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Sample records for active lateral flexion

  1. In vivo medial and lateral tibial loads during dynamic and high flexion activities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong; Banks, Scott A; D'Lima, Darryl D; Colwell, Clifford W; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2007-05-01

    Though asymmetric loading between the medial and lateral compartments of total knee replacements may contribute to implant loosening and failure, the in vivo contact force distribution during dynamic daily activities remains unknown. This study reports in vivo medial and lateral contact forces experienced by a well-aligned knee implant for a variety of activities. In vivo implant motion and total axial load data were collected from a single knee replacement patient performing treadmill gait (hands resting on handlebars), step up/down, lunge, and kneel activities. In vivo motion was measured using video fluoroscopy, while in vivo axial loads were collected simultaneously using an instrumented tibial component. An elastic foundation contact model employing linear and nonlinear polyethylene material properties was constructed to calculate medial and lateral contact forces based on the measured kinematics, total axial loads, and centers of pressure. For all activities, the predicted medial and lateral contact forces were insensitive to the selected material model. The percentage of medial to total contact force ranged from 18 to 60 for gait, 47 to 65 for step up/down, and 55 to 60 for kneel and lunge. At maximum load during the motion cycle, medial force was 1.2 BW for gait and 2.0 BW for step up/down, while the corresponding lateral forces were 1.0 and 1.5 BW, respectively. At mean load in the final static pose, medial force was 0.2 BW for kneel and 0.9 BW for lunge, with corresponding lateral forces of 0.1 and 0.7 BW, respectively. For this patient, a constant load split of 55% medial-45% lateral during loaded activity would be a reasonable approximation for these test conditions.

  2. Spine lateral flexion strength development differences between exercises with pelvic stabilization and without pelvic stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straton, Alexandru; Gidu, Diana Victoria; Micu, Alexandru

    2015-02-01

    Poor lateral flexor muscle strength can be an important source of lumbar/thoracic back pain in women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pelvic stabilization (PS) and no pelvic stabilization (NoPS) lateral flexion strength exercise training on the development of isolated right and left lateral flexion strength. Isometric torque of the isolated right and left lateral flexion muscles was measured at two positions (0° and 30° opposed angle range of motion) on 42 healthy women before and after 8 weeks of PS and NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise training. Subjects were assigned in three groups, the first (n=14) trained 3 times/week with PS lateral flexion strength exercise, the second (n=14) trained 3 times/week with NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise and the third (control, n=14) did not train. Post training isometric strength values describing PS and NoPS lateral flexion strength improved in greater extent for the PS lateral flexion strength exercise group and in lesser extent for the NoPS lateral flexion strength exercise group, in both angles (p<0.05) relative to controls. These data indicate that the most effective way of training the spine lateral flexion muscles is PS lateral flexion strength exercises; NoPS lateral flexion strength exercises can be an effective way of training for the spine lateral flexion muscles, if there is no access to PS lateral flexion strength training machines.

  3. Effect of a pelvic wedge and belt on the medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed a pelvic wedge and belt and investigated their effects on the selective activation of medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion. [Subjects and Methods] Nine adults were enrolled. The participants performed exercises without and with the pelvic wedge and belt, and the electromyographic activities of the medial and lateral hamstring muscles were recorded. [Results] The activity of the medial hamstring was increased significantly when using the pelvic wedge and belt, while the activity of the lateral hamstring did not differ significantly. [Conclusion] The pelvic wedge and belt provide a self-locked position during knee flexion in the prone position. Prone knee flexion in this position is an effective self-exercise for balanced strengthening of the medial hamstring.

  4. Effect of a pelvic wedge and belt on the medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed a pelvic wedge and belt and investigated their effects on the selective activation of medial and lateral hamstring muscles during knee flexion. [Subjects and Methods] Nine adults were enrolled. The participants performed exercises without and with the pelvic wedge and belt, and the electromyographic activities of the medial and lateral hamstring muscles were recorded. [Results] The activity of the medial hamstring was increased significantly when using the pelvic wedge and belt, while the activity of the lateral hamstring did not differ significantly. [Conclusion] The pelvic wedge and belt provide a self-locked position during knee flexion in the prone position. Prone knee flexion in this position is an effective self-exercise for balanced strengthening of the medial hamstring. PMID:28210048

  5. Active Flexion in Weight Bearing Better Correlates with Functional Outcomes of Total Knee Arthroplasty than Passive Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Young Dong; Jain, Nimash; Kang, Yeon Gwi; Kim, Tae Yune

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Correlations between maximum flexion and functional outcomes in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients are reportedly weak. We investigated whether there are differences between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing and other types of maximum flexion and whether the type of maximum flexion correlates with functional outcomes. Materials and Methods A total of 210 patients (359 knees) underwent preoperative evaluation and postoperative follow-up evaluations (6, 12, and 24 months) for the assessment of clinical outcomes including maximum knee flexion. Maximum flexion was measured under five conditions: passive nonweight bearing, passive weight bearing, active nonweight bearing, and active weight bearing with or without arm support. Data were analyzed for relationships between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing by Pearson correlation analyses, and a variance comparison between measurement techniques via paired t test. Results We observed substantial differences between passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing and the other four maximum flexion types. At all time points, passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing correlated poorly with active maximum flexion in weight bearing with or without arm support. Active maximum flexion in weight bearing better correlated with functional outcomes than the other maximum flexion types. Conclusions Our study suggests active maximum flexion in weight bearing should be reported together with passive maximum flexion in nonweight bearing in research on the knee motion arc after TKA. PMID:27274468

  6. Analysis of muscle activation patterns during transitions into and out of high knee flexion postures.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Liana M; Maly, Monica R; Callaghan, Jack P; Acker, Stacey M

    2014-10-01

    Increased risk of medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (OA) is linked to occupations that require frequent transitions into and out of postures which require high knee flexion (>90°). Muscle forces are major contributors to joint loading, and an association between compressive forces due to muscle activations and the degeneration of joint cartilage has been suggested. The purpose of this study was to evaluate muscle activation patterns of muscles crossing the knee during transitions into and out of full-flexion kneeling and squatting, sitting in a low chair, and gait. Both net and co-activation were greater when transitioning out of high flexion postures, with maximum activation occurring at knee angles greater than 100°. Compared to gait, co-activation levels during high flexion transitions were up to approximately 3 times greater. Co-activation was significantly greater in the lateral muscle group compared to the medial group during transitions into and out of high flexion postures. These results suggest that compression due to activation of the medial musculature of the knee may not be the link between high knee flexion postures and increased medial knee OA observed in occupational settings. Further research on a larger subject group and workers with varying degrees of knee OA is necessary.

  7. Contributions of active and passive toe flexion to forefoot loading.

    PubMed

    Hamel, A J; Donahue, S W; Sharkey, N A

    2001-12-01

    Toe flexion during terminal stance has an active component contributed by the muscles that flex the toes and a passive component contributed by the plantar fascia. This study examined the relative importance of these two mechanisms in maintaining proper force sharing between the toes and forefoot. Thirteen nonpaired cadaver feet were tested in a dynamic gait stimulator, which reproduces the kinematics and kinetics of the foot, ankle, and tibia by applying physiologic muscle forces and proximal tibial kinematics. The distribution of plantar pressure beneath the foot was measured at the terminal stance phase of gait under normal extrinsic muscle activity with an intact plantar fascia, in the absence of extrinsic toe flexor activity (no flexor hallucis longus or flexor digitorum longus) with an intact plantar fascia, and after complete fasciotomy with normal extrinsic toe flexor activity. In the absence of the toe flexor muscles or after plantar fasciotomy the contact area decreased beneath the toes and contact force shifted from the toes to the metatarsal heads. In addition, pressure distribution beneath the metatarsal heads after fasciotomy shifted laterally and posteriorly, indicating that the plantar fascia enables more efficient force transmission through the high gear axis during locomotion. The plantar fascia enables the toes to provide plantar-directed force and bear high loads during push-off.

  8. The Effect of Tibial Rotation on the Contribution of Medial and Lateral Hamstrings During Isometric Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Jónasson, Gunnlaugur; Helgason, Andri; Ingvarsson, Þorsteinn; Kristjánsson, Arnar Már; Briem, Kristín

    2015-01-01

    Background: Selective atrophy of hamstring components may result from muscle strain or graft harvesting for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Assessment and rehabilitation that specifically targets medial (MH) or lateral (LH) hamstring components may improve patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effects of volitional tibial rotation medially (MR) versus laterally (LR) on activation levels of MH versus LH and strength measures during isometric testing of knee flexors. Hypothesis: Muscle activation of MH and LH during knee flexor strength testing will be augmented when coupled with MR and LR of the tibia, respectively, without affecting knee flexor strength measures. Study Design: Cross-sectional laboratory study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Surface electrodes were used to record neuromuscular activity from MH and LH of the right lower limb in 40 healthy young men and women during isometric knee flexor strength testing at 40° of knee flexion, where participants maintained concurrent volitional MR or LR of the tibia. Statistical analyses of variance included general linear models for repeated measures. Results: A significant interaction was found for tibial rotation and hamstring component variables (P < 0.01). When isometric knee flexion was coupled with LR, normalized activation levels were similar for MH and LH. When performed with MR, a significant drop in LH activation led to dissimilar activation levels of the 2 components. Significantly greater strength measures were found when isometric knee flexion was performed with concurrent LR of the tibia (P < 0.01). Both sexes demonstrated the same rotation-dependent differences. Conclusion: Coupling tibial rotation with knee flexor activities primarily affects the LH component. Clinical Relevance: Strategies involving volitional tibial rotation may be considered for specific assessment/rehabilitation of the MH or LH component. PMID:26721286

  9. Relationship between active cervical range of motion and flexion-relaxation ratio in asymptomatic computer workers.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu; Park, Se-Yeon; Lee, Mi-Ra

    2011-01-01

    A high prevalence and incidence of neck and shoulder pain is present in the working population, especially sedentary workers. Recent findings have indicated that the flexion-relaxation (FR) ratio in the cervical erector spinae (CES) muscles might be a significant criteria of neuromuscular impairment and function. Additionally, the active cervical range of motion (ROM) is frequently used for discriminating between individuals with pain and those who are asymptomatic. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the active cervical ROM and the FR ratio in a sample of regular visual display terminal (VDT) workers. In total, 20 asymptomatic male VDT workers were recruited. Active cervical ROM was measured by a cervical ROM (CROM) instrument. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to collect myoelectrical signals from the CES muscles, and the FR ratio was calculated for statistical analysis. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to quantify the linear relationship between the active cervical ROM and the FR ratio. The values obtained for the FR ratio in the right CES muscles correlated significantly with the active cervical ROM measured in flexion (r=0.73, p<0.01), left lateral flexion (r=0.64, p<0.01), and left rotation (r=0.60, p<0.01). Flexion (r=0.74, p<0.01) and right lateral flexion (r=0.61, p<0.01) positively correlated with the left FR ratio. Extension and right rotation showed either a very weak or no correlation with the mean value of the right and left FR ratio. Our findings suggested that the cervical FR ratio had a positive correlation with cervical movements, and that changes of the activation patterns in CES demonstrated as cervical FR ratio are associated with reduction of the cervical range of motion including flexion and lateral flexion. In addition, muscular dysfunction of the CES could occur in regular computer workers prior to occurrence of pain; this means that the FR ratio could be used to evaluate the potential

  10. Comparison of the Symmetry of Right and Left Lateral Cervical Flexion and Rotation and the Cervical FRR in Young Computer Workers.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the symmetry of right and left lateral cervical flexion and rotation, and the cervical flexion-relaxation ratio (FRR) in young computer workers in Korea. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty computer workers (14 males and 6 females) participated in this study. We measured their right and left lateral cervical flexion, rotation, and FRR. [Results] Right and left lateral flexion and right and left rotation showed no significant differences between the sides. The left cervical FRR was significantly lower than the right cervical FRR. [Conclusion] The cervical FRR, expressed as a numerical value, is a more sensitive marker for measuring neuromuscular changes associated with mild asymmetry than CROM.

  11. EMG activities of the quadratus lumborum and erector spinae muscles during flexion-relaxation and other motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Andersson, E A; Oddsson, L I E; Grundström, H; Nilsson, J; Thorstensson, A

    1996-10-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to provide new information on the myoelectrical activation of the quadratus lumborum, the deep lateral and the superficial medial lumbar erector spinae, the psoas, and the iliacus muscles in various motor tasks. DESIGN: An intramuscular electromyographic study was performed. BACKGROUND: The contribution of individual deep trunk muscles to the stability of the lumbar spine is relatively unknown in different tasks, including the flexion-relaxation phenomenon. METHODS: Seven healthy subjects participated. Fine-wire electrodes were inserted with a needle guided by ultrasound. RESULTS: The highest activity observed for quadratus lumborum and deep lateral erector spinae occurred in ipsilateral trunk flexion in a side-lying position and for superficial medial erector spinae during bilateral leg lift in a prone position. Quadratus lumborum and deep lateral erector spinae were activated when the flexion-relaxation phenomenon was present for superficial medial erector spinae, i.e. when its activity ceased in the latter part of full forward flexion of the trunk, held relaxed and kyphotic. CONCLUSIONS: In general, the activation of the investigated muscles showed a high degree of task specificity, where activation of a certain muscle was not always predictable from its anatomical arrangement and mechanical advantage.

  12. Influence of temporal pressure on anticipatory postural control of medio-lateral stability during rapid leg flexion.

    PubMed

    Yiou, E; Hussein, T; Larue, J

    2012-03-01

    During leg flexion from erect posture, postural stability along the medio-lateral direction is organized in advance during "anticipatory postural adjustments" (APAs). This study aimed to investigate the influence of temporal pressure on this anticipatory postural control of medio-lateral stability. Eight young healthy participants performed series of leg flexions (1) as soon as possible in response to an acoustic signal (reaction-time condition; condition with temporal pressure) and (2) in a self-initiated condition (no temporal pressure). Results showed that APAs duration was shorter in the reaction-time condition as compared to the self-initiated condition; this shortening was compensated by an increase in the medio-lateral center-of-pressure displacement so that the dynamic stability reached at foot-off, as measured by the "extrapolated center-of-mass", remained unchanged. It is concluded that when a complex task is performed under temporal pressure, the central nervous system is able to modulate the spatio-temporal features of APAs in a way to both hasten the initiation of the voluntary movement and maintain optimal conditions of dynamic stability. In other words, it seems that the central nervous system does not "trade off optimal stability for speed of movement initiation under reaction-time condition", as it had been proposed in the literature.

  13. Influence of fear of falling on anticipatory postural control of medio-lateral stability during rapid leg flexion.

    PubMed

    Yiou, E; Deroche, T; Do, M C; Woodman, T

    2011-04-01

    During leg flexion from erect posture, postural stability is organized in advance during "anticipatory postural adjustments" (APA). During these APA, inertial forces are generated that propel the centre of gravity (CoG) laterally towards stance leg side. This study examined how fear of falling (FoF) may influence this anticipatory postural control of medio-lateral (ML) stability. Ten young healthy participants performed a series of leg flexions at maximal velocity from low and high surface heights (6 and 66 cm above ground, respectively). In this latter condition with increased FoF, stance foot was placed at the lateral edge of the support surface to induce maximal postural threat. Results showed that the amplitude of ML inertial forces generated during APA decreased with FoF; this decrease was compensated by an increase in APA duration so that the CoG position at time of swing foot-off was located further towards stance leg side. With these changes in ML APA, the CoG was propelled in the same final (unipodal) position above stance foot as in condition with low FoF. These results contrast with those obtained in the literature during quiet standing which showed that FoF did not have any influence on the ML component of postural control. It is proposed that ML APA are modified with increased FoF, in such a way that the risk of a sideway fall induced by the large CoG motion is attenuated.

  14. Measured flexion following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mai, Kenny T; Verioti, Christopher A; Hardwick, Mary E; Ezzet, Kace A; Copp, Steven N; Colwell, Clifford W

    2012-10-01

    Postoperative flexion is an important factor in the outcome of total knee arthroplasty. Although normal activities of daily living require a minimum of 105° to 110° of flexion, patients from non-Western cultures often engage in activities such as kneeling and squatting that require higher flexion. The desire to achieve greater flexion serves as the driving force for prosthetic modifications, including high-flexion designs. Techniques used to measure knee flexion and knee position during measurement are not often described or are different depending on the examiner. The purpose of this study was to compare active (self) and passive (assisted) flexion after successful total knee arthroplasty for 5 prostheses (2 standard and 3 high-flexion) using clinical (goniometer) and radiographic (true lateral radiograph) measurement techniques by different independent examiners.At a mean follow-up of 2.7 years (range, 1-5.6 years), a total of 108 patients (144 total knee arthroplasties) had completed the study. Mean postoperative active flexion was 111° clinically and 109° radiographically for the standard designs and 114° clinically and 117° radiographically for the high-flexion designs. Adding passive flexion increased flexion to 115° clinically and 117° radiographically for the standard designs and 119° clinically and 124° radiographically for the high-flexion designs. Flexion differences between the 2 measurement techniques (active vs passive and clinically vs radiographically) were statistically significant (P<.05). These findings demonstrate the importance of describing how flexion is measured in studies and understanding how the method of measurement can affect the findings.

  15. Effect of implant design on knee flexion.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Douglas A; Heekin, R David; Clark, Charles R; Murphy, Jeffrey A; O'Dell, Tammy L; Dwyer, Kimberly A

    2013-03-01

    From March 2006 to August 2008, 93 subjects (186 knees) underwent simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty performed by eight surgeons at North American centers. This randomized study was conducted to determine whether non-weight-bearing passive flexion was superior for knees receiving a posterior stabilized high flexion device compared to a posterior stabilized standard device in the contra-lateral knee. Weight-bearing single leg active flexion was one secondary endpoint. Follow-up compliance was 92.5%. Results show small, but significant superiority in the motion metrics for the high flexion device compared to the standard device 12 months after surgery, especially for a subgroup of patients with pre-operative flexion less than 120° in both knees. Thus, the ideal candidate for the high flexion device may be one with lesser pre-operative flexion.

  16. Effect of neck flexion restriction on sternocleidomastoid and abdominal muscle activity during curl-up exercises.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Moon, Dong-Chul; Hong, Ki-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neck flexion restriction on sternocleidomastoid (SCM), rectus abdominis (RA), and external oblique (EO) muscle activity during a traditional curl-up exercise and a curl-up with neck flexion restriction. [Subjects] In total, 13 healthy male subjects volunteered for this study. [Methods] All subjects performed a traditional curl-up exercise and a curl-up exercise in which neck flexion was restricted by the subject's hand. Surface electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from the SCM, RA, and EO during the curl-up. [Results] There was significantly lower EMG activity of the SCM during the curl-up exercise with neck flexion restriction compared to the traditional curl-up exercise. Conversely, the activity of the RA and EO muscles was significantly higher in the curl-up exercise with neck flexion restriction than in the traditional curl-up exercise. [Conclusion] Neck flexion restriction is recommended to prevent excessive activation of superficial cervical flexors during the curl-up exercise.

  17. Effect of neck flexion restriction on sternocleidomastoid and abdominal muscle activity during curl-up exercises

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Moon, Dong-Chul; Hong, Ki-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neck flexion restriction on sternocleidomastoid (SCM), rectus abdominis (RA), and external oblique (EO) muscle activity during a traditional curl-up exercise and a curl-up with neck flexion restriction. [Subjects] In total, 13 healthy male subjects volunteered for this study. [Methods] All subjects performed a traditional curl-up exercise and a curl-up exercise in which neck flexion was restricted by the subject’s hand. Surface electromyography (EMG) signals were recorded from the SCM, RA, and EO during the curl-up. [Results] There was significantly lower EMG activity of the SCM during the curl-up exercise with neck flexion restriction compared to the traditional curl-up exercise. Conversely, the activity of the RA and EO muscles was significantly higher in the curl-up exercise with neck flexion restriction than in the traditional curl-up exercise. [Conclusion] Neck flexion restriction is recommended to prevent excessive activation of superficial cervical flexors during the curl-up exercise. PMID:26957735

  18. Activation of back and lower limb muscles during squat exercises with different trunk flexion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae-Sik; Song, Min-Young; Kwon, Yu-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the activation of back and lower limb muscles in subjects who were performing a squat exercise at different angles of trunk flexion. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy subjects (age 21.1± 1.8 years, height 168.7 ± 8.2 cm, weight 66.1 ± 12.3 kg) volunteered. The activation of the erector spinae muscle, rectus femoris muscle, gluteus maximus muscle and biceps femoris muscle was observed while the subjects performed squat exercises with a trunk flexion of 0°, 15°, and 30°. [Results] The erector spinae muscle, gluteus maximus muscle, and biceps femoris muscle were activated more during the squat exercise with the trunk flexion at 30° than the exercise with the trunk flexion at 0°. The rectus femoris muscle showed a tendency to decrease as the truck flexion increased. [Conclusion] Squat exercise be executed while maintaining an erect trunk posture if one wishes to strengthen the quadriceps muscle while reducing the load on the lower back. PMID:28174462

  19. Activation of back and lower limb muscles during squat exercises with different trunk flexion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Sik; Song, Min-Young; Kwon, Yu-Jeong

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the activation of back and lower limb muscles in subjects who were performing a squat exercise at different angles of trunk flexion. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy subjects (age 21.1± 1.8 years, height 168.7 ± 8.2 cm, weight 66.1 ± 12.3 kg) volunteered. The activation of the erector spinae muscle, rectus femoris muscle, gluteus maximus muscle and biceps femoris muscle was observed while the subjects performed squat exercises with a trunk flexion of 0°, 15°, and 30°. [Results] The erector spinae muscle, gluteus maximus muscle, and biceps femoris muscle were activated more during the squat exercise with the trunk flexion at 30° than the exercise with the trunk flexion at 0°. The rectus femoris muscle showed a tendency to decrease as the truck flexion increased. [Conclusion] Squat exercise be executed while maintaining an erect trunk posture if one wishes to strengthen the quadriceps muscle while reducing the load on the lower back.

  20. In vivo healthy knee kinematics during dynamic full flexion.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Satoshi; Moro-oka, Taka-aki; Dunbar, Nicholas J; Miura, Hiromasa; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Banks, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Healthy knee kinematics during dynamic full flexion were evaluated using 3D-to-2D model registration techniques. Continuous knee motions were recorded during full flexion in a lunge from 85° to 150°. Medial and lateral tibiofemoral contacts and femoral internal-external and varus-valgus rotations were analyzed as a function of knee flexion angle. The medial tibiofemoral contact translated anteroposteriorly, but remained on the center of the medial compartment. On the other hand, the lateral tibiofemoral contact translated posteriorly to the edge of the tibial surface at 150° flexion. The femur exhibited external and valgus rotation relative to the tibia over the entire activity and reached 30° external and 5° valgus rotations at 150° flexion. Kinematics' data during dynamic full flexion may provide important insight as to the designing of high-flexion total knee prostheses.

  1. Identification of a new target muscle for treatment in patients with Parkinson's disease who have lateral trunk flexion?

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Hiroshi; Sawa, Nobuhiro; Ueno, Satoshi

    2015-11-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) can present with lateral trunk flexion (LTF). Abnormal posture associated with PD has been treated, but the effectiveness of these treatments is limited, resulting in unsatisfactory outcomes. Unilateral hypertrophy and unilateral hyperactivity may be useful for deciding targets for injection of botulinum toxin or physical rehabilitation. However, such findings may be limited such as the obliquus abdominis muscle or thoracic paraspinal muscles, and several other muscles may have a causative role in LTF. We investigated 8 patients whether other muscles show unilateral hypertrophy by analyzing computed tomographic scans. Cobb's angle was 11° to 34°. The area of the paravertebral muscles was large contralateral to the bending side and this trend intensified from L4 to Th10. The lumbar quadrate muscle and psoas major muscle showed unilateral enlargement. These larger muscles were prominent contralateral to the bending side in five patients and ipsilateral to the bending side in two patients. This unilateral muscle change was mildly seen in the internal and external abdominal oblique muscles. The lumbar quadrate muscle or psoas major muscle showed two hypertrophic patterns, and these muscles might be new therapeutic targets for treatments such as botulinum toxin.

  2. Effects of Shoulder Flexion Loaded by an Elastic Tubing Band on EMG Activity of the Gluteal Muscles during Squat Exercises.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Hyeok; Jang, Jun-Hyeok; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-11-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effects of shoulder flexion loaded by an elastic tubing band during squat exercises, by assessing electromyographic activities of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius. [Subjects] In total, 17 healthy males were recruited. [Methods] Participants performed squat exercises with and without shoulder flexion loaded by a tubing band. Gluteal muscle activities during the downward and upward phases of the squat exercises were recorded using a surface electromyography (EMG) system. The mean electromyographic activities of the gluteal muscles during squat exercises with and without loaded shoulder flexion were compared using the paired t-test. [Results] Electromyographic activities of the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius were greater in both the upward and downward phases of the squat with loaded shoulder flexion. [Conclusions] The combination of squat and loaded shoulder flexion can be an effective exercise for increasing gluteal muscle activity.

  3. Sonography assessment of the median nerve during cervical lateral glide and lateral flexion. Is there a difference in neurodynamics of asymptomatic people?

    PubMed

    Brochwicz, Peter; von Piekartz, Harry; Zalpour, Christoff

    2013-06-01

    There is clinical evidence that cervical lateral glide (CLG) improves neurodynamics and alleviates pain in patients who suffer from neurogenic arm pain. Cervical lateral flexion (CLF) is also a treatment method and a means of testing neurodynamics. However, for both techniques nerve movement has not yet been investigated using ultrasound imaging (US). The purpose of this study was to quantify median nerve movement in the arm during CLG and CLF. For this study 27 healthy participants were recruited. Longitudinal movement of the median nerve was measured using US during CLG and CLF with the shoulder in 30° abduction in the middle and distal forearm (Fad). Data could be obtained from 11 participants (6 women and 5 men, average age 25.6 years, ± 2.25) at the middle forearm (Fam) and from 9 participants (5 women and 4 men, average age 27.2 years, ± 2.75) at the Fad. When applying CLF, the median nerve moved 2.3 mm (SEM ± 0.1 mm) at the Fam. At the same measuring point the median nerve moved 3.3 mm (SEM ± 0.3 mm, p = 0.005) by applying CLG. At the Fad the difference between CLF and CLF amounted to 0.6 mm (CLF: 1.9 mm (SEM ± 0.2 mm, CLG: 2.5 mm (SEM ± 0.2 mm, p ≤ 0.05). The movements during CLG are larger than during CLF. This difference is statistically significant. However, the statistical relevance cannot be extrapolated to a clinical relevance.

  4. Immediate effects of active cranio-cervical flexion exercise versus passive mobilisation of the upper cervical spine on pain and performance on the cranio-cervical flexion test.

    PubMed

    Lluch, Enrique; Schomacher, Jochen; Gizzi, Leonardo; Petzke, Frank; Seegar, Dagmar; Falla, Deborah

    2014-02-01

    This study compared the immediate effects of an assisted plus active cranio-cervical flexion exercise (exercise group) versus a passive mobilisation plus assisted cranio-cervical flexion (mobilisation group) on performance of the cranio-cervical flexion test (CCFT), cervical range of motion (ROM) and pain in patients with chronic neck pain. Eighteen volunteers with chronic idiopathic neck pain participated in the study and were randomised to one of the two intervention groups. Current level of pain, cervical ROM and pain perceived during movement, pressure pain threshold (PPT) and surface electromyography (EMG) during performance of the CCFT were measured before and immediately after the intervention. A significant reduction in resting pain and PPT measured over cervical sites was observed immediately following both interventions, although a greater change was observed for the exercise group. No change in cervical ROM was observed after either intervention. Reduced sternocleidomastoid and anterior scalene EMG amplitude were observed during stages of the CCFT but only for the participants in the active exercise group. Although both active and passive interventions offered pain relief, only the exercise group improved on a task of motor function highlighting the importance of specific active treatment for improved motor control of the cervical spine.

  5. Trunk Muscle Activation at the Initiation and Braking of Bilateral Shoulder Flexion Movements of Different Amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Eriksson Crommert, M; Halvorsen, K; Ekblom, M M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if trunk muscle activation patterns during rapid bilateral shoulder flexions are affected by movement amplitude. Eleven healthy males performed shoulder flexion movements starting from a position with arms along sides (0°) to either 45°, 90° or 180°. EMG was measured bilaterally from transversus abdominis (TrA), obliquus internus (OI) with intra-muscular electrodes, and from rectus abdominis (RA), erector spinae (ES) and deltoideus with surface electrodes. 3D kinematics was recorded and inverse dynamics was used to calculate the reactive linear forces and torque about the shoulders and the linear and angular impulses. The sequencing of trunk muscle onsets at the initiation of arm movements was the same across movement amplitudes with ES as the first muscle activated, followed by TrA, RA and OI. All arm movements induced a flexion angular impulse about the shoulders during acceleration that was reversed during deceleration. Increased movement amplitude led to shortened onset latencies of the abdominal muscles and increased level of activation in TrA and ES. The activation magnitude of TrA was similar in acceleration and deceleration where the other muscles were specific to acceleration or deceleration. The findings show that arm movements need to be standardized when used as a method to evaluate trunk muscle activation patterns and that inclusion of the deceleration of the arms in the analysis allow the study of the relationship between trunk muscle activation and direction of perturbing torque during one and the same arm movement.

  6. Trunk Muscle Activation at the Initiation and Braking of Bilateral Shoulder Flexion Movements of Different Amplitudes

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson Crommert, M.; Halvorsen, K.; Ekblom, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if trunk muscle activation patterns during rapid bilateral shoulder flexions are affected by movement amplitude. Eleven healthy males performed shoulder flexion movements starting from a position with arms along sides (0°) to either 45°, 90° or 180°. EMG was measured bilaterally from transversus abdominis (TrA), obliquus internus (OI) with intra-muscular electrodes, and from rectus abdominis (RA), erector spinae (ES) and deltoideus with surface electrodes. 3D kinematics was recorded and inverse dynamics was used to calculate the reactive linear forces and torque about the shoulders and the linear and angular impulses. The sequencing of trunk muscle onsets at the initiation of arm movements was the same across movement amplitudes with ES as the first muscle activated, followed by TrA, RA and OI. All arm movements induced a flexion angular impulse about the shoulders during acceleration that was reversed during deceleration. Increased movement amplitude led to shortened onset latencies of the abdominal muscles and increased level of activation in TrA and ES. The activation magnitude of TrA was similar in acceleration and deceleration where the other muscles were specific to acceleration or deceleration. The findings show that arm movements need to be standardized when used as a method to evaluate trunk muscle activation patterns and that inclusion of the deceleration of the arms in the analysis allow the study of the relationship between trunk muscle activation and direction of perturbing torque during one and the same arm movement. PMID:26562017

  7. Peak triceps surae muscle activity is not specific to knee flexion angles during MVIC.

    PubMed

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Schneiders, Anthony G; García, José A; Sullivan, S John; Simoneau, Guy G

    2011-10-01

    There is limited research on peak activity of the separate triceps surae muscles in select knee flexion (KF) positions during a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) used to normalize EMG signals. The aim of this study was to determine how frequent peak activity occurred during an MVIC for soleus (SOL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) in select KF positions, and if these peaks were recorded in similar KF positions. Forty-eight healthy individuals performed unilateral plantar-flexion MVIC in standing with 0°KF and 45°KF, and in sitting with 90°KF. Surface EMG of SOL, GM, and GL were collected and processed in 250 ms epochs to determine peak root-mean-square amplitude. Peak activity was most frequently captured in standing and rarely in sitting, with no position selective to SOL, GM or GL activity. Peak GM and GL activity was more frequent in 0°KF than 45°KF, and more often in similar KF positions than not. Peak SOL activity was just as likely in 45°KF as 0°KF, and more in positions similar to GM, but not GL. The EMG amplitudes were at least 20% greater in positions that captured peak activity over those that did not. The overall findings support performing an MVIC in more than one KF position to normalize triceps surae EMG. It is emphasized that no KF position is selective to SOL, GM, or GL alone.

  8. Comparison of trunk muscle reflex activation patterns between active and passive trunk flexion-extension loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael W

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of trunk flexion-extension loading on the neuromuscular reflexive latencies and amplitude responses of the trunk musculature. Eighteen male and female subjects (18-27yrs) participated in active and passive trunk flexion extension, performed ∼7days apart. Subjects performed 60 trunk flexion-extension repetitions. Surface electromyography (EMG) was collected bilaterally from paraspinal and abdominal muscles. In the active condition, subjects volitionally moved their trunks, while in the passive condition the dynamometer controlled the movements. The trunk was perturbed before and immediately after 30 repetitions. Latency of muscle onset, latency of first peak, latency of maximum peak, and peak EMG amplitude were evaluated. No differences between conditions, sides, or perturbation session were apparent. Overall latencies were shorter in females (p<.05) and abdominal muscles compared to paraspinals (p<.05). Thoracic paraspinal muscle amplitudes were greater than all other muscles (p<.05). Based upon the present results, the neuromuscular system engages trunk flexor muscles prior to the paraspinals in order to provide possible stabilization of the trunk when flexor moments are generated. Overall, the results indicate no difference in response of the neuromuscular system to active or passive repetitive loading.

  9. Peak activation of lower limb musculature during high flexion kneeling and transitional movements.

    PubMed

    Kingston, David C; Tennant, Liana M; Chong, Helen C; Acker, Stacey M

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have measured lower limb muscle activation during high knee flexion or investigated the effects of occupational safety footwear. Therefore, our understanding of injury and disease mechanisms, such as knee osteoarthritis, is limited for these high-risk postures. Peak activation was assessed in eight bilateral lower limb muscles for twelve male participants, while shod or barefoot. Transitions between standing and kneeling had peak quadriceps and tibialis anterior (TA) activations above 50% MVC. Static kneeling and simulated tasks performed when kneeling had peak TA activity above 15% MVC but below 10% MVC for remaining muscles. In three cases, peak muscle activity was significantly higher (mean 8.9% MVC) when shod. However, net compressive knee joint forces may not be significantly increased when shod. EMG should be used as a modelling input when estimating joint contact forces for these postures, considering the activation levels in the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles during transitions. Practitioner Summary: Kneeling transitional movements are used in activities of daily living and work but are linked to increased knee osteoarthritis risk. We found peak EMG activity of some lower limb muscles to be over 70% MVC during transitions and minimal influence of wearing safety footwear.

  10. In vivo knee kinematics during stair and deep flexion activities in patients with bicruciate substituting total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuroyanagi, Yuji; Mu, Shang; Hamai, Satoshi; Robb, William J; Banks, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons and their patients continue to seek better functional outcomes after total knee arthroplasty. The bicruciate substituting (BCS) total knee arthroplasty design has been introduced to achieve more natural knee mechanics. The purpose of this study was to characterize kinematics in knees with BCS arthroplasty during deep flexion and stair activities using fluoroscopy and model-image registration. In 20 patients with 25 BCS knees, we observed average implant flexion of 128° during kneeling and consistent posterior condylar translations with knee flexion. Tibial rotations were qualitatively similar to those observed in the arthritic natural knee. Knee kinematics with BCS arthroplasty were qualitatively more similar to arthritic natural knees than knees with either posterior cruciate-retaining or posterior-stabilized arthroplasty.

  11. Comparison of Muscle Activation during Dominant Hand Wrist Flexion when Writing.

    PubMed

    Park, Soohee

    2013-12-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the difference in muscle activation of the dominant upper extremity in right-handed and left-handed persons during writing. [Subjects] There were 36 subjects (16 left- handers/ 20 right- handers), and the study was conducted from 03/01/2012 to 30/3/2012. [Methods] Six electrodes were attached to the FCU (flexor carpi ulnaris), FCR (flexor carpi radialis), ECU (extensor carpi ulnaris), ECR (extensor carpi radialis), and both UT (upper trapezius) muscles. [Results] FCU muscle activation was 16.77±9.12% in left-handers and 10.29±4.13% (%MVIC) in right-handers. FCR muscle activation was 19.09±9.43% in left-handers and 10.64±5.03% in right-handers. In addition, the UT muscle activation on the writing hand side was 11.91±5.79% in left-handers and 1.66±1.19% in right-handers. [Conclusion] As a result of this study, it was discovered that left-handers used more wrist flexion in performance of the writing task with the dominant upper extremity than right-handers, and that the left-handers activated the wrist and shoulder muscles more than the right-handers. These results indicate a potential danger of musculoskeletal disease in left-hander.

  12. Comparison of Muscle Activation during Dominant Hand Wrist Flexion when Writing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soohee

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the difference in muscle activation of the dominant upper extremity in right-handed and left-handed persons during writing. [Subjects] There were 36 subjects (16 left- handers/ 20 right- handers), and the study was conducted from 03/01/2012 to 30/3/2012. [Methods] Six electrodes were attached to the FCU (flexor carpi ulnaris), FCR (flexor carpi radialis), ECU (extensor carpi ulnaris), ECR (extensor carpi radialis), and both UT (upper trapezius) muscles. [Results] FCU muscle activation was 16.77±9.12% in left-handers and 10.29±4.13% (%MVIC) in right-handers. FCR muscle activation was 19.09±9.43% in left-handers and 10.64±5.03% in right-handers. In addition, the UT muscle activation on the writing hand side was 11.91±5.79% in left-handers and 1.66±1.19% in right-handers. [Conclusion] As a result of this study, it was discovered that left-handers used more wrist flexion in performance of the writing task with the dominant upper extremity than right-handers, and that the left-handers activated the wrist and shoulder muscles more than the right-handers. These results indicate a potential danger of musculoskeletal disease in left-hander. PMID:24409013

  13. Nonlinear Coupling between Cortical Oscillations and Muscle Activity during Isotonic Wrist Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuan; Solis-Escalante, Teodoro; van de Ruit, Mark; van der Helm, Frans C. T.; Schouten, Alfred C.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling between cortical oscillations and muscle activity facilitates neuronal communication during motor control. The linear part of this coupling, known as corticomuscular coherence, has received substantial attention, even though neuronal communication underlying motor control has been demonstrated to be highly nonlinear. A full assessment of corticomuscular coupling, including the nonlinear part, is essential to understand the neuronal communication within the sensorimotor system. In this study, we applied the recently developed n:m coherence method to assess nonlinear corticomuscular coupling during isotonic wrist flexion. The n:m coherence is a generalized metric for quantifying nonlinear cross-frequency coupling as well as linear iso-frequency coupling. By using independent component analysis (ICA) and equivalent current dipole source localization, we identify four sensorimotor related brain areas based on the locations of the dipoles, i.e., the contralateral primary sensorimotor areas, supplementary motor area (SMA), prefrontal area (PFA) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC). For all these areas, linear coupling between electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) is present with peaks in the beta band (15–35 Hz), while nonlinear coupling is detected with both integer (1:2, 1:3, 1:4) and non-integer (2:3) harmonics. Significant differences between brain areas is shown in linear coupling with stronger coherence for the primary sensorimotor areas and motor association cortices (SMA, PFA) compared to the sensory association area (PPC); but not for the nonlinear coupling. Moreover, the detected nonlinear coupling is similar to previously reported nonlinear coupling of cortical activity to somatosensory stimuli. We suggest that the descending motor pathways mainly contribute to linear corticomuscular coupling, while nonlinear coupling likely originates from sensory feedback. PMID:27999537

  14. Nonlinear Coupling between Cortical Oscillations and Muscle Activity during Isotonic Wrist Flexion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Solis-Escalante, Teodoro; van de Ruit, Mark; van der Helm, Frans C T; Schouten, Alfred C

    2016-01-01

    Coupling between cortical oscillations and muscle activity facilitates neuronal communication during motor control. The linear part of this coupling, known as corticomuscular coherence, has received substantial attention, even though neuronal communication underlying motor control has been demonstrated to be highly nonlinear. A full assessment of corticomuscular coupling, including the nonlinear part, is essential to understand the neuronal communication within the sensorimotor system. In this study, we applied the recently developed n:m coherence method to assess nonlinear corticomuscular coupling during isotonic wrist flexion. The n:m coherence is a generalized metric for quantifying nonlinear cross-frequency coupling as well as linear iso-frequency coupling. By using independent component analysis (ICA) and equivalent current dipole source localization, we identify four sensorimotor related brain areas based on the locations of the dipoles, i.e., the contralateral primary sensorimotor areas, supplementary motor area (SMA), prefrontal area (PFA) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC). For all these areas, linear coupling between electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) is present with peaks in the beta band (15-35 Hz), while nonlinear coupling is detected with both integer (1:2, 1:3, 1:4) and non-integer (2:3) harmonics. Significant differences between brain areas is shown in linear coupling with stronger coherence for the primary sensorimotor areas and motor association cortices (SMA, PFA) compared to the sensory association area (PPC); but not for the nonlinear coupling. Moreover, the detected nonlinear coupling is similar to previously reported nonlinear coupling of cortical activity to somatosensory stimuli. We suggest that the descending motor pathways mainly contribute to linear corticomuscular coupling, while nonlinear coupling likely originates from sensory feedback.

  15. Effect of shoulder flexion angle and exercise resistance on the serratus anterior muscle activity during dynamic hug exercise.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of shoulder flexion angle and exercise resistance on the serratus anterior muscle during dynamic hug exercise. [Subjects] Ten men aged 22-32 years were recruited. [Methods] The subjects performed dynamic hug exercise at different shoulder flexion angles and under resistance weight conditions. Serratus anterior muscle activities were measured by using the surface electromyographic system during the dynamic hug exercises. After performing the exercise, each subject described the exercise intensity by using the Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale. [Results] The normalized serratus anterior muscle activity increased significantly in the order of Conditions 1 and 4 < Condition 3 < Condition 2. The Borg RPE scale increased significantly in the order of Condition 1 < Condition 2 < Condition 3 < Condition 4. [Conclusion] The results suggest that dynamic hug exercise with the use of a multi-air-cushion biofeedback device is an effective scapular stability exercise.

  16. Effect of shoulder flexion angle and exercise resistance on the serratus anterior muscle activity during dynamic hug exercise

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of shoulder flexion angle and exercise resistance on the serratus anterior muscle during dynamic hug exercise. [Subjects] Ten men aged 22–32 years were recruited. [Methods] The subjects performed dynamic hug exercise at different shoulder flexion angles and under resistance weight conditions. Serratus anterior muscle activities were measured by using the surface electromyographic system during the dynamic hug exercises. After performing the exercise, each subject described the exercise intensity by using the Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale. [Results] The normalized serratus anterior muscle activity increased significantly in the order of Conditions 1 and 4 < Condition 3 < Condition 2. The Borg RPE scale increased significantly in the order of Condition 1 < Condition 2 < Condition 3 < Condition 4. [Conclusion] The results suggest that dynamic hug exercise with the use of a multi-air-cushion biofeedback device is an effective scapular stability exercise. PMID:26957774

  17. Influence of knee flexion angle and age on triceps surae muscle activity during heel raises.

    PubMed

    Hébert-Losier, Kim; Schneiders, Anthony G; García, José A; Sullivan, S John; Simoneau, Guy G

    2012-11-01

    Triceps surae and Achilles tendon injuries are frequent in sports medicine, particularly in middle-aged adults. Muscle imbalances and weakness are suggested to be involved in the etiology of these conditions, with heel-raise testing often used to assess and treat triceps surae (TS) injuries. Although heel raises are recommended with the knee straight for gastrocnemius and bent for soleus (SOL), the extent of muscle selectivity in these positions is not clear. This study aimed to determine the influence of knee angle and age on TS muscle activity during heel raises. Forty-eight healthy men and women were recruited from a younger-aged (18-25 years) and middle-aged (35-45 years) population. All the subjects performed unilateral heel raises in 0° and 45° knee flexion (KF). Soleus, gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) surface electromyography signals were processed to compute root-mean-square amplitudes, and data were analyzed using mixed-effects models and stepwise regression. The mean TS activity during heel raises was 23% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction when performed in 0° KF and 21% when in 45°. Amplitudes were significantly different between TS muscles (p < 0.001) and KF angles (p < 0.001), with a significant interaction (p < 0.001). However, the age of the population did not influence the results (p = 0.193). The findings demonstrate that SOL activity was 4% greater when tested in 45° compared with 0° KF and 5% lower in the GM and GL. The results are consistent with the recommended use of heel raises in select knee positions for assessing, training, and rehabilitating the SOL and gastrocnemius muscles; however, the 4-5% documented change in activity might not be enough to significantly influence clinical outcome measures or muscle-specific benefits. Contrary to expectations, TS activity did not distinguish between middle-aged and younger-aged adults, despite the higher injury prevalence in middle age.

  18. Active Range of Motion with Individual Protective Equipment: Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus and Levels B and A Configurations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    CONDITIONS 27 FIGURES 1. AROM for Cervical Rotation during Head S2S Activity for Each IPE Condition 14 2. AROM for Cervical Flexion and Extension...during Head Nod Activity 14 3. AROM for Lateral Cervical Flexion to Left and Right for Head Lat Flex Activity 15 4. Left and Right Shoulder...Head Nod Cervical flexion and extension; full range of flexion and extension Head Lat Flex Left and right cervical lateral flexion ; total lateral

  19. Muscular Activation Pattern of Bilateral Extensors Response to Asymmetric Hand Lifting During Trunk Flexion-extension Performance.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ying; Shan, Xinhai

    2016-10-14

    The authors' purpose was to test the effect of asymmetric hand lifting on muscular activation patterns of 3 bilateral extensors. Eighteen male university students without back pain were volunteered. Each performed flexion-extension randomly with conditions of right lifting, left lifting, and nonlifting. Surface electromyography from bilateral thoracic, lumbar erector spinae, and hamstring was recorded. The cross-correlation and relative intensity in paired muscles of bilateral extensors was calculated in flexion as well as extension period. The results showed that the cross-correlation coefficient was decreased and the phase lag as well as the relative intensity of bilateral extensors was increased significantly in thoracic level. The phase lag as well as the relative intensity of bilateral extensors was increased significantly in lumbar level. It was concluded that asymmetric lifting has a significant effect on muscular activation of bilateral extensors in thorax level, which causes the ipsilateral extensor to activate larger and longer. Asymmetric lifting also has some effect on muscular activation of bilateral extensors in lumbar level but with less extent than in thorax level, which causes contralateral extensor to activate larger and longer. Asymmetric lifting seems to have no significant effect on muscular activation of bilateral hamstring.

  20. Influence of shoes increasing dorsiflexion and decreasing metatarsus flexion on lower limb muscular activity during fitness exercises, walking, and running.

    PubMed

    Bourgit, David; Millet, Guillaume Y; Fuchslocher, Jörg

    2008-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare electromyographic activity during fitness exercises, walking, and running among 3 different dorsiflexion shoes (+2 degrees , +4 degrees , and +10 degrees ) and standard shoes (-4 degrees ). The 3 different dorsiflexion shoes tested in this study have a curvature placed in the middle of the sole. This design was specially projected to decrease the metatarsus flexion. Electromyographic activity of 9 lower limb muscles was measured on 12 healthy female subjects during 5 fitness exercises (unload squat, side and front step, submaximal ballistic plantar flexion, and lunge exercise), and during running (10 km x h(-1)) and walking (4.5 km x h(-1)) on a treadmill. EMG signal was analyzed with the root mean square (RMS) and integrated EMG. All RMS data measured during these exercises were expressed as percentages of maximum voluntary isometric contraction. The results show that dorsiflexion affects muscle recruitment and reorganizes the motor pattern. The general tendency was that the tibialis anterior activity increased with dorsiflexion. However, an optimal dorsiflexion existed for various exercises. It is concluded that shoes with moderate dorsiflexion can activate lower limb muscles differently compared with both standard shoes and shoes with large dorsiflexion during submaximal exercises and locomotion.

  1. Focusing on Increasing Velocity during Heavy Resistance Knee Flexion Exercise Boosts Hamstring Muscle Activity in Chronic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Markus D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Muscle strength is markedly reduced in stroke patients, which has negative implications for functional capacity and work ability. Different types of feedback during strength training exercises may alter neuromuscular activity and functional gains. Objective. To compare levels of muscle activity during conditions of blindfolding and intended high contraction speed with a normal condition of high-intensity knee flexions. Methods. Eighteen patients performed unilateral machine knee flexions with a 10-repetition maximum load. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded from the quadrics and hamstring muscles and normalized to maximal EMG (nEMG) of the nonparetic limb. Results. For the paretic leg, the speed condition showed higher values of muscle activity compared with the normal and blindfolded conditions for both biceps femoris and semitendinosus. Likewise, the speed condition showed higher co-contraction values compared with the normal and blindfolded conditions for the vastus lateralis. No differences were observed between exercise conditions for the nonparetic leg. Conclusion. Chronic stroke patients are capable of performing heavy resistance training with intended high speed of contraction. Focusing on speed during the concentric phase elicited higher levels of muscle activity of the hamstrings compared to normal and blindfolded conditions, which may have implications for regaining fast muscle strength in stroke survivors. PMID:27525118

  2. Immediate Effects of Inhibitive Distraction on Active Range of Cervical Flexion in Patients with Neck Pain: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Briem, Kristín; Huijbregts, Peter; Thorsteinsdottir, Maria

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the immediate effects of a manual therapy technique called Inhibitive Distraction (ID) on active range of motion (AROM) for cervical flexion in patients with neck pain with or without concomitant headache. A secondary objective of this study was to see whether patient subgroups could be identified who might benefit more from ID by studying variables such as age, pain intensity, presence of headache, or pre-intervention AROM. We also looked at patients' ability to identify pre- to post-intervention changes in their ability to actively move through a range of motion. Forty subjects (mean age 34.7 years; range 16–48 years) referred to a physical therapy clinic due to discomfort in the neck region were randomly assigned to an experimental and a control group. We used the CROM goniometer to measure pre- and post-intervention cervical flexion AROM in the sagittal plane within a single treatment session. The between-group difference in AROM increase was not statistically significant at P<0.05 with a mean post-intervention increase in ROM of 2.4° (SD 6.2°) for the experimental group and 1.2° (SD 5.8°) for the placebo group. We were also unable to identify potential subgroups more likely to respond to ID, although a trend emerged for greater improvement in chronic patients with headaches, lower pain levels, and less pre-intervention AROM. In the experimental group and in both groups combined, subjects noting increased AROM indeed had a significantly greater increase in AROM than those subjects not noting improvement. In conclusion, this study did not confirm immediate effects of ID on cervical flexion AROM but did provide indications for potential subgroups likely to benefit from this technique. Recommendations are provided with regard to future research and clinical use of the technique studied. PMID:19066648

  3. Correlation between deep cervical flexor muscle thickness at rest and sternocleidomastoid activity during the craniocervical flexion test.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Suehiro, Tadanobu; Ono, Koji; Kurozumi, Chiharu; Watanabe, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between the thickness of the deep cervical flexor muscles (longus capitis and longus colli) at rest and sternocleidomastoid activity during the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). Thirteen healthy males participated in this study. The thickness of the deep cervical flexor muscles was measured by ultrasound imaging in a relaxed supine position. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid was measured by electromyography during the CCFT at five incremental levels (22, 24, 26, 28, and 30 mm Hg). Correlations between normalized muscle thickness relative to body mass index and sternocleidomastoid activity were determined. Significant negative correlations were observed between normalized muscle thickness and activity of the sternocleidomastoid at 26 (r = -0.622, P = 0.023) and 28 mmHg (r = -0.653, P = 0.015). Individuals with smaller deep cervical flexor muscles exhibited increased activity in the sternocleidomastoid during the CCFT.

  4. Electromyography activity of the deltoid muscle of the weight-bearing side during shoulder flexion in various weight-bearing positions

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung-kwang; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the deltoid muscle activation during shoulder flexion exercise in various weight-bearing positions. [Subjects] A total of 15 males participated. [Methods] The participants completed three repetitions of shoulder flexion exercises in three positions (prone-on-elbow, quadruped, and standing) with electromyography activity being collected from the exercised. The muscle activations in each position by each exercise were compared using a one-way analysis of variance. [Results] The electromyography activities of the middle and posterior deltoids differed significantly among positions. The prone-on-elbow and quadruped position showed a significantly higher activity than the standing position. There were no significant differences between the prone-on-elbow and quadruped positions. [Conclusion] The deltoid muscles were further strengthened in the low posture positions (prone-on-elbows and quadruped) than in standing. PMID:26644694

  5. Impact responses of the cervical spine: A computational study of the effects of muscle activity, torso constraint, and pre-flexion.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Roger W; Sganga, Jake; Cutcliffe, Hattie; Bass, Cameron R 'Dale'

    2016-02-29

    Cervical spine injuries continue to be a costly societal problem. Future advancements in injury prevention depend on improved physical and computational models, which are predicated on a better understanding of the neck response during dynamic loading. Previous studies have shown that the tolerance of the neck is dependent on its initial position and its buckling behavior. This study uses a computational model to examine three important factors hypothesized to influence the loads experienced by vertebrae in the neck under compressive impact: muscle activation, torso constraints, and pre-flexion angle of the cervical spine. Since cadaver testing is not practical for large scale parametric analyses, these factors were studied using a previously validated computational model. On average, simulations with active muscles had 32% larger compressive forces and 25% larger shear forces-well in excess of what was expected from the muscle forces alone. In the short period of time required for neck injury, constraints on torso motion increased the average neck compression by less than 250N. The pre-flexion hypothesis was tested by examining pre-flexion angles from neutral (0°) to 64°. Increases in pre-flexion resulted in the largest increases in peak loads and the expression of higher-order buckling modes. Peak force and buckling modality were both very sensitive to pre-flexion angle. These results validate the relevance of prior cadaver models for neck injury and help explain the wide variety of cervical spine fractures that can result from ostensibly similar compressive loadings. They also give insight into the mechanistic differences between burst fractures and lower cervical spine dislocations.

  6. Torso flexion modulates stiffness and reflex response.

    PubMed

    Granata, K P; Rogers, E

    2007-08-01

    Neuromuscular factors that contribute to spinal stability include trunk stiffness from passive and active tissues as well as active feedback from reflex response in the paraspinal muscles. Trunk flexion postures are a recognized risk factor for occupational low-back pain and may influence these stabilizing control factors. Sixteen healthy adult subjects participated in an experiment to record trunk stiffness and paraspinal muscle reflex gain during voluntary isometric trunk extension exertions. The protocol was designed to achieve trunk flexion without concomitant influences of external gravitational moment, i.e., decouple the effects of trunk flexion posture from trunk moment. Systems identification analyses identified reflex gain by quantifying the relation between applied force disturbances and time-dependent EMG response in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Trunk stiffness was characterized from a second order model describing the dynamic relation between the force disturbances versus the kinematic response of the torso. Trunk stiffness increased significantly with flexion angle and exertion level. This was attributed to passive tissue contributions to stiffness. Reflex gain declined significantly with trunk flexion angle but increased with exertion level. These trends were attributed to correlated changes in baseline EMG recruitment in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Female subjects demonstrated greater reflex gain than males and the decline in reflex gain with flexion angle was greater in females than in males. Results reveal that torso flexion influences neuromuscular factors that control spinal stability and suggest that posture may contribute to the risk of instability injury.

  7. Design of a mechanism to simulate the quasi-static moment-deflection behaviour of the osteoligamentous structure of the C3-C4 cervical spine segment in the flexion-extension and lateral bending directions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Samuel; Arsenault, Marc; Moglo, Kodjo

    2012-11-01

    The human neck is susceptible to traumatic injuries due to impacts as well as chronic injuries caused by loads such as those attributed to the wearing of heavy headgear. To facilitate the analysis of the loads that cause injuries to the cervical spine, it is possible to replicate the human neck's behaviour with mechanical devices. The goal of this work is to lay the foundation for the eventual development of a novel mechanism used to simulate the behaviour of the cervical spine during laboratory experiments. The research presented herein focuses on the design of a mechanism capable of reproducing the non-linear relationships between moments applied to the C3 vertebra and its corresponding rotations with respect to the C4 vertebra. The geometrical and mechanical properties of the mechanism are optimized based on the ability of the latter to replicate the load-deflection profile of the osteoligamentous structure of the C3-C4 vertebral pair in the flexion-extension and lateral bending directions. The results show that the proposed design concept is capable of faithfully replicating the non-linear behaviour of the motion segment within acceptable tolerances.

  8. Anticipatory postural muscle activity associated with bilateral arm flexion while standing in individuals with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hidehito; Fukaya, Yoshiki; Honma, Shota; Ueda, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiji; Shionoya, Katsuyoshi

    2010-07-26

    Compared to automatic postural responses to external perturbation, little is known about anticipatory postural adjustments in individuals with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. In this study, we examined whether anticipatory activation of postural muscles would be observed before voluntary arm movement while standing in individuals with spastic diplegia. Seven individuals with spastic diplegia (SDCP(group), 12-22 years) and 7 age- and gender-matched individuals without disability (Control(group)) participated in this study. Participants performed bilateral arm flexion at maximum speed at their own timing while standing, during which electromyographic (EMG) activities of focal and postural muscles were recorded. In both groups, the erector spinae (ES) and medial hamstring (MH) muscles were activated in advance of the anterior deltoid muscle (AD), which is a focal muscle of arm flexion. Although start times of ES and MH with respect to AD were similar in the 2 groups, increases in EMG amplitudes of ES and MH in the anticipatory range from -150ms to +50ms, with respect to burst onset of AD, were significantly smaller in the SDCP(group) than in the Control(group). These findings suggest that individuals with spastic diplegia have the ability to anticipate the effects of disturbance of posture and equilibrium caused by arm movement and to activate postural muscles in advance of focal muscles. However, it is likely that the anticipatory increase in postural muscle activity is insufficient in individuals with spastic diplegia.

  9. The relationship between superficial muscle activity during the cranio-cervical flexion test and clinical features in patients with chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Shaun; Falla, Deborah; Jull, Gwendolen

    2011-10-01

    Changes in motor behavior are a known feature of chronic mechanical neck pain disorders. This study examined the strength of the association between reported levels of pain and disability from 84 individuals (63 women, 21 men) with chronic mechanical neck pain and levels of electromyographic activity recorded from superficial cervical flexor (sternocleidomastoid; SCM and anterior scalene; AS) muscles during progressive stages of the cranio-cervical flexion muscle test. A significant positive association was observed between superficial muscle activity and pain intensity (P < 0.003), but not pain duration (P > 0.5) or perceived disability (P > 0.21). The strongest relationship between pain intensity and superficial muscle activity occurred at the final increment of the cranio-cervical flexion test (inner-range test position) for both the SCM and AS muscles (R(2) = 0.16). Although a positive and significant relationship between pain intensity and superficial muscle activity was shown, the relationship was only modest (16% explained variance), indicating that multiple factors contribute to the altered motor function observed in individuals with chronic mechanical neck pain.

  10. Is high flexion following total knee arthroplasty safe?: evaluation of knee joint loads in the patients during maximal flexion.

    PubMed

    Nagura, Takeo; Otani, Toshiro; Suda, Yasunori; Matsumoto, Hideo; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to indicate the mechanical loads and the flexion angle at the knee during rise from maximal flexion following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty three knees were evaluated using skin marker-based motion analysis system during four different activities of daily living. The average maximum flexion was 90 degrees (34 degrees less than passive flexion) and all subjects required support for their weight to rise from maximal flexion. The external moments and the external forces at the knee during the maximal flexion were smaller than those during the stair descending activity. The results indicate that capable flexion angle for the patients following TKA is approximately 90 degrees which has smaller mechanical loads at the knee than the stair descending activity.

  11. Effects of Static Flexion-relaxation on Paraspinal Reflex Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Kevin P.; Rogers, Ellen; Moorhouse, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Background. Static trunk flexion working postures and disturbed trunk muscle reflexes are related to increased risk of low-back pain. Animal studies conclude that these factors may be related; passive tissue strain in spinal ligaments causes subsequent short-term changes in reflex. Although studies have documented changes in the myoelectric onset angle of flexion-relaxation following prolonged static flexion and cyclic flexion we could find no published evidence related to the human reflex response of the trunk extensor muscles following a period of static flexion-relaxation loading. Methods. Eighteen subjects maintained static lumbar flexion for 15 min. Paraspinal muscle reflexes were elicited both before and after the flexion-relaxation protocol using pseudorandom stochastic force disturbances while recording EMG. Reflex gain was computed from the peak value of the impulse response function relating input force perturbation to EMG response using time-domain deconvolution analyses. Findings. Reflexes showed a trend toward increased gain after the period of flexion-relaxation (P < 0.055) and were increased with trunk extension exertion (P < 0.021). Significant gender differences in reflex gain were observed (P < 0.01). Interpretations. Occupational activities requiring extended periods of trunk flexion contribute to changes in reflex behavior of the paraspinal muscles. Results suggest potential mechanisms by which flexed posture work may contribute to low-back pain. Significant gender differences indicate risk analyses should consider personal factors when considering neuromuscular behavior. PMID:15567532

  12. Perceived Strategies and Activities for Successful Later Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holahan, Carole K.; Velasquez, Katherine S.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated perceived strategies and activities for successful later aging. Participants were 242 members of the Terman Study of the Gifted who responded to an open-ended question concerning how they make the most of their aging years. Data were collected in 1996 and 1999, when the participants were average ages of 84 and 86.…

  13. Electromyographic Activity of the Cervical Flexor Muscles in Patients With Temporomandibular Disorders While Performing the Craniocervical Flexion Test: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre, Rony; Fuentes, Jorge; da Costa, Bruno R.; Gadotti, Inae C.; Warren, Sharon; Major, Paul W.; Thie, Norman M.R.; Magee, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Most patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have been shown to have cervical spine dysfunction. However, this cervical dysfunction has been evaluated only qualitatively through a general clinical examination of the cervical spine. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients with TMD had increased activity of the superficial cervical muscles when performing the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT) compared with a control group of individuals who were healthy. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted. Methods One hundred fifty individuals participated in this study: 47 were healthy, 54 had myogenous TMD, and 49 had mixed TMD. All participants performed the CCFT. Data for electromyographic activity of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and anterior scalene (AS) muscles were collected during the CCFT for all participants. A 3-way mixed-design analysis of variance for repeated measures was used to evaluate the differences in EMG activity for selected muscles while performing the CCFT under 5 incremental levels. Effect size values were calculated to evaluate the clinical relevance of the results. Results Although there were no statistically significant differences in electromyographic activity in the SCM or AS muscles during the CCFT in patients with mixed and myogenous TMD compared with the control group, those with TMD tended to have increased activity of the superficial cervical muscles. Limitations The results obtained in this research are applicable for the group of individuals who participated in this study under the protocols used. They could potentially be applied to people with TMD having characteristics similar to those of the participants of this study. Conclusion This information may give clinicians insight into the importance of evaluation and possible treatment of the deep neck flexors in patients with TMD. However, future research should test the effectiveness of this type of program through a randomized controlled

  14. Effects of Cervical Flexion on the Flexion-relaxation Ratio during Smartphone Use.

    PubMed

    Shin, HyeonHui; Kim, KyeongMi

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to measure the cervical flexion-relaxation ratio (FRR) and intensity of neck pain and identify the differences according to postures adopted while using smartphones. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy adults with no neck pain, spinal trauma, or history cervical surgery participated in this study. [Methods] The activity of the cervical erector spinae muscle was recorded while performing a standardized cervical flexion-extension movement in three phases (flexion, sustained full flexion, extension). And neck pain intensity was recorded using a visual analog scale (VAS) with values between 0 and 10. Postures held while using a smartphone are distinguished between desk postures and lap postures. The FRR was calculated by dividing the maximal muscle activation during the extension phase by average activation during the complete flexion phase. [Results] No significant differences were found in the FRR between desk posture, lap posture, and baseline, though the intensity of the neck pain increased in the lap posture. [Conclusion] The FRR could be a significant criterion of neuromuscular impairment in chronic neck pain or lumbar pain patients, but it is impossible to distinguish neck pain that is caused by performing task for a short time. Prolonged lap posture might cause neck pain, so the use of smartphones for a long time in this posture should be avoided.

  15. The effects of neurodynamic straight leg raise treatment duration on range of hip flexion and protective muscle activity at P1

    PubMed Central

    Neal Hanney, Ryan; Ridehalgh, Colette; Dawson, Allan; Lewis, Daniel; Kenny, Deirdre

    2016-01-01

    Study design: Randomized, single blind, same subject crossover trial. Objectives: To compare the effects of two neurodynamic treatment doses on range of hip flexion (ROM HF) and electromyographic (EMG) activity of semitendinosus, at first onset of pain (P1). Methods: A total of 26 healthy participants without low back or leg pain received each treatment in a random order with at least 48 hours between sessions. Baseline ROM HF and EMG magnitude of semitendinosus at P1 were collected. Subjects then received either 361 or 362 minutes of oscillating end of range (grade IVz) straight leg raise (SLR) neurodynamic treatment and were re-assessed for baseline measures. Results: There was no significant difference between groups in EMG magnitude (P50.190) and ROM HF (P50.739) at P1. There was also no significant difference within groups in EMG magnitude at P1 (P50.182); however, there was a significant improvement in ROM HF at P1 in both groups compared to baseline readings (P50.000), with increases of 6.7u and 5.1u for the 361- and 362-minute groups, respectively. Conclusion: Findings indicate that 362 minutes of oscillating grade IVz SLR neurodynamic treatment has no additional benefit over 361 minute, on ROM HF or EMG magnitude of semitendinosus at P1. Using an oscillating SLR treatment may, however, help to increase pain-free ROM HF, although further studies are necessary to confirm this. PMID:27252578

  16. Emergent patterns from probabilistic generalizations of lateral activation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kabla, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The combination of laterally activating and inhibiting feedbacks is well known to spontaneously generate spatial organization. It was introduced by Gierer and Meinhardt as an extension of Turing's great insight that two reacting and diffusing chemicals can spontaneously drive spatial morphogenesis per se. In this study, we develop an accessible nonlinear and discrete probabilistic model to study simple generalizations of lateral activation and inhibition. By doing so, we identify a range of modes of morphogenesis beyond the familiar Turing-type modes; notably, beyond stripes, hexagonal nets, pores and labyrinths, we identify labyrinthine highways, Kagome lattices, gyrating labyrinths and multi-colour travelling waves and spirals. The results are discussed within the context of Turing's original motivating interest: the mechanisms which underpin the morphogenesis of living organisms. PMID:27170648

  17. Laterality of Brain Activation for Risk Factors of Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Harold W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Laterality of brain activation is reported for tests of risk factors of addiction—impulsivity and craving—but authors rarely address the potential significance of those asymmetries. Objective The purpose of this study is to demonstrate this laterality and discuss its relevance to cognitive and neurophysiological asymmetries associated with drug abuse vulnerability in order to provide new insights for future research in drug abuse. Method From published reports, brain areas of activation for two tests of response inhibition or craving for drugs of abuse were compiled from fMRI activation peaks were tabulated for eight sections (octants) in each hemisphere. Percent asymmetries were calculated (R−L/R+L) across studies for each area. Results For impulsivity, most activation peaks favored the right hemisphere. Overall, the percent difference was 32% (Χ2 = 16.026; p < .0001) with the greater asymmetry for anterior peaks (46.8%; Χ2 = 17.329; p < .0001). The asymmetries for cue-induced craving were opposite, favoring the left hemisphere by 6.7% (Χ2 = 4.028; p < .05). The consistency of left asymmetry was found for almost all drugs. For nicotine, studies where subjects were not allowed to smoke (deprived) prior to measurement had the same left hemisphere activation but those who smoked (satiated) before the fMRI measure showed right asymmetry. Conclusions Brain activation studies demonstrate different left/right hemispheric contributions for impulsivity versus craving—factors related to addiction. Failure to take laterality into consideration is a missed opportunity in designing studies and gaining insight into the etiology of drug abuse and pathways for treatment. PMID:26674074

  18. Bilateral Medial Tibiofemoral Joint Stiffness in Full Extension and 20° of Knee Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Patricia A; Rijke, Arie M; Ingersoll, Christopher D

    2008-01-01

    Context: The valgus stress test is used clinically to assess injury to the medial knee structures in 2 positions: full extension and some degree of flexion. The amount of flexion used to “isolate” the medial collateral ligament is not consistent in the literature, but most studies have shown that stiffness of the ligaments was consistent between the limbs. Objective: To determine (1) if the stiffness of the medial knee structures was the same bilaterally, and (2) if the stiffness was different in full extension compared with 20° of knee flexion. Design: Criterion standard, before-after design. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Both knees of 45 healthy and active volunteers (26 females, 19 males; age  =  23.2 ± 3.96 years, height  =  170.6 ± 7.75 cm, mass  =  74.2 ± 15.14 kg) were studied. Intervention(s): A valgus force of 60 N was applied to the lateral aspect of both knees in full extension and in 20° of flexion. Main Outcome Measure(s): The slope of the force-strain line of the medial knee during a valgus force was calculated using the LigMaster arthrometer. Results: Slope means in full extension were 16.1 ± 3.3 (right knee) and 15.8 ± 3.1(left knee). Means for 20° of flexion were 12.2 ± 3.1 (right) and 11.7 ± 2.8 (left). Stiffness was greater when the knee was in full extension versus 20° of flexion (t44  =  12.04, P < .001). No difference was noted between the slopes of the 2 knees in extension (t44  =  0.74, P  =  .46) or in flexion (t44  =  1.2, P  =  .27). Conclusions: These findings support the use of the contralateral knee as a control. Further, the valgus stress test should be performed in full extension and in some degree of flexion to assess the different restraining structures of the medial tibiofemoral joint. PMID:18345340

  19. Glial activation colocalizes with structural abnormalities in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Alshikho, Mohamad J.; Zürcher, Nicole R.; Loggia, Marco L.; Cernasov, Paul; Chonde, Daniel B.; Izquierdo Garcia, David; Yasek, Julia E.; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Catana, Ciprian; Rosen, Bruce R.; Cudkowicz, Merit E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to evaluate brain structural abnormalities in relation to glial activation in the same cohort of participants. Methods: Ten individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 10 matched healthy controls underwent brain imaging using integrated MR/PET and the radioligand [11C]-PBR28. Diagnosis history and clinical assessments including Upper Motor Neuron Burden Scale (UMNB) were obtained from patients with ALS. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analyses including tract-based spatial statistics and tractography were applied. DTI metrics including fractional anisotropy (FA) and diffusivities (mean, axial, and radial) were measured in regions of interest. Cortical thickness was assessed using surface-based analysis. The locations of structural changes, measured by DTI and the areas of cortical thinning, were compared to regional glial activation measured by relative [11C]-PBR28 uptake. Results: In this cohort of individuals with ALS, reduced FA and cortical thinning colocalized with regions demonstrating higher radioligand binding. [11C]-PBR28 binding in the left motor cortex was correlated with FA (r = −0.68, p < 0.05) and cortical thickness (r = −0.75, p < 0.05). UMNB was correlated with glial activation (r = +0.75, p < 0.05), FA (r = −0.77, p < 0.05), and cortical thickness (r = −0.75, p < 0.05) in the motor cortex. Conclusions: Increased uptake of the glial marker [11C]-PBR28 colocalizes with changes in FA and cortical thinning. This suggests a link between disease mechanisms (gliosis and inflammation) and structural changes (cortical thinning and white and gray matter changes). In this multimodal neuroimaging work, we provide an in vivo model to investigate the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:27837005

  20. Endothelial activation drives lateral migration and diapedesis of leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Stock, Christian; Riethmuller, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    To invade a tissue, leukocytes have to overcome the endothelial barrier. Prior to trans-endothelial migration, leukocytes move laterally on the endothelial surface-searching for an emigration site. It is still unclear, how the actual diapedesis step is initiated and whether the endothelium has a decisive role. Here, video-microscopy was employed to investigate, whether lateral migration of leukocytes is correlated to their diapedesis rate. To address the contribution of each cell type, selective stimulation of either leukocytes or endothelial cells with TNFα was performed. Stimulation of endothelial cells alone was sufficient for maximal effects, thereby underlining their decisive role for leukocyte diapedesis. Concomitant to the TNFα-enhanced diapedesis rate, leukocyte adhesion was intensified and, unexpectedly, the lateral leukocyte migration was accelerated.

