the immobilization of microorganisms enriched from municipal sewage activated sludge to remove gas-phase hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a major odorous component of waste gas from sewage treatment plants. A series of designed experiments is used to examine the effect on bacteria-immobilized activated carbon (termed "biocarbon") due to physical adsorption, chemical reaction, and microbial degradation in the overall removal of H2S. H2S breakthrough tests are conducted with various samples, including microbe-immobilized carbon and Teflon discs, salts-medium-washed carbon, and ultra-pure water-washed carbon. The results show a higher removal capacity for the microbe-immobilized activated carbon compared with the activated carbon control in a batch biofilter column. The increase in removal capacity is attributed to the role played by the immobilized microorganisms in metabolizing adsorbed sulfur and sulfur compounds on the biocarbon, hence releasing the adsorption sites for further H2S uptake. The advantage for activated carbon serving as the support medium is to adsorb a high initial concentration of substrate and progressively release this for microbial degradation, hence acting as a buffer for the microorganisms. Results obtained from surface area and pore size distribution analyses of the biocarbon show a correlation between the available surface area and pore volume with the extent of microbial immobilization and H2S uptake. The depletion of surface area and pore volume is seen as one of the factors which cause the onset of column breakthrough. Microbial growth retardation is due to the accumulation of metabolic products (i.e., sulfuric acid); and a lack of water and nutrient salts in the batch biofilter are other

  13. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions. PMID:27053227

  14. Imaging of Endogenous Metabolites of Plant Leaves by Mass Spectrometry Based on Laser Activated Electron Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lulu; Tang, Xuemei; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Chen, Disong; Zhang, Juan; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-04-01

    A new mass spectrometric imaging approach based on laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) was described and applied to analysis of endogenous metabolites of plant leaves. LAET is an electron-directed soft ionization technique. Compressed thin films of semiconductor nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were placed on the sample plate for proof-of-principle demonstration because they can not only absorb ultraviolet laser but also have high electron mobility. Upon laser irradiation, electrons are excited from valence bands to conduction bands. With appropriate kinetic energies, photoexcited electrons can tunnel away from the barrier and eventually be captured by charge deficient atoms present in neutral molecules. Resultant unpaired electron subsequently initiates specific chemical bond cleavage and generates ions that can be detected in negative ion mode of the mass spectrometer. LAET avoids the co-crystallization process of routinely used organic matrix materials with analyzes in MALDI (matrix assisted-laser desorption ionization) analysis. Thus uneven distribution of crystals with different sizes and shapes as well as background peaks in the low mass range resulting from matrix molecules is eliminated. Advantages of LAET imaging technique include not only improved spatial resolution but also photoelectron capture dissociation which produces predictable fragment ions.

  15. Chemical imaging of latent fingerprints by mass spectrometry based on laser activated electron tunneling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-01

    Identification of endogenous and exogenous chemicals contained in latent fingerprints is important for forensic science in order to acquire evidence of criminal identities and contacts with specific chemicals. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for such applications without any derivatization or fluorescent tags. Among these techniques, MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) provides small beam size but has interferences with MALDI matrix materials, which cause ion suppressions as well as limited spatial resolution resulting from uneven distribution of MALDI matrix crystals with different sizes. LAET (Laser Activated Electron Tunneling) described in this work offers capabilities for chemical imaging through electron-directed soft ionization. A special film of semiconductors has been designed for collection of fingerprints. Nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were compressed on a conductive metal substrate (Al or Cu sticky tape) under 10 MPa pressure. Resultant uniform thin films provide tight and shining surfaces on which fingers are impressed. Irradiation of ultraviolet laser pulses (355 nm) on the thin film instantly generates photoelectrons that can be captured by adsorbed organic molecules and subsequently cause electron-directed ionization and fragmentation. Imaging of latent fingerprints is achieved by visualization of the spatial distribution of these molecular ions and structural information-rich fragment ions. Atomic electron emission together with finely tuned laser beam size improve spatial resolution. With the LAET technique, imaging analysis not only can identify physical shapes but also reveal endogenous metabolites present in females and males, detect contacts with prohibited substances, and resolve overlapped latent fingerprints. PMID:25647159

  16. Chemical imaging of latent fingerprints by mass spectrometry based on laser activated electron tunneling.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-01

    Identification of endogenous and exogenous chemicals contained in latent fingerprints is important for forensic science in order to acquire evidence of criminal identities and contacts with specific chemicals. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for such applications without any derivatization or fluorescent tags. Among these techniques, MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) provides small beam size but has interferences with MALDI matrix materials, which cause ion suppressions as well as limited spatial resolution resulting from uneven distribution of MALDI matrix crystals with different sizes. LAET (Laser Activated Electron Tunneling) described in this work offers capabilities for chemical imaging through electron-directed soft ionization. A special film of semiconductors has been designed for collection of fingerprints. Nanoparticles of bismuth cobalt zinc oxide were compressed on a conductive metal substrate (Al or Cu sticky tape) under 10 MPa pressure. Resultant uniform thin films provide tight and shining surfaces on which fingers are impressed. Irradiation of ultraviolet laser pulses (355 nm) on the thin film instantly generates photoelectrons that can be captured by adsorbed organic molecules and subsequently cause electron-directed ionization and fragmentation. Imaging of latent fingerprints is achieved by visualization of the spatial distribution of these molecular ions and structural information-rich fragment ions. Atomic electron emission together with finely tuned laser beam size improve spatial resolution. With the LAET technique, imaging analysis not only can identify physical shapes but also reveal endogenous metabolites present in females and males, detect contacts with prohibited substances, and resolve overlapped latent fingerprints.

  17. Ultraviolet light and laser irradiation enhances the antibacterial activity of glucosamine-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Govindaraju, Saravanan; Ramasamy, Mohankandhasamy; Baskaran, Rengarajan; Ahn, Sang Jung; Yun, Kyusik

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a novel method for the synthesis of glucosamine-functionalized gold nanoparticles (GlcN-AuNPs) using biocompatible and biodegradable glucosamine for antibacterial activity. GlcN-AuNPs were prepared using different concentrations of glucosamine. The synthesized AuNPs were characterized for surface plasmon resonance, surface morphology, fluorescence spectroscopy, and antibacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the AuNPs, GlcN-AuNPs, and GlcN-AuNPs when irradiated by ultraviolet light and laser were investigated and compared with the MIC of standard kanamycin using Escherichia coli by the microdilution method. Laser-irradiated GlcN-AuNPs exhibited significant bactericidal activity against E. coli. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopic analysis supported the cell death mechanism in the presence of GlcN-AuNP-treated bacteria. Further, morphological changes in E. coli after laser treatment were investigated using atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The overall results of this study suggest that the prepared nanoparticles have potential as a potent antibacterial agent for the treatment of a wide range of disease-causing bacteria. PMID:26345521

  18. Study of dopant activation in biaxially compressively strained SiGe layers using excimer laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, G. V.; Wirths, S.; Stefanov, S.; Holländer, B.; Schubert, J.; Conde, J. C.; Stoica, T.; Breuer, U.; Chiussi, S.; Goryll, M.; Buca, D.; Mantl, S.

    2013-05-01

    Excimer Laser Annealing (ELA) with a wavelength of 248 nm is used to study doping of biaxialy compressively strained Si1-xGex/Si heterostructures. The challenge is to achieve a high activation of As in SiGe, while conserving the elastic strain and suppressing dopant diffusion. Doping of 20 nm Si0.64Ge0.36 layers by ion implantation of 1 × 1015 As+/cm2 and subsequent laser annealing using single 20 ns pulse with an energy density of 0.6 J/cm2 leads to an As activation of about 20% and a sheet resistance of 650 Ω/sq. At this laser energy density, the entire SiGe layer melts and the subsequent fast recrystallization on a nanosecond time scale allows high As incorporation into the lattice. Moreover, using these annealing parameters, the SiGe layer exhibits epitaxial regrowth with negligible strain relaxation. ELA at energy densities greater than 0.6 J/cm2 resembles Pulsed Lased Induced Epitaxy, leading to an intermixing of the SiGe layer with the Si substrate, thus to thicker single-crystalline strained SiGe layers with sheet resistance down to 62 Ω/sq. Effects of energy densities on composition, crystal quality, activation of As and co-doping with B are discussed and related to the spatial and temporal evolution of the temperature in the irradiated zone, as simulated by Finite Element Methods.

  19. Promising high-pressure DF - CO{sub 2} laser for amplifying picosecond radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Agroskin, V Ya; Bravy, B G; Vasil'ev, G K; Kashtanov, S A; Makarov, E F; Sotnichenko, S A; Chernyshev, Yu A

    2012-10-31

    A scheme of the experiment is described and the results of measuring the small-signal gain in the active medium of a pulsed chemical DF - CO{sub 2} laser at a medium pressure in the range from 1 to 2.5 atm are reported. The values obtained (above 5 m{sup -1} at a pressure of 2.5 atm) make this laser a promising final amplifier of a multiterawatt laser system in the 10-{mu}m wavelength region. (lasers)

  20. 212-Angstrom neonlike zinc laser of LULI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamelot, Gerard; Jaegle, Pierre; Rus, Bedrich; Carillon, Antoine; Klisnick, Annie; Nantel, Marc; Sebban, Stephane; Albert, F.; Zeitoun, Philippe; Plankl, E.; Sirgand, A.; Lewis, Ciaran L. S.; MacPhee, Andrew G.; Tallents, Gregory J.; Krishnan, J.; Holden, M.

    1995-09-01

    The main feature of x-ray laser research at LULI is the development of a saturated laser at 212 angstrom with a relatively small pump laser of 0.4 kJ in 600 ps. The laser works with the 3p- 3s J equals O yields 1 transition of neon-like zinc, by using the double-pass of amplified radiation in the active medium. Plasma parameters (temperature, density, homogeneity), and x-ray laser emission properties (intensity, pointing angle, divergence, and coherence) have been studied. Lasing action needs the main laser pulse to be preceded by a ten-prepulse train (contrast ratio less than 103) due to the remnant oscillator. The effect of a single prepulse was investigated as a function of contrast ratio and delay between the prepulse and the main pulse.