  1. Unmasking Language Lateralization in Human Brain Intrinsic Activity.

    PubMed

    McAvoy, Mark; Mitra, Anish; Coalson, Rebecca S; d'Avossa, Giovanni; Keidel, James L; Petersen, Steven E; Raichle, Marcus E

    2016-04-01

    Lateralization of function is a fundamental feature of the human brain as exemplified by the left hemisphere dominance of language. Despite the prominence of lateralization in the lesion, split-brain and task-based fMRI literature, surprisingly little asymmetry has been revealed in the increasingly popular functional imaging studies of spontaneous fluctuations in the fMRI BOLD signal (so-called resting-state fMRI). Here, we show the global signal, an often discarded component of the BOLD signal in resting-state studies, reveals a leftward asymmetry that maps onto regions preferential for semantic processing in left frontal and temporal cortex and the right cerebellum and a rightward asymmetry that maps onto putative attention-related regions in right frontal, temporoparietal, and parietal cortex. Hemispheric asymmetries in the global signal resulted from amplitude modulation of the spontaneous fluctuations. To confirm these findings obtained from normal, healthy, right-handed subjects in the resting-state, we had them perform 2 semantic processing tasks: synonym and numerical magnitude judgment and sentence comprehension. In addition to establishing a new technique for studying lateralization through functional imaging of the resting-state, our findings shed new light on the physiology of the global brain signal.

  2. Interaction of viscoelastic tissue compliance with lumbar muscles during passive cyclic flexion-extension.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael W; Li, Li; Solomonow, Moshe

    2009-02-01

    Human and animal models using electromyography (EMG) based methods have hypothesized that viscoelastic tissue properties becomes compromised by prolonged repetitive cyclic trunk flexion-extension which in turn influences muscular activation including the flexion-relaxation phenomenon. Empirical evidence to support this hypothesis, especially the development of viscoelastic tension-relaxation and its associated muscular response in passive cyclic activity in humans, is incomplete. The objective of this study was to examine the response of lumbar muscles to tension-relaxation development of the viscoelastic tissue during prolonged passive cyclic trunk flexion-extension. Activity of the lumbar muscles remained low and steady during the passive exercise session. Tension supplied by the posterior viscoelastic tissues decreased over time without corresponding changes in muscular activity. Active flexion, following the passive flexion session, elicited significant increase in paraspinal muscles EMG together with increase in the median frequency. It was concluded that reduction of tension in the lumbar viscoelastic tissues of humans occurs during cyclic flexion-extension and is compensated by increased activity of the musculature in order to maintain stability. It was also concluded that the ligamento-muscular reflex is inhibited during passive activities but becomes hyperactive following active cyclic flexion, indicating that moment requirements are the controlling variable. It is conceived that prolonged routine exposure to cyclic flexion minimizes the function of the viscoelastic tissues and places increasing demands on the neuromuscular system which over time may lead to a disorder and possible exposure to injury.

  3. [Transformation of neuronal activity in the cat lateral geniculate body].

    PubMed

    Silakov, V L

    1976-05-01

    The neuronal activity transformations were studied in the cat LGB under the action of nembutal, light stimulation, and micropolarization of geniculate cells. The transformation of single spike activity into bursts was found to reflect the inhibitory state of the neurons. Their excitation entailed a reverse transformation. Short feed-back connections functioning within the microsystems of LGB neurons are supposed to underlie the transformations.

  4. Increased Visual Stimulation Systematically Decreases Activity in Lateral Intermediate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nasr, Shahin; Stemmann, Heiko; Vanduffel, Wim; Tootell, Roger B. H.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have attributed multiple diverse roles to the posterior superior temporal cortex (STC), both visually driven and cognitive, including part of the default mode network (DMN). Here, we demonstrate a unifying property across this multimodal region. Specifically, the lateral intermediate (LIM) portion of STC showed an unexpected feature: a progressively decreasing fMRI response to increases in visual stimulus size (or number). Such responses are reversed in sign, relative to well-known responses in classic occipital temporal visual cortex. In LIM, this “reversed” size function was present across multiple object categories and retinotopic eccentricities. Moreover, we found a significant interaction between the LIM size function and the distribution of subjects' attention. These findings suggest that LIM serves as a part of the DMN. Further analysis of functional connectivity, plus a meta-analysis of previous fMRI results, suggests that LIM is a heterogeneous area including different subdivisions. Surprisingly, analogous fMRI tests in macaque monkeys did not reveal a clear homolog of LIM. This interspecies discrepancy supports the idea that self-referential thinking and theory of mind are more prominent in humans, compared with monkeys. PMID:25480358

  5. Increased Visual Stimulation Systematically Decreases Activity in Lateral Intermediate Cortex.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Shahin; Stemmann, Heiko; Vanduffel, Wim; Tootell, Roger B H

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies have attributed multiple diverse roles to the posterior superior temporal cortex (STC), both visually driven and cognitive, including part of the default mode network (DMN). Here, we demonstrate a unifying property across this multimodal region. Specifically, the lateral intermediate (LIM) portion of STC showed an unexpected feature: a progressively decreasing fMRI response to increases in visual stimulus size (or number). Such responses are reversed in sign, relative to well-known responses in classic occipital temporal visual cortex. In LIM, this "reversed" size function was present across multiple object categories and retinotopic eccentricities. Moreover, we found a significant interaction between the LIM size function and the distribution of subjects' attention. These findings suggest that LIM serves as a part of the DMN. Further analysis of functional connectivity, plus a meta-analysis of previous fMRI results, suggests that LIM is a heterogeneous area including different subdivisions. Surprisingly, analogous fMRI tests in macaque monkeys did not reveal a clear homolog of LIM. This interspecies discrepancy supports the idea that self-referential thinking and theory of mind are more prominent in humans, compared with monkeys.

  6. Prolonged Intermittent Trunk Flexion Increases Trunk Muscles Reflex Gains and Trunk Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Voglar, Matej; Wamerdam, Jeffrey; Kingma, Idsart; Sarabon, Nejc; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of prolonged, intermittent flexion on trunk neuromuscular control. Furthermore, the potential beneficial effects of passive upper body support during flexion were investigated. Twenty one healthy young volunteers participated during two separate visits in which they performed 1 hour of intermittent 60 seconds flexion and 30 seconds rest cycles. Flexion was set at 80% lumbar flexion and was performed with or without upper body support. Before and after intermittent flexion exposure, lumbar range of motion was measured using inertial measurement units and trunk stability was assessed during perturbations applied in the forward direction with a force controlled actuator. Closed-loop system identification was used to determine the trunk translational admittance and reflexes as frequency response functions. The admittance describes the actuator displacement as a function of contact force and to assess reflexes muscle activation was related to actuator displacement. Trunk admittance gain decreased after unsupported flexion, while reflex gain and lumbar range of motion increased after both conditions. Significant interaction effects confirmed a larger increase in lumbar range of motion and reflex gains at most frequencies analysed following unsupported flexion in comparison to supported flexion, probably compensating for decreased passive tissue stiffness. In contrast with some previous studies we found that prolonged intermittent flexion decreased trunk admittance, which implies an increase of the lumped intrinsic and reflexive stiffness. This would compensate for decreased stiffness at the cost of an increase in cumulative low back load. Taking into account the differences between conditions it would be preferable to offer upper body support during activities that require prolonged trunk flexion.

  7. Prolonged Intermittent Trunk Flexion Increases Trunk Muscles Reflex Gains and Trunk Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Wamerdam, Jeffrey; Kingma, Idsart; Sarabon, Nejc; van Dieën, Jaap H.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of prolonged, intermittent flexion on trunk neuromuscular control. Furthermore, the potential beneficial effects of passive upper body support during flexion were investigated. Twenty one healthy young volunteers participated during two separate visits in which they performed 1 hour of intermittent 60 seconds flexion and 30 seconds rest cycles. Flexion was set at 80% lumbar flexion and was performed with or without upper body support. Before and after intermittent flexion exposure, lumbar range of motion was measured using inertial measurement units and trunk stability was assessed during perturbations applied in the forward direction with a force controlled actuator. Closed-loop system identification was used to determine the trunk translational admittance and reflexes as frequency response functions. The admittance describes the actuator displacement as a function of contact force and to assess reflexes muscle activation was related to actuator displacement. Trunk admittance gain decreased after unsupported flexion, while reflex gain and lumbar range of motion increased after both conditions. Significant interaction effects confirmed a larger increase in lumbar range of motion and reflex gains at most frequencies analysed following unsupported flexion in comparison to supported flexion, probably compensating for decreased passive tissue stiffness. In contrast with some previous studies we found that prolonged intermittent flexion decreased trunk admittance, which implies an increase of the lumped intrinsic and reflexive stiffness. This would compensate for decreased stiffness at the cost of an increase in cumulative low back load. Taking into account the differences between conditions it would be preferable to offer upper body support during activities that require prolonged trunk flexion. PMID:27768688

  8. WEAK LENSING MASS RECONSTRUCTION: FLEXION VERSUS SHEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Pires, S.

    2010-11-10

    Weak gravitational lensing has proven to be a powerful tool to map directly the distribution of dark matter in the universe. The technique, currently used, relies on the accurate measurement of the gravitational shear that corresponds to the first-order distortion of the background galaxy images. More recently, a new technique has been introduced that relies on the accurate measurement of the gravitational flexion that corresponds to the second-order distortion of the background galaxy images. This technique should probe structures on smaller scales than that of shear analysis. The goal of this paper is to compare the ability of shear and flexion to reconstruct the dark matter distribution by taking into account the dispersion in shear and flexion measurements. Our results show that the flexion is less sensitive than shear for constructing the convergence maps on scales that are physically feasible for mapping, meaning that flexion alone should not be used to do convergence map reconstruction, even on small scales.

  9. Time for Action: Advocacy for Physical Activity in Later Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Bevan

    2010-01-01

    By 2050, the over 65 year's age group will account for approximately one quarter of the population. This will have many unprecedented social and economic consequences of which one is the cost associated with health. A preventive health related behaviour attracting considerable attention is physical activity, something that becomes less popular…

  10. Soap Operas and Sexual Activity: A Decade Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Bradley S.; Busselle, Rick W.

    1996-01-01

    Finds that soap operas analyzed in 1994 contain more frequent sexual incidence on an hourly average, both within the same soaps analyzed a decade earlier and even more so on two additional very popular soaps. Shows that the more frequent sex centers on physical intercourse, primarily among partners not married to anyone; and sexual activity is…

  11. Dynamic Variation in Pleasure in Children Predicts Nonlinear Change in Lateral Frontal Brain Electrical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Sharee N.; Coan, James A.; Frye, Corrina; Goldsmith, H. Hill; Davidson, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Individual variation in the experience and expression of pleasure may relate to differential patterns of lateral frontal activity. Brain electrical measures have been used to study the asymmetric involvement of lateral frontal cortex in positive emotion, but the excellent time resolution of these measures has not been used to capture…

  12. Lateralization of brain activity pattern during unilateral movement in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Hou, Yanan; Hallett, Mark; Zhang, Jiarong; Chan, Piu

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the lateralization of brain activity pattern during performance of unilateral movement in drug-naïve Parkinson's disease (PD) patients with only right hemiparkinsonian symptoms. Functional MRI was obtained when the subjects performed strictly unilateral right hand movement. A laterality index was calculated to examine the lateralization. Patients had decreased activity in the left putamen and left supplementary motor area, but had increased activity in the right primary motor cortex, right premotor cortex, left postcentral gyrus, and bilateral cerebellum. The laterality index was significantly decreased in PD patients compared with controls (0.41 ± 0.14 vs. 0.84 ± 0.09). The connectivity from the left putamen to cortical motor regions and cerebellum was decreased, while the interactions between the cortical motor regions, cerebellum, and right putamen were increased. Our study demonstrates that in early PD, the lateralization of brain activity during unilateral movement is significantly reduced. The dysfunction of the striatum-cortical circuit, decreased transcallosal inhibition, and compensatory efforts from cortical motor regions, cerebellum, and the less affected striatum are likely reasons contributing to the reduced motor lateralization. The disruption of the lateralized brain activity pattern might be a reason underlying some motor deficits in PD, like mirror movements or impaired bilateral motor coordination.

  13. Head flexion angle while using a smartphone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sojeong; Kang, Hwayeong; Shin, Gwanseob

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive or prolonged head flexion posture while using a smartphone is known as one of risk factors for pain symptoms in the neck. To quantitatively assess the amount and range of head flexion of smartphone users, head forward flexion angle was measured from 18 participants when they were conducing three common smartphone tasks (text messaging, web browsing, video watching) while sitting and standing in a laboratory setting. It was found that participants maintained head flexion of 33-45° (50th percentile angle) from vertical when using the smartphone. The head flexion angle was significantly larger (p < 0.05) for text messaging than for the other tasks, and significantly larger while sitting than while standing. Study results suggest that text messaging, which is one of the most frequently used app categories of smartphone, could be a main contributing factor to the occurrence of neck pain of heavy smartphone users. Practitioner Summary: In this laboratory study, the severity of head flexion of smartphone users was quantitatively evaluated when conducting text messaging, web browsing and video watching while sitting and standing. Study results indicate that text messaging while sitting caused the largest head flexion than that of other task conditions.

  14. Dynamic variation in pleasure in children predicts nonlinear change in lateral frontal brain electrical activity.

    PubMed

    Light, Sharee N; Coan, James A; Frye, Corrina; Goldsmith, H Hill; Davidson, Richard J

    2009-03-01

    Individual variation in the experience and expression of pleasure may relate to differential patterns of lateral frontal activity. Brain electrical measures have been used to study the asymmetric involvement of lateral frontal cortex in positive emotion, but the excellent time resolution of these measures has not been used to capture second-by-second changes in ongoing emotion until now. The relationship between pleasure and second-by-second lateral frontal activity was examined with the use of hierarchical linear modeling in a sample of 128 children ages 6-10 years. Electroencephalographic activity was recorded during "pop-out toy," a standardized task that elicits pleasure. The task consisted of 3 epochs: an anticipation period sandwiched between 2 play periods. The amount of pleasure expressed during the task predicted the pattern of nonlinear change in lateral frontal activity. Children who expressed increasing amounts of pleasure during the task exhibited increasing left lateral frontal activity during the task, whereas children who expressed contentment exhibited increasing right/decreasing left activity. These findings indicate that task-dependent changes in pleasure relate to dynamic, nonlinear changes in lateral frontal activity as the task unfolds.

  15. Computer-assisted navigation for the assessment of fixed flexion in knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gallie, Price A.M.; Davis, Edward T.; Macgroarty, Kelly; Waddell, James P.; Schemitsch, Emil H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Correction of a fixed flexion deformity is an important goal when performing total knee arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of clinical assessment compared with imageless computer navigation in determining the degree of fixed flexion. Methods We performed navigation anatomy registration using 14 cadaver knees. The knees were held in various degrees of flexion with 2 crossed pins. The degree of flexion was first recorded on the computer and then on lateral radiographs. The cadaver knees were draped as they would be for a total knee arthroplasty, and 9 examiners were asked to clinically assess by visual observation the amount of fixed flexion. Three examiners repeated the process 1 week later. Results The mean error from the radiographs in the navigation group was 2.18° (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23°–3.01°) compared with 5.57° (95%CI 4.86°–6.29°) in the observer group. The navigation was more consistent, with a range of error of −5° to +5.5° compared with −18.5° to +17.5° in the observer group. The observers tended to underestimate the amount of knee flexion (median error −4°), whereas the navigation group was more evenly distributed (median error 0). The highest concordance coefficient was found between navigation and radiography (0.96). The concordance coefficient was 0.88 for the 3 surgeons who repeated the measurements 1 week later (mean error 3.5°, range 15°). Conclusion The use of computer navigation appears to be a more accurate method for assessing the degree of knee flexion, with a reduced range of error compared with clinical assessment. The use of computer-assisted surgery may therefore provide surgeons with the information required to more consistently restore full extension during total knee arthroplasty. PMID:20100412

  16. Effect of chronic knee osteoarthritis on flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae in elderly females

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yeon-Gyu; Jeong, Yeon-Jae; Koo, Jung-Wan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae in elderly women with chronic knee osteoarthritis and determined whether the flexion-relaxation phenomenon can be used as a pain evaluation tool in such cases. [Subjects and Methods] Seventeen elderly females with chronic knee osteoarthritis and 13 healthy young females voluntarily participated in this study. They performed three postural positions in 15 s: trunk flexion, complete trunk flexion, and trunk extension, each for 5 s. While these positions were held, muscle activation of the thoracic and lumbar erector spinae were measured using surface electromyography. The flexion-relaxation rate was determined by dividing the values for trunk extension by those of complete trunk flexion and by dividing the values for trunk flexion by those of complete trunk flexion. [Results] According to our results, the flexion-relaxation phenomenon was different between healthy young and elderly females with chronic knee osteoarthritis. Specifically, there was a difference in the left thoracic erector spinae muscle, but not in the left and right lumbar erector spinae or right thoracic spinae muscle. [Conclusion] Our study demonstrated that the erector spinae muscle flexion-relaxation phenomenon can be used as a pain evaluation tool in elderly females with chronic knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27512244

  17. Neck rotation modulates flexion synergy torques, indicating an ipsilateral reticulospinal source for impairment in stroke.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael D; Drogos, Justin; Carmona, Carolina; Keller, Thierry; Dewald, Julius P A

    2012-12-01

    The effect of reticular formation excitability on maximum voluntary torque (MVT) generation and associated muscle activation at the shoulder and elbow was investigated through natural elicitation (active head rotation) of the asymmetric tonic neck reflex (ATNR) in 26 individuals with stroke and 9 age-range-matched controls. Isometric MVT generation at the shoulder and elbow was quantified with the head rotated (face pointing) contralateral and ipsilateral to the paretic (stroke) and dominant (control) arm. Given the dominance of abnormal torque coupling of elbow flexion with shoulder abduction (flexion synergy) in stroke and well-developed animal models demonstrating a linkage between reticular formation and ipsilateral elbow flexors and shoulder abductors, we hypothesized that constituent torques of flexion synergy, specifically elbow flexion and shoulder abduction, would increase with contralateral head rotation. The findings of this investigation support this hypothesis. Increases in MVT for three of four flexion synergy constituents (elbow flexion, shoulder abduction, and shoulder external rotation) were observed during contralateral head rotation only in individuals with stroke. Electromyographic data of the associated muscle coactivations were nonsignificant but are presented for consideration in light of a likely underpowered statistical design for this specific variable. This study not only provides evidence for the reemergence of ATNR following stroke but also indicates a common neuroanatomical link, namely, an increased reliance on ipsilateral reticulospinal pathways, as the likely mechanism underlying the expression of both ATNR and flexion synergy that results in the loss of independent joint control.

  18. Lateral posterior parietal activity during reality monitoring discriminations of memories of high and low perceptual vividness.

    PubMed

    King, Danielle R; Schubert, Misty L; Miller, Michael B

    2015-09-01

    Regions of the lateral posterior parietal cortex (PPC) tend to be more active during recognition of previously studied items compared to correct rejection of unstudied items. Previously, we demonstrated that this effect is source-specific. While items that were encoded through visual perception elicited robust successful retrieval activity in the lateral PPC during a subsequent source memory test, items that were visually imagined did not elicit this effect. Memories of perceived events typically contain more perceptually-based contextual details than memories of imagined events. Therefore, source-based differences in lateral parietal activity might be due to a difference in the perceptual vividness of memories of perceived and imagined events. The goal of the present study was to test this hypothesis. Participants perceived and imagined items in both high and low perceptual vividness conditions. Experiment 1 demonstrated that memories for items encoded in the high vividness conditions contained significantly greater visual detail than memories encoded in the low vividness conditions. In Experiment 2, participants were scanned while they made source memory judgments about items that were previously perceived and imagined in high and low vividness conditions. Consistent with previous findings, the left lateral PPC was more active during retrieval of perceived compared to imagined events. However, lateral PPC activity did not vary according to vividness, suggesting that source effects in this region cannot be explained by a difference in the perceptual vividness of memories encoded through perception versus imagination.

  19. Ballistic flexion movements of the human thumb.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Marsden, C D

    1979-01-01

    1. In response to an auditory stimulus normal subjects made ballistic flexion movements of the top joint of the thumb against a lever attached to the spindle of a low-inertia electric motor. 2. Electromyographic (e.m.g.) activity was recorded from pairs of fine wire electrodes inserted into flexor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis longus, respectively the sole flexor and extensor of the joint. 3. Movements of 5 degrees, 10 degrees and 20 degrees were made from initial angles of 10 degrees, 20 degrees and 30 degrees flexion against torques of 0.04, 0.08 and 0.16 Nm. 4. The e.m.g. activity initiating such movements was characterized by a 'triphasic' pattern of sequential bursts of activity in the agonist (flexor pollicis longus), then in the antagonist (extensor pollicis longus), and then in the agonist again. 5. The duration of the first agonist and first antagonist bursts ranged from about 50 to 90 ms and there was no significant change of burst length in the different mechanical conditions. 6. In movements of differing angular distance, the rectified and integrated e.m.g. activity of the first agonist burst could be correlated with the distance moved. The rectified and integrated e.m.g. activity of the first antagonist burst could not be correlated with the distance moved. 7. Responses of the muscles to perturbations either before or during the ballistic movements were studied. Current in the motor could be altered so to extend the thumb ('stretch'), to allow it to accelerate ('release'), or to prevent further movement ('halt'). 8. Suitably timed stretch increased the e.m.g. activity of the first agonist burst while release decreased it. 9. There was a small response of the agonist to stretch or halt timed to act during the interval between the first two agonist bursts; the major response was an augmentation of the second agonist burst. 10. Stretch, timed to act between the first two agonist bursts which released the antagonist, diminished the activity of the

  20. Changes in flexion-relaxation phenomenon and lumbo-pelvic kinematics following lumbar disc replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A single group prospective study. Disc prostheses are believed to contribute to the restoration of the segmental movement and the preservation of the adjacent segments. The study’s main objective was to determine if changes in neuromuscular patterns assessed using the flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) can be observed following disc replacement surgery. Methods Fifteen subjects participated in this study; they were evaluated before and after lumbar disc replacement surgery. Both assessments included ten repetitions of a trunk flexion and extension movement (with and without a load), where the surface electromyography (EMG) and kinematic data were recorded. Results Following the disc replacement procedure (17.3 weeks ± 8.4), participants reported a significant reduction in their ODI and FABQ - physical activity scores. Increases in pelvic flexion as well as in erector spinae (ES) muscle activity at L5 in the flexion phase were observed. Following the disc replacement surgery, ES activity at L2 decreased during the quiet standing position. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that although improvements in disability scores and fear-avoidance related to physical activities scores were noted after a disc replacement surgery, the lumbar ROM was not modified. Nevertheless, a significant increase in the hip ROM during the flexion-extension task as well as an increase in ES muscle activity in flexion was observed following surgery. The VAS, FABQ I and ODQ scores were positively correlated with change in the muscular activities during the FRP. PMID:23842284

  1. Auxin-mediated cell cycle activation during early lateral root initiation.

    PubMed

    Himanen, Kristiina; Boucheron, Elodie; Vanneste, Steffen; de Almeida Engler, Janice; Inzé, Dirk; Beeckman, Tom

    2002-10-01

    Lateral root formation can be divided into two major phases: pericycle activation and meristem establishment. In Arabidopsis, the first lateral root initiation event is spatially and temporally asynchronous and involves a limited number of cells in the xylem pericycle. To study the molecular regulation during pericycle activation, we developed a lateral root-inducible system. Successive treatments with an auxin transport inhibitor and exogenous auxin were used to prevent the first formative divisions and then to activate the entire pericycle. Our morphological and molecular data show that, in this inducible system, xylem pericycle activation was synchronized and enhanced to cover the entire length of the root. The results also indicate that the inducible system can be considered a novel in planta system for the study of synchronized cell cycle reactivation. In addition, the expression patterns of Kip-Related Protein2 (KRP2) in the pericycle and its ectopic expression data revealed that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor plays a significant role in the regulation of lateral root initiation. KRP2 appears to regulate early lateral root initiation by blocking the G1-to-S transition and to be regulated transcriptionally by auxin.

  2. Fuzzy chaos control for vehicle lateral dynamics based on active suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chen; Chen, Long; Jiang, Haobin; Yuan, Chaochun; Xia, Tian

    2014-07-01

    The existing research of the active suspension system (ASS) mainly focuses on the different evaluation indexes and control strategies. Among the different components, the nonlinear characteristics of practical systems and control are usually not considered for vehicle lateral dynamics. But the vehicle model has some shortages on tyre model with side-slip angle, road adhesion coefficient, vertical load and velocity. In this paper, the nonlinear dynamic model of lateral system is considered and also the adaptive neural network of tire is introduced. By nonlinear analysis methods, such as the bifurcation diagram and Lyapunov exponent, it has shown that the lateral dynamics exhibits complicated motions with the forward speed. Then, a fuzzy control method is applied to the lateral system aiming to convert chaos into periodic motion using the linear-state feedback of an available lateral force with changing tire load. Finally, the rapid control prototyping is built to conduct the real vehicle test. By comparison of time response diagram, phase portraits and Lyapunov exponents at different work conditions, the results on step input and S-shaped road indicate that the slip angle and yaw velocity of lateral dynamics enter into stable domain and the results of test are consistent to the simulation and verified the correctness of simulation. And the Lyapunov exponents of the closed-loop system are becoming from positive to negative. This research proposes a fuzzy control method which has sufficient suppress chaotic motions as an effective active suspension system.

  3. Improving lensing cluster mass estimate with flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardone, V. F.; Vicinanza, M.; Er, X.; Maoli, R.; Scaramella, R.

    2016-11-01

    Gravitational lensing has long been considered as a valuable tool to determine the total mass of galaxy clusters. The shear profile, as inferred from the statistics of ellipticity of background galaxies, allows us to probe the cluster intermediate and outer regions, thus determining the virial mass estimate. However, the mass sheet degeneracy and the need for a large number of background galaxies motivate the search for alternative tracers which can break the degeneracy among model parameters and hence improve the accuracy of the mass estimate. Lensing flexion, i.e. the third derivative of the lensing potential, has been suggested as a good answer to the above quest since it probes the details of the mass profile. We investigate here whether this is indeed the case considering jointly using weak lensing, magnification and flexion. We use a Fisher matrix analysis to forecast the relative improvement in the mass accuracy for different assumptions on the shear and flexion signal-to- noise (S/N) ratio also varying the cluster mass, redshift, and ellipticity. It turns out that the error on the cluster mass may be reduced up to a factor of ˜2 for reasonable values of the flexion S/N ratio. As a general result, we get that the improvement in mass accuracy is larger for more flattened haloes, but it extracting general trends is difficult because of the many parameters at play. We nevertheless find that flexion is as efficient as magnification to increase the accuracy in both mass and concentration determination.

  4. Flexion strength of the toes in the normal foot. An evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Green, S M; Briggs, P J

    2013-12-01

    Flexion of the toes may be active from muscle contraction or passive from the reversed windlass function of the plantar aponeurosis. The aim of this study was to estimate the flexion moments the muscles of the foot and long digital flexors may be capable of generating and compare these calculations with published data. Magnetic resonance images were used to measure the maximal cross-sectional area of the foot muscles and long digital flexors, along with the radius of curvature of the metatarsal heads. Using known physiological data the maximal flexion moments the muscles may be able to generate at the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints were calculated. The methodology overestimates muscle strength and flexion moments at the metatarsophalangeal joints. The calculated maximal flexion moment at the 1st MTP joint is 4.27-6.84 Nm, for the 2nd, 3rd and 4th MTP joints 3.06-4.91 Nm, and the 5th MTP joint 0.47-0.75 Nm. The flexion moments the muscles may generate at the MTP joints do not account for the flexion forces seen in normal walking. Given that maximal strength is not used in normal walking, we conclude that the reversed windlass mechanism of the plantar aponeurosis must be important in normal function of the toes.

  5. Neuromuscular disorders associated with static lumbar flexion: a feline model.

    PubMed

    Solomonow, M; Zhou, B; Baratta, R V; Zhu, M; Lu, Y

    2002-04-01

    Static flexion of the lumbar spine with constant load applied to the viscoelastic structures for 20 minutes and for 50 minutes resulted in development of spasms and inhibition in the multifidus muscles (e.g., deep erector spinae) and in creep of the supraspinous ligament in the feline model. The development of spasms and inhibition was not dependent on load magnitude. It is suggested that occupational and sports activities which require prolonged static lumbar flexion within the physiological range can cause a "sprain"-like injury to the ligaments, which in turn reflexively induce spasms and inhibition in some erector spinae muscles. Such disorder may take a long time to recover, in the order of days to weeks, depending on the level of creep developed in the tissues.

  6. Intensity of recreational physical activity throughout life and later life cognitive functioning in women.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Mary C; Moineddin, Rahim; Morra, Angela; Manson, Judith; Blake, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Long-term physical activity may affect risk of cognitive impairment but few studies have examined later life cognition in relation to intensity of life-long physical activity. We examined the associations between the intensity of long-term recreational physical activity and neuropsychological functioning in 90 healthy postmenopausal women on tests found to be useful in the early identification of dementia. Information was collected about their participation in strenuous and moderate activities between high school and menopause. Summary measures of long-term strenuous and moderate activity were constructed for each participant. All analyses were adjusted for relevant covariates. The six linear regression analyses showed significant positive associations between moderate activity and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised (WAIS-R), Digit Span backward, WAIS-R Digit Symbol, and Trail Making Test Part B. Significant negative relationships were found between strenuous activity and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test delayed verbal recall, Complex Figure Test delayed visual memory, WAIS-R Digit Span backward, category fluency, and WAIS-R Digit Symbol. The associations found in the present study suggest that while moderate activity may be protective, long-term strenuous activity before menopause may lower cognitive performance later in life. These results support further investigation of the effects of life-long exercise intensity on cognition in later life.

  7. Comparison of laterality index of upper and lower limb movement using brain activated fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Rezvanizadeh, Alireza; Bolandzadeh, Niousha

    2008-03-01

    Asymmetry of bilateral cerebral function, i.e. laterality, is an important phenomenon in many brain actions such as motor functions. This asymmetry maybe altered in some clinical conditions such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to delineate the laterality differences for upper and lower limbs in healthy subjects to compare this pattern with subjects suffering from MS in advance. Hence 9 Male healthy subjects underwent fMRI assessment, while they were asked to move their limbs in a predetermined pattern. The results showed that hands movement activates the brain with a significant lateralization in pre-motor cortex in comparison with lower limb. Also, dominant hands activate brain more lateralized than the non-dominant hand. In addition, Left basal ganglia were observed to be activated regardless of the hand used, While, These patterns of Brain activation was not detected in lower limbs. We hypothesize that this difference might be attributed to this point that hand is usually responsible for precise and fine voluntary movements, whereas lower limb joints are mainly responsible for locomotion, a function integrating voluntary and automatic bilateral movements.

  8. Lumbopelvic flexibility modulates neuromuscular responses during trunk flexion-extension.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Zuriaga, Daniel; Artacho-Pérez, Carla; Biviá-Roig, Gemma

    2016-06-01

    Various stimuli such as the flexibility of lumbopelvic structures influence the neuromuscular responses of the trunk musculature, leading to different load sharing strategies and reflex muscle responses from the afferents of lumbopelvic mechanoreceptors. This link between flexibility and neuromuscular response has been poorly studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between lumbopelvic flexibility and neuromuscular responses of the erector spinae, hamstring and abdominal muscles during trunk flexion-extension. Lumbopelvic movement patterns were measured in 29 healthy women, who were separated into two groups according to their flexibility during trunk flexion-extension. The electromyographic responses of erector spinae, rectus abdominis and biceps femoris were also recorded. Subjects with greater lumbar flexibility had significantly less pelvic flexibility and vice versa. Subjects with greater pelvic flexibility had a higher rate of relaxation and lower levels of hamstring activation during maximal trunk flexion. The neuromuscular response patterns of the hamstrings seem partially modulated by pelvic flexibility. Not so with the lumbar erector spinae and lumbar flexibility, despite the assertions of some previous studies. The results of this study improve our knowledge of the relationships between trunk joint flexibility and neuromuscular responses, a relationship which may play a role in low back pain.

  9. Use of the Taguchi method for biomechanical comparison of flexor-tendon-repair techniques to allow immediate active flexion. A new method of analysis and optimization of technique to improve the quality of the repair.

    PubMed

    Singer, G; Ebramzadeh, E; Jones, N F; Meals, R

    1998-10-01

    The current trend toward early active flexion after repair of the flexor tendons necessitates a stronger repair than that provided by a modified Kessler technique with use of 4-0 nylon suture. The purpose of the current study was to determine, with use of the Taguchi method of analysis, the strongest and most consistent repair of the flexor tendons. Flexor tendons were obtained from fresh-frozen hands of human cadavera. Eight flexor tendons initially were repaired with the modified Kessler technique with use of 4-0 nylon core suture and 6-0 nylon epitenon suture. A test matrix was used to analyze a total of twenty variables in sixty-four tests. These variables included eight techniques for core-suture repair, four types of core suture, two sizes of core suture, four techniques for suture of the epitenon, and two distances from the repair site for placement of the core suture. After each repair, the specimens were mounted in a servohydraulic mechanical testing machine for tension-testing to failure. The optimum combination of variables was determined, with the Taguchi method, to be an augmented Becker technique with use of 3-0 Mersilene core suture, placed 0.75 centimeter from the cut edge with volar epitenon suture. The four-strand, double modified Kessler technique provided the second strongest repair. Five tendons that had been repaired with use of the optimum combination then were tested and compared with tendons that had been repaired with the standard modified Kessler technique. With the optimum combination of variables, the strength of the repair improved from a mean (and standard deviation) of 17.2 +/- 2.9 to 128 +/- 5.6 newtons, and the stiffness improved from a mean of 4.6 to 16.2 newtons per millimeter.

  10. Differential activity of regions of the psoas major and quadratus lumborum during submaximal isometric trunk efforts.

    PubMed

    Park, Rachel J; Tsao, Henry; Cresswell, Andrew G; Hodges, Paul W

    2012-02-01

    Controversy exists regarding the function of psoas major (PM) and quadratus lumborum (QL) at the lumbar spine. The functions of discrete regions of PM and QL were studied during trunk loading tasks. Twelve healthy participants performed isometric trunk loading tasks in various directions in upright sitting. Fine-wire electromyography (EMG) electrodes were inserted under ultrasound guidance into PM fascicles arising from the transverse process (PM-t) and vertebral body (PM-v) and the anterior (QL-a) and posterior (QL-p) layers of QL on the right side. Although right PM-t and PM-v were both active during right lateral-flexion trunk efforts, their activity was opposite in the sagittal plane, with greater PM-t towards extension and PM-v towards flexion. QL-a and QL-p were similarly active, though QL-p was active to a greater percentage of MVC during right trunk lateral-flexion efforts. Activity of QL-p was modulated with respiratory phase during the loading tasks with trunk efforts towards the right lateral-flexion/flexion and right lateral-flexion directions. These findings provide novel understanding of the unique activation of discrete regions of PM and QL. These differences must be considered in future EMG studies to better understand the function of these deeply situated trunk muscles in the control of the lumbar spine.

  11. The Roles of Human Lateral Temporal Cortical Neuronal Activity in Recent Verbal Memory Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfield-McNeill, Julie; Corina, David

    2009-01-01

    Activity of 98 single neurons in human lateral temporal cortex was measured during memory encoding for auditory words, text, or pictures and compared with identification of material of the same modality in extracellular recordings during awake neurosurgery for epilepsy. Frequency of activity was divided into early or late epochs or activity sustained throughout both; 44 neurons had significant changes in one or more categories. Polymodal and sustained changes lateralized to dominant hemisphere and late changes to nondominant. The majority of polymodal neurons shifted categories for different modalities. In dominant hemisphere, the timing and nature of changes in activity provide the basis for a model of the roles of temporal cortex in encoding. Superior temporal gyrus excitatory activity was related to the early epoch, when perception and processing occur, and middle gyrus to the late epoch, when semantic labeling occurs. The superior two-thirds of middle gyrus also demonstrated sustained inhibition. In a subset of lateral temporal neurons, memory-encoding activity reflected simultaneous convergence of sustained attentional and early perceptual inputs. PMID:18469317

  12. Activation of lateral habenula inputs to the ventral midbrain promotes behavioral avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Stamatakis, Alice M.; Stuber, Garret D.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral habenula (LHb) projections to the ventral midbrain, including the rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg) conveys negative reward-related information, but the behavioral ramifications of selective activation of this pathway remain unexplored. We found that exposure to aversive stimuli in mice increased LHb excitatory drive onto RMTg neurons. Further, optogenetic activation of this pathway promoted active, passive, and conditioned behavioral avoidance. These data demonstrate that activity of LHb efferents to the midbrain is aversive, but can also serve to negatively reinforce behavioral responding. PMID:22729176

  13. Chemiluminescence lateral flow immunoassay based on Pt nanoparticle with peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Min; Jung, Ha-Wook; Chang, Young Wook; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Kang, Min-Jung; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2015-01-01

    A lateral flow immunoassay (LF-immunoassay) with an enhanced sensitivity and thermostability was developed by using Pt nanoparticles with a peroxidase activity. The Pt nanoparticles were synthesized by citrate reduction method, and the peroxidase activity of Pt nanoparticles was optimized by adjusting reaction conditions. The peroxidase activity was estimated by using Michaelis-Menten kinetics model with TMB as a chromogenic substrate. The kinetics parameters of KM and Vmax were calculated and compared with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The thermal stability of the Pt nanoparticles was compared with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) according to the storage temperature and long-term storage period. The feasibility of lateral flow immunoassay with a chemiluminescent signal band was demonstrated by the detection of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) as a model analyte, and the sensitivity was determined to be improved by as much as 1000-fold compared to the conventional rapid test based on colored gold-colloids.

  14. The Arterial Folding Point During Flexion of the Hip Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung Il; Won, Je Hwan Kim, Byung Moon; Kim, Jae Keun; Lee, Do Yun

    2005-04-15

    Purpose: Endovascular stents placed in periarticular vessels may be at a greater risk of neointimal hyperplasia and eventual occlusion than those placed in non-periarticular vessels. The purpose of this study was to investigate the location of maximal conformational change along the iliac and femoral artery, the folding point, during flexion of the hip joint and its location relative to the hip joint and the inguinal ligament. Methods: Seventy patients undergoing femoral artery catheterization were evaluated. The patients were 47 men and 23 women and ranged in age from 26 to 75 years (mean 54 years). The arteries (right:left = 34:36) were measured using a marked catheter for sizing vessels. Fluoroscopic images were obtained in anteroposterior and lateral projections in neutral position, and in the lateral projection in flexed position of the hip joint. The folding point was determined by comparing the lateral projection images in the neutral and flexed positions. The distance from the acetabular roof to the folding point and the distance from the inguinal ligament to the folding point was evaluated. Results: : The folding point was located 42.8 {+-} 28.6 mm cranial to the acetabular roof and 35.1 {+-} 30.1 mm cranial to the inguinal ligament. As the patient's age increased, the folding point was located more cranially (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The folding point during flexion of the hip joint was located 42.8 {+-} 28.6 mm cranial to the acetabular roof and 35.1 {+-} 30.1 mm cranial to the inguinal ligament. As the patient's age increased, the folding point was located more cranially. When a stent is inserted over this region, more attention may be needed during follow-up to monitor possible occlusion and stent failure.

  15. Lateralized activation of Cluster N in the brains of migratory songbirds.

    PubMed

    Liedvogel, Miriam; Feenders, Gesa; Wada, Kazuhiro; Troje, Nikolaus F; Jarvis, Erich D; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2007-02-01

    Cluster N is a cluster of forebrain regions found in night-migratory songbirds that shows high activation of activity-dependent gene expression during night-time vision. We have suggested that Cluster N may function as a specialized night-vision area in night-migratory birds and that it may be involved in processing light-mediated magnetic compass information. Here, we investigated these ideas. We found a significant lateralized dominance of Cluster N activation in the right hemisphere of European robins (Erithacus rubecula). Activation predominantly originated from the contralateral (left) eye. Garden warblers (Sylvia borin) tested under different magnetic field conditions and under monochromatic red light did not show significant differences in Cluster N activation. In the fairly sedentary Sardinian warbler (Sylvia melanocephala), which belongs to the same phyolgenetic clade, Cluster N showed prominent activation levels, similar to that observed in garden warblers and European robins. Thus, it seems that Cluster N activation occurs at night in all species within predominantly migratory groups of birds, probably because such birds have the capability of switching between migratory and sedentary life styles. The activation studies suggest that although Cluster N is lateralized, as is the dependence on magnetic compass orientation, either Cluster N is not involved in magnetic processing or the magnetic modulations of the primary visual signal, forming the basis for the currently supported light-dependent magnetic compass mechanism, are relatively small such that activity-dependent gene expression changes are not sensitive enough to pick them up.

  16. Patellofemoral overstuff and its relationship to flexion after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mihalko, William; Fishkin, Zair; Krackow, Kenneth; Krakow, Kenneth

    2006-08-01

    Flexion is an important outcome variable after total knee arthroplasty. Traditionally, matched implant-bone resections of the distal and posterior aspects of the femur are used to prevent loss of knee flexion or extension. However, given limited implant sizes, resection of these portions of the femur may affect the shape of the knee. Variations in the anterior aspects of the femur along with implant size constraints may increase trochlear groove height in the anterior compartment, increase the arc that the extensor mechanism must travel, and thereby decrease passive flexion. We determined the trochlear groove height change in 55 patients after primary total knee arthroplasties. The thickness of the replaced lateral and medial anterior flanges increased by 1.1 +/- 2.6 mm and 0.5 +/- 2.2 mm, respectively, whereas the change in trochlear groove thickness was 0 +/- 1.1 mm. We examined varying amounts of patellofemoral buildup in a cadaver model to observe the effect on passive range of motion of the knee. A 2-mm and 4-mm buildup of the anterior cortex resulted in flexion loss of 1.8 degrees and 4.4 degrees, respectively. The change in the shape of the anterior aspect of the femur may have small effects on flexion but they may not be clinically important.

  17. The Mechanosensory Lateral Line System Mediates Activation of Socially-Relevant Brain Regions during Territorial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Julie M.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Animals use multiple senses during social interactions and must integrate this information in the brain to make context-dependent behavioral decisions. For fishes, the largest group of vertebrates, the mechanosensory lateral line system provides crucial hydrodynamic information for survival behaviors, but little is known about its function in social communication. Our previous work using the African cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni, provided the first empirical evidence that fish use their lateral line system to detect water movements from conspecifics for mutual assessment and behavioral choices. It is unknown, however, where this socially-relevant mechanosensory information is processed in the brain to elicit adaptive behavioral responses. To examine for the first time in any fish species which brain regions receive contextual mechanosensory information, we quantified expression of the immediate early gene cfos as a proxy for neural activation in sensory and socially-relevant brain nuclei from lateral line-intact and -ablated fish following territorial interactions. Our in situ hybridization results indicate that in addition to known lateral line processing regions, socially-relevant mechanosensory information is processed in the ATn (ventromedial hypothalamus homolog), Dl (putative hippocampus homolog), and Vs (putative medial extended amygdala homolog). In addition, we identified a functional network within the conserved social decision-making network (SDMN) whose co-activity corresponds with mutual assessment and behavioral choice. Lateral line-intact and –ablated fight winners had different patterns of co-activity of these function networks and group identity could be determined solely by activation patterns, indicating the importance of mechanoreception to co-activity of the SDMN. These data show for the first time that the mechanosensory lateral line system provides relevant information to conserved decision-making centers of the brain during

  18. Trait Approach and Avoidance Motivation: Lateralized Neural Activity Associated with Executive Function

    PubMed Central

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M.; Miller, Gregory A.; Engels, Anna S.; Herrington, John D.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Banich, Marie T.; Heller, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Motivation and executive function are both necessary for the completion of goal-directed behavior. Research investigating the manner in which these processes interact is beginning to emerge and has implicated middle frontal gyrus (MFG) as a site of interaction for relevant neural mechanisms. However, this research has focused on state motivation, and it has not examined functional lateralization. The present study examined the impact of trait levels of approach and avoidance motivation on neural processes associated with executive function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while participants performed a color-word Stroop task. Analyses identified brain regions in which trait approach and avoidance motivation (measured by questionnaires) moderated activation associated with executive control. Approach was hypothesized to be associated with left-lateralized MFG activation, whereas avoidance was hypothesized to be associated with right-lateralized MFG activation. Results supported both hypotheses. Present findings implicate areas of middle frontal gyrus in top-down control to guide behavior in accordance with motivational goals. PMID:20728552

  19. Trait approach and avoidance motivation: lateralized neural activity associated with executive function.

    PubMed

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Miller, Gregory A; Engels, Anna S; Herrington, John D; Sutton, Bradley P; Banich, Marie T; Heller, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Motivation and executive function are both necessary for the completion of goal-directed behavior. Research investigating the manner in which these processes interact is beginning to emerge and has implicated middle frontal gyrus (MFG) as a site of interaction for relevant neural mechanisms. However, this research has focused on state motivation, and it has not examined functional lateralization. The present study examined the impact of trait levels of approach and avoidance motivation on neural processes associated with executive function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while participants performed a color-word Stroop task. Analyses identified brain regions in which trait approach and avoidance motivation (measured by questionnaires) moderated activation associated with executive control. Approach was hypothesized to be associated with left-lateralized MFG activation, whereas avoidance was hypothesized to be associated with right-lateralized MFG activation. Results supported both hypotheses. Present findings implicate areas of middle frontal gyrus in top-down control to guide behavior in accordance with motivational goals.

  20. Brain activation to negative stimuli mediates a relationship between adolescent marijuana use and later emotional functioning

    PubMed Central

    Heitzeg, Mary M.; Cope, Lora M.; Martz, Meghan E.; Hardee, Jillian E.; Zucker, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigated the impact of heavy marijuana use during adolescence on emotional functioning, as well as the brain functional mediators of this effect. Participants (n=40) were recruited from the Michigan Longitudinal Study (MLS). Data on marijuana use were collected prospectively beginning in childhood as part of the MLS. Participants were classified as heavy marijuana users (n=20) or controls with minimal marijuana use. Two facets of emotional functioning—negative emotionality and resiliency (a self-regulatory mechanism)—were assessed as part of the MLS at three time points: mean age 13.4; mean age 19.6; and mean age 23.1. Functional neuroimaging data during an emotion-arousal word task were collected at mean age 20.2.Negative emotionality decreased and resiliency increased across the three time points in controls but not heavy marijuana users. Compared with controls, heavy marijuana users had less activation to negative words in temporal, prefrontal, and occipital cortices, insula, and amygdala. Activation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to negative words mediated an association between marijuana group and later negative emotionality. Activation of the cuneus/lingual gyrus mediated an association between marijuana group and later resiliency. Results support growing evidence that heavy marijuana use during adolescence affects later emotional outcomes. PMID:26403581

  1. Evaluation of document location during computer use in terms of neck muscle activity and neck movement.

    PubMed

    Goostrey, Sonya; Treleaven, Julia; Johnston, Venerina

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the impact on neck movement and muscle activity of placing documents in three commonly used locations: in-line, flat desktop left of the keyboard and laterally placed level with the computer screen. Neck excursion during three standard head movements between the computer monitor and each document location and neck extensor and upper trapezius muscle activity during a 5 min typing task for each of the document locations was measured in 20 healthy participants. Results indicated that muscle activity and neck flexion were least when documents were placed laterally suggesting it may be the optimal location. The desktop option produced both the greatest neck movement and muscle activity in all muscle groups. The in-line document location required significantly more neck flexion but less lateral flexion and rotation than the laterally placed document. Evaluation of other holders is needed to guide decision making for this commonly used office equipment.

  2. Negative emotions impact lateral prefrontal cortex activation during theory of mind: An fNIRS study.

    PubMed

    Himichi, Toshiyuki; Fujita, Hiroyo; Nomura, Michio

    2015-01-01

    The lateral prefrontal cortex (lPFC) plays a critical role in inhibiting self-perspective information, which is necessary for theory of mind (ToM) processing. Additionally, previous research has indicated that negative emotions interfere with lPFC activation during executive tasks. In this study, we hypothesized that negative emotions would inhibit lPFC activation during a ToM task. While female participants performed the director task following the observation of emotionally laden movies (neutral/negative/positive), their prefrontal hemodynamic activity was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. After viewing the neutral movie, bilateral lPFC activity was significantly enhanced during ToM process compared to the control condition. In contrast, after viewing the negative movie, left lPFC activity during ToM process was significantly impaired. These results were interpreted to support the idea that negative emotions interfere with inhibition of self-perspective information through inactivation of the lPFC.

  3. Optogenetic Activation of a Lateral Hypothalamic-Ventral Tegmental Drive-Reward Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gigante, Eduardo D.; Benaliouad, Faiza; Zamora-Olivencia, Veronica; Wise, Roy A.

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus can motivate feeding or can serve as a reward in its own right. It remains unclear whether the same or independent but anatomically overlapping circuitries mediate the two effects. Electrical stimulation findings implicate medial forebrain bundle (MFB) fibers of passage in both effects, and optogenetic studies confirm a contribution from fibers originating in the lateral hypothalamic area and projecting to or through the ventral tegmental area. Here we report that optogenetic activation of ventral tegmental fibers from cells of origin in more anterior or posterior portions of the MFB failed to induce either reward or feeding. The feeding and reward induced by optogenetic activation of fibers from the lateral hypothalamic cells of origin were influenced similarly by variations in stimulation pulse width and pulse frequency, consistent with the hypothesis of a common substrate for the two effects. There were, however, several cases where feeding but not self-stimulation or self-stimulation but not feeding were induced, consistent with the hypothesis that distinct but anatomically overlapping systems mediate the two effects. Thus while optogenetic stimulation provides a more selective tool for characterizing the mechanisms of stimulation-induced feeding and reward, it does not yet resolve the question of common or independent substrates. PMID:27387668

  4. Lateralization of expression of neural sympathetic activity to the vessels and effects of carotid baroreceptor stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, André; Porta, Alberto; Barbic, Franca; Brychta, Robert J.; Bonizzi, Pietro; Diedrich, Laura; Cerutti, Sergio; Robertson, David; Furlan, Raffaello

    2009-01-01

    Human studies suggest that cardiovascular neural sympathetic control is predominantly modulated by the right cerebral hemisphere. It is unknown whether post-ganglionic sympathetic activity [muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA)] shows any functional asymmetry. Eight right-handed volunteers (3 women and 5 men, 32 ± 2 yr of age) underwent ECG, beat-by-beat blood pressure, respiratory activity, and simultaneous right and left MSNA recordings during spontaneous and controlled breathing (CB, 15 breaths/min, 0.25 Hz). Dynamic carotid baroreceptor stimulation was obtained by 0.1-Hz sinusoidal suction, from 0 to −50 mmHg, randomly applied to the right, left, and combined right and left sides of the neck during CB. Laterality was assessed by changes in the MSNA burst rate (in bursts/min, and bursts/100 beats), strength [amplitude (A) and area (AA)], and the oscillatory component at 0.1 Hz during baroreceptor stimulation. Amplitude parameters were normalized by CB burst mean amplitude and area of the same side. At rest, the right and left MSNA burst rate and total MSNA activity were similar. Conversely, the right MSNA normalized burst AN (1.36 ± 0.18) and AAN (1.31 ± 0.16) were larger than the left MSNA AN (1.04 ± 0.09) and AAN (1.02 ± 0.08). Unilateral and bilateral carotid baroreflex stimulation abolished the right prevalence of AN and AAN. In conclusion, the right lateralization of sympathetic activity to the vessels is indicated by normalized burst strength parameters of bilateral MSNA recordings at rest during spontaneous breathing. Carotid baroreceptor stimulation disrupted such expression of MSNA lateralization possibly by disturbing the synchronizing action of right cerebral hemisphere. PMID:19363133

  5. Bubble mass center and fluid feedback force fluctuations activated by constant lateral impulse with variable thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Long, Y. T.

    1995-01-01

    Sloshing dynamics within a partially filled rotating dewar of superfluid helium 2 are investigated in response to constant lateral impulse with variable thrust. The study, including how the rotating bubble of superfluid helium 2 reacts to the constant impulse with variable time period of thrust action in microgravity, how amplitudes of bubble mass center fluctuates with growth and decay of disturbances, and how fluid feedback forces fluctuates in activating on the rotating dewar through the dynamics of sloshing waves are investigated. The numerical computation of sloshing dynamics is based on the non-inertial frame spacecraft bound coordinate with lateral impulses actuating on the rotating dewar in both inertial and non-inertial frames of thrust. Results of the simulations are illustrated.

  6. Disruption of Lateral Olivocochlear Neurons With a Dopaminergic Neurotoxin Depresses Spontaneous Auditory Nerve Activity

    PubMed Central

    Le Prell, Colleen G.; Dolan, David F.; Hughes, Larry F.; Altschuler, Richard A.; Shore, Susan E.; Bledsoe, Sanford C.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons of the lateral olivocochlear (LOC) system project from the auditory brainstem to the cochlea, where they synapse on radial dendrites of auditory nerve fibers. Selective LOC disruption depresses sound-evoked auditory nerve activity in the guinea pig, but enhances it in the mouse. Here, LOC disruption depressed spontaneous auditory nerve activity in the guinea pig. Recordings from single auditory nerve fibers revealed a significantly reduced proportion of fibers with the highest spontaneous firing rates (SRs) and an increased proportion of neurons with lower SRs. Ensemble activity, estimated using round window noise, also decreased after LOC disruption. Decreased spontaneous activity after LOC disruption may be a consequence of reduced tonic release of excitatory transmitters from the LOC terminals in guinea pigs. PMID:25175420

  7. Successful Remembering Elicits Event-Specific Activity Patterns in Lateral Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Marvin M.

    2014-01-01

    Remembering a past event involves reactivation of content-specific patterns of neural activity in high-level perceptual regions (e.g., ventral temporal cortex, VTC). In contrast, the subjective experience of vivid remembering is typically associated with increased activity in lateral parietal cortex (LPC)—“retrieval success effects” that are thought to generalize across content types. However, the functional significance of LPC activation during memory retrieval remains a subject of active debate. In particular, theories are divided with respect to whether LPC actively represents retrieved content or if LPC activity only scales with content reactivation elsewhere (e.g., VTC). Here, we report a human fMRI study of visual memory recall (faces vs scenes) in which complementary forms of multivoxel pattern analysis were used to test for and compare content reactivation within LPC and VTC. During recall of visual images, we observed robust reactivation of broad category information (face vs scene) in both VTC and LPC. Moreover, recall-related activity patterns in LPC, but not VTC, differentiated between individual events. Importantly, these content effects were particularly evident in areas of LPC (namely, angular gyrus) in which activity scaled with subjective reports of recall vividness. These findings provide striking evidence that LPC not only signals that memories have been successfully recalled, but actively represents what is being remembered. PMID:24899726

  8. Chiropractic Treatment of Lateral Epicondylitis: A Case Report Utilizing Active Release Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Gliedt, Jordan A.; Daniels, Clinton J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this report is to describe the chiropractic management of a case of lateral epicondylitis with active release techniques (ART). Clinical features A 48-year-old white man presented to a chiropractic clinic with a complaint of left lateral elbow pain that began 2 years previous with insidious onset. The patient reported an inability to play 18 consecutive holes of golf due to the pain. Intervention and outcome Treatment consisted of 5 sessions of ART (a soft tissue technique that is applied to muscles, fascia, tendons, ligaments, and nerves) applied to the left elbow soft tissue over a duration of 3 weeks. The patient reported an absence of pain and ability to consistently play 18 consecutive holes of golf up to 3 times per week at 4 and 8 weeks post-treatment. Conclusion This patient with lateral epicondylitis responded favorably to chiropractic treatment using the application of ART, as demonstrated by reduced pain and increased functional outcomes. PMID:25685118

  9. Activation of forearm muscles for wrist extension in patients affected by lateral epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Monica; Mañanas, Miquel A; Muller, Bertram; Chaler, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    Work related upper extremity disorders are associated with cumulative trauma resulting from the continuous use of forearm muscles rather than from a specific incident. The aim of this work is to compare wrist extensor muscles activation between patients with lateral epicondylitis and healthy subjects. Differences can be used in the design of rehabilitation or injury prevention programs according to biomechanical deficits. Surface EMG signals from three forearm extensor muscles (Carpi Radialis-ECR, Digitorum Communis-EDC and Carpi Ulnaris-ECU) were recorded by linear electrode arrays in wrist extension as well as during selective contractions. Average Rectified Values (ARV) were calculated in order to identify the contribution of each muscle to different tasks. On the other hand, Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity, Mean and Median Frequencies and also ARV were studied to obtain fatigue indexes related to metabolic changes in the muscles during a high force sustained contraction. Results showed muscular imbalance with lower ECR activity compensated by higher ECU activation, and higher fatigue indexes in patients with lateral epicondylitis.

  10. Dynamic splinting for knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty: a case report.

    PubMed

    Finger, Eric; Willis, F Buck

    2008-12-29

    Total Knee Arthroplasty operations are increasing in frequency, and knee flexion contracture is a common pathology, both pre-existing and post-operative. A 61-year-old male presented with knee flexion contracture following a total knee arthroplasty. Physical therapy alone did not fully reduce the contracture and dynamic splinting was then prescribed for daily low-load, prolonged-duration stretch. After 28 physical therapy sessions, the active range of motion improved from -20 degrees to -12 degrees (stiff knee still lacking full extension), and after eight additional weeks with nightly wear of dynamic splint, the patient regained full knee extension, (active extension improved from -12 degrees to 0 degrees ).

  11. Functional Laterality of Task-Evoked Activation in Sensorimotor Cortex of Preterm Infants: An Optimized 3 T fMRI Study Employing a Customized Neonatal Head Coil

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Collins, Adam PR; Müller, Nicole; Stegmann-Woessner, Gaby; Jankowski, Jacob; Gieseke, Jürgen; Born, Mark; Seitz, Hermann; Bartmann, Peter; Schild, Hans H.; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Boecker, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in neonates has been introduced as a non-invasive method for studying sensorimotor processing in the developing brain. However, previous neonatal studies have delivered conflicting results regarding localization, lateralization, and directionality of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses in sensorimotor cortex (SMC). Amongst the confounding factors in interpreting neonatal fMRI studies include the use of standard adult MR-coils providing insufficient signal to noise, and liberal statistical thresholds, compromising clinical interpretation at the single subject level. Patients / methods Here, we employed a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil adapted and optimized to the head size of a newborn in order to improve robustness, reliability and validity of neonatal sensorimotor fMRI. Thirteen preterm infants with a median gestational age of 26 weeks were scanned at term-corrected age using a prototype 8-channel neonatal head coil at 3T (Achieva, Philips, Best, NL). Sensorimotor stimulation was elicited by passive extension/flexion of the elbow at 1 Hz in a block design. Analysis of temporal signal to noise ratio (tSNR) was performed on the whole brain and the SMC, and was compared to data acquired with an ‘adult’ 8 channel head coil published previously. Task-evoked activation was determined by single-subject SPM8 analyses, thresholded at p < 0.05, whole-brain FWE-corrected. Results Using a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil, we found significant positive BOLD responses in contralateral SMC after unilateral passive sensorimotor stimulation in all neonates (analyses restricted to artifact-free data sets = 8/13). Improved imaging characteristics of the neonatal MR-coil were evidenced by additional phantom and in vivo tSNR measurements: phantom studies revealed a 240% global increase in tSNR; in vivo studies revealed a 73% global and a 55% local (SMC) increase in tSNR, as compared to the ‘adult’ MR

  12. Selectivity of voluntary finger flexion during ischemic nerve block of the hand

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Karen T.; Schieber, Marc H.; McNulty, Penelope A.

    2009-01-01

    During ischemic nerve block of an extremity, the cortical representations of muscles proximal to the block are known to expand, increasing the overlap of different muscle representations. Such reorganization mimics that seen in actual amputees. We investigated whether such changes degrade voluntary control of muscles proximal to the block. Nine subjects produced brief, isometric flexion force selectively with each fingertip before, during, and after ischemic block at the wrist. We recorded the isometric force exerted at the distal phalanx of each digit, along with electromyographic (EMG) activity from intrinsic and extrinsic finger muscles. Despite paralysis of the intrinsic hand muscles, and associated decrements in the flexion forces exerted by the thumb, index, and little fingers, the selectivity of voluntary finger flexion forces and of EMG activity in the extrinsic finger muscles that generated these forces remained unchanged. Our observations indicate that during ischemic nerve block, reorganization does not eliminate or degrade motor representations of the temporarily deafferented and paralyzed fingers. PMID:18431564

  13. Effect of lateral structure parameters of SiGe HBTs on synthesized active inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Xiao, Zhao; Wan-Rong, Zhang; Huang, Xin; Hong-Yun, Xie; Dong-Yue, Jin; Qiang, Fu

    2016-03-01

    The effect of lateral structure parameters of transistors including emitter width, emitter length, and emitter stripe number on the performance parameters of the active inductor (AI), such as the effective inductance Ls, quality factor Q, and self-resonant frequency ω0 is analyzed based on 0.35-μm SiGe BiCMOS process. The simulation results show that for AI operated under fixed current density JC, the HBT lateral structure parameters have significant effect on Ls but little influence on Q and ω0, and the larger Ls can be realized by the narrow, short emitter stripe and few emitter stripes of SiGe HBTs. On the other hand, for AI with fixed HBT size, smaller JC is beneficial for AI to obtain larger Ls, but with a cost of smaller Q and ω0. In addition, under the fixed collector current IC, the larger the size of HBT is, the larger Ls becomes, but the smaller Q and ω0 become. The obtained results provide a reference for selecting geometry of transistors and operational condition in the design of active inductors. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Beijing, China (Grant Nos. 4142007 and 4122014), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61574010), and the Higher Educational Science and Technology Program of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. J13LN09).

  14. Learning-related neuronal activity in the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus during associative cerebellar learning

    PubMed Central

    Kashef, Alireza; Campolattaro, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    During delay eyeblink conditioning, rats learn to produce an eyelid-closure conditioned response (CR) to a conditioned stimulus (CS), such as a light, which precedes and coterminates with an unconditioned stimulus (US). Previous studies have suggested that the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus (LGNv) might play an important role in visual eyeblink conditioning by supplying visual sensory input to the pontine nuclei (PN) and also receiving feedback from the cerebellum. No prior study has investigated LGNv neuronal activity during eyeblink conditioning. The present study used multiple tetrodes to monitor single-unit activity in the rat LGNv during pre-exposure (CS only), unpaired CS/US, and paired CS-US training conditions. This behavioral-training sequence was used to investigate nonassociative- and associative-driven neuronal activity in the LGNv during training. LGNv neuronal activity habituated during unpaired training and then recovered from habituation during subsequent paired training, which may indicate that the LGNv plays a role in attention to the CS. The amplitude of LGNv neuronal activity correlated with CR production during paired but not unpaired CS/US training. Cerebellar feedback to the LGNv may play a role in modulating LGNv activity and attention to the CS during paired training. Based on the present findings, we hypothesize that the role of LGNv in visual eyeblink conditioning goes beyond simply routing visual CS information to the PN and involves modulation of attention. PMID:25122718

  15. The temporal dynamics of metacognition: Dissociating task-related activity from later metacognitive processes.

    PubMed

    Desender, Kobe; Van Opstal, Filip; Hughes, Gethin; Van den Bussche, Eva

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, neuroscience research spent much effort in revealing brain activity related to metacognition. Despite this endeavor, it remains unclear exactly when metacognitive experiences develop during task performance. To investigate this, the current study used EEG to temporally and spatially dissociate task-related activity from metacognitive activity. In a masked priming paradigm, metacognitive experiences of difficulty were induced by manipulating congruency between prime and target. As expected, participants more frequently rated incongruent trials as difficult and congruent trials as easy, while being completely unable to perceive the masked primes. Results showed that both the N2 and the P3 ERP components were modulated by congruency, but that only the P3 modulation interacted with metacognitive experiences. Single-trial analysis additionally showed that the magnitude of the P3 modulation by congruency accurately predicted the metacognitive response. Source localization indicated that the N2 task-related activity originated in the ACC, whereas the P3-interplay between task-related activation and metacognitive experiences originated from the precuneus. We conclude that task-related activity can be dissociated from later metacognitive processing.

  16. Decoding Target Distance and Saccade Amplitude from Population Activity in the Macaque Lateral Intraparietal Area (LIP)

    PubMed Central

    Bremmer, Frank; Kaminiarz, Andre; Klingenhoefer, Steffen; Churan, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Primates perform saccadic eye movements in order to bring the image of an interesting target onto the fovea. Compared to stationary targets, saccades toward moving targets are computationally more demanding since the oculomotor system must use speed and direction information about the target as well as knowledge about its own processing latency to program an adequate, predictive saccade vector. In monkeys, different brain regions have been implicated in the control of voluntary saccades, among them the lateral intraparietal area (LIP). Here we asked, if activity in area LIP reflects the distance between fovea and saccade target, or the amplitude of an upcoming saccade, or both. We recorded single unit activity in area LIP of two macaque monkeys. First, we determined for each neuron its preferred saccade direction. Then, monkeys performed visually guided saccades along the preferred direction toward either stationary or moving targets in pseudo-randomized order. LIP population activity allowed to decode both, the distance between fovea and saccade target as well as the size of an upcoming saccade. Previous work has shown comparable results for saccade direction (Graf and Andersen, 2014a,b). Hence, LIP population activity allows to predict any two-dimensional saccade vector. Functional equivalents of macaque area LIP have been identified in humans. Accordingly, our results provide further support for the concept of activity from area LIP as neural basis for the control of an oculomotor brain-machine interface. PMID:27630547

  17. Tibiofemoral contact areas and pressures in six high flexion knees

    PubMed Central

    Vizesi, Frank; Bruce, Warwick; Herrmann, Sebastian; Walsh, William R

    2007-01-01

    The tibiofemoral articulating interfaces of six high flexion knee designs were examined using a standard testing protocol developed by Harris et al. [J Biomech 32:951–958 (1999)] to investigate the polyethylene insert contact areas and pressures. A load of 3600 N was applied for 10 s at 0, 30, 60, 90, 110, 135 and 155° of flexion. Contact areas and pressures at the femoral–polyethylene insert interface were measured with a I-scan 4000 system. Up to 110°of flexion, the VANGUARD RP HI-FLEX showed the highest contact area and lowest pressure. At the deep flexion angles, contact area decreased and contact pressure increased significantly in all knees. The NexGen series showed a constant contact area throughout the various flexion angles. In general, all high flexion knees could result in almost point contact in an extremely high range of motion. PMID:18034243

  18. Postnatal temporal, spatial and modality tuning of nociceptive cutaneous flexion reflexes in human infants.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Laura; Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Patten, Deborah; Worley, Alan; Meek, Judith; Boyd, Stewart; Slater, Rebeccah; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous flexion reflexes are amongst the first behavioural responses to develop and are essential for the protection and survival of the newborn organism. Despite this, there has been no detailed, quantitative study of their maturation in human neonates. Here we use surface electromyographic (EMG) recording of biceps femoris activity in preterm (<37 weeks gestation, GA) and term (≥ 37 weeks GA) human infants, less than 14 days old, in response to tactile, punctate and clinically required skin-breaking lance stimulation of the heel. We show that all infants display a robust and long duration flexion reflex (>4 seconds) to a single noxious skin lance which decreases significantly with gestational age. This reflex is not restricted to the stimulated limb: heel lance evokes equal ipsilateral and contralateral reflexes in preterm and term infants. We further show that infant flexion withdrawal reflexes are not always nociceptive specific: in 29% of preterm infants, tactile stimulation evokes EMG activity that is indistinguishable from noxious stimulation. In 40% of term infants, tactile responses are also present but significantly smaller than nociceptive reflexes. Infant flexion reflexes are also evoked by application of calibrated punctate von Frey hairs (vFh), 0.8-17.2 g, to the heel. Von Frey hair thresholds increase significantly with gestational age and the magnitude of vFh evoked reflexes are significantly greater in preterm than term infants. Furthermore flexion reflexes in both groups are sensitized by repeated vFh stimulation. Thus human infant flexion reflexes differ in temporal, modality and spatial characteristics from those in adults. Reflex magnitude and tactile sensitivity decreases and nociceptive specificity and spatial organisation increases with gestational age. Strong, relatively non-specific, reflex sensitivity in early life may be important for driving postnatal activity dependent maturation of targeted spinal cord sensory circuits.