  1. X-ray measurements at high-power lasers. Relative conversion efficiencies of short pulse laser light into K X-ray radiation in medium to high Z elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, C. I.; Indelicato, P.; Gumberidze, A.; Holland, G. E.; Seely, J. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, A.; Audebert, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Tabakhoff, E.; Brambrink, E.

    2009-03-01

    Conversion efficiencies of laser light into K x-ray radiation are used to characterize laser-solid interactions e.g. in measurements with back-lighter targets in Inertial Confinement Fusion research or in ultra short x-ray science where ultra short laser pulses are used to create x-rays for investigation of dynamic processes. In our measurements we observed high energy (few tens of keV) K x-ray radiation of element pairs created upon impact of a 1 ps, 100 J laser pulse on the target surface. The high-energy electrons created in this interaction ionise and excite the target material. We have used high purity alloy foils of Pd and Ag, as well as In and Sn and crystals of CsI and rare earth molybdates as target materials. Both constituents of these targets were simultaneously excited in one shot. The K x-ray radiation was dispersed and detected with the LCS (LULI Crystal Spectrometer), a Cauchois-type cylindrically bent transmission-crystal spectrometer. Measuring ratios in the x-ray spectra permits determination of relative conversion efficiencies for pairs of elements under identical laser-target interaction conditions.

  2. Oxidation-reduction potential changes in aeration tanks and microprofiles of activated sludge floc in medium- and low-strength wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Li, Baikun; Bishop, Paul L

    2004-01-01

    Real-time control of aeration tank operation is key to high-efficiency pollutant removal and energy savings. One of the aims of this study was to examine the potential for using redox potential (oxidation-reduction potential [ORP]) to indicate wastewater quality online in aeration tanks treating medium (chemical oxygen demand [COD] of 70 to 150 mg/L) and low (COD of 15 to 30 mg/L) pollutant-concentration wastewaters. The field-scale data provide a good relationship between ORP values and nutrient removal along the length of the aeration tanks. The ORP values increased dramatically as organic matter was removed along the aeration tanks, indicating the improvement of the bulk liquor redox status. Dissolved oxygen higher than 1.0 mg/L was necessary for good biodegradation and improvement of the liquid redox status. Nitrification occurred at higher ORP values (380 to 420 mV) than was the case for organic substrate oxidation (250 to 300 mV). The microprofiles obtained from microelectrode measurements substantiate the heterogeneity of the microbial processes inside activated sludge flocs. Because of microbial oxygen utilization, the aerobic region in the activated sludge floc was limited to the top layer (0.1 to 0.2 mm) of the activated sludge aggregate present in medium-strength wastewater, with an anoxic zone dominating inside the flocs. When dissolved oxygen in the bulk water was higher than 4.0 mg/L, the anoxic zone inside the floc disappeared. At low wastewater pollutant concentrations, the ORP and dissolved oxygen inside the activated sludge aggregates were higher than those from medium-strength wastewater. The prospect of using ORP as an online control approach for aeration tank operation and the potential reasons for activated sludge floc size varying with pollutant strengths are also discussed.

  3. Stand-off detection of HMX traces by active spectral imaging with a tunable CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlenko, A A; Maksimenko, E V; Chernyshova, L V

    2014-04-28

    Experimental results on stand-off detection of HMX traces at various surfaces using the method of active spectral imaging in the IR region are reported. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Active mode-locked lasers and other photonic devices using electro-optic whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Techniques and devices using whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators, where the optical materials of the WGM resonators exhibit an electro-optical effect to perform optical modulation. Examples of actively mode-locked lasers and other devices are described.

  5. Microbial activity in argillite waste storage cells for the deep geological disposal of French bituminous medium activity long lived nuclear waste: Impact on redox reaction kinetics and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, A.; Leone, L.; Charlet, L.

    2009-04-01

    Micro-organisms are ubiquitous and display remarkable capabilities to adapt and survive in the most extreme environmental conditions. It has been recognized that microorganisms can survive in nuclear waste disposal facilities if the required major (P, N, K) and trace elements, a carbon and energy source as well as water are present. The space constraint is of particular interest as it has been shown that bacteria do not prosper in compacted clay. An evaluation of the different types of French medium and high level waste, in a clay-rich host rock storage environment at a depth between 500 and 600 m, has shown that the bituminous waste is the most likely candidate to accommodate significant microbial activity. The waste consists of a mixture of bitumen (source of bio-available organic matter and H2 as a consequence of its degradation and radiolysis) and nitrates and sulphates kept in a stainless steel container. The assumption, that microbes only have an impact on reaction kinetics needs to be reassessed in the case where nitrates and sulphates are present since both are known not to react at low temperatures without bacterial catalysis. The additional impact of both oxy-anions and their reduced species on redox conditions, radionuclide speciation and mobility gives this evaluation their particular relevance. Storage architecture proposes four primary waste containers positioned into armoured cement over packs and placed with others into the waste storage cell itself composed of a cement mantle enforcing the argillite host rock, the latter being characterized by an excavation damaged zone constricted both in space and in time and a pristine part of 60 m thickness. Bacterial activity within the waste and within the pristine argillite is disregarded because of the low water activity (< 0.7) and the lack of space, respectively. The most probable zones of microbial activity, those likely to develop sustainable biofilms are within the interface zones. A major restriction

  6. ACTIVE MEDIA: Pump and amplification dynamics of gamma rays in a nuclear medium with the hidden population inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivlin, Lev A.

    2009-12-01

    The features of the pump dynamics of isomeric nuclei excited by X-rays of a repetitively pulsed relativistic electron beam followed by the production of a medium with the negative absorption of gamma quanta are analysed. In the extended nuclear medium, the pump excites a travelling hidden-population-inversion wave with the anisotropic gamma amplification, which becomes positive in the case of the excess over the critical pump parameter equal to the product of the peak spectral power density of the X-ray source and the relative duration of an ultrashort relativistic electron bunch. In the alternative scheme with orthogonal directions of pumping X-rays and a flux of amplified gamma quanta, the absence of the amplification anisotropy opens up the possibility for constructing a standard two-mirror resonator with Bragg single-crystal reflectors. The critical peak value of the spectral pump power density is compared with the known characteristics of relativistic-electron X-ray sources by examples of some nuclides.

  7. Laser light scattering spectroscopy: a new method to measure tracheobronchial mucociliary activity.

    PubMed Central

    Svartengren, K; Wiman, L G; Thyberg, P; Rigler, R

    1989-01-01

    Laser light scattering spectroscopy is based on the evaluation of the frequency shift of coherent light scattered by moving particles. This makes it particularly suitable for use in light guiding systems. In this study laser light scattering spectroscopy was assessed for its ability to provide information on the motility of respiratory cilia. In vitro and in vivo measurements were undertaken with animal tracheal mucosa. The intensity fluctuations of laser light scattered from moving cilia were analysed in terms of their autocorrelation functions to provide information on the frequency and synchrony of beating cilia. In vitro measurements were performed on fresh bovine trachea to estimate a safe laser power level for mucosal exposure and to test the method by defining the temperature dependence of the ciliary beat frequency. Power densities not exceeding 0.3 kW/cm2 were found to be the upper limit for long term exposure of the mucosa in vitro. Ciliary beat frequency showed a pronounced temperature dependence, ranging from 5.8 to 28.3 Hz over the temperature range 20-43.5 degrees C. A maximum frequency was found at 41.5 degrees C. In vivo measurements of ciliary activity were performed in six pigs by means of optical fibres for light transmission combined with fibreoptic bronchoscopy. A ciliary beat frequency of 5 Hz was obtained; heart and breathing frequencies could be separated and identified. These results suggest that laser light scattering spectroscopy might provide a convenient method of studying the mucociliary system of the lower airways. PMID:2772854

  8. Spectral and generating properties of active laser media based on dye-doped elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrodnyi, Vladimir; Derevyanko, N.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Slobodin, Valeriy V.; Karabanova, Ludmila V.

    2002-12-01

    The advantages of a polyurethane matrix over other polymers, which are widely used as active media for dye lasers, are analzyed. This matrix exhibits the photostability, service life, radiation resistance, conversion efficiency, and homogeneity of the dye distribution that surpass these properties for active media based on polyurethane acrylate, which has close physical and operation properties. These advantages result not only from the milder polymerization conditions but also from a lower probability of the formation of ion pairs and dye aggregates. A substantial suppression of these processes in polyurethane is explained by its greater polarity and solvation ability compared to polyurathane acrylate.

  9. Generation of picosecond pulses and frequency combs in actively mode locked external ring cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wójcik, Aleksander K.; Belyanin, Alexey; Malara, Pietro; Blanchard, Romain; Mansuripur, Tobias S.; Capasso, Federico

    2013-12-02

    We propose a robust and reliable method of active mode locking of mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers and develop its theoretical description. Its key element is the use of an external ring cavity, which circumvents fundamental issues undermining the stability of mode locking in quantum cascade lasers. We show that active mode locking can give rise to the generation of picosecond pulses and phase-locked frequency combs containing thousands of the ring cavity modes.