  19. Repetitive and Retinotopically Restricted Activation of the Dorsal Lateral Geniculate Nucleus with Optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Castonguay, Alexandre; Thomas, Sébastien; Lesage, Frédéric; Casanova, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetics allows the control of cellular activity using focused delivery of light pulses. In neuroscience, optogenetic protocols have been shown to efficiently inhibit or stimulate neuronal activity with a high temporal resolution. Among the technical challenges associated with the use of optogenetics, one is the ability to target a spatially specific population of neurons in a given brain structure. To address this issue, we developed a side-illuminating optical fiber capable of delivering light to specific sites in a target nucleus with added flexibility through rotation and translation of the fiber and by varying the output light power. The designed optical fiber was tested in vivo in visual structures of ChR2-expressing transgenic mice. To assess the spatial extent of neuronal activity modulation, we took advantage of the hallmark of the visual system: its retinotopic organization. Indeed, the relative position of ganglion cells in the retina is transposed in the cellular topography of both the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in the thalamus and the primary visual cortex (V1). The optical fiber was inserted in the LGN and by rotating it with a motor, it was possible to sequentially activate different neuronal populations within this structure. The activation of V1 neurons by LGN projections was recorded using intrinsic optical imaging. Increasing light intensity (from 1.4 to 8.9 mW/mm2) led to increasing activation surfaces in V1. Optogenetic stimulation of the LGN at different translational and rotational positions was associated with different activation maps in V1. The position and/or orientation of the fiber inevitably varied across experiments, thus limiting the capacity to pool data. With the optogenetic design presented here, we demonstrate for the first time a transitory and spatially-concise activation of a deep neuronal structure. The optogenetic design presented here thus opens a promising avenue for studying the function of deep brain

  20. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. Methods We evaluated 10 non professional ballet dancers (16-23 years old). We measured the active range of motion and flexibility through Well Banks. We compared active range of motion between left and right sides (hip flexion and abduction) and performed correlation between active movements and flexibility. Results There was a small difference between the right and left sides of the hip in relation to the movements of flexion and abduction, which suggest the dominant side of the subjects, however, there was no statistical significance. Bank of Wells test revealed statistical difference only between the 1st and the 3rd measurement. There was no correlation between the movements of the hip (abduction and flexion, right and left sides) with the three test measurements of the bank of Wells. Conclusion There is no imbalance between the sides of the hip with respect to active abduction and flexion movements in non-professional ballet dancers. PMID:21819566

  1. Laterally tapered undercut active waveguide fabricated by simple wet etching method for vertical waveguide directional coupler.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang-Zheng; Chiu, Yi-Jen; Tsai, Shun-An; Wu, Tsu-Hsiu

    2008-05-26

    A novel structure, namely a laterally tapered undercut active-waveguide (LTUAWG) for an optical spot-size converter (SSC) is proposed and demonstrated in this paper. Using a selectively undercut-etching-active-region (UEAR) on a laterally tapered ridge to define a LTUAWG, a vertical waveguide directional coupler (VWGDC) can be fabricated simply by a wet etching-based technique. The VWGDC comprises a top LTUAWG and a bottom passive waveguide (PWG). An electroabsorption modulator (EAM) is monolithically integrated with a LTUAWG-VWGDC serving as the connecting active waveguide (AWG) and the optical transmission testing device. Through a loss budget analysis on an EAM-integrated VWGDC, an optical mode transfer loss of -1.6 dB is observed between the PWG and the AWG. By comparing the reverse directions of optical excitation, the identical optical transmission relations with bias are observed, further verifying the high efficiency properties in a SSC. Optical misalignment tolerance is employed to test the two transferred optical modes. 1dB misalignment tolerance of +/-2.9 microm (horizontal) and +/-2.2 microm (vertical) is obtained from the PWG, which is better than the value of +/-1.9 microm (horizontal) and +/-1.6 microm (vertical) from the AWG. Far-field angle measurement shows 6.0 degrees (horizontal) 9.3 degrees (vertical) and 11 degrees (horizontal) x 20 degrees (vertical) for the PWG and the AWG, respectively, exhibiting the capability of a mode transformer. All of these measurements are also examined by a 3D beam propagation method (BPM) showing quite consistent results. In this wet etching technique, no regrowth is needed during processing. Furthermore, UEAR processing controlled by in situ monitoring can lead to a simple way for submicron-size processing, showing that a highly reliable processing technique can thus be expected. A low cost of fabrication can also be realized, indicating that this method can be potentially used in optoelectronic integration.

  2. The influence of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ki-sik; Park, Kyungyeon; Choi, Bo-ram

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 university students with no history of ankle sprain. They descended stairs while wearing the medio-lateral unstable sole or with bare feet. Electromyography was used to record the activity of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscles and paired t-tests were used to assess statistical significance. [Results] The medio-lateral unstable sole group showed increased tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscle activation compared to the barefoot group. [Conclusion] Medio-lateral unstable sole can be used with exercises to prevent further ankle damage by activating both the inversion and eversion muscles. PMID:27630412

  3. Shoes influence lower limb muscle activity and may predispose the wearer to lateral ankle ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Robin; Arnold, Graham P; Drew, Tim S; Cochrane, Lynda A; Abboud, Rami J

    2009-03-01

    Lateral ankle ligaments are injured by hyperinversion of the foot. Foot position is controlled by the lower limb muscles. Awareness of foot position is impaired by wearing shoes. We aimed to determine the influence of wearing shoes upon muscle activity. Sixty-two healthy subjects underwent the same measurements, barefoot and with standardized shoes in a random order. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from the peroneus longus muscle in response to sudden and unanticipated inversion of the ipsilateral foot. Following foot inversion, the EMG signal showed an initial peak muscle contraction followed by a sustained smaller contraction. Both changes were significantly greater in shoes compared to the barefoot condition for all tested degrees of inversion. Muscle contraction following sudden inversion of the foot was significantly greater when wearing shoes. This greater muscular contraction may be an intrinsic mechanism to oppose the increased moment created by the inverted foot/shoe condition, and hence, may counter balance the increased tendency to injure the lateral ankle ligaments created by wearing shoes.

  4. Scapular winging as a symptom of cervical flexion myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Tashiro, Jun; Tsuji, Sachiko; Yabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2007-01-01

    A 23-year-old man complained of weakness of the right arm that he first noted six years prior to his visit. Neurological examination revealed atrophy and weakness of the triceps and serratus anterior muscle on the right side, which resulted in scapular winging on that side. MRI with neck flexion revealed compression of the cervical cord enabling a diagnosis of flexion myelopathy. Proximal muscle weakness and atrophy in flexion myelopathies including Hirayama disease are extremely rare. Here, we report a case of unilateral, proximal upper limb atrophy with scapular winging, attributed to middle cervical flexion myelopathy.

  5. Lateral entorhinal modulation of piriform cortical activity and fine odor discrimination.

    PubMed

    Chapuis, Julie; Cohen, Yaniv; He, Xiaobin; Zhang, Zhijan; Jin, Sen; Xu, Fuqiang; Wilson, Donald A

    2013-08-14

    The lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC) receives direct input from olfactory bulb mitral cells and piriform cortical pyramidal cells and is the gateway for olfactory input to the hippocampus. However, the LEC also projects back to the piriform cortex and olfactory bulb. Activity in the LEC is shaped by input from the perirhinal cortices, hippocampus, and amygdala, and thus could provide a rich contextual modulation of cortical odor processing. The present study further explored LEC feedback to anterior piriform cortex by examining how LEC top-down input modulates anterior piriform cortex odor evoked activity in rats. Retrograde viral tracing confirmed rich LEC projections to both the olfactory bulb and piriform cortices. In anesthetized rats, reversible lesions of the ipsilateral LEC increased anterior piriform cortical single-unit spontaneous activity. In awake animals performing an odor discrimination task, unilateral LEC reversible lesions enhanced ipsilateral piriform cortical local field potential oscillations during odor sampling, with minimal impact on contralateral activity. Bilateral LEC reversible lesions impaired discrimination performance on a well learned, difficult odor discrimination task, but had no impact on a well learned simple odor discrimination task. The simple discrimination task was impaired by bilateral reversible lesions of the anterior piriform cortex. Given the known function of LEC in working memory and multisensory integration, these results suggest it may serve as a powerful top-down modulator of olfactory cortical function and odor perception. Furthermore, the results provide potential insight into how neuropathology in the entorhinal cortex could contribute to early olfactory deficits seen in Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Nicotine regulates activity of lateral habenula neurons via presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Wanhong; Xiao, Cheng; Gao, Ming; Hopf, F. Woodward; Krnjević, Krešimir; McIntosh, J. Michael; Fu, Rao; Wu, Jie; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-01-01

    There is much interest in brain regions that drive nicotine intake in smokers. Interestingly, both the rewarding and aversive effects of nicotine are probably critical for sustaining nicotine addiction. The medial and lateral habenular (LHb) nuclei play important roles in processing aversion, and recent work has focused on the critical involvement of the LHb in encoding and responding to aversive stimuli. Several neurotransmitter systems are implicated in nicotine’s actions, but very little is known about how nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) regulate LHb activity. Here we report in brain slices that activation of nAChRs depolarizes LHb cells and robustly increases firing, and also potentiates glutamate release in LHb. These effects were blocked by selective antagonists of α6-containing (α6*) nAChRs, and were absent in α6*-nAChR knockout mice. In addition, nicotine activates GABAergic inputs to LHb via α4β2-nAChRs, at lower concentrations but with more rapid desensitization relative to α6*-nAChRs. These results demonstrate the existence of diverse functional nAChR subtypes at presynaptic and postsynaptic sites in LHb, through which nicotine could facilitate or inhibit LHb neuronal activity and thus contribute to nicotine aversion or reward. PMID:27596561

  7. Reward bias and lateralization in gambling behavior: behavioral activation system and alpha band analysis.

    PubMed

    Balconi, Michela; Finocchiaro, Roberta; Canavesio, Ylenia; Messina, Rossella

    2014-11-30

    The present research explored the main factors that can influence subjects' choices in the case of decisions. In order to elucidate the individual differences that influence the decisional processes, making their strategies more or less advantageous, we tested the effect of a reward sensitivity in the behavioral activation system (BAS-Reward) constructed on the ability to distinguish between high- and low-risk decisions. Secondly, the lateralization effect, related to increased activation of the left (BAS-related) hemisphere, was explored. Thirty-one subjects were tested using the Iowa Gambling Task, and the BAS-Reward measure was applied to distinguish between high-BAS and low-BAS groups. Behavioral responses (gain/loss options) and alpha-band modulation were considered. It was found that high-BAS group increased their tendency to opt in favor of the immediate reward (loss strategy) rather than the long-term option (win strategy). Secondly, high-BAS subjects showed an increased left-hemisphere activation in response to losing (with immediate reward) choices in comparison with low-BAS subjects. A "reward bias" effect was supposed to explain both the bad strategy and the unbalanced hemispheric activation for high-BAS and more risk-taking subjects.

  8. Lateral prefrontal cortex activity during cognitive control of emotion predicts response to social stress in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tully, Laura M; Lincoln, Sarah Hope; Hooker, Christine I

    2014-01-01

    LPFC dysfunction is a well-established neural impairment in schizophrenia and is associated with worse symptoms. However, how LPFC activation influences symptoms is unclear. Previous findings in healthy individuals demonstrate that lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) activation during cognitive control of emotional information predicts mood and behavior in response to interpersonal conflict, thus impairments in these processes may contribute to symptom exacerbation in schizophrenia. We investigated whether schizophrenia participants show LPFC deficits during cognitive control of emotional information, and whether these LPFC deficits prospectively predict changes in mood and symptoms following real-world interpersonal conflict. During fMRI, 23 individuals with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 24 healthy controls completed the Multi-Source Interference Task superimposed on neutral and negative pictures. Afterwards, schizophrenia participants completed a 21-day online daily-diary in which they rated the extent to which they experienced mood and schizophrenia-spectrum symptoms, as well as the occurrence and response to interpersonal conflict. Schizophrenia participants had lower dorsal LPFC activity (BA9) during cognitive control of task-irrelevant negative emotional information. Within schizophrenia participants, DLPFC activity during cognitive control of emotional information predicted changes in positive and negative mood on days following highly distressing interpersonal conflicts. Results have implications for understanding the specific role of LPFC in response to social stress in schizophrenia, and suggest that treatments targeting LPFC-mediated cognitive control of emotion could promote adaptive response to social stress in schizophrenia.

  9. Human trace fear conditioning: right-lateralized cortical activity supports trace-interval processes.

    PubMed

    Haritha, Abhishek T; Wood, Kimberly H; Ver Hoef, Lawrence W; Knight, David C

    2013-06-01

    Pavlovian conditioning requires the convergence and simultaneous activation of neural circuitry that supports conditioned stimulus (CS) and unconditioned stimulus (US) processes. However, in trace conditioning, the CS and US are separated by a period of time called the trace interval, and thus do not overlap. Therefore, determining brain regions that support associative learning by maintaining a CS representation during the trace interval is an important issue for conditioning research. Prior functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research has identified brain regions that support trace-conditioning processes. However, relatively little is known about whether this activity is specific to the trace CS, the trace interval, or both periods of time. The present study was designed to disentangle the hemodynamic response produced by the trace CS from that associated with the trace interval, in order to identify learning-related activation during these distinct components of a trace-conditioning trial. Trace-conditioned activity was observed within dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsolateral PFC, insula, inferior parietal lobule (IPL), and posterior cingulate (PCC). Each of these regions showed learning-related activity during the trace CS, while trace-interval activity was only observed within a subset of these areas (i.e., dorsomedial PFC, PCC, right dorsolateral PFC, right IPL, right superior/middle temporal gyrus, and bilateral insula). Trace-interval activity was greater in right than in left dorsolateral PFC, IPL, and superior/middle temporal gyrus. These findings indicate that components of the prefrontal, cingulate, insular, and parietal cortices support trace-interval processes, as well as suggesting that a right-lateralized fronto-parietal circuit may play a unique role in trace conditioning.

  10. Comparison of upper cervical flexion and cervical flexion angle of computer workers with upper trapezius and levator scapular pain.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we compared upper cervical flexion and cervical flexion angle of computer workers with upper trapezius and levator scapular pain. [Subject] Eight male computer workers with upper trapezius muscle pain and eight others with levator scapular muscle pain participated. [Methods] Each subject was assessed in terms of upper cervical flexion angle and total cervical flexion angles using a cervical range of motion instrument after one hour of computer work. [Results] The upper cervical flexion angle of the group with levator scapular pain was significantly lower than that of the group with upper trapezius pain after computer work. The total cervical flexion angle of the group with upper trapezius pain was significantly lower than that of the group with levator scapular pain after computer work. [Conclusion] For selective and effective intervention for neck pain, therapists should evaluate upper and lower cervical motion individually.

  11. Effect of compressive follower preload on the flexion-extension response of the human lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Avinash G; Havey, Robert M; Carandang, Gerard; Simonds, James; Voronov, Leonard I; Ghanayem, Alexander J; Meade, Kevin P; Gavin, Thomas M; Paxinos, Odysseas

    2003-05-01

    Traditional experimental methods are unable to study the kinematics of whole lumbar spine specimens under physiologic compressive preloads because the spine without active musculature buckles under just 120 N of vertical load. However, the lumbar spine can support a compressive load of physiologic magnitude (up to 1200 N) without collapsing if the load is applied along a follower load path. This study tested the hypothesis that the load-displacement response of the lumbar spine in flexion-extension is affected by the magnitude of the follower preload and the follower preload path. Twenty-one fresh human cadaveric lumbar spines were tested in flexion-extension under increasing compressive follower preload applied along two distinctly different optimized preload paths. The first (neutral) preload path was considered optimum if the specimen underwent the least angular change in its lordosis when the full range of preload (0-1200 N) was applied in its neutral posture. The second (flexed) preload path was optimized for an intermediate specimen posture between neutral and full flexion. A twofold increase in flexion stiffness occurred around the neutral posture as the preload was increased from 0 to 1200 N. The preload magnitude (400 N and larger) significantly affected the range of motion (ROM), with a 25% decrease at 1200 N preload applied along the neutral path. When the preload was applied along a path optimized for an intermediate forward-flexed posture, only a 15% decrease in ROM occurred at 1200 N. The results demonstrate that whole lumbar spine specimens can be subjected to compressive follower preloads of in vivo magnitudes while allowing physiologic mobility under flexion-extension moments. The optimized follower preload provides a method to simulate the resultant vector of the muscles that allow the spine to support physiologic compressive loads induced during flexion-extension activities.

  12. Central as well as Peripheral Attentional Bottlenecks in Dual-Task Performance Activate Lateral Prefrontal Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Szameitat, André J.; Vanloo, Azonya; Müller, Hermann J.

    2016-01-01

    Human information processing suffers from severe limitations in parallel processing. In particular, when required to respond to two stimuli in rapid succession, processing bottlenecks may appear at central and peripheral stages of task processing. Importantly, it has been suggested that executive functions are needed to resolve the interference arising at such bottlenecks. The aims of the present study were to test whether central attentional limitations (i.e., bottleneck at the decisional response selection stage) as well as peripheral limitations (i.e., bottleneck at response initiation) both demand executive functions located in the lateral prefrontal cortex. For this, we re-analyzed two previous studies, in which a total of 33 participants performed a dual-task according to the paradigm of the psychological refractory period (PRP) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In one study (N = 17), the PRP task consisted of two two-choice response tasks known to suffer from a central bottleneck (CB group). In the other study (N = 16), the PRP task consisted of two simple-response tasks known to suffer from a peripheral bottleneck (PB group). Both groups showed considerable dual-task costs in form of slowing of the second response in the dual-task (PRP effect). Imaging results are based on the subtraction of both single-tasks from the dual-task within each group. In the CB group, the bilateral middle frontal gyri and inferior frontal gyri were activated. Higher activation in these areas was associated with lower dual-task costs. In the PB group, the right middle frontal and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) were activated. Here, higher activation was associated with higher dual-task costs. In conclusion we suggest that central and peripheral bottlenecks both demand executive functions located in lateral prefrontal cortices (LPFC). Differences between the CB and PB groups with respect to the exact prefrontal areas activated and the correlational patterns

  13. Increasing lateralized motor activity in younger and older adults using Real-time fMRI during executed movements.

    PubMed

    Neyedli, Heather F; Sampaio-Baptista, Cassandra; Kirkman, Matthew A; Havard, David; Lührs, Michael; Ramsden, Katie; Flitney, David D; Clare, Stuart; Goebel, Rainer; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2017-02-15

    Neurofeedback training involves presenting an individual with a representation of their brain activity and instructing them to alter the activity using the feedback. One potential application of neurofeedback is for patients to alter neural activity to improve function. For example, there is evidence that greater laterality of movement-related activity is associated with better motor outcomes after stroke; so using neurofeedback to increase laterality may provide a novel route for improving outcomes. However, we must demonstrate that individuals can control relevant neurofeedback signals. Here, we performed two proof-of-concept studies, one in younger (median age: 26years) and one in older healthy volunteers (median age: 67.5years). The purpose was to determine if participants could manipulate laterality of activity between the motor cortices using real-time fMRI neurofeedback while performing simple hand movements. The younger cohort trained using their left and right hand, the older group trained using their left hand only. In both studies participants in a neurofeedback group were able to achieve more lateralized activity than those in a sham group (younger adults: F(1,23)=4.37, p<0.05; older adults: F(1,15)=9.08, p<0.01). Moreover, the younger cohort was able to maintain the lateralized activity for right hand movements once neurofeedback was removed. The older cohort did not maintain lateralized activity upon feedback removal, with the limitation being that they did not train with their right hand. The results provide evidence that neurofeedback can be used with executed movements to promote lateralized brain activity and thus is amenable for testing as a therapeutic intervention for patients following stroke.

  14. Histamine excites rat lateral vestibular nuclear neurons through activation of post-synaptic H2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Han, Xiao-Hu; Li, Hong-Zhao; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2008-12-19

    Through whole-cell patch recordings in brainstem slices, the effects of histamine on neuronal activity of the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN) were investigated. Bath application of histamine elicited a concentration-dependent excitation of both spontaneous firing (n=19) and silent (n=7) LVN neurons. Moreover, histamine induced a stable inward current in the LVN neurons (n=5) and the histamine-induced depolarization of membrane potential persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin (n=4), indicating a direct post-synaptic effect of the histamine on the LVN neurons. Selective histamine H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine effectively blocked the histamine-evoked excitatory responses on the LVN neurons (n=4), but selective histamine H1 receptor antagonist triprolidine did not (n=4). In addition, selective histamine H2 receptor agonist dimaprit (n=3) rather than 2-pyridylethylamine (n=4), a selective histamine H1 receptor agonist, mimicked the excitatory action of histamine on LVN neurons. The results demonstrate that histamine excites the LVN neurons via post-synaptic histamine H2 receptors and suggest that the central histaminergic projection arising from the hypothalamus may modulate LVN neurons activity and actively influence the vestibular reflexes and functions.

  15. Intrinsic and extrinsic cues regulate the daily profile of mouse lateral habenula neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Sakhi, Kanwal; Wegner, Sven; Belle, Mino D C; Howarth, Michael; Delagrange, Philippe; Brown, Timothy M; Piggins, Hugh D

    2014-01-01

    The epithalamic lateral habenula (LHb) is implicated as part of the mammalian brain's circadian system. Anatomical evidence suggests that the LHb receives extrinsic circadian timing cues from retinal ganglion cells and the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Intriguingly, some LHb neurones contain the molecular circadian clock, but it is unclear if and how intrinsic and extrinsic circadian processes influence neuronal activity in the mouse LHb. Here, using an in vitro brain slice preparation isolating the LHb from the SCN, we show through whole-cell patch-clamp recordings that LHb neurones exhibit heterogeneity in their resting state, but the majority spontaneously fire action potentials (APs). Discharge rate of APs varied from low firing in the early day to higher firing later in the day and was absent in LHb brain slices prepared from Cry1−/−Cry2−/− mice that lack a functional molecular clock. Low amplitude circadian oscillations in the molecular circadian clock were also monitored in LHb brain slices, but were absent in Cry1−/−Cry2−/− LHb brain tissue. A putative neurochemical output signal of the SCN, prokineticin 2 (PK2), inhibited some LHb neurones by elevating the frequency of GABA release in the LHb. Using multi-electrode recordings in vivo, we found that LHb neurones sluggishly respond to retinal illumination, suggesting that they receive such information through polysynaptic processes. In summary, our results show for the first time that intrinsic circadian signals are important for regulating LHb neuronal state, while the SCN-derived signal PK2 is less influential. Moreover, we demonstrate that mouse LHb neurones have access to and can respond to visual input, but such signals are unlikely to be directly communicated to the LHb. Broadly, these findings raise the possibility that intrinsic circadian signals are likely to be influential in shaping LHb contributions to cognition and emotionality. PMID:25194046

  16. Feeding and Reward Are Differentially Induced by Activating GABAergic Lateral Hypothalamic Projections to VTA

    PubMed Central

    Barbano, M. Flavia; Wang, Hui-Ling; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) has two motivational effects: long trains of stimulation induce drive-like effects such as eating, and short trains are rewarding. It has not been clear whether a single set of activated fibers subserves the two effects. Previous optogenetic stimulation studies have confirmed that reinforcement and induction of feeding can each be induced by selective stimulation of GABAergic fibers originating in the bed nucleus of the LH and projecting to the ventral tegmental area (VTA). In the present study we determined the optimal stimulation parameters for each of the two optogenetically induced effects in food-sated mice. Stimulation-induced eating was strongest with 5 Hz and progressively weaker with 10 and 20 Hz. Stimulation-induced reward was strongest with 40 Hz and progressively weaker with lower or higher frequencies. Mean preferred duration for continuous 40 Hz stimulation was 61.6 s in a “real-time” place preference task; mean preferred duration for 5 Hz stimulation was 45.6 s. The differential effects of high- and low-frequency stimulation of this pathway seem most likely to be due to differential effects on downstream targets. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study reports that the eating and the reward induced by optogenetic stimulation of a previously identified GABAergic projection from the lateral hypothalamus to the ventral tegmental area are differentially affected by low- and high-frequency stimulation, respectively. This suggests a way that stimulation of the same pathway can have very different motivational effects on behavior, inducing a drive state (usually thought to be aversive) under one condition and inducing the rewarding state under another. This offers an insight into what has been called the “drive-reward paradox”: why would an animal work for stimulation that established an apparent drive state? PMID:26961951

  17. Using the traditional model to evaluate the active force of the human lateral rectus muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, ZhiPeng; Chen, WeiYi; Jing, Lin; Feng, PengFei; Wu, XiaoGang; Guo, HongMei

    2014-05-01

    The information on the force of extraocular muscles (EOMs) is beneficial for strabismus diagnosis and surgical planning, and a direct and simple method is important for surgeons to obtain these forces. Based on the traditional model, a numerical simulation method was proposed to achieve this aim, and then the active force of the lateral rectus (LR) muscle was successfully simulated when the eye rotated every angle from 0° to 30° in the horizontal plane from the nasal to the temporal side. In order to verify these simulations, the results were compared with the previous experimental data. The comparison shows that the simulation results diverged much more than the experimental data in the range of 0°-10°. The errors were corrected to make the simulation results closer to the experimental data. Finally, a general empirical equation was proposed to evaluate the active force of the LR muscle by fitting these data, which represent the relationship between the simulation forces and the contractive amounts of the LR muscle.

  18. Long-term physical activity: an exogenous risk factor for sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, Ceryl A.; Westgate, Kate; Gunstone, Sue; Brage, Soren; Wareham, Nicholas J.; McDermott, Christopher J.; Shaw, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To conduct a geographically defined, UK-based case-control study, to examine any association between physical activity (PA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: A novel historical PA questionnaire was designed, validated, and subsequently administered in individual face-to-face interviews of 175 newly diagnosed sporadic ALS cases and 317 age- and sex-matched community controls. Historical PA energy expenditure and time spent in vigorous-intensity PA were derived from questionnaire data and compared between cases and controls. Results: Participation in an extra 10kJ/kg/day of PA (equivalent to approximately 45minutes brisk walking) was consistently associated with an increased risk of ALS, with the strongest association observed for adulthood exercise-related PA (OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.10-1.97). An extra 10mins/day of vigorous PA was also associated with the odds of ALS (OR 1.03, 95% CI 1·01-1·05). Results were slightly attenuated following adjustment for smoking and educational attainment. Conclusions: To our knowledge this is the first study to demonstrate a positive association between ALS and PA participation using a specifically designed and validated historical PA questionnaire. Despite the well-established health benefits of PA, a high activity lifestyle may also be associated with elevated risk of ALS. Large-scale prospective studies in the future may help to confirm this association. PMID:26998882

  19. Alpha-interferon suppresses food intake and neuronal activity of the lateral hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Vázquez, C; Prieto-Gómez, B; Dafny, N

    1994-12-01

    Alpha-interferon (alpha-IFN) treatment in humans induces anorexic effects. However, the mechanisms and sites of action are unknown. Rats implanted with an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) cannula for local injection, and semi-microelectrodes in the lateral hypothalamic (LH) area for neuronal recording were used. The animals were kept in metabolic cages, and food and water intake was measured daily at 7:00 and 19:00 hr for 35 days, including: 5 days before the experiment; 10 days during daily alpha-IFN application (either i.p. 1500 I.U./gbw, or i.c.v. 1500 and 150 I.U./animal) and/or a vehicle control group; and 20 days post drug treatment. The unitary activity recording from the LH area was made before (30 min), during (10 min) and after (200 min) the alpha-IFN applications. alpha-IFN elicited a reversible dose-related decrease of both food intake and body weight. This decrease in food intake following alpha-IFN injections was correlated with a depression of LH neuronal electrical activity. Since direct brain application (i.c.v.) and systemic (i.p.) alpha-IFN treatment elicited identical responses, it is possible to assume that alpha-IFN suppresses food intake by a direct action on CNS sites including the LH neurons.

  20. Functioning free gracilis transfer to reconstruct elbow flexion and quality of life in global brachial plexus injured patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Yang, Jian-Tao; Fu, Guo; Li, Xiang-Ming; Qin, Ben-Gang; Hou, Yi; Qi, Jian; Li, Ping; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Gu, Li-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    In the study, the functional recovery and relative comprehensive quality of life of cases of global brachial plexus treated with free functioning muscle transfers were investigated. Patients who received functioning gracilis muscle transfer between August 1999 and October 2014 to reconstruct elbow flexion, wrist and fingers extension were recruited. The mean age of the patients was 26.36 (range, 16–42) years. The mean period of time from gracilis transfer to the last follow-up was 54.5 months (range, 12–185 months). Muscle power, active range of motion of the elbow flexion, wrist extension, and total active fingers extension were recorded. SDS, SAS and DASH questionnaires were given to estimate patients’ quality of life. 35.71% reported good elbow flexion and 50.00% reported excellent elbow flexion. The average ROM of the elbow flexion was 106.5° (range, 0–142°) and was 17.00° (range, 0–72°) for wrist extension. The average DASH score was 51.14 (range, 17.5–90.8). The prevalence of anxiety and depression were 42.86% and 45.24%. Thrombosis and bowstringing were the most common short and long-term complications. Based on these findings, free gracilis transfer using accessory nerve as donor nerve is a satisfactory treatment to reconstruct the elbow flexion and wrist extension in global-brachial-plexus-injured patients. PMID:26935173

  1. [Management of Flexion Contracture in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Hube, R; Mayr, H O; Pfitzner, T; von Roth, P

    2015-06-01

    Flexion contracture is a common deformity of the arthritic knee. The present publication describes causes, clinical relevance and surgical technique in the presence of flexion contractures in total knee arthroplasty. Flexion contracture can be attributed to different causes. Basically it is a mismatch between flexion and extension gaps. Moderate and severe deformities have to be corrected by additional surgical interventions. In most cases soft tissue techniques with release of contracted structures, the removal of osteophytes and additional distal femoral bone resection are necessary. The goal of these interventions is to achieve full extension of the knee. During rehabilitation attention has to be paid to maintain it with intensive physical therapy. A remaining flexion contracture is associated with inferior functional outcome and persistent pain.

  2. Weak lensing goes bananas: what flexion really measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, P.; Er, X.

    2008-07-01

    In weak gravitational lensing, the image distortion caused by shear measures the projected tidal gravitational field of the deflecting mass distribution. To lowest order, the shear is proportional to the mean image ellipticity. If the image sizes are not small compared to the scale over which the shear varies, higher-order distortions occur, called flexion. For ordinary weak lensing, the observable quantity is not the shear, but the reduced shear, owing to the mass-sheet degeneracy. Likewise, the flexion itself is unobservable. Instead, higher-order image distortions measure the reduced flexion, i.e., derivatives of the reduced shear. We derive the corresponding lens equation in terms of the reduced flexion and calculate the resulting relation between brightness moments of source and image. Assuming an isotropic distribution of source orientations, estimates for the reduced shear and flexion are obtained and then tested with simulations. In particular, the presence of flexion affects the determination of the reduced shear. The results of these simulations yield the amount of bias of the estimators as a function of the shear and flexion. We point out and quantify a fundamental limitation of the flexion formalism in terms of the product of reduced flexion and source size. If this product increases above the derived threshold, multiple images of the source are formed locally, and the formalism breaks down. Finally, we show how a general (reduced) flexion field can be decomposed into its four components. Two of them are due to a shear field, carrying an E- and B-mode in general. The other two components do not correspond to a shear field, and they can also be split up into corresponding E- and B-modes.

  3. Trapezoid supracondylar femoral extension osteotomy for knee flexion contractures in patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, S M J; Heidari, P; Esfandiari, H; Motamedi, M

    2008-01-01

    Flexion deformity of the haemophilic knee is a considerable cause of disability and may need to be managed surgically in severe cases. We have used a trapezoid supracondylar femoral extension osteotomy to correct severe knee flexion deformity. Nine severe haemophilic patients with contractures >30 degrees that were unresponsive to conservative measures underwent 11 trapezoid osteotomies. The angle of deformity was measured using anteroposterior and lateral knee X-ray films at maximum extension. Factor levels of 80-100% were achieved before the operation. A trapezoid osteotomy of the distal femur bone was performed using a lateral approach. The frontal plane angular deformity (if any) was corrected at the same time. The osteotomy site was fixed using an Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteo synthesefragen (AO) condylar blade plate. Following surgery, the knee was supported by a plaster splint at 20 degrees of flexion. Physiotherapy was started on third postoperative day and continued three times a week. There was no serious complication. The deformities were corrected in all of the patients and the mean range of motion increased form 68.6 degrees to 98.1 degrees . Bleeding episodes decreased in all four knees which had a bleeding score of 3 before surgery. Using the Orthopaedic Advisory Committee of the World Federation of Haemophilia scores, nine good and two fair results were obtained. All patients regained the ability to walk for both short and long distance without any aid, climb the stairs, bath, and use public transportation. Trapezoid supracondylar femoral extension osteotomy should be considered in the surgical management of severe haemophilic flexion deformity of the knee joint.

  4. In Vivo Cervical Facet Joint Capsule Deformation During Flexion-Extension

    PubMed Central

    Anderst, William J; Lee, Joon Y; Kang, James D

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Non-randomized controlled cohort. Objective To characterize subaxial cervical facet joint kinematics and facet joint capsule (FJC) deformation during in vivo, dynamic flexion-extension. To assess the effect of single-level anterior arthrodesis on adjacent segment FJC deformation. Summary of Background Data The cervical facet joint has been identified as the most common source of neck pain and it is thought to play a role in chronic neck pain related to whiplash injury. Our current knowledge of cervical facet joint kinematics is based on cadaveric mechanical testing. Methods 14 asymptomatic controls and 9 C5-C6 arthrodesis patients performed full range of motion (ROM) flexion-extension while biplane radiographs were collected at 30 Hz. A volumetric model-based tracking process determined 3D vertebral position with sub-millimeter accuracy. FJC fibers were modeled and grouped into anterior, lateral, posterior-lateral, posterior, and posterior-medial regions. FJC fiber deformations (total, shear and compression-distraction) relative to the static position were determined for each cervical motion segment (C2-C3 through C6-C7) during flexion-extension. Results No significant differences in the rate of fiber deformation in flexion were identified among motion segments (p = .159), however, significant differences were observed among fiber regions (p < .001). Significant differences in the rate of fiber deformation in extension were identified among motion segments (p < .001) and among fiber regions (p = .001). The rate of FJC deformation in extension adjacent to the arthrodesis was 45% less than in corresponding motion segments in control subjects (p = .001). Conclusion In control subjects, facet joint capsule deformations are significantly different among vertebral levels and capsule regions when vertebrae are in an extended orientation. In a flexed orientation, FJC deformations are only different among capsule regions. Single-level anterior arthrodesis is

  5. Flexion myelopathy of the thoracic spine. Case report.

    PubMed

    Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Neo, Masashi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of surgically treated symptomatic thoracic kyphosis caused by dynamic compression in an elderly man. Myelopathy due to thoracic kyphosis has been reported in patients with congenital kyphosis, Scheuermann dorsal kyphosis, and Cushing disease, but to the authors' knowledge this is the first report of dynamic kyphosis in an elderly person. This otherwise healthy 84-year-old man presented with a 2-year history of progressive difficulty in walking and bilateral leg dysesthesia. Despite several cervical and lumbar surgeries, his symptoms gradually worsened. A radiological examination revealed severe thoracic kyphosis, with a lateral Cobb angle of 59 degrees from T-2 to T-12. On a dynamic computed tomography (CT) myelogram, severe thoracic spinal cord draping and stretching on flexion was demonstrated. On extension, however, imaging studies failed to show draping or stretching. Posterior corrective fusion was performed with instrumentation from T-2 to T-9. Postoperative CT myelography demonstrated no significant spinal cord compression with restoration of the cerebrospinal fluid space anterior to the spinal cord, and the successful correction of the kyphosis to 44 degrees. The patient's neurological sequelae gradually resolved throughout 6 months of follow up.

  6. The medial gastrocnemius muscle attenuates force fluctuations during plantar flexion.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Minoru; Yoshitake, Yasuhide; Kouzaki, Motoki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2006-02-01

    Force fluctuations during steady contractions of multiple agonist muscles may be influenced by the relative contribution of force by each muscle. The purpose of the study was to compare force fluctuations during steady contractions performed with the plantar flexor muscles in different knee positions. Nine men (25.8+/-5.1 years) performed steady contractions of the plantar flexor muscles in the knee-flexed and knee-extended (greater involvement of the gastrocnemii muscles) positions. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force was 32% greater in the knee-extended position compared with the knee-flexed position. The target forces were 2.5-10% MVC force in the respective position. The amplitude of electromyogram in the medial gastrocnemius muscle was greater in the knee-extended position (10.50+/-9.80%) compared with the knee-flexed position (1.26+/-1.15%, P<0.01). The amplitude of electromyogram in the soleus muscle was not influenced by the knee position. The amplitude of electromyogram in the lateral gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles was marginal and unaltered with knee position. At the same force (in Newtons), the standard deviation of force was lower in the knee-extended position compared with the knee-flexed position. These results indicate that force fluctuations during plantar flexion are attenuated with greater involvement of the medial gastrocnemius muscle.

  7. DNA methyltransferase activity is required for memory-related neural plasticity in the lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Stephanie A; Watts, Casey S; Schafe, Glenn E

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that auditory Pavlovian fear conditioning is associated with an increase in DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) expression in the lateral amygdala (LA) and that intra-LA infusion or bath application of an inhibitor of DNMT activity impairs the consolidation of an auditory fear memory and long-term potentiation (LTP) at thalamic and cortical inputs to the LA, in vitro. In the present study, we use awake behaving neurophysiological techniques to examine the role of DNMT activity in memory-related neurophysiological changes accompanying fear memory consolidation and reconsolidation in the LA, in vivo. We show that auditory fear conditioning results in a training-related enhancement in the amplitude of short-latency auditory-evoked field potentials (AEFPs) in the LA. Intra-LA infusion of a DNMT inhibitor impairs both fear memory consolidation and, in parallel, the consolidation of training-related neural plasticity in the LA; that is, short-term memory (STM) and short-term training-related increases in AEFP amplitude in the LA are intact, while long-term memory (LTM) and long-term retention of training-related increases in AEFP amplitudes are impaired. In separate experiments, we show that intra-LA infusion of a DNMT inhibitor following retrieval of an auditory fear memory has no effect on post-retrieval STM or short-term retention of training-related changes in AEFP amplitude in the LA, but significantly impairs both post-retrieval LTM and long-term retention of AEFP amplitude changes in the LA. These findings are the first to demonstrate the necessity of DNMT activity in the consolidation and reconsolidation of memory-associated neural plasticity, in vivo.

  8. Arthrofibrosis after TKA - Influence factors on the absolute flexion and gain in flexion after manipulation under anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Stiffness with decreased range of motion (ROM) has been described as a frustrating complication after TKA. If all methods of physiotherapeutic treatment have been exhausted trying to develop ROM, manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) can be discussed. The aim of the present study was to show the effect of MUA and to determine the influence of BMI, number of previous surgical procedures, pre-MUA ROM and timing of MUA for the results after MUA in regard to absolute flexion and gain in flexion. Methods 858 patients underwent TKA at our institution between 2004 and 2009. 39 of these patients underwent MUA because of postoperative knee stiffness. The data were retrospective analysed for the influence of BMI, pre-MUA flexion (/≤ 30 days after TKA) and number of previous surgery on the results after MUA (absolute Flexion/gain in flexion). Results The prevalence for stiffness after TKA was 4.54%. There was a statistically significant improvement in flexion not only directly after MUA but also 6 weeks after MUA. Patients with two or more previous operations before TKA showed statistically significant worse results six weeks after MUA in absolute flexion and gain in flexion (p = 0.039) than patients with one or two previous operations. No statistical significance in absolute flexion (p = 0.655) and gain in flexion (p = 0.328) after MUA between "early" and "late" was detected. The stiffer knees with a flexion below 70° showed significantly worse results (p = 0.044) in absolute flexion six weeks after MUA, but they also had statistical statistically better results with regard to gain in flexion (p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion MUA is a good instrument for improving ROM after TKA. The time between TKA and MUA seems less important, so different types of physiotherapeutic treatment could be tried before the procedure is started. MUA in patients with many previous operations and a flexion of less than 70° before MUA is not as effective as in

  9. Fear conditioning suppresses large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in lateral amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, P; Zhang, Q; Zhang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, L; Yamamoto, R; Sugai, T; Kato, N

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that depression-like behavior is accompanied with suppression of the large-conductance calcium activated potassium (BK) channel in cingulate cortex pyramidal cells. To test whether BK channels are also involved in fear conditioning, we studied neuronal properties of amygdala principal cells in fear conditioned mice. After behavior, we made brain slices containing the amygdala, the structure critically relevant to fear memory. The resting membrane potential in lateral amygdala (LA) neurons obtained from fear conditioned mice (FC group) was more depolarized than in neurons from naïve controls. The frequencies of spikes evoked by current injections were higher in neurons from FC mice, demonstrating that excitability of LA neurons was elevated by fear conditioning. The depolarization in neurons from FC mice was shown to depend on BK channels by using the BK channel blocker charybdotoxin. Suppression of BK channels in LA neurons from the FC group was further confirmed on the basis of the spike width, since BK channels affect the descending phase of spikes. Spikes were broader in the FC group than those in the naïve control in a manner dependent on BK channels. Consistently, quantitative real-time PCR revealed a decreased expression of BK channel mRNA. The present findings suggest that emotional disorder manifested in the forms of fear conditioning is accompanied with BK channel suppression in the amygdala, the brain structure critical to this emotional disorder.

  10. Active music therapy approach in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Raglio, Alfredo; Giovanazzi, Elena; Pain, Debora; Baiardi, Paola; Imbriani, Chiara; Imbriani, Marcello; Mora, Gabriele

    2016-12-01

    This randomized controlled study assessed the efficacy of active music therapy (AMT) on anxiety, depression, and quality of life in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Communication and relationship during AMT treatment were also evaluated. Thirty patients were assigned randomly to experimental [AMT plus standard of care (SC)] or control (SC) groups. AMT consisted of 12 sessions (three times a week), whereas the SC treatment was based on physical and speech rehabilitation sessions, occupational therapy, and psychological support. ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire, and Music Therapy Rating Scale were administered to assess functional, psychological, and music therapy outcomes. The AMT group improved significantly in McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire global scores (P=0.035) and showed a positive trend in nonverbal and sonorous-music relationship during the treatment. Further studies involving larger samples in a longer AMT intervention are needed to confirm the effectiveness of this approach in ALS.

  11. [The evoked activity of the lateral hypothalamus during extinction and differential inhibition].

    PubMed

    Vanetsian, G L

    1995-01-01

    Character of interaction between symmetric points of the cat's auditory cortex (A1) and the lateral hypothalamus (HL) was determined by calculating Spearman correlation coefficients between averaged summed sound-evoked activity (AEP) of the structures before, during elaboration, extinction and restoration, as well as differentiation of food-procuring conditioned reflex and in the eating full. Close mutual co-tuning between the cortex and hypothalamus characteristic for stable conditioned reflex was found to disrupted during its extinction, elaboration of differentiation and fullness eat inhibition due to entire reduction of hypothalamic AEP and disappearance of correlated with negativity of HL AEP "doubling" of the first positive wave of A1 AEP. Hyperactivity stage, expressed at the beginning of extinction and at the end of differentiation, preceded inactivation of hypothalamic afferents during elaboration of conditioned inhibition. The stage of hyperactivity, initiated by the elevated emotional state of the animal, testifies to an important role of emotional brain structures in the process of internal inhibition. The stage of HL and A1 hyperactivity initiated by emotional stress of the animal and following HL inactivation during inhibition of the conditioned response point to an important role of emotional subcortical brain structures in the mechanisms of inhibitory conditioning.

  12. Lesions of the lateral habenula facilitate active avoidance learning and threat extinction.

    PubMed

    Song, Mihee; Jo, Yong Sang; Lee, Yeon-Kyung; Choi, June-Seek

    2017-02-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is an epithalamic brain structure that provides strong projections to midbrain monoaminergic systems that are involved in motivation, emotion, and reinforcement learning. LHb neurons are known to convey information about aversive outcomes and negative prediction errors, suggesting a role in learning from aversive events. To test this idea, we examined the effects of electrolytic lesions of the LHb on signaled two-way active avoidance learning in which rats were trained to avoid an unconditioned stimulus (US) by taking a proactive shuttling response to an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS). The lesioned animals learned the avoidance response significantly faster than the control groups. In a separate experiment, we also investigated whether the LHb contributes to Pavlovian threat (fear) conditioning and extinction. Following paired presentations of the CS and the US, LHb-lesioned animals showed normal acquisition of conditioned response (CR) measured with freezing. However, extinction of the CR in the subsequent CS-only session was significantly faster. The enhanced performance in avoidance learning and in threat extinction jointly suggests that the LHb normally plays an inhibitory role in learning driven by absence of aversive outcomes.

  13. Effect of the angle of shoulder flexion on the reach trajectory of children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Makiko; Ohata, Koji; Izumi, Keisuke; Matsubayashi, Jun; Tominaga, Wataru; Mitani, Akira

    2014-11-11

    Many children with cerebral palsy (CP) use a wheelchair during activities of daily living and often extend their hand upward and downward to reach objects in a seated position in a wheelchair. However, the effect of shoulder position on reaching movements of children with CP is not established. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the angle of shoulder flexion on the reach trajectory of children with spastic CP. Seven children with mild CP [Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) levels I-II], five children with severe CP (MACS levels III-V) and six typically developing (TD) children participated. We prepared the device to have a top board with variable tilting angle in order to reduce the effect of gravity imposing on reaching movements. By using this device, the subjects could extend their arm by sliding it on the board to push a target button. The reaching movements were performed with the more affected hand at three angles (60°, 90° and 120°) of shoulder flexion and captured using a camera motion analysis system. Subjects in the TD and mild CP groups reached the target at 60°, 90° and 120° of shoulder flexion. Subjects of the severe CP group reached the target at 60° and 90° of shoulder flexion, but two of the subjects could not reach the target at 120° of shoulder flexion. The TD and mild CP groups showed smooth and almost straight trajectories at all three angles of shoulder flexion; however, the reach trajectory in the subjects with severe CP changed with the angle of shoulder flexion. A large angle of shoulder flexion induced great outward deviation in the trajectory. These findings suggest that the difficulty of the reaching task is changed depending on the shoulder joint angle in children with severe CP and that therapeutic interventions for children with severe CP should be provided in a manner appropriate for the shoulder joint angle.

  14. Early-light embryonic stimulation suggests a second route, via gene activation, to cerebral lateralization in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Chiandetti, Cinzia; Galliussi, Jessica; Andrew, Richard J.; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors determine the asymmetrical position of vertebrate embryos allowing asymmetric environmental stimulation to shape cerebral lateralization. In birds, late-light stimulation, just before hatching, on the right optic nerve triggers anatomical and functional cerebral asymmetries. However, some brain asymmetries develop in absence of embryonic light stimulation. Furthermore, early-light action affects lateralization in the transparent zebrafish embryos before their visual system is functional. Here we investigated whether another pathway intervenes in establishing brain specialization. We exposed chicks' embryos to light before their visual system was formed. We observed that such early stimulation modulates cerebral lateralization in a comparable vein of late-light stimulation on active retinal cells. Our results show that, in a higher vertebrate brain, a second route, likely affecting the genetic expression of photosensitive regions, acts before the development of a functional visual system. More than one sensitive period seems thus available to light stimulation to trigger brain lateralization. PMID:24048072

  15. Early-light embryonic stimulation suggests a second route, via gene activation, to cerebral lateralization in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Chiandetti, Cinzia; Galliussi, Jessica; Andrew, Richard J; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors determine the asymmetrical position of vertebrate embryos allowing asymmetric environmental stimulation to shape cerebral lateralization. In birds, late-light stimulation, just before hatching, on the right optic nerve triggers anatomical and functional cerebral asymmetries. However, some brain asymmetries develop in absence of embryonic light stimulation. Furthermore, early-light action affects lateralization in the transparent zebrafish embryos before their visual system is functional. Here we investigated whether another pathway intervenes in establishing brain specialization. We exposed chicks' embryos to light before their visual system was formed. We observed that such early stimulation modulates cerebral lateralization in a comparable vein of late-light stimulation on active retinal cells. Our results show that, in a higher vertebrate brain, a second route, likely affecting the genetic expression of photosensitive regions, acts before the development of a functional visual system. More than one sensitive period seems thus available to light stimulation to trigger brain lateralization.

  16. The influence of age, gender, lifestyle factors and sub-clinical neck pain on the cervical flexion-rotation test and cervical range of motion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenric; Hall, Toby; Robinson, Kim

    2008-12-01

    The flexion-rotation test (FRT) is commonly used when assessing cervicogenic headache. Additionally, active range of motion (AROM) is frequently used to evaluate impairment in neck pain. No studies have investigated the interaction of the FRT and AROM with age, gender, pain and lifestyle factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of these factors on the FRT and cervical AROM. A group of 66 participants (aged 20-78) were studied, 28 experienced sub-clinical neck pain (recurrent neck pain or discomfort which has not received treatment from a healthcare professional) while 38 did not. Age, gender, lifestyle factors and sub-clinical neck pain were assessed using a questionnaire. Measurement of AROM was performed by two examiners blind to the results of the questionnaire. Multiple linear regression analysis found that 59% of the variance in the FRT was explained by the presence of sub-clinical pain and cervical lateral flexion measures. Secondly, 58-72% of the variance in active cervical ROM measures was influenced by factors including the FRT, gender and movements of the neck in other planes. This study found that lifestyle factors do not influence the cervical FRT and AROM.

  17. Calcaneal Plantar Flexion During the Stance Phase of Gait.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Stacy E; Chiu, Loren Z F

    2016-04-01

    When the rear- and forefoot are constrained, calcaneal plantar flexion may occur, deforming the longitudinal arch. Previous research has reported calcaneal motion relative to the tibia or forefoot; these joint rotations may not accurately describe rotation of the calcaneus alone. This investigation: (1) characterized the calcaneus and leg segment and ankle joint rotations during stance in gait, and (2) described the range of calcaneal plantar flexion in different structural arch types. Men (n = 14) and women (n = 16) performed gait in a motion analysis laboratory. From heel strike to heel off, the leg rotated forward while the calcaneus plantar flexed. Before foot flat, calcaneal plantar flexion was greater than forward leg rotation, resulting in ankle plantar flexion. After foot flat, forward leg rotation was greater than calcaneal plantar flexion, resulting in ankle dorsiflexion. Structural arch type was classified using the longitudinal arch angle. The range of calcaneal plantar flexion from foot flat to heel off was small in low (-2° to -8°), moderate in high (-3° to -12°), and large in normal (-2° to -20°) structural arches. Calcaneal plantar flexion in gait during midstance may reflect functional arch characteristics, which vary depending on structural arch type.

  18. Variable and Asymmetric Range of Enslaving: Fingers Can Act Independently over Small Range of Flexion

    PubMed Central

    van den Noort, Josien C.; van Beek, Nathalie; van der Kraan, Thomas; Veeger, DirkJan H. E. J.; Stegeman, Dick F.; Veltink, Peter H.; Maas, Huub

    2016-01-01

    The variability in the numerous tasks in which we use our hands is very large. However, independent movement control of individual fingers is limited. To assess the extent of finger independency during full-range finger flexion including all finger joints, we studied enslaving (movement in non-instructed fingers) and range of independent finger movement through the whole finger flexion trajectory in single and multi-finger movement tasks. Thirteen young healthy subjects performed single- and multi-finger movement tasks under two conditions: active flexion through the full range of movement with all fingers free to move and active flexion while the non-instructed finger(s) were restrained. Finger kinematics were measured using inertial sensors (PowerGlove), to assess enslaving and range of independent finger movement. Although all fingers showed enslaving movement to some extent, highest enslaving was found in adjacent fingers. Enslaving effects in ring and little finger were increased with movement of additional, non-adjacent fingers. The middle finger was the only finger affected by restriction in movement of non-instructed fingers. Each finger showed a range of independent movement before the non-instructed fingers started to move, which was largest for the index finger. The start of enslaving was asymmetrical for adjacent fingers. Little finger enslaving movement was affected by multi-finger movement. We conclude that no finger can move independently through the full range of finger flexion, although some degree of full independence is present for smaller movements. This range of independent movement is asymmetric and variable between fingers and between subjects. The presented results provide insight into the role of finger independency for different types of tasks and populations. PMID:27992598

  19. Contralateral cortical organisation of information in visual short-term memory: evidence from lateralized brain activity during retrieval.

    PubMed

    Fortier-Gauthier, Ulysse; Moffat, Nicolas; Dell'Acqua, Roberto; McDonald, John J; Jolicœur, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    We studied brain activity during retention and retrieval phases of two visual short-term memory (VSTM) experiments. Experiment 1 used a balanced memory array, with one color stimulus in each hemifield, followed by a retention interval and a central probe, at the fixation point that designated the target stimulus in memory about which to make a determination of orientation. Retrieval of information from VSTM was associated with an event-related lateralization (ERL) with a contralateral negativity relative to the visual field from which the probed stimulus was originally encoded, suggesting a lateralized organization of VSTM. The scalp distribution of the retrieval ERL was more anterior than what is usually associated with simple maintenance activity, which is consistent with the involvement of different brain structures for these distinct visual memory mechanisms. Experiment 2 was like Experiment 1, but used an unbalanced memory array consisting of one lateral color stimulus in a hemifield and one color stimulus on the vertical mid-line. This design enabled us to separate lateralized activity related to target retrieval from distractor processing. Target retrieval was found to generate a negative-going ERL at electrode sites found in Experiment 1, and suggested representations were retrieved from anterior cortical structures. Distractor processing elicited a positive-going ERL at posterior electrodes sites, which could be indicative of a return to baseline of retention activity for the discarded memory of the now-irrelevant stimulus, or an active inhibition mechanism mediating distractor suppression.

  20. Respiration drives network activity and modulates synaptic and circuit processing of lateral inhibition in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew E.; Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Willhite, David C.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2012-01-01

    Respiration produces rhythmic activity in the entire olfactory system, driving neurons in the olfactory epithelium, bulb (OB) and cortex. The rhythmic nature of this activity is believed to be a critical component of sensory processing. OB projection neurons, mitral and tufted cells, exhibit both spiking and subthreshold membrane potential oscillations rhythmically coupled to respiration. Yet, the network and synaptic mechanisms that produce respiration-coupled activity, and the effects of respiration on lateral inhibition, a major component of sensory processing in OB circuits, are not known. Is respiration-coupled activity in mitral and tufted cells produced by sensory synaptic inputs from nasal airflow alone, cortico-bulbar feedback, or intrinsic membrane properties of the projection neurons? Does respiration facilitate or modulate the activity of inhibitory lateral circuits in the OB? Here, in vivo intracellular recordings from identified mitral and tufted cells in anesthetized rats demonstrate that nasal airflow provides excitatory synaptic inputs to both cell types and drives respiration-coupled spiking. Lateral inhibition, inhibitory post-synaptic potentials evoked by intrabulbar microstimulation, was modulated by respiration. In individual mitral and tufted cells inhibition was larger at specific respiratory phases. However, lateral inhibition was not uniformly larger during a particular respiratory phase in either cell type. Removing nasal airflow abolished respiration-coupled spiking in both cell types and nearly eliminated spiking in mitral, but not tufted cells. In the absence of nasal airflow, lateral inhibition was weaker in mitral cells and less modulated in tufted cells. Thus, respiration drives distinct network activities that functionally modulate sensory processing in the OB. PMID:22219272

  1. Abnormal functional lateralization and activity of language brain areas in typical specific language impairment (developmental dysphasia).

    PubMed

    de Guibert, Clément; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Tréguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-10-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting structural language (n = 21), to a matched group of typically developing children using a panel of four language tasks neither requiring reading nor metalinguistic skills, including two auditory lexico-semantic tasks (category fluency and responsive naming) and two visual phonological tasks based on picture naming. Data processing involved normalizing the data with respect to a matched pairs paediatric template, groups and between-groups analysis, and laterality indices assessment within regions of interest using single and combined task analysis. Children with specific language impairment exhibited a significant lack of left lateralization in all core language regions (inferior frontal gyrus-opercularis, inferior frontal gyrus-triangularis, supramarginal gyrus and superior temporal gyrus), across single or combined task analysis, but no difference of lateralization for the rest of the brain. Between-group comparisons revealed a left hypoactivation of Wernicke's area at the posterior superior temporal/supramarginal junction during the responsive naming task, and a right hyperactivation encompassing the anterior insula with adjacent inferior frontal gyrus and the head of the caudate nucleus during the first phonological task. This study thus provides evidence that this subtype of specific language impairment is associated with atypical lateralization and functioning of core language areas.

  2. Abnormal functional lateralization and activity of language brain areas in typical specific language impairment (developmental dysphasia)

    PubMed Central

    De Guibert, Clément; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferré, Jean-Christophe; Tréguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting structural language (n=21), to a matched group of typically-developing children using a panel of four language tasks neither requiring reading nor metalinguistic skills, including two auditory lexico-semantic tasks (category fluency and responsive naming) and two visual phonological tasks based on picture naming. Data processing involved normalizing the data with respect to a matched pairs pediatric template, groups and between-groups analysis, and laterality indexes assessment within regions of interest using single and combined task analysis. Children with specific language impairment exhibited a significant lack of left lateralization in all core language regions (inferior frontal gyrus-opercularis, inferior frontal gyrus-triangularis, supramarginal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus), across single or combined task analysis, but no difference of lateralization for the rest of the brain. Between-group comparisons revealed a left hypoactivation of Wernicke’s area at the posterior superior temporal/supramarginal junction during the responsive naming task, and a right hyperactivation encompassing the anterior insula with adjacent inferior frontal gyrus and the head of the caudate nucleus during the first phonological task. This study thus provides evidence that this specific subtype of specific language impairment is associated with atypical lateralization and functioning of core language areas. PMID:21719430

  3. Does dragonfly's abdomen flexion help with fast turning maneuvers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Geng; Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo; Flow Simulation Research Group Team

    2013-11-01

    Dragonflies are able to achieve fast turning maneuvers during take-off flights. Both asymmetric wing flapping and abdomen flexion have been observed during the fast turning. It's widely thought that the asymmetric wing beats are responsible of producing the aerodynamic moment needed for the body rotation. However, the dynamic effect of the abdomen flexion is not clear yet. In this study, an integrated experimental and computational approach is used to study the underlying dynamic effect of dragonfly abdomen flexion. It's found that dragonfly abdomen tended to bend towards the same side as the body reorienting to. Quantitative analysis have shown that during take-off turning maneuver the abdomen flexion can modulate the arm of force by changing the position of the center of mass relative to the thorax. As a result, roll and yaw moments produced by the wing flapping can be enhanced. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217. This work is supported by NSF CBET-1313217.

  4. The role of anticipatory postural adjustments in interlimb coordination of coupled arm movements in the parasagittal plane: II. Postural activities and coupling coordination during cyclic flexion-extension arm movements, ISO- and ANTI-directionally coupled.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, Fausto G; Esposti, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    When coupling cyclic adduction-abduction movements of the arms in the transverse (horizontal) plane, isodirectional (ISO) coupling is less stable than antidirectional (ANTI) coupling. We proposed that such deficiency stems from the disturbing action that anticipatory postural adjustments exert on ISO coupling. To ascertain if postural adjustments differentiate ISO versus ANTI coupling coordination in other types of cyclic arm movements, we examined flexion-extension oscillations in the parasagittal plane. Oscillations of the right arm alone elicited cyclic Postural Adjustments (PAs) in the left Anterior Deltoid and Posterior Deltoid, which replicated the excitation-inhibition pattern of the prime movers right Anterior Deltoid, right Posterior Deltoid. Cyclic PAs also developed symmetrically in Erector Spinae (RES and LES) and in phase opposition in Ischiocruralis (RIC and LIC), so as to discharge to the ground both an anteroposterior force, Fy, and a moment about the vertical axis, Tz. Oscillations of both arms in ISO coupling induced symmetric PAs in both ES and IC muscles, thus generating a large Fy but no Tz. In ANTI coupling, PAs in RES and LES remained symmetric but smaller in size, while PAs in RIC and LIC were large and opposite in phase, resulting in a large Tz and small Fy. Altogether, PAs would thus favour ISO and hamper ANTI parasagittal movements because (1) in the motor pathways to the prime movers of either arm, a convergence would occur between the voluntary commands and the commands for PAs linked to the movement of the other arm, the two commands having the same sign (excitatory or inhibitory) during ISO and an opposite sign during ANTI; (2) the postural effort of trunk and leg muscles would be higher for generating Tz in ANTI than Fy in ISO. These predictions fit with the finding that coupling stability was lower in ANTI than in ISO, i.e., opposite to horizontal movements. In conclusion, in both parasagittal and horizontal arm movements, the less

  5. In vivo knee laxity in flexion and extension: a radiographic study in 30 older healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Heesterbeek, P J C; Verdonschot, N; Wymenga, A B

    2008-01-01

    In order to determine how "tight" a total knee prosthesis should be implanted, it is important to know the amount of laxity in a healthy knee. The objective of this study was to determine knee laxity in extension and flexion in healthy, non-arthritic knees of subjects similar in age to patients undergoing a total knee arthroplasty and to provide guidelines for the orthopaedic surgeon in his attempt to restore the stability of an osteoarthritic knee to normal. Thirty healthy subjects (15 male, 15 female), mean age 62 (SD 6.4) years, were included in the study. For each subject one, randomly selected, knee was stressed in extension and in 70 degrees flexion (15 Nm). Varus and valgus laxity were measured on radiographs. The passive range of motion and active flexion was assessed. Mean valgus laxity in extension was 2.3 degrees (SD 0.9, range 0.2 degrees -4.1 degrees ). In extension mean varus laxity was 2.8 degrees (SD 1.3, range 0.6 degrees -5.4 degrees ). In flexion, mean valgus laxity was 2.5 degrees (SD 1.5, range 0.0 degrees -6.0 degrees ) and mean varus laxity was 3.1 degrees (SD 2.0, range 0.1 degrees -7.0 degrees ). Varus and valgus knee laxity in extension and in flexion were comparable. This study shows that the normal knee in this age group has an inherent degree of varus-valgus laxity. Whether the results of the present study can be used to optimise the total knee arthroplasty implantation technique requires further investigation.

  6. Longitudinal Relationships Between Productive Activities and Functional Health in Later Years: A Multivariate Latent Growth Curve Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunhee; Tang, Fengyan; Kim, Sung-Geun; Turk, Phillip

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the longitudinal relationships between functional health in later years and three types of productive activities: volunteering, full-time, and part-time work. Using the data from five waves (2000-2008) of the Health and Retirement Study, we applied multivariate latent growth curve modeling to examine the longitudinal relationships among individuals 50 or over. Functional health was measured by limitations in activities of daily living. Individuals who volunteered, worked either full time or part time exhibited a slower decline in functional health than nonparticipants. Significant associations were also found between initial functional health and longitudinal changes in productive activity participation. This study provides additional support for the benefits of productive activities later in life; engagement in volunteering and employment are indeed associated with better functional health in middle and old age.

  7. Implementation of active steering on longer combination vehicles for enhanced lateral performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharrazi, Sogol; Lidberg, Mathias; Roebuck, Richard; Fredriksson, Jonas; Odhams, Andrew

    2012-12-01

    A steering-based controller for improving lateral performance of longer combination vehicles (LCVs) is proposed. The controller steers the axles of the towed units to regulate the time span between the driver steering and generation of tyre lateral forces at the towed units and consequently reduces the yaw rate rearward amplification (RWA) and offtracking. The open-loop effectiveness of the controller is evaluated with simulations and its closed loop or driver in the loop effectiveness is verified on a test track with a truck-dolly-semitrailer test vehicle in a series of single- and double-lane change manoeuvres. The developed controller reduces the yaw rate RWA and offtracking considerably without diminishing the manoeuvrability. Furthermore, as a byproduct, it decreases the lateral acceleration RWA moderately. The obtained safety improvements by the proposed controller can promote the use of LCVs in traffic which will result in the reduction of congestion problem as well as environmental and economic benefits.

  8. Effects of neck flexion on contingent negative variation and anticipatory postural control during arm movement while standing.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Tomita, Hidehito; Maeda, Kaoru; Kunita, Kenji

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the effects of neck flexion on contingent negative variation (CNV) and anticipatory postural control using an arm flexion task in standing. CNV was adopted to evaluate the state of activation of brain areas related to anticipatory postural control. Subjects were required to flex the arms in response to a sound stimulus preceded by a warning sound stimulus. Two different intervals (2.0 and 3.5s) between these two stimuli were used in neck position in quiet standing (neck resting) and neck position at 80% angle of maximal neck flexion. The mean amplitude of CNV 100-ms before the response stimulus, recorded from a Cz electrode, was calculated. Onset timing of activation of the postural muscles (lumbar paraspinal, biceps femoris and gastrocnemius) with respect to the anterior deltoid was analyzed. Reaction time at the anterior deltoid was significantly shorter in the 2.0s period than in the 3.5s period, and in the neck flexion than in the neck resting in both periods. In the 2.0s, but not in the 3.5s period, neck flexion resulted in an increased CNV amplitude and an increased duration of preceding activation of the postural muscles, and the correlation between these increases was significant.

  9. High resolution weak lensing mass mapping combining shear and flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanusse, F.; Starck, J.-L.; Leonard, A.; Pires, S.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: We propose a new mass mapping algorithm, specifically designed to recover small-scale information from a combination of gravitational shear and flexion. Including flexion allows us to supplement the shear on small scales in order to increase the sensitivity to substructures and the overall resolution of the convergence map without relying on strong lensing constraints. Methods: To preserve all available small scale information, we avoid any binning of the irregularly sampled input shear and flexion fields and treat the mass mapping problem as a general ill-posed inverse problem, which is regularised using a robust multi-scale wavelet sparsity prior. The resulting algorithm incorporates redshift, reduced shear, and reduced flexion measurements for individual galaxies and is made highly efficient by the use of fast Fourier estimators. Results: We tested our reconstruction method on a set of realistic weak lensing simulations corresponding to typical HST/ACS cluster observations and demonstrate our ability to recover substructures with the inclusion of flexion, which are otherwise lost if only shear information is used. In particular, we can detect substructures on the 15'' scale well outside of the critical region of the clusters. In addition, flexion also helps to constrain the shape of the central regions of the main dark matter halos. Our mass mapping software, called Glimpse2D, is made freely available at http://www.cosmostat.org/software/glimpse

  10. Differences between two subgroups of low back pain patients in lumbopelvic rotation and symmetry in the erector spinae and hamstring muscles during trunk flexion when standing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-hee; Yoo, Won-gyu; Choi, Bo-ram

    2013-04-01

    The present study was performed to examine lumbopelvic rotation and to identify asymmetry of the erector spinae and hamstring muscles in people with and without low back pain (LBP). The control group included 16 healthy subjects, the lumbar-flexion-rotation syndrome LBP group included 17 subjects, and the lumbar-extension-rotation syndrome LBP group included 14 subjects. Kinematic parameters were recorded using a 3D motion-capture system, and electromyography parameters were measured using a Noraxon TeleMyo 2400T. The two LBP subgroups showed significantly more lumbopelvic rotation during trunk flexion in standing than did the control group. The muscle activity and flexion-relaxation ratio asymmetries of the erector spinae muscles in the lumbar-flexion-rotation syndrome LBP group were significantly greater than those in the control group, and the muscle activity and flexion-relaxation ratio asymmetry of the hamstring muscles in the lumbar-extension-rotation syndrome LBP group were significantly greater than those in the control group. Imbalance or asymmetry of passive tissue could lead to asymmetry of muscular activation. Muscle imbalance can cause asymmetrical alignment or movements such as unexpected rotation. The results showed a greater increase in lumbopelvic rotation during trunk flexion in standing among the lumbar-flexion-rotation syndrome and lumbar-extension-rotation syndrome LBP groups compared with the control group. The differences between the two LBP subgroups may be a result of imbalance and asymmetry in erector spinae and hamstring muscle properties.

  11. In Vivo Kinematics of the Scaphoid, Lunate, Capitate, and Third Metacarpal in Extreme Wrist Flexion and Extension

    PubMed Central

    Rainbow, Michael J; Kamal, Robin N; Leventhal, Evan; Akelman, Edward; Moore, Douglas C; Wolfe, Scott W; Crisco, Joseph J

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Insights into the complexity of active in vivo carpal motion have recently been gained using 3D imaging; however kinematics during extremes of motion have not been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to determine motion of the carpus during extremes of wrist flexion and extension. Methods Computed tomography scans of 12 healthy wrists were obtained in neutral-grip, extreme loaded flexion, and extreme loaded extension. Three-dimensional bone surfaces and 6-degree-of-freedom kinematics were obtained for the radius and carpal bones. The flexion and extension rotation from neutral-grip to extreme flexion and extreme extension of the scaphoid and lunate was expressed as a percentage of capitate flexion and extension and then compared to previous studies of active wrist flexion and extension. We also tested the hypothesis that the capitate and third metacarpal function as a single rigid body. Finally, joint space metrics at the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints were used to describe arthrokinematics. Results In extreme flexion, the scaphoid and lunate flexed 70% and 46% of the amount the capitate flexed, respectively. In extreme extension, the scaphoid extended 74% and the lunate extended 42% of the amount the capitates extended, respectively. The third metacarpal extended 4° farther than the capitate in extreme extension. The joint contact area decreased at the radiocarpal joint during extreme flexion. The radioscaphoid joint contact center moved onto the radial styloid and volar ridge of the radius in extreme flexion from a more proximal and ulnar location in neutral. Conclusions The contributions of the scaphoid and lunate to capitate rotation were approximately 25% less in extreme extension compared to wrist motion through an active range of motion. More than half the motion of the carpus when the wrist was loaded in extension occured at the midcarpal joint. Clinical Relevance These findings highlight the difference in kinematics of the carpus during at

  12. Abnormal Functional Lateralization and Activity of Language Brain Areas in Typical Specific Language Impairment (Developmental Dysphasia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guibert, Clement; Maumet, Camille; Jannin, Pierre; Ferre, Jean-Christophe; Treguier, Catherine; Barillot, Christian; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Allaire, Catherine; Biraben, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    Atypical functional lateralization and specialization for language have been proposed to account for developmental language disorders, yet results from functional neuroimaging studies are sparse and inconsistent. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study compared children with a specific subtype of specific language impairment affecting…

  13. Intra- and Interindividual Differences in Lateralized Cognitive Performance and Asymmetrical EEG Activity in the Frontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papousek, Ilona; Murhammer, Daniela; Schulter, Gunter

    2011-01-01

    The study shows that changes in relative verbal vs. figural working memory and fluency performance from one session to a second session two to 3 weeks apart covary with spontaneously occurring changes of cortical asymmetry in the lateral frontal and central cortex, measured by electroencephalography (EEG) in resting conditions before the execution…

  14. Optogenetic Activation of Presynaptic Inputs in Lateral Amygdala Forms Associative Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Jeong-Tae; Nakajima, Ryuichi; Hyung-Su, Kim; Jeong, Yire; Augustine, George J.; Han, Jin-Hee

    2014-01-01

    In Pavlovian fear conditioning, the lateral amygdala (LA) has been highlighted as a key brain site for association between sensory cues and aversive stimuli. However, learning-related changes are also found in upstream sensory regions such as thalamus and cortex. To isolate the essential neural circuit components for fear memory association, we…

  15. Correlations between sagittal plane kinematics and landing impact force during single-leg lateral jump-landings

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa, Junya; Ohji, Shunsuke; Koga, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tadashi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The correlations of peak vertical ground reaction force and sagittal angles during single-leg lateral jump-landing with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury remain unknown. This study aimed to clarify the correlations between kinematics and impact force during lateral jump-landing. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty active males were included in the analysis. A sagittal-view movie camera and force plate were time synchronized. Trunk and lower extremity sagittal angles were measured 100 ms before initial contact and at peak vertical ground reaction force. Peak vertical ground reaction force, time between initial contact and peak vertical ground reaction force, and loading rate were calculated. [Results] The mean sagittal angle was 40.7° ± 7.7° for knee flexion during the flight phase and 16.4° ± 6.3° for pelvic anterior inclination during the landing phase. The mean peak vertical ground reaction force was four times the body weight. The median time to peak vertical ground reaction force was 63.8 ms. The knee flexion during the flight phase and pelvic anterior inclination angles during the landing phase were related to the peak vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] Increasing knee flexion and decreasing pelvic anterior inclination might reduce the impact during single-leg lateral jump-landing. PMID:27630422

  16. Correlations between sagittal plane kinematics and landing impact force during single-leg lateral jump-landings.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Junya; Ohji, Shunsuke; Koga, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tadashi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The correlations of peak vertical ground reaction force and sagittal angles during single-leg lateral jump-landing with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury remain unknown. This study aimed to clarify the correlations between kinematics and impact force during lateral jump-landing. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty active males were included in the analysis. A sagittal-view movie camera and force plate were time synchronized. Trunk and lower extremity sagittal angles were measured 100 ms before initial contact and at peak vertical ground reaction force. Peak vertical ground reaction force, time between initial contact and peak vertical ground reaction force, and loading rate were calculated. [Results] The mean sagittal angle was 40.7° ± 7.7° for knee flexion during the flight phase and 16.4° ± 6.3° for pelvic anterior inclination during the landing phase. The mean peak vertical ground reaction force was four times the body weight. The median time to peak vertical ground reaction force was 63.8 ms. The knee flexion during the flight phase and pelvic anterior inclination angles during the landing phase were related to the peak vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] Increasing knee flexion and decreasing pelvic anterior inclination might reduce the impact during single-leg lateral jump-landing.

  17. Lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay for detecting active tuberculosis in Hiv-positive adults

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maunank; Hanrahan, Colleen; Wang, Zhuo Yu; Dendukuri, Nandini; Lawn, Stephen D; Denkinger, Claudia M; Steingart, Karen R

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid detection of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a global health priority. HIV-associated TB may have different clinical presentations and is challenging to diagnose. Conventional sputum tests have reduced sensitivity in HIV-positive individuals, who have higher rates of extrapulmonary TB compared with HIV-negative individuals. The lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay (LF-LAM) is a new, commercially available point-of-care test that detects lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a lipopolysaccharide present in mycobacterial cell walls, in people with active TB disease. Objectives To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM for the diagnosis of active TB disease in HIV-positive adults who have signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB diagnosis).To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM as a screening test for active TB disease in HIV-positive adults irrespective of signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB screening). Search methods We searched the following databases without language restriction on 5 February 2015: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; MEDLINE (PubMed,1966); EMBASE (OVID, from 1980); Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, from 1900), Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S, from 1900), and BIOSIS Previews (from 1926) (all three using the Web of Science platform; MEDION; LILACS (BIREME, from 1982); SCOPUS (from 1995); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT); the search portal of the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP); and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&l (from 1861). Selection criteria Eligible study types included randomized controlled trials, cross-sectional studies, and cohort studies that determined LF-LAM accuracy for TB against a microbiological reference standard (culture or nucleic acid amplification test from any body site). A higher quality reference standard was one in which two or more specimen types were

  18. TIRDA Originating From Lateral Temporal Cortex in a Patient With mTLE Is Not Related to Hippocampal Activity.

    PubMed

    Serafini, Anna; Issa, Naoum P; Rose, Sandra; Wu, Shasha; Warnke, Peter; Tao, James X

    2016-12-01

    Electrophysiological studies have suggested that temporal intermittent rhythmic delta activity (TIRDA) has a localizing value similar to interictal spikes in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and is associated with a favorable outcome after temporal lobectomy. However, it remains controversial whether TIRDA is an EEG marker for mesial or lateral temporal epileptogenesis. We simultaneously recorded scalp EEG and stereoencephalography in a patient with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy during epilepsy presurgical evaluation. Seizure onset was localized to the hippocampus. However, TIRDA originated from the lateral temporal cortex, and rhythmic delta activity was not observed concomitantly in the hippocampus. In addition, TIRDA was not associated with repetitive interictal spikes or subclinical seizures in the hippocampus as previously speculated. This case suggests that TIRDA can be an EEG marker that is independent of hippocampal activity and can represent temporal neocortical epileptogenesis.

  19. Finger-thumb coupling contributes to exaggerated thumb flexion in stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Kamper, Derek G; Fischer, Heidi C; Conrad, Megan O; Towles, Joseph D; Rymer, William Z; Triandafilou, Kristen M

    2014-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate altered finger-thumb coupling in individuals with chronic hemiparesis poststroke. First, an external device stretched finger flexor muscles by passively rotating the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints. Subjects then performed isometric finger or thumb force generation. Forces/torques and electromyographic signals were recorded for both the thumb and finger muscles. Stroke survivors with moderate (n = 9) and severe (n = 9) chronic hand impairment participated, along with neurologically intact individuals (n = 9). Stroke survivors exhibited strong interactions between finger and thumb flexors. The stretch reflex evoked by stretch of the finger flexors of stroke survivors led to heteronymous reflex activity in the thumb, while attempts to produce isolated voluntary finger MCP flexion torque/thumb flexion force led to increased and undesired thumb force/finger MCP torque production poststroke with a striking asymmetry between voluntary flexion and extension. Coherence between the long finger and thumb flexors estimated using intermuscular electromyographic correlations, however, was small. Coactivation of thumb and finger flexor muscles was common in stroke survivors, whether activation was evoked by passive stretch or voluntary activation. The coupling appears to arise from subcortical or spinal sources. Flexor coupling between the thumb and fingers seems to contribute to undesired thumb flexor activity after stroke and may impact rehabilitation outcomes.

  20. Effects of neck flexion on discriminative and cognitive processing in anticipatory postural control during bilateral arm movement.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Katsuo; Yaguchi, Chie; Kunita, Kenji; Mammadova, Aida

    2012-06-19

    We investigated the effect of neck flexion on discriminative and cognitive processing in postural control during bilateral arm movement while standing, using event-related potential (ERP) and electromyogram. Fourteen healthy subjects flexed their arms to the target stimuli with a 20% probability in neck resting and flexion positions. Amplitude and latency of N2 and P3, anterior deltoid (AD) reaction time, onset time of postural muscles with respect to AD activation, and peak amplitude and latency of all muscles were measured. With neck flexion, N2 and P3 amplitudes increased, N2 and P3 latencies and AD reaction time shortened, and onset times of all postural muscles became earlier. No significant differences in peak amplitude and latency of each muscle were found between neck positions. Significant positive correlations were found in changes with neck flexion between P3 latency and AD reaction time, and between N2 latency and onset time of erector spinae. These suggest that with neck flexion, attention allocation to discriminative and cognitive processing increased, and the processing speed increased with shortening of reaction time in focal muscles. In addition, the onset time of postural muscles became earlier without changing the activation pattern, which was associated with the hastened discriminative processing.

  1. A positive association between active lifestyle and hemispheric lateralization for motor control and learning in older adults.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinsung; D'Amato, Arthur; Bambrough, Jennifer; Swartz, Ann M; Miller, Nora E

    2016-11-01

    Physical activity (PA) is well known to have general health benefits for older adults, but it is unclear whether it can also positively affect brain function involved in motor control and learning. We have previously shown that interlimb transfer of visuomotor adaptation occurs asymmetrically in young adults, while that occurs symmetrically in older adults, which suggests that the lateralized function of each hemisphere during motor tasks is diminished with aging. Here, we investigated the association between the level of PA and hemispheric motor lateralization by comparing the pattern of interlimb transfer following visuomotor adaptation between physically active and inactive older adults. Subjects were divided into two groups based on their PA level (active, inactive). They were further divided into two groups, such that a half of the subjects in each group adapted to a 30° rotation during targeted reaching movements with the left arm first, then with the right arm; and the other half with the right arm first, then with the left arm. Results indicated asymmetrical transfer (from left to right only) in the active subjects, whereas symmetrical transfer (from left to right, and vice versa) was observed in the inactive subjects. These findings suggest that older adults who maintain active lifestyle have a central nervous system that is more intact in terms of its lateralized motor function as compared with those who are inactive.

  2. Effect of Spinal Manipulation Thrust Duration on Trunk Mechanical Activation Thresholds of Nociceptive-Specific Lateral Thalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William R.; Sozio, Randall; Pickar, Joel G.; Onifer, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this preliminary study was to determine if high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) thrust duration alters mechanical trunk activation thresholds of nociceptive-specific (NS) lateral thalamic neurons. Methods Extracellular recordings were obtained from 18 NS neurons located in 2 lateral thalamic nuclei (ventrolateral [n = 12] and posterior [n = 6]) in normal anesthetized Wistar rats. Response thresholds to electronic von Frey anesthesiometer (rigid tip) mechanical trunk stimuli applied in 3 lumbar directions (dorsal-ventral, 45° caudal, and 45° cranial) were determined before and immediately after the delivery of 3 HVLA-SM thrust durations (time control 0, 100, and 400 milliseconds). Mean changes in mechanical trunk activation thresholds were compared using a mixed model analysis of variance. Results High-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation duration did not significantly alter NS lateral thalamic neurons’ mechanical trunk responses to any of the 3 directions tested with the anesthesiometer. Conclusions This study is the first to examine the effect of HVLA-SM thrust duration on NS lateral thalamic mechanical response thresholds. High-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation thrust duration did not affect mechanical trunk thresholds. PMID:25220757

  3. Left-right organizer flow dynamics: how much cilia activity reliably yields laterality?

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Pedro; Ferreira, Rita R; Guerrero, Adán; Pintado, Petra; Tavares, Bárbara; Amaro, Joana; Smith, Andrew A; Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas; Smith, David J; Lopes, Susana S

    2014-06-23

    Internal organs are asymmetrically positioned inside the body. Embryonic motile cilia play an essential role in this process by generating a directional fluid flow inside the vertebrate left-right organizer. Detailed characterization of how fluid flow dynamics modulates laterality is lacking. We used zebrafish genetics to experimentally generate a range of flow dynamics. By following the development of each embryo, we show that fluid flow in the left-right organizer is asymmetric and provides a good predictor of organ laterality. This was tested in mosaic organizers composed of motile and immotile cilia generated by dnah7 knockdowns. In parallel, we used simulations of fluid dynamics to analyze our experimental data. These revealed that fluid flow generated by 30 or more cilia predicts 90% situs solitus, similar to experimental observations. We conclude that cilia number, dorsal anterior motile cilia clustering, and left flow are critical to situs solitus via robust asymmetric charon expression.

  4. Elbow Flexion Contractures in Childhood in Obstetric Brachial Plexus Lesions: A Longitudinal Study of 20 Neurosurgically Reconstructed Infants with 8-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    van der Sluijs, Maaike J.; van Ouwerkerk, Willem-Jan R.; van der Sluijs, Johannes A.; van Royen, Barend J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective  Little knowledge exists on the development of elbow flexion contractures in children with obstetrical brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). This study aims to evaluate the prognostic significance of several neuromuscular parameters in infants with OBPL regarding the later development of elbow flexion contractures. Methods  Twenty infants with OBPL with insufficient signs of recovery in the first months of life who were neurosurgically reconstructed were included. At a mean age of 4.6 months, the following neuromuscular parameters were assessed: existence of flexion contractures, cross-sectional area (CSA) of upper arm muscles on MRI, Narakas classification, EMG results, and elbow muscle function using the Gilbert score. In childhood at follow-up at mean age of 7.7 years, we measured the amount of flexion contractures and the upper arm peak force (Newton). Statistical analysis is used to assess relations between these parameters. Results  Flexion contractures of greater than 10 degrees occurred in 55% of our patient group. The relation between the parameters in infancy and the flexion contractures in childhood is almost nonexistent. Only the Narakas classification was related to the development of flexion contractures in childhood (p = 0.006). Infant muscle CSA is related to childhood peak muscle force. Conclusion  The role of infancy upper arm muscle hypotrophy/hypertrophy, reinnervation, and early elbow muscle function in the development of childhood elbow contractures remains unclear. In this cohort prediction of childhood flexion, contractures were not possible using infancy neuromuscular parameters. We suggest that contractures might be an adaptive process to optimize residual muscle function. PMID:27917234

  5. Increased in vivo glial activation in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: assessed with [(11)C]-PBR28.

    PubMed

    Zürcher, Nicole R; Loggia, Marco L; Lawson, Robert; Chonde, Daniel B; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Yasek, Julia E; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Catana, Ciprian; Rosen, Bruce R; Cudkowicz, Merit E; Hooker, Jacob M; Atassi, Nazem

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from human post mortem, in vivo and animal model studies implicates the neuroimmune system and activated microglia in the pathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The study aim was to further evaluate in vivo neuroinflammation in individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis using [(11)C]-PBR28 positron emission tomography. Ten patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (seven males, three females, 38-68 years) and ten age- and [(11)C]-PBR28 binding affinity-matched healthy volunteers (six males, four females, 33-65 years) completed a positron emission tomography scan. Standardized uptake values were calculated from 60 to 90 min post-injection and normalized to whole brain mean. Voxel-wise analysis showed increased binding in the motor cortices and corticospinal tracts in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis compared to healthy controls (p FWE < 0.05). Region of interest analysis revealed increased [(11)C]-PBR28 binding in the precentral gyrus in patients (normalized standardized uptake value = 1.15) compared to controls (1.03, p < 0.05). In patients those values were positively correlated with upper motor neuron burden scores (r = 0.69, p < 0.05), and negatively correlated with the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale (r = -0.66, p < 0.05). Increased in vivo glial activation in motor cortices, that correlates with phenotype, complements previous histopathological reports. Further studies will determine the role of [(11)C]-PBR28 as a marker of treatments that target neuroinflammation.

  6. Lateral Mobility and Nanoscale Spatial Arrangement of Chemokine-activated α4β1 Integrins on T Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Costa, Alberto; Isern de Val, Sol; Sevilla-Movilla, Silvia; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine stimulation of integrin α4β1-dependent T lymphocyte adhesion is a key step during lymphocyte trafficking. A central question regarding α4β1 function is how its lateral mobility and organization influence its affinity and avidity following cell stimulation with chemokines and/or ligands. Using single particle tracking and superresolution imaging approaches, we explored the lateral mobility and spatial arrangement of individual α4β1integrins on T cells exposed to different activating stimuli. We show that CXCL12 stimulation leads to rapid and transient α4β1activation, measured by induction of the activation epitope recognized by the HUTS-21 anti-β1antibody and by increased talin-β1 association. CXCL12-dependent α4β1 activation directly correlated with restricted lateral diffusion and integrin immobilization. Moreover, co-stimulation by CXCL12 together with soluble VCAM-1 potentiated integrin immobilization with a 5-fold increase in immobile integrins compared with unstimulated conditions. Our data indicate that docking by talin of the chemokine-activated α4β1 to the actin cytoskeleton favors integrin immobilization, which likely facilitates ligand interaction and increased adhesiveness. Superresolution imaging showed that the nanoscale organization of high-affinity α4β1 remains unaffected following chemokine and/or ligand addition. Instead, newly activated α4β1 integrins organize on the cell membrane as independent units without joining pre-established integrin sites to contribute to cluster formation. Altogether, our results provide a rationale to understand how the spatiotemporal organization of activated α4β1 integrins regulates T lymphocyte adhesion. PMID:27481944

  7. Cervical flexion-relaxation response to neck muscle fatigue in males and females.

    PubMed

    Nimbarte, Ashish D; Zreiqat, Majed M; Chowdhury, Suman Kanti

    2014-12-01

    In this study the effect of muscle fatigue on the cervical spine flexion-relaxation response was studied. Twenty healthy participants (10 males and 10 females) were recruited for data collection. The Sorenson protocol was utilized to induce neck muscle fatigue. Surface electromyography and optical motion capture systems were used to measure neck muscle activation and head-neck posture, respectively. A post-fatigue reduction in the Flexion-Relaxation Ratio (FRR) and higher FRR for females compared to males were observed. A post-fatigue decrease was also observed in the onset and offset angles resulting in an expansion of the myoelectric silence period. Gender had no effect on the onset and offset angles of the silence period. Post-fatigue shift in the onset and offset angles and the expansion of the silence period indicate an increased contribution by the passive viscoelastic tissues in stabilizing the cervical spine under fatigued condition.

  8. mGluR1/5 activation in the lateral hypothalamus increases food intake via the endocannabinoid system.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fuentes, Asai; Marichal-Cancino, Bruno A; Méndez-Díaz, Mónica; Becerril-Meléndez, Alline L; Ruiz-Contreras, Alejandra E; Prospéro-Garcia, Oscar

    2016-09-19

    Mounting evidence has shown that glutamatergic and endocannabinoid systems in the hypothalamus regulate mammalian food intake. Stimulation of hypothalamic mGluR1/5 and CB1 receptors induces hyperphagia suggesting a possible interaction between these systems to control food intake. In addition, synthesis of endocannabinoids has been reported after mGluR1/5 stimulation in the brain. The aim of this study was to examine the potential cannabinergic activity in the food intake induction by lateral hypothalamic stimulation of mGluR1/5. Wistar albino male rats received bilateral infusions in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) of: (i) vehicle; (ii) (RS)-2-Chloro-5-hidroxyphenylglycine (CHPG; mGluR1/5 agonist); (iii) 2-AG (CB1 endogenous agonist); (iv) AM251 (CB1 antagonist); (v) tetrahydrolipstatin (THL, 1.2μg; diacyl-glycerol lipase inhibitor); and (vi) combinations of CHPG + with the other aforementioned drugs. Food intake was evaluated the first two hours after drug administration. CHPG significantly increased food intake; whereas CHPG in combination with a dose of 2-AG (with no effects on food intake) greatly increased food ingestion compared to CHPG alone. The increase induced by CHPG in food intake was prevented with AM251 or THL. These results suggest that activation of mGluR1/5 in the lateral hypothalamus induces an orexigenic effect via activation of the endocannabinoid system.

  9. Stance controlled knee flexion improves stimulation driven walking after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Functional neuromuscular stimulation (FNS) restores walking function after paralysis from spinal cord injury via electrical activation of muscles in a coordinated fashion. Combining FNS with a controllable orthosis to create a hybrid neuroprosthesis (HNP) has the potential to extend walking distance and time by mechanically locking the knee joint during stance to allow knee extensor muscle to rest with stimulation turned off. Recent efforts have focused on creating advanced HNPs which couple joint motion (e.g., hip and knee or knee and ankle) to improve joint coordination during swing phase while maintaining a stiff-leg during stance phase. Methods The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of incorporating stance controlled knee flexion during loading response and pre-swing phases on restored gait. Knee control in the HNP was achieved by a specially designed variable impedance knee mechanism (VIKM). One subject with a T7 level spinal cord injury was enrolled and served as his own control in examining two techniques to restore level over-ground walking: FNS-only (which retained a stiff knee during stance) and VIKM-HNP (which allowed controlled knee motion during stance). The stimulation pattern driving the walking motion remained the same for both techniques; the only difference was that knee extensor stimulation was constant during stance with FNS-only and modulated together with the VIKM to control knee motion during stance with VIKM-HNP. Results Stance phase knee angle was more natural during VIKM-HNP gait while knee hyperextension persisted during stiff-legged FNS-only walking. During loading response phase, vertical ground reaction force was less impulsive and instantaneous gait speed was increased with VIKM-HNP, suggesting that knee flexion assisted in weight transfer to the leading limb. Enhanced knee flexion during pre-swing phase also aided flexion during swing, especially when response to stimulation was compromised. Conclusions

  10. Lifecourse Activity Participation From Early, Mid, and Later Adulthood as Determinants of Cognitive Aging: The Lothian Birth Cohort 1921

    PubMed Central

    Pattie, Alison; Deary, Ian J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To examine potential sensitive periods for activity participation across adulthood to reduce cognitive decline and to determine whether associations persist after accounting for the lifetime stability of cognitive ability. Method: The Lothian Birth Cohort 1921 is a longitudinal study of cognitive aging. Participants were born in 1921 and most completed a mental ability test at the age of 11 years. Cognitive assessments were completed at mean ages 79 (N = 550), 83 (N = 321), 87 (N = 235), and 90 years (N = 129). Participants provided retrospective details of their activity participation for young (20–35 years), mid (40–55 years), and later adulthood (60–75 years), and contemporaneously at age 79. Results: Associations between activity and the level of, and change in, cognitive ability in old age were examined with latent growth curve models. Accounting for demographics and childhood cognitive ability, engagement in leisure activities in midlife was positively associated with cognitive ability level (path coefficient = .32), whereas higher physical activity in later adulthood was associated with less cognitive decline (.27). Discussion: The findings support a lifecourse approach in identifying determinants of cognitive aging; leisure and physical activity during different periods of adulthood may enhance cognitive abilities or reduce decline. PMID:27974473

  11. Separate evaluation of target facilitation and distractor suppression in the activity of macaque lateral intraparietal neurons during visual search.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Satoshi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Ogawa, Tadashi

    2013-12-01

    During visual search, neurons in the lateral intraparietal area (LIP) discriminate the target from distractors by exhibiting stronger activation when the target appears within the receptive field than when it appears outside the receptive field. It is generally thought that such target-discriminative activity is produced by the combination of target-related facilitation and distractor-related suppression. However, little is known about how the target-discriminative activity is constituted by these two types of neural modulation. To address this issue, we recorded activity from LIP of monkeys performing a visual search task that consisted of target-present and target-absent trials. Monkeys had to make a saccade to a target in the target-present trials, whereas they had to maintain fixation in the target-absent trials, in which only distractors were presented. By introducing the activity from the latter trials as neutral activity, we were able to separate the target-discriminative activity into target-related elevation and distractor-related reduction components. We found that the target-discriminative activity of most LIP neurons consisted of the combination of target-related elevation and distractor-related reduction or only target-related elevation. In contrast, target-discriminative activity composed of only distractor-related reduction was observed for very few neurons. We also found that, on average, target-related elevation was stronger and occurred earlier compared with distractor-related reduction. Finally, we consider possible underlying mechanisms, including lateral inhibitory interactions, responsible for target-discriminative activity in visual search. The present findings provide insight into how neuronal modulations shape target-discriminative activity during visual search.

  12. Transcutaneous spinal cord direct current stimulation inhibits the lower limb nociceptive flexion reflex in human beings.

    PubMed

    Cogiamanian, Filippo; Vergari, Maurizio; Schiaffi, Elena; Marceglia, Sara; Ardolino, Gianluca; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2011-02-01

    Aiming at developing a new, noninvasive approach to spinal cord neuromodulation, we evaluated whether transcutaneous direct current (DC) stimulation induces long-lasting changes in the central pain pathways in human beings. A double-blind crossover design was used to investigate the effects of anodal direct current (2mA, 15min) applied on the skin overlying the thoracic spinal cord on the lower-limb flexion reflex in a group of 11 healthy volunteers. To investigate whether transcutaneous spinal cord DC stimulation (tsDCS) acts indirectly on the nociceptive reflex by modulating excitability in mono-oligosynaptic segmental reflex pathways, we also evaluated the H-reflex size from soleus muscle after tibial nerve stimulation. In our healthy subjects, anodal thoracic tsDCS reduced the total lower-limb flexion reflex area by 40.25% immediately after stimulation (T0) and by 46.9% 30min after stimulation offset (T30). When we analyzed the 2 lower-limb flexion reflex components (RII tactile and RIII nociceptive) separately, we found that anodal tsDCS induced a significant reduction in RIII area with a slight but not significant effect on RII area. After anodal tsDCS, the RIII area decreased by 27% at T0 and by 28% at T30. Both sham and active tsDCS left all the tested H-reflex variables unchanged. None of our subjects reported adverse effects after active stimulation. These results suggest that tsDCS holds promise as a tool that is complementary or alternative to drugs and invasive spinal cord electrical stimulation for managing pain. Thoracic transcutaneous direct current stimulation induces depression of nociceptive lower limb flexion reflex in human beings that persists after stimulation offset; this form of stimulation holds promise as a tool that is complementary or alternative to drugs and invasive spinal cord electrical stimulation for managing pain.

  13. Flexion-relaxation ratio in computer workers with and without chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Carina Ferreira; dos Santos, Marina Foresti; Chaves, Thais Cristina

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the flexion-relaxation phenomenon (FRP) and flexion-relaxation ratios (FR-ratios) using surface electromyography (sEMG) of the cervical extensor muscles of computer workers with and without chronic neck pain, as well as of healthy subjects who were not computer users. This study comprised 60 subjects 20-45years of age, of which 20 were computer workers with chronic neck pain (CPG), 20 were computer workers without neck pain (NPG), and 20 were control individuals who do not use computers for work and use them less than 4h/day for other purposes (CG). FRP and FR-ratios were analyzed using sEMG of the cervical extensors. Analysis of FR-ratios showed smaller values in the semispinalis capitis muscles of the two groups of workers compared to the control group. The reference FR-ratio (flexion relaxation ratio [FRR], defined as the maximum activity in 1s of the re-extension/full flexion sEMG activity) was significantly higher in the computer workers with neck pain compared to the CG (CPG: 3.10, 95% confidence interval [CI95%] 2.50-3.70; NPG: 2.33, CI95% 1.93-2.74; CG: 1.99, CI95% 1.81-2.17; p<0.001). The FR-ratios and FRR of sEMG in this study suggested that computer use could increase recruitment of the semispinalis capitis during neck extension (concentric and eccentric phases), which could explain our results. These results also suggest that the FR-ratios of the semispinalis may be a potential functional predictive neuromuscular marker of asymptomatic neck musculoskeletal disorders since even asymptomatic computer workers showed altered values. On the other hand, the FRR values of the semispinalis capitis demonstrated a good discriminative ability to detect neck pain, and such results suggested that each FR-ratio could have a different application.

  14. Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints: An unsolvable problem

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sailendra

    2016-01-01

    Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints beyond 90° is a difficult condition to treat for any orthopedic surgeon. There is no fixed protocol of treatment described, by and large it is individualized. A 20 year old female presented with paraplegia for last 15 years due to irrecoverable spinal cord disease with complete sensory and motor loss of both lower extremities and was admitted with acute flexion contracture of both hip joints with trunk resting on thighs. She underwent bilateral proximal femoral resection. Both hip joints were straight immediately after surgery and patient could lie on her back. In a course of time, she started sitting on her buttocks, led a comfortable wheelchair life with a sitting balance. Proximal femoral resection is an effective method to treat long standing irrecoverable paraplegic acute flexion deformity of the hip joint. PMID:27904226

  15. Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints: An unsolvable problem.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Sailendra

    2016-01-01

    Paraplegic flexion contracture of hip joints beyond 90° is a difficult condition to treat for any orthopedic surgeon. There is no fixed protocol of treatment described, by and large it is individualized. A 20 year old female presented with paraplegia for last 15 years due to irrecoverable spinal cord disease with complete sensory and motor loss of both lower extremities and was admitted with acute flexion contracture of both hip joints with trunk resting on thighs. She underwent bilateral proximal femoral resection. Both hip joints were straight immediately after surgery and patient could lie on her back. In a course of time, she started sitting on her buttocks, led a comfortable wheelchair life with a sitting balance. Proximal femoral resection is an effective method to treat long standing irrecoverable paraplegic acute flexion deformity of the hip joint.

  16. Young Children's Interest-Oriented Activity and Later Academic Self-Regulation Strategies in Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neitzel, Carin; Alexander, Joyce M.; Johnson, Kathy E.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated children's interest-based activities in the home during the preschool years and their subsequent academic self-regulation behaviors in school. Children's home activities were tracked for 1 year prior to kindergarten entry. Based on their profiles of activities, children (109) were assigned to one of four interest groups:…

  17. Reliability of forced internal rotation and active internal rotation to assess lateral instability of the biceps pulley

    PubMed Central

    ARRIGONI, PAOLO; ROSE, GIACOMO DELLE; D’AMBROSI, RICCARDO; ROTUNDO, GIORGIO; CAMPAGNA, VINCENZO; PIRANI, PIERGIORGIO; PANASCÌ, MANLIO; PETRICCIOLI, DARIO; BERTONE, CELESTE; GRASSO, ANDREA; LATTE, CARMINE; COSTA, ALBERTO; VIOLA, GINO; DE GIORGI, SILVANA; PANELLA, ANTONELLO; PADUA, ROBERTO; BECCARINI, ALESSANDRO; SALCHER, BARBARA; OLIVIERI, MATTEO; MUGNAINI, MARCO; PANNONE, ANTONELLO; CEOLDO, CHIARA; LONGO, UMILE GIUSEPPE; DENARO, VINCENZO; CERCIELLO, SIMONE; PANNI, ALFREDO SCHIAVONE; AVANZI, PAOLO; ZORZI, CLAUDIO; RAGONE, VINCENZA; CASTAGNA, ALESSANDRO; RANDELLI, PIETRO

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between positive painful forced internal rotation (FIR) and lateral pulley instability in the presence of a pre-diagnosed posterosuperior cuff tear. The same investigation was conducted for painful active internal rotation (AIR). Methods a multicenter prospective study was conducted in a series of patients scheduled to undergo arthroscopic posterosuperior cuff repair. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH) was administered. The VAS score at rest, DASH score, and presence/absence of pain on FIR and AIR were recorded and their relationships with lesions of the lateral pulley, cuff tear patterns and shape of lesions were analyzed. Results the study population consisted of 115 patients (mean age: 55.1 years) recruited from 12 centers. The dominant arm was affected in 72 cases (62.6%). The average anteroposterior extension of the lesion was 1.61 cm. The mean preoperative VAS and DASH scores were 6.1 and 41.8, respectively. FIR and AIR were positive in 94 (81.7%) and 85 (73.9%) cases, respectively. The lateral pulley was compromised in 50 cases (43.4%). Cuff tears were partial articular in 35 patients (30.4%), complete in 61 (53%), and partial bursal in 19 (16.5%). No statistical correlation between positive FIR or AIR and lateral pulley lesions was detected. Positive FIR and AIR were statistically associated with complete lesions. Negative FIR was associated with the presence of partial articular tears. Conclusions painful FIR in the presence of a postero-superior cuff tear does not indicate lateral pulley instability. When a cuff tear is suspected, positive FIR and AIR are suggestive of full-thickness tear patterns while a negative FIR suggests a partial articular lesion. Level of evidence: level I, validating cohort study with good reference standards. PMID:26151035

  18. Intraoperative Manipulation for Flexion Contracture During Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshio; Minoda, Yukihide; Fumiaki, Inori; Nakagawa, Sigeru; Okajima, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Akio

    2016-11-01

    Joint gap balancing during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is important for ensuring postoperative joint stability and range of motion. Although the joint gap should be balanced to ensure joint stability, it is not easy to achieve perfect balancing during TKA. In particular, relative extension gap shortening can induce flexion contracture. Intraoperative manipulation is often empirically performed. This study evaluated the tension required for this manipulation and investigated the influence of intraoperative manipulation on the joint gap in cadaveric knees. Total knee arthroplasty was performed in 6 cadaveric knees from whole body cadavers. Flexion contracture was induced using an insert that was 4 mm thicker than the extension gap, and intraoperative manipulation was performed. Study measurements included the changes in the joint gap after manipulation at 6 positions, with the knee bending from extension to 120° flexion, and the manipulation tension that was required to create a 4-mm increase in the gap. The manipulation tension needed to create a 4-mm increase in the extension gap was 303±17 N. The changes in the joint gap after manipulation were 0.4 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.2 mm, -0.2 mm, -0.4 mm, and -0.6 mm at 0°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 90°, and 120° flexion, respectively. Therefore, the joint gap was not significantly changed by the manipulation. Intraoperative manipulation does not resolve flexion contracture. Therefore, if flexion contracture occurs during TKA, treatment with additional bone cutting and soft tissue release is likely more appropriate than manipulation. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1070-e1074.].

  19. Genetic and chemical reductions in protein phosphatase activity alter auxin transport, gravity response, and lateral root growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, A. M.; DeLong, A.; Muday, G. K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin transport is required for important growth and developmental processes in plants, including gravity response and lateral root growth. Several lines of evidence suggest that reversible protein phosphorylation regulates auxin transport. Arabidopsis rcn1 mutant seedlings exhibit reduced protein phosphatase 2A activity and defects in differential cell elongation. Here we report that reduced phosphatase activity alters auxin transport and dependent physiological processes in the seedling root. Root basipetal transport was increased in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings but showed normal sensitivity to the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). Phosphatase inhibition reduced root gravity response and delayed the establishment of differential auxin-induced gene expression across a gravity-stimulated root tip. An NPA treatment that reduced basipetal transport in rcn1 and cantharidin-treated wild-type plants also restored a normal gravity response and asymmetric auxin-induced gene expression, indicating that increased basipetal auxin transport impedes gravitropism. Increased auxin transport in rcn1 or phosphatase inhibitor-treated seedlings did not require the AGR1/EIR1/PIN2/WAV6 or AUX1 gene products. In contrast to basipetal transport, root acropetal transport was normal in phosphatase-inhibited seedlings in the absence of NPA, although it showed reduced NPA sensitivity. Lateral root growth also exhibited reduced NPA sensitivity in rcn1 seedlings, consistent with acropetal transport controlling lateral root growth. These results support the role of protein phosphorylation in regulating auxin transport and suggest that the acropetal and basipetal auxin transport streams are differentially regulated.

  20. Comparing Language Lateralization Determined by Dichotic Listening and fMRI Activation in Frontal and Temporal Lobes in Children with Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandes, M. A.; Smith, M. L.; Logan, W.; Crawley, A.; McAndrews, M. P.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between ear advantage scores on the Fused Dichotic Words Test (FDWT), and laterality of activation in fMRI using a verb generation paradigm in fourteen children with epilepsy. The magnitude of the laterality index (LI), based on spatial extent and magnitude of activation in classical language areas (BA 44/45,…

  1. Absence of lateral gastrocnemius activity and differential motor unit behavior in soleus and medial gastrocnemius during standing balance

    PubMed Central

    Héroux, Martin E.; Dakin, Christopher J.; Luu, Billy L.; Inglis, John Timothy

    2013-01-01

    In a standing position, the vertical projection of the center of mass passes in front of the ankle, which requires active plantar-flexor torque from the triceps surae to maintain balance. We recorded motor unit (MU) activity in the medial (MG) and lateral (LG) gastrocnemius muscle and the soleus (SOL) in standing balance and voluntary isometric contractions to understand the effect of functional requirements and descending drive from different neural sources on motoneuron behavior. Single MU activity was recorded in seven subjects with wire electrodes in the triceps surae. Two 3-min standing balance trials and several ramp-and-hold contractions were performed. Lateral gastrocnemius MU activity was rarely observed in standing. The lowest thresholds for LG MUs in ramp contractions were 20–35 times higher than SOL and MG MUs (P < 0.001). Compared with MUs from the SOL, MG MUs were intermittently active (P < 0.001), had higher recruitment thresholds (P = 0.022), and greater firing rate variability (P < 0.001); this difference in firing rate variability was present in standing balance and isometric contractions. In SOL and MG MUs, both recruitment of new MUs (R2 = 0.59–0.79, P < 0.01) and MU firing rates (R2 = 0.05–0.40, P < 0.05) were associated with anterior-posterior and medio-lateral torque in standing. Our results suggest that the two heads of the gastrocnemius may operate in different ankle ranges with the larger MG being of primary importance when standing, likely due to its fascicle orientation. These differences in MU discharge behavior were independent of the type of descending neural drive, which points to a muscle-specific optimization of triceps surae motoneurons. PMID:24311748

  2. Absence of lateral gastrocnemius activity and differential motor unit behavior in soleus and medial gastrocnemius during standing balance.

    PubMed

    Héroux, Martin E; Dakin, Christopher J; Luu, Billy L; Inglis, John Timothy; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-15

    In a standing position, the vertical projection of the center of mass passes in front of the ankle, which requires active plantar-flexor torque from the triceps surae to maintain balance. We recorded motor unit (MU) activity in the medial (MG) and lateral (LG) gastrocnemius muscle and the soleus (SOL) in standing balance and voluntary isometric contractions to understand the effect of functional requirements and descending drive from different neural sources on motoneuron behavior. Single MU activity was recorded in seven subjects with wire electrodes in the triceps surae. Two 3-min standing balance trials and several ramp-and-hold contractions were performed. Lateral gastrocnemius MU activity was rarely observed in standing. The lowest thresholds for LG MUs in ramp contractions were 20-35 times higher than SOL and MG MUs (P < 0.001). Compared with MUs from the SOL, MG MUs were intermittently active (P < 0.001), had higher recruitment thresholds (P = 0.022), and greater firing rate variability (P < 0.001); this difference in firing rate variability was present in standing balance and isometric contractions. In SOL and MG MUs, both recruitment of new MUs (R(2) = 0.59-0.79, P < 0.01) and MU firing rates (R(2) = 0.05-0.40, P < 0.05) were associated with anterior-posterior and medio-lateral torque in standing. Our results suggest that the two heads of the gastrocnemius may operate in different ankle ranges with the larger MG being of primary importance when standing, likely due to its fascicle orientation. These differences in MU discharge behavior were independent of the type of descending neural drive, which points to a muscle-specific optimization of triceps surae motoneurons.

  3. Wipe and flexion reflexes of the frog. II. Response to perturbations.

    PubMed

    Schotland, J L; Rymer, W Z

    1993-05-01

    1. To evaluate the hypothesis that the neural control of sensorimotor transformations may be simplified by using a single control variable, we compared the movement kinematics and muscle activity patterns [electromyograms (EMGs)] of the frog during flexion withdrawal and the hind limb-hind limb wipe reflex before and after adding an external load. In addition, the flexibility of spinal cord circuitry underlying the hind limb-hind limb wipe reflex was evaluated by comparing wipes before and after removal of one of the contributing muscles by cutting a muscle nerve. 2. The kinematics of the movements were recorded using a WATSMART infrared emitter-detector system and quantified using principal-components analysis to provide a measure of the shape (eigenvalues) and orientation (eigenvector coefficients) of the movement trajectories. The neural pattern coordinating the movements was characterized by the latencies and magnitudes of EMGs of seven muscles acting at the hip, knee, and ankle. These variables were compared 1) during flexion withdrawal and the initial movement segment of the limb during the hind limb-hind limb wipe reflex in both unrestrained movements and in movements executed when a load equal to approximately 10% of the animal's body weight was attached to a distal limb segment and 2) during the initial movement segment of the wipe reflex before and after cutting the nerve to the knee flexor-hip extensor, iliofibularis. 3. Addition of the load had no discernible effect on the end-point position of the foot during either reflex. However, during the loaded flexion reflex, the ankle joint did not move until after the hip and knee joints had moved to their normal positions. This delayed flexion of the ankle was accompanied by large increases in the magnitude of EMG activity in two ankle muscles that exceeded the levels found during unrestrained movements. Significant changes in the temporal organization of the EMG pattern accompanied the change in joint angle

  4. Detection method of flexion relaxation phenomenon based on wavelets for patients with low back pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nougarou, François; Massicotte, Daniel; Descarreaux, Martin

    2012-12-01

    The flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP) can be defined as a reduction or silence of myoelectric activity of the lumbar erector spinae muscle during full trunk flexion. It is typically absent in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Before any broad clinical utilization of this neuromuscular response can be made, effective, standardized, and accurate methods of identifying FRP limits are needed. However, this phenomenon is clearly more difficult to detect for LBP patients than for healthy patients. The main goal of this study is to develop an automated method based on wavelet transformation that would improve time point limits detection of surface electromyography signals of the FRP in case of LBP patients. Conventional visual identification and proposed automated methods of time point limits detection of relaxation phase were compared on experimental data using criteria of accuracy and repeatability based on physiological properties. The evaluation demonstrates that the use of wavelet transform (WT) yields better results than methods without wavelet decomposition. Furthermore, methods based on wavelet per packet transform are more effective than algorithms employing discrete WT. Compared to visual detection, in addition to demonstrating an obvious saving of time, the use of wavelet per packet transform improves the accuracy and repeatability in the detection of the FRP limits. These results clearly highlight the value of the proposed technique in identifying onset and offset of the flexion relaxation response in LBP subjects.

  5. The Effect of Shoulder Flexion Angles on the Recruitment of Upper-extremity Muscles during Isometric Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jeheon; Shin, Insik; Kang, Myoungsoo; Kim, Yeonghun; Lee, Kunwoo; Park, Jaewoo; Kim, Kyungnam; Hong, Daehie; Koo, Dohoon; O'sullivan, David

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in muscle activation patterns of the biceps brachii (BB) and flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscles, while measuring the resultant force (RF) at different shoulder flexion angles. [Subjects] Thirteen healthy males (age 24.85±3.4 years, weight; 77.8±7.9 kg; height, 1.7±0.05 m) were enrolled in this study. [Methods] The resultant force was measured by a force transducer . The elbow angle remained constant and the flexion shoulder angle was changed (30°, 45°, 60°, 75° and 90°). [Results] The results of the surface EMG show the largest muscle activities occurred at a shoulder flexion of 75° for BB and 90° for FCR. The largest resultant force was measured at a shoulder flexion angle of 75°. We conclude, that when performing the biceps curl exercise using an arm curl machine, the shoulder should be flexed at 75° to maximize the focus of the exercise for the BB. [Conclusion] These results are useful from the perspective of design as they highlight the differences in the muscle activation of BB and FCR with postural change. Ultimately this knowledge can be used in the design of rehabilitation training for the shoulder as they show that posture can affect muscle activation. PMID:24259780

  6. Foot claudication with plantar flexion as a result of dorsalis pedis artery impingement in an Irish dancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brigitte K; Engelbert, Travis; Turnipseed, William D

    2013-07-01

    Dorsalis pedis artery impingement is an extremely rare cause of foot claudication, with a single case reported in the literature. In this report, we describe the case of a 17-year-old female Irish dancer who presented with intermittent bilateral foot pain and discoloration during active plantar flexion.

  7. Larger plantar flexion torque variability implies less stable balance in the young: an association affected by knee position.

    PubMed

    Mello, Emanuele Moraes; Magalhães, Fernando Henrique; Kohn, André Fabio

    2013-12-01

    The present study examined the association between plantar flexion torque variability during isolated isometric contractions and during quiet bipedal standing. For plantar flexion torque measurements in quiet stance (QS), subjects stood still over a force plate. The mean plantar flexion torque level exerted by each subject in QS (divided by 2 to give the torque due to a single leg) served as the target torque level for right leg force-matching tasks in extended knee (KE) and flexed knee (KF) conditions. Muscle activation levels (EMG amplitudes) of the triceps surae and mean, standard deviation and coefficient of variation of plantar flexion torque were computed from signals acquired during periods with and without visual feedback. No significant correlations were found between EMG amplitudes and torque variability, regardless of the condition and muscle being analyzed. A significant correlation was found between torque variability in QS and KE, whereas no significant correlation was found between torque variability in QS and KF, regardless of vision availability. Therefore, torque variability measured in a controlled extended knee plantar flexion contraction is a predictor of torque variability in the anterior-posterior direction when the subjects are in quiet standing. In other words, larger plantar flexion torque variability in KE (but not in KF) implies less stable balance. The mechanisms underlying the findings above are probably associated with the similar proprioceptive feedback from the triceps surae in QS and KE and poorer proprioceptive feedback from the triceps surae in KF due to the slackening of the gastrocnemii. An additional putative mechanism includes the different torque contributions of each component of the triceps surae in the two knee angles. From a clinical and research standpoint, it would be advantageous to be able to estimate changes in balance ability by means of simple measurements of torque variability in a force matching task.

  8. Soleus and vastus medialis H-reflexes: similarities and differences while standing or lying during varied knee flexion angles.

    PubMed

    Alrowayeh, Hesham N; Sabbahi, Mohamed A; Etnyre, Bruce

    2005-06-15

    The H-reflex may be a useful measure to examine the lower extremity muscles activation and inhibition following an injury. Recording the vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes in healthy subjects while standing or lying during varied knee flexion angles may establish a reference for comparison for patients with ACL injury. Vastus medialis and soleus H-reflexes were recorded from 14 healthy subjects while lying and standing during 0, 30, 45, and 60 degrees knee flexion. EMG unit was used to electrically stimulate the tibial and femoral nerves (using 0.5 ms pulses at 0.2 pps of H-maximum amplitude) and to record four traces of the soleus and vastus medialis H-wave and one trace of the M-wave peak-to-peak amplitudes. Repeated measures three-way ANOVAs were calculated with the global alpha=0.05. Results showed that (1) the average soleus H-reflex amplitude was significantly less during standing than lying across all knee flexion conditions, (2) the average vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes showed no measurable significant differences between neutral standing compared with lying, (3) the average vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes were significantly greater during standing knee flexion conditions (30, 45, and 60 degrees ) than lying or neutral standing, and (4) there were no differences between soleus and vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes during lying across all knee flexion conditions. Data from H/M ratio follow the same pattern of H-amplitude. Recording the vastus medialis H-reflex amplitude during standing and knee flexion may be a reflective of the knee function. It is more specific than the soleus H-reflex because it reflects the changes in the excitability of the quadriceps motoneurons acting directly around the knee joint.

  9. Lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LOTC) activity is greatest while viewing dance compared to visualization and movement: learning and expertise effects.

    PubMed

    Di Nota, Paula M; Levkov, Gabriella; Bar, Rachel; DeSouza, Joseph F X

    2016-07-01

    The lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LOTC) is comprised of subregions selectively activated by images of human bodies (extrastriate body area, EBA), objects (lateral occipital complex, LO), and motion (MT+). However, their role in motor imagery and movement processing is unclear, as are the influences of learning and expertise on its recruitment. The purpose of our study was to examine putative changes in LOTC activation during action processing following motor learning of novel choreography in professional ballet dancers. Subjects were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging up to four times over 34 weeks and performed four tasks: viewing and visualizing a newly learned ballet dance, visualizing a dance that was not being learned, and movement of the foot. EBA, LO, and MT+ were activated most while viewing dance compared to visualization and movement. Significant increases in activation were observed over time in left LO only during visualization of the unlearned dance, and all subregions were activated bilaterally during the viewing task after 34 weeks of performance, suggesting learning-induced plasticity. Finally, we provide novel evidence for modulation of EBA with dance experience during the motor task, with significant activation elicited in a comparison group of novice dancers only. These results provide a composite of LOTC activation during action processing of newly learned ballet choreography and movement of the foot. The role of these areas is confirmed as primarily subserving observation of complex sequences of whole-body movement, with new evidence for modification by experience and over the course of real world ballet learning.

  10. Customary physical activity and survival in later life: a study in Nottingham, UK.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, K; Clarke, D

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the value of broadly based customary physical activity scores, derived from a questionnaire inventory, in predicting 10 year mortality among elderly people. DESIGN: A 10 year survival analysis of participants in the first wave of the Nottingham longitudinal study of activity and ageing who, in face to face interviews in 1985, provided detailed information on customary physical activity, health, and lifestyle. SETTING: Urban and suburban Nottingham PARTICIPANTS: A total of 1042 people aged 65 years and over randomly sampled from general practitioner records. MAIN RESULTS: On the basis of factor scores derived from the interview questionnaire, activity levels were graded as "high", "intermediate", or "low". In Cox regression models controlling for age, health status, and cigarette smoking at the time of the activity assessment, these gradings were significantly related to 10 year survival. Relative to the "high" activity groups, the risk of dying was significantly increased in both the "intermediate" (hazard ratio (HR) 1.53; 95% CI 1.12, 2.09) and "low" (HR 2.07; 95% CI 1.53, 2.79) groups for women, and in the "low" group (HR 1.59; 95% CI 1.12, 2.25) for men (p < 0.01 throughout). CONCLUSION: Since the survival model controlled for age, health status, and cigarette smoking, it is unlikely that the activity gradings used here are simple proxies for physical health. It is concluded, therefore, that within the elderly population, recall based survey assessments covering a wide range of customary or habitual physical activities, can provide indices showing both cross sectional utility and predictive validity. PMID:9425457

  11. Laterality of brain activity during motor imagery is modulated by the provision of source level neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Boe, Shaun; Gionfriddo, Alicia; Kraeutner, Sarah; Tremblay, Antoine; Little, Graham; Bardouille, Timothy

    2014-11-01

    Motor imagery (MI) may be effective as an adjunct to physical practice for motor skill acquisition. For example, MI is emerging as an effective treatment in stroke neurorehabilitation. As in physical practice, the repetitive activation of neural pathways during MI can drive short- and long-term brain changes that underlie functional recovery. However, the lack of feedback about MI performance may be a factor limiting its effectiveness. The provision of feedback about MI-related brain activity may overcome this limitation by providing the opportunity for individuals to monitor their own performance of this endogenous process. We completed a controlled study to isolate neurofeedback as the factor driving changes in MI-related brain activity across repeated sessions. Eighteen healthy participants took part in 3 sessions comprised of both actual and imagined performance of a button press task. During MI, participants in the neurofeedback group received source level feedback based on activity from the left and right sensorimotor cortex obtained using magnetoencephalography. Participants in the control group received no neurofeedback. MI-related brain activity increased in the sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the imagined movement across sessions in the neurofeedback group, but not in controls. Task performance improved across sessions but did not differ between groups. Our results indicate that the provision of neurofeedback during MI allows healthy individuals to modulate regional brain activity. This finding has the potential to improve the effectiveness of MI as a tool in neurorehabilitation.

  12. An Ultrasensitive Gold Nanoparticle-based Lateral Flow Test for the Detection of Active Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Shan; Kang, Lin; Ji, Bin; Xin, Wenwen; Kang, Jingjing; Li, Ping; Gao, Jie; Wang, Hanbin; Wang, Jinglin; Yang, Hao

    2017-12-01

    Botulism is a severe and potentially lethal paralytic disease caused by several botulinum neurotoxin-producing Clostridia spp. In China, the majority of the cases caused by botulism were from less-developed rural areas. Here, we designed specific substrate peptides and reconfigured gold nanoparticle-based lateral flow test strip (LFTS) to develop an endopeptidase-based lateral flow assay for the diagnosis of botulism. We performed this lateral flow assay on botulinum neurotoxin-spiked human serum samples. The as-prepared LFTS had excellent performance in the detection of botulinum neurotoxin using only 1 μL of simulated serum, and its sensitivity and specificity were comparable to that of mouse lethality assay. Moreover, the assay takes only half a day and does not require highly trained laboratory staff, specialized facility, or equipment. Finally, our LFTS can be potentially extended to other serotypes of BoNTs by designing specific substrate peptides against the different types of BoNTs. Overall, we demonstrate a strategy by which LFTS and endopeptidase activity assays can be integrated to achieve facile and economic diagnosis of botulism in resource-limited settings.

  13. Prior Knowledge Improves Decoding of Finger Flexion from Electrocorticographic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Ji, Q.; Miller, K. J.; Schalk, Gerwin

    2011-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) use brain signals to convey a user’s intent. Some BCI approaches begin by decoding kinematic parameters of movements from brain signals, and then proceed to using these signals, in absence of movements, to allow a user to control an output. Recent results have shown that electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings from the surface of the brain in humans can give information about kinematic parameters (e.g., hand velocity or finger flexion). The decoding approaches in these studies usually employed classical classification/regression algorithms that derive a linear mapping between brain signals and outputs. However, they typically only incorporate little prior information about the target movement parameter. In this paper, we incorporate prior knowledge using a Bayesian decoding method, and use it to decode finger flexion from ECoG signals. Specifically, we exploit the constraints that govern finger flexion and incorporate these constraints in the construction, structure, and the probabilistic functions of the prior model of a switched non-parametric dynamic system (SNDS). Given a measurement model resulting from a traditional linear regression method, we decoded finger flexion using posterior estimation that combined the prior and measurement models. Our results show that the application of the Bayesian decoding model, which incorporates prior knowledge, improves decoding performance compared to the application of a linear regression model, which does not incorporate prior knowledge. Thus, the results presented in this paper may ultimately lead to neurally controlled hand prostheses with full fine-grained finger articulation. PMID:22144944

  14. Partition of voluntary command to antagonist muscles during cyclic flexion-extension of the hand.

    PubMed

    Esposti, Roberto; Cavallari, Paolo; Baldissera, Fausto

    2005-05-01

    Activity distribution between wrist movers during rhythmic flexion-extension of the wrist has been analysed in three different mechanical conditions. Wrist angular position and surface EMG from Extensor Carpi Radialis (ECR) and Flexor Carpi Radialis (FCR) were recorded. In the first condition (hand prone, flexion-extension in a vertical parasagittal plane) the hand passive equilibrium position was approximately 50 degrees in flexion. During hand oscillations FCR and ECR were alternatively recruited to move the hand symmetrically away from the equilibrium and de-recruited to allow conservative forces to restore the equilibrium. Switching between antagonists occurred at the centre of the oscillation (equilibrium crossing). In the second condition (hand semi-prone, flexion-extension in a horizontal transversal plane) the hand equilibrium was attained over an angle of about 26 degrees . When the hand was oscillated symmetrically around this equilibrium range, each muscle was recruited when the hand entered the equilibrium range and switching between antagonists therefore occurred in advance of the oscillation centre. Both vertical and horizontal oscillations were also performed all externally to the equilibrium position or range: in these cases only one muscle was recruited over the entire cycle, the EMG burst starting at the onset of the related movement. In the third condition (hand semi-prone, flexion-extension in a horizontal transversal plane) a frictional load added to the platform pivot expanded the equilibrium range to encompass the entire hand oscillation. Now concentric muscle contraction was needed throughout each phase of the movement and switching between antagonists occurred at the movement reversal, i.e. ~90 degrees in advance of the oscillation centre. The above descriptions held for oscillation frequencies from 0.2 Hz to 3.0 Hz, once the frequency-dependent effects of viscosity and inertia were accounted for. In all the three conditions, contractile

  15. Spontaneous activity in electromyography may differentiate certain benign lower motor neuron disease forms from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jokela, Manu E; Jääskeläinen, Satu K; Sandell, Satu; Palmio, Johanna; Penttilä, Sini; Saukkonen, Annamaija; Soikkeli, Raija; Udd, Bjarne

    2015-08-15

    There is limited data on electromyography (EMG) findings in other motor neuron disorders than amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We assessed whether the distribution of active denervation detected by EMG, i.e. fibrillations and fasciculations, differs between ALS and slowly progressive motor neuron disorders. We compared the initial EMG findings of 43 clinically confirmed, consecutive ALS patients with those of 41 genetically confirmed Late-onset Spinal Motor Neuronopathy and 14 Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy patients. Spontaneous activity was more frequently detected in the first dorsal interosseus and deltoid muscles of ALS patients than in patients with the slowly progressive motor neuron diseases. The most important observation was that absent fibrillations in the first dorsal interosseus muscle identified the benign forms with sensitivities of 66%-77% and a specificity of 93%. The distribution of active denervation may help to separate ALS from mimicking disorders at an early stage.

  16. Critical Role of Activated Protein C in Early Coagulopathy and Later Organ Failure, Infection and Death in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mitchell Jay; Call, Mariah; Nelson, Mary; Calfee, Carolyn S.; Esmon, Charles T; Brohi, Karim; Pittet, Jean Francois

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies have identified an acute traumatic coagulopathy that is present on admission to the hospital and is independent of iatrogenic causes. We have previously reported that this coagulopathy is due to the association of severe injury and shock and is characterized by a decrease in plasma protein C levels. Whether this early coagulopathy and later propensity to infection, MOF and mortality are associated with the activation of protein C pathway has not been demonstrated and constitutes the aim of this study. Methods and Findings This was a prospective cohort study of 203 major trauma patients. Serial blood samples were drawn on arrival in the ED, and at 6, 12, and 24 hours after admission to the hospital. PT, PTT, Va, VIIIa, PC aPC t-PA and D-Dimer levels were assayed. Comprehensive injury, resuscitation and outcome data were prospectively collected. A total of 203 patients were enrolled. Patients with tissue hypoperfusion and severe traumatic injury showed a strong activation of the protein C which was associated with a coagulopathy characterized by inactivation of the coagulation factors V and VIII and a derepression of the fibrinolysis with high plasma levels of plasminogen activator and high D-dimers. Elevated plasma levels of activated protein C were significantly associated with increased mortality, organ injury, increased blood transfusion requirements, and reduced ICU ventilator-free days. Finally early depletion of protein C after trauma is associated with a propensity to post-traumatic ventilator-associated pneumonia. Conclusions Acute traumatic coagulopathy occurs in the presence of tissue hypoperfusion and severe traumatic injury and is mediated by activation of the protein C pathway. Higher plasma levels of aPC upon admission are predictive of poor clinical outcomes following major trauma. After activation, patients who fail to recover physiologic plasma values of protein C have an increased propensity to later nosocomial lung

  17. An Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain Significantly Decreases Physical Activity across the Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Hubbard-Turner, Tricia; Wikstrom, Erik A; Guderian, Sophie; Turner, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    We do not know the impact an ankle sprain has on physical activity levels across the lifespan. With the negative consequences of physical inactivity well established, understanding the effect of an ankle sprain on this outcome is critical. The objective of this study was to measure physical activity across the lifespan after a single ankle sprain in an animal model. Thirty male mice (CBA/J) were randomly placed into one of three groups: the transected calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) group, the transected anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL)/CFL group, and a SHAM group. Three days after surgery, all of the mice were individually housed in a cage containing a solid surface running wheel. Physical activity levels were recorded and averaged every week across the mouse's lifespan. The SHAM mice ran significantly more distance each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p = 0.011). Daily duration was different between the three running groups (p = 0.048). The SHAM mice ran significantly more minutes each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p=0.046) while the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly less minutes each day (post hoc p = 0.028) compared to both the SHAM and CFL only group. The SHAM mice ran at a faster daily speed versus the remaining two groups of mice (post hoc p = 0.019) and the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly slower each day compared to the SHAM and CFL group (post hoc p = 0.005). The results of this study indicate that a single ankle sprain significantly decreases physical activity across the lifespan in mice. This decrease in physical activity can potentially lead to the development of numerous chronic diseases. An ankle sprain thus has the potential to lead to significant long term health risks if not treated appropriately. Key pointsA single ankle significantly decreased physical activity levels in mice across the lifespan.Decreased physical activity could significantly negatively impact overall health if not modified

  18. An Acute Lateral Ankle Sprain Significantly Decreases Physical Activity across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard-Turner, Tricia; Wikstrom, Erik A.; Guderian, Sophie; Turner, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We do not know the impact an ankle sprain has on physical activity levels across the lifespan. With the negative consequences of physical inactivity well established, understanding the effect of an ankle sprain on this outcome is critical. The objective of this study was to measure physical activity across the lifespan after a single ankle sprain in an animal model. Thirty male mice (CBA/J) were randomly placed into one of three groups: the transected calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) group, the transected anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL)/CFL group, and a SHAM group. Three days after surgery, all of the mice were individually housed in a cage containing a solid surface running wheel. Physical activity levels were recorded and averaged every week across the mouse’s lifespan. The SHAM mice ran significantly more distance each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p = 0.011). Daily duration was different between the three running groups (p = 0.048). The SHAM mice ran significantly more minutes each day compared to the remaining two running groups (post hoc p=0.046) while the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly less minutes each day (post hoc p = 0.028) compared to both the SHAM and CFL only group. The SHAM mice ran at a faster daily speed versus the remaining two groups of mice (post hoc p = 0.019) and the ATFL/CFL mice ran significantly slower each day compared to the SHAM and CFL group (post hoc p = 0.005). The results of this study indicate that a single ankle sprain significantly decreases physical activity across the lifespan in mice. This decrease in physical activity can potentially lead to the development of numerous chronic diseases. An ankle sprain thus has the potential to lead to significant long term health risks if not treated appropriately. Key points A single ankle significantly decreased physical activity levels in mice across the lifespan. Decreased physical activity could significantly negatively impact overall health if not

  19. Identifying the Functional Flexion-extension Axis of the Knee: An In-Vivo Kinematics Study

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Li; Chen, Kaining; Guo, Lin; Cheng, Liangjun; Wang, Fuyou; Yang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to calculate the flexion-extension axis (FEA) of the knee through in-vivo knee kinematics data, and then compare it with two major anatomical axes of the femoral condyles: the transepicondylar axis (TEA) defined by connecting the medial sulcus and lateral prominence, and the cylinder axis (CA) defined by connecting the centers of posterior condyles. Methods The knee kinematics data of 20 healthy subjects were acquired under weight-bearing condition using bi-planar x-ray imaging and 3D-2D registration techniques. By tracking the vertical coordinate change of all points on the surface of femur during knee flexion, the FEA was determined as the line connecting the points with the least vertical shift in the medial and lateral condyles respectively. Angular deviation and distance among the TEA, CA and FEA were measured. Results The TEA-FEA angular deviation was significantly larger than that of the CA-FEA in 3D and transverse plane (3.45° vs. 1.98°, p < 0.001; 2.72° vs. 1.19°, p = 0.002), but not in the coronal plane (1.61° vs. 0.83°, p = 0.076). The TEA-FEA distance was significantly greater than that of the CA-FEA in the medial side (6.7 mm vs. 1.9 mm, p < 0.001), but not in the lateral side (3.2 mm vs. 2.0 mm, p = 0.16). Conclusion The CA is closer to the FEA compared with the TEA; it can better serve as an anatomical surrogate for the functional knee axis. PMID:26039711

  20. A Discrete Population of Neurons in the Lateral Amygdala Is Specifically Activated by Contextual Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Yvette M.; Murphy, Mark

    2009-01-01

    There is no clear identification of the neurons involved in fear conditioning in the amygdala. To search for these neurons, we have used a genetic approach, the "fos-tau-lacZ" (FTL) mouse, to map functionally activated expression in neurons following contextual fear conditioning. We have identified a discrete population of neurons in the lateral…

  1. Becoming a Runner: Big, Middle and Small Stories about Physical Activity Participation in Later Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Meridith; Phoenix, Cassandra

    2016-01-01

    How do older adults learn to tell a "new" story about, through, and with the body? We know that narratives are embodied, lived and central to the process of meaning-making--and as such, they do not lie in the waiting for telling, but are an active part of everyday interaction. Telling stories about ourselves to others is one way in which…

  2. Effect of the 6-minute walk test on plantar loading and capability to produce ankle plantar flexion forces.

    PubMed

    Vie, Bruno; Griffon, Patricia; Bijoux, Audrey; Cadiere, Julie; Weber, Jean Paul; Jammes, Yves

    2016-09-01

    The six-minute walk test (6MWT) is used to evaluate the ambulatory capacity of patients suffering from respiratory disorders, obesity or neuromuscular diseases. Our primary aim was to evaluate the effects of the 6MWT on the postural sway and the ankle plantar flexion forces in healthy subjects. We measured the ankle plantar flexion forces and the plantar contact area before and after a 6MWT in normal weight and overweight subjects with no history of respiratory, cardiac, and neuromuscular disorders. A post-6MWT sensation of bodily fatigue was evaluated by Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI) and Pichot fatigue scales. A computerized pedobarographic platform was used to collect the mean plantar contact area, the changes of the center of pressure (CoP) surface and its medial and lateral deviations. In a limited number of subjects, the reproducibility of all the measurements was explored. In both groups, the 6MWT elicited a sensation of bodily fatigue. It also significantly reduced the ankle plantar flexion forces, and increased both the mean plantar contact area and the CoP surface, the changes being not apparent after 10min. The post-6MWT lateral CoP deviations were accentuated in normal weight subjects, while an increase in medial CoP deviations occurred in overweight ones. The 6MWT-induced changes in the plantar flexion force and pedobarographic variables were reproducible. Because this study clearly showed some post-6MWT alterations of the subjects' posture sway of our subjects, we questioned the possible mechanisms occurring that could explain the altered muscle force and the transient destabilization of posture after the 6MWT.

  3. Differential Determinants of Men’s and Women’s Everyday Physical Activity in Later Life

    PubMed Central

    Chipperfield, Judith G.; Newall, Nancy E.; Chuchmach, Loring P.; Swift, Audrey U.; Haynes, Tara L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The present study of a representative sample of older adults quantified everyday physical activity (EPA) by having participants wear actigraphs. Our objectives were to examine whether poor health may partly explain why older adults become less physically active with advancing age and whether gender might moderate the extent to which health status predicts EPA. Methods We performed multiple regression analyses on a sample of older, community-dwelling adults (aged 80–98 years, N = 198; women = 63.1%). Results The results imply that age-related declines in EPA may be partially accounted for by health (in men) and by living arrangements (in women). Discussion We consider reasons why poorer health might erode EPA for men (but not women) and why living alone might erode EPA for women (but not men). PMID:18689770

  4. Motivational incentives lead to a strong increase in lateral prefrontal activity after self-control exertion.

    PubMed

    Luethi, Matthias S; Friese, Malte; Binder, Julia; Boesiger, Peter; Luechinger, Roger; Rasch, Björn

    2016-10-01

    Self-control is key to success in life. Initial acts of self-control temporarily impair subsequent self-control performance. Why such self-control failures occur is unclear, with prominent models postulating a loss of a limited resource vs a loss of motivation, respectively. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify the neural correlates of motivation-induced benefits on self-control. Participants initially exerted or did not exert self-control. In a subsequent Stroop task, participants performed worse after exerting self-control, but not if they were motivated to perform well by monetary incentives. On the neural level, having exerted self-control resulted in decreased activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus. Increasing motivation resulted in a particularly strong activation of this area specifically after exerting self-control. Thus, after self-control exertion participants showed more prefrontal neural activity without improving performance beyond baseline level. These findings suggest that impaired performance after self-control exertion may not exclusively be due to a loss of motivation.

  5. Activation lateralization in human core, belt, and parabelt auditory fields with unilateral deafness compared to normal hearing

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Harold; Firszt, Jill B.; Holden, Timothy; Agato, Alvin; Uchanski, Rosalie M.