  10. Low level laser therapy activates NF-kB via generation of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aaron Chih-Hao; Arany, Praveen R.; Huang, Ying-Ying; Tomkinson, Elizabeth M.; Saleem, Taimur; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT), the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation remain unclear. In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) from transgenic NF-kB luciferase reporter mice and studied their response to 810-nm laser radiation. Significant activation of NFkB was observed for fluences higher than 0.003 J/cm2. NF-kB activation by laser was detectable at 1-hour time point. Moreover, we demonstrated that laser phosphorylated both IKK α/β and NF-kB 15 minutes after irradiation, which implied that laser activates NF-kB via phosphorylation of IKK α/β. Suspecting mitochondria as the source of NF-kB activation signaling pathway, we demonstrated that laser increased both intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fluorescence microscopy with dichlorodihydrofluorescein and ATP synthesis by luciferase assay. Mitochondrial inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone and paraquat increased ROS and NF-kB activation but had no effect on ATP. The ROS quenchers N-acetyl-L-cysteine and ascorbic acid abrogated laser-induced NF-kB and ROS but not ATP. These results suggested that ROS might play an important role in the signaling pathway of laser induced NF-kB activation. However, the western blot showed that antimycin A, a mitochondrial inhibitor, did not activate NF-kB via serine phosphorylation of IKK α/β as the laser did. On the other hand, LLLT, unlike mitochondrial inhibitors, induced increased cellular ATP levels, which indicates that light also upregulates mitochondrial respiration. ATP upregulation reached a maximum at 0.3 J/cm2 or higher. We conclude that LLLT not only enhances mitochondrial respiration, but also activates the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-kB by generating ROS as signaling molecules.

  11. The Identification of Complex Organic Molecules in the Interstellar Medium: Using Lasers and Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy to Simulate the Interstellar Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Bradley M.

    1998-01-01

    The Astrochemistry Group at NASA Ames Research Center is interested in the identification of large organic molecules in the interstellar medium Many smaller organic species (e.g. hydrocarbons, alcohols, etc.) have been previously identified by their radiofrequency signature due to molecular rotations. However, this becomes increasingly difficult to observe as the size of the molecule increases. Our group in interested in the identification of the carriers of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (absorption features observed throughout the visible and near-infrared in the spectra of stars, due to species in the interstellar medium). Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and related molecules are thought to be good candidates for these carriers. Laboratory experiments am performed at Ames to simulate the interstellar environment, and to compare spectra obtained from molecules in the laboratory to those derived astronomically. We are also interested in PAHs with respect to their possible connection to the UIR (Unidentified infrared) and ERE (Extended Red Emission) bands - emission features found to emanate from particular regions of our galaxy (e.g. Orion nebula, Red Rectangle, etc.). An old, "tried and proven spectroscopic technique, matrix isolation spectroscopy creates molecular conditions ideal for performing laboratory astrophysics.

  12. Nd:YAG laser with passive-active mode-locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weijiang; Chen, Zhenlei; Ren, Deming; Qu, Yanchen; Mo, Shuang; Huang, Jinjer; Andreev, Yury M.; Gorobets, Vadim A.; Petukhov, Vladimir O.; Zemlyanov, Aleksei A.

    2008-03-01

    All solid-state flash-lamp pumped passive-active mode-locked Nd3+:YAG laser is designed and experimentally studded. Saturation absorber Cr4+:YAG with initial transparency 25 and 47% are used as a passive Q-switcher and acousto-optical fused quartz modulator as an active mode-locker. Efficient length of the laser cavity with fixed mirror positions (1.45 m spaced) is droved by changes of 100% flat mirror for concave mirrors with different focus lengths. Changeable output mirrors with transparencies of 15 and 50% are used. Driving of the cavity parameters, laser and acousto-optical modulator power supply voltages let us to control output pulse train and single pulse parameters. As it goes from the analyses of oscillograms fixed with pyroelectric detector (τ=0.5 ns) and 1 GHz oscilloscope, over 95% of pulse output energy has been mode-locked. Average duration of the pulse train envelope of 5 to 50 single pulses at FWHM has been droved within 50 to 600 ns. When this single pulse duration is controlled but did not exceed 2 ns.

  13. Active coherent laser spectrometer for remote detection and identification of chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Neil A.; Weidmann, Damien

    2012-10-01

    Currently, there exists a capability gap for the remote detection and identification of threat chemicals. We report here on the development of an Active Coherent Laser Spectrometer (ACLaS) operating in the thermal infrared and capable of multi-species stand-off detection of chemicals at sub ppm.m levels. A bench top prototype of the instrument has been developed using distributed feedback mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers as spectroscopic sources. The instrument provides active eye-safe illumination of a topographic target and subsequent spectroscopic analysis through optical heterodyne detection of the diffuse backscattered field. Chemical selectivity is provided by the combination of the narrow laser spectral bandwidth (typically < 2 MHz) and frequency tunability that allows the recording of the full absorption spectrum of any species within the instrument line of sight. Stand-off detection at distances up to 12 m has been demonstrated on light molecules such as H2O, CH4 and N2O. A physical model of the stand-off detection scenario including ro-vibrational molecular absorption parameters was used in conjunction with a fitting algorithm to retrieve quantitative mixing ratio information on multiple absorbers.

  14. Photo-catalytic Activities of Plant Hormones on Semiconductor Nanoparticles by Laser-Activated Electron Tunneling and Emitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-01

    Understanding of the dynamic process of laser-induced ultrafast electron tunneling is still very limited. It has been thought that the photo-catalytic reaction of adsorbents on the surface is either dependent on the number of resultant electron-hole pairs where excess energy is lost to the lattice through coupling with phonon modes, or dependent on irradiation photon wavelength. We used UV (355 nm) laser pulses to excite electrons from the valence band to the conduction band of titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and bismuth cobalt zinc oxide (Bi2O3)0.07(CoO)0.03(ZnO)0.9 semiconductor nanoparticles with different photo catalytic properties. Photoelectrons are extracted, accelerated in a static electric field and eventually captured by charge deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to detect negative molecules and fragment ions generated by un-paired electron directed bond cleavages. We show that the probability of electron tunneling is determined by the strength of the static electric field and intrinsic electron mobility of semiconductors. Photo-catalytic dissociation or polymerization reactions of adsorbents are highly dependent on the kinetic energy of tunneling electrons as well as the strength of laser influx. By using this approach, photo-activities of phytohormones have been investigated.

  15. Photo-catalytic Activities of Plant Hormones on Semiconductor Nanoparticles by Laser-Activated Electron Tunneling and Emitting

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the dynamic process of laser-induced ultrafast electron tunneling is still very limited. It has been thought that the photo-catalytic reaction of adsorbents on the surface is either dependent on the number of resultant electron-hole pairs where excess energy is lost to the lattice through coupling with phonon modes, or dependent on irradiation photon wavelength. We used UV (355 nm) laser pulses to excite electrons from the valence band to the conduction band of titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and bismuth cobalt zinc oxide (Bi2O3)0.07(CoO)0.03(ZnO)0.9 semiconductor nanoparticles with different photo catalytic properties. Photoelectrons are extracted, accelerated in a static electric field and eventually captured by charge deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to detect negative molecules and fragment ions generated by un-paired electron directed bond cleavages. We show that the probability of electron tunneling is determined by the strength of the static electric field and intrinsic electron mobility of semiconductors. Photo-catalytic dissociation or polymerization reactions of adsorbents are highly dependent on the kinetic energy of tunneling electrons as well as the strength of laser influx. By using this approach, photo-activities of phytohormones have been investigated. PMID:25749635

  16. Photo-catalytic activities of plant hormones on semiconductor nanoparticles by laser-activated electron tunneling and emitting.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the dynamic process of laser-induced ultrafast electron tunneling is still very limited. It has been thought that the photo-catalytic reaction of adsorbents on the surface is either dependent on the number of resultant electron-hole pairs where excess energy is lost to the lattice through coupling with phonon modes, or dependent on irradiation photon wavelength. We used UV (355 nm) laser pulses to excite electrons from the valence band to the conduction band of titanium dioxide (TiO₂), zinc oxide (ZnO) and bismuth cobalt zinc oxide (Bi₂O₃)₀.₀₇(CoO)₀.₀₃(ZnO)₀.₉ semiconductor nanoparticles with different photo catalytic properties. Photoelectrons are extracted, accelerated in a static electric field and eventually captured by charge deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to detect negative molecules and fragment ions generated by un-paired electron directed bond cleavages. We show that the probability of electron tunneling is determined by the strength of the static electric field and intrinsic electron mobility of semiconductors. Photo-catalytic dissociation or polymerization reactions of adsorbents are highly dependent on the kinetic energy of tunneling electrons as well as the strength of laser influx. By using this approach, photo-activities of phytohormones have been investigated.

  17. Absolute calibration method for laser megajoule neutron yield measurement by activation diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landoas, Olivier; Yu Glebov, Vladimir; Rossé, Bertrand; Briat, Michelle; Disdier, Laurent; Sangster, Thomas C.; Duffy, Tim; Marmouget, Jean Gabriel; Varignon, Cyril; Ledoux, Xavier; Caillaud, Tony; Thfoin, Isabelle; Bourgade, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    The laser megajoule (LMJ) and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) plan to demonstrate thermonuclear ignition using inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The neutron yield is one of the most important parameters to characterize ICF experiment performance. For decades, the activation diagnostic was chosen as a reference at ICF facilities and is now planned to be the first nuclear diagnostic on LMJ, measuring both 2.45 MeV and 14.1 MeV neutron yields. Challenges for the activation diagnostic development are absolute calibration, accuracy, range requirement, and harsh environment. At this time, copper and zirconium material are identified for 14.1 MeV neutron yield measurement and indium material for 2.45 MeV neutrons. A series of calibrations were performed at Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) on a Van de Graff facility to determine activation diagnostics efficiencies and to compare them with results from calculations. The CEA copper activation diagnostic was tested on the OMEGA facility during DT implosion. Experiments showed that CEA and Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) diagnostics agree to better than 1% on the neutron yield measurement, with an independent calibration for each system. Also, experimental sensitivities are in good agreement with simulations and allow us to scale activation diagnostics for the LMJ measurement range.