    2012-01-01

    We studied activation magnitudes in core, belt, and parabelt auditory cortex in adults with normal hearing (NH) and unilateral hearing loss (UHL) using an interrupted, single-event design and monaural stimulation with random spectrographic sounds. NH patients had one ear blocked and received stimulation on the side matching the intact ear in UHL. The objective was to determine whether the side of deafness affected lateralization and magnitude of evoked blood oxygen level-dependent responses across different auditory cortical fields (ACFs). Regardless of ear of stimulation, NH showed larger contralateral responses in several ACFs. With right ear stimulation in UHL, ipsilateral responses were larger compared to NH in core and belt ACFs, indicating neuroplasticity in the right hemisphere. With left ear stimulation in UHL, only posterior core ACFs showed larger ipsilateral responses, suggesting that most ACFs in the left hemisphere had greater resilience against reduced crossed inputs from a deafferented right ear. Parabelt regions located posterolateral to core and belt auditory cortex showed reduced activation in UHL compared to NH irrespective of RE/LE stimulation and lateralization of inputs. Thus, the effect in UHL compared to NH differed by ACF and ear of deafness. PMID:22502976

  6. Activation lateralization in human core, belt, and parabelt auditory fields with unilateral deafness compared to normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Burton, Harold; Firszt, Jill B; Holden, Timothy; Agato, Alvin; Uchanski, Rosalie M

    2012-05-15

    We studied activation magnitudes in core, belt, and parabelt auditory cortex in adults with normal hearing (NH) and unilateral hearing loss (UHL) using an interrupted, single-event design and monaural stimulation with random spectrographic sounds. NH patients had one ear blocked and received stimulation on the side matching the intact ear in UHL. The objective was to determine whether the side of deafness affected lateralization and magnitude of evoked blood oxygen level-dependent responses across different auditory cortical fields (ACFs). Regardless of ear of stimulation, NH showed larger contralateral responses in several ACFs. With right ear stimulation in UHL, ipsilateral responses were larger compared to NH in core and belt ACFs, indicating neuroplasticity in the right hemisphere. With left ear stimulation in UHL, only posterior core ACFs showed larger ipsilateral responses, suggesting that most ACFs in the left hemisphere had greater resilience against reduced crossed inputs from a deafferented right ear. Parabelt regions located posterolateral to core and belt auditory cortex showed reduced activation in UHL compared to NH irrespective of RE/LE stimulation and lateralization of inputs. Thus, the effect in UHL compared to NH differed by ACF and ear of deafness.

  7. Inhibition of H3K27me3 Histone Demethylase Activity Prevents the Proliferative Regeneration of Zebrafish Lateral Line Neuromasts

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Beier; He, Yingzi; Tang, Dongmei; Li, Wenyan; Li, Huawei

    2017-01-01

    The H3K27 demethylases are involved in a variety of biological processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, and cell death by regulating transcriptional activity. However, the function of H3K27 demethylation in the field of hearing research is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the role of H3K27me3 histone demethylase activity in hair cell regeneration using an in vivo animal model. Our data showed that pharmacologic inhibition of H3K27 demethylase activity with the specific small-molecule inhibitor GSK-J4 decreased the number of regenerated hair cells in response to neomycin damage. Furthermore, inhibition of H3K27me3 histone demethylase activity dramatically suppressed cell proliferation and activated caspase-3 levels in the regenerating neuromasts of the zebrafish lateral line. GSK-J4 administration also increased the expression of p21 and p27 in neuromast cells and inhibited the ERK signaling pathway. Collectively, our findings indicate that H3K27me3 demethylation is a key epigenetic regulator in the process of hair cell regeneration in zebrafish and suggest that H3K27me3 histone demethylase activity might be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of hearing loss. PMID:28348517

  8. A historical perspective on the lateral diffusion model of GTPase activation and related coupling of membrane signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of our discovery of lateral diffusion of the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) rhodopsin and that a single activated rhodopsin can non-covalently catalyze GTP binding to thousands of GTPases per second on rod disk membranes via this diffusion are summarized herein. Rapid GTPase coupling to membrane-bound phosphodiesterase (PDE) further amplifies the signal via cGMP hydrolysis, essential to visual transduction. Important generalizations from this work are that biomembranes can uniquely concentrate, orient for reaction and provide a solvent appropriate to rapid, powerful and appropriately controlled sequential interaction of signaling proteins. Of equal importance to function is timely control and termination of such powerful amplification via receptor phosphorylation (quenching) and arrestin binding. Downstream kinetic modulation by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) and regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) and related mechanisms as well as limitations set by membrane domain fencing, structural protein binding etc. can be essential in relevant systems. PMID:25279248

  9. Three Point Extension Splint To Treat Flexion Contractures About Limb Synovial Hinge Joints.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    rehabilitating flexion contractures caused by soft tissue injury. More particularly, the invention relates to a three point extension splint to treat flexion contractures about the knee, elbow and/or finger.

  10. Effects of the sustained computer work on upper cervical flexion motion.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Yeon; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of sustained computer work on cervical flexion, especially the upper cervical region. [Subjects] We recruited 11 sedentary workers who used a computer for at least 4 hours a day. [Methods] Total range of cervical flexion, upper cervical flexion, and their ratio were measured before and after 1 hour of computer work. [Results] The total range of cervical flexion was not significantly different between pre-and post-measurement. However, upper cervical flexion, and the ratio between the upper cervical flexion and total cervical flexion significantly decreased after 1 hour of computer work, compared to pre-measurement. [Conclusion] Sustained computer work affects the range of cervical flexion, especially in the upper cervical region.

  11. Fibre architecture and song activation rates of syringeal muscles are not lateralized in the European starling

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, A. M.; Meyers, R. A.; Cooper, B. G.; Goller, F.

    2010-01-01

    The songbird vocal organ, the syrinx, is composed of two sound generators, which are independently controlled by sets of two extrinsic and four intrinsic muscles. These muscles rank among the fastest vertebrate muscles, but the molecular and morphological foundations of this rapid physiological performance are unknown. Here we show that the four intrinsic muscles in the syrinx of male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) are composed of fast oxidative and superfast fibres. Dorsal and ventral tracheobronchialis muscles contain slightly more superfast fibres relative to the number of fast oxidative fibres than dorsal and ventral syringealis muscles. This morphological difference is not reflected in the highest, burst-like activation rate of the two muscle groups during song as assessed with electromyographic recordings. No difference in fibre type ratio was found between the corresponding muscles of the left and right sound generators. Airflow and electromyographic measurements during song indicate that maximal activation rate and speed of airflow regulation do not differ between the two sound sources. Whereas the potential for high-speed muscular control exists on both sides, the two sound generators are used differentially for modulation of acoustic parameters. These results show that large numbers of superfast fibre types are present in intrinsic syringeal muscles of a songbird, providing further confirmation of rapid contraction kinetics. However, syringeal muscles are composed of two fibre types which raises questions about the neuromuscular control of this heterogeneous muscle architecture. PMID:20228343

  12. Lateral Antimicrobial Resistance Genetic Transfer is active in the open environment.

    PubMed

    Chamosa, Luciana S; Álvarez, Verónica E; Nardelli, Maximiliano; Quiroga, María Paula; Cassini, Marcelo H; Centrón, Daniela

    2017-03-31

    Historically, the environment has been viewed as a passive deposit of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, where bacteria show biological cost for maintenance of these genes. Thus, in the absence of antimicrobial pressure, it is expected that they disappear from environmental bacterial communities. To test this scenario, we studied native IntI1 functionality of 11 class 1 integron-positive environmental strains of distant genera collected in cold and subtropical forests of Argentina. We found natural competence and successful site-specific insertion with no significant fitness cost of both aadB and bla VIM-2 antimicrobial resistance gene cassettes, in a model system without antibiotic pressure. A bidirectional flow of antimicrobial resistance gene cassettes between natural and nosocomial habitats is proposed, which implies an active role of the open environment as a reservoir, recipient and source of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, outlining an environmental threat where novel concepts of rational use of antibiotics are extremely urgent and mandatory.

  13. Contralateral parahippocampal gamma-band activity determines noise-like tinnitus laterality: a region of interest analysis.

    PubMed

    Vanneste, S; Heyning, P Van de; Ridder, D De

    2011-12-29

    Tinnitus is described as an auditory perception in the absence of any external sound source. Tinnitus loudness has been correlated to sustained high frequency gamma-band activity in auditory cortex. It remains unknown whether unilateral tinnitus is always generated in the left auditory cortex, irrespective of the side on which the tinnitus is perceived, or in the contralateral auditory cortex. In order to solve this enigma source localized electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings of a homogenous group of unilateral left and right-sided tinnitus patients presenting with noise-like tinnitus was analyzed. Based on a region of interest analysis, the most important result of this study is that tinnitus lateralization depended on the gamma-band activity of the contralateral parahippocampal area. As for the auditory cortex no differences were found between left-sided and right-sided tinnitus patients. However, in comparison to a control group both left and right-sided tinnitus patients had an increased gamma-band activity in both the left and right primary and secondary auditory cortex. Thus whereas in tinnitus the primary and secondary auditory cortices of both sides are characterized by increased gamma-band activity, the side on which the tinnitus is perceived relates to gamma-band activity in the contralateral parahippocampal area.

  14. Early postnatal deprivation of active sleep with desipramine or zimeldine impairs later behavioural reactivity to auditory stimuli in rats.

    PubMed

    Hilakivi, L A; Taira, T; Hilakivi, I

    1988-02-01

    To examine the functional significance of early postnatal active sleep for the development of behavioural reactivity to auditory stimuli, rat pups were daily injected i.p. from the 7th to the 18th postnatal days with 5 mg kg-1 (6.6 mmol l-1) desipramine or 25 mg kg-1 (12.2 mmol l-1) zimeldine. Sleep-wake behaviour was recorded with a static-charge-sensitive bed (SCSB) method. Both desipramine and zimeldine suppressed the percentage of active sleep relative to the total recording time throughout the treatment period. In addition, these drugs increased the percentage of quiet state and waking. At the age of 38 days the zimeldine-treated rats showed more motor activity in the open field than the controls. At the age of 39 and 78 days all rat groups behaved similarly in the open field. Startle measures and motor activation, provoked by auditory stimulation, were determined by the SCSB method when the rats were 4 months of age. Auditory stimuli, consisting of a series of ten clicks, induced a greater number of startles as well as strong movement responses in the control rats than in the desipramine- or zimeldine-treated rats. The number of small movement responses did not differ between the rat groups. These findings indicate that early postnatal active sleep and the monoaminergic systems regulating it may be important for the normal development of neuronal circuitry associated with later reactivity to auditory stimuli.

  15. Variability of Measurement of Patellofemoral Indices with Knee Flexion and Quadriceps Contraction: An MRI-Based Anatomical Study

    PubMed Central

    Laugharne, Edward; Bali, Navi; Purushothamdas, Sanjay; Almallah, Faris; Kundra, Rik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of varying knee flexion and quadriceps activity on patellofemoral indices measured on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods MRI of the knee was performed in 20 patients for indications other than patellar or patellofemoral pathology. Axial and sagittal sequences were performed in full extension of the knee with the quadriceps relaxed, full extension of the knee with the quadriceps contracted, 30° flexion of the knee with the quadriceps relaxed, and 30° flexion with the quadriceps contracted. Bisect offset, patella tilt angle, Insall-Salvati ratio and Caton-Deschamps index were measured. Results With the knee flexed to 30° and quadriceps relaxed, the mean values of patellar tilt angle, bisect offset, Insall-Salvati ratio and Caton-Deschamps index were all within normal limits. With the knee extended and quadriceps contracted, the mean patellar tilt angle (normal value, <15°) was 14.6° and the bisect offset (normal value, <65%) was 65%, while the Caton-Deschamps index was 1.34 (normal range, 0.6 to 1.3). With the knee extended and quadriceps relaxed, the mean Caton-Deschamps index was 1.31. Conclusions MRI scanning of the knee in extension with the quadriceps contracted leads to elevated patellofemoral indices. MRI taken with the knee in 30° of flexion allows more reliable assessment of the patellofemoral joint and minimises the confounding effect of quadriceps contraction. PMID:27894177

  16. Early and later life stress alter brain activity and sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Mrdalj, Jelena; Pallesen, Ståle; Milde, Anne Marita; Jellestad, Finn Konow; Murison, Robert; Ursin, Reidun; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Grønli, Janne

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to early life stress may profoundly influence the developing brain in lasting ways. Neuropsychiatric disorders associated with early life adversity may involve neural changes reflected in EEG power as a measure of brain activity and disturbed sleep. The main aim of the present study was for the first time to characterize possible changes in adult EEG power after postnatal maternal separation in rats. Furthermore, in the same animals, we investigated how EEG power and sleep architecture were affected after exposure to a chronic mild stress protocol. During postnatal day 2-14 male rats were exposed to either long maternal separation (180 min) or brief maternal separation (10 min). Long maternally separated offspring showed a sleep-wake nonspecific reduction in adult EEG power at the frontal EEG derivation compared to the brief maternally separated group. The quality of slow wave sleep differed as the long maternally separated group showed lower delta power in the frontal-frontal EEG and a slower reduction of the sleep pressure. Exposure to chronic mild stress led to a lower EEG power in both groups. Chronic exposure to mild stressors affected sleep differently in the two groups of maternal separation. Long maternally separated offspring showed more total sleep time, more episodes of rapid eye movement sleep and higher percentage of non-rapid eye movement episodes ending in rapid eye movement sleep compared to brief maternal separation. Chronic stress affected similarly other sleep parameters and flattened the sleep homeostasis curves in all offspring. The results confirm that early environmental conditions modulate the brain functioning in a long-lasting way.

  17. Anabolic steroids alter the physiological activity of aggression circuits in the lateral anterior hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Morrison, T R; Sikes, R W; Melloni, R H

    2016-02-19

    Syrian hamsters exposed to anabolic/androgenic steroids (AAS) during adolescence consistently show increased aggressive behavior across studies. Although the behavioral and anatomical profiles of AAS-induced alterations have been well characterized, there is a lack of data describing physiological changes that accompany these alterations. For instance, behavioral pharmacology and neuroanatomical studies show that AAS-induced changes in the vasopressin (AVP) neural system within the latero-anterior hypothalamus (LAH) interact with the serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) systems to modulate aggression. To characterize the electrophysiological profile of the AAS aggression circuit, we recorded LAH neurons in adolescent male hamsters in vivo and microiontophoretically applied agonists and antagonists of aggressive behavior. The interspike interval (ISI) of neurons from AAS-treated animals correlated positively with aggressive behaviors, and adolescent AAS exposure altered parameters of activity in regular firing neurons while also changing the proportion of neuron types (i.e., bursting, regular, irregular). AAS-treated animals had more responsive neurons that were excited by AVP application, while cells from control animals showed the opposite effect and were predominantly inhibited by AVP. Both DA D2 antagonists and 5HT increased the firing frequency of AVP-responsive cells from AAS animals and dual application of AVP and D2 antagonists doubled the excitatory effect of AVP or D2 antagonist administration alone. These data suggest that multiple DA circuits in the LAH modulate AAS-induced aggressive responding. More broadly, these data show that multiple neurochemical interactions at the neurophysiological level are altered by adolescent AAS exposure.

  18. Peak knee flexion angles during stair descent in TKA patients.

    PubMed

    Bjerke, Joakim; Öhberg, Fredrik; Nilsson, Kjell G; Foss, Olav A; Stensdotter, Ann K

    2014-04-01

    Reduced peak knee flexion during stair descent (PKSD) is demonstrated in subjects with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), but the underlying factors are not well studied. 3D gait patterns during stair descent, peak passive knee flexion (PPKF), quadriceps strength, pain, proprioception, demographics, and anthropometrics were assessed in 23 unilateral TKA-subjects ~19 months post-operatively, and in 23 controls. PKSD, PPKF and quadriceps strength were reduced in the TKA-side, but also in the contralateral side. A multiple regression analysis identified PPKF as the only predictor (57%) to explain the relationship with PKSD. PPKF was, however sufficient for normal PKSD. Deficits in quadriceps strength in TKA-group suggest that strength is also contributing to smaller PKSD. Increased hip adduction at PKSD may indicate both compensatory strategy and reduced hip strength.

  19. Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel inactivation contributes to spike broadening during repetitive firing in the rat lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Faber, E S Louise; Sah, Pankaj

    2003-10-15

    In many neurons, trains of action potentials show frequency-dependent broadening. This broadening results from the voltage-dependent inactivation of K+ currents that contribute to action potential repolarisation. In different neuronal cell types these K+ currents have been shown to be either slowly inactivating delayed rectifier type currents or rapidly inactivating A-type voltage-gated K+ currents. Recent findings show that inactivation of a Ca2+-dependent K+ current, mediated by large conductance BK-type channels, also contributes to spike broadening. Here, using whole-cell recordings in acute slices, we examine spike broadening in lateral amygdala projection neurons. Spike broadening is frequency dependent and is reversed by brief hyperpolarisations. This broadening is reduced by blockade of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and BK channels. In contrast, broadening is not blocked by high concentrations of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) or alpha-dendrotoxin. We conclude that while inactivation of BK-type Ca2+-activated K+ channels contributes to spike broadening in lateral amygdala neurons, inactivation of another as yet unidentified outward current also plays a role.

  20. Medial and lateral perforant path evoked potentials are selectively modulated by pairing with glutamatergic activation of locus coeruleus in the dentate gyrus of the anesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Edison, Hilary T; Harley, Carolyn W

    2012-03-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) in vitro produces long-lasting potentiation of medial perforant path input and depression of lateral perforant path input to dentate gyrus in the rat. Similar, but highly transient, effects have been reported in vivo using paragigantocellular stimulation to release NE. The present study uses alternate stimulation of the medial perforant path and lateral olfactory tract (eliciting a lateral perforant path-evoked potential) to examine the effects of glutamatergic activation of locus coeruleus (LC) on the two pathways for up to 3 h post-LC activation. In the first experiment, the expected potentiation of the medial perforant path population spike in dentate gyrus was observed, but without accompanying depression of the lateral perforant path-mediated evoked potential (lateral olfactory tract stimulation, 60 s ISI). In a second experiment, with more frequent pairing of input with NE release (10 s ISI), significant potentiation of lateral perforant path-mediated input to dentate gyrus occurred, but potentiation of medial perforant path input was not seen. A third experiment with a 30 s ISI again produced potentiation of lateral perforant path-mediated input without potentiation of the medial perforant path population spike. The size of effects with the 30 s ISI was intermediate between that seen with 10 s and 60 s ISI. Potentiation of lateral perforant path over medial perforant path input has previously been reported with acute nicotinic activation of the LC. This outcome also resembles heterosynaptic modulation previously reported with tetanic potentiation. The data argue for a competitive relationship between medial and lateral perforant path inputs to dentate gyrus and suggest pairing with increased NE produces a bias favoring one or the other pathway depending on parameters such as strength and frequency. NE potentiating effects on lateral perforant path input here may also have occurred in entorhinal cortex (EC) given the system-wide NE release

  1. The alteration of serine transporter activity in a cell line model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Lee, Na-Young; Kim, Yunha; Ryu, Hoon; Kang, Young-Sook

    2017-01-29

    The alteration of d-serine levels is associated with the pathogenesis of sporadic ALS and mutant SOD1 (G93A) animal model of ALS. However, the exact mechanism of d-serine transport is not known in ALS. To better understand the distribution of d-serine in ALS, we determined the activity and the expression of serine transporter in a motor neuronal cell line model of ALS (NSC-34/hSOD1(G93A) cells). The uptake of [(3)H]d-serine was significantly lower in NSC-34/hSOD1(G93A) cells than in control NSC-34 and NSC-34/hSOD1(wt) cells. In contrast, the uptake of [(3)H]l-serine, precursor of d-serine, was markedly increased in NSC-34/hSOD1(G93A) cells compared to control NSC-34 and NSC-34/hSOD1(wt) cells. Both [(3)H]d-serine and [(3)H]l-serine uptake were saturable in these cells. The estimated Michaelis-Menten constant, Km, for d-serine uptakes was higher in NSC-34/hSOD1(G93A) cells than in NSC-34/hSOD1(wt) cells while the Km for l-serine uptake was 2 fold lower in NSC-34/hSOD1(G93A) cells than in control cells. [(3)H]d-serine and [(3)H]l-serine uptakes took place in a Na(+)-dependent manner, and both uptakes were significantly inhibited by system ASC (alanine-serine-cysteine) substrates. As a result of small interfering RNA experiments, we found that ASCT2 (SLC1A5) and ASCT1 (SLC1A4) are involved in [(3)H]d-serine and [(3)H]l-serine uptake in NSC-34/hSOD1(G93A) cells, respectively. The level of SLC1A4 mRNA was significantly increased in NSC-34/hSOD1(G93A) compared to NSC-34 and NSC-34/hSOD1(wt) cells. In contrast, the level of SLC7A10 mRNA was relatively lower in NSC-34/hSOD1(G93A) cells than the control cells. Together, these data suggest that the pathological alteration of d- and l-serine uptakes in ALS is driven by the affinity change of d-and l-serine uptake system.

  2. The effect of trunk flexion on able-bodied gait.

    PubMed

    Saha, Devjani; Gard, Steven; Fatone, Stefania

    2008-05-01

    This study examined the effect of sagittal trunk posture on the gait of able-bodied subjects. Understanding the effect of trunk posture on gait is of clinical interest since alterations in trunk posture often occur with age or in the presence of spinal pathologies, such as lumbar flatback. Gait analysis was conducted on 14 adults walking at self-selected slow, normal, and fast walking speeds while maintaining three trunk postures: upright, and with 25+/-7 degrees and 50+/-7 degrees of trunk flexion from the vertical. During trunk-flexed gait, subjects adopted a crouch posture characterized by sustained knee flexion during stance and an increase in ankle dorsiflexion and hip flexion angles. During stance, these kinematic adaptations produced a posterior shift in the positions of the trunk and pelvis, which helped to offset the anterior shift in the trunk mass that occurred with trunk flexion. In this way, kinematic adaptations may have been used to maintain balance by shifting the body's center of mass to a position similar to that of upright walking. These changes in lower limb joint kinematics created a phase lag in the position of the hip joint center relative to that of the ankle joint center in the sagittal plane. Alterations in the sagittal alignment of the hip and ankle joint positions were associated with a phase lag in the vertical position, velocity, and acceleration of the body's center of mass (BCOM) relative to upright walking. Since the vertical ground reaction force (GRF(v)) is proportional to the vertical acceleration of the BCOM, significant changes were also seen in the GRF(v) during trunk-flexed gait. In summary, kinematic adaptations necessary to maintain dynamic balance altered the trajectory and acceleration of the BCOM in the vertical direction, which was reflected in the GRF(v). The results of this study may help clinicians better understand the nature and impact of compensatory mechanisms in patients who exhibit trunk-flexed postures during

  3. Do Productive Activities Reduce Inflammation in Later Life? Multiple Roles, Frequency of Activities, and C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seoyoun; Ferraro, Kenneth F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The study investigates whether productive activities by older adults reduce bodily inflammation, as indicated by C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomeasure associated with the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Design and Methods: The study uses a representative survey of adults aged 57–85 from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (N = 1,790). Linear regression models were used to analyze the effects of multiple roles (employment, volunteering, attending meetings, and caregiving) and the frequency of activity within each role on log values of CRP concentration (mg/L) drawn from assayed blood samples. Results: Number of roles for productive activities was associated with lower levels of CRP net of chronic conditions, lifestyle factors, and socioeconomic resources. When specific types of activity were examined, volunteering manifested the strongest association with lower levels of inflammation, particularly in the 70+ group. There was no evidence that frequent engagement in volunteer activity was associated with heightened inflammation. Implications: Productive activities—and frequent volunteering in particular—may protect individuals from inflammation that is associated with increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. PMID:23969258

  4. Weak gravitational shear and flexion with polar shapelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Rowe, Barnaby; Refregier, Alexandre; Bacon, David J.; Bergé, Joel

    2007-09-01

    We derive expressions, in terms of `polar shapelets', for the image distortion operations associated with weak gravitational lensing. Shear causes galaxy shapes to become elongated, and is sensitive to the second derivative of the projected gravitational potential along their line of sight; flexion bends galaxy shapes into arcs, and is sensitive to the third derivative. Polar shapelets provide a natural representation, in which both shear and flexion transformations are compact. Through this tool, we understand progress in several weak lensing methods. We then exploit various symmetries of shapelets to construct a range of shear estimators with useful properties. Through an analogous investigation, we also explore several flexion estimators. In particular, some of the estimators can be measured simultaneously and independently for every galaxy, and will provide unique checks for systematics in future weak lensing analyses. Using simulated images from the Shear TEsting Programme, we show that we can recover input shears with no significant bias. A complete software package to parametrize astronomical images in terms of polar shapelets, and to perform a full weak lensing analysis, is available on the Internet.

  5. In-vivo spinal cord deformation in flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qing; Dougherty, Lawrence; Margulies, Susan S.

    1997-05-01

    Traumatic mechanical loading of the head-neck complex results cervical spinal cord injury when the distortion of the cord is sufficient to produce functional or structural failure of the cord's neural and/or vascular components. Characterizing cervical spinal cord deformation during physiological loading conditions is an important step to defining a comprehensive injury threshold associated with acute spinal cord injury. In this study, in vivo quasi- static deformation of the cervical spinal cord during flexion of the neck in human volunteers was measured using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of motion with spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM). A custom-designed device was built to guide the motion of the neck and enhance more reproducibility. the SPAMM pulse sequence labeled the tissue with a series of parallel tagging lines. A single- shot gradient-recalled-echo sequence was used to acquire the mid-sagittal image of the cervical spine. A comparison of the tagged line pattern in each MR reference and deformed image pair revealed the distortion of the spinal cord. The results showed the cervical spinal cord elongates during head flexion. The elongation experienced by the spinal cord varies linearly with head flexion, with the posterior surface of the cord stretching more than the anterior surface. The maximal elongation of the cord is about 12 percent of its original length.

  6. Surgical Release of Severe Flexion Contracture for Oncologic Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Vincent Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Severe postoperative knee contractures after arthroplasty or megaprosthesis reconstruction occur rarely, but are devastating complications. Management of preoperative flexion contractures is well-described, but there is a paucity of literature for surgical treatment of postoperative contractures. A retrospective chart review was performed for a single surgeon of cases between 1996 and 2014. Results: Nine patients (5 of 66 for pediatrics; 4 of 95 for adults) underwent surgical release for severe stiffness after implantation of knee megaprosthesis. The total arc of motion was improved from a preoperative mean of 34° (range, 10° to 70°) to a postoperative mean 89° (63° to 125°). The amount of extension improved by a mean of 27° (range, -3° to +70°) and the amount of flexion improved by a mean of 28° (range, -10° to +75°). Conclusion: Surgical release of severe postoperative knee contracture is a challenging procedure, but in most cases, the amount of extension and flexion can be improved, yielding a greater total arc of motion.

  7. A test of the longevity of impact-induced faults as preferred sites for later tectonic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Duxbury, Elizabeth D.

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that impact-induced faults have been preferred sites for later deformation in response to lithospheric stresses has been suggested for several planets and satellites. This hypothesis is investigated on earth by examining whether terrestrial impact structures show higher rates of nearby earthquake activity than do surrounding intraplate regions. For 28 of 30 probable impact structures having an original crater 20 km or more in diameter, the rates of nearby seismicity have been no higher than the regional background rates. For two large probable impact structures, Vredefort and Charlevoix, with higher than normal rates of nearby seismicity, factors other than slip on impact-induced faults appear to control the occurrence of earthquakes. It is concluded that impact-induced faults, at least on earth, do not persist as lithospheric 'weak zones' for periods in excess of several million years after the impact event.

  8. Transition of target-location signaling in activity of macaque lateral intraparietal neurons during delayed-response visual search.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Satoshi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Ogawa, Tadashi

    2014-09-15

    Neurons in the lateral intraparietal area (LIP) are involved in signaling the location of behaviorally relevant objects during visual discrimination and working memory maintenance. Although previous studies have examined these cognitive processes separately, they often appear as inseparable sequential processes in real-life situations. Little is known about how the neural representation of the target location is altered when both cognitive processes are continuously required for executing a task. We investigated this issue by recording single-unit activity from LIP of monkeys performing a delayed-response visual search task in which they were required to discriminate the target from distractors in the stimulus period, remember the location at which the extinguished target had been presented in the delay period, and make a saccade to that location in the response period. Target-location signaling was assessed using response modulations contingent on whether the target location was inside or opposite the receptive field. Although the population-averaged response modulation was consistent and changed only slightly during a trial, the across-neuron pattern of response modulations showed a marked and abrupt change around 170 ms after stimulus offset due to concurrent changes in the response modulations of a subset of LIP neurons, which manifested heterogeneous patterns of activity changes during the task. Our findings suggest that target-location signaling by the across-neuron pattern of LIP activity discretely changes after the stimulus disappearance under conditions that continuously require visual discrimination and working memory to perform a single behavioral task.

  9. Stumbling reactions during perturbed walking: Neuromuscular reflex activity and 3-D kinematics of the trunk - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Müller, Juliane; Müller, Steffen; Engel, Tilman; Reschke, Antje; Baur, Heiner; Mayer, Frank

    2016-04-11

    Reflex activity of the lower leg muscles involved when compensating for falls has already been thoroughly investigated. However, the trunk׳s role in this compensation strategy remains unclear. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to analyze the kinematics and muscle activity of the trunk during perturbed walking. Ten subjects (29 ± 3 yr;79 ± 11 cm;74 ± 14 kg) walked (1m/s) on a split-belt treadmill, while 5 randomly timed, right-sided perturbations (treadmill belt deceleration: 40 m/s(2)) were applied. Trunk muscle activity was assessed with a 12-lead-EMG. Trunk kinematics were measured with a 3D-motion analysis system (12 markers framing 3 segments: upper thoracic area (UTA), lower thoracic area (LTA), lumbar area (LA)). The EMG-RMS [%] (0-200 ms after perturbation) was analyzed and then normalized to the RMS of normal walking. The total range of motion (ROM;[°]) for the extension/flexion, lateral flexion and rotation of each segment were calculated. Individual kinematic differences between walking and stumbling [%; ROM] were also computed. Data analysis was conducted descriptively, followed by one- and two-way ANOVAs (α=0.05). Stumbling led to an increase in ROM, compared to unperturbed gait, in all segments and planes. These increases ranged between 107 ± 26% (UTA/rotation) and 262 ± 132% (UTS/lateral flexion), significant only in lateral flexion. EMG activity of the trunk was increased during stumbling (abdominal: 665 ± 283%; back: 501 ± 215%), without significant differences between muscles. Provoked stumbling leads to a measurable effect on the trunk, quantifiable by an increase in ROM and EMG activity, compared to normal walking. Greater abdominal muscle activity and ROM of lateral flexion may indicate a specific compensation pattern occurring during stumbling.

  10. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase attenuates the blood pressure response to plantar flexion exercise in peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Rachel C.; Ross, Amanda J.; Blaha, Cheryl A.; Cauffman, Aimee E.; Kaufman, Marc P.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2015-01-01

    Prostanoids are produced during skeletal muscle contraction and subsequently stimulate muscle afferent nerves, thereby contributing to the exercise pressor reflex. Humans with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex, but the metabolite(s) responsible for this augmented response is not known. We tested the hypothesis that intravenous injection of ketorolac, which blocks the activity of cyclooxygenase, would attenuate the rise in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) evoked by plantar flexion exercise. Seven PAD patients underwent 4 min of single-leg dynamic plantar flexion (30 contractions/min) in the supine posture (workload: 0.5–2.0 kg). MAP and HR were measured on a beat-by-beat basis; changes from baseline in response to exercise were determined. Ketorolac did not affect MAP or HR at rest. During the first 20 s of exercise with the most symptomatic leg, ΔMAP was significantly attenuated by ketorolac (2 ± 2 mmHg) compared with control (8 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.005), but ΔHR was similar (6 ± 2 vs. 5 ± 1 beats/min). Importantly, patients rated the exercise bout as “very light” to “fairly light,” and average pain ratings were 1 of 10. Ketorolac had no effect on perceived exertion or pain ratings. Ketorolac also had no effect on MAP or HR in seven age- and sex-matched healthy subjects who performed a similar but longer plantar flexion protocol (workload: 0.5–7.0 kg). These data suggest that prostanoids contribute to the augmented exercise pressor reflex in patients with PAD. PMID:26055794

  11. Neural Adaptations Associated with Interlimb Transfer in a Ballistic Wrist Flexion Task

    PubMed Central

    Ruddy, Kathy L.; Rudolf, Anne K.; Kalkman, Barbara; King, Maedbh; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Carroll, Timothy J.; Carson, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Cross education is the process whereby training of one limb gives rise to increases in the subsequent performance of its opposite counterpart. The execution of many unilateral tasks is associated with increased excitability of corticospinal projections from primary motor cortex (M1) to the opposite limb. It has been proposed that these effects are causally related. Our aim was to establish whether changes in corticospinal excitability (CSE) arising from prior training of the opposite limb determine levels of interlimb transfer. We used three vision conditions shown previously to modulate the excitability of corticospinal projections to the inactive (right) limb during wrist flexion movements performed by the training (left) limb. These were: (1) mirrored visual feedback of the training limb; (2) no visual feedback of either limb; and (3) visual feedback of the inactive limb. Training comprised 300 discrete, ballistic wrist flexion movements executed as rapidly as possible. Performance of the right limb on the same task was assessed prior to, at the mid point of, and following left limb training. There was no evidence that variations in the excitability of corticospinal projections (assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)) to the inactive limb were associated with, or predictive of, the extent of interlimb transfer that was expressed. There were however associations between alterations in muscle activation dynamics observed for the untrained limb, and the degree of positive transfer that arose from training of the opposite limb. The results suggest that the acute adaptations that mediate the bilateral performance gains realized through unilateral practice of this ballistic wrist flexion task are mediated by neural elements other than those within M1 that are recruited at rest by single-pulse TMS. PMID:27199722

  12. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase attenuates the blood pressure response to plantar flexion exercise in peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Muller, Matthew D; Drew, Rachel C; Ross, Amanda J; Blaha, Cheryl A; Cauffman, Aimee E; Kaufman, Marc P; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-08-01

    Prostanoids are produced during skeletal muscle contraction and subsequently stimulate muscle afferent nerves, thereby contributing to the exercise pressor reflex. Humans with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex, but the metabolite(s) responsible for this augmented response is not known. We tested the hypothesis that intravenous injection of ketorolac, which blocks the activity of cyclooxygenase, would attenuate the rise in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) evoked by plantar flexion exercise. Seven PAD patients underwent 4 min of single-leg dynamic plantar flexion (30 contractions/min) in the supine posture (workload: 0.5-2.0 kg). MAP and HR were measured on a beat-by-beat basis; changes from baseline in response to exercise were determined. Ketorolac did not affect MAP or HR at rest. During the first 20 s of exercise with the most symptomatic leg, ΔMAP was significantly attenuated by ketorolac (2 ± 2 mmHg) compared with control (8 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.005), but ΔHR was similar (6 ± 2 vs. 5 ± 1 beats/min). Importantly, patients rated the exercise bout as "very light" to "fairly light," and average pain ratings were 1 of 10. Ketorolac had no effect on perceived exertion or pain ratings. Ketorolac also had no effect on MAP or HR in seven age- and sex-matched healthy subjects who performed a similar but longer plantar flexion protocol (workload: 0.5-7.0 kg). These data suggest that prostanoids contribute to the augmented exercise pressor reflex in patients with PAD.

  13. Acute stress induces down-regulation of large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels in the lateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan-yan; Liu, Shui-bing; Cui, Guang-Bin; Ma, Lan; Feng, Bin; Xing, Jiang-hao; Yang, Qi; Li, Xiao-qiang; Wu, Yu-mei; Xiong, Li-ze; Zhang, Weiqi; Zhao, Ming-gao

    2012-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels (BKCa) are highly expressed in the lateral amygdala (LA), which is closely involved in assigning stress disorders, but data on their role in the neuronal circuits of stress disorders are limited. In the present study, a significant reduction in BKCa channel expression in the amygdala of mice accompanied anxiety-like behaviour induced by acute stress. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from LA neurons of the anxious animals revealed a pronounced reduction in the fast after-hyperpolarization (fAHP) of action potentials mediated by BKCa channels that led to hyperexcitability of the LA neurons. Activation of BKCa channels in the LA reversed stress-induced anxiety-like behaviour after stress. Furthermore, down-regulated BKCa channels notably increased the evoked NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the thalamo-LA synapses. These data demonstrate, for the first time, that restraint stress-induced anxiety-like behaviour could at least partly be explained by alterations in the functional BKCa channels in the LA. PMID:22199169

  14. EMG activities of two heads of the human lateral pterygoid muscle in relation to mandibular condyle movement and biting force.

    PubMed

    Hiraba, K; Hibino, K; Hiranuma, K; Negoro, T

    2000-04-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the superior (SUP) and inferior heads (INF) of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPT) were recorded in humans during voluntary stepwise changes in biting force and jaw position that were adopted to exclude the effects of acceleration and velocity of jaw movements on the muscle activity. The SUP behaved like a jaw-closing muscle and showed characteristic activity in relation to the biting force. It showed a considerable amount of background activity (5-32% of the maximum) even in the intercuspal position without teeth clenching and reached a nearly maximum activity at relatively lower biting-force levels than the jaw-closing muscles during increment of the biting force. Stretch reflexes were found in the SUP, the function of which could be to stabilize the condyle against the biting force that pulls the condyle posteriorly. This notion was verified by examining the biomechanics on the temporomandibular joint. The complex movements of the mandibular condyle in a sagittal plane were decomposed into displacement in the anteroposterior direction (Ac) and angle of rotation (RAc) around a kinesiological specific point on the condyle. In relation to Ac, each head of the LPT showed quite a similar behavior to each other in all types of jaw movements across all subjects. Working ranges of the muscle activities were almost constant (Ac <3 mm for the SUP and Ac >3 mm for the INF). The amount of EMG activity of the SUP changed in inverse proportion to Ac showing a hyperbola-like relation, whereas that of the INF changed rather linearly. The EMG amplitude of the SUP showed a quasilinear inverse relation with RAc in the hinge movement during which the condyle rotated with no movement in the anteroposterior direction. This finding suggests that the SUP controls the angular relationship between the articular disk and the condyle. On the other hand, the position of the disk in relation to the maxilla, not to the condyle, is controlled indirectly by

  15. Behavioural and neuronal activation after microinjections of AMPA and NMDA into the perifornical lateral hypothalamus in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Frederick W; Deurveilher, Samuel; Semba, Kazue

    2011-10-31

    The perifornical lateral hypothalamic area (PeFLH), which houses orexin/hypocretin (OX) neurons, is thought to play an important role in arousal, feeding, and locomotor activity. The present study examined behavioural effects of activating PeFLH neurons with microinjections of ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists. Three separate unilateral microinjections of either (1) AMPA (1 and 2mM in 0.1 μL artificial cerebrospinal fluid, ACSF) and ACSF, or (2) NMDA (1 and 10mM in 0.1 μL ACSF), and ACSF were made into the PeFLH of adult male rats. Following each injection, the rats were placed into an open field for behavioural scoring for 45 min. Rats were perfused after the third injection for immunohistochemistry for c-Fos and OX to assess the level of activation of OX neurons. Behavioural analyses showed that, as compared to ACSF conditions, AMPA injections produced a dose-dependent increase in locomotion and rearing that persisted throughout the 45 min recording period, and an increase in drinking. Injection of NMDA at 10mM, but not 1mM, induced a transient increase in locomotion and an increase in feeding. Histological analyses showed that while both agonists increased the number of neurons immunoreactive for c-Fos in the PeFLH, only AMPA increased the number of neurons immunoreactive for both c-Fos and OX. There were positive correlations between the number of c-Fos/OX-immunoreactive neurons and the amounts of locomotion, rearing, and drinking. These results support the role of ionotropic glutamate receptors on OX and other neurons in the PeFLH in the regulation of locomotor and ingestive behaviours.

  16. Enhanced slow-wave EEG activity and thermoregulatory impairment following the inhibition of the lateral hypothalamus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cerri, Matteo; Del Vecchio, Flavia; Mastrotto, Marco; Luppi, Marco; Martelli, Davide; Perez, Emanuele; Tupone, Domenico; Zamboni, Giovanni; Amici, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Neurons within the lateral hypothalamus (LH) are thought to be able to evoke behavioural responses that are coordinated with an adequate level of autonomic activity. Recently, the acute pharmacological inhibition of LH has been shown to depress wakefulness and promote NREM sleep, while suppressing REM sleep. These effects have been suggested to be the consequence of the inhibition of specific neuronal populations within the LH, i.e. the orexin and the MCH neurons, respectively. However, the interpretation of these results is limited by the lack of quantitative analysis of the electroencephalographic (EEG) activity that is critical for the assessment of NREM sleep quality and the presence of aborted NREM-to-REM sleep transitions. Furthermore, the lack of evaluation of the autonomic and thermoregulatory effects of the treatment does not exclude the possibility that the wake-sleep changes are merely the consequence of the autonomic, in particular thermoregulatory, changes that may follow the inhibition of LH neurons. In the present study, the EEG and autonomic/thermoregulatory effects of a prolonged LH inhibition provoked by the repeated local delivery of the GABAA agonist muscimol were studied in rats kept at thermoneutral (24°C) and at a low (10°C) ambient temperature (Ta), a condition which is known to depress sleep occurrence. Here we show that: 1) at both Tas, LH inhibition promoted a peculiar and sustained bout of NREM sleep characterized by an enhancement of slow-wave activity with no NREM-to-REM sleep transitions; 2) LH inhibition caused a marked transitory decrease in brain temperature at Ta 10°C, but not at Ta 24°C, suggesting that sleep changes induced by LH inhibition at thermoneutrality are not caused by a thermoregulatory impairment. These changes are far different from those observed after the short-term selective inhibition of either orexin or MCH neurons, suggesting that other LH neurons are involved in sleep-wake modulation.

  17. Enhanced Slow-Wave EEG Activity and Thermoregulatory Impairment following the Inhibition of the Lateral Hypothalamus in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Cerri, Matteo; Vecchio, Flavia Del; Mastrotto, Marco; Luppi, Marco; Martelli, Davide; Perez, Emanuele; Tupone, Domenico; Zamboni, Giovanni; Amici, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Neurons within the lateral hypothalamus (LH) are thought to be able to evoke behavioural responses that are coordinated with an adequate level of autonomic activity. Recently, the acute pharmacological inhibition of LH has been shown to depress wakefulness and promote NREM sleep, while suppressing REM sleep. These effects have been suggested to be the consequence of the inhibition of specific neuronal populations within the LH, i.e. the orexin and the MCH neurons, respectively. However, the interpretation of these results is limited by the lack of quantitative analysis of the electroencephalographic (EEG) activity that is critical for the assessment of NREM sleep quality and the presence of aborted NREM-to-REM sleep transitions. Furthermore, the lack of evaluation of the autonomic and thermoregulatory effects of the treatment does not exclude the possibility that the wake-sleep changes are merely the consequence of the autonomic, in particular thermoregulatory, changes that may follow the inhibition of LH neurons. In the present study, the EEG and autonomic/thermoregulatory effects of a prolonged LH inhibition provoked by the repeated local delivery of the GABAA agonist muscimol were studied in rats kept at thermoneutral (24°C) and at a low (10°C) ambient temperature (Ta), a condition which is known to depress sleep occurrence. Here we show that: 1) at both Tas, LH inhibition promoted a peculiar and sustained bout of NREM sleep characterized by an enhancement of slow-wave activity with no NREM-to-REM sleep transitions; 2) LH inhibition caused a marked transitory decrease in brain temperature at Ta 10°C, but not at Ta 24°C, suggesting that sleep changes induced by LH inhibition at thermoneutrality are not caused by a thermoregulatory impairment. These changes are far different from those observed after the short-term selective inhibition of either orexin or MCH neurons, suggesting that other LH neurons are involved in sleep-wake modulation. PMID:25398141

  18. Absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation.

    PubMed Central

    Fried, K; Mundel, G

    1976-01-01

    An Ashkenazi Jewish family is described, in which absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation is transmitted through 4 generations with 8 affected individuals. The malformation is caused by an autosomal dominant gene with full penetrance and variable expressivity, and causes only little inconvenience. In one case the joints were normal on radiological examination. The malformation was not associated with any other anomaly except in the propositus who was referred becaused of profound mental retardation and cerebral palsy. This association is probably fortuitous as the other affected members were of above average intelligence. We were unable to find any report on this anomaly without associated malformations. Images PMID:933109

  19. Absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation.

    PubMed

    Fried, K; Mundel, G

    1976-04-01

    An Ashkenazi Jewish family is described, in which absence of distal interphalangeal creases of fingers with flexion limitation is transmitted through 4 generations with 8 affected individuals. The malformation is caused by an autosomal dominant gene with full penetrance and variable expressivity, and causes only little inconvenience. In one case the joints were normal on radiological examination. The malformation was not associated with any other anomaly except in the propositus who was referred becaused of profound mental retardation and cerebral palsy. This association is probably fortuitous as the other affected members were of above average intelligence. We were unable to find any report on this anomaly without associated malformations.

  20. Evaluation of lumbar intersegmental range of motion using flexion-extension radiographs of asymptomatic versus low back pain adults

    PubMed Central

    Cardin, André J; Hadida, Camille

    1994-01-01

    In this descriptive study, active lumbar flexion-extension radiographs of low back pain patients and asymptomatic volunteers were evaluated. The radiographs were evaluated to assess differences between the two groups using intersegmental angular and translational measurements. Average differences for angular and translational ranges of motion between groups were found, with a lower range of motion affecting the low back pain group. Subjective definitions of hypo and hypermobility were also offered to evaluate their prevalence within the samples.

  1. Lipid lateral heterogeneity in phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine/diacylglycerol vesicles and its influence on protein kinase C activation.

    PubMed Central

    Dibble, A R; Hinderliter, A K; Sando, J J; Biltonen, R L

    1996-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is influenced by lateral heterogeneities of the components of the lipid bilayer, the thermotropic phase behavior of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC)/dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS)/dioleoylglycerol (DO) vesicles was compared with the activation of PKC by this system. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to monitor the main transition (i.e., the gel-to-fluid phase transition) as a function of mole fraction DO (chi(DO)) in DMPC/DO, DMPS/DO, and [DMPC/DMPS (1:1, mol/mol)]/DO multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). In each case, when chi(DO) < or approximately 0.3, DO significantly broadened the main transition and shifted it to lower temperatures; but when chi(DO) > approximately 0.3, the main transition became highly cooperative, i.e., narrow, again. The coexistence of overlapping narrow and broad transitions was clearly evident in DSC thermograms from chi(DO) approximately 0.1 to chi(DO) approximately 0.3, with the more cooperative transition growing at the expense of the broader one as chi(DO) increased. FTIR spectroscopy, using analogs of DMPC and DMPS with perdeuterated acyl chains, showed that the melting profiles of all three lipid components in [DMPC/DMPS (1:1, mol/mol)]/DO MLVs virtually overlay when chi(DO) = 0.33, suggesting that a new type of phase, with a phospholipid/DO mole ratio near 2:1, is formed in this system. Collectively, the results are consistent with the coexistence of DO-poor and DO-rich domains throughout the compositions chi(DO) approximately 0.1 to chi(DO) approximately 0.3, even at temperatures above the main transition. Comparison of the phase behavior of the binary mixtures with that of the ternary mixtures suggests that DMPS/DO interactions may be more favorable than DMPC/DO interactions in the ternary system, especially in the gel state. PKC activity was measured using [DMPC/DMPS (1:1, mol/mol)]/DO MLVs

  2. The medial amygdaloid nucleus is involved in the cardiovascular pathway activated by noradrenaline into the lateral septal area of rats.

    PubMed

    Scopinho, América A; Fortaleza, Eduardo A T; Corrêa, Fernando M A

    2012-10-01

    We have previously reported that noradrenaline (NA) microinjected into the lateral septal area (LSA) caused pressor and bradicardic responses that were mediated by vasopressin release into the circulation through the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN). Although PVN is the final structure involved in the cardiovascular responses caused by NA in the LSA, there is no evidence of direct connections between these areas, suggesting that some structures could be links in this pathway. In the present study, we verified the effect of reversible synaptic inactivation of the medial amygdaloid nucleus (MeA), bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST) or diagonal band of Broca (DBB) with Cobalt Chloride (CoCl(2) ) on the cardiovascular response to NA microinjection into the LSA of unanesthetized rats. Male Wistar rats had guide cannulae implanted into the LSA and the MeA, BNST or DBB for drug administration, and a femoral catheter for blood pressure and heart rate recordings. Local microinjection of CoCl(2) (1 mm in 100 nL) into the MeA significantly reduced the pressor and bradycardic responses caused by NA microinjection (21 nmol in 200 nL) into the LSA. In contrast, microinjection of CoCl(2) into the BNST or DBB did not change the cardiovascular responses to NA into the LSA. The results indicate that synapses within the MeA, but not in BNST or DBB, are involved in the cardiovascular pathway activated by NA microinjection into the LSA.

  3. Fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) combined with gene expression microarrays for transcription enrichment profiling of zebrafish lateral line cells.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Viviana E; Behra, Martine

    2013-08-15

    Transgenic lines carrying fluorescent reporter genes like GFP have been of great value in the elucidation of developmental features and physiological processes in various animal models, including zebrafish. The lateral line (LL), which is a fish specific superficial sensory organ, is an emerging organ model for studying complex cellular processes in the context of the whole living animal. Cell migration, mechanosensory cell development/differentiation and regeneration are some examples. This sensory system is made of superficial and sparse small sensory patches called neuromasts, with less than 50 cells in any given patch. The paucity of cells is a real problem in any effort to characterize those cells at the transcriptional level. We describe here a method which we applied to efficiently separate subpopulation of cells of the LL, using two distinct stable transgenic zebrafish lines, Tg(cldnb:gfp) and Tg(tnks1bp1:EGFP). In both cases, the GFP positive (GFP+) cells were separated from the remainder of the animal by using a Fluorescent Activated Cell Sorter (FACS). The transcripts of the GFP+ cells were subsequently analyzed on gene expression microarrays. The combination of FACS and microarrays is an efficient method to establish a transcriptional signature for discrete cell populations which would otherwise be masked in whole animal preparation.

  4. Cytoarchitecture, Proliferative Activity and Neuroblast Migration in the Subventricular Zone and Lateral Ventricle Extension of the Adult Guinea Pig Brain.

    PubMed

    Jara, Nery; Cifuentes, Manuel; Martínez, Fernando; Salazar, Katterine; Nualart, Francisco

    2016-10-01

    In the mouse brain, neuroblasts generated in the subventricular zone (SVZ) migrate to the olfactory bulb (OB) through the rostral migratory stream (RMS). Although the RMS is not present in the human brain, a migratory pathway that is organized around a ventricular cavity that reaches the OB has been reported. A similar cavity, the lateral ventricle extension (LVE), is found in the adult guinea pig brain. Therefore, we analyzed cytoarchitecture, proliferative activity and precursor cell migration in the SVZ and LVE of 1-, 6- and 12-month-old guinea pigs. In young animals, we used confocal spectral and transmission electron microscopy to identify neuroblasts, astrocytes, and progenitor cells in the SVZ and LVE. Analysis of peroxidase diffusion demonstrated that the LVE was a continuous cavity lined by ependymal cells and surrounded by neuroblasts. Precursor cells were mostly located in the SVZ and migrated from the SVZ to the OB through the LVE. Finally, analysis of 6- and 12-month-old guinea pigs revealed that the LVE was preserved in older animals; however, the number of neurogenic cells was significantly reduced. Consequently, we propose that the guinea pig brain may be used as a new neurogenic model with increased similarity to humans, given that the LVE connects the LV with the OB, as has been described in humans, and that the LVE works a migratory pathway. Stem Cells 2016;34:2574-2586.

  5. Fingerprints of Learned Object Recognition Seen in the fMRI Activation Patterns of Lateral Occipital Complex.

    PubMed

    Roth, Zvi N; Zohary, Ehud

    2015-09-01

    One feature of visual processing in the ventral stream is that cortical responses gradually depart from the physical aspects of the visual stimulus and become correlated with perceptual experience. Thus, unlike early retinotopic areas, the responses in the object-related lateral occipital complex (LOC) are typically immune to parameter changes (e.g., contrast, location, etc.) when these do not affect recognition. Here, we use a complementary approach to highlight changes in brain activity following a shift in the perceptual state (in the absence of any alteration in the physical image). Specifically, we focus on LOC and early visual cortex (EVC) and compare their functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses to degraded object images, before and after fast perceptual learning that renders initially unrecognized objects identifiable. Using 3 complementary analyses, we find that, in LOC, unlike EVC, learned recognition is associated with a change in the multivoxel response pattern to degraded object images, such that the response becomes significantly more correlated with that evoked by the intact version of the same image. This provides further evidence that the coding in LOC reflects the recognition of visual objects.

  6. Enhanced alcohol-drinking behavior associated with active ghrelinergic and serotoninergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus and amygdala.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Kanji; Nagao, Masataka; Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Ueda, Shuichi; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Nishimura, Kaneyasu; Inden, Masatoshi; Marunaka, Yoshinori; Hattori, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Kaori; Tokaji, Megumi; Ochi, Kozo

    2017-02-01

    Central ghrelin is required for the rewarding properties of drug abuse. We investigated whether alcohol affects ghrelinergic, dopaminergic, and serotoninergic neurons and growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1A (GHS-R1A) levels in the reward system of the brain. Alcohol-naïve C57BL/6J mice received 2g/kg ethanol (EtOH) intraperitoneally (i.p.). Plasma ghrelin levels decreased between 1 and 4h. We investigated the effects of EtOH administration on plasma ghrelin levels in two different animal models at 1, 3, and 10months of age. Plasma ghrelin levels decreased following the EtOH treatment in 1- and 3-month-old short-term (1-day) alcohol vapor-exposed (STA) mice. In contrast, EtOH administration increased plasma ghrelin levels in 1- and 3-month-old long-term (20-day) alcohol vapor-exposed (LTA) mice. In vivo ghrelin release in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) increased in STA and LTA mice after the i.p. administration of EtOH. EtOH increased in vivo dopamine (DA), but not serotonin (5-HT) release in the LH of STA mice, and increased in vivo DA and 5-HT release in the LH of LTA mice. GHS-R1A mRNA expression and GHS-R1A protein levels in the LH were increased in LTA mice. The number of GHS-R1A-immunoreactive cells was greater in the LH and amygdala of LTA mice. These results support the neurobiological correlation between the development of drinking behavior and activation of ghrelinergic and serotonergic neurons in the LH. The activation of ghrelinergic systems in the amygdala may also induce an increase in 5-HT release in the LH during long-term alcohol intake.

  7. Active Ingredients of Treatment and Client Mechanisms of Change in Behavioral Treatments for Alcohol Use Disorders: Progress 10 Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Magill, M.; Kiluk, B.D.; McCrady, B.; Tonigan, J.S.; Longabaugh, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background The current review revisits the article entitled: Active Ingredients of Behavioral Treatments for Alcohol Use Disorders (AUDs) published in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. This work summarized proceedings from a 2004 Symposium of the same name that was held at the Annual Meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA). A decade has passed, which provides occasion for an evaluation of progress. In 2014, an RSA symposium titled Active Treatment Ingredients and Client Mechanisms of Change in Behavioral Treatments for Alcohol Use Disorders: Progress 10 Years Later did just that. Overview The current review revisits state-of-the-art research on the three treatments examined 10 years ago: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Alcohol Behavior Couples Therapy (ABCT), and Twelve Step Facilitation (TSF). Because of its empirically-validated effectiveness and robust research agenda on the study of process-outcome, Motivational Interviewing (MI) has been selected as the fourth treatment modality to be discussed. For each of these four treatments, the reviewers provide a critical assessment of current theory and research with a special emphasis on key recommendations for the future. Conclusions Noteworthy progress has been made in identifying AITs and MOBCs in these four behavioral interventions for alcohol and other drug use disorders. Not only have we established some of the mechanisms through which these evidence-based treatments work, but we have also uncovered some of the limitations in our existing frameworks and methods. Further progress in this area will require a broader view with respect to conceptual frameworks, analytic methods, and measurement instrumentation. PMID:26344200

  8. β1-adrenoceptor activation is required for ethanol enhancement of lateral paracapsular GABAergic synapses in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J; Weiner, Jeff L

    2012-11-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) potentiation of GABAergic neurotransmission in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) may contribute to the acute anxiolytic effects of this drug. Previous studies have shown that BLA pyramidal neurons receive GABAergic input from two distinct sources: local interneurons and a cluster of GABAergic cells termed lateral paracapsular (LPCS) interneurons. It is noteworthy that whereas EtOH enhances local GABAergic synapses via a presynaptic increase in GABA release, EtOH potentiation of LPCS inhibition is mediated via a distinct mechanism that requires adrenoceptor (AR) activation. Here, we sought to further characterize the interaction between the AR system and EtOH enhancement of LPCS GABAergic synapses by using in vitro electrophysiology techniques in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Exogenous norepinephrine (NE) enhanced LPCS-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) via the activation of β-ARs, because this effect was blocked by propranolol. EtOH potentiation of LPCS eIPSCs was also blocked by propranolol and significantly reduced by NE pretreatment, suggesting that NE and EtOH may enhance LPCS inhibition via a common mechanism. EtOH enhancement of LPCS eIPSCs was significantly reduced by a selective β1-, but not β2- or β3-, AR antagonist, and both EtOH and NE potentiation of LPCS IPSCs was blocked by postsynaptic disruption of cAMP signaling. These data suggest that EtOH enhances LPCS synapses via a postsynaptic β1-AR, cAMP-dependent cascade. Because enhancement of LPCS inhibition can reduce anxiety-like behaviors, these findings shed light on a novel mechanism that may play a role in some of the anxiolytic effects of EtOH that are thought to contribute to the development and progression of alcoholism.

  9. Maximum Velocities in Flexion and Extension Actions for Sport

    PubMed Central

    Jessop, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Speed of movement is fundamental to the outcome of many human actions. A variety of techniques can be implemented in order to maximise movement speed depending on the goal of the movement, constraints, and the time available. Knowing maximum movement velocities is therefore useful for developing movement strategies but also as input into muscle models. The aim of this study was to determine maximum flexion and extension velocities about the major joints in upper and lower limbs. Seven university to international level male competitors performed flexion/extension at each of the major joints in the upper and lower limbs under three conditions: isolated; isolated with a countermovement; involvement of proximal segments. 500 Hz planar high speed video was used to calculate velocities. The highest angular velocities in the upper and lower limb were 50.0 rad·s-1 and 28.4 rad·s-1, at the wrist and knee, respectively. As was true for most joints, these were achieved with the involvement of proximal segments, however, ANOVA analysis showed few significant differences (p<0.05) between conditions. Different segment masses, structures and locations produced differing results, in the upper and lower limbs, highlighting the requirement of segment specific strategies for maximal movements. PMID:28149339

  10. The functional anatomy of the iliotibial band during flexion and extension of the knee: implications for understanding iliotibial band syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, John; Hayashi, Koji; Toumi, Hechmi; Lyons, Kathleen; Bydder, Graeme; Phillips, Nicola; Best, Thomas M; Benjamin, Mike

    2006-03-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is a common overuse injury in runners and cyclists. It is regarded as a friction syndrome where the ITB rubs against (and 'rolls over') the lateral femoral epicondyle. Here, we re-evaluate the clinical anatomy of the region to challenge the view that the ITB moves antero-posteriorly over the epicondyle. Gross anatomical and microscopical studies were conducted on the distal portion of the ITB in 15 cadavers. This was complemented by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of six asymptomatic volunteers and studies of two athletes with acute ITB syndrome. In all cadavers, the ITB was anchored to the distal femur by fibrous strands, associated with a layer of richly innervated and vascularized fat. In no cadaver, volunteer or patient was a bursa seen. The MR scans showed that the ITB was compressed against the epicondyle at 30 degrees of knee flexion as a consequence of tibial internal rotation, but moved laterally in extension. MR signal changes in the patients with ITB syndrome were present in the region occupied by fat, deep to the ITB. The ITB is prevented from rolling over the epicondyle by its femoral anchorage and because it is a part of the fascia lata. We suggest that it creates the illusion of movement, because of changing tension in its anterior and posterior fibres during knee flexion. Thus, on anatomical grounds, ITB overuse injuries may be more likely to be associated with fat compression beneath the tract, rather than with repetitive friction as the knee flexes and extends.

  11. A Pilot Study of Individual Muscle Force Prediction during Elbow Flexion and Extension in the Neurorehabilitation Field

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jiateng; Sun, Yingfei; Sun, Lixin; Pan, Bingyu; Huang, Zhipei; Wu, Jiankang; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a neuromusculoskeletal (NMS) model to predict individual muscle force during elbow flexion and extension. Four male subjects were asked to do voluntary elbow flexion and extension. An inertial sensor and surface electromyography (sEMG) sensors were attached to subject's forearm. Joint angle calculated by fusion of acceleration and angular rate using an extended Kalman filter (EKF) and muscle activations obtained from the sEMG signals were taken as the inputs of the proposed NMS model to determine individual muscle force. The result shows that our NMS model can predict individual muscle force accurately, with the ability to reflect subject-specific joint dynamics and neural control solutions. Our method incorporates sEMG and motion data, making it possible to get a deeper understanding of neurological, physiological, and anatomical characteristics of human dynamic movement. We demonstrate the potential of the proposed NMS model for evaluating the function of upper limb movements in the field of neurorehabilitation. PMID:27916853

  12. Intraoperative medial pivot affects deep knee flexion angle and patient-reported outcomes after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Yusuke; Onodera, Tomohiro; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Daisuke; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Majima, Tokifumi

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between clinical results including patient-reported outcomes and intraoperative knee kinematic patterns after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A cross-sectional survey of forty consecutive medial osteoarthritis patients who had a primary TKA using a CT-based navigation system was conducted. Subjects were divided into two groups based on intraoperative kinematic patterns: a medial pivot group (n = 20) and a non-medial pivot group (n = 20). Subjective outcomes with the new Knee Society Score and clinical outcomes were evaluated. The functional activities, patient satisfaction and the knee flexion angle of the medial pivot group were significantly better than those of the non-medial pivot group. An intraoperative medial pivot pattern positively influences deep knee flexion and patient-reported outcomes.

  13. Effects of anti-saccade training with neck flexion on eye movement performance, presaccadic potentials and prefrontal hemodynamics in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Naoe; Fujiwara, Katsuo

    2010-12-01

    Anti-saccade performance, with strong contributions from frontal brain regions, reportedly deteriorates with age and maintenance of neck flexion and is known to cause brain activation. We investigated the effects of anti-saccade training on eye movement performance and frontal activity, and synergistic effects of training with neck flexion in the elderly. Thirty elderly individuals were divided into three equal groups: training group at neck resting position (NRT); training group at 20° neck flexion position (NFT); and untrained group. NRT and NFT performed approximately 200 anti-saccades (a block of 10-12 anti-saccades for 30 s × 20 blocks) per day over 3 weeks. Before and after training, horizontal eye movement, presaccadic potentials, and oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (oxy-Hb) in the prefrontal cortex during anti-saccades were tested in neck resting and 20° neck flexion conditions. In NRT and NFT, reaction time (-50 ms), percentage of erroneous saccades (-24%), and period between peak of presaccadic negativity and onset of spike potential (-16 ms) were significantly decreased through training. Only in NFT, after training, slight shortening of reaction time associated with neck flexion was recognized (-10 ms), and peak amplitude of presaccadic negativity was increased in both test neck conditions. Oxy-Hb was not significantly affected by trainings and test neck conditions. We demonstrated that in the elderly, anti-saccade training with both neck postures improved performance and facilitated related neural pathways. Moreover, training with neck flexion showed small but synergistic effects on performance and frontal activity. However, these trainings would be insufficient for elderly individuals to automatically control anti-saccade.

  14. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    apl.uw.edu/dasaro LONG-TERM GOALS I seek to understand the processes controlling lateral mixing in the ocean, particularly at the submesoscale ...APPROACH During AESOP, Lee and D’Asaro pioneered an innovative approach to measuring submesoscale structure in strong fronts. An adaptive measurement...injection of potential vorticity and scalars is predicted to create an intense ‘ submesoscale soup’ of high small-scale variance. The combination of small

  15. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-08

    to mesoscale forcing. APPROACH Figure 1: MVP system deployed from stern of R/V Endeavor in Sargasso Sea . 1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for...integrative efforts with other sea -going investigators and numerical modelers. The Lateral Mixing Experiment project was an ideal opportunity to...2011 I also participated in the sea -going part of this project, taking my group on the R/V Endeavor in June 2011. Our role was to sample around the

  16. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    ocean as it responds to mesoscale forcing. APPROACH Figure 1: MVP system deployed from stern of R/V Endeavor in Sargasso Sea . My approach for...therefore requires integrative efforts with other sea -going investigators and numerical modelers. The Lateral Mixing Experiment project was an ideal...also participated in the sea -going part of this project, taking my group on the R/V Endeavor in June 2011. Our role was to sample around the center of

  17. Differential muscle function between muscle synergists: long and lateral heads of the triceps in jumping and landing goats (Capra hircus).

    PubMed

    Carroll, Andrew M; Lee, David V; Biewener, Andrew A

    2008-10-01

    We investigate how the biarticular long head and monoarticular lateral head of the triceps brachii function in goats (Capra hircus) during jumping and landing. Elbow moment and work were measured from high-speed video and ground reaction force (GRF) recordings. Muscle activation and strain were measured via electromyography and sonomicrometry, and muscle stress was estimated from elbow moment and by partitioning stress based on its relative strain rate. Elbow joint and muscle function were compared among three types of limb usage: jump take-off (lead limb), the step prior to jump take-off (lag limb), and landing. We predicted that the strain and work patterns in the monoarticular lateral head would follow the kinematics and work of the elbow more closely than would those of the biarticular long head. In general this prediction was supported. For instance, the lateral head stretched (5 +/- 2%; mean +/- SE) in the lead and lag limbs to absorb work during elbow flexion and joint work absorption, while the long head shortened (-7 +/- 1%) to produce work. During elbow extension, both muscles shortened by similar amounts (-10 +/- 2% long; -13 +/- 4% lateral) in the lead limb to produce work. Both triceps heads functioned similarly in landing, stretching (13 +/- 3% in the long head and 19 +/- 5% in the lateral) to absorb energy. In general, the long head functioned to produce power at the shoulder and elbow, while the lateral head functioned to resist elbow flexion and absorb work, demonstrating that functional diversification can arise between mono- and biarticular muscle agonists operating at the same joint.

  18. The effects of a single game of rugby on active cervical range of motion.

    PubMed

    Lark, Sally D; McCarthy, Peter W

    2009-03-01

    The cumulative effect of playing rugby over many years decreases active cervical range of motion, especially in the forwards. This in itself should influence long-term neck care; however, it leaves the important question of how noticeable the acute effects of active cervical range of motion are following a single game. The active cervical range of motion was measured in 21 elite rugby players (mean age 24.4 +/- 4.3 years; average professional career of 7 +/- 3.4 years) before and after a single game of rugby at the start of the season. The active cervical range of motion was recorded in flexion, extension, left and right side flexion, plus left and right rotation using a cervical range of motion device. The results show generally decreased active cervical range of motion from before to after a game independent of position played. Rugby backs had significantly (P < 0.05) reduced active cervical range of motion in flexion, while forwards were affected in extension and left lateral flexion (P < 0.05). These results highlight that a single game of rugby can reduce functional capacity of the neck (active cervical range of motion), and the affected neck movement appears to be related to the role of positional play. The authors suggest that neck training and muscle damage repair should be an important part of a rugby player's post-game recovery to limit the reduction in functional capacity.

  19. Lateral paracapsular GABAergic synapses in the basolateral amygdala contribute to the anxiolytic effects of beta 3 adrenoceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J; Chappell, Ann M; Yorgason, Jordan T; Weiner, Jeff L

    2010-08-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is known to play an integral role in the neurobiological response to stress. Exposure to stressful stimuli increases NE levels in brain regions that regulate stress and anxiety, like the basolateral amygdala (BLA). NE is thought to increase excitability in these areas through alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors (ARs), leading to increased anxiety. Surprisingly, recent studies have shown that systemic beta 3-AR agonist administration decreases anxiety-like behaviors, suggesting that beta 3-ARs may inhibit excitability in anxiety-related brain regions. Therefore, in this study we integrated electrophysiological and behavioral approaches to test the hypothesis that the anxiolytic effects of beta 3-AR agonists may be mediated by an increase in BLA GABAergic inhibition. We examined the effect of a selective beta 3-AR agonist, BRL37344 (BRL), on GABAergic synapses arising from local circuit interneurons and inhibitory synapses originating from a recently described population of cells called lateral paracapsular (LPCS) interneurons. Surprisingly, BRL selectively enhanced LPCS-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) with no effect on local GABAergic inhibition. BRL also had no effect on glutamatergic synaptic excitation within the BLA. BRL potentiation of LPCS eIPSCs was blocked by the selective beta 3-AR antagonist, SR59230A, or by intracellular dialysis of Rp-CAMPS (cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor), and this enhancement was not associated with any changes in spontaneous IPSCs or LPCS paired-pulse ratio. BRL also increased the amplitude of unitary LPCS IPSCs (uIPSCs) with no effect on uIPSC failure rate. Finally, bilateral BLA microinjection of BRL reduced anxiety-like behaviors in an open-field assay and the elevated plus-maze. Collectively, these data suggest that beta 3-AR activation selectively enhances LPCS, but not local, BLA GABAergic synapses, and that increases in LPCS-mediated inhibition may contribute to the anxiolytic profile of

  20. S[+] Apomorphine is a CNS penetrating activator of the Nrf2-ARE pathway with activity in mouse and patient fibroblast models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mead, Richard J; Higginbottom, Adrian; Allen, Scott P; Kirby, Janine; Bennett, Ellen; Barber, Siân C; Heath, Paul R; Coluccia, Antonio; Patel, Neelam; Gardner, Iain; Brancale, Andrea; Grierson, Andrew J; Shaw, Pamela J

    2013-08-01

    Compelling evidence indicates that oxidative stress contributes to motor neuron injury in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but antioxidant therapies have not yet achieved therapeutic benefit in the clinic. The nuclear erythroid 2-related-factor 2 (Nrf2) transcription factor is a key regulator of an important neuroprotective response by driving the expression of multiple cytoprotective genes via its interaction with the antioxidant response element (ARE). Dysregulation of the Nrf2-ARE system has been identified in ALS models and human disease. Taking the Nrf2-ARE pathway as an attractive therapeutic target for neuroprotection in ALS, we aimed to identify CNS penetrating, small molecule activators of Nrf2-mediated transcription in a library of 2000 drugs and natural products. Compounds were screened extensively for Nrf2 activation, and antioxidant and neuroprotective properties in vitro. S[+]-Apomorphine, a receptor-inactive enantiomer of the clinically approved dopamine-receptor agonist (R[-]-apomorphine), was identified as a nontoxic Nrf2 activating molecule. In vivo S[+]-apomorphine demonstrated CNS penetrance, Nrf2 induction, and significant attenuation of motor dysfunction in the SOD1(G93A) transgenic mouse model of ALS. S[+]-apomorphine also reduced pathological oxidative stress and improved survival following an oxidative insult in fibroblasts from ALS patients. This molecule emerges as a promising candidate for evaluation as a potential neuroprotective agent in ALS patients in the clinic.

  1. A New Distal Arthrogryposis Syndrome Characterized by Plantar Flexion Contractures

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, D.A.; Swoboda, K.J.; Sanders, R.K.; Bamshad, M.

    2011-01-01

    The distal arthrogryposis (DA) syndromes are a distinct group of disorders characterized by contractures of two or more different body areas. More than a decade ago, we revised the classification of DAs and distinguished several new syndromes. This revision has facilitated the identification of five genes (i.e., TNNI2, TNNT3, MYH3, MYH8, and TPM2) that encode components of the contractile apparatus of fast-twitch myofibers and cause DA syndromes. We now report the phenotypic features of a novel DA disorder characterized primarily by plantar flexion contractures in a large five-generation Utah family. Contractures of hips, elbows, wrists, and fingers were much milder though they varied in severity among affected individuals. All affected individuals had normal neurological examinations; electromyography and creatinine kinase levels were normal on selected individuals. We have tentatively labeled this condition distal arthrogryposis type 10 (DA10). PMID:17103435

  2. Neck injury after repeated flexions due to parachuting.

    PubMed

    Mäkelä, J P; Hietaniemi, K

    1997-03-01

    A 37-yr-old, previously healthy officer developed a severe pain in the right shoulder and parethesia in the right I-III fingers during a high-altitude low-opening parachute jump. The pain started after a sudden neck flexion while he was checking the developing canopy, well before landing. Electroneuromyography revealed damage to the right C7 nerve root. Cervical radiography showed severe spondylosis and discus degeneration in the CV-VII region; magnetic resonance image demonstrated posterior disk protrusions in this area. Military aviators flying high-performance aircraft often have similar problems in the cervical spine; they have been attributed to effects of high + Gz forces in association with twisted head positions. Parachutists appear to face similar risks. Selection of the optimal head position during the parachute opening and use of light helmets should be emphasized.

  3. Combined flexion and extension cervical spine fractures with vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Lisanti, Christopher J; Hartness, Christopher

    2009-10-01

    We present a radiologic case report of a combined flexion and extension cervical spine fractures with associated vascular injury in a young patient who presented after a motorcycle crash with bilateral upper extremity paresthesias. CT and MRI examinations demonstrated an unstable anterior spondylolisthesis at C7/T1 with laminar/spinous process fracture of C7 and posterior longitudinal ligament avulsion requiring emergent surgery. Patient also had an extension teardrop fracture of C2 and focal right vertebral artery dissection. The case report reviews the classification of cervical spine injuries both by mechanism of injury and by stability/instability classification. Finally, we discuss the etiology and diagnosis of vascular injury including injury patterns that predispose to vascular trauma.

  4. The flexion synergy, mother of all synergies and father of new models of gait

    PubMed Central

    Duysens, Jacques; De Groote, Friedl; Jonkers, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been a growing interest in the modular organization of leg movements, in particular those related to locomotion. One of the basic modules involves the flexion of the leg during swing and it was shown that this module is already present in neonates (Dominici et al., 2011). In this paper, we question how these finding build upon the original work by Sherrington, who proposed that the flexor reflex is the basic building block of flexion during swing phase. Similarly, the relation between the flexor reflex and the withdrawal reflex modules of Schouenborg and Weng (1994) will be discussed. It will be argued that there is large overlap between these notions on modules and the older concepts of reflexes. In addition, it will be shown that there is a great flexibility in the expression of some of these modules during gait, thereby allowing for a phase-dependent modulation of the appropriate responses. In particular, the end of the stance phase is a period when the flexor synergy is facilitated. It is proposed that this is linked to the activation of circuitry that is responsible for the generation of locomotor patterns (CPG, “central pattern generator”). More specifically, it is suggested that the responses in that period relate to the activation of a flexor burst generator. The latter structure forms the core of a new asymmetric model of the CPG. This activation is controlled by afferent input (facilitation by a broad range of afferents, suppression by load afferent input). Meanwhile, many of these physiologic features have found their way in the control of very flexible walking bipedal robots. PMID:23494365

  5. Thickness variations and absence of lateral compositional fluctuations in aberration-corrected STEM images of InGaN LED active regions at low dose.

    PubMed

    Yankovich, Andrew B; Kvit, Alexander V; Li, Xing; Zhang, Fan; Avrutin, Vitaliy; Liu, Huiyong; Izyumskaya, Natalia; Özgür, Ümit; Van Leer, Brandon; Morkoç, Hadis; Voyles, Paul M

    2014-06-01

    Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy images of the In(0.15)Ga(0.85)N active region of a blue light-emitting diode, acquired at ~0.1% of the electron dose known to cause electron beam damage, show no lateral compositional fluctuations, but do exhibit one to four atomic plane steps in the active layer's upper boundary. The area imaged was measured to be 2.9 nm thick using position averaged convergent beam electron diffraction, ensuring the sample was thin enough to capture compositional variation if it was present. A focused ion beam prepared sample with a very large thin area provides the possibility to directly observe large fluctuations in the active layer thickness that constrict the active layer at an average lateral length scale of 430 nm.

  6. Two cases of work-related lateral epicondylopathy treated with Graston Technique® and conservative rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Papa, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the conservative treatment and management of two work-related cases of lateral elbow pain diagnosed as lateral epicondylopathy. Clinical features: Patient 1: A 48-year old female presented with gradual onset of right lateral elbow pain over the course of six weeks related to work activities of repetitive flexion/extension movements of the wrist and finger keying. Patient 2: A 47-year old female presented with gradual onset of left lateral elbow pain over the course of four weeks related to work activities of repetitive squeezing and gripping. Intervention and outcome: The conservative treatment approach consisted of activity modification, bracing, medical acupuncture with electrical stimulation, Graston Technique®, and rehabilitative exercise prescription. Outcome measures included verbal pain rating scale (VPRS), QuickDASH Work Module Score (QDWMS), and a return to regular work activities. Both patients attained resolution of their complaints, and at eight month follow-up reported no recurrence of symptoms. Conclusion: A combination of conservative rehabilitation strategies may be used by chiropractors to treat work-related lateral epicondylopathy and allow for individuals to minimize lost time related to this condition. PMID:22997469

  7. Active lateral secondary suspension with H ∞ control to improve ride comfort: simulations on a full-scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orvnäs, Anneli; Stichel, Sebastian; Persson, Rickard

    2011-09-01

    In this study, a full-scale rail vehicle model is used to investigate how lateral ride comfort is influenced by implementing the H ∞ and sky-hook damping control strategies. Simulations show that significant ride comfort improvements can be achieved on straight track with both control strategies compared with a passive system. In curves, it is beneficial to add a carbody centring Hold-Off Device (HOD) to reduce large spring deflections and hence to minimise the risk of bumpstop contact. In curve transitions, the relative lateral displacement between carbody and bogie is reduced by the concept of H ∞ control in combination with the HOD. However, the corresponding concept with sky-hook damping degrades the effect of the carbody centring function. Moreover, it is shown that lateral and yaw mode separation is a way to further improve the performance of the studied control strategies.

  8. Application of the restoring force method for identification of lumbar spine flexion-extension motion under flexion-extension moment.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Sean L; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Sangiorgio, Sophia N; Masri, Sami F

    2014-04-01

    The restoring force method (RFM), a nonparametric identification technique established in applied mechanics, was used to maximize the information obtained from moment-rotation hysteresis curves under pure moment flexion-extension testing of human lumbar spines. Data from a previous study in which functional spine units were tested intact, following simulated disk injury, and following implantation with an interspinous process spacer device were used. The RFM was used to estimate a surface map to characterize the dependence of the flexion-extension rotation on applied moment and the resulting axial displacement. This described each spine response as a compact, reduced-order model of the complex underlying nonlinear biomechanical characteristics of the tested specimens. The RFM was applied to two datasets, and successfully estimated the flexion-extension rotation, with error ranging from 3 to 23%. First, one specimen, tested in the intact, injured, and implanted conditions, was analyzed to assess the differences between the three specimen conditions. Second, intact specimens (N = 12) were analyzed to determine the specimen variability under equivalent testing conditions. Due to the complexity and nonlinearity of the hysteretic responses, the mathematical fit of each surface was defined in terms of 16 coefficients, or a bicubic fit, to minimize the identified (estimated) surface fit error. The results of the first analysis indicated large differences in the coefficients for each of the three testing conditions. For example, the coefficient corresponding to the linear stiffness (a01) had varied magnitude among the three conditions. In the second analysis of the 12 intact specimens, there was a large variability in the 12 unique sets of coefficients. Four coefficients, including two interaction terms comprised of both axial displacement and moment, were different from zero (p < 0.05), and provided necessary quantitative information to describe the hysteresis in

  9. Neck kinematics and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation during neck rotation in subjects with forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated differences in the kinematics of the neck and activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle during neck rotation between subjects with and without forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight subjects participated in the study (14 with FHP, 14 without FHP). Subjects performed neck rotation in two directions, left and right. The kinematics of rotation-lateral flexion movement patterns were recorded using motion analysis. Activity in the bilateral SCM muscles was measured using surface electromyography. Differences in neck kinematics and activation of SCM between the groups were analyzed by independent t-tests. [Results] Maintaining FHP increased the rotation-lateral flexion ratio significantly in both directions. The FHP group had significantly faster onset time for lateral flexion movement in both directions during neck rotation. Regarding the electromyography of the SCM muscles during neck rotation in both directions, the activity values of subjects with FHP were greater than those of subjects without FHP for the contralateral SCM muscles. [Conclusion] FHP can induce changes in movement in the frontal plane and SCM muscle activation during neck rotation. Thus, clinicians should consider movement in the frontal plane as well as in the sagittal plane when assessing and treating patients with forward head posture.

  10. Neck kinematics and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation during neck rotation in subjects with forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated differences in the kinematics of the neck and activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle during neck rotation between subjects with and without forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight subjects participated in the study (14 with FHP, 14 without FHP). Subjects performed neck rotation in two directions, left and right. The kinematics of rotation-lateral flexion movement patterns were recorded using motion analysis. Activity in the bilateral SCM muscles was measured using surface electromyography. Differences in neck kinematics and activation of SCM between the groups were analyzed by independent t-tests. [Results] Maintaining FHP increased the rotation-lateral flexion ratio significantly in both directions. The FHP group had significantly faster onset time for lateral flexion movement in both directions during neck rotation. Regarding the electromyography of the SCM muscles during neck rotation in both directions, the activity values of subjects with FHP were greater than those of subjects without FHP for the contralateral SCM muscles. [Conclusion] FHP can induce changes in movement in the frontal plane and SCM muscle activation during neck rotation. Thus, clinicians should consider movement in the frontal plane as well as in the sagittal plane when assessing and treating patients with forward head posture. PMID:26696712

  11. Large lateral movement of transmembrane helix S5 is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid intramembrane protease.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yi; Ha, Ya

    2013-06-07

    Rhomboids represent an evolutionarily ancient protease family. Unlike most other proteases, they are polytopic membrane proteins and specialize in cleaving transmembrane protein substrates. The polar active site of rhomboid protease is embedded in the membrane and normally closed. For the bacterial rhomboid GlpG, it has been proposed that one of the transmembrane helices (S5) of the protease can rotate to open a lateral gate, enabling substrate to enter the protease from inside the membrane. Here, we studied the conformational change in GlpG by solving the cocrystal structure of the protease with a mechanism-based inhibitor. We also examined the lateral gating model by cross-linking S5 to a neighboring helix (S2). The crystal structure shows that inhibitor binding displaces a capping loop (L5) from the active site but causes only minor shifts in the transmembrane helices. Cross-linking S5 and S2, which not only restricts the lateral movement of S5 but also prevents substrate from passing between the two helices, does not hinder the ability of the protease to cleave a membrane protein substrate in detergent solution and in reconstituted membrane vesicles. Taken together, these data suggest that a large lateral movement of the S5 helix is not required for substrate access to the active site of rhomboid protease.

  12. Regional Changes in Word-Production Laterality after a Naming Treatment Designed to Produce a Rightward Shift in Frontal Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosson, Bruce; Moore, Anna Bacon; McGregor, Keith M.; Chang, Yu-Ling; Benjamin, Michelle; Gopinath, Kaundinya; Sherod, Megan E.; Wierenga, Christina E.; Peck, Kyung K.; Briggs, Richard W.; Rothi, Leslie J. Gonzalez; White, Keith D.

    2009-01-01

    Five nonfluent aphasia patients participated in a picture-naming treatment that used an intention manipulation (opening a box and pressing a button on a device in the box with the left hand) to initiate naming trials and was designed to re-lateralize word production mechanisms from the left to the right frontal lobe. To test the underlying…

  13. The Effects of Psoas Major and Lumbar Lordosis on Hip Flexion and Sprint Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copaver, Karine; Hertogh, Claude; Hue, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the correlations between hip flexion power, sprint performance, lumbar lordosis (LL) and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the psoas muscle (PM). Ten young adults performed two sprint tests and isokinetic tests to determine hip flexion power. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine LL and PM CSA. There were…

  14. 49 CFR 572.165 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion...) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.165 Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure. (a) Upper/lower torso assembly. The test objective is...

  15. 49 CFR 572.165 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion...) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.165 Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure. (a) Upper/lower torso assembly. The test objective is...

  16. Evaluation of plantar flexion contracture contribution during the gait of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Nathaly; Gravel, Denis; Nadeau, Sylvie

    2009-06-01

    Because of extensor weakness, children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) maintain internal flexion moments at the joints of the lower extremities when they walk. We believe that at the ankle, the plantar flexion moments caused by contractures may contribute significantly to the production of the net ankle flexion moment during the gait in these children. The goal of the present study is to quantify ankle plantar flexion passive moments that may be associated with the presence of flexion contractures and to estimate their contribution to the net moment during the gait of children with DMD. Kinematic and kinetic parameters were collected during gait of eleven subjects with DMD. Ankle plantar flexion passive moments were also measured experimentally during the same session. Fourteen control children participated in the study in order to have normal reference values. The presence of ankle plantar flexion contractures in children with DMD was reflected by a rigidity coefficient obtained at a common moment of -7 Nm that was higher for these children (0.75 Nm/degrees vs. 0.48 Nm/degrees; p<0.05). The relative passive moment contribution to the net plantar flexion moments was higher for the children with DMD at the end of the lengthening phase of the plantar flexors (25% vs. 18%; p<0.05). We believe that the passive moments can compensate for the presence of progressive muscle weakness in the children with DMD and help these children with gait.

  17. Principles for Manipulation of the Lateral Organization of Aqueous-Soluble Surface-Active Molecules at the Liquid Crystal-Aqueous Interface

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Jugal K.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    We report an investigation of the lateral organization of water-soluble, surface-active molecules within monolayers formed spontaneously at interfaces between aqueous phases and immiscible, micrometer-thick films of nematic liquid crystals (LCs; 4′-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl and TL205, a mixture of cyclohexanefluorinated biphenyls and fluorinated terphenyls). Using both anionic (sodium dodecylsulfate) and cationic surfactants (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide), we demonstrate that the nematic order of the LCs can direct monolayers of surfactant in dynamic equilibria with bulk aqueous solutions to phase separate and assume lateral organizations at the interfaces of the LCs that are not seen in the absence of the nematic order. The lateral organization of the surfactants is readily evidenced by the patterned orientations assumed by the LCs, and can be manipulated reversibly by changes in the bulk concentrations of the surfactants. Experimental observations of the effects of bulk surfactant concentration, thickness of the film of LC, nematic order, and aqueous electrolyte concentration are placed within the framework of a simple thermodynamic model. The model incorporates the dynamic equilibration of surfactant between the bulk and interface as well as the coupling between the elasticity of nematic LCs and the lateral organization of the water-soluble surfactants within the monolayers. Qualitative agreement is found between the model predictions and experimental observations, thus supporting our conclusion that LCs offer the basis of general and facile methods to direct the lateral organization of interfacial molecular assemblies. PMID:19140731

  18. Humic Acids Isolated from Earthworm Compost Enhance Root Elongation, Lateral Root Emergence, and Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase Activity in Maize Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Canellas, Luciano Pasqualoto; Olivares, Fabio Lopes; Okorokova-Façanha, Anna L.; Façanha, Arnoldo Rocha

    2002-01-01

    Earthworms (Eisenia foetida) produce humic substances that can influence plant growth by mechanisms that are not yet clear. In this work, we investigated the effects of humic acids (HAs) isolated from cattle manure earthworm compost on the earliest stages of lateral root development and on the plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity. These HAs enhance the root growth of maize (Zea mays) seedlings in conjunction with a marked proliferation of sites of lateral root emergence. They also stimulate the plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity, apparently associated with an ability to promote expression of this enzyme. In addition, structural analysis reveals the presence of exchangeable auxin groups in the macrostructure of the earthworm compost HA. These results may shed light on the hormonal activity that has been postulated for these humic substances. PMID:12481077

  19. Subsidiary lateral femoral condyle in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Schopler, S A; Menelaus, M B

    1987-01-01

    A previously undescribed anomaly of the distal femur occurred in a 3-month-old child with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. There was a large boss of bone superior and posterior to the true lateral femoral condyle with which the lateral tibial femoral condyle articulated. To obtain full extension of the knee, it was necessary to perform a full posterior release and to replace the tibial condyle distally onto the true lateral condyle. The etiology of the anomaly remains conjectural, but the lesion should be sought for in patients with resistant flexion contracture requiring surgical release.

  20. Lateralized Kinematics of Predation Behavior in a Lake Tanganyika Scale-Eating Cichlid Fish

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Yuichi; Hori, Michio; Oda, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral lateralization has been documented in many vertebrates. The scale-eating cichlid fish Perissodus microlepis is well known for exhibiting lateral dimorphism in its mouth morphology and lateralized behavior in robbing scales from prey fish. A previous field study indicated that this mouth asymmetry closely correlates with the side on which prey is attacked, but details of this species' predation behavior have not been previously analyzed because of the rapidity of the movements. Here, we studied scale-eating behavior in cichlids in a tank through high-speed video monitoring and quantitative assessment of behavioral laterality and kinematics. The fish observed showed a clear bias toward striking on one side, which closely correlated with their asymmetric mouth morphologies. Furthermore, the maximum angular velocity and amplitude of body flexion were significantly larger during attacks on the preferred side compared to those on the nonpreferred side, permitting increased predation success. In contrast, no such lateral difference in movement elements was observed in acoustically evoked flexion during the escape response, which is similar to flexion during scale eating and suggests that they share a common motor control pathway. Thus the neuronal circuits controlling body flexion during scale eating may be functionally lateralized upstream of this common motor pathway. PMID:22238598

  1. Reflection of induced and amplified food motivation in impulse activity of the masticatory muscles during electrostimulation of the "hunger center" in the lateral hypothalamus in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, J P; Kromin, A A

    2012-04-01

    We studied reflection of artificially induced and amplified food motivation in impulse activity of the masticatory muscles during electrostimulation of "hunger center" of the lateral hypothalamus in the absence and presence of food. The threshold stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in hungry and satiated animals in the absence of food induced incessant food-procuring behavior paralleled by regular generation of spike bursts in masticatory muscles with biomodal distributions of intervals between pulses. This reaction of masticatory muscles during stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in the absence of food was an example of the anticipatory reaction reflecting characteristics of the action result acceptor. Higher level of hunger motivation during threshold stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in hungry and satiated rabbits in the course of effective food-procuring behavior increased the incidence of spike burst generation during the food capture phase, but did not modify this parameter during the chewing phase. Impulse activity of the masticatory muscles reflected convergent interactions of food motivation and support excitation on neurons of the central generator of chewing pattern.

  2. Effect of short-term application of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk repositioning in healthy females.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Sara A; Frost, Lydia R; Vallis, Lori Ann; Brown, Stephen H M

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential effects of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk position sense when applied for a short period (30 min) to the low back of healthy female participants. Twenty-four participants were assigned to one of two groups: kinesio tape applied in either the recommended stretched or non-stretched (control) manner over the low back. Tests were performed at three time points (pre-tape, with tape, post-tape) to assess low-back muscle flexion-relaxation, position sense during active trunk repositioning and trunk postural control during seated balance. Results demonstrated that wearing kinesio tape did not affect the angle at which the erector spinae muscles became silent during trunk flexion (flexion-relaxation). Trunk repositioning error increased when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and this increased error persisted after the tape was removed. Seated balance control improved when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and these improvements persisted after the tape was removed. In conclusion, these findings do not support the general suggestions that short-term use of kinesio tape on the low-back region alter low-back muscle activation and enhance tasks related to proprioception, at least under these taping conditions in a group of healthy females.

  3. Evaluation of the numeric rating scale for perception of effort during isometric elbow flexion exercise.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulou, Sofia; Nowicky, Alexander V

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the reliability and validity of the numerical rating scale (0-10 NRS) for rating perception of effort during isometric elbow flexion in healthy people. 33 individuals (32 ± 8 years) participated in the study. Three re-test measurements within one session and three weekly sessions were undertaken to determine the reliability of the scale. The sensitivity of the scale following 10 min isometric fatiguing exercise of the elbow flexors as well as the correlation of the effort with the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the flexor muscles were tested. Perception of effort was tested during isometric elbow flexion at 10, 30, 50, 70, 90, and 100% MVC. The 0-10 NRS demonstrated an excellent test-retest reliability [intra class correlation (ICC) = 0.99 between measurements taken within a session and 0.96 between 3 consecutive weekly sessions]. Exploratory curve fitting for the relationship between effort ratings and voluntary force, and underlying EMG showed that both are best described by power functions (y = ax ( b )). There were also strong correlations (range 0.89-0.95) between effort ratings and EMG recordings of all flexor muscles supporting the concurrent criterion validity of the measure. The 0-10 NRS was sensitive enough to detect changes in the perceived effort following fatigue and significantly increased at the level of voluntary contraction used in its assessment (p < 0.001). These findings suggest the 0-10 NRS is a valid and reliable scale for rating perception of effort in healthy individuals. Future research should seek to establish the validity of the 0-10 NRS in clinical settings.

  4. Parallel reflex pathways from flexor muscle afferents evoking resetting and flexion enhancement during fictive locomotion and scratch in the cat.

    PubMed

    Stecina, Katinka; Quevedo, Jorge; McCrea, David A

    2005-11-15

    Reflex actions of muscle afferents in hindlimb flexor nerves were examined on ipsilateral motoneurone activity recorded in peripheral nerves during midbrain stimulation-evoked fictive locomotion and during fictive scratch in decerebrate cats. Trains of stimuli (15-30 shocks at 200 Hz) were delivered during the flexion phase at intensities sufficient to activate both group I and II afferents (5 times threshold, T). In many preparations tibialis anterior (TA) nerve stimulation terminated ongoing flexion and reset the locomotor cycle to extension (19/31 experiments) while extensor digitorum longus (EDL) stimulation increased and prolonged the ongoing flexor phase activity (20/33 preparations). The effects of sartorius, iliopsoas and peroneus longus muscle afferent stimulation were qualitatively similar to those of EDL nerve. Resetting to extension was seen only with higher intensity stimulation (5T) while ongoing flexor activity was often enhanced at group I intensity (2T) stimulation. The effects of flexor nerve stimulation were qualitatively similar during fictive scratch. Reflex reversals were consistently observed in some fictive locomotor preparations. In those cases, EDL stimulation produced a resetting to extension and TA stimulation prolonged the ongoing flexion phase. Occasionally reflex reversals occurred spontaneously during only one of several stimulus presentations. The variable and opposite actions of flexor afferents on the locomotor step cycle indicate the existence of parallel spinal reflex pathways. A hypothetical organization of reflex pathways from flexor muscle afferents to the spinal pattern generator networks with competing actions of group I and group II afferents on the flexor and extensor portions of this central circuitry is proposed.

  5. Prevalence of pain and dysfunction in the cervical and thoracic spine in persons with and without lateral elbow pain.

    PubMed

    Berglund, K M; Persson, B H; Denison, E

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the prevalence of pain in the cervical and thoracic spine (C2-T7) in persons with and without lateral elbow pain. Thirty-one subjects with lateral elbow pain and 31 healthy controls participated in the study. The assessment comprised a pain drawing, provocation tests of the cervical and thoracic spine, a neurodynamic test of the radial nerve, and active cervical range of motion. Seventy percent of the subjects with lateral elbow pain indicated pain in the cervical or thoracic spine, as compared to 16% in the control group (p<0.001). The frequency of pain responses to the provocation tests of the cervical and thoracic spine was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the lateral elbow pain (LEP) group, as was the frequency of pain responses to the neurodynamic test of the radial nerve (p<0.001). Cervical flexion and extension range of motion was significantly lower (p<0.01) in the LEP group. The results indicate a relation between lateral elbow pain and pain in the vertebral spine (C2-T7). The cervical and thoracic spine should be included in the assessment of patients with lateral elbow pain.

  6. An individual approach for optimizing ankle-foot orthoses to improve mobility in children with spastic cerebral palsy walking with excessive knee flexion.

    PubMed

    Kerkum, Yvette L; Harlaar, Jaap; Buizer, Annemieke I; van den Noort, Josien C; Becher, Jules G; Brehm, Merel-Anne

    2016-05-01

    Ankle-Foot Orthoses (AFOs) are commonly prescribed to promote gait in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The AFO prescription process is however largely dependent on clinical experience, resulting in confusing results regarding treatment efficacy. To maximize efficacy, the AFO's mechanical properties should be tuned to the patient's underlying impairments. This study aimed to investigate whether the efficacy of a ventral shell AFO (vAFO) to reduce knee flexion and walking energy cost could be improved by individually optimizing AFO stiffness in children with CP walking with excessive knee flexion. Secondarily, the effect of the optimized vAFO on daily walking activity was investigated. Fifteen children with spastic CP were prescribed with a hinged vAFO with adjustable stiffness. Effects of a rigid, stiff, and flexible setting on knee angle and the net energy cost (EC) [Jkg(-1)m(-1)] were assessed to individually select the optimal stiffness. After three months, net EC, daily walking activity [stridesmin(-1)] and knee angle [deg] while walking with the optimized vAFO were compared to walking with shoes-only. A near significant 9% (p=0.077) decrease in net EC (-0.5Jkg(-1)m(-1)) was found for walking with the optimized vAFO compared to shoes-only. Daily activity remained unchanged. Knee flexion in stance was reduced by 2.4° (p=0.006). These results show that children with CP who walk with excessive knee flexion show a small, but significant reduction of knee flexion in stance as a result of wearing individually optimized vAFOs. Data suggest that this also improves gait efficiency for which an individual approach to AFO prescription is emphasized.

  7. Delensing gravitational wave standard sirens with shear and flexion maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, C.; Bacon, D. J.; Hendry, M.; Hoyle, B.

    2010-05-01

    Supermassive black hole binary (SMBHB) systems are standard sirens - the gravitational wave analogue of standard candles - and if discovered by gravitational wave detectors, they could be used as precise distance indicators. Unfortunately, gravitational lensing will randomly magnify SMBHB signals, seriously degrading any distance measurements. Using a weak lensing map of the SMBHB line of sight, we can estimate its magnification and thereby remove some uncertainty in its distance, a procedure we call `delensing'. We find that delensing is significantly improved when galaxy shears are combined with flexion measurements, which reduce small-scale noise in reconstructed magnification maps. Under a Gaussian approximation, we estimate that delensing with a 2D mosaic image from an Extremely Large Telescope could reduce distance errors by about 25-30 per cent for an SMBHB at z = 2. Including an additional wide shear map from a space survey telescope could reduce distance errors by nearly a factor of 2. Such improvement would make SMBHBs considerably more valuable as cosmological distance probes or as a fully independent check on existing probes.

  8. Wing Flexion and Aerodynamics Performance of Insect Free Flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Haibo; Liang, Zongxian; Ren, Yan

    2010-11-01

    Wing flexion in flapping flight is a hallmark of insect flight. It is widely thought that wing flexibility and wing deformation would potentially provide new aerodynamic mechanisms of aerodynamic force productions over completely rigid wings. However, there are lack of literatures on studying fluid dynamics of freely flying insects due to the presence of complex shaped moving boundaries in the flow domain. In this work, a computational study of freely flying insects is being conducted. High resolution, high speed videos of freely flying dragonflies and damselflies is obtained and used as a basis for developing high fidelity geometrical models of the dragonfly body and wings. 3D surface reconstruction technologies are used to obtain wing topologies and kinematics. The wing motions are highly complex and a number of different strategies including singular vector decomposition of the wing kinematics are used to examine the various kinematical features and their impact on the wing performance. Simulations are carried out to examine the aerodynamic performance of all four wings and understand the wake structures of such wings.

  9. Isokinetic strength during knee flexion and extension in elite fencers.

    PubMed

    Poulis, I; Chatzis, S; Christopoulou, K; Tsolakis, Ch

    2009-06-01

    The relation of leg preference and muscular strength in elite fencers was examined. The dominant and nondominant extensor and flexor muscles of 30 elite fencers (M age = 18.2 yr., SD = 2.0 yr.; M height = 173 cm, SD=7.4 cm; M weight = 62.7 kg, SD=8.9 kg), who were members of the Greek national team, and 14 healthy, young, sedentary adults (8 men, 6 women; M age 23.4 yr., SD = 1.9; M height = 169 cm, SD = 10.5 cm; M weight = 66.3 kg, SD = 9.9) were tested for concentric isokinetic contraction at slow (30 to 60 degrees/sec.) and fast (240 degrees/sec.) angular velocities. Significant multivariate differences were found between groups for knee extension, angle of knee extension, knee flexion, and flexor/extensor peak torque ratio. In contrast, no significant difference was found between the dominant and nondominant legs. There was no significant difference in the flexor/extensor peak torque ratio among any of the concentric angular velocities tested. These findings suggest that long-term training in fencing influences the strength characteristics of the lower limbs.

  10. Effects of electric stimulation of the hunger center in the lateral hypothalamus on slow electric activity and spike activity of fundal and antral stomach muscles in rabbits under conditions of hunger and satiation.

    PubMed

    Kromin, A A; Zenina, O Yu

    2013-09-01

    In chronic experiments on rabbits, the effect of electric stimulation of the hunger center in the lateral hypothalamus on myoelectric activity of the fundal and antral parts of the stomach was studied under conditions of hunger and satiation in the absence of food. Stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation and in previously fed rabbits produced incessant seeking behavior, which was followed by reorganization of the structure of temporal organization of slow wave electric activity of muscles of the stomach body and antrum specific for hungry and satiated animals. Increased hunger motivation during electric stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus manifested in the structure of temporal organization of slow wave electric activity of the stomach body and antrum muscles in rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation in the replacement of bimodal distribution of slow wave periods to a trimodal type typical of 2-day deprivation, while transition from satiation to hunger caused by electric stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus was associated with a shift from monomodal distributions of slow wave periods to a bimodal type typical of 24-h deprivation. Reorganization of the structure of temporal organization of slow wave electric activity of the stomach body and antrum muscles during electric stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus was determined by descending inhibitory influences of food motivational excitation on activity of the myogenic pacemaker of the lesser curvature of the stomach.

  11. Relative sensitivity of depth discrimination for ankle inversion and plantar flexion movements.

    PubMed

    Black, Georgia; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger

    2014-02-01

    25 participants (20 women, 5 men) were tested for sensitivity in discrimination between sets of six movements centered on 8 degrees, 11 degrees, and 14 degrees, and separated by 0.3 degrees. Both inversion and plantar flexion movements were tested. Discrimination of the extent of inversion movement was observed to decline linearly with increasing depth; however, for plantar flexion, the discrimination function for movement extent was found to be non-linear. The relatively better discrimination of plantar flexion movements than inversion movements at around 11 degrees from horizontal is interpreted as an effect arising from differential amounts of practice through use, because this position is associated with the plantar flexion movement made in normal walking. The fact that plantar flexion movements are discriminated better than inversion at one region but not others argues against accounts of superior proprioceptive sensitivity for plantar flexion compared to inversion that are based on general properties of plantar flexion such as the number of muscle fibres on stretch.

  12. MEASURING GRAVITATIONAL LENSING FLEXION IN A1689 USING AN ANALYTIC IMAGE MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, Benjamin

    2011-07-20

    Measuring dark matter substructure within galaxy cluster halos is a fundamental probe of the {Lambda}CDM model of structure formation. Gravitational lensing is a technique for measuring the total mass distribution which is independent of the nature of the gravitating matter, making it a vital tool for studying these dark-matter-dominated objects. We present a new method for measuring weak gravitational lensing flexion fields, the gradients of the lensing shear field, to measure mass distributions on small angular scales. While previously published methods for measuring flexion focus on measuring derived properties of the lensed images, such as shapelet coefficients or surface brightness moments, our method instead fits a mass-sheet transformation invariant Analytic Image Model (AIM) to each galaxy image. This simple parametric model traces the distortion of lensed image isophotes and constrains the flexion fields. We test the AIM method using simulated data images with realistic noise and a variety of unlensed image properties, and show that it successfully reproduces the input flexion fields. We also apply the AIM method for flexion measurement to Hubble Space Telescope observations of A1689 and detect mass structure in the cluster using flexion measured with this method. We also estimate the scatter in the measured flexion fields due to the unlensed shape of the background galaxies and find values consistent with previous estimates.

  13. Functional Brain Activity within the Medial and Lateral Portion of BA10 during a Prospective Memory Task

    PubMed Central

    Barban, Francesco; Carlesimo, Giovanni Augusto; Macaluso, Emiliano; Caltagirone, Carlo; Costa, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    In this study we tested the gateway hypothesis of Broadmann area 10 (BA10). With a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) protocol we manipulated the saliency–stimulus-oriented (SO) attending– and the memory load – stimulus-independent (SI) attending–during a prospective memory (PM) task. We found a significant main effect of the SO manipulation within the medial BA10 and a significant interaction between SI attending and PM task within the left lateral BA10. Our results give experimental support to the gateway hypothesis. PMID:22713428

  14. Laterally coupled distributed feedback lasers emitting at 2 μm with quantum dash active region and high-duty-cycle etched semiconductor gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papatryfonos, Konstantinos; Saladukha, Dzianis; Merghem, Kamel; Joshi, Siddharth; Lelarge, Francois; Bouchoule, Sophie; Kazazis, Dimitrios; Guilet, Stephane; Le Gratiet, Luc; Ochalski, Tomasz J.; Huyet, Guillaume; Martinez, Anthony; Ramdane, Abderrahim

    2017-02-01

    Single-mode diode lasers on an InP(001) substrate have been developed using InAs/In0.53Ga0.47As quantum dash (Qdash) active regions and etched lateral Bragg gratings. The lasers have been designed to operate at wavelengths near 2 μm and exhibit a threshold current of 65 mA for a 600 μm long cavity, and a room temperature continuous wave output power per facet >5 mW. Using our novel growth approach based on the low ternary In0.53Ga0.47As barriers, we also demonstrate ridge-waveguide lasers emitting up to 2.1 μm and underline the possibilities for further pushing the emission wavelength out towards longer wavelengths with this material system. By introducing experimentally the concept of high-duty-cycle lateral Bragg gratings, a side mode suppression ratio of >37 dB has been achieved, owing to an appreciably increased grating coupling coefficient of κ ˜ 40 cm-1. These laterally coupled distributed feedback (LC-DFB) lasers combine the advantage of high and well-controlled coupling coefficients achieved in conventional DFB lasers, with the regrowth-free fabrication process of lateral gratings, and exhibit substantially lower optical losses compared to the conventional metal-based LC-DFB lasers.

  15. Biomechanical evaluation of lateral lumbar interbody fusion with secondary augmentation.

    PubMed

    Reis, Marco T; Reyes, Phillip M; Bse; Altun, Idris; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Singh, Vaneet; Chang, Steve W; Kelly, Brian P; Crawford, Neil R

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF) has emerged as a popular method for lumbar fusion. In this study the authors aimed to quantify the biomechanical stability of an interbody implant inserted using the LLIF approach with and without various supplemental fixation methods, including an interspinous plate (IP). METHODS Seven human cadaveric L2-5 specimens were tested intact and in 6 instrumented conditions. The interbody implant was intended to be used with supplemental fixation. In this study, however, the interbody was also tested without supplemental fixation for a relative comparison of these conditions. The instrumented conditions were as follows: 1) interbody implant without supplemental fixation (LLIF construct); and interbody implant with supplemental fixation performed using 2) unilateral pedicle screws (UPS) and rod (LLIF + UPS construct); 3) bilateral pedicle screws (BPS) and rods (LLIF + BPS construct); 4) lateral screws and lateral plate (LP) (LLIF + LP construct); 5) interbody LP and IP (LLIF + LP + IP construct); and 6) IP (LLIF + IP construct). Nondestructive, nonconstraining torque (7.5 Nm maximum) induced flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, whereas 3D specimen range of motion (ROM) was determined optoelectronically. RESULTS The LLIF construct reduced ROM by 67% in flexion, 52% in extension, 51% in lateral bending, and 44% in axial rotation relative to intact specimens (p < 0.001). Adding BPS to the LLIF construct caused ROM to decrease by 91% in flexion, 82% in extension and lateral bending, and 74% in axial rotation compared with intact specimens (p < 0.001), providing the greatest stability among the constructs. Adding UPS to the LLIF construct imparted approximately one-half the stability provided by LLIF + BPS constructs, demonstrating significantly smaller ROM than the LLIF construct in all directions (flexion, p = 0.037; extension, p < 0.001; lateral bending, p = 0.012) except axial rotation (p = 0

  16. Clinical evaluation of 292 Genesis II posterior stabilized high-flexion total knee arthroplasty: range of motion and predictors.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Mathijs C H W; Janssen, Rob P A

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to evaluate the range of motion and complications after Genesis II total knee arthroplasty with high-flexion tibia insert (TKA-HF). Furthermore, difference in knee flexion between high flexion and standard inserts was compared. The hypothesis was that knee flexion is better after high-flexion TKA. A total of 292 TKA-HF were retrospectively reviewed. Mean follow-up was 24.3 months. The range of motion was compared between TKA-HF (high-flexion group) and a comparable cohort of 86 Genesis II TKA with a standard tibia insert (control group). Surgeries were performed by one experienced knee orthopedic surgeon. Knee flexion in the high-flexion group increased from 114.8° preoperatively to 118.0° postoperatively (P < 0.01). Knee extension in the high-flexion group increased from -4.5° preoperatively to -0.4° after surgery (P < 0.01). Mean knee flexion was 5.52° (± 1.46°) better in the high-flexion group compared with the control group (P < 0.01). Preoperative range of motion, body mass index, diabetes mellitus and patellofemoral pain significantly influenced range of motion. Few complications occurred after TKA-HF. The Genesis II TKA-HF showed good short-term results with limited complications. Knee flexion after Genesis II TKA-HF was better compared with a standard tibia insert.

  17. Decreased electroencephalogram alpha band [8-13 Hz] power in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a study of alpha activity in an awake relaxed state.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Jayashree; Bhatia, Manvir; Sahu, Shweta; Anand, Sneh

    2005-03-01

    An attempt was made to quantitatively analyze the alpha activity in the awake relaxed state of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) patients and was compared with normals. ALS patients showed significantly low amplitude with a corresponding alpha band (8-13 Hz) power reduction, in both hemispheres though the change was more prominent in the left hemisphere. A review of the literature revealed no studies done on alpha oscillations in ALS patients; hence the results may have important implications for the interpretation of resting state brain activities.

  18. Effects of muscle activation on shear between human soleus and gastrocnemius muscles.

    PubMed

    Finni, T; Cronin, N J; Mayfield, D; Lichtwark, G A; Cresswell, A G

    2017-01-01

    Lateral connections between muscles provide pathways for myofascial force transmission. To elucidate whether these pathways have functional roles in vivo, we examined whether activation could alter the shear between the soleus (SOL) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles. We hypothesized that selective activation of LG would decrease the stretch-induced shear between LG and SOL. Eleven volunteers underwent a series of knee joint manipulations where plantar flexion force, LG, and SOL muscle fascicle lengths and relative displacement of aponeuroses between the muscles were obtained. Data during a passive full range of motion were recorded, followed by 20° knee extension stretches in both passive conditions and with selective electrical stimulation of LG. During active stretch, plantar flexion force was 22% greater (P < 0.05) and relative displacement of aponeuroses was smaller than during passive stretch (P < 0.05). Soleus fascicle length changes did not differ between passive and active stretches but LG fascicles stretched less in the active than passive condition when the stretch began at angles of 70° and 90° of knee flexion (P < 0.05). The activity-induced decrease in the relative displacement of SOL and LG suggests stronger (stiffer) connectivity between the two muscles, at least at flexed knee joint angles, which may serve to facilitate myofascial force transmission.

  19. The functional anatomy of the iliotibial band during flexion and extension of the knee: implications for understanding iliotibial band syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fairclough, John; Hayashi, Koji; Toumi, Hechmi; Lyons, Kathleen; Bydder, Graeme; Phillips, Nicola; Best, Thomas M; Benjamin, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome is a common overuse injury in runners and cyclists. It is regarded as a friction syndrome where the ITB rubs against (and ‘rolls over’) the lateral femoral epicondyle. Here, we re-evaluate the clinical anatomy of the region to challenge the view that the ITB moves antero-posteriorly over the epicondyle. Gross anatomical and microscopical studies were conducted on the distal portion of the ITB in 15 cadavers. This was complemented by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of six asymptomatic volunteers and studies of two athletes with acute ITB syndrome. In all cadavers, the ITB was anchored to the distal femur by fibrous strands, associated with a layer of richly innervated and vascularized fat. In no cadaver, volunteer or patient was a bursa seen. The MR scans showed that the ITB was compressed against the epicondyle at 30° of knee flexion as a consequence of tibial internal rotation, but moved laterally in extension. MR signal changes in the patients with ITB syndrome were present in the region occupied by fat, deep to the ITB. The ITB is prevented from rolling over the epicondyle by its femoral anchorage and because it is a part of the fascia lata. We suggest that it creates the illusion of movement, because of changing tension in its anterior and posterior fibres during knee flexion. Thus, on anatomical grounds, ITB overuse injuries may be more likely to be associated with fat compression beneath the tract, rather than with repetitive friction as the knee flexes and extends. PMID:16533314

  20. A Novel Implant System for Unloading the Medial Compartment of the Knee by Lateral Displacement of the Iliotibial Band

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vivek N.; Gifford, Hanson S.; Kao, John T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) typically occurs with excessive mechanical load within the medial compartment, resulting in degeneration of the articular cartilage. Purpose: A novel extracapsular implant (Latella Knee Implant) has been developed to unload the medial compartment of the knee. The implant displaces the iliotibial band (ITB) over the lateral femoral condyle, thereby increasing its effective moment arm, resulting in a transfer of load from the medial compartment to the lateral compartment of the knee. A cadaveric study was performed to evaluate the effect of altering the moment arm of the ITB on knee biomechanics. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A 6-degrees-of-freedom robotic testing system was utilized to measure medial and lateral compartment loads in 8 fresh-frozen cadaveric knees at various ITB loads and knee flexion angles. Measurements were made with and without the implant in place. The system measured the compartment forces at flexion angles between 0° and 30° under 3 simulated loading conditions (300 N quadriceps, 100 N hamstrings, and [1] 0 N ITB, [2] 50 N ITB, [3] 100 N ITB). Results: Lateral displacement of the ITB between 15 and 20 mm resulted in medial compartment unloading between 34% and 65%. Conclusion: Unloading the medial compartment with this novel implant has the potential to address the treatment gap for patients with medial knee OA. Clinical Relevance: Currently, there exists a treatment gap for patients with medial compartment OA who have exhausted conservative management but whose disease and symptoms do not warrant more invasive surgical procedures. An extracapsular implant to unload the medial compartment could fill this treatment gap by providing patients and surgeons with a less invasive option for early to mid-stage OA. Unloading the medial compartment may alleviate pain and improve function, allowing patients with early-stage medial OA to remain active longer prior to considering more

  1. Suprachiasmatic nuclei and Circadian rhythms. The role of suprachiasmatic nuclei on rhythmic activity of neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, ventromedian nuclei and pineal gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishino, H.

    1977-01-01

    Unit activity of lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) and Ventromedian nuclei (VMN) was recorded in urethane anesthetized male rats. A 5 to 10 sec. a 3-5 min and a circadian rhythmicity were observed. In about 15% of all neurons, spontaneous activity of LHA and VMN showed reciprocal relationships. Subthreshold stimuli applied at a slow rate in the septum and the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) suppressed the rhythms without changing firing rates. On the other hand, stimulation of the optic nerve at a rate of 5 to 10/sec increased firing rates in 1/3 of neurons of SCN. Iontophoretically applied acetylcholine increased 80% of tested neurons of SCN, whereas norepinephrine, dopamine and 5 HT inhibited 64, 60 and 75% of SCN neurons respectively. These inhibitions were much stronger in neurons, the activity of which was increased by optic nerve stimulation. Stimulation of the SCN inhibited the tonic activity in cervical sympathetic nerves.

  2. 49 CFR 572.145 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... lumbar spine and abdomen of a fully assembled dummy (drawing 210-0000) to flexion articulation between... in paragraph (c) of this section, the lumbar spine-abdomen assembly shall flex by an amount...

  3. 49 CFR 572.145 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... lumbar spine and abdomen of a fully assembled dummy (drawing 210-0000) to flexion articulation between... in paragraph (c) of this section, the lumbar spine-abdomen assembly shall flex by an amount...

  4. 49 CFR 572.145 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... lumbar spine and abdomen of a fully assembled dummy (drawing 210-0000) to flexion articulation between... in paragraph (c) of this section, the lumbar spine-abdomen assembly shall flex by an amount...

  5. 49 CFR 572.145 - Upper and lower torso assemblies and torso flexion test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... lumbar spine and abdomen of a fully assembled dummy (drawing 210-0000) to flexion articulation between... in paragraph (c) of this section, the lumbar spine-abdomen assembly shall flex by an amount...

  6. Total Knee Arthroplasty for Severe Flexion Contracture in Rheumatoid Arthritis Knees

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Youn Soo; Moon, Kyu Pill; Kim, Kyung Taek; Kim, Jin Wan; Park, Won Seok

    2016-01-01

    Flexion contracture deformities, as well as severe varus and valgus deformities of the knee joint, accompany osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In particular, severe flexion contracture deformity of the knee joint is often found in patients with RA, which renders them nonambulatory. This report describes a 26-year-old female patient diagnosed with RA 10 years ago. She had chronic joint pain, severe flexion contracture, valgus deformity in both knees, and limited range of motion in both knees and became nonambulatory. She underwent a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and serial casting and physical therapy to restore stable joint movement and correct knee joint deformity. Her pain was successfully relieved, and she was able to walk after surgery. Here, we report the excellent results of TKA in this RA patient with severe flexion contracture of both knees. PMID:27894181

  7. HINGED CAST BRACE FOR PERSISTENT FLEXION CONTRACTURE FOLLOWING TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Matthew D; Pugely, Andrew; Callaghan, John J; Shurr, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The reported incidence of persistent knee flexion contracture following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has varied from 1-15 percent Various treatment modalities have been described in attempts to manage this often difficult problem. This paper describes a novel method of treatment by using a hinged cast brace (previously reported for treatment of femur fractures and knee contractures secondary to hemophilia and cerebral palsy) for use in patients with symptomatic knee flexion contractures. Application of this cast brace with frequent adjustment (every three to four days, initially) toward full extension can often improve knee extension, after physical therapy and other modalities such as extension-assist braces have failed. Care must be taken in the application and use of this device which utilizes frequent manipulations to reduce and maintain the knee flexion angle. We report two clinical cases in which this protocol was effectively used in decreasing symptomatic knee flexion contractures. PMID:22096423

  8. Development of a knee joint motion simulator to evaluate deep knee flexion of artificial knee joints.

    PubMed

    Takano, Y; Ueno, M; Kiguchi, K; Ito, J; Mawatari, M; Hotokebuchi, T

    2008-01-01

    A purpose of this study is to examine the effect that quadriceps femoris force gives to rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis during deep knee flexion such as a unique sitting style called 'seiza' in Japanese. For the evaluation, we developed the knee motion simulator which could bend to 180 degrees continually simulating the passive flexion performed by clinicians. A total knee prosthesis, which is a specially-devised posterior stabilized type and capable of flexion up to 180 degrees, was inserted into bone model. And this prosthesis pulled by three kinds of quadriceps femoris forces to perform parameter study. The results obtained in this study were showed the same tendency with those in the past cadaveric experiment. It is suggested that the rotation angle and joint reaction force of total knee prosthesis are affected by shape of prosthesis, a vector of quadriceps femoris force, and bony aliments during deep knee flexion.

  9. A model of flexion-extension movement in hip joint using polynomial interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Taşcǎu, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    The study proposes a mathematical model of flexion-extension movement in hip joint based on Lagrange polynomial interpolation. In order to develop and validate the proposed model the angle of flexion-extension (F-E) in hip joint was analyzed. The two main reasons of this option rely on the importance of the hip joint in human locomotion and the fact that flexion-extension movement is developed in most of the human joints. The mathematical model of joint movement allows developing a more detailed kinematic analysis of the joint movements. The raw data representing the variation of the flexion-extension angle in hip joint was achieved by experimental kinematic analysis of a lot of ten young healthy subjects.

  10. Negative Experiences in Physical Education and Sport: How Much Do They Affect Physical Activity Participation Later in Life?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardinal, Bradley J.; Yan, Zi; Cardinal, Marita K.

    2013-01-01

    People's feelings toward physical activity are often influenced by memories of their childhood experiences in physical education and sport. Unfortunately, many adults remember negative experiences, which may affect their desire to maintain a physically active lifestyle. A survey that asked 293 students about recollections from their childhood…

  11. A demonstration that task difficulty can confound the interpretation of lateral differences in brain activation between typical and dyslexic readers.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Janet McGraw; Liederman, Jacqueline; Johnsen, Jami; Lincoln, Alexis; Frye, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Dyslexic readers (DRs) manifest atypical patterns of brain activity, which may be attributed to aberrant neural connectivity and/or an attempt to activate compensatory pathways. This paper evaluates whether differences in brain activation patterns between DRs and typical readers (TRs) are confounded by task difficulty. Eight DRs and eight TRs matched for age, sex, and nonverbal IQ performed pseudoword rhyming tasks at two levels of difficulty during magnetoencephalography. Task difficulty varied with the number of successive target pseudowords presented before the test pseudoword. Regions of interest were: the temporoparietal area (TPA), the ventral occipital temporal area (VOT), and the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Activity was analysed for the 660-ms period after test pseudoword onset. During the discrepant performance condition left hemispheric TPA activation increased across time for TRs, but not DRs, and IFG bihemispheric activation was greater in TRs by the end of the trial. During the equivalent performance condition no group differences in TPA or IFG activation were found. We argue that these results indicate that direct comparison of DR versus TR brain activity is confounded when DRs are more challenged than TRs. This highlights the importance of equating reading group performance during neuroimaging of reading-related tasks.

  12. The relationship between the active cervical range of motion and changes in head and neck posture after continuous VDT work.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu; An, Duk-Hyun

    2009-04-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the active cervical range of motion (ROM) and changes in the head and neck posture after continuous visual display terminal (VDT) work. Twenty VDT workers were recruited from laboratories. The active cervical ROM of the participants was measured and videotaped to capture the craniocervical and cervicothoracic angles using a single video camera before and after VDT work. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to quantify the linear relationship between active cervical ROM measurements and the changes in the craniocervical and cervicothoracic angles after continuous VDT work. Active neck extension (r=-0.84, p<0.01) was negatively correlated with the mean craniocervical angle, and active neck flexion (r=-0.82, p<0.01) and left lateral flexion (r=-0.67, p<0.01) were negatively correlated with the mean cervicothoracic angle.

  13. Femoral shortening in correction of congenital knee flexion deformity with popliteal webbing.

    PubMed

    Saleh, M; Gibson, M F; Sharrard, W J

    1989-01-01

    Severe knee flexion deformity with popliteal webbing or pterygium is considered to be uncorrectable. The soft tissues and, in particular, the main nerves and vessels are short relative to the bone. Femoral shortening was used in correction of such a deformity in a child with arthrogryposis. The operative procedure is described. Femoral shortening should be considered as an aid to correction of any severe knee flexion deformity.

  14. How does the neck flexion affect the cervical MRI features of Hirayama disease?

    PubMed

    Hou, Chao; Han, Hongbin; Yang, Xiaohong; Xu, Xiaojuan; Gao, Hui; Fan, Dongsheng; Fu, Yu; Sun, Yu; Liu, Bo

    2012-10-01

    Although flexion cervical MRI has been recommended for the diagnosis of Hirayama disease (HD), no study focused on the MR features at different neck flexion angles. Moreover, no uniform flexion angle has been confirmed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively investigate the MRI typical signs of HD patients in different neck flexion degree and gives a suggestion to the MR scanning. Cervical MRI in neutral and different flexion positions (cervical flexion angle 20°, 25°, 30°, 35°, and 40°) were performed in 45 HD patients. Three MRI features including anterior shifting of the posterior wall of the cervical dural canal (ASD), widening of cervical epidural space, and epidural flow voids (EFV) at each flexed position were summarized. To evaluate ASD quantitatively, the widest cervical epidural space with the maximum sagittal diameters (d) and cervical canal sagittal diameter (D) at the same level were measured. The d/D values at different angles were calculated and compared. ASD was demonstrated in 34 out of 45 cases (75.6%) at 20° and in all cases (100%) at other 4 angles (χ (2) = 25.728, P < 0.05). Significant difference was demonstrated for the appearance rate of EFV (mean 72.8%) among different angles (χ (2) = 11.373, P = 0.021). The peak mean d/D value was found at 35°. Neck flexion angles have effects on ASD, widening of cervical epidural space and EFV. 25° is recommended as the least effective diagnostic flexion angle for MRI diagnosis of HD, and 35° may be the best one.

  15. In Vivo Kinematics of the Trapeziometacarpal Joint During Thumb Extension-flexion and Abduction-adduction

    PubMed Central

    Crisco, Joseph J.; Halilaj, Eni; Moore, Douglas C.; Patel, Tarpit; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C.; Ladd, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The primary aim of this study was to determine whether the in vivo kinematics of the trapeziometacarpal (TMC) joint differ as a function of age and sex during thumb extension-flexion and abduction-adduction motions. Methods The hands and wrists of 44 subjects (10 men and 11 women aged 18 to 35 years and 10 men and 13 women aged 40 to 75 years) with no symptoms or signs of TMC joint pathology were imaged with computed tomography (CT) during thumb extension, flexion, abduction, and adduction. The kinematics of the TMC joint were computed and compared across direction, age, and sex. Results We found no significant effects of age or sex, after normalizing for size, in any of the kinematic parameters. The extension-flexion and abduction-adduction rotation axes did not intersect, and both were oriented obliquely to the saddle-shaped anatomy of the TMC articulation. The extension-flexion axis was located in the trapezium and the abduction-adduction axis was located in the metacarpal. Metacarpal translation and internal rotation occurred primarily during extension-flexion. Discussion Our in vivo findings support previous cadaver and modeling studies that have concluded that the functional axes of the TMC joint are non-orthogonal and non-intersecting. However, in contrast to previous studies, we found extension-flexion and adduction-abduction to be coupled with internal-external rotation and translation. Specifically, internal rotation and ulnar translation were coupled with flexion, indicating a potential stabilizing screw-home mechanism. Clinical Relevance The treatment of TMC pathology and arthroplasty design require a detailed and accurate understanding of TMC function. This study confirms the complexity of TMC kinematics and describes metacarpal translation coupled with internal rotation during extension-flexion, which may explain some of the limitations of current treatment strategies and should help improve implant designs. PMID:25542440

  16. Crouched gait in myelomeningocele: a comparison between the degree of knee flexion contracture in the clinical examination and during gait.

    PubMed

    Moen, Todd; Gryfakis, Nicholas; Dias, Luciano; Lemke, Laura

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively evaluate, in patients with low lumbar and sacral level myelomeningocele who have knee flexion contractures, whether there are significant differences between the degree of knee flexion contracture measured clinically and the degree of actual knee flexion during gait, measured by computerized gait analysis. Patients were divided into two groups, those who walked with ankle-foot orthoses (AFOs) alone and those who walked with AFOs and crutches. In both groups, the patient's knee flexion contractures were measured clinically, and the degree of knee flexion was measured dynamically at two representative points in the gait cycle. In both groups and at both points of the gait cycle, the degree of knee flexion during gait was significantly greater than the degree of clinical knee flexion contracture. This should be taken into account when evaluating the crouch gait of children with myelomeningocele and planning the proper treatment.

  17. A test of the hypothesis that impact-induced fractures are preferred sites for later tectonic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, Sean C.; Duxbury, Elizabeth D.

    1987-01-01

    Impact cratering has been an important process in the solar system. The cratering event is generally accompanied by faulting in adjacent terrain. Impact-induced faults are nearly ubiquitous over large areas on the terrestrial planets. The suggestion is made that these fault systems, particularly those associated with the largest impact features are preferred sites for later deformation in response to lithospheric stresses generated by other processes. The evidence is a perceived clustering of orientations of tectonic features either radial or concentric to the crater or basin in question. An opportunity exists to test this suggestion more directly on Earth. The terrestrial continents contain more than 100 known or probable impact craters, with associated geological structures mapped to varying levels of detail. Prime facie evidence for reactivation of crater-induced faults would be the occurrence of earthquakes on these faults in response to the intraplate stress field. Either an alignment of epicenters with mapped fault traces or fault plane solutions indicating slip on a plane approximately coincident with that inferred for a crater-induced fault would be sufficient to demonstrate such an association.

  18. Preserving plantar flexion strength after surgical treatment for contracture of the triceps surae: a computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Delp, S L; Statler, K; Carroll, N C

    1995-01-01

    Contractures of the triceps surae commonly are treated by surgical lengthening of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis or the Achilles tendon. Although these procedures generally relieve contractures, patients sometimes are left with dramatically decreased plantar flexion strength (i.e., decreased capacity to generate plantar flexion moment). The purpose of this study was to examine the trade-off between restoring range of motion and maintaining plantar flexion strength after surgical treatment for contracture of the triceps surae. A computer model representing the normal moment-generating characteristics of the triceps surae was altered to represent two conditions: isolated contracture of the gastrocnemius and contracture of both the gastrocnemius and the soleus. The effects of lengthening the gastrocnemius aponeurosis and the Achilles tendon were simulated for each condition. The simulations showed that nearly normal moment-generating characteristics could be restored when isolated gastrocnemius contracture was treated with lengthening of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis. However, when isolated gastrocnemius contracture was treated with lengthening of the Achilles tendon, the moment-generating capacity of the plantar flexors decreased greatly. This suggests that lengthening of the Achilles tendon should be avoided in persons with isolated gastrocnemius contracture. Our simulations also suggest that neither lengthening of the gastrocnemius aponeurosis nor lengthening of the Achilles tendon by itself is an effective treatment for combined contracture of the gastrocnemius and soleus. Lengthening the gastrocnemius aponeurosis did not decrease the excessive passive moment developed by the contracted soleus. Lengthening the Achilles tendon restored the normal passive range of motion but substantially decreased the active force-generating capacity of the muscles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Mechanical power of ankle plantar flexion and subjective pain by monophasic electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tatsuto; Watanabe, Takashi; Saura, Ryuichi; Uchiyama, Hironobu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical power of the ankle plantar flexion. The investigated power of the ankle plantar flexion would help to improve effectively the FES walking system using the ankle plantar flexion for patients and aged people in slow walking. The subjective pain by electrical stimulation sometimes becomes the burden to use the FES system. We also investigated the relationship between the mechanical power in ankle plantar flexion by electrical stimulation and the subjective pain. We developed the device to measure the ankle movement by electrical stimulation against load resistance torque. The device consisted of pads to support a single lower leg, a rotational footplate with a large pulley and a vertical weight to generate the load resistance torque, and a monophasic electrical stimulator via surface electrodes. Our results showed the proportional relationship between the mechanical power of the ankle plantar flexion and the subjective pain by electrical stimulation. To generate the same level in the ankle plantar flexor power 2.75 W under the maximum voluntary exertion, the subjective pain by electrical stimulation exceeded 70, which means the feeling of crying at the Face Pain Scale. This result would help the better design of the FES walking system using the ankle plantar flexion for patients and aged people.

  20. Image Segmentation and Analysis of Flexion-Extension Radiographs of Cervical Spines

    PubMed Central

    Enikov, Eniko T.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new analysis tool for cervical flexion-extension radiographs based on machine vision and computerized image processing. The method is based on semiautomatic image segmentation leading to detection of common landmarks such as the spinolaminar (SL) line or contour lines of the implanted anterior cervical plates. The technique allows for visualization of the local curvature of these landmarks during flexion-extension experiments. In addition to changes in the curvature of the SL line, it has been found that the cervical plates also deform during flexion-extension examination. While extension radiographs reveal larger curvature changes in the SL line, flexion radiographs on the other hand tend to generate larger curvature changes in the implanted cervical plates. Furthermore, while some lordosis is always present in the cervical plates by design, it actually decreases during extension and increases during flexion. Possible causes of this unexpected finding are also discussed. The described analysis may lead to a more precise interpretation of flexion-extension radiographs, allowing diagnosis of spinal instability and/or pseudoarthrosis in already seemingly fused spines. PMID:27006937

  1. Successful Correction of Idiopathic Bilateral Flexion Deformity of Knee: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mugalur, Aakash; Pathak, Aditya C; Shahane, Sunil M; Samant, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Bilateral Flexion Deformity commonly results secondary to cerebral palsy, poliomyelitis, haemophilia etc. It is accompanied by valgus deformity and external rotation at knee in long standing cases secondary to the contracture of the iliotibial tract. Flexion deformity at knees is an impediment to the normal ambulation and is difficult to address. Case Report: A 34 year old male presented with bilateral knee stiffness. He had multifocal tuberculosis and was bed ridden for almost a year and consequently developed bilateral knee flexion deformity of 60o with further flexion upto 120o. Patient was treated with gradual distraction using a modified external fixator and achieved full correction at the end of 6 weeks. At final followup patient was walking comfortably and was able to squat and sit crossed legged. Conclusion: Idiopathic isolated bilateral flexion deformity of knees is very rare and is an impediment to normal ambulation. Arthrodiastasis with indigenously designed fixator using the Ilizarov principle and modified fixator is a simple, efficient and cost effective treatment for flexion deformity of knee. PMID:27299020

  2. The Neuro-Mechanical Processes That Underlie Goal-Directed Medio-Lateral APA during Gait Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Schieppati, Marco; Crisafulli, Oscar; Do, Manh-Cuong

    2016-01-01

    Gait initiation (GI) involves passing from bipedal to unipedal stance. It requires a rapid movement of the center of foot pressure (CoP) towards the future swing foot and of the center of mass (CoM) in the direction of the stance foot prior to the incoming step. This anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) allows disengaging the swing leg from the ground and establishing favorable conditions for stepping. This study aimed to describe the neuro-mechanical process that underlies the goal-directed medio-lateral (ML) APA. We hypothesized that controlled knee flexion of the stance leg contributes to the initial ML displacement of the CoP and to the calibration of the first step. Fourteen subjects initiated gait starting from three different initial stance widths of 15 cm (Small), 30 cm (Medium), and 45 cm (Large). Optoelectronic, force platform and electromyogram (EMG) measurements were performed. During APA, soleus activity diminished bilaterally, while tibialis anterior (TA) activity increased, more so in the stance leg than in the swing leg, and to a larger extent with increasing initial stance width. Knee flexion of the stance leg was observed during APA and correlated with the ML CoP displacement towards the swing leg. ML CoP and CoM displacements during APA increased with increasing stance width. The activity of stance-leg TA was correlated with the degree of knee flexion. Swing-leg tensor fasciae latae (TFL) was also active during APA. Across subjects, when stance-leg tibialis activity was low, TFL activity was large and vice versa. The modulation of the ML CoP position during APA allowed the gravity-driven torque to place the CoM just lateral to the stance foot during step execution. Accordingly, the gravity-driven torque, the ML CoM velocity during step execution, and the step width at foot contact (FC) were lower in the Small and greater in the Large condition. Consequently, the position of the stepping foot at FC remained close to the sagittal plane in all

  3. The Neuro-Mechanical Processes That Underlie Goal-Directed Medio-Lateral APA during Gait Initiation.

    PubMed

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Schieppati, Marco; Crisafulli, Oscar; Do, Manh-Cuong

    2016-01-01

    Gait initiation (GI) involves passing from bipedal to unipedal stance. It requires a rapid movement of the center of foot pressure (CoP) towards the future swing foot and of the center of mass (CoM) in the direction of the stance foot prior to the incoming step. This anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) allows disengaging the swing leg from the ground and establishing favorable conditions for stepping. This study aimed to describe the neuro-mechanical process that underlies the goal-directed medio-lateral (ML) APA. We hypothesized that controlled knee flexion of the stance leg contributes to the initial ML displacement of the CoP and to the calibration of the first step. Fourteen subjects initiated gait starting from three different initial stance widths of 15 cm (Small), 30 cm (Medium), and 45 cm (Large). Optoelectronic, force platform and electromyogram (EMG) measurements were performed. During APA, soleus activity diminished bilaterally, while tibialis anterior (TA) activity increased, more so in the stance leg than in the swing leg, and to a larger extent with increasing initial stance width. Knee flexion of the stance leg was observed during APA and correlated with the ML CoP displacement towards the swing leg. ML CoP and CoM displacements during APA increased with increasing stance width. The activity of stance-leg TA was correlated with the degree of knee flexion. Swing-leg tensor fasciae latae (TFL) was also active during APA. Across subjects, when stance-leg tibialis activity was low, TFL activity was large and vice versa. The modulation of the ML CoP position during APA allowed the gravity-driven torque to place the CoM just lateral to the stance foot during step execution. Accordingly, the gravity-driven torque, the ML CoM velocity during step execution, and the step width at foot contact (FC) were lower in the Small and greater in the Large condition. Consequently, the position of the stepping foot at FC remained close to the sagittal plane in all

  4. Association of Physical Activity in Childhood and Early Adulthood With Carotid Artery Elasticity 21 Years Later: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study

    PubMed Central

    Pälve, Kristiina S.; Pahkala, Katja; Magnussen, Costan G.; Koivistoinen, Teemu; Juonala, Markus; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Viikari, Jorma S. A.; Raitakari, Olli T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Decreased arterial elasticity is a risk factor for several cardiovascular outcomes. Longitudinal data on the effect of physical activity in youth on adult arterial elasticity are limited. The aim of this study was to determine the long‐term effects of physical activity in children and young adults on carotid artery elasticity after 21 years of follow‐up. Methods and Results Participants were 1417 children (aged 9 to 15 years) and 999 young adults (aged 18 to 24 years) from the prospective Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Participants had questionnaire measures of leisure‐time physical activity available from 1986 and ultrasound‐derived indices of carotid artery elasticity measured in 2007. Carotid artery elasticity indices were distensibility (%/10 mm Hg), Young's elastic modulus (kPa), and stiffness index (unitless). Physical activity at age 18 to 24 years was directly associated with distensibility (β=0.068, P=0.014) and inversely with Young's elastic modulus (β=−0.057, P=0.0037) and indirectly with stiffness index (β=−0.050, P=0.0028) 21 years later in males and females. The associations remained after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, systolic blood pressure, serum lipids and insulin, and 21‐year change in physical activity. At age 9 to 15 years, the favorable association, remaining after adjustment, was found in males (distensibility [β=0.097, P=0.010], Young's elastic modulus [β=−0.060, P=0.028], and stiffness index [β=−0.062, P=0.007]) but not in females (P=0.70, P=0.85, and P=0.91, respectively). Conclusions Leisure‐time physical activity in boys and young adults is associated with carotid artery elasticity later in life, suggesting that higher levels of physical activity in youth may benefit future cardiovascular health. PMID:24755150

  5. Crucial Role of Lateral Size for Graphene Oxide in Activating Macrophages and Stimulating Pro-inflammatory Responses in Cells and Animals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Juan; Liu, Rui; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Qian; Chen, Yunan; Valle, Russell P; Zuo, Yi Y; Xia, Tian; Liu, Sijin

    2015-10-27

    Graphene oxide (GO) is increasingly used in biomedical applications because it possesses not only the unique properties of graphene including large surface area and flexibility but also hydrophilicity and dispersibility in aqueous solutions. However, there are conflicting results on its biocompatibility and biosafety partially due to large variations in physicochemical properties of GO, and the role of these properties including lateral size in the biological or toxicological effects of GO is still unclear. In this study, we focused on the role of lateral size by preparing a panel of GO samples with differential lateral sizes using the same starting material. We found that, in comparison to its smaller counterpart, larger GO showed a stronger adsorption onto the plasma membrane with less phagocytosis, which elicited more robust interaction with toll-like receptors and more potent activation of NF-κB pathways. By contrast, smaller GO sheets were more likely taken up by cells. As a result, larger GO promoted greater M1 polarization, associated with enhanced production of inflammatory cytokines and recruitment of immune cells. The in vitro results correlated well with local and systemic inflammatory responses after GO administration into the abdominal cavity, lung, or bloodstream through the tail vein. Together, our study delineated the size-dependent M1 induction of macrophages and pro-inflammatory responses of GO in vitro and in vivo. Our data also unearthed the detailed mechanism underlying these effects: a size-dependent interaction between GO and the plasma membrane.