  18. Quantum cascade laser based active hyperspectral imaging for standoff detection of chemicals on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugger, S.; Fuchs, F.; Jarvis, J.; Yang, Q. K.; Rattunde, M.; Ostendorf, R.; Schilling, C.; Driad, R.; Bronner, W.; Aidam, R.; Wagner, J.; Tybussek, T.; Rieblinger, K.

    2016-02-01

    We employ active hyperspectral imaging using tunable mid-infrared (MIR) quantum cascade lasers for contactless identification of solid and liquid contaminations on surfaces. By collecting the backscattered laser radiation with a camera, a hyperspectral data cube, containing the spatially resolved spectral information of the scene is obtained. Data is analyzed using appropriate algorithms to find the target substances even on substrates with a priori unknown spectra. Eye-save standoff detection of residues of explosives and precursors over extended distances is demonstrated and the main purpose of our system. However, it can be applied to any substance with characteristic reflectance / absorbance spectrum. As an example, we present first results of monitoring food quality by distinguishing fresh and mold contaminated peanuts by their MIR backscattering spectrum.

  19. 3D pulsed laser-triggered high-speed microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Kung, Yu-Chun; Teitell, Michael A; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2013-11-12

    We report a 3D microfluidic pulsed laser-triggered fluorescence-activated cell sorter capable of sorting at a throughput of 23 000 cells per s with 90% purity in high-purity mode and at a throughput of 45 000 cells per s with 45% purity in enrichment mode in one stage and in a single channel. This performance is realized by exciting laser-induced cavitation bubbles in a 3D PDMS microfluidic channel to generate high-speed liquid jets that deflect detected fluorescent cells and particles focused by 3D sheath flows. The ultrafast switching mechanism (20 μs complete on-off cycle), small liquid jet perturbation volume, and three-dimensional sheath flow focusing for accurate timing control of fast (1.5 m s(-1)) passing cells and particles are three critical factors enabling high-purity sorting at high-throughput in this sorter. PMID:23844418

  20. Automated co-alignment of coherent fiber laser arrays via active phase-locking.

    PubMed

    Goodno, Gregory D; Weiss, S Benjamin

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel closed-loop approach for high-precision co-alignment of laser beams in an actively phase-locked, coherently combined fiber laser array. The approach ensures interferometric precision by optically transducing beam-to-beam pointing errors into phase errors on a single detector, which are subsequently nulled by duplication of closed-loop phasing controls. Using this approach, beams from five coherent fiber tips were simultaneously phase-locked and position-locked with sub-micron accuracy. Spatial filtering of the sensed light is shown to extend the control range over multiple beam diameters by recovering spatial coherence despite the lack of far-field beam overlap.

  1. Effect of inhomogeneous broadening on a DPAL based superluminal laser for precision sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi-Salloum, T. Y.; Yablon, J.; Tseng, S.; Shahriar, S. M.

    2012-03-01

    In several applications such as optical gyroscopes, gravitational wave detection, and vibrometry, the precision sensing of the effective length of the optical cavity is key. In this work we show how an active single mode laser with a negatively dispersive medium can enhance the sensitivity of measuring the alteration of the length of the cavity in the practical case of a warm medium. We also state how a Rubidium based Diode Pump Alkali Laser satisfies the requirements of the proposed model.

  2. Picosecond pulsed diode ring laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Rosker, M.J.; Christian, W.R.; McMichael, I.C.

    1994-12-31

    An external ring cavity containing as its active medium a pair of InGaAsP diodes is modelocked to produce picosecond pulses. In such a laser, a small frequency difference proportional to the nonreciprocal phase shift (resulting from, e.g., the Sagnac effect) can be observed by beating together the counter propagating laser arms; the device therefore acts as a rotating sensor. In contrast to a conventional (cw) ring laser gyroscope, the pulsed gyroscope can avoid gain competition, thereby enabling the use of homogeneously broadened gain media like semiconductor diodes. Temporal separation of the pulses within the cavity also discriminates against frequency locking of the lasers. The picosecond pulsed diode ring laser gyroscope is reviewed. Both active and passive modelocking are discussed.

  3. Delivery of Molecules into Human Corneal Endothelial Cells by Carbon Nanoparticles Activated by Femtosecond Laser

    PubMed Central

    Jumelle, Clotilde; Mauclair, Cyril; Houzet, Julien; Bernard, Aurélien; He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Peoc’h, Michel; Acquart, Sophie; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) form a monolayer at the innermost face of the cornea and are the engine of corneal transparency. Nevertheless, they are a vulnerable population incapable of regeneration in humans, and their diseases are responsible for one third of corneal grafts performed worldwide. Donor corneas are stored in eye banks for security and quality controls, then delivered to surgeons. This period could allow specific interventions to modify the characteristics of CECs in order to increase their proliferative capacity, increase their resistance to apoptosis, or release immunosuppressive molecules. Delivery of molecules specifically into CECs during storage would therefore open up new therapeutic perspectives. For clinical applications, physical methods have a more favorable individual and general benefit/risk ratio than most biological vectors, but are often less efficient. The delivery of molecules into cells by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses is a promising recent technique developed on non-adherent cells. The nanoparticles are partly consummated by the reaction releasing CO and H2 gas bubbles responsible for the shockwave at the origin of cell transient permeation. Our aim was to develop an experimental setting to deliver a small molecule (calcein) into the monolayer of adherent CECs. We confirmed that increased laser fluence and time exposure increased uptake efficiency while keeping cell mortality below 5%. We optimized the area covered by the laser beam by using a motorized stage allowing homogeneous scanning of the cell culture surface using a spiral path. Calcein uptake reached median efficiency of 54.5% (range 50.3–57.3) of CECs with low mortality (0.5%, range (0.55–1.0)). After sorting by flow cytometry, CECs having uptaken calcein remained viable and presented normal morphological characteristics. Delivery of molecules into CECs by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser could prove useful for

  4. Delivery of Molecules into Human Corneal Endothelial Cells by Carbon Nanoparticles Activated by Femtosecond Laser.

    PubMed

    Jumelle, Clotilde; Mauclair, Cyril; Houzet, Julien; Bernard, Aurélien; He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Peoc'h, Michel; Acquart, Sophie; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) form a monolayer at the innermost face of the cornea and are the engine of corneal transparency. Nevertheless, they are a vulnerable population incapable of regeneration in humans, and their diseases are responsible for one third of corneal grafts performed worldwide. Donor corneas are stored in eye banks for security and quality controls, then delivered to surgeons. This period could allow specific interventions to modify the characteristics of CECs in order to increase their proliferative capacity, increase their resistance to apoptosis, or release immunosuppressive molecules. Delivery of molecules specifically into CECs during storage would therefore open up new therapeutic perspectives. For clinical applications, physical methods have a more favorable individual and general benefit/risk ratio than most biological vectors, but are often less efficient. The delivery of molecules into cells by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses is a promising recent technique developed on non-adherent cells. The nanoparticles are partly consummated by the reaction releasing CO and H2 gas bubbles responsible for the shockwave at the origin of cell transient permeation. Our aim was to develop an experimental setting to deliver a small molecule (calcein) into the monolayer of adherent CECs. We confirmed that increased laser fluence and time exposure increased uptake efficiency while keeping cell mortality below 5%. We optimized the area covered by the laser beam by using a motorized stage allowing homogeneous scanning of the cell culture surface using a spiral path. Calcein uptake reached median efficiency of 54.5% (range 50.3-57.3) of CECs with low mortality (0.5%, range (0.55-1.0)). After sorting by flow cytometry, CECs having uptaken calcein remained viable and presented normal morphological characteristics. Delivery of molecules into CECs by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser could prove useful for future

  5. Delivery of Molecules into Human Corneal Endothelial Cells by Carbon Nanoparticles Activated by Femtosecond Laser.

    PubMed

    Jumelle, Clotilde; Mauclair, Cyril; Houzet, Julien; Bernard, Aurélien; He, Zhiguo; Forest, Fabien; Peoc'h, Michel; Acquart, Sophie; Gain, Philippe; Thuret, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Corneal endothelial cells (CECs) form a monolayer at the innermost face of the cornea and are the engine of corneal transparency. Nevertheless, they are a vulnerable population incapable of regeneration in humans, and their diseases are responsible for one third of corneal grafts performed worldwide. Donor corneas are stored in eye banks for security and quality controls, then delivered to surgeons. This period could allow specific interventions to modify the characteristics of CECs in order to increase their proliferative capacity, increase their resistance to apoptosis, or release immunosuppressive molecules. Delivery of molecules specifically into CECs during storage would therefore open up new therapeutic perspectives. For clinical applications, physical methods have a more favorable individual and general benefit/risk ratio than most biological vectors, but are often less efficient. The delivery of molecules into cells by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser pulses is a promising recent technique developed on non-adherent cells. The nanoparticles are partly consummated by the reaction releasing CO and H2 gas bubbles responsible for the shockwave at the origin of cell transient permeation. Our aim was to develop an experimental setting to deliver a small molecule (calcein) into the monolayer of adherent CECs. We confirmed that increased laser fluence and time exposure increased uptake efficiency while keeping cell mortality below 5%. We optimized the area covered by the laser beam by using a motorized stage allowing homogeneous scanning of the cell culture surface using a spiral path. Calcein uptake reached median efficiency of 54.5% (range 50.3-57.3) of CECs with low mortality (0.5%, range (0.55-1.0)). After sorting by flow cytometry, CECs having uptaken calcein remained viable and presented normal morphological characteristics. Delivery of molecules into CECs by carbon nanoparticles activated by femtosecond laser could prove useful for future

  6. Plasma-tail activity and the interplanetary medium at Halley's Comet during Armada Week: 6-14 March 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedner, Malcolm B., Jr.; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Dryer, Murray; Mcintosh, Patrick S.

    1987-01-01

    The encounters of five spacecraft with Halley's Comet during 6-14 March 1986 offered a unique opportunity to calibrate the solar-wind interaction with cometary plasmas as recorded by remote wide-field and narrow-field/narrowband imaging. Perhaps not generally recognized in the comet community is the additional opportunity offered by the Halley Armada to study the structure of the solar-wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) in three dimensions using five sets of data obtained over similar time intervals and heliocentric distances, but at somewhat different heliolatitudes. In fact, the two problems, i.e., comet physics and the structure of the interplanetary medium, are coupled if one wants to understand what conditions pertained at the comet between the encounters. This relationship is discussed.

  7. Formation and catalytic activity of high molecular weight soluble polymers produced by heating amino acids in a modified sea medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okihana, Hiroyuki

    1982-06-01

    Eighteen protein amino acids with milk casein composition were heated in a modified sea medium. Marigranules were formed in the precipitates and soluble polymers were formed in the supernatant. Time course of the reaction (ultraviolet spectra, the concentration of metal ions, and the concentration of amino acids in the supernatant) were measured. The time course of the formation of the soluble polymers was also studied by Bio-Gel P-2 column. High molecular weight soluble polymers (HMWSP) were separated from low molecular weight ones by dialysis. It was shown that these polymers catalyzed the dehydrogenation of NADH. These polymers also catalyzed the coupled reaction between dehydrogenation of NADH and reduction of resazurin. This coupled reaction was accelerated by the light.

  8. Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) attenuates microglial cytotoxicity through the activation of Src pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.

    2014-02-01

    It has been known for a long time that microglial activation plays an important role in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Once activated, they have macrophage-like capabilities, which can be detrimental by producing proinflammatory and neurotoxic factors including cytokines, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide that directly or indirectly cause neurodegeneration. Therefore, the regulation of microglial-induced neuroinflammation is considered a useful strategy in searching for neuroprotective treatments. In this study, our results showed that low power laser irradiation (LPLI) (20 J/cm2) could suppress microglial-induced neuroinflammation in LPS-activated microglia. We found that LPLI-mediated neuroprotection was achieved by activating tyrosine kinases Src, which led to MyD88 tyrosine phosphorylation, thus impairing MyD88-dependent proinflammatory signaling cascade. Our research may provide a feasible therapeutic approach to control the progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. Activation of the Mercury Laser: A Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser Driver for Inertial Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, A J; Bibeau, C; Beach, R J; Chanteloup, J C; Ebbers, C A; Kanz, K; Nakano, H; Payne, S A; Powell, H T; Schaffers, K I; Seppala, L; Skulina, K; Smith, L K; Sutton, S B; Zapata, L E

    2001-03-07

    Initial measurements are reported for the Mercury laser system, a scalable driver for rep-rated high energy density physics research. The performance goals include 10% electrical efficiency at 10 Hz and 100 J with a 2-10 ns pulse length. This laser is an angularly multiplexed 4-pass gas-cooled amplifier system based on image relaying to minimize wavefront distortion and optical damage risk at the 10 Hz operating point. The efficiency requirements are fulfilled using diode laser pumping of ytterbium doped strontium fluorapatite crystals.

  10. Influence of low-power laser radiation on the activity of some membraneous and mitochondrial enzymes of hepatocytes in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslar, Grzegorz; Adamek, Mariusz; Sieron, Aleksander; Kaminski, Marcin

    1995-01-01

    It was observed in some experiments that visible laser radiation activates the enzymatic function of mitochondria, while infrared laser radiation affects the enzymatic activity of cellular membranes. The aim of the study was to estimate the activity of some membranous as well as mitochondrial enzymes of hepatocytes in rats irradiated with infrared laser. Experimental material consisted of 38 Wistar rats divided into 2 groups -- a studied group exposed to infrared laser radiation and a control group, in which no irradiation was made. A semiconductive infrared laser (wavelength -- 904 nm, mean power -- 8.9 mW) was used. The clean-shaven skin of the right infracostal region of animals was irradiated 5 minutes daily for 15 consecutive days. After finishing the experiment in the preparations from obtained segments of the left liver lobe, the enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, EC 1.3.99.1), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27), Mg2+ dependent ATP-ase (ATP-ase Mg2+, EC 3.1.3.2.) and acid phosphatase (AcP, EC 3.6.1.8.) was estimated with the use of histochemical methods. In the case of SDH and LDH the increase of enzymatic activity was observed in all 3 zones of liver cluster, especially in male rats. In the case of ATP-ase Mg2+ and AcP the increase of enzymatic activity in biliary canaliculi of hepatocytes in all zones of the liver cluster was observed. On the basis of the obtained results it was proved that infrared laser radiation activates significantly the enzymatic activity of most of the analyzed enzymes, which means that it affects not only properties of biological membranes but also activates the oxidoreductive processes of organism, as it has been observed for visible laser radiation. On the basis of the spectrum of energetic levels in macromolecules (Jablonski's diagram) the mechanisms of availed results are discussed both for enzymes possessing and not possessing chromatophores.

  11. Administration of activated glial condition medium in the nucleus accumbens extended extinction and intensified reinstatement of methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Arezoomandan, Reza; Moradi, Marzieh; Attarzadeh-Yazdi, Ghassem; Tomaz, Carlos; Haghparast, Abbas

    2016-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant drug with significant abuse potential and neurotoxic effects. A high percentage of users relapse to use after detoxification and no effective medication has been developed for treatment of METH addiction. Developing evidences indicated the role of glial cells in drugs abused related phenomena. However, little is known about the role of these cells in the maintenance and reinstatement of METH-seeking behaviors. Therefore, the current study was conducted to clarify the role of glial cells in the maintenance and reinstatement of METH-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats. Astrocyte condition medium (ACM) and neuroglia conditioned medium (NCM) are liquid mediums prepared from primary astrocyte and neuroglia cells. These mediums seem to contain many factors that release by glia cells. CPP was induced by systemic administration of METH (1mg/kg for 5days, s.c.). Following the establishment of CPP, the rats were given daily bilateral injections (0.5μl/side) of either vehicle, ACM or NCM into the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and then were tested for the maintenance and reinstatement. Intra-NAc administration of ACM treated with METH, could extend the extinction period and also, intensified the magnitude of METH reinstatement. Furthermore, intra-accumbal administration of NCM treated with METH notably delayed the extinction period by four days and significantly increased the magnitude of CPP score in the reinstatement phase compared to the post-test phase. Collectively, these findings suggested that activation of glial cells may be involved in the maintenance and reinstatement of METH-seeking behaviors. It provides new evidence that glia cells might be considered as a potential target for the treatment of METH addiction. PMID:27346277

  12. Phillips CO-oxidation catalyts for long-lived CO2 lasers: Activity and initial characterization studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolts, J. H.; Elliott, D. J.; Pennella, F.

    1990-01-01

    Four different catalysts have been developed specifically for use in sealed carbon dioxide lasers. The catalysts have been designed to be low dusting, stable to shock and vibration, have high activity at low temperatures and have long active lifetimes. Measured global CO oxidation rates range from 1.4 to 2.2 cc CO converted per minute per gram of catalyst at ambient temperature. The catalysts also retain substantial activity at temperatures as low as -35 C. The Phillips laser catalysts are prepared in a variety of different shapes to meet the different pressure drop and gas flow profiles present in the many different styles of lasers. Each catalyst has been tested in sealed TEA lasers and has been shown to substantially increase the sealed life of the laser. Activity measurements made on the precious metal catalysts which were prepared with and without activity promoters showed that the promoter materials increase catalyst CO oxidation activity at least an order of magnitude at ambient temperature. Initial studies using H2 and CO chemisorption, X ray diffraction (XRD) and X ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have shown that the activity promoters do not significantly affect the precious metal crystallite size or the electronic structure around the precious metal. In addition, the formation or lack of formation of solid solutions between the precious metal and promoters has also been shown not to affect the activity of the promoted catalyst.

  13. Use of a glass bead-containing liquid medium for efficient production of a soil-free culture with polychlorinated biphenyl-dechlorination activity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Baba, Daisuke; Satheeja Santhi, Velayudhan; Jebakumar Solomon, Robinson David; Katayama, Arata

    2013-08-01

    We established a soil-free culture capable of dechlorinating polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in Kanechlor-300 and Kanechlor-400 by establishing a PCB-dechlorinating soil culture in liquid medium containing 0.5 mm glass beads. PCB-dechlorination activity in liquid cultures with glass beads appeared to depend on the size of the glass beads, and soil-free cultures with 0.05-, 1.0- or 2.0 mm glass beads did not dechlorinate PCBs. Soil-free culture without glass beads also failed to dechlorinate PCBs. The soil-free culture containing 0.5 mm glass beads dechlorinated 42.6 ± 12.0 mol% in total PCBs. This soil-free culture was more effective than soil culture for dechlorinating PCBs ranging from dichlorinated PCBs to tetrachlorinated PCBs. Clone analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that one of the predominant groups of microorganisms in the soil-free culture comprised heat-tolerant and spore-forming bacteria from the phylum Firmicutes. Heat treatment (100 °C, 10 min) did not destroy the PCB-dechlorination activity of the soil-free culture with glass beads. These results suggest that unknown species of the phylum Firmicutes were involved in PCB dechlorination in the soil-free culture. In this study, we succeeded in using a liquid medium containing glass beads as an inorganic soil substitute and showed that such a medium enhances PCB-dechlorination activity. Our study provides valuable information for developing PCB-bioremediation techniques using dechlorinating bacteria in anoxic contaminated soils and sediments.

  14. COMPONENTS AND PARAMETERS OF LASER SYSTEMS: Thermal depolarization of optical radiation in a laser active element made of GSGG:Cr3+:Nd3+ crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, A. A.; Nikol'skiĭ, M. Yu; Shcherbakov, Ivan A.

    1987-08-01

    Investigations were made of the thermal depolarization in a gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (GSGG) crystal doped with neodymium and chromium. It was found that at average optical pump powers higher than 250-300 W, inhomogeneities of the active medium make a substantial contribution to the thermal depolarization. A method is proposed for the control of the thermal depolarization by additional heating of the active element.