  6. External Knee Adduction and Flexion Moments during Gait and Medial Tibiofemoral Disease Progression in Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Moisio, Kirsten C.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Eckstein, Felix; Guermazi, Ali; Prasad, Pottumarthi V.; Zhang, Yunhui; Almagor, Orit; Belisle, Laura; Hayes, Karen; Sharma, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that greater baseline peak external knee adduction moment (KAM), KAM impulse, and peak external knee flexion moment (KFM) during the stance phase of gait are associated with baseline-to-2-year medial tibiofemoral cartilage damage and bone marrow lesion progression, and cartilage thickness loss. Methods Participants all had knee OA in at least one knee. Baseline peak KAM, KAM impulse, and peak KFM (normalized to body weight and height) were captured and computed using a motion analysis system and 6 force plates. Participants underwent MRI of both knees at baseline and two years later. To assess the association between baseline moments and baseline-to-2-year semiquantitative cartilage damage and bone marrow lesion progression and quantitative cartilage thickness loss, we used logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE), adjusting for gait speed, age, gender, disease severity, knee pain severity, and medication use. Results The sample consisted of 391 knees (204 persons): mean age 64.2 years (SD 10.0); BMI 28.4 kg/m2 (5.7); 156 (76.5%) women. Greater baseline peak KAM and KAM impulse were each associated with worsening of medial bone marrow lesions, but not cartilage damage. Higher baseline KAM impulse was associated with 2-year medial cartilage thickness loss assessed both as % loss and as a threshold of loss, whereas peak KAM was related only to % loss. There was no relationship between baseline peak KFM and any medial disease progression outcome measures. Conclusion Findings support targeting KAM parameters in an effort to delay medial OA disease progression. PMID:25677110

  7. Shortening behavior of the different components of muscle-tendon unit during isokinetic plantar flexions.

    PubMed

    Hauraix, Hugo; Nordez, Antoine; Dorel, Sylvain

    2013-10-01

    The torque-velocity relationship has been widely considered as reflecting the mechanical properties of the contractile apparatus, and the influence of tendinous tissues on this relationship obtained during in vivo experiments remains to be determined. This study describes the pattern of shortening of various muscle-tendon unit elements of the triceps surae at different constant angular velocities and quantifies the contributions of fascicles, tendon, and aponeurosis to the global muscle-tendon unit shortening. Ten subjects performed isokinetic plantar flexions at different preset angular velocities (i.e., 30, 90, 150, 210, 270, and 330°/s). Ultrafast ultrasound measurements were performed on the muscle belly and on the myotendinous junction of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscles. The contributions of fascicles, tendon, and aponeurosis to global muscle-tendon unit shortening velocity were calculated for velocity conditions for four parts of the total range of motion. For both muscles, the fascicles' contribution decreased throughout the motion (73.5 ± 21.5% for 100-90° angular range to 33.7 ± 20.2% for 80-70°), whereas the tendon contribution increased (25.8 ± 15.4 to 55.6 ± 16.8%). In conclusion, the tendon contribution to the global muscle-tendon unit shortening is significant even during a concentric contraction. However, this contribution depends on the range of motion analyzed. The intersubject variability found in the maximal fascicle shortening velocity, for a given angular velocity, suggests that some subjects might possess a more efficient musculoarticular complex to produce the movement velocity. These findings are of great interest for understanding the ability of muscle-tendon shortening velocity.

  8. Primary afferent depolarization and flexion reflexes produced by radiant heat stimulation of the skin.

    PubMed

    Burke, R E; Rudomin, P; Vyklický, L; Zajac, F E

    1971-02-01

    1. The reflex effects of pulses of intense radiant heat applied to the skin of the central plantar pad have been studied in unanaesthetized (decerebrate) spinal cats.2. Pad heat pulses produced flexion of the ipsilateral hind limb and increased ipsilateral flexor monosynaptic reflexes, due to post-synaptic excitation of flexor alpha motoneurones. These effects were accompanied by reduction of extensor monosynaptic reflexes and post-synaptic inhibition of extensor motoneurones.3. Ipsilateral (and contralateral) pad heat pulses consistently evoked negative dorsal root potentials (DRPs) as well as increased excitability of both cutaneous and group Ib muscle afferent terminals. The excitability of group Ia afferents was sometimes also increased during pad heat pulses, but to a lesser extent.4. Pad heat pulses produced negative DRPs in preparations in which positive DRP components could be demonstrated following electrical stimulation of both skin and muscle nerves.5. The motor and primary afferent effects of heat pulses always accompanied one another, beginning after the pad surface temperature had reached rather high levels (usually 48-55 degrees C).6. Negative DRPs increased excitability of cutaneous and group Ib afferents, and motoneurone activation produced by pad heat pulses was essentially unmodified when conduction in large myelinated afferents from the central plantar pad was blocked by cooling the posterior tibial nerve trunk.7. It is concluded that adequate noxious activation of cutaneous afferents of small diameter produces primary afferent depolarization in a variety of large diameter afferent fibres, as well as post-synaptic effects in alpha motoneurones.

  9. Primary afferent depolarization and flexion reflexes produced by radiant heat stimulation of the skin

    PubMed Central

    Burke, R. E.; Rudomin, P.; Vyklický, L.; Zajac, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    1. The reflex effects of pulses of intense radiant heat applied to the skin of the central plantar pad have been studied in unanaesthetized (decerebrate) spinal cats. 2. Pad heat pulses produced flexion of the ipsilateral hind limb and increased ipsilateral flexor monosynaptic reflexes, due to post-synaptic excitation of flexor alpha motoneurones. These effects were accompanied by reduction of extensor monosynaptic reflexes and post-synaptic inhibition of extensor motoneurones. 3. Ipsilateral (and contralateral) pad heat pulses consistently evoked negative dorsal root potentials (DRPs) as well as increased excitability of both cutaneous and group Ib muscle afferent terminals. The excitability of group Ia afferents was sometimes also increased during pad heat pulses, but to a lesser extent. 4. Pad heat pulses produced negative DRPs in preparations in which positive DRP components could be demonstrated following electrical stimulation of both skin and muscle nerves. 5. The motor and primary afferent effects of heat pulses always accompanied one another, beginning after the pad surface temperature had reached rather high levels (usually 48-55° C). 6. Negative DRPs increased excitability of cutaneous and group Ib afferents, and motoneurone activation produced by pad heat pulses was essentially unmodified when conduction in large myelinated afferents from the central plantar pad was blocked by cooling the posterior tibial nerve trunk. 7. It is concluded that adequate noxious activation of cutaneous afferents of small diameter produces primary afferent depolarization in a variety of large diameter afferent fibres, as well as post-synaptic effects in alpha motoneurones. PMID:5575337

  10. Gβ1 controls collective cell migration by regulating the protrusive activity of leader cells in the posterior lateral line primordium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Ye, Ding; Behra, Martine; Burgess, Shawn; Chen, Songhai; Lin, Fang

    2014-01-15

    Collective cell migration is critical for normal development, tissue repair and cancer metastasis. Migration of the posterior lateral line primordium (pLLP) generates the zebrafish sensory organs (neuromasts, NMs). This migration is promoted by the leader cells at the leading edge of the pLLP, which express the G protein-coupled chemokine receptor Cxcr4b and respond to the chemokine Cxcl12a. However, the mechanism by which Cxc112a/Cxcr4b signaling regulates pLLP migration remains unclear. Here we report that signal transduction by the heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gβ1 is essential for proper pLLP migration. Although both Gβ1 and Gβ4 are expressed in the pLLP and NMs, depletion of Gβ1 but not Gβ4 resulted in an arrest of pLLP migration. In embryos deficient for Gβ1, the pLLP cells migrated in an uncoordinated fashion and were unable to extend protrusions at the leading front, phenocopying those in embryos deficient for Cxcl12a or Cxcr4b. A transplantation assay showed that, like Cxcr4b, Gβ1 is required only in the leader cells of the pLLP. Analysis of F-actin dynamics in the pLLP revealed that whereas wild-type leader cells display extensive actin polymerization in the direction of pLLP migration, counterparts defective for Gβ1, Cxcr4b or Cxcl12a do not. Finally, synergy experiments revealed that Gβ1 and Cxcr4b interact genetically in regulating pLLP migration. Collectively, our data indicate that Gβ1 controls migration of the pLLP, likely by acting downstream of the Cxcl12a/Cxcr4b signaling. This study also provides compelling evidence for functional specificity among Gβ isoforms in vivo.

  11. Age differences in cognitive performance in later life: relationships to self-reported health and activity life style.

    PubMed

    Hultsch, D F; Hammer, M; Small, B J

    1993-01-01

    The predictive relationships among individual differences in self-reported physical health and activity life style and performance on an array of information processing and intellectual ability measures were examined. A sample of 484 men and women aged 55 to 86 years completed a battery of cognitive tasks measuring verbal processing time, working memory, vocabulary, verbal fluency, world knowledge, word recall, and text recall. Hierarchical regression was used to predict performance on these tasks from measures of self-reported physical health, alcohol and tobacco use, and level of participation in everyday activities. The results indicated: (a) individual differences in self-reported health and activity predicted performance on multiple cognitive measures; (b) self-reported health was more predictive of processing resource variables than knowledge-based abilities; (c) interaction effects indicated that participation in cognitively demanding activities was more highly related to performance on some measures for older adults than for middle-aged adults; and (d) age-related differences in performance on multiple measures were attenuated by partialing individual differences in self-reported health and activity.

  12. Successive motor nerve blocks to identify the muscles causing a spasticity pattern: example of the arm flexion pattern.

    PubMed

    Genet, F; Schnitzler, A; Droz-Bartholet, F; Salga, M; Tatu, L; Debaud, C; Denormandie, P; Parratte, B

    2017-01-01

    Botulinum Toxin A has been the main treatment for spasticity since the beginning of the 1990s. Surprisingly, there is still no consensus regarding injection parameters or, importantly, how to determine which muscles to target to improve specific functions. The aim of this study was to develop a systematic approach to determine this, using the example of the arm flexion pattern. We first determined anatomical landmarks for selective motor block of the brachialis nerve, using 20 forearms from 10 fresh cadavers in Ecole Européenne de Chirurgie and a university-based dissection centre, Paris, France. We then carried out selective blocks of the motor nerves to the brachialis, brachioradialis and biceps brachii in patients with stroke with an arm flexion pattern, in a University Rehabilitation Hospital, Garches, France. We measured: the resting angle of the elbow angle in standing (manual goniometer), active and passive range of extension, and spasticity using the Held and Tardieu and the Modified Ashworth scales. Range of passive elbow extension was also measured with the shoulder in 90° of flexion. The resting angle of the elbow in standing decreased by 35.0° (from 87.6 ± 23.7 to 52.6 ± 24.2°) with inhibition of brachialis, by a further 3.9° (from 52.6 ± 24.2 to 48.7 ± 23.7°) with inhibition of brachioradialis and a further 14.5° (from 48.7 ± 23.7to 34.2 ± 20.7°) with inhibition of biceps brachii. These results were consistent with the clinical evaluation of passive elbow range of motion with the shoulder at 90°. Sequential blocking of the nerves to the three main elbow flexors revealed that the muscle that limited elbow extension the most, was brachialis. This muscle should be the main target to improve the arm flexion pattern. These results show that it is important not simply to inject the most superficial or powerful muscles to treat a spastic deformity. A comprehensive assessment is required. The strategy proposed in this paper should

  13. Nerve transfers for restoration of finger flexion in patients with tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme A; Ghizoni, Marcos F

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this paper was to report the authors' results with finger flexion restoration by nerve transfer in patients with tetraplegia. METHODS Surgery was performed for restoration of finger flexion in 17 upper limbs of 9 patients (8 male and 1 female) at a mean of 7.6 months (SD 4 months) after cervical spinal cord injury. The patients' mean age at the time of surgery was 28 years (SD 15 years). The motor level according to the ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) classification was C-5 in 4 upper limbs, C-6 in 10, and C-7 in 3. In 3 upper limbs, the nerve to the brachialis was transferred to the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN), which was separated from the median nerve from the antecubital fossa to the midarm. In 5 upper limbs, the nerve to the brachialis was transferred to median nerve motor fascicles innervating finger flexion muscles in the midarm. In 4 upper limbs, the nerve to the brachioradialis was transferred to the AIN. In the remaining 5 upper limbs, the nerve to the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) was transferred to the AIN. Patients were followed for an average of 16 months (SD 6 months). At the final evaluation the range of finger flexion and strength were estimated by manual muscle testing according to the British Medical Research Council scale. RESULTS Restoration of finger flexion was observed in 4 of 8 upper limbs in which the nerve to the brachialis was used as a donor. The range of motion was incomplete in all 5 of these limbs, and the strength was M3 in 3 limbs and M4 in 1 limb. Proximal retrograde dissection of the AIN was associated with better outcomes than transfer of the nerve to the brachialis to median nerve motor fascicles in the arm. After the nerve to the brachioradialis was transferred to the AIN, incomplete finger flexion with M4 strength was restored in 1 limb; the remaining 3 limbs did not show any recovery. Full finger flexion with M4 strength was demonstrated in all 5 upper limbs in which the nerve

  14. Contralateral Cortical Organisation of Information in Visual Short-Term Memory: Evidence from Lateralized Brain Activity during Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortier-Gauthier, Ulysse; Moffat, Nicolas; Dell'Acqua, Robert; McDonald, John J.; Jolicoeur, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    We studied brain activity during retention and retrieval phases of two visual short-term memory (VSTM) experiments. Experiment 1 used a balanced memory array, with one color stimulus in each hemifield, followed by a retention interval and a central probe, at the fixation point that designated the target stimulus in memory about which to make a…

  15. Selective lengthening of the psoas and rectus femoris and preservation of the iliacus for flexion deformity of the hip in cerebral palsy patients.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Hara, H; Tada, S

    1987-01-01

    Between 1978 and 1983, 52 Japanese patients with cerebral palsy underwent operative correction of flexion deformity of the hip. The results of lengthening of the psoas, rectus femoris, and proximal hamstrings were satisfactory. The iliacus was left intact. Improvement in gait and activities of daily living was attained. Concentric reduction was obtained in 27 of 33 dislocated or subluxated hips. Sitting and perineal care were facilitated, and pain was alleviated. We conclude that preservation of the iliacus is important.

  16. The activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1) is required for memory consolidation of pavlovian fear conditioning in the lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Ploski, Jonathan E; Pierre, Vicki J; Smucny, Jason; Park, Kevin; Monsey, Melissa S; Overeem, Kathie A; Schafe, Glenn E

    2008-11-19

    The activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1) is an immediate early gene that has been widely implicated in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory and is believed to play an integral role in synapse-specific plasticity. Here, we examined the role of Arc/Arg3.1 in amygdala-dependent Pavlovian fear conditioning. We first examined the regulation of Arc/Arg3.1 mRNA and protein after fear conditioning and LTP-inducing stimulation of thalamic inputs to the lateral amygdala (LA). Quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry revealed a significant upregulation of Arc/Arg3.1 mRNA and protein in the LA relative to controls. In behavioral experiments, intra-LA infusion of an Arc/Arg3.1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) was observed to be anatomically restricted to the LA, taken up by LA cells, and to promote significant knockdown of Arc/Arg3.1 protein. Rats given intra-LA infusions of multiple doses of the Arc/Arg3.1 ODN showed an impairment of LTM (tested approximately 24 later), but no deficit in STM (tested 3 h later) relative to controls infused with scrambled ODN. Finally, to determine whether upregulation of Arc/Arg3.1 occurs downstream of ERK/MAPK activation, we examined Arc/Arg3.1 expression in rats given intra-LA infusion of the MEK inhibitor U0126. Relative to vehicle controls, infusion of U0126 impaired training-induced increases in Arc/Arg3.1 expression. These findings suggest that Arc/Arg3.1 expression in the amygdala is required for fear memory consolidation, and further suggest that Arc/Arg3.1 regulation in the LA is downstream of the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway.

  17. Conditioned reflex activity of rats at later periods after the end of flight aboard the Kosmos-605 biosatellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livshits, N. N.; Meyzerov, Y. S.; Apanasenko, Z. I.; Kuznetsova, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The aftereffects of spaceflight on the higher nervous activity of rats were studied. A five lane maze with a feeding terminal was used to check such factors as transfer of experience, the habit and speed of reaching the goal in the maze, long term memory, and the dynamics of errors. During the 3rd-7th postflight week, functional disturbances in the rat HNA were manifested in the deterioration of the capacity for the transfer of experience and for locating the feeding compartment in the maze, thus indicating a general decrease of work capacity. The increased number of errors and failures pointed to exhaustion of higher nervous processes and to the weakened functional activity of the brain.

  18. Thigh Muscle Activity, Knee Motion, and Impact Force During Side-Step Pivoting in Agility-Trained Female Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Wilderman, Danielle R; Ross, Scott E; Padua, Darin A

    2009-01-01

    Context: Improving neuromuscular control of hamstrings muscles might have implications for decreasing anterior cruciate ligament injuries in females. Objective: To examine the effects of a 6-week agility training program on quadriceps and hamstrings muscle activation, knee flexion angles, and peak vertical ground reaction force. Design: Prospective, randomized clinical research trial. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty female intramural basketball players with no history of knee injury (age  =  21.07 ± 2.82 years, height  =  171.27 ± 4.66 cm, mass  =  66.36 ± 7.41 kg). Intervention(s): Participants were assigned to an agility training group or a control group that did not participate in agility training. Participants in the agility training group trained 4 times per week for 6 weeks. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used surface electromyography to assess muscle activation for the rectus femoris, vastus medialis oblique, medial hamstrings, and lateral hamstrings for 50 milliseconds before initial ground contact and while the foot was in contact with the ground during a side-step pivot maneuver. Knee flexion angles (at initial ground contact, maximum knee flexion, knee flexion displacement) and peak vertical ground reaction force also were assessed during this maneuver. Results: Participants in the training group increased medial hamstrings activation during ground contact after the 6-week agility training program. Both groups decreased their vastus medialis oblique muscle activation during ground contact. Knee flexion angles and peak vertical ground reaction force did not change for either group. Conclusions: Agility training improved medial hamstrings activity in female intramural basketball players during a side-step pivot maneuver. Agility training that improves hamstrings activity might have implications for reducing anterior cruciate ligament sprain injury associated with side-step pivots. PMID

  19. Event-related induced frontal alpha as a marker of lateral prefrontal cortex activation during cognitive reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Parvaz, Muhammad A.; MacNamara, Annmarie; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Hajcak, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Electrocortical activity, typically used to track the effects of cognitive reappraisal on the processing of emotional stimuli, has not been used to index PFC-mediated regulatory mechanisms responsible for these effects. In the current study, we examined the novel possibility that induced frontal alpha (i.e., 8 – 13 Hz), shown to reflect the inhibition and disengagement of task-relevant cortical regions, may be quantified to explore cortical activation that is specifically enhanced during cognitive reappraisal. For this purpose, 44 participants viewed unpleasant and neutral pictures followed by auditory instructions to either continue viewing the picture or reduce emotional response to the picture by making the picture seem less emotional (i.e., cognitive reappraisal). In line with previous work, unpleasant compared to neutral pictures elicited a larger late positive potential (LPP). Also corroborating previous work, the mid-latency LPP was reduced when pictures were cognitively reappraised. However, the current study showed for the first time that whereas unpleasant pictures elicited higher frontal alpha power than the neutral pictures bilaterally, frontal alpha power was reduced (indicative of more activation and cognitive control) during cognitive reappraisal of both picture types over the left hemisphere. Taken together, the LPP and event-related induced frontal alpha findings contribute unique information about distinct neural substrates and cognitive processes underlying reappraisal. PMID:22773414

  20. Co-contraction Recruitment and Spinal Load During Isometric Trunk Flexion and Extension

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Kevin P.; Lee, Patrick E.; Franklin, Timothy C.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Pushing and pulling tasks account for 20% of occupational low-back injury claims. Primary torso muscle groups recruited during pushing tasks include rectus abdominis and the external obliques. However, analyses suggest that antagonistic co-contraction of the para spinal muscles is necessary to stabilize the spine during flexion exertions. The study quantified co-contraction and spinal load differences during isometric flexion and extension exertions. The goal was to provide insight into the mechanisms requiring greater co-contraction during trunk flexion exertions compared to extension exertions. Methods. Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from the trunk muscles of healthy volunteers during isometric trunk flexion and extension exertions. A biomechanical model was implemented to estimate total muscle force from the measured EMG and trunk moment data. A similar model estimated the muscle forces necessary to achieve equilibrium while minimizing the sum of squared muscle forces. The difference in these forces represented co-contraction. Spinal load attributed to co-contraction was computed. Results. Average co-contraction during flexion exertions was approximately twice the value of co-contraction during extension, i.e. 28% and 13% of total muscle forces respectively. Co-contraction accounted for up to 47% of the total spinal load during flexion exertions. Consequently, spinal compression during the flexion tasks was nearly 50% greater than during extension exertions despite similar levels of trunk moment. Interpretation. Co-contraction must be considered when evaluating spinal load during pushing exertions. Results underscore the need to consider neuromuscular control of spinal stability when evaluating the biomechanical risks. PMID:16154249

  1. Knee and Hip Joint Kinematics Predict Quadriceps and Hamstrings Neuromuscular Activation Patterns in Drop Jump Landings

    PubMed Central

    Malfait, Bart; Dingenen, Bart; Smeets, Annemie; Staes, Filip; Pataky, Todd; Robinson, Mark A.; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Verschueren, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to assess if variation in sagittal plane landing kinematics is associated with variation in neuromuscular activation patterns of the quadriceps-hamstrings muscle groups during drop vertical jumps (DVJ). Methods Fifty female athletes performed three DVJ. The relationship between peak knee and hip flexion angles and the amplitude of four EMG vectors was investigated with trajectory-level canonical correlation analyses over the entire time period of the landing phase. EMG vectors consisted of the {vastus medialis(VM),vastus lateralis(VL)}, {vastus medialis(VM),hamstring medialis(HM)}, {hamstring medialis(HM),hamstring lateralis(HL)} and the {vastus lateralis(VL),hamstring lateralis(HL)}. To estimate the contribution of each individual muscle, linear regressions were also conducted using one-dimensional statistical parametric mapping. Results The peak knee flexion angle was significantly positively associated with the amplitudes of the {VM,HM} and {HM,HL} during the preparatory and initial contact phase and with the {VL,HL} vector during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak knee flexion angles were significantly associated with higher HM amplitudes during the preparatory and initial contact phase (p<0.001). The amplitudes of the {VM,VL} and {VL,HL} were significantly positively associated with the peak hip flexion angle during the peak loading phase (p<0.05). Small peak hip flexion angles were significantly associated with higher VL amplitudes during the peak loading phase (p = 0.001). Higher external knee abduction and flexion moments were found in participants landing with less flexed knee and hip joints (p<0.001). Conclusion This study demonstrated clear associations between neuromuscular activation patterns and landing kinematics in the sagittal plane during specific parts of the landing. These findings have indicated that an erect landing pattern, characterized by less hip and knee flexion, was significantly associated with an

  2. Perception of hand movement by mirror reflection evokes brain activation in the motor cortex contralateral to a non-moving hand.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Ranjan; Franz, Elizabeth A

    2016-08-01

    We investigated whether perception of hand movement via mirror reflection evokes activation in the motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the non-moving hand (the M1 ipsilateral to the moving hand). Continuous electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from 14 participants while they performed unimanual extension-flexion hand movements in direct view and mirror view conditions. We measured the lateralized readiness potential (LRP) as a marker of M1 activation in both conditions. Both the direct and mirror view conditions produced LRPs, with the mirror view conditions revealing clear activation in M1 contralateral to the non-moving hand (ipsilateral to the moving hand) during both flexion and extension phases. This unambiguous demonstration of M1 activation in association with a non-moving hand (which is visually-perceived as moving), suggests that perception of movement can directly lead to M1 activation.

  3. Nociceptive Flexion Reflex and Pain Rating Responses During Endogenous Opiate Blockade with Naltrexone in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    France, Christopher R.; al'Absi, Mustafa; Ring, Christopher; France, Janis L.; Harju, Angie; Wittmers, Lorentz E.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of opioid blockade on nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) activity and subjective pain ratings was examined in 151 healthy young men and women. Using a within-subjects design, NFR threshold was assessed on two days after administration of either placebo or a 50 mg dose of naltrexone. Electrocutaneous pain threshold and tolerance levels were measured after NFR threshold assessment on each day. Results indicated that administration of naltrexone was consistently associated with hypoalgesic responding. Specifically, participants exhibited lower levels of NFR activity and reported lower pain ratings for electrocutaneous stimulation delivered at pain threshold and tolerance levels following administration of naltrexone as compared to placebo. These findings indicate that opiate blockade using the current standard dose may elicit hypoalgesia. A potential moderating effect of dose of opiate blockade medication and level of endogenous opioid activation should be carefully examined in future research. PMID:17244518

  4. Effects of manipulation of the thorax and intensity of the pressure biofeedback unit on the superficial cervical flexors muscle during craniocervical flexion exercise

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin Mo; Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of manipulation of the thorax and the intensity of the pressure biofeedback unit on the superficial cervical flexors muscle during craniocervical flexion exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty three subjects participated in the experiment. Thirty three healthy people without any orthopedic history were also selected. The subjects could monitor the pressure applied to cervical vertebra 3 of the craniocervical junction by markings on the pressure biofeedback unit. Craniocervical flexion exercise was performed for 20 seconds per pressure, and two minutes of rest was allowed after exercise to reduce muscle fatigue. [Results] Significant differences in the post-training gains in the sternocleidomastoid and scalene were observed between the thorax fixation group and thorax non-fixation group. The thorax fixation group showed that muscle activation of the sternocleidomastoid and scalene was increased when the pressure biofeedback unit intensity was 40 mmHg than when pressure biofeedback unit intensity was 20 mmHg and 30 mmHg in the post-hoc result. The thorax non-fixation group showed that muscle activation of the sternocleidomastoid and scalene was higher when the pressure biofeedback unit intensity was 40mmHg compared to that when the pressure biofeedback unit intensity was 20mmHg in the post-hoc result. [Conclusion] Craniocervical flexion exercise is a clinically effective method that reduces the superficial neck flexor muscle activation. PMID:28265158

  5. Movement Analysis of Flexion and Extension of Honeybee Abdomen Based on an Adaptive Segmented Structure.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jieliang; Wu, Jianing; Yan, Shaoze

    2015-01-01

    Honeybees (Apis mellifera) curl their abdomens for daily rhythmic activities. Prior to determining this fact, people have concluded that honeybees could curl their abdomen casually. However, an intriguing but less studied feature is the possible unidirectional abdominal deformation in free-flying honeybees. A high-speed video camera was used to capture the curling and to analyze the changes in the arc length of the honeybee abdomen not only in free-flying mode but also in the fixed sample. Frozen sections and environment scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the microstructure and motion principle of honeybee abdomen and to explore the physical structure restricting its curling. An adaptive segmented structure, especially the folded intersegmental membrane (FIM), plays a dominant role in the flexion and extension of the abdomen. The structural features of FIM were utilized to mimic and exhibit movement restriction on honeybee abdomen. Combining experimental analysis and theoretical demonstration, a unidirectional bending mechanism of honeybee abdomen was revealed. Through this finding, a new perspective for aerospace vehicle design can be imitated.

  6. Volitional control of ankle plantar flexion in a powered transtibial prosthesis during stair-ambulation.

    PubMed

    Kannape, Oliver A; Herr, Hugh M

    2014-01-01

    Although great advances have been made in the design and control of lower extremity prostheses, walking on different terrains, such as ramps or stairs, and transitioning between these terrains remains a major challenge for the field. In order to generalize biomimetic behaviour of active lower-limb prostheses top-down volitional control is required but has until recently been deemed unfeasible due to the difficulties involved in acquiring an adequate electromyographic (EMG) signal. In this study, we hypothesize that a transtibial amputee can extend the functionality of a hybrid controller, designed for level ground walking, to stair ascent and descent by volitionally modulating powered plantar-flexion of the prosthesis. We here present data illustrating that the participant is able to reproduce ankle push-off behaviour of the intrinsic controller during stair ascent as well as prevent inadvertent push-off during stair descent. Our findings suggest that EMG signal from the residual limb muscles can be used to transition between level-ground walking and stair ascent/descent within a single step and significantly improve prosthesis performance during stair-ambulation.

  7. Systemic vs. local cytokine and leukocyte responses to unilateral wrist flexion exercise.

    PubMed

    Nemet, Dan; Hong, Suzi; Mills, Paul J; Ziegler, Michael G; Hill, Maryann; Cooper, Dan M

    2002-08-01

    We hypothesized that brief exercise of a small muscle group would lead to local rather than systemic alterations in cytokines, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mediators of angiogenesis. Fifteen men and eight women (age range 22-36 yr old) performed 10 min of unilateral wrist flexion exercise. Blood was sampled from venous catheters in the resting and exercising arm at baseline, at the end of exercise, and at 10, 30, 60, and 120 min after exercise. Lactate was significantly elevated in the exercising arm (+276 +/- 35%; P < 0.0005) with no change in the resting arm. In contrast, increases in both arms were observed for interleukin-6 (+139 +/- 51%; P < 0.0005), growth hormone (+1,104 +/- 284%; P < 0.003), natural killer cells (+81 +/- 9%; P < 0.0005), and lymphocytes expressing CD62L, CD11a, and CD54. There were no significant differences in these increases between the resting and exercising arm. Catecholamines increased in both arms [epinephrine peak increase, +226 +/- 36% (P < 0.001); norepinephrine peak increase, +90 +/- 15% (P < 0.01)]. Fibroblast growth factor-2 initially decreased with exercise in both arms, and this was followed by a rebound increase. Vascular endothelial growth factor demonstrated a small but significant increase in both arms (+124 +/- 31%; P < 0.05). Brief, low-intensity exercise leads to a systemic rather than local response of mediators that could be involved in inflammation, repair, or angiogenic adaptation to physical activity.

  8. Respiratory hypoalgesia? Breath-holding, but not respiratory phase modulates nociceptive flexion reflex and pain intensity.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Hassan; Van de Broek, Karlien; Plaghki, Léon; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; Van den Bergh, Omer; Van Diest, Ilse

    2016-03-01

    Several observations suggest that respiratory phase (inhalation vs. exhalation) and post-inspiratory breath-holds could modulate pain and the nociceptive reflex. This experiment aimed to investigate the role of both mechanisms. Thirty-two healthy participants received supra-threshold electrocutaneous stimulations to elicit both the Nociceptive Flexion Reflex (NFR) and pain, either during spontaneous inhalations or exhalations, or during three types of instructed breath-holds: following exhalation, at mid-inhalation and at full-capacity inhalation. Whether the electrocutaneous stimulus was applied during inhalation or exhalation did not affect the NFR or pain. Self-reported pain was reduced and the NFR was increased during breath-holding compared to spontaneous breathing. Whereas the type of breath-hold did not impact on self-reported pain, breath-holds at full-capacity inhalation and following exhalation were associated with a lower NFR amplitude compared to breath-holds at mid-inhalation. The present findings confirm that breath-holding can modulate pain (sensitivity) and suggest that both attentional distraction and changes in vagal activity may underlie the observed effects.

  9. Motion as motivation: using repetitive flexion movements to stimulate the approach system.

    PubMed

    Haeffel, Gerald J

    2011-12-01

    Research suggests that having a healthy approach system is critical for adaptive emotional functioning. The goal of the current study (n=186 undergraduates) was to determine the efficacy of an easy-to-disseminate and cost-efficient strategy for stimulating this system. The experiment tested the effects of repeated flexion movements (rFM) on approach system activation as measured by both self-report (BAS scales) and behavior. The results showed that rFM increased approach system motivation in men but not women. Men who completed the rFM task reported significantly greater levels of fun-seeking motivation than men in the control task. Moreover, the rFM task led to changes in actual behavior. Men who completed the rFM task exhibited significantly greater persistence on a difficult laboratory task than men in the control task. In contrast, women who completed the rFM task reported significantly lower levels of fun seeking and tended to exhibit less persistence on a difficult laboratory task than women in the control task. These results provide support for embodied theories of emotion as well as additional evidence for a gender difference in approach-avoidance tendencies.

  10. Movement Analysis of Flexion and Extension of Honeybee Abdomen Based on an Adaptive Segmented Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jieliang; Wu, Jianing; Yan, Shaoze

    2015-01-01

    Honeybees (Apis mellifera) curl their abdomens for daily rhythmic activities. Prior to determining this fact, people have concluded that honeybees could curl their abdomen casually. However, an intriguing but less studied feature is the possible unidirectional abdominal deformation in free-flying honeybees. A high-speed video camera was used to capture the curling and to analyze the changes in the arc length of the honeybee abdomen not only in free-flying mode but also in the fixed sample. Frozen sections and environment scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the microstructure and motion principle of honeybee abdomen and to explore the physical structure restricting its curling. An adaptive segmented structure, especially the folded intersegmental membrane (FIM), plays a dominant role in the flexion and extension of the abdomen. The structural features of FIM were utilized to mimic and exhibit movement restriction on honeybee abdomen. Combining experimental analysis and theoretical demonstration, a unidirectional bending mechanism of honeybee abdomen was revealed. Through this finding, a new perspective for aerospace vehicle design can be imitated. PMID:26223946

  11. Preliminary Study on Continuous Recognition of Elbow Flexion/Extension Using sEMG Signals for Bilateral Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhibin; Zhang, Songyuan

    2016-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals are closely related to the activation of human muscles and the motion of the human body, which can be used to estimate the dynamics of human limbs in the rehabilitation field. They also have the potential to be used in the application of bilateral rehabilitation, where hemiplegic patients can train their affected limbs following the motion of unaffected limbs via some rehabilitation devices. Traditional methods to process the sEMG focused on motion pattern recognition, namely, discrete patterns, which are not satisfactory for use in bilateral rehabilitation. In order to overcome this problem, in this paper, we built a relationship between sEMG signals and human motion in elbow flexion and extension on the sagittal plane. During the conducted experiments, four participants were required to perform elbow flexion and extension on the sagittal plane smoothly with only an inertia sensor in their hands, where forearm dynamics were not considered. In these circumstances, sEMG signals were weak compared to those with heavy loads or high acceleration. The contrastive experimental results show that continuous motion can also be obtained within an acceptable precision range. PMID:27775573

  12. Treatment for flexion contracture of the knee during Ilizarov reconstruction of tibia with passive knee extension splint.

    PubMed

    Kwan, M K; Penafort, R; Saw, A

    2004-12-01

    Joint stiffness is one of the complications of limb procedure. It developes as a result of failure of knee flexors to lengthen in tandem with the bone, especially when there is inadequate physical therapy to provide active and passive mobilization of the affected joint. We are reporting four patients who developed fixed flexion contracture of their knees during bone lengthening procedure for the tibia with Ilizarov external fixator. Three of them were treated for congenital pseudoarthrosis and one was for fibular hemimelia. None of them were able to visit the physiotherapist even on a weekly basis. A splint was constructed from components of Ilizarov external fixator and applied on to the existing frame to passively extend the affected knee. Patients and their family members were taught to perform this exercise regularly and eventually near complete correction were achieved. With this result, we would like to recommend the use of this "Passive Knee Extension Splint" to avoid knee flexion Contracture during limb lengthening procedures with Ilizarov external fixators.

  13. Lateral vibration control of a flexible overcritical rotor via an active gas bearing - Theoretical and experimental comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierart, Fabian G.; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2016-11-01

    The lack of damping of radial gas bearings leads to high vibration levels of a rotor supported by this type of bearing when crossing resonant areas. This is even more relevant for flexible rotors, as studied in this work. In order to reduce these high vibration levels, an active gas bearing is proposed. The control action of this active bearing is selected based on two different strategies: a simple proportional integral derivative controller and an optimal controller. Both controllers are designed based on a theoretical model previously presented. The dynamics of the flexible rotor are modelled aided by the finite element method and the rotor-fluid interaction in the gas bearing is included using the solution of a modified version of the Reynolds equation for compressible fluids, taking into account the piezoelectrically controlled jet action. Performance and accuracy of both model-based controllers are compared against experimental results, showing good agreement. Theoretical and experimental results show a significant increase in the damping ratio of the system, enabling the flexible rotor to run safely across the critical speeds and up to 12,000 rev/min, i.e. 50 percent over the second critical speed without any instability problems.

  14. Visible-Light-Induced Activity Control of Peroxidase Bound to Fe-Doped Titanate Nanosheets with Nanometric Lateral Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Kai; Ito, Daiki; Soh, Nobuaki

    2015-10-21

    Catalytic performance of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) electrostatically adsorbed on nanometric and semiconducting Fe-doped titanate (FT) nanosheets was successfully manipulated by visible light illumination. A colloidal solution of FT with a narrow band gap corresponding to a visible light region was fabricated through a hydrolysis reaction of metals sources. HRP could be easily bound to the FT at pH = 4 through an electrostatic interaction between them, and the formed HRP-FT was utilized for the visible-light-driven enzymatic reaction. Under exposure to visible light with enough energy for band gap excitation of the FT, catalytic activity of HRP-FT was dramatically enhanced as compared with free (unbound) HRP and was simply adjusted by light intensity. In addition, wavelength dependence of an enzymatic reaction rate was analogous to an optical absorption spectrum of the FT. These results substantiated an expected reaction mechanism in which the photoenzymatic reaction was initiated by band gap excitation of FT followed by transferring holes generated in the valence band of irradiated FT to HRP. The excited HRP oxidized substrates (amplex ultrared: AUR) accompanied by two-electron reduction to regenerate the resting state. In addition, the catalytic activity was clearly switched by turning on and off the light source.

  15. Pay Me Now or Pay Me More Later: Start the Development of Active Orbital Debris Removal Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D.

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine when the aerospace community should proceed to develop and deploy active debris removal solutions. A two-prong approach is taken to examine both (1) operational hazard thresholds and (2) economic triggers. Research in the paper reinforces work by previous investigators that show accurately determining a hazard metric, and an appropriate threshold for that metric that triggers an imperative to implement active debris removal options, is difficult to formulate. A new operational hazard threshold defined by the doubling of the “lethal” debris environment coupled with the threshold that would affect insurance premiums is disclosed for the first time. The doubling of the lethal hazard at 850km and the annual probability of collision in the 650-1000km region may both occur as early as 2035. A simple static (i.e. no temporal dimension) economic threshold is derived that provides the clearest indicator that active debris removal solutions development and deployment should start immediately. This straightforward observation is based on the fact that it will always be at least an order of magnitude less expensive, quicker to execute, and operationally beneficial to remove mass from orbit as one large (several thousand kilograms) object rather than as the result of tens of thousands of fragments that would be produced from a catastrophic collision. Additionally, the ratio of lethal fragments to trackable objects is only ~1,000x yet there is a need for the collection efficiency to be ~10,000x so “sweeping” of lethal fragments is not viable. The practicality of the large object removal is tempered by the observation that one may have to remove ~10-50x derelict objects to prevent a single collision. This fact forces the imperative that removal needs to start now due to the delays that will be necessary not only to perfect/deploy approaches to debris removal and establish supporting policies/regulations but also because of the

  16. The Occupancy of the Components in the Cervical Spine and Their Changes with Extension and Flexion.

    PubMed

    Sayıt, Emrah; Aghdasi, Bayan; Daubs, Michael D; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objectives The kinematics of the cervical spine has been investigated by many researchers. However, the occupancy of the disk bulges, spinal cord, ligamentum flavum, and the rest of the canal as well as the changes of these structures with motion have not yet been investigated. The goal of this study is to investigate these dynamic changes. Methods The kinetic magnetic resonance images of 248 patients (124 men and 124 women) were evaluated, and the occupancy of each structure for each cervical level at neutral, flexion, and extension were calculated. Results Whole canal anteroposterior (AP) diameters showed significant differences between neutral-extension and flexion-extension at the C4-C5 and C5-C6 levels (p < 0.05). The mean disk bulges showed significant differences between neutral-flexion and flexion-extension at the C4-C5, C5-C6, C6-C7, and C7-T1 levels (p < 0.01). The mean spinal canal AP diameter showed significant differences between flexion-extension and neutral-extension at the C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p < 0.05). There were significant differences between neutral-flexion at the C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p < 0.05). The mean thickness of the ligamentum flavum showed significant differences between flexion-extension at the C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p < 0.001). There were significant differences between neutral-extension at the C3-C4 and C5-C6 levels (p < 0.05). There were significant differences between neutral-flexion at the C5-C6 and C6-C7 levels (p < 0.05). The mean thickness of the spinal cord showed significant differences between neutral-flexion at the C2-C3 and C3-C4 levels (p < 0.05). There were significant differences between flexion-extension at the C3-C4 and C4-C5 levels (p < 0.01). The rest of the canal showed significant differences between neutral-extension and flexion-extension at the C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p

  17. Constraining primordial non-Gaussianity with cosmological weak lensing: shear and flexion

    SciTech Connect

    Fedeli, C.; Bartelmann, M.; Moscardini, L. E-mail: bartelmann@uni-heidelberg.de

    2012-10-01

    We examine the cosmological constraining power of future large-scale weak lensing surveys on the model of the ESA planned mission Euclid, with particular reference to primordial non-Gaussianity. Our analysis considers several different estimators of the projected matter power spectrum, based on both shear and flexion. We review the covariance and Fisher matrix for cosmic shear and evaluate those for cosmic flexion and for the cross-correlation between the two. The bounds provided by cosmic shear alone are looser than previously estimated, mainly due to the reduced sky coverage and background number density of sources for the latest Euclid specifications. New constraints for the local bispectrum shape, marginalized over σ{sub 8}, are at the level of Δf{sub NL} ∼ 100, with the precise value depending on the exact multipole range that is considered in the analysis. We consider three additional bispectrum shapes, for which the cosmic shear constraints range from Δf{sub NL} ∼ 340 (equilateral shape) up to Δf{sub NL} ∼ 500 (orthogonal shape). Also, constraints on the level of non-Gaussianity and on the amplitude of the matter power spectrum σ{sub 8} are almost perfectly anti-correlated, except for the orthogonal bispectrum shape for which they are correlated. The competitiveness of cosmic flexion constraints against cosmic shear ones depends by and large on the galaxy intrinsic flexion noise, that is still virtually unconstrained. Adopting the very high value that has been occasionally used in the literature results in the flexion contribution being basically negligible with respect to the shear one, and for realistic configurations the former does not improve significantly the constraining power of the latter. Since the shear shot noise is white, while the flexion one decreases with decreasing scale, by considering high enough multipoles the two contributions have to become comparable. Extending the analysis up to l{sub max} = 20,000 cosmic flexion, while

  18. Measurement of knee joint gaps without bone resection: "physiologic" extension and flexion gaps in total knee arthroplasty are asymmetric and unequal and anterior and posterior cruciate ligament resections produce different gap changes.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, Andrej Maria; Majewski, Martin; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Valderrabano, Victor

    2012-04-01

    General agreement is that flexion and extension gaps should be equal and symmetrical in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedures. However, comparisons using a standard TKA approach to normal knee joints that have not undergone bone resection are currently unavailable. Since bony preparation can influence capsule and ligament tension, our purpose was to perform measurements without this influence. Ten normal cadaveric knees were assessed using a standard medial parapatellar TKA approach with patellar subluxation. Gap measurements were carried out twice each alternating 100 and 200 N per compartment using a prototypical force-determining ligament balancer without the need for bony resection. Initial measurements were performed in extension, followed by 908 of flexion. The ACL was then resected, and finally the PCL was resected, and measurements were carried out in an analogous fashion. In general, the lateral compartment could be stretched further than the medial compartment, and the corresponding flexion gap values were significantly larger. ACL resection predominantly increased extension gaps, while PCL resection increased flexion gaps. Distraction force of 100 N per compartment appeared adequate; increasing to 200 N did not improve the results.

  19. Calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channel activators in the 5β-cholanic acid-3α-ol analogue series with modifications in the lateral chain.

    PubMed

    Bukiya, Anna N; Patil, Shivaputra A; Li, Wei; Miller, Duane D; Dopico, Alex M

    2012-10-01

    Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels regulate various physiological processes and represent an attractive target for drug discovery. Numerous BK channel activators are available. However, these agents usually interact with the ubiquitously distributed channel-forming subunit and thus cannot selectively target a particular tissue. We performed a structure-activity relationship study of lithocholic acid (LCA), a cholane that activates BK channels via the accessory BK β1 subunit. The latter protein is highly abundant in smooth muscle but scarce in most other tissues. Modifications to the LCA lateral chain length and functional group yielded two novel smooth muscle BK channel activators in which the substituent at C24 has a small volume and a net negative charge. Our data provide detailed structural information that will be useful to advance a pharmacophore in search of β1 subunit-selective BK channel activators. These compounds are expected to evoke smooth muscle relaxation, which would be beneficial in the pharmacotherapy of prevalent human disorders associated with increased smooth muscle contraction, such as systemic hypertension, cerebral or coronary vasospasm, bronchial asthma, bladder hyperactivity, and erectile dysfunction.

  20. LATERAL ROOT PRIMORDIA 1 of maize acts as a transcriptional activator in auxin signalling downstream of the Aux/IAA gene rootless with undetectable meristem 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanxiang; von Behrens, Inga; Zimmermann, Roman; Ludwig, Yvonne; Hey, Stefan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Only little is known about target genes of auxin signalling downstream of the Aux/IAA-ARF module. In the present study, it has been demonstrated that maize lateral root primordia 1 (lrp1) encodes a transcriptional activator that is directly regulated by the Aux/IAA protein ROOTLESS WITH UNDETECTABLE MERISTEM 1 (RUM1). Expression of lrp1 is confined to early root primordia and meristems and is auxin-inducible. Based on its primary protein structure, LRP1 is predicted to be a transcription factor. This notion is supported by exclusive LRP1 localization in the nucleus and its ability to activate downstream gene activity. Based on the observation that lrp1 transcription is completely repressed in the semi-dominant gain of function mutant rum1, it was demonstrated that the lrp1 promoter is a direct target of RUM1 proteins. Subsequently, promoter activation assays indicated that RUM1 represses the expression of a GFP reporter fused to the native promoter of lrp1. Constitutive repression of lrp1 in rum1 mutants is a consequence of the stability of mutated rum1 proteins which cannot be degraded by the proteasome and thus constitutively bind to the lrp1 promoter and repress transcription. Taken together, the repression of the transcriptional activator lrp1 by direct binding of RUM1 to its promoter, together with specific expression of lrp1 in root meristems, suggests a function in maize root development via the RUM1-dependent auxin signalling pathway.

  1. Reliability of sagittal pelvic position assessments in standing, sitting and during hip flexion using palpation meter.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Daniel Camara; Santos, Henrique; Carneiro, Ricardo Luiz; Andrade, Guilherme Trivellato

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate reliability of assessing sagittal pelvic position using the palpation meter (PALM) in healthy subjects while sitting, standing and while in different hip flexion angles in standing. Twenty healthy subjects were assessed two times by the same examiner, with a 48-h interval between test sessions. Reliability indices of PALM measures (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC), standard error of measurement (SEM) and smallest detectable change (SDC) were calculated. ICC values showed excellent intra-rater reliability for measurements of sagittal pelvic position in standing and sitting position and for both standing hip flexion angles (ICC = .89-.96). SEM values ranged from .5° (hip flexion 90°) to 1.5° (sitting position). SDC values ranged from 1.5° (hip flexion 90°) to 4.0° (sitting position). The results of this study showed excellent intra-rater reliability for assessing sagittal pelvic position in standing, sitting and hip flexion in healthy subjects using the PALM.

  2. Effect of elbow flexion on the proximity of the PIN during 2-incision distal biceps repair.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jason A; Jones, Christopher M; Grossman, Mark G

    2013-07-01

    The posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) is at risk for injury during surgical dissection for distal biceps repair, yet the optimal position of elbow flexion to avoid a PIN injury has never been established for the 2-incision approach. The purpose of this study was to determine the proximity of the PIN to the radial tuberosity during surgical dissection in different degrees of elbow flexion. Ten cadaveric specimens with an intact elbow and forearm were dissected in full pronation using a modified Boyd-Anderson approach. Half of the dissections were completed in 90° of flexion and the other half were completed in maximal flexion. To simulate the location of the PIN during a single-incision biceps repair, the distance of the PIN to the radial tuberosity was recorded in full extension and supination. Results from these measurements were assessed for differences using paired t tests, with differences deemed significant for P values less than .05. The PIN was not identified in any of the 2-incision surgical dissections. Based on these findings, the proximity of the PIN to the radial tuberosity is not significantly affected by the degree of elbow flexion in the muscle-splitting 2-incision approach. In addition, a safe zone exists for avoiding PIN injury in a single-incision technique for distal biceps repair because a drill bit exiting the radial tuberosity greater than 1 cm in a distal-radial direction would place the PIN at risk.

  3. Extension and flexion in the upper cervical spine in neck pain patients.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Markus J; Crawford, Rebecca J; Schelldorfer, Sarah; Rausch-Osthoff, Anne-Kathrin; Barbero, Marco; Kool, Jan; Bauer, Christoph M

    2015-08-01

    Neck pain is a common problem in the general population with high risk of ongoing complaints or relapses. Range of motion (ROM) assessment is scientifically established in the clinical process of diagnosis, prognosis and outcome evaluation in neck pain. Anatomically, the cervical spine (CS) has been considered in two regions, the upper and lower CS. Disorders like cervicogenic headache have been clinically associated with dysfunctions of the upper CS (UCS), yet ROM tests and measurements are typically conducted on the whole CS. A cross-sectional study assessing 19 subjects with non-specific neck pain was undertaken to examine UCS extension-flexion ROM in relation to self-reported disability and pain (via the Neck Disability Index (NDI)). Two measurement devices (goniometer and electromagnetic tracking) were employed and compared. Correlations between ROM and the NDI were stronger for the UCS compared to the CS, with the strongest correlation between UCS flexion and the NDI-headache (r = -0.62). Correlations between UCS and CS ROM were fair to moderate, with the strongest correlation between UCS flexion and CS extension ROM (r = -0.49). UCS flexion restriction is related to headache frequency and intensity. Consistency and agreement between both measurement systems and for all tests was high. The results demonstrate that separate UCS ROM assessments for extension and flexion are useful in patients with neck pain.

  4. In vivo kinematic evaluation and design considerations related to high flexion in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Argenson, Jean-Noël A; Scuderi, Giles R; Komistek, Richard D; Scott, W Norman; Kelly, Michael A; Aubaniac, Jean-Manuel

    2005-02-01

    In designing a posterior-stabilized total knee arthroplasty (TKA) it is preferable that when the cam engages the tibial spine the contact point of the cam move down the tibial spine. This provides greater stability in flexion by creating a greater jump distance and reduces the stress on the tibial spine. In order to eliminate edge loading of the femoral component on the posterior tibial articular surface, the posterior femoral condyles need to be extended. This provides an ideal femoral contact with the tibial articular surface during high flexion angles. To reduce extensor mechanism impingement in deep flexion, the anterior margin of the tibial articular component should be recessed. This provides clearance for the patella and patella tendon. An in vivo kinematic analysis that determined three dimensional motions of the femorotibial joint was performed during a deep knee bend using fluoroscopy for 20 subjects having a TKA designed for deep flexion. The average weight-bearing range-of-motion was 125 degrees . On average, TKA subjects experienced 4.9 degrees of normal axial rotation and all subjects experienced at least -4.4 mm of posterior femoral rollback. It is assumed that femorotibial kinematics can play a major role in patellofemoral kinematics. In this study, subjects implanted with a high-flexion TKA design experienced kinematic patterns that were similar to the normal knee. It can be hypothesized that forces acting on the patella were not substantially increased for TKA subjects compared with the normal subjects.

  5. Sensitivity of lumbar spine response to follower load and flexion moment: finite element study.

    PubMed

    Naserkhaki, Sadegh; El-Rich, Marwan

    2017-04-01

    The follower load (FL) combined with moments is commonly used to approximate flexed/extended posture of the lumbar spine in absence of muscles in biomechanical studies. There is a lack of consensus as to what magnitudes simulate better the physiological conditions. Considering the in-vivo measured values of the intradiscal pressure (IDP), intervertebral rotations (IVRs) and the disc loads, sensitivity of these spinal responses to different FL and flexion moment magnitudes was investigated using a 3D nonlinear finite element (FE) model of ligamentous lumbosacral spine. Optimal magnitudes of FL and moment that minimize deviation of the model predictions from in-vivo data were determined. Results revealed that the spinal parameters i.e. the IVRs, disc moment, and the increase in disc force and moment from neutral to flexed posture were more sensitive to moment magnitude than FL magnitude in case of flexion. The disc force and IDP were more sensitive to the FL magnitude than moment magnitude. The optimal ranges of FL and flexion moment magnitudes were 900-1100 N and 9.9-11.2 Nm, respectively. The FL magnitude had reverse effect on the IDP and disc force. Thus, magnitude for FL or flexion that minimizes the deviation of all the spinal parameters together from the in-vivo data can vary. To obtain reasonable compromise between the IDP and disc force, our findings recommend that FL of low magnitude must be combined with flexion moment of high intensity and vice versa.

  6. Gender and Health Lifestyle: An In-Depth Exploration of Self-Care Activities in Later Life

    PubMed Central

    Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Stoller, Eleanor P.; Brewer-Lowry, A. Nichol; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evaluate similarities and differences in the self-care domain of health lifestyle among older, rural dwelling women and men. Method Qualitative analysis of in-depth interview data from 62 community-dwelling older (M = 74.3 years) African and European American women and men. Results Both older women and men rely heavily on over-the-counter (OTC) medications and home remedies self-care; professional health care is typically sought when self-care is not effective. However, relative to men, women were more knowledgeable about different approaches to self-care, especially home remedies, they used a wider range of self-care activities, and they placed greater priority on self-care over professional health care. Discussion The structure of older women’s and men’s self-care domain of health lifestyle is similar. However, there are subtle differences in health lifestyle that are likely embedded in gendered role behavior and may contribute to women’s greater health complaints. PMID:21632439

  7. Creativity in later life.

    PubMed

    Price, K A; Tinker, A M

    2014-08-01

    The ageing population presents significant challenges for the provision of social and health services. Strategies are needed to enable older people to cope within a society ill prepared for the impacts of these demographic changes. The ability to be creative may be one such strategy. This review outlines the relevant literature and examines current public health policy related to creativity in old age with the aim of highlighting some important issues. As well as looking at the benefits and negative aspects of creative activity in later life they are considered in the context of the theory of "successful ageing". Creative activity plays an important role in the lives of older people promoting social interaction, providing cognitive stimulation and giving a sense of self-worth. Furthermore, it is shown to be useful as a tool in the multi-disciplinary treatment of health problems common in later life such as depression and dementia. There are a number of initiatives to encourage older people to participate in creative activities such as arts-based projects which may range from visual arts to dance to music to intergenerational initiatives. However, participation shows geographical variation and often the responsibility of provision falls to voluntary organisations. Overall, the literature presented suggests that creative activity could be a useful tool for individuals and society. However, further research is needed to establish the key factors which contribute to patterns of improved health and well-being, as well as to explore ways to improve access to services.

  8. Arabidopsis thaliana mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 is involved in seed formation and modulation of primary and lateral root development

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-García, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) cascades are signal transduction modules highly conserved in all eukaryotes regulating various aspects of plant biology, including stress responses and developmental programmes. In this study, we characterized the role of MAPK 6 (MPK6) in Arabidopsis embryo development and in post-embryonic root system architecture. We found that the mpk6 mutation caused altered embryo development giving rise to three seed phenotypes that, post-germination, correlated with alterations in root architecture. In the smaller seed class, mutant seedlings failed to develop the primary root, possibly as a result of an earlier defect in the division of the hypophysis cell during embryo development, but they had the capacity to develop adventitious roots to complete their life cycle. In the larger class, the MPK6 loss of function did not cause any evident alteration in seed morphology, but the embryo and the mature seed were bigger than the wild type. Seedlings developed from these bigger seeds were characterized by a primary root longer than that of the wild type, accompanied by significantly increased lateral root initiation and more and longer root hairs. Apparently, the increment in primary root growth resulted from an enhanced cell production and cell elongation. Our data demonstrated that MPK6 plays an important role during embryo development and acts as a repressor of primary and lateral root development. PMID:24218326

  9. Serotonin stimulates lateral habenula via activation of the post-synaptic serotonin 2/3 receptors and transient receptor potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Wanhong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Guiqin; Gregor, Danielle; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest on the role of the lateral habenula (LHb) in depression, because it closely and bilaterally connects with the serotoninergic raphe nuclei. The LHb sends glutamate efferents to the raphe nuclei, while it receives serotoninergic afferents, and expresses a high density of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Recent studies suggest that 5-HT receptors exist both in the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites of LHb neurons, and activation of these receptors may have different effects on the activity of LHb neurons. The current study focused on the effect of 5-HT on the postsynaptic membrane. We found that 5-HT initiated a depolarizing inward current (I(5-HTi)) and accelerated spontaneous firing in ~80% of LHb neurons in rat brain slices. I(5-HTi) was also induced by the 5-HT uptake blocker citalopram, indicating activity of endogenous 5-HT. I(5-HTi) was diminished by 5-HT2/3 receptor antagonists (ritanserin, SB-200646 or ondansetron), and activated by the selective 5-HT2/3 agonists 1-(3- Chlorophenyl) piperazine hydrochloride or 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) biguanide hydrochloride. Furthermore, I(5-HTi) was attenuated by 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate, a blocker of transient receptor potential channels, and an IP3 receptor inhibitor, indicating the involvement of transient receptor potential channels. These results demonstrate that the reciprocal connection between the LHb and the 5-HT system highlights a key role for 5-HT stimulation of LHb neurons that may be important in the pathogenesis of depression. PMID:26471419

  10. Serotonin stimulates lateral habenula via activation of the post-synaptic serotonin 2/3 receptors and transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wanhong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Guiqin; Gregor, Danielle; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-02-01

    There is growing interest on the role of the lateral habenula (LHb) in depression, because it closely and bilaterally connects with the serotoninergic raphe nuclei. The LHb sends glutamate efferents to the raphe nuclei, while it receives serotoninergic afferents, and expresses a high density of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Recent studies suggest that 5-HT receptors exist both in the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites of LHb neurons, and activation of these receptors may have different effects on the activity of LHb neurons. The current study focused on the effect of 5-HT on the postsynaptic membrane. We found that 5-HT initiated a depolarizing inward current (I((5-HTi))) and accelerated spontaneous firing in ∼80% of LHb neurons in rat brain slices. I((5-HTi)) was also induced by the 5-HT uptake blocker citalopram, indicating activity of endogenous 5-HT. I((5-HTi)) was diminished by 5-HT(2/3) receptor antagonists (ritanserin, SB-200646 or ondansetron), and activated by the selective 5-HT(2/3) agonists 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) piperazine hydrochloride or 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) biguanide hydrochloride. Furthermore, I((5-HTi)) was attenuated by 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate, a blocker of transient receptor potential channels, and an IP3 receptor inhibitor, indicating the involvement of transient receptor potential channels. These results demonstrate that the reciprocal connection between the LHb and the 5-HT system highlights a key role for 5-HT stimulation of LHb neurons that may be important in the pathogenesis of depression.

  11. Real-time tracking of motor response activation and response competition in a Stroop task in young children: a lateralized readiness potential study.

    PubMed

    Szucs, Dénes; Soltész, Fruzsina; Bryce, Donna; Whitebread, David

    2009-11-01

    The ability to select an appropriate motor response by resolving competition among alternative responses plays a major role in cognitive performance. fMRI studies suggest that the development of this skill is related to the maturation of the frontal cortex that underlies the improvement of motor inhibition abilities. However, fMRI cannot characterize the temporal properties of motor response competition and motor activation in general. We studied the development of the time course of resolving motor response competition. To this end, we used the lateralized readiness potential (LRP), an ERP measure, for tracking correct and incorrect motor cortex activation in children in real time. Fourteen children and 14 adults took part in an animal-size Stroop task where they selected between two animals, presented simultaneously on the computer screen, which was larger in real life. In the incongruent condition, the LRP detected stronger and longer lasting incorrect response activation in children than in adults. LRP results could explain behavioral congruency effects, the generally longer RT in children than in adults and the larger congruency effect in children than in adults. In contrast, the peak latency of ERP waves, usually associated with stimulus processing speed, could explain neither of the above effects. We conclude that the development of resolving motor response competition, relying on motor inhibition skills, is a crucial factor in child development. Our study demonstrates that the LRP is an excellent tool for studying motor activation in children.

  12. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation experiment for semi-active vibration control of lateral vibrations of railway vehicle by magneto-rheological fluid damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Lee, Jae-Ha; Yang, Dong-Ho; You, Won-Hee

    2014-07-01

    The active lateral suspension (ALS) of a train consists of either active or semi-active technologies. However, such an active system on a real railway vehicle is not easy to test because of cost and time. In this study, a hardware-in-the-loop simulation (HILS) system is developed to test the ALS. To this end, the dynamic model of a railway vehicle is equipped with the actuator, two bogies and four-wheel sets, and the ALS is used. The proposed HILS system consists of an alternating current servo motor connected to a ball-screw mechanism and a digital control system. The digital control system implements the dynamic model and the control algorithm. The design and manufacture of the HILS system are explained in detail. Both the passive damper and the magneto-rheological (MR) fluid damper are tested using the HILS system, where the sky-hook control algorithm was applied for the MR fluid damper. Experimental results show that the proposed HILS system can be effectively used for the performance estimation of the ALS.

  13. A comparison of neck bending and flexion measurement methods for assessment of ergonomic risk.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohsen; Biau, Sophie; Brunet, Rene; Gourlay, Antoine; Roquelaure, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Head movements of workers were measured in the sagittal plane in order to establish a precise and accurate assessment method to be used in real work situations. Measurements were performed using two inclinometers connected to an embedded recording system. Two quantitative analysis methods were tested, i.e., measurement of bending with an inclinometer attached to the head, and measurement of flexion/extension by using an additional inclinometer located at C7/T1. The results were also compared with a video observation method (qualitative). The results showed that bending measurements were significantly different from those of flexion/extension for angles between 0° and 20°, and angles >45°. There were also significant differences between workers for flexion >45°, reflecting individual variability. Additionally, several limitations of observational methods were revealed by this study.

  14. Effect of patellar thickness on knee flexion in total knee arthroplasty: a biomechanical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemian, Mansour; Samiezadeh, Saeid; Sternheim, Amir; Bougherara, Habiba; Barnes, C Lowry; Backstein, David J

    2014-01-01

    A biomechanical computer-based model was developed to simulate the influence of patellar thickness on passive knee flexion after arthroplasty. Using the computer model of a single-radius, PCL-sacrificing knee prosthesis, a range of patella-implant composite thicknesses was simulated. The biomechanical model was then replicated using two cadaveric knees. A patellar-thickness range of 15 mm was applied to each of the knees. Knee flexion was found to decrease exponentially with increased patellar thickness in both the biomechanical and experimental studies. Importantly, this flexion loss followed an exponential pattern with higher patellar thicknesses in both studies. In order to avoid adverse biomechanical and functional consequences, it is recommended to restore patellar thickness to that of the native knee during total knee arthroplasty.

  15. A Textile-Based Wearable Sensing Device Designed for Monitoring the Flexion Angle of Elbow and Knee Movements

    PubMed Central

    Shyr, Tien-Wei; Shie, Jing-Wen; Jiang, Chang-Han; Li, Jung-Jen

    2014-01-01

    In this work a wearable gesture sensing device consisting of a textile strain sensor, using elastic conductive webbing, was designed for monitoring the flexion angle of elbow and knee movements. The elastic conductive webbing shows a linear response of resistance to the flexion angle. The wearable gesture sensing device was calibrated and then the flexion angle-resistance equation was established using an assembled gesture sensing apparatus with a variable resistor and a protractor. The proposed device successfully monitored the flexion angle during elbow and knee movements. PMID:24577526

  16. Hemispheric lateralization in reasoning.

    PubMed

    Turner, Benjamin O; Marinsek, Nicole; Ryhal, Emily; Miller, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that reasoning in humans relies on a number of related processes whose neural loci are largely lateralized to one hemisphere or the other. A recent review of this evidence concluded that the patterns of lateralization observed are organized according to two complementary tendencies. The left hemisphere attempts to reduce uncertainty by drawing inferences or creating explanations, even at the cost of ignoring conflicting evidence or generating implausible explanations. Conversely, the right hemisphere aims to reduce conflict by rejecting or refining explanations that are no longer tenable in the face of new evidence. In healthy adults, the hemispheres work together to achieve a balance between certainty and consistency, and a wealth of neuropsychological research supports the notion that upsetting this balance results in various failures in reasoning, including delusions. However, support for this model from the neuroimaging literature is mixed. Here, we examine the evidence for this framework from multiple research domains, including an activation likelihood estimation analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of reasoning. Our results suggest a need to either revise this model as it applies to healthy adults or to develop better tools for assessing lateralization in these individuals.

  17. Voluntary contraction direction dependence of motor unit number index in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Nandedkar, Sanjeev D; Barkhaus, Paul E

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the voluntary contraction direction dependence of motor unit number index (MUNIX) for multifunctional muscles in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The MUNIX technique was applied in nine first dorsal interosseous muscles of eight ALS subjects, using surface electromyography (EMG) signals from index finger abduction and flexion, respectively. In seven examined muscles, the MUNIX derived from the index finger abduction mode was smaller than that from the flexion mode. For the remaining two muscles, one had the same MUNIX; the other showed an abduction mode MUNIX much higher than the flexion mode MNUIX. Across all muscles, the median MUNIX was 96 for the index finger abduction mode and 161 for the flexion mode. The findings reveal the dependence of multifunctional muscle MUNIX on voluntary contraction directions in ALS patients. Based on this analysis, we further explored the concept of "multidimensional MUNIX" for an appropriate performance or interpretation of MUNIX in multifunctional muscles of ALS patients. An effort towards such a development was presented using both abduction and flexion mode surface EMG for MUNIX calculation.

  18. Cervical spine intervertebral kinematics with respect to the head are different during flexion and extension motions

    PubMed Central

    Anderst, William J.; Donaldson, William F.; Lee, Joon Y.; Kang, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Previous dynamic imaging studies of the cervical spine have focused entirely on intervertebral kinematics while neglecting to investigate the relationship between head motion and intervertebral motion. Specifically, it is unknown if the relationship between head and intervertebral kinematics is affected by movement direction. We tested the hypothesis that there would be no difference in sagittal plane intervertebral angles at identical head orientations during the flexion and extension movements. Nineteen asymptomatic subjects performed continuous head flexion-extension movements while biplane radiographs were collected at 30 images per second. A previously validated model-based volumetric tracking process determined three-dimensional vertebral position with sub-millimeter accuracy throughout the flexion–extension motion. Head movement was recorded at 60 Hz using conventional motion analysis and reflective markers. Intervertebral angles were determined at identical head orientations during the flexion and extension movements. Cervical motion segments were in a more extended orientation during flexion and in a more flexed orientation during extension for any given head orientation. The results suggest that static radiographs cannot accurately represent vertebral orientation during dynamic motion. Further, data should be collected during both flexion and extension movements when investigating intervertebral kinematics with respect to global head orientation. Also, in vitro protocols that use intervertebral total range of motion as validation criteria may be improved by assessing model fidelity using continuous intervertebral kinematics in flexion and in extension. Finally, musculoskeletal models of the head and cervical spine should account for the direction of head motion when determining muscle moment arms because vertebral orientations (and therefore muscle attachment sites) are dependent on the direction of head motion. PMID:23540377

  19. Posterior femoral condylar offset after total knee replacement in the risk of knee flexion contracture.

    PubMed

    Onodera, Tomohiro; Majima, Tokifumi; Nishiike, Osamu; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the risk of knee flexion contracture associated with a posterior femoral condylar offset after total knee replacement (TKR). Radiographs from 100 healthy Japanese volunteers were included in the study. We evaluated femoral component posterior offset in various implants and compared them with the normal Japanese knee. Posterior offset of the femoral condyle is up to a maximum of 4.7 times greater than that of the healthy Japanese knee in all knee implants. Excess posterior offset of the femoral condyle in TKR prostheses may cause knee joint flexion contracture due to the relative shortening of the posterior soft tissue.