  15. Antiosteoclastogenesis activity of a CO2 laser antagonizing receptor activator for nuclear factor kappaB ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation of murine macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chun-Liang; Kao, Chia-Tze; Fang, Hsin-Yuan; Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shie, Ming-You

    2015-03-01

    Macrophage cells are the important effector cells in the immune reaction which are indispensable for osteoclastogenesis; their heterogeneity and plasticity renders macrophages a primer target for immune system modulation. In recent years, there have been very few studies about the effects of macrophage cells on laser treatment-regulated osteoclastogenesis. In this study, RAW 264.7 macrophage cells were treated with RANKL to regulate osteoclastogenesis. We used a CO2 laser as a model biostimulation to investigate the role of osteoclastogenic. We also evaluated cell viability, cell death and cathepsin K expression. The CO2 laser inhibited a receptor activator of the NF-ĸB ligand (RANKL)-induced formation of osteoclasts during the osteoclast differentiation process. It was also found that irradiation for two times reduced RANKL-enhanced TRAP activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, CO2 laser-treatment diminished the expression and secretion of cathepsin K elevated by RANKL and was concurrent with the inhibition of TRAF6 induction and NF-ĸB activation. The current report demonstrates that CO2 laser abrogated RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by retarding osteoclast differentiation. The CO2 laser can modulate every cell through dose-dependent in vitro RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis, such as the proliferation and fusion of preosteoclasts and the maturation of osteoclasts. Therefore, the current results serve as an improved explanation of the cellular roles of macrophage cell populations in osteoclastogenesis as well as in alveolar bone remodeling by CO2 laser-treatment.

  16. Optimization of Liquid Fermentation Medium for Production of Inonotus sanghuang (Higher Basidiomycetes) Mycelia and Evaluation of their Mycochemical Contents and Antioxidant Activities.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xue-Mei; Dai, Yu-Cheng; Song, Ai-Rong; Xu, Kun; Ng, Lean Teik

    2015-01-01

    Inonotus sanghuang, an authentic "Sanghuang" mushroom used in traditional Chinese medicine, is known to possess important pharmacological activities. In this study, we aimed to optimize the liquid fermentation medium for I. sanghuang mycelial production and to determine the effects of two-stage cultivation (shake and static) on the yield of total flavonoids, total phenolics, and polysaccharides, as well as the antioxidant activities of I. sanghuang mycelial extracts (ISME). Under an optimized medium composition (38.96 g/L of corn flour, 4.15 g/L of yeast extract, 20.55 g/L of bran and pH 6.39), the predicted and experimental optimal mycelial biomasses were 17.60 g/L and 18.33±0.86 g/L, respectively. The results of two-stage cultivation showed that contents of total flavonoids and total phenolics in mycelia increased by 37.92% and 77.27%, respectively. However, irregular polysaccharide contents were noted throughout the experimental period. Antioxidant assays showed that ISME possessed good free-radical scavenging activity, which is mainly contributed by polyphenolic-type metabolites.

  17. Optimization of Liquid Fermentation Medium for Production of Inonotus sanghuang (Higher Basidiomycetes) Mycelia and Evaluation of their Mycochemical Contents and Antioxidant Activities.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xue-Mei; Dai, Yu-Cheng; Song, Ai-Rong; Xu, Kun; Ng, Lean Teik

    2015-01-01

    Inonotus sanghuang, an authentic "Sanghuang" mushroom used in traditional Chinese medicine, is known to possess important pharmacological activities. In this study, we aimed to optimize the liquid fermentation medium for I. sanghuang mycelial production and to determine the effects of two-stage cultivation (shake and static) on the yield of total flavonoids, total phenolics, and polysaccharides, as well as the antioxidant activities of I. sanghuang mycelial extracts (ISME). Under an optimized medium composition (38.96 g/L of corn flour, 4.15 g/L of yeast extract, 20.55 g/L of bran and pH 6.39), the predicted and experimental optimal mycelial biomasses were 17.60 g/L and 18.33±0.86 g/L, respectively. The results of two-stage cultivation showed that contents of total flavonoids and total phenolics in mycelia increased by 37.92% and 77.27%, respectively. However, irregular polysaccharide contents were noted throughout the experimental period. Antioxidant assays showed that ISME possessed good free-radical scavenging activity, which is mainly contributed by polyphenolic-type metabolites. PMID:26559702

  18. Production of extracellular proteolytic activity by Histoplasma capsulatum grown in Histoplasma-macrophage medium is limited to restriction fragment length polymorphism class 1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Zarnowski, Robert; Connolly, Patricia A; Wheat, L Joseph; Woods, Jon P

    2007-09-01

    Extracellular proteolytic activity was studied for 28 strains of Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum and 2 strains of H. capsulatum var. duboisii. Secreted protease activity assessed by skim milk agarose clearance was limited solely to H. capsulatum var. capsulatum restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) class 1 strains. There was a difference in proteolytic activity levels among class 1 strains. Extracellular proteolytic activity was further determined during growth of those strains in liquid medium using azodye-impregnated protein substrates. In general, the highest activities were measured when azocollagen was used, whereas azocasein and azoalbumin were cleaved less efficiently. The activity was inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride, antipain, and chymostatin, indicating, thereby, the presence of chymotrypsin-like serine proteases. Chromatographic analyses as well as variable substrate use at different culture times revealed production of at least 2 different enzyme pools of the same serine-like protease family. Our results demonstrate a distinctive ability of RFLP class 1 isolates to produce and secrete serine proteinase-type activity. This peculiarity may be relevant to the biology and pathogenesis of this particular clade of H. capsulatum isolates. Overall, the feature of extracellular proteolytic activity production enables a convenient and unequivocal identification of RFLP class 1 isolates and, thereby, can be used in H. capsulatum strain differentiation and typing. PMID:17509799

  19. Laser Activated Streak Camera for Measurement of Electron Pulses with Femtosecond Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Omid; Desimone, Alice; Wilkin, Kyle; Yang, Jie; Centurion, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The duration of femtosecond electron pulses used in time-resolved diffraction and microscopy experiments is challenging to measure in-situ. To overcome this problem, we have fabricated a streak camera that uses the time-varying electric field of a discharging parallel plate capacitor. The capacitor is discharged using a laser-activated GaAs photoswitch, resulting in a damped oscillation of the electric field. The delay time between the laser pulse and electron pulse is set so that the front and back halves of the bunch encounter opposite electric fields of the capacitor and are deflected in opposite directions. Thus, the electron bunch appears streaked on the detector with a length proportional to its duration. The temporal resolution of the streak camera is proportional to the maximum value of the electric field and the frequency of the discharge oscillation. The capacitor is charged by high voltage short pulses to achieve a high electric field and prevent breakdown. We have achieved an oscillation frequency in the GHz range by reducing the circuit size and hence its inductance. The camera was used to measure 100 keV electron pulses with up to a million electrons that are compressed transversely by magnetic lenses and longitudinally by an RF cavity. This work was supported mainly by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Ultrashort Pulse Laser Matter Interaction program, under grant # FA9550-12-1-0149.

  20. Limits of active laser triangulation as an instrument for high precision plant imaging.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Stefan; Eichert, Thomas; Goldbach, Heiner E; Kuhlmann, Heiner

    2014-02-05

    Laser scanning is a non-invasive method for collecting and parameterizing 3D data of well reflecting objects. These systems have been used for 3D imaging of plant growth and structure analysis. A prerequisite is that the recorded signals originate from the true plant surface. In this paper we studied the effects of species, leaf chlorophyll content and sensor settings on the suitability and accuracy of a commercial 660 nm active laser triangulation scanning device. We found that surface images of Ficus benjamina leaves were inaccurate at low chlorophyll concentrations and a long sensor exposure time. Imaging of the rough waxy leaf surface of leek (Allium porrum) was possible using very low exposure times, whereas at higher exposure times penetration and multiple refraction prevented the correct imaging of the surface. A comparison of scans with varying exposure time enabled the target-oriented analysis to identify chlorotic, necrotic and healthy leaf areas or mildew infestations. We found plant properties and sensor settings to have a strong influence on the accuracy of measurements. These interactions have to be further elucidated before laser imaging of plants is possible with the high accuracy required for e.g., the observation of plant growth or reactions to water stress.

  1. Integration of electronics and photonics in active material by femtosecond laser for functional microdevice fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan; Sugioka, Koji; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2010-02-01

    Recently, hybrid integration of multifunctional micro-components for creating complex, intelligent micro/nano systems has attracted significant attention. These micro/nano systems have important applications in a variety of areas, such as healthcare, environment, communication, national security, and so on. Until now, fabrication of micro/nano systems incorporated with different functions is still a challenging issue, which generally requires fabrication of microcomponents beforehand followed by assembly and packaging procedures. Thus, the fabrication process is complex and costly. In recent years, the rapid development of femtosecond laser microfabrication technology has enabled direct fabrication and integration of multifunctional components, such as microfluidics, microoptics, micromechanics, microelectronics, etc., into a substrate. Particularly, in this talk, we show the use of femtosecond laser microfabrication for integrating microelectronics and microphotonics. Both microelectrodes and optical waveguides can be directly embedded in active materials after a femtosecond laser direct writing followed by electroless chemical plating. As examples, electric-optic (EO) modulators were fabricated in lithium niobate (LiNbO3) crystal and their functions were demonstrated.