  20. CT of facet distraction in flexion injuries of the thoracolumbar spine: the "naked" facet.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, J P; Ullrich, C G; Yuan, H A; Kieffer, S A

    1980-03-01

    Vertical distraction of the articular processes is an important sign of ligamentous disruption due to flexion injuries of the thoracolumbar spine. In addition to illustrating this finding in cross section (the "naked" facet), computed tomography in the transaxial plane allows assessment of the presence and position of fracture fragments that may encroach on the spinal canal. Image reconstruction in sagittal and coronal planes provides a clear demonstration of the degree of bony compression, facet distraction, and kyphosis associated with flexion injuries without additional patient manipulation or radiation exposure.

  1. Two Patients with Osteochondral Injury of the Weight-Bearing Portion of the Lateral Femoral Condyle Associated with Lateral Dislocation of the Patella

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Atsumi, Satoru; Ichimaru, Shohei; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Complications of patellar dislocation include osteochondral injury of the lateral femoral condyle and patella. Most cases of osteochondral injury occur in the anterior region, which is the non-weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle. We describe two patients with osteochondral injury of the weight-bearing surface of the lateral femoral condyle associated with lateral dislocation of the patella. The patients were 18- and 11-year-old females. Osteochondral injury occurred on the weight-bearing surface distal to the lateral femoral condyle. The presence of a free osteochondral fragment and osteochondral injury of the lateral femoral condyle was confirmed on MRI and reconstruction CT scan. Treatment consisted of osteochondral fragment fixation or microfracture, as well as patellar stabilization. Osteochondral injury was present in the weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle in both patients, suggesting that the injury was caused by friction between the patella and lateral femoral condyle when the patella was dislocated or reduced at about 90° flexion of the knee joint. These findings indicate that patellar dislocation may occur and osteochondral injury may extend to the weight-bearing portion of the femur even in deep flexion, when the patella is stabilized on the bones of the femoral groove. PMID:25506015

  2. Sensorimotor tests, such as movement control and laterality judgment accuracy, in persons with recurrent neck pain and controls. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Elsig, Simone; Luomajoki, Hannu; Sattelmayer, Martin; Taeymans, Jan; Tal-Akabi, Amir; Hilfiker, Roger

    2014-12-01

    Assessing sensorimotor abilities, such as movement control, becomes increasingly important for the management of patients with neck pain because of the potential contribution to the development of chronic neck pain. Our aim was to evaluate whether sensorimotor tests could discriminate between persons with neck pain and persons without neck pain and to assess correlations among the assessments. A matched case-control study with 30 persons with recurrent neck pain and 30 controls was conducted. We tested two-point discrimination (TPD), joint position error (JPE), muscle activation with the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT), laterality judgment accuracy and movement control (MC). We administered the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ), the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and the painDetect questionnaire. According to the areas under the curve (AUC), tests for the JPE (0.69), CCFT (0.73), MC (0.83) and laterality judgment accuracy (0.68) were able to discriminate between persons with and without neck pain. Among the five tests, laterality judgment accuracy exhibited moderate to large correlations with the JPE and MC, and moderate correlations were observed between the TPD and CCFT (r between -0.4 and -0.5). We recommend the assessment of various aspects of sensorimotor ability and of central representation of the body schema, even in patients with mild neck pain. For clinical practice, we recommend the craniocervical flexion test, testing of laterality judgment accuracy and three movement control tests (cervico-thoracic extension, protraction-retraction of the head and quadruped cervical rotation).

  3. The Effect of Breakfast Prior to Morning Exercise on Cognitive Performance, Mood and Appetite Later in the Day in Habitually Active Women.

    PubMed

    Veasey, Rachel C; Haskell-Ramsay, Crystal F; Kennedy, David O; Tiplady, Brian; Stevenson, Emma J

    2015-07-14

    Pre-exercise nutritional practices for active females exercising for mood, cognitive and appetite benefits are not well established. Results from an initial field pilot study showed that higher energy intake at breakfast was associated with lower fatigue and higher overall mood and alertness post-exercise (all p < 0.05). In a follow-up, randomised, controlled trial, 24 active women completed three trials in a balanced, cross-over design. At 0815 h participants completed baseline cognitive tasks, mood and appetite visual analogue scales (VAS) and were administered a cereal breakfast (providing 118 or 236 kcal) or no breakfast. After 45 min, they completed a 30 min run at 65% heart rate reserve (HRR). Parameters were re-assessed immediately after exercise, then hourly until lunch (~1240 h), immediately post-lunch and at 1500 and 1900 h via a mobile phone. Breakfast enhanced feelings of relaxation before lunch (p < 0.05, d > 0.40), though breakfast was detrimental for working memory mid-afternoon (p = 0.019, d = 0.37) and mental fatigue and tension later in the day (all p < 0.05, d > 0.038). Breakfast was also beneficial for appetite control before lunch irrespective of size (all p < 0.05, d > 0.43). These data provide information on pre-exercise nutritional practices for active females and suggest that a small breakfast eaten prior to exercise can benefit post-exercise mood and subjective appetite ratings.

  4. The Effect of Breakfast Prior to Morning Exercise on Cognitive Performance, Mood and Appetite Later in the Day in Habitually Active Women

    PubMed Central

    Veasey, Rachel C.; Haskell-Ramsay, Crystal F.; Kennedy, David O.; Tiplady, Brian; Stevenson, Emma J.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-exercise nutritional practices for active females exercising for mood, cognitive and appetite benefits are not well established. Results from an initial field pilot study showed that higher energy intake at breakfast was associated with lower fatigue and higher overall mood and alertness post-exercise (all p < 0.05). In a follow-up, randomised, controlled trial, 24 active women completed three trials in a balanced, cross-over design. At 0815 h participants completed baseline cognitive tasks, mood and appetite visual analogue scales (VAS) and were administered a cereal breakfast (providing 118 or 236 kcal) or no breakfast. After 45 min, they completed a 30 min run at 65% heart rate reserve (HRR). Parameters were re-assessed immediately after exercise, then hourly until lunch (~1240 h), immediately post-lunch and at 1500 and 1900 h via a mobile phone. Breakfast enhanced feelings of relaxation before lunch (p < 0.05, d > 0.40), though breakfast was detrimental for working memory mid-afternoon (p = 0.019, d = 0.37) and mental fatigue and tension later in the day (all p < 0.05, d > 0.038). Breakfast was also beneficial for appetite control before lunch irrespective of size (all p < 0.05, d > 0.43). These data provide information on pre-exercise nutritional practices for active females and suggest that a small breakfast eaten prior to exercise can benefit post-exercise mood and subjective appetite ratings. PMID:26184302

  5. Functional pelvic orientation measured from lateral standing and sitting radiographs.

    PubMed

    DiGioia, Anthony M; Hafez, Mahmoud A; Jaramaz, Branislav; Levison, Timothy J; Moody, James E

    2006-12-01

    We prospectively obtained preoperative and 3-month postoperative lateral pelvic radiographs in the standing and sitting positions from 84 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. We measured pelvic orientation (flexion extension) using the anterior pelvic plane as defined by the anterior superior iliac spines and pubic tubercles as references. There was a trend towards upright pelvic alignment when standing, with a mean anterior pelvic plane angle of 1.2 degrees (range, -22 degrees - +27 degrees). In the sitting position the pelvis tended to extend posteriorly, with a mean anterior pelvic plane angle of -36.2 degrees (range, -64 degrees - +4 degrees). There was a wide variation in the arc of pelvic flexion extension as patients moved from standing to sitting, with are of pelvic motion in some patients as mobile as 70 degrees and in others as stiff as 5 degrees. There was no significant variation between males and females or between preoperative and postoperative pelvic flexion extension. There were substantial variations in pelvic orientation when comparing standing and sitting for an individual patient and between different patients. This variation can be unpredictable, and may influence implant alignment and stability after total hip arthroplasty.

  6. Using of Remote Sensing Techniques for Monitoring the Earthquakes Activities Along the Northern Part of the Syrian Rift System (LEFT-LATERAL),SYRIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalati, Moutaz

    Earthquake mitigation can be achieved with a better knowledge of a region's infra-and substructures. High resolution Remote Sensing data can play a significant role to implement Geological mapping and it is essential to learn about the tectonic setting of a region. It is an effective method to identify active faults from different sources of Remote Sensing and compare the capability of some satellite sensors in active faults survey. In this paper, it was discussed a few digital image processing approaches to be used for enhancement and feature extraction related to faults. Those methods include band ratio, filtering and texture statistics . The experimental results show that multi-spectral images have great potentials in large scale active faults investigation. It has also got satisfied results when deal with invisible faults. Active Faults have distinct features in satellite images. Usually, there are obvious straight lines, circular structures and other distinct patterns along the faults locations. Remotely Sensed imagery Landsat ETM and SPOT XS /PAN are often used in active faults mapping. Moderate and high resolution satellite images are the best choice, because in low resolution images, the faults features may not be visible in most cases. The area under study is located Northwest of Syria that is part of one of the very active deformation belt on the Earth today. This area and the western part of Syria are located along the great rift system (Left-Lateral or African- Syrian Rift System). Those areas are tectonically active and caused a lot of seismically events. The AL-Ghab graben complex is situated within this wide area of Cenozoic deformation. The system formed, initially, as a result of the break up of the Arabian plate from the African plate. This action indicates that these sites are active and in a continual movement. In addition to that, the statistic analysis of Thematic Mapper data and the features from a digital elevation model ( DEM )produced from

  7. Diagonal movement of the upper limb produces greater adaptive plasticity than sagittal plane flexion in the shoulder.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Rayele; Lial, Lysnara; Teles Monteiro, Maria Gabriela; Aragão, Alice; Santos David, Lorena; Coertjens, Marcelo; Silva-Júnior, Fernando L; Dias, Gildário; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Teixeira, Silmar Silva; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2017-03-16

    The motor rehabilitation is based on exercises that involve various joints and muscle groups. One such treatment method is Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF), which involves diagonal movements simulating many activities of daily living. The objective of this study was to investigate the differences between PNF and shoulder flexion movements performed without the diagonal component (i.e., only in the sagittal plane) using beta band absolute power as a measure of plasticity. The study included 30 volunteers randomized into three groups (control, PNF, and FLEX), with electroencephalographic signals captured before and after the performance of the task. The PNF group showed an increase in beta band absolute power in both hemispheres, indicating greater plasticity than that seen in the FLEX group. Therefore, PNF seems to be capable of promoting cortical adaptations that lead to the recruitment of both hemispheres, thus influencing cortical organization in more complex tasks.

  8. In Vivo Voltage-Sensitive Dye Study of Lateral Spreading of Cortical Activity in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex Induced by a Current Impulse

    PubMed Central

    Fehérvári, Tamás Dávid; Sawai, Hajime; Yagi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1), lateral spreading of excitatory potentials is believed to be involved in spatial integrative functions, but the underlying cortical mechanism is not well understood. Visually-evoked population-level responses have been shown to propagate beyond the V1 initial activation site in mouse, similar to higher mammals. Visually-evoked responses are, however, affected by neuronal circuits prior to V1 (retina, LGN), making the separate analysis of V1 difficult. Intracortical stimulation eliminates these initial processing steps. We used in vivo RH1691 voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging and intracortical microstimulation in adult C57BL/6 mice to elucidate the spatiotemporal properties of population-level signal spreading in V1 cortical circuits. The evoked response was qualitatively similar to that measured in single-cell electrophysiological experiments in rodents: a fast transient fluorescence peak followed by a fast and a slow decrease or hyperpolarization, similar to EPSP and fast and slow IPSPs in single cells. The early cortical response expanded at speeds commensurate with long horizontal projections (at 5% of the peak maximum, 0.08–0.15 m/s) however, the bulk of the VSD signal propagated slowly (at half-peak maximum, 0.05–0.08 m/s) suggesting an important role of regenerative multisynaptic transmission through short horizontal connections in V1 spatial integrative functions. We also found a tendency for a widespread and fast cortical response suppression in V1, which was eliminated by GABAA-antagonists gabazine and bicuculline methiodide. Our results help understand the neuronal circuitry involved in lateral spreading in V1. PMID:26230520

  9. Can a functional postural exercise improve performance in the cranio-cervical flexion test?--a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Beer, Alexi; Treleaven, Julia; Jull, Gwendolen

    2012-06-01

    Deep cervical flexor (DCF) muscle impairment is common in patients with neck pain. Retraining function is often commenced with a motor relearning approach, requiring the patient to practice and hold a cranio-cervical flexion position in supine lying. Motor relearning requires multiple repetitions which is difficult to achieve if only exercising in supine. This preliminary study investigated the effects of training the DCF with a functional exercise: assumption of an upright lumbo-pelvic and spinal postural position, adding a neck lengthening manoeuvre. The exercise effect was evaluated by changes in sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle activity in the cranio-cervical flexion test (CCFT). Twenty subjects with neck pain were randomly assigned to an exercise or control group. The exercise group trained for two weeks. Pre and post-intervention, electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from the SCM muscles during the five stages of the CCFT. Results indicated that the exercise improved performance. SCM EMG signal amplitudes decreased across all CCFT stages, albeit significant only at the first and third stages of the test; 22 mmHg (p = 0.043) and 26 mmHg (p = 0.003). No differences were evident in the control group (all p > 0.05). There was no difference between groups for pain and disability measures. This initial study indicates that a postural exercise, convenient to perform during the working day, improves the pattern of SCM muscle activity in the CCFT. Whilst further research is necessary, these observations suggest the worth of such an exercise to augment other training in the rehabilitation of patients with neck pain.

  10. Effects of hamstring stretching on passive muscle stiffness vary between hip flexion and knee extension maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, N; Hirata, K; Kanehisa, H

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the effects of hamstring stretching on the passive stiffness of each of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFl), semitendinosus (ST), and semimembranosus (SM) vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In 12 male subjects, before and after five sets of 90 s static stretching, passive lengthening measurements where knee or hip joint was passively rotated to the maximal range of motion (ROM) were performed. During the passive lengthening, shear modulus of each muscle was measured by ultrasound shear wave elastography. Both stretching maneuvers significantly increased maximal ROM and decreased passive torque at a given joint angle. Passive knee extension stretching maneuver significantly reduced shear modulus at a given knee joint angle in all of BFl, ST, and SM. In contrast, the stretching effect by passive hip flexion maneuver was significant only in ST and SM. The present findings indicate that the effects of hamstring stretching on individual passive muscles' stiffness vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In terms of reducing the muscle stiffness of BFl, stretching of the hamstring should be performed by passive knee extension rather than hip flexion.

  11. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    SciTech Connect

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Adjustable bracing technique for the prevention of knee flexion contracture during tibial lengthening.

    PubMed

    Segev, Eitan; Hayek, Shlomo

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a simple thigh-knee brace that prevents flexion contracture during tibial lengthening. The brace is strapped to the thigh and connected to the Ilizarov frame via two simple hinges. While in the brace the knee can be mobilized for physiotherapy and locked in extension during rest.

  13. Detecting mass substructure in galaxy clusters: an aperture mass statistic for gravitational flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Adrienne; King, Lindsay J.; Wilkins, Stephen M.

    2009-05-01

    Gravitational flexion has been introduced as a technique by which one can map out and study substructure in clusters of galaxies. Previous analyses involving flexion have measured the individual galaxy-galaxy flexion signal, or used either parametric techniques or a Kaiser, Squires and Broadhurst (KSB)-type inversion to reconstruct the mass distribution in Abell 1689. In this paper, we present an aperture mass statistic for flexion, and apply it to the lensed images of background galaxies obtained by ray-tracing simulations through a simple analytic mass distribution and through a galaxy cluster from the Millennium Simulation. We show that this method is effective at detecting and accurately tracing structure within clusters of galaxies on subarcminute scales with high signal to noise even using a moderate background source number density and image resolution. In addition, the method provides much more information about both the overall shape and the small-scale structure of a cluster of galaxies than can be achieved through a weak lensing mass reconstruction using gravitational shear data. Lastly, we discuss how the zero-points of the aperture mass might be used to infer the masses of structures identified using this method.

  14. [Effect of electrostimulation "hunger center" of lateral hypothalamus on the impulse activity of masticatory muscles in unfed and fed rabbits in the absence and the presence of food].

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Iu P; Kromin, A A

    2011-01-01

    In chronic experiences on rabbits the influence of electrostimulation of "the hunger centres" of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) on impulse activity of chewing muscles of rabbits under the conditions of hunger and satiation was studied. It is established, threshold irritation of the LH of hungry and preliminary fed animals in the absence of food caused the occurrence of incessant search behavior which was followed by the regular generation of bursts of AP by masseter and mylohyoideus muscles with bimodal distributions of interpulse intervals. Such reaction of chewing muscles during irritation of the LH in the absence of food is an example of advancing type reaction. The increase of level of alimentary motivation, arising at threshold irritation of the LH of rabbits under the conditions of hunger and satiety during the resultant food-intake behavior, increased frequency of generation of bursts of AP in a phase of the capture of food, but did not influence on this indicator in a phase of chewing of food. The received results testify about descending stimulating influences of alimentary motivational excitation on neurons of the chewing centre in medulla and on impulse activity of chewing muscles.

  15. Neuronal activity causes rapid changes of lateral amygdala neuronal membrane properties and reduction of synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, J. Amiel

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal membrane properties dictate neuronal responsiveness. Plasticity of membrane properties alters neuronal function and can arise in response to robust neuronal activity. Despite the potential for great impact, there is little evidence for a rapid effect of activity-dependent changes of membrane properties on many neuronal functions in vivo in mammalian brain. In this study it was tested whether periods of neuronal firing lead to a rapid change of membrane properties in neurons of a rat brain region important for some forms of learning, the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LAT), using in vivo intracellular recordings. Our results demonstrate that rapid plasticity of membrane properties occurs in vivo, in response to action potential firing. This plasticity of membrane properties leads to changes of synaptic integration and subsequent synaptic plasticity. These changes require Ca2+, but are NMDA independent. Furthermore, the parameters and timecourse of these changes would not have been predicted from most in vitro studies. The plasticity of membrane properties demonstrated here may represent a basic form of in vivo short-term plasticity that modifies neuronal function. PMID:21508236

  16. Intracellular amyloid beta interacts with SOD1 and impairs the enzymatic activity of SOD1: implications for the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Eun Jin; Park, Hyo Jin; Kim, Goo Young; Cho, Hyung Min; Choi, Jung Ha; Park, Hye Yoon; Jang, Ja Young; Rhim, Hyang Shuk; Kang, Seong Man

    2009-09-30

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the degeneration of motor neurons. Mutations in Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), including G93A, were reportedly linked to familial ALS. SOD1 is a key antioxidant enzyme, and is also one of the major targets for oxidative damage in the brains of patients suffering from Alzheimers disease (AD). Several lines of evidence suggest that intracellular amyloid beta (Abeta) is associated with the pathogenesis of AD. In this report we demonstrate that intracellular Abeta directly interacts with SOD1, and that this interaction decreases the enzymatic activity of the enzyme. We observed Abeta-SOD1 aggregates in the perinuclear region of H4 cells, and mapped the SOD1 binding region to Abeta amino acids 26-42. Interestingly, intracellular Ab binds to the SOD1 G93A mutant with greater affinity than to wild-type SOD1. This resulted in considerably less mutant enzymatic activity. Our study implicates a potential role for Abeta in the development of ALS by interacting with the SOD1 G93A mutant.

  17. Non-invasive quantification of lower limb mechanical alignment in flexion

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, Angela; Fogg, Quentin A.; Picard, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Objective Non-invasive navigation techniques have recently been developed to determine mechanical femorotibial alignment (MFTA) in extension. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the precision and accuracy of an image-free navigation system with new software designed to provide multiple kinematic measurements of the knee. The secondary aim was to test two types of strap material used to attach optical trackers to the lower limb. Methods Seventy-two registrations were carried out on 6 intact embalmed cadaveric specimens (mean age: 77.8 ± 12 years). A validated fabric strap, bone screws and novel rubber strap were used to secure the passive tracker baseplate for four full experiments with each knee. The MFTA angle was measured under the conditions of no applied stress, valgus stress, and varus stress. These measurements were carried out at full extension and at 30°, 40°, 50° and 60° of flexion. Intraclass correlation coefficients, repeatability coefficients, and limits of agreement (LOA) were used to convey precision and agreement in measuring MFTA with respect to each of the independent variables, i.e., degree of flexion, applied coronal stress, and method of tracker fixation. Based on the current literature, a repeatability coefficient and LOA of ≤3° were deemed acceptable. Results The mean fixed flexion for the 6 specimens was 12.8° (range: 6–20°). The mean repeatability coefficient measuring MFTA in extension with screws or fabric strapping of the baseplate was ≤2°, compared to 2.3° using rubber strapping. When flexing the knee, MFTA measurements taken using screws or fabric straps remained precise (repeatability coefficient ≤3°) throughout the tested range of flexion (12.8–60°); however, using rubber straps, the repeatability coefficient was >3° beyond 50° flexion. In general, applying a varus/valgus stress while measuring MFTA decreased precision beyond 40° flexion. Using fabric strapping, excellent repeatability

  18. A Relationship between Reduced Nucleus Accumbens Shell and Enhanced Lateral Hypothalamic Orexin Neuronal Activation in Long-Term Fructose Bingeing Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rorabaugh, Jacki M.; Stratford, Jennifer M.; Zahniser, Nancy R.

    2014-01-01

    Fructose accounts for 10% of daily calories in the American diet. Fructose, but not glucose, given intracerebroventricularly stimulates homeostatic feeding mechanisms within the hypothalamus; however, little is known about how fructose affects hedonic feeding centers. Repeated ingestion of sucrose, a disaccharide of fructose and glucose, increases neuronal activity in hedonic centers, the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell and core, but not the hypothalamus. Rats given glucose in the intermittent access model (IAM) display signatures of hedonic feeding including bingeing and altered DA receptor (R) numbers within the NAc. Here we examined whether substituting fructose for glucose in this IAM produces bingeing behavior, alters DA Rs and activates hedonic and homeostatic feeding centers. Following long-term (21-day) exposure to the IAM, rats given 8–12% fructose solutions displayed fructose bingeing but unaltered DA D1R or D2R number. Fructose bingeing rats, as compared to chow bingeing controls, exhibited reduced NAc shell neuron activation, as determined by c-Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-IR). This activation was negatively correlated with orexin (Orx) neuron activation in the lateral hypothalamus/perifornical area (LH/PeF), a brain region linking homeostatic to hedonic feeding centers. Following short-term (2-day) access to the IAM, rats exhibited bingeing but unchanged Fos-IR, suggesting only long-term fructose bingeing increases Orx release. In long-term fructose bingeing rats, pretreatment with the Ox1R antagonist SB-334867 (30 mg/kg; i.p.) equally reduced fructose bingeing and chow intake, resulting in a 50% reduction in calories. Similarly, in control rats, SB-334867 reduced chow/caloric intake by 60%. Thus, in the IAM, Ox1Rs appear to regulate feeding based on caloric content rather than palatability. Overall, our results, in combination with the literature, suggest individual monosaccharides activate distinct neuronal circuits to promote feeding behavior

  19. Cervical spine segmental vertebral motion in healthy volunteers feigning restriction of neck flexion and extension.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Filadelfio; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Papathanasiou, Matthildi; Kapreli, Eleni; Bonelli, Aurelio; Sgambetterra, Sergio; Ferrari, Robert

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain comparative data concerning the percentage contribution of segmental cervical vertebral motion to the cervical range of motion (ROM) in healthy volunteers under two conditions: (1) normal, voluntary neck flexion and extension and (2) feigned restriction of neck flexion and extension. Each healthy subject's angular motion over forward cervical flexion and extension was measured first by X-ray analysis during normal, voluntary motion. Then the subjects were asked to pretend that they had a 50% restricted neck range due to pain or stiffness and thus to move in both flexion and extension only as far as about 50% of their normal range. A total of 26 healthy subjects (ten males and sixteen females, age 28.7+/-7.7 years) participated. The total angular motion from C2 to C7 was normal in the unrestricted condition and was significantly reduced in the feigned restriction condition (p<0.001). The percentage contribution of each of the functional units C2-C3 to C6-C7 to this rotation was different between the normal unrestricted and the feigned restricted conditions. In the feigned restricted neck flexion and extension, a shift occurred in the pattern of how each segment contributes to the total angular range. A greater percentage contribution was made by C2-C3 and C3-C4 than under normal conditions (P<0.01), and the percentage contribution to total rotation made by C6-C7 became much less under the feigned restricted movements than under normal, unrestricted neck range (p<0.001). Thus, simulated or feigned restricted neck ROM affects the percentage contribution of the functional units C2-C3 to C6-C7 by showing a higher percentage contribution of the upper cervical segments and less contribution to the angular rotation by the lowest cervical segment. Feigners of restricted neck range thus produce a pattern different from nonfeigning subjects.

  20. Goniometrie evaluation of standing extension and maximum flexion joint angles of llamas and alpacas.

    PubMed

    Walters, Amy L; Semevolos, Stacy A; Baker, Rose E

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine and compare mean standing extension and maximum flexion angles of various joints in healthy adult alpacas and llamas, and determine the reliability of goniometric data within and between 2 observers for each joint of interest. SAMPLE 6 healthy adult llamas and 6 healthy adult alpacas. PROCEDURES The shoulder joint, elbow joint, carpal, and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of the forelimbs and the hip joint, stifle joint, tarsal, and metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints of the hind limbs were investigated. Each articulation was measured with a universal goniometer by 2 observers, who each obtained 2 measurements when each joint was maintained in standing extension and in maximal passive flexion. Two sample (unpaired) t tests were performed for comparisons of mean standing extension and maximum passive flexion angles between alpacas and llamas. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated for each articulation to assess interobserver and intra-observer reliability of measurements. RESULTS Llamas had larger mean standing extension angles than alpacas for the tarsal and elbow joint, but there were no significant differences between species for all other joints. For all joints, flexion measurements did not differ significantly between the 2 species. For most joints, the reliability of goniometric data between observers was good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficients, 0.6 to 0.95) CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Except for the elbow joint and tarsus in extension, the angle of limb articulations during flexion and extension can be considered similar for alpacas and llamas. These measurements have relevance for veterinary surgeons when assessing joint mobility and conformation and determining appropriate angles for arthrodesis.

  1. Blood pressure and calf muscle oxygen extraction during plantar flexion exercise in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Luck, J Carter; Miller, Amanda J; Aziz, Faisal; Radtka, John F; Proctor, David N; Leuenberger, Urs A; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Muller, Matthew D

    2017-04-06

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic vascular disease that affects 200 million worldwide. While PAD primarily affects large arteries, it is also associated with microvascular dysfunction, an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise, and high cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that fatiguing plantar flexion exercise that evokes claudication elicits a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation (SmO2) and a higher rise in BP in PAD compared to age-matched healthy subjects, but low-intensity steady state plantar flexion elicits similar responses between groups. In the first experiment, eight PAD patients and eight healthy controls performed fatiguing plantar flexion exercise (from 0.5 to 7 kg for up to 14 min). In the second experiment, seven PAD patients and seven healthy controls performed low-intensity plantar flexion exercise (2.0 kg for 14 min). BP, heart rate (HR), and SmO2 from near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) were measured continuously. SmO2 is the ratio of oxygenated hemoglobin to total hemoglobin, expressed as a percent. At fatigue, PAD patients had a greater increase in mean arterial BP (18 ± 2 versus vs. 10 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.029) and HR (14 ± 2 versus 6 ± 2 beats/min, P = 0.033) and a greater reduction in SmO2 (-54 ± 10 versus -12 ± 4 %, P = 0.001). However, both groups had similar physiological responses to low-intensity, non-painful plantar flexion exercise. These data suggest that PAD patients have altered oxygen uptake and/or utilization during fatiguing exercise coincident with an augmented BP response.

  2. [Lateral retinacular release].

    PubMed

    Verdonk, P; Bonte, F; Verdonk, R

    2008-09-01

    This overview of numerous studies discusses, based on short-term and long-term results, which diagnoses are indications for lateral retinacular release. No significant differences in outcome between arthroscopic and open lateral release could be documented. Isolated lateral release offers a good success rate for treating a stable patella with excessive lateral pressure. In patellar instability, the results are less favorable in long-term follow-up evaluation. Hyperlaxity with hypermobility of the patella is an absolute contraindication. Lateral release provides only temporary benefit for patellofemoral osteoarthritis. Proximal and/or distal realignment of the extensor mechanism gives better results than isolated lateral release.

  3. Braking of fast and accurate elbow flexions in the monkey.

    PubMed Central

    Flament, D; Hore, J; Vilis, T

    1984-01-01

    The processes responsible for braking fast and accurate elbow movements were studied in the monkey. The movements studied were made over different amplitudes and against different inertias . All were made to the same end position. Only fast movements that showed the typical biphasic or triphasic pattern of activity in agonists and antagonists were analysed in detail. For movements made over different amplitudes and at different velocities there was symmetry between the acceleration and deceleration phases of the movements. For movements of the same amplitude performed at different velocities there was a direct linear relation between peak velocity and both the peak acceleration (and integrated agonist burst) and peak deceleration (and integrated antagonist burst). The slopes of these relations and their intercept with the peak velocity axis were a function of movement amplitude. This was such that for large and small movements of the same peak velocity and the same end position (i) peak acceleration and phasic agonist activity were larger for the small movements and (ii) peak deceleration and phasic antagonist activity were larger for the small movements. The slope of these relations and the symmetry between acceleration and deceleration were not affected by the addition of an inertial load to the handle held by the monkey. The results indicate that fast and accurate elbow movements in the monkey are braked by antagonist activity that is centrally programmed. As all movements were made to the same end position, the larger antagonist burst in small movements, made at the same peak velocity as large movements, cannot be due to differences in the viscoelastic contribution to braking (cf. Marsden, Obeso & Rothwell , 1983).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6737291

  4. Lysosomal and phagocytic activity is increased in astrocytes during disease progression in the SOD1 G93A mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David J.; Blackburn, Daniel J.; Keatinge, Marcus; Sokhi, Dilraj; Viskaitis, Paulius; Heath, Paul R.; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Kirby, Janine; Shaw, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Previously, gene expression profiling of astrocytes from the pre-symptomatic stage of the SOD1G93A model of ALS has revealed reduced lactate metabolism and altered trophic support. Here, we have performed microarray analysis of symptomatic and late-stage disease astrocytes isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM) from the lumbar spinal cord of the SOD1G93A mouse to complete the picture of astrocyte behavior throughout the disease course. Astrocytes at symptomatic and late-stage disease show a distinct up-regulation of transcripts defining a reactive phenotype, such as those involved in the lysosome and phagocytic pathways. Functional analysis of hexosaminidase B enzyme activity in the spinal cord and of astrocyte phagocytic ability has demonstrated a significant increase in lysosomal enzyme activity and phagocytic activity in SOD1G93A vs. littermate controls, validating the findings of the microarray study. In addition to the increased reactivity seen at both stages, astrocytes from late-stage disease showed decreased expression of many transcripts involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Staining for the master regulator of cholesterol synthesis, SREBP2, has revealed an increased localization to the cytoplasm of astrocytes and motor neurons in late-stage SOD1G93A spinal cord, indicating that down-regulation of transcripts may be due to an excess of cholesterol in the CNS during late-stage disease possibly due to phagocytosis of neuronal debris. Our data reveal that SOD1G93A astrocytes are characterized more by a loss of supportive function than a toxic phenotype during ALS disease progression and future studies should focus upon restorative therapies. PMID:26528138

  5. PICKLE is required for SOLITARY-ROOT/IAA14-mediated repression of ARF7 and ARF19 activity during Arabidopsis lateral root initiation.

    PubMed

    Fukaki, Hidehiro; Taniguchi, Naohide; Tasaka, Masao

    2006-11-01

    Lateral root (LR) formation in Arabidopsis is regulated by auxin signaling through AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR transcriptional activators, ARF7 and ARF19, and auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) repressors, including SOLITARY-ROOT (SLR)/IAA14. Previous studies have strongly suggested that, in the gain-of-function slr-1 mutant, stabilized mutant IAA14 (mIAA14) protein inactivates ARF7/19 functions, thereby completely blocking LR initiation. However, the mechanism of inactivation is still unknown. We have now identified an extragenic suppressor mutation of slr-1, suppressor of slr2 (ssl2), which specifically restores LR formation in the slr-1 mutant, and have found that SSL2 negatively regulates the auxin-induced pericycle cell divisions required for LR initiation. The SSL2 gene encodes PICKLE (PKL), a homologue of the animal chromatin-remodeling factor CHD3/Mi-2, and LR formation restored in pkl/ssl2 slr-1 mutants depends on ARF7/19 functions, suggesting that ARF7/19-dependent transcription takes place if there is a pkl/ssl2 mutation in slr-1. In animals, Mi-2 represses transcription as a subunit of the NuRD/Mi-2 complex containing histone deacetylases (HDACs). Inhibition of HDAC activity by trichostatin A also results in LR formation in the slr-1 mutant, but not in the slr-1 arf7 arf19 triple mutant, suggesting that normal HDAC activity is required for the mIAA14-mediated inactivation of ARF7/19 functions in LR initiation. Taken together, our data suggest that PKL/SSL2-mediated chromatin remodeling negatively regulates auxin-mediated LR formation in Arabidopsis.

  6. Lateral gene expression in Drosophila early embryos is supported by Grainyhead-mediated activation and tiers of dorsally-localized repression.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Mayra; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2011-01-01

    The general consensus in the field is that limiting amounts of the transcription factor Dorsal establish dorsal boundaries of genes expressed along the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis of early Drosophila embryos, while repressors establish ventral boundaries. Yet recent studies have provided evidence that repressors act to specify the dorsal boundary of intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind), a gene expressed in a stripe along the DV axis in lateral regions of the embryo. Here we show that a short 12 base pair sequence ("the A-box") present twice within the ind CRM is both necessary and sufficient to support transcriptional repression in dorsal regions of embryos. To identify binding factors, we conducted affinity chromatography using the A-box element and found a number of DNA-binding proteins and chromatin-associated factors using mass spectroscopy. Only Grainyhead (Grh), a CP2 transcription factor with a unique DNA-binding domain, was found to bind the A-box sequence. Our results suggest that Grh acts as an activator to support expression of ind, which was surprising as we identified this factor using an element that mediates dorsally-localized repression. Grh and Dorsal both contribute to ind transcriptional activation. However, another recent study found that the repressor Capicua (Cic) also binds to the A-box sequence. While Cic was not identified through our A-box affinity chromatography, utilization of the same site, the A-box, by both factors Grh (activator) and Cic (repressor) may also support a "switch-like" response that helps to sharpen the ind dorsal boundary. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that TGF-β signaling acts to refine ind CRM expression in an A-box independent manner in dorsal-most regions, suggesting that tiers of repression act in dorsal regions of the embryo.

  7. Activation of Phosphatidylinositol-Linked Dopamine Receptors Induces a Facilitation of Glutamate-Mediated Synaptic Transmission in the Lateral Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Glovaci, Iulia; Chapman, C. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The lateral entorhinal cortex receives strong inputs from midbrain dopamine neurons that can modulate its sensory and mnemonic function. We have previously demonstrated that 1 µM dopamine facilitates synaptic transmission in layer II entorhinal cortex cells via activation of D1-like receptors, increased cAMP-PKA activity, and a resulting enhancement of AMPA-receptor mediated currents. The present study assessed the contribution of phosphatidylinositol (PI)-linked D1 receptors to the dopaminergic facilitation of transmission in layer II of the rat entorhinal cortex, and the involvement of phospholipase C activity and release of calcium from internal stores. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of glutamate-mediated evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents were obtained from pyramidal and fan cells. Activation of D1-like receptors using SKF38393, SKF83959, or 1 µM dopamine induced a reversible facilitation of EPSCs which was abolished by loading cells with either the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 or the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA. Neither the L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine, nor the L/N-type channel blocker cilnidipine, blocked the facilitation of synaptic currents. However, the facilitation was blocked by blocking Ca2+ release from internal stores via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors or ryanodine receptors. Follow-up studies demonstrated that inhibiting CaMKII activity with KN-93 failed to block the facilitation, but that application of the protein kinase C inhibitor PKC(19-36) completely blocked the dopamine-induced facilitation. Overall, in addition to our previous report indicating a role for the cAMP-PKA pathway in dopamine-induced facilitation of synaptic transmission, we demonstrate here that the dopaminergic facilitation of synaptic responses in layer II entorhinal neurons also relies on a signaling cascade dependent on PI-linked D1 receptors, PLC, release of Ca2+ from internal stores, and PKC activation which is likely dependent

  8. The evolution of compliance in the human lateral mid-foot

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Karl T.; Collins, David; Savage, Russell; McClymont, Juliet; Webster, Emma; Pataky, Todd C.; D'Aout, Kristiaan; Sellers, William I.; Bennett, Matthew R.; Crompton, Robin H.

    2013-01-01

    Fossil evidence for longitudinal arches in the foot is frequently used to constrain the origins of terrestrial bipedality in human ancestors. This approach rests on the prevailing concept that human feet are unique in functioning with a relatively stiff lateral mid-foot, lacking the significant flexion and high plantar pressures present in non-human apes. This paradigm has stood for more than 70 years but has yet to be tested objectively with quantitative data. Herein, we show that plantar pressure records with elevated lateral mid-foot pressures occur frequently in healthy, habitually shod humans, with magnitudes in some individuals approaching absolute maxima across the foot. Furthermore, the same astonishing pressure range is present in bonobos and the orangutan (the most arboreal great ape), yielding overlap with human pressures. Thus, while the mean tendency of habitual mechanics of the mid-foot in healthy humans is indeed consistent with the traditional concept of the lateral mid-foot as a relatively rigid or stabilized structure, it is clear that lateral arch stabilization in humans is not obligate and is often transient. These findings suggest a level of detachment between foot stiffness during gait and osteological structure, hence fossilized bone morphology by itself may only provide a crude indication of mid-foot function in extinct hominins. Evidence for thick plantar tissues in Ardipithecus ramidus suggests that a human-like combination of active and passive modulation of foot compliance by soft tissues extends back into an arboreal context, supporting an arboreal origin of hominin bipedalism in compressive orthogrady. We propose that the musculoskeletal conformation of the modern human mid-foot evolved under selection for a functionally tuneable, rather than obligatory stiff structure. PMID:23966646

  9. The evolution of compliance in the human lateral mid-foot.

    PubMed

    Bates, Karl T; Collins, David; Savage, Russell; McClymont, Juliet; Webster, Emma; Pataky, Todd C; D'Aout, Kristiaan; Sellers, William I; Bennett, Matthew R; Crompton, Robin H

    2013-10-22

    Fossil evidence for longitudinal arches in the foot is frequently used to constrain the origins of terrestrial bipedality in human ancestors. This approach rests on the prevailing concept that human feet are unique in functioning with a relatively stiff lateral mid-foot, lacking the significant flexion and high plantar pressures present in non-human apes. This paradigm has stood for more than 70 years but has yet to be tested objectively with quantitative data. Herein, we show that plantar pressure records with elevated lateral mid-foot pressures occur frequently in healthy, habitually shod humans, with magnitudes in some individuals approaching absolute maxima across the foot. Furthermore, the same astonishing pressure range is present in bonobos and the orangutan (the most arboreal great ape), yielding overlap with human pressures. Thus, while the mean tendency of habitual mechanics of the mid-foot in healthy humans is indeed consistent with the traditional concept of the lateral mid-foot as a relatively rigid or stabilized structure, it is clear that lateral arch stabilization in humans is not obligate and is often transient. These findings suggest a level of detachment between foot stiffness during gait and osteological structure, hence fossilized bone morphology by itself may only provide a crude indication of mid-foot function in extinct hominins. Evidence for thick plantar tissues in Ardipithecus ramidus suggests that a human-like combination of active and passive modulation of foot compliance by soft tissues extends back into an arboreal context, supporting an arboreal origin of hominin bipedalism in compressive orthogrady. We propose that the musculoskeletal conformation of the modern human mid-foot evolved under selection for a functionally tuneable, rather than obligatory stiff structure.

  10. Effectiveness of rosiglitazone in reducing flexion contracture in a rabbit model of arthrofibrosis with surgical capsular release

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, J. D.; Morrey, M. E.; Hartzler, R. U.; Arsoy, D.; Riester, S.; van Wijnen, A. J.; Morrey, B. F.; Sanchez-Sotelo, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Animal models have been developed that allow simulation of post-traumatic joint contracture. One such model involves contracture-forming surgery followed by surgical capsular release. This model allows testing of antifibrotic agents, such as rosiglitazone. Methods A total of 20 rabbits underwent contracture-forming surgery. Eight weeks later, the animals underwent a surgical capsular release. Ten animals received rosiglitazone (intramuscular initially, then orally). The animals were sacrificed following 16 weeks of free cage mobilisation. The joints were tested biomechanically, and the posterior capsule was assessed histologically and via genetic microarray analysis. Results There was no significant difference in post-traumatic contracture between the rosiglitazone and control groups (33° (standard deviation (sd) 11) vs 37° (sd14), respectively; p = 0.4). There was no difference in number or percentage of myofibroblasts. Importantly, there were ten genes and 17 pathways that were significantly modulated by rosiglitazone in the posterior capsule. Discussion Rosiglitazone significantly altered the genetic expression of the posterior capsular tissue in a rabbit model, with ten genes and 17 pathways demonstrating significant modulation. However, there was no significant effect on biomechanical or histological properties. Cite this article: M. P. Abdel. Effectiveness of rosiglitazone in reducing flexion contracture in a rabbit model of arthrofibrosis with surgical capsular release: A biomechanical, histological, and genetic analysis. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:11–17. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.51.2000593 PMID:26813567

  11. Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)

    MedlinePlus

    .org Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis) Page ( 1 ) Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondyliti s, is a painful condition of the elbow caused by overuse. Not surprisingly, playing tennis or other racquet sports can cause ...

  12. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a-my-o-TROE-fik LAT-ur-ul skluh-ROE-sis), or ALS, is a progressive nervous system (neurological) disease that ...

  13. Activation of a glycine transporter on spinal cord neurons causes enhanced glutamate release in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Raiteri, Luca; Paolucci, Egle; Prisco, Simona; Raiteri, Maurizio; Bonanno, Giambattista

    2003-01-01

    The release of [3H]D-aspartate ([3H]D-ASP) or [3H]GABA evoked by glycine from spinal cord synaptosomes was compared in mice expressing mutant human SOD1 with a Gly93 Ala substitution ([SOD1-G93A(+)]), a transgenic model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and in control mice. Mice expressing mutated SOD1 were killed at the advanced phase of the pathology, when they showed signs of ingestion disability, because of paralysis of the posterior limbs. In control mice glycine concentration-dependently evoked [3H]D-ASP and [3H]GABA release. Potentiation of the spontaneous release of both amino acids is likely to be mediated by activation of a glycine transporter, since the effects of glycine were counteracted by the glycine transporter blocker glycyldodecylamide but not by the glycine receptor antagonists strychnine and 5,7-dichlorokynurenate. The glycine-evoked release of [3H]D-ASP, but not that of [3H]GABA, was significantly more pronounced in SOD1-G93A(+) than in control animals. PMID:12684256

  14. Lateral/basolateral amygdala serotonin type-2 receptors modulate operant self-administration of a sweetened ethanol solution via inhibition of principal neuron activity

    PubMed Central

    McCool, Brian A.; Christian, Daniel T.; Fetzer, Jonathan A.; Chappell, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The lateral/basolateral amygdala (BLA) forms an integral part of the neural circuitry controlling innate anxiety and learned fear. More recently, BLA dependent modulation of self-administration behaviors suggests a much broader role in the regulation of reward evaluation. To test this, we employed a self-administration paradigm that procedurally segregates “seeking” (exemplified as lever-press behaviors) from consumption (drinking) directed at a sweetened ethanol solution. Microinjection of the nonselective serotonin type-2 receptor agonist, alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (α-m5HT) into the BLA reduced lever pressing behaviors in a dose-dependent fashion. This was associated with a significant reduction in the number of response-bouts expressed during non-reinforced sessions without altering the size of a bout or the rate of responding. Conversely, intra-BLA α-m5HT only modestly effected consumption-related behaviors; the highest dose reduced the total time spent consuming a sweetened ethanol solution but did not inhibit the total number of licks, number of lick bouts, or amount of solution consumed during a session. In vitro neurophysiological characterization of BLA synaptic responses showed that α-m5HT significantly reduced extracellular field potentials. This was blocked by the 5-HT2A/C antagonist ketanserin suggesting that 5-HT2-like receptors mediate the behavioral effect of α-m5HT. During whole-cell patch current-clamp recordings, we subsequently found that α-m5HT increased action potential threshold and hyperpolarized the resting membrane potential of BLA pyramidal neurons. Together, our findings show that the activation of BLA 5-HT2A/C receptors inhibits behaviors related to reward-seeking by suppressing BLA principal neuron activity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the BLA modulates reward-related behaviors and provides specific insight into BLA contributions during operant self-administration of a sweetened ethanol solution

  15. Differential effects of GABAB autoreceptor activation on ethanol potentiation of local and lateral paracapsular GABAergic synapses in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J; Weiner, Jeff L

    2009-04-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that GABAergic inhibition within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays an integral role in the regulation of anxiety, an important behavioral component in the etiology of alcoholism. Although ethanol has recently been shown to enhance BLA GABAergic inhibition via two distinct populations of inhibitory cells, local and lateral paracapsular (lpcs) interneurons, little is known about the mechanisms underlying ethanol potentiation of these two inhibitory pathways. Ethanol is known to enhance GABAergic inhibition in many brain regions via a complex array of pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. In addition, ethanol's presynaptic effects are often subject to GABA(B) autoreceptor (GABA(B)-R) modulation. Therefore, in this study, we characterized GABA(B)-R function and modulation of ethanol actions at local and lpcs GABAergic synapses. At local synapses, we found significant paired-pulse depression (PPD, 250 ms inter-pulse interval) which was abated by SCH-50911 (GABA(B)-R antagonist). No significant PPD was detected at lpcs synapses, but SCH-50911 significantly potentiated lpcs-evoked IPSCs. Baclofen (GABA(B)-R agonist) had similar depressant effects on local- and lpcs-evoked IPSCs, however baclofen pretreatment only reduced ethanol potentiation at local synapses. Ethanol also significantly enhanced the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs, and these effects were also sensitive to GABA(B)-R modulators. Collectively, these data suggest that stimulus-independent inhibitory responses recorded from BLA principal neurons primarily reflect the activity of local GABAergic interneurons and provide additional evidence that ethanol potentiates local BLA inhibitory synapses primarily via a presynaptic enhancement of GABA release that is tightly regulated by GABA(B)-Rs. In contrast, ethanol potentiation of lpcs GABAergic synapses is not sensitive to GABA(B)-R activation and does not appear to involve increased presynaptic GABA release.

  16. Left Lateral Prefrontal Activity Reflects a Change of Behavioral Tactics to Cope with a Given Rule: An fNIRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Naoki; Shirasawa, Naoko; Kanoh, Shin’ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Rules prescribe human behavior and our attempts to choose appropriate behavior under a given rule. Cognitive control, a mechanism to choose and evaluate actions under a rule, is required to determine the appropriate behavior within the limitations of that rule. Consequently, such cognitive control increases mental workload. However, the workload caused by a cognitive task might be different when an additional rule must be considered in choosing the action. The present study was a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) investigation of an experimental task, in which the difficulty of an operation and existence of an additional rule were manipulated to dissociate the influence of that additional rule on cognitive processing. Twenty healthy Japanese volunteers participated. The participants performed an experimental task, in which the player caught one of five colored balls from the upper part of a computer screen by operating a mouse. Four task conditions were prepared to manipulate the task difficulty, which was defined in terms of operational difficulty. In turn, operational difficulty was determined by the width of the playable space and the existence of an additional rule, which reduced the score when a red ball was not caught. The 52-channel fNIRS data were collected from the forehead. Two regions of interest (ROIs) associated with the bilateral lateral prefrontal cortices (LPFCs) were determined, and a three-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed using the task-related signal changes from each ROI. The fNIRS results revealed that bilateral LPFCs showed large signal changes with the increase in mental workload. The ANOVA showed a significant interaction between the existence of an additional rule and the location of the ROIs; that is, the left lateral prefrontal area showed a significant increase in signal intensity when the additional rule existed, and the participant occasionally decided to avoid catching a ball to successfully

  17. Lateral flow strip assay

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Robin R; Benett, William J; Coleman, Matthew A; Pearson, Francesca S; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  18. Effects of combined wrist flexion/extension and forearm rotation and two levels of relative force on discomfort.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abid Ali; O'Sullivan, Leonard; Gallwey, Timothy J

    2009-10-01

    This study investigated perceived discomfort in an isometric wrist flexion task. Independent variables were wrist flexion/extension (55%, 35% flexion, neutral, 35% and 55% extension ranges of motion (ROM)), forearm rotation (60%, 30% prone, neutral, 30% and 60% supine ROM) and two levels of flexion force (10% and 20% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)). Discomfort was significantly affected by flexion force, forearm rotation and a two-way interaction of force with forearm rotation (each p < 0.05). High force for 60%ROM forearm pronation and supination resulted in increasingly higher discomfort for these combinations. Flexion forces were set relative to the MVC in each wrist posture and this appears to be important in explaining a lack of significant effect (p = 0.34) for flexion/extension on discomfort. Regression equations predicting discomfort were developed and used to generate iso-discomfort contours, which indicate regions where the risk of injury should be low and others where it is likely to be high. Regression equations predicting discomfort and iso-discomfort contours are presented, which indicate combinations of upper limb postures for which discomfort is predicted to be low, and others where it is likely to be high. These are helpful in the study of limits for risk factors associated with upper limb musculoskeletal injury in industry.

  19. Lateral epicondylitis of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Tosti, Rick; Jennings, John; Sewards, J Milo

    2013-04-01

    Lateral epicondylitis, or "tennis elbow," is a common musculotendinous degenerative disorder of the extensor origin at the lateral humeral epicondyle. Repetitive occupational or athletic activities involving wrist extension and supination are thought to be causative. The typical symptoms include lateral elbow pain, pain with wrist extension, and weakened grip strength. The diagnosis is made clinically through history and physical examination; however, a thorough understanding of the differential diagnosis is imperative to prevent unnecessary testing and therapies. Most patients improve with nonoperative measures, such as activity modification, physical therapy, and injections. A small percentage of patients will require surgical release of the extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon. Common methods of release may be performed via percutaneous, arthroscopic, or open approaches.

  20. Medialized Versus Lateralized Center of Rotation in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-12-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty may be performed using components that medialize or lateralize the center of rotation. The purpose of this prospective study was to directly compare 2 reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs. Two treatment groups and 1 control group were identified. Group I comprised 9 patients using a medialized Grammont-style (GRM) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 155°. Group II comprised 9 patients using a lateralized (LAT) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 135°. Pre- and postoperative assessment of range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and visual analog scale pain score were performed. Radiographic measurements of lateral humeral offset and acromiohumeral distance were compared. The GRM prosthesis achieved greater forward flexion (143.9° vs 115.6°; P=.05), whereas the LAT achieved greater external rotation (35.0° vs 28.3°; P=.07). The lateral humeral offset was greater for the LAT prosthesis compared with the GRM prosthesis, but this distance was not significantly different from that found in the control group. The acromiohumeral distance was significantly greater in the GRM prosthesis group compared with both the LAT and the control groups. The results of this study confirm that different reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs produce radiographically different anatomy. Whereas the GRM prosthesis significantly alters the anatomy of the shoulder, the LAT design can preserve some anatomic relationships found in the normal shoulder. The clinical outcomes indicate that this may have an effect on range of motion, with traditional designs achieving greater forward flexion and lateralized designs achieving greater external rotation.

  1. Continuous Cervical Spine Kinematics During In Vivo Dynamic Flexion-Extension

    PubMed Central

    Anderst, William J; Donaldson, William F; Lee, Joon Y; Kang, James D

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT A precise and comprehensive definition of “normal” in vivo cervical kinematics does not exist due to high inter-subject variability and the absence of mid-range kinematic data. In vitro test protocols and finite element models that are validated using only end range of motion data may not accurately reproduce continuous in vivo motion. PURPOSE The primary objective of this study was to precisely quantify cervical spine intervertebral kinematics during continuous, functional flexion-extension in asymptomatic subjects. The advantages of assessing continuous intervertebral kinematics were demonstrated by comparing asymptomatic controls with single-level anterior arthrodesis patients. STUDY DESIGN Cervical spine kinematics were determined during continuous in vivo flexion-extension in a clinically relevant age group of asymptomatic controls and a group of C5/C6 arthrodesis patients. PATIENT SAMPLE 6 single-level (C5/C6) anterior arthrodesis patients (average age: 48.8 ± 6.9 yrs; 1 M, 5 F; 7.6±1.2 mo. post-surgery) and 18 asymptomatic control subjects of similar age (average age: 45.6 ± 5.8 yrs; 5 M, 13 F). OUTCOME MEASURES The physiologic measure of continuous kinematic motion paths at each cervical motion segment (C2 to C7) during flexion-extension. METHODS Participants performed flexion-extension while biplane radiographs were collected at 30 images per second. A previously validated tracking process determined three-dimensional vertebral positions with sub-millimeter accuracy. Continuous flexion-extension rotation and anterior-posterior translation motion paths were adjusted for disc height and static orientation of each corresponding motion segment. This study was funded by NIH/NIAMS Grant #1R03AR056265 and The Cervical Spine Research Society 21st Century Development Grant. The authors have no potential financial conflict of interest biases related to this study. RESULTS Inter-subject variability in flexion-extension angle was decreased 15

  2. Differential Expression of Phosphorylated Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (pMAPK) in the Lateral Amygdala of Mice Selectively Bred for High and Low Fear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-02

    stimulus and a nociceptive unconditioned foot shock stimulus converge in the lateral amygdala (LA) via auditory thalamus and cortex and somatosensory...shows how an auditory conditioned stimulus and a nociceptive unconditioned foot shock stimulus converge in the lateral amygdala (LA) via auditory...the US is noxious or mildly painful . Generally, in vertebrates, the US can be as simple as a puff of air into the face or a brief electric shock

  3. Treatable Bedridden Elderly―Recovery from Flexion Contracture after Cortisol Replacement in a Patient with Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takamasa; Terada, Norihiko; Fujikawa, Yoshiki; Fujimoto, Takushi

    2016-01-01

    Isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency (IAD) is a rare disorder with diverse clinical presentations. A 79-year-old man was bedridden for six months due to flexion contractures of the bilateral hips and knees, along with hyponatremia. He was diagnosed with IAD based on the results of endocrine tests. After one month of corticosteroid replacement, he recovered and was able to stand up by himself. Although flexion contracture is a rare symptom of IAD, steroid replacement therapy may be effective, even for seemingly irreversibly bedridden elderly patients. In bedridden elderly patients with flexion contractures, we should consider and look for any signs of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27746435

  4. Cervical Motion Segment Percent Contributions to Flexion-Extension During Continuous Functional Movement in Control Subjects and Arthrodesis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Anderst, William J; Donaldson, William F; Lee, Joon Y; Kang, James D

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Case-control. Objective To precisely quantify and compare intervertebral segmental contributions to cervical spine flexion-extension during continuous, functional flexion-extension in asymptomatic subjects to single-level anterior arthrodesis patients. Summary of Background Data Segmental contributions to cervical flexion-extension have traditionally been determined using single images collected at full flexion and full extension. These calculations neglect mid-range motion, and assume percentage contributions to motion remain constant throughout the entire flexion-extension range of motion (ROM). Methods 6 single-level (C5/C6) anterior arthrodesis patients and 18 asymptomatic control subjects performed flexion-extension while biplane radiographs were collected at 30 images per second. A previously validated tracking process determined three-dimensional vertebral position with sub-millimeter accuracy during continuous flexion-extension. Mixed-effects models of segmental percentage contribution to C2/C7 flexion-extension were developed to identify differences in percentage contribution within each motion segment, among motion segments, and between control and arthrodesis patients over the full ROM. Results The C2/C3, C3/C4 and C4/C5 motion segments made their maximum contributions during the mid-range of motion. The C5/C6 and C6/C7 motion segments, in contrast, made their maximum contributions near the start and end of the ROM. Arthrodesis patients’ contribution from the C4/C5 motion segment increased significantly over the range of motion from 30% to 95% of the total flexion-extension ROM (average increased contribution of 5.1%) and arthrodesis patients’ contribution from the C6/C7 motion segment increased significantly over the entire flexion-extension ROM (average increased percentage contribution of 8.9%) in comparison to controls. Conclusion Cervical motion segment contributions to flexion-extension change significantly during the flexion

  5. Treatable Bedridden Elderly -Recovery from Flexion Contracture after Cortisol Replacement in a Patient with Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takamasa; Terada, Norihiko; Fujikawa, Yoshiki; Fujimoto, Takushi

    Isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency (IAD) is a rare disorder with diverse clinical presentations. A 79-year-old man was bedridden for six months due to flexion contractures of the bilateral hips and knees, along with hyponatremia. He was diagnosed with IAD based on the results of endocrine tests. After one month of corticosteroid replacement, he recovered and was able to stand up by himself. Although flexion contracture is a rare symptom of IAD, steroid replacement therapy may be effective, even for seemingly irreversibly bedridden elderly patients. In bedridden elderly patients with flexion contractures, we should consider and look for any signs of adrenal insufficiency.

  6. Absolute reliability of isokinetic knee flexion and extension measurements adopting a prone position.

    PubMed

    Ayala, F; De Ste Croix, M; Sainz de Baranda, P; Santonja, F

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the absolute and relative reliability of isokinetic peak torque (PT), angle of peak torque (APT), average power (PW) and total work (TW) for knee flexion and extension during concentric and eccentric actions measured in a prone position at 60, 180 and 240° s(-1). A total of 50 recreational athletes completed the study. PT, APT, PW and TW for concentric and eccentric knee extension and flexion were recorded at three different angular velocities (60, 180 and 240° s(-1)) on three different occasions with a 72- to 96-h rest interval between consecutive testing sessions. Absolute reliability was examined through typical percentage error (CV(TE)), percentage change in the mean (ChM) and relative reliability with intraclass correlations (ICC(3,1)). For both the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups, all strength data (except APT during knee flexion movements) demonstrated moderate absolute reliability (ChM < 3%; ICCs > 0·70; and CV(TE) < 20%) independent of the knee movement (flexion and extension), type of muscle action (concentric and eccentric) and angular velocity (60, 180 and 240° s(-1)). Therefore, the current study suggests that the CV(TE) values reported for PT (8-20%), APT (8-18%) (only during knee extension movements), PW (14-20%) and TW (12-28%) may be acceptable to detect the large changes usually observed after rehabilitation programmes, but not acceptable to examine the effect of preventative training programmes in healthy individuals.

  7. Low incidence of flexion-type supracondylar humerus fractures but high rate of complications

    PubMed Central

    Kuoppala, Eira; Parviainen, Roope; Pokka, Tytti; Sirviö, Minna; Serlo, Willy; Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Supracondylar humerus fractures are the most common type of elbow fracture in children. A small proportion of them are flexion-type fractures. We analyzed their current incidence, injury history, clinical and radiographic findings, treatment, and outcomes. Patients and methods We performed a population-based study, including all children <16 years of age. Radiographs were re-analyzed to include only flexion-type supracondylar fractures. Medical records were reviewed and outcomes were evaluated at a mean of 9 years after the injury. In addition, we performed a systematic literature review of all papers published on the topic since 1990 and compared the results with the findings of the current study. Results During the study period, the rate of flexion-type fractures was 1.2% (7 out of 606 supracondylar humeral fractures). The mean annual incidence was 0.8 per 105. 4 fractures were multidirectionally unstable, according to the Gartland-Wilkins classification. All but 1 were operatively treated. Reduced range of motion, changed carrying angle, and ulnar nerve irritation were the most frequent short-term complications. Finally, in the long-term follow-up, mean carrying angle was 50% more in injured elbows (21°) than in uninjured elbows (14°). 4 patients of the 7 achieved a satisfactory long-term outcome according to Flynn’s criteria. Interpretation Supracondylar humeral flexion-type fractures are rare. They are usually severe injuries, often resulting in short-term and long-term complications regardless of the original surgical fixation used. PMID:27168001

  8. Determining finger segmental centers of rotation in flexion-extension based on surface marker measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xudong; Lee, Sang-Wook; Braido, Peter

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel algorithm for deriving finger segmental center of rotation (COR) locations during flexion-extension from measured surface marker motions in vivo. The algorithm employs an optimization routine minimizing the time-variance of the internal link lengths, and incorporates an empirically quantifiable relationship between the local movement of a surface marker around a joint (termed "surface marker excursion") and the joint flexion-extension. The latter relationship constrains and simplifies the optimization routine to make it computationally tractable. To empirically investigate this relationship and test the proposed algorithm, an experiment was conducted, in which hand cylinder-grasping movements were performed by 24 subjects (12 males and 12 females). Spherical retro-reflective markers were placed at various surface landmarks on the dorsal aspect of each subject's right (grasping) hand, and were measured during the movements by an opto-electronic system. Analysis of experimental data revealed a highly linear relationship between the "surface marker excursion" and the marker-defined flexion-extension angle: the average R(2) in linear regression ranged from 0.89 to 0.97. The algorithm successfully determined the CORs of the distal interphalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and metacarpophalangeal joints of digits 2-5 during measured motions. The derived CORs appeared plausible as examined in terms of the physical locations relative to surface marker trajectories and the congruency across different joints and individuals.

  9. Finger flexion does not contribute to ball speed in overarm throws.

    PubMed

    Hore, J; Watts, S; Martin, J

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether, in overarm throws made by recreational ball players, the fingers undergo flexion movement before ball release and thereby contribute to the generation of ball speed. To obtain the high resolution needed to answer this question, the magnetic-field search-coil technique was used and the data were sampled at 1000 Hz. The subjects, who were either seated or were standing, threw tennis balls at different speeds at a target 3 m away. Angular positions in three dimensions were simultaneously recorded of the distal phalanx of the middle finger and hand and, in additional experiments to determine the mechanism of ball release in more detail, three middle finger phalanges and the hand. Different phases of ball release were determined by pressure-sensitive microswitches on the proximal and distal phalanges of the middle finger. Irrespective of whether the subjects were seated or were standing, for all throws at all speeds, finger flexion did not occur before ball release. That is, up until final release of the ball, the fingers only underwent extension associated with hand opening. For fast throws, at the instant of final ball release the fingers began to flex, presumably as a result of reactive forces associated with release of the ball. Thus, in overarm throws made by recreational ball players, finger flexion movement does not appear to contribute to the generation of ball speed.

  10. DOES RECTUS FEMORIS TRANSFER INCREASE KNEE FLEXION DURING STANCE PHASE IN CEREBRAL PALSY?

    PubMed Central

    de Morais, Mauro César; Blumetti, Francesco Camara; Kawamura, Cátia Miyuki; Lopes, José Augusto Fernandes; Neves, Daniella Lins; Cardoso, Michelle de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate whether distal rectus femoris transfer (DRFT) is related to postoperative increase of knee flexion during the stance phase in cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: The inclusion criteria were Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I-III, kinematic criteria for stiff-knee gait at baseline, and individuals who underwent orthopaedic surgery and had gait analyses performed before and after intervention. The patients included were divided into the following two groups: NO-DRFT (133 patients), which included patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery without DRFT, and DRFT (83 patients), which included patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery that included DRFT. The primary outcome was to evaluate in each group if minimum knee flexion in stance phase (FMJFA) changed after treatment. Results: The mean FMJFA increased from 13.19° to 16.74° (p=0.003) and from 10.60° to 14.80° (p=0.001) in Groups NO-DRFT and DRFT, respectively. The post-operative FMJFA was similar between groups NO-DRFT and DRFT (p=0.534). The increase of FMJFA during the second exam (from 13.01° to 22.51°) was higher among the GMFCS III patients in the DRFT group (p<0.001). Conclusion: In this study, DRFT did not generate additional increase of knee flexion during stance phase when compared to the control group. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Comparative Study. PMID:26997910

  11. A Method for Weak-Lensing Flexion Analysis by the HOLICs Moment Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okura, Yuki; Umetsu, Keiichi; Futamase, Toshifumi

    2008-06-01

    We have developed a method for measuring higher order weak-lensing distortions of faint background galaxies, namely, the weak gravitational flexion, by fully extending the Kaiser, Squires, and Broadhurst method to include higher order lensing image characteristics (HOLICs) introduced by Okura, Umetsu, and Futamase. We take into account explicitly the weight function in calculations of noisy shape moments and the effect of higher order point-spread function (PSF) anisotropy, as well as isotropic PSF smearing. Our HOLICs formalism allows accurate measurements of flexion from practical observational data in the presence of a noncircular, anisotropic PSF. We test our method using mock observations of simulated galaxy images and actual, ground-based Subaru observations of the massive galaxy cluster A1689 (z = 0.183). From the high-precision measurements of the spin-1 first flexion, we obtain a high-resolution mass map in the central region of A1689. The reconstructed mass map shows a bimodal feature in the central 4' × 4' region of the cluster. The major, pronounced peak is associated with the brightest cluster galaxy and central cluster members, while the secondary mass peak is associated with a local concentration of bright galaxies. The refined, high-resolution mass map of A1689 demonstrates the power of the generalized weak-lensing analysis techniques for quantitative and accurate measurements of the weak gravitational lensing signal. Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Society of Japan.

  12. Lateral Femoral Epicondylar Osteotomy: An Extensile Posterolateral Knee Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Andrea L.

    2008-01-01

    Open exposure of the posterolateral corner of the knee is challenged by limitations of posterolateral ligamentous tissues and posterior neurovascular structures. We have used a modification of a lateral femoral epicondyle osteotomy, described historically for surgical management of posterolateral rotatory instability, as an approach to the posterolateral intraarticular structures. The historic technique for ligamentous reconstruction has been abandoned because its nonanatomic fixation does not restore ligamentous isometry. In this report, osteotomy of a bone block from the lateral femoral epicondyle is used to access the joint space. The lateral collateral ligament is reflected distally and posteriorly through traction on the block. Once the intraarticular disorder has been addressed, the lateral femoral epicondyle is secured in its native, anatomic position, thereby restoring isometry and normal joint mechanics after surgery. This technique has been used successfully to address posterolateral articular disorders on femoral and tibial sides. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging verified restoration of lateral collateral ligament anatomy. Physical examination at 0° and 30° knee flexion showed clinical stability at all postoperative evaluations through 6 and 10 months followup. Using this technique, intraarticular disorders at the posterolateral corner may be addressed in an open manner with anatomic reduction and preserved postoperative function of the lateral collateral ligament. Level of Evidence: Level V, expert opinion. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18373126

  13. Effects of opioid blockade on nociceptive flexion reflex thresholds and nociceptive responding in hypertensive and normotensive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Louisa; Ring, Christopher; France, Christopher R.; McIntyre, David; Martin, Una

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension and risk for hypertension have been associated with reduced pain sensitivity. It has been hypothesised that endogenous opioids contribute to this hypertensive hypoalgesia. The nociceptive flexion reflex can be used as a tool to investigate modulation of nociceptive transmission at spinal level. The current study employed a double-blind placebo-controlled design to compare the effects of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and placebo on nociceptive flexion reflex thresholds and nociceptive responding in unmedicated patients with essential hypertension and normotensive individuals. Neither nociceptive flexion reflex thresholds nor nociceptive responding differed between hypertensives and normotensives during placebo or naltrexone. These data provide no support for the hypothesis that essential hypertension is characterised by higher levels endogenous opioids in the central nervous system and reveal no association between blood pressure status and nociceptive flexion reflex responses. PMID:18436318

  14. Optineurin and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2013-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a devastating disease, and thus it is important to identify the causative gene and resolve the mechanism of the disease. We identified optineurin as a causative gene for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We found three types of mutations: a homozygous deletion of exon 5, a homozygous Q398X nonsense mutation and a heterozygous E478G missense mutation within its ubiquitin-binding domain. Optineurin negatively regulates the tumor necrosis factor-α-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Nonsense and missense mutations abolished this function. Mutations related to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also negated the inhibition of interferon regulatory factor-3. The missense mutation showed a cyotoplasmic distribution different from that of the wild type. There are no specific clinical symptoms related to optineurin. However, severe brain atrophy was detected in patients with homozygous deletion. Neuropathologically, an E478G patient showed transactive response DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa-positive neuronal intracytoplasmic inclusions in the spinal and medullary motor neurons. Furthermore, Golgi fragmentation was identified in 73% of this patient's anterior horn cells. In addition, optineurin is colocalized with fused in sarcoma in the basophilic inclusions of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with fused in sarcoma mutations, and in basophilic inclusion body disease. These findings strongly suggest that optineurin is involved in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  15. Reading Disability and Laterality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparrow, Sara S.

    The purpose of this study was to determine how retarded readers differed from normal readers in the various ways laterality is manifested. An additional purpose was to investigate the development of laterality as seen across several age levels. Subjects were 80 white male 9-, 10-, 11-, and 12-year-olds from regular classrooms in suburban…

  16. Differences in end-range lumbar flexion during slumped sitting and forward bending between low back pain subgroups and genders.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Shannon L; Johnson, Molly B; Zou, Dequan; Van Dillen, Linda R

    2012-04-01

    Patterns of lumbar posture and motion are associated with low back pain (LBP). Research suggests LBP subgroups demonstrate different patterns during common tasks. This study assessed differences in end-range lumbar flexion during two tasks between two LBP subgroups classified according to the Movement System Impairment model. Additionally, the impact of gender differences on subgroup differences was assessed. Kinematic data were colle