  2. Activator-inhibitor coupling between Rho signaling and actin assembly make the cell cortex an excitable medium

    PubMed Central

    Bement, William M.; Leda, Marcin; Moe, Alison M.; Kita, Angela M.; Larson, Matthew E.; Golding, Adriana E.; Pfeuti, Courtney; Su, Kuan-Chung; Miller, Ann L.; Goryachev, Andrew B.; von Dassow, George

    2016-01-01

    Animal cell cytokinesis results from patterned activation of the small GTPase Rho, which directs assembly of actomyosin in the equatorial cortex. Cytokinesis is restricted to a portion of the cell cycle following anaphase onset in which the cortex is responsive to signals from the spindle. We show that shortly after anaphase onset oocytes and embryonic cells of frogs and echinoderms exhibit cortical waves of Rho activity and F-actin polymerization. The waves are modulated by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) activity and require the Rho GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor), Ect2. Surprisingly, during wave propagation, while Rho activity elicits F-actin assembly, F-actin subsequently inactivates Rho. Experimental and modeling results show that waves represent excitable dynamics of a reaction diffusion system with Rho as the activator and F-actin the inhibitor. We propose that cortical excitability explains fundamental features of cytokinesis including its cell cycle regulation. PMID:26479320

  3. Spectroscopic analysis of a novel Nd3+-activated barium borate glass for broadband laser amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, G. V.; Muñoz H., G.; Camarillo, I.; Falcony, C.; Caldiño, U.; Lira, A.

    2015-08-01

    Spectroscopic parameters of a novel Nd3+-activated barium borate (BBONd) glass have been analyzed for broadband laser amplification. The Judd-Ofelt (JO) intensity parameters were determined through a systematic analysis of the absorption spectrum of Nd3+ ions in the BBONd glass. High values of the JO intensity parameters reveal a great centro-symmetrical loss of the Nd3+ sites and high covalency degree of the ligand field. The very high Ω6 intensity parameter value makes evident both a great structural distortion of the Nd3+ sites and a strong electron-phonon coupling between Nd3+ and free OH- ions, which is consistent with the phonon energy maximum (3442.1 cm-1) recorded by Raman spectroscopy. This strong electron-phonon coupling favors high effective bandwidth and gain bandwidth values of the laser emission (4F3/2 → 4I11/2) of Nd3+ ions. The electric-dipole oscillator strengths of all the Nd3+ absorption transitions, and in particular that of the hypersensitive transition (4I9/2 → 4G5/2), are enhanced by this great structural distortion of the host. Broadband laser amplification of the 4F3/2 → 4I11/2 emission (1062 nm) of Nd3+ ions in the BBONd glass pumped at 805 nm (4I9/2 → 4F5/2 + 2H9/2) is evaluated through the main fluorescent parameters in competition with non-radiative processes. In general, the BBONd glass exhibits spectroscopic parameters comparable with those reported in the literature for broadband laser amplification into the IR region.

  4. Effect of the dipole-dipole interaction of particles in an active medium on the character of superradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Berezovsky, V. V.; Men'shikov, L. I.; Oberg, S.; Latham, C. D.

    2008-07-15

    The motion of a system of interacting nonlinear charged oscillators is investigated numerically. Because of nonlinearity, the total collective electric field gives rise to a phasing effect-correlations in the phases of the oscillators. The consequence is superradiation-the enhanced spontaneous short-term emission of the energy stored in the oscillators. It is shown that the oscillations of the oscillators become stochastic because of the dipole-dipole interaction between them and their nearest neighbors. As a result, as the density of the oscillators increases, distant collective correlations are suppressed, superradiation ceases to be generated, and radiation is shielded in the medium. The phenomena considered in the present paper can play an important role in cyclotron emission from a plasma and thus should be taken into account in emission calculations. The process whereby the energy of the transverse electron motion in electron cooling devices decreases is analyzed as an example. This process occurs as a result of the development of cyclotron maser instability and has the nature of superradiation. The onset of correlations between individual electrons moving in their Larmor circles is the initial, linear stage of instability developing in the plasma. Superradiation is the final, nonlinear instability stage.

  5. Signal-to-noise analysis for propagation of laser radiation through a tissue-like medium by diffuse photon-density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netz, U. J.; Hielscher, A. H.; Scheel, A. K.; Beuthan, J.

    2007-04-01

    Biomedical optical imaging in the near-infrared (NIR) region provides the possibility to detect and determine pathological and functional changes in human tissue without the drawback of ionizing radiation. Of special promise is the application of this technology for the detection of joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It has been shown that optical changes in the synovial fluid and the vasculature surrounding the joints can be detected with optical methods. Applying optical tomographic methods one should be able to localize and quantify these changes for detection of the onset of RA. The first studies have been limited to continuous wave imaging. However, it is well known that enhanced resolution and better separation between absorption and scattering properties of tissue can be achieved using intensity modulated light sources. Intensity modulation of laser light in the MHz region leads to propagation of so-called diffuse photon density waves (PDW) through the tissue In this study we report on basic experimental results to determine performance and sensitivity of PDW-transillumination of tissue like phantoms. We used a vector network analyzer to generate and analyze intensity modulation from 100 MHz up to 1 GHz via a diode laser and an avalanche photo diode. Scans were performed across phantoms containing a layer with different absorbing and scattering properties bounded by an edge. The thickness of the phantoms was chosen similar to human fingers to gain information for optimization of tomographic imaging of finger joints. We experimentally determined the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the system and compared the results to theoretical predictions. Noise and SNR of amplitude and phase depend on frequency of modulation. While the amplitude SNR decreases with frequency, phase SNR increases to assume a maximum value. We found that the inserted layer can be better characterized using phase information, which becomes more valuable as the source

  6. Active Plasma Lensing for Relativistic Laser-Plasma-Accelerated Electron Beams.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, J; Steinke, S; Geddes, C G R; Matlis, N H; Shaw, B H; Gonsalves, A J; Huijts, J V; Nakamura, K; Daniels, J; Schroeder, C B; Benedetti, C; Esarey, E; Bulanov, S S; Bobrova, N A; Sasorov, P V; Leemans, W P

    2015-10-30

    Compact, tunable, radially symmetric focusing of electrons is critical to laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) applications. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of a discharge-capillary active plasma lens to focus 100-MeV-level LPA beams. The lens can provide tunable field gradients in excess of 3000 T/m, enabling cm-scale focal lengths for GeV-level beam energies and allowing LPA-based electron beams and light sources to maintain their compact footprint. For a range of lens strengths, excellent agreement with simulation was obtained. PMID:26565471

  7. Optical characterization of femtosecond laser induced active channel waveguides in lithium fluoride crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chiamenti, I.; Kalinowski, H. J.; Bonfigli, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Gomes, A. S. L.; Michelotti, F.

    2014-01-14

    We successfully realized broad-band light-emitting color center waveguides buried in LiF crystals by using femtosecond laser pulses. The characterization of the waveguides was performed by optical microscopy, photoluminescence spectra, loss measurements and near-field profiling. The experimental results show that the direct-writing fabrication process induces low-index contrast active channel waveguides: their wavelength-dependent refractive index changes, estimated from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup −4} depending on the writing conditions, allow supporting few modes at visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

  8. Transform-limited pulses generated by an actively Q-switched distributed fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Pérez-Millán, P; Andrés, M V; Díez, A; Cruz, J L; Barmenkov, Yu O

    2008-11-15

    A single-mode, transform-limited, actively Q-switched distributed-feedback fiber laser is presented, based on a new in-line acoustic pulse generator. Our technique permits a continuous adjustment of the repetition rate that modulates the Q factor of the cavity. Optical pulses of 800 mW peak power, 32 ns temporal width, and up to 20 kHz repetition rates were obtained. The measured linewidth demonstrates that these pulses are transform limited: 6 MHz for a train of pulses of 10 kHz repetition rate, 80 ns temporal width, and 60 mW peak power. Efficient excitation of spontaneous Brillouin scattering is demonstrated.

  9. Review of development of laser active imaging technology in China and foreign countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Youchen; Zhao, Hongli; Li, Yingcun

    2014-11-01

    Range-gated laser active imaging technology is an effective way to image detection and precise tracking of remote, dark, and small targets that overcomes the shortcomings of passive visible or infrared imaging technology, thus has important practical value and broad application prospects in the military. The paper based on the analysis of its principle, technical advantages and key technologies focus on the typical systems under atmospheric conditions at home and abroad and the latest research results, and discusses the development trends of this technology.

  10. Active Plasma Lensing for Relativistic Laser-Plasma-Accelerated Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tilborg, J.; Steinke, S.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Shaw, B. H.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Huijts, J. V.; Nakamura, K.; Daniels, J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Bulanov, S. S.; Bobrova, N. A.; Sasorov, P. V.; Leemans, W. P.

    2015-10-01

    Compact, tunable, radially symmetric focusing of electrons is critical to laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) applications. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of a discharge-capillary active plasma lens to focus 100-MeV-level LPA beams. The lens can provide tunable field gradients in excess of 3000 T /m , enabling cm-scale focal lengths for GeV-level beam energies and allowing LPA-based electron beams and light sources to maintain their compact footprint. For a range of lens strengths, excellent agreement with simulation was obtained.

  11. Oxygen reduction activity of N-doped carbon-based films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakoda, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Shunya; Kawaguchi, Kazuhiro; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Yoshikawa, Masahito

    2010-12-01

    Carbon-based films with nitrogen species on their surface were prepared on a glassy carbon (GC) substrate for application as a non-platinum cathode catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Cobalt and carbon were deposited in the presence of N 2 gas using a pulsed laser deposition method and then the metal Co was removed by HCl-washing treatment. Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was electrochemically determined using a rotating disk electrode system in which the film samples on the GC substrate were replaceable. The ORR activity increased with the temperature of the GC substrate during deposition. A carbon-based film prepared at 600 °C in the presence of N 2 at 66.7 Pa showed the highest ORR activity among the tested samples (0.66 V vs. NHE). This film was composed of amorphous carbons doped with pyridine type nitrogen atoms on its surface.

  12. Photoswitching of enzyme activity by laser-induced pH-jump.

    PubMed

    Kohse, Stefanie; Neubauer, Antje; Pazidis, Alexandra; Lochbrunner, Stefan; Kragl, Udo

    2013-06-26

    Controlled initiation of biochemical events and in particular of protein activity is a powerful tool in biochemical research. Specifically, optical trigger signals are an attractive approach for remote control of enzyme activity. We present a method for generating optical control of enzyme activity applicable to a widespread range of enzymes. The approach is based on short laser pulses as optical "switches" introducing an instantaneous change of the pH-value for activation of protein function. The pH-jump is induced by proton release from 2-nitrobenzaldehyde. Reaction conditions were chosen to yield a pH-jump of almost 3 units on switching from inactive to active conditions for the enzyme. In this experimental setup, irradiation can be realized without any loss of enzyme activity. Following this change in pH-value, a controlled activation of hydrolytic activity of acid phosphatase is successfully demonstrated. This application provides a general method for photocontrol of enzymatic function for proteins having a significant pH-profile. The kinetic data for the substrate 6-chloro-8-fluoro-4-methylumbelliferone phosphate are determined.

  13. Detachment instability of self-sustained volume discharge in active media of non-chain HF(DF) lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Belevtsev, A A; Kazantsev, S Yu; Kononov, I G; Firsov, K N

    2010-08-27

    The development of detachment instability in active media of electric-discharge non-chain HF(DF) lasers due to the electron-impact detachment of electrons from negative ions is considered. This instability is initiated in large volumes of SF{sub 6}-based gas mixtures, spatially separated from electrodes and heated by a pulsed CO{sub 2} laser. The self-organisation of self-sustained volume discharge upon laser heating, which results in the formation of quasi-periodic plasma structures within the discharge gap, is experimentally investigated. The evolution of these structures, depending on the gas temperature and specific deposition of electric energy, is analysed. The possible relationship between the self-organisation and detachment instability is discussed. A mechanism of development of single plasma channels in the working media of HF(DF) lasers, based on electron-impact destruction of negative ions is proposed. (active media)

  14. Effect of low-level laser therapy on the modulation of the mitochondrial activity of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Nadhia H. C.; Ferrari, Raquel A. M.; Silva, Daniela F. T.; Nunes, Fabio D.; Bussadori, Sandra K.; Fernandes, Kristianne P. S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macrophages play a major role among the inflammatory cells that invade muscle tissue following an injury. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has long been used in clinical practice to accelerate the muscle repair process. However, little is known regarding its effect on macrophages. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effect of LLLT on the mitochondrial activity (MA) of macrophages. METHOD: J774 macrophages were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon - gamma (IFN-γ) (activation) for 24 h to simulate an inflammatory process, then irradiated with LLLT using two sets of parameters (780 nm; 70 mW; 3 J/cm2 and 660 nm; 15 mW; 7.5 J/cm2). Non-activated/non-irradiated cells composed the control group. MA was evaluated by the cell mitochondrial activity (MTT) assay (after 1, 3 and 5 days) in three independent experiments. The data were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: After 1 day of culture, activated and 780 nm irradiated macrophages showed lower MA than activated macrophages, but activated and 660 nm irradiated macrophages showed MA similar to activated cells. After 3 days, activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed greater MA than activated macrophages, and after 5 days, the activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed similar MA to the activated macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that 660 nm and 780 nm LLLT can modulate the cellular activation status of macrophages in inflammation, highlighting the importance of this resource and of the correct determination of its parameters in the repair process of skeletal muscle. PMID:25076002

  15. Improvement of medium chain fatty acid content and antimicrobial activity of coconut oil via solid-state fermentation using a Malaysian Geotrichum candidum.

    PubMed

    Khoramnia, Anahita; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Ghanbari, Raheleh; Ajdari, Zahra; Lai, Oi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Coconut oil is a rich source of beneficial medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) particularly lauric acid. In this study, the oil was modified into a value-added product using direct modification of substrate through fermentation (DIMOSFER) method. A coconut-based and coconut-oil-added solid-state cultivation using a Malaysian lipolytic Geotrichum candidum was used to convert the coconut oil into MCFAs-rich oil. Chemical characteristics of the modified coconut oils (MCOs) considering total medium chain glyceride esters were compared to those of the normal coconut oil using ELSD-RP-HPLC. Optimum amount of coconut oil hydrolysis was achieved at 29% moisture content and 10.14% oil content after 9 days of incubation, where the quantitative amounts of the modified coconut oil and MCFA were 0.330 mL/g of solid media (76.5% bioconversion) and 0.175 mL/g of solid media (53% of the MCO), respectively. MCOs demonstrated improved antibacterial activity mostly due to the presence of free lauric acid. The highest MCFAs-rich coconut oil revealed as much as 90% and 80% antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, respectively. The results of the study showed that DIMOSFER by a local lipolytic G. candidum can be used to produce MCFAs as natural, effective, and safe antimicrobial agent. The produced MCOs and MCFAs could be further applied in food and pharmaceutical industries.

  16. Improvement of Medium Chain Fatty Acid Content and Antimicrobial Activity of Coconut Oil via Solid-State Fermentation Using a Malaysian Geotrichum candidum

    PubMed Central

    Khoramnia, Anahita; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Ghanbari, Raheleh; Ajdari, Zahra; Lai, Oi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Coconut oil is a rich source of beneficial medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) particularly lauric acid. In this study, the oil was modified into a value-added product using direct modification of substrate through fermentation (DIMOSFER) method. A coconut-based and coconut-oil-added solid-state cultivation using a Malaysian lipolytic Geotrichum candidum was used to convert the coconut oil into MCFAs-rich oil. Chemical characteristics of the modified coconut oils (MCOs) considering total medium chain glyceride esters were compared to those of the normal coconut oil using ELSD-RP-HPLC. Optimum amount of coconut oil hydrolysis was achieved at 29% moisture content and 10.14% oil content after 9 days of incubation, where the quantitative amounts of the modified coconut oil and MCFA were 0.330 mL/g of solid media (76.5% bioconversion) and 0.175 mL/g of solid media (53% of the MCO), respectively. MCOs demonstrated improved antibacterial activity mostly due to the presence of free lauric acid. The highest MCFAs-rich coconut oil revealed as much as 90% and 80% antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, respectively. The results of the study showed that DIMOSFER by a local lipolytic G. candidum can be used to produce MCFAs as natural, effective, and safe antimicrobial agent. The produced MCOs and MCFAs could be further applied in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:23971051

  17. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of selected Iranian essential oils against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in nutrient broth medium.

    PubMed

    Mohsenzadeh, Mohammad

    2007-10-15

    The antibacterial effect of different concentrations (0.01 to 15%) of thyme (Thymus vulgaris), peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) caraway seed (Carum carvi), fennel (Foeniculum vulgar), tarragon (Artmesia dracunculus) and pennyroyal (Mentha pullegium) essential oils on the Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was studied in nutrient broth medium. The MIC values of peppermint, fennel, thyme, pennyroyal and caraway essential oils against Escherichia coli were 0.5 +/- 0.03, 1 +/- 0.03, 0.3 +/- 0.01, 0.7 +/- 0.03 and 0.6 +/- 0.02% and in contrast, for Staphylococcus aureus were 0.4 +/- 0.01, 2 +/- 0.13, 0.1 +/- 0.01, 0.5 +/- 0.02 and 0.5 +/- 0.02%, respectively. The MBC values of peppermint, fennel, thyme, pennyroyal and caraway essential oils for Escherichia coli were 0.7 +/- 0.02, 2 +/- 0.05, 0.5 +/- 0.02, 1 +/- 0.02 and 0.8 +/- 0.02 and for Staphylococcus aureus were 0.5 +/- 0.02, 4 +/- 0.26, 0.3 +/- 0.02, 0.7 +/- 0.02 and 0.6 +/- 0.01, respectively. Statistical evaluation of the results indicated that the essential oils of thyme (Thymus vulgaris) showed the broadest spectrum of action (p < 0.05). Essential oils of peppermint (Mentha piperita), caraway seed (Carum carvi), pennyroyal (Menthae pullegium) and fennel (Foeniculum vulgar) had moderate effect against tested microorganisms and in contrast, tarragon essential oil were less effective against tested microorganisms. In conclusion, essential oils of edible plants could be a potential source for inhibitory substances for some foodborne pathogens. Natural substances that extracted from plants have applications in controlling pathogens in foods.

  18. Rare gas halide lasers

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, F.

    1985-01-01

    Contents include: Basic principles of operation of E-beam-pumped KrF lasers--(Spectroscopy, Kinetic processes in E-beam-pumped KrF lasers, Absorbers in the KrF gain medium, Sprite - A 200J, 5ns KrF laser); Current topics in KrF laser research--(Target experiments with the Sprite KrF laser, Pulse compression and power multiplication of KrF lasers, Improved efficiency of E-beam-pumped KrF lasers).

  19. Soliton generation from an actively mode-locked fiber laser incorporating an electro-optic fiber modulator.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Mikael; Margulis, Walter; Tarasenko, Oleksandr; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik

    2012-01-30

    This work demonstrates an actively mode-locked fiber laser operating in soliton regime and employing an all-fiber electro-optic modulator. Nonlinear polarization rotation is utilized for femtosecond pulse generation. Stable operation of the all-fiber ring laser is readily achieved at a fundamental repetition rate of 2.6 MHz and produces 460 fs pulses with a spectral bandwidth of 5.3 nm.

  20. Explosive laser

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Davis, W.C.; Sullivan, J.A.

    1975-09-01

    This patent relates to a laser system wherein reaction products from the detonation of a condensed explosive expand to form a gaseous medium with low translational temperature but high vibration population. Thermal pumping of the upper laser level and de-excitation of the lower laser level occur during the expansion, resulting in a population inversion. The expansion may be free or through a nozzle as in a gas-dynamic configuration. In one preferred embodiment, the explosive is such that its reaction products are CO$sub 2$ and other species that are beneficial or at least benign to CO$sub 2$ lasing. (auth)