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Sample records for active lava lakes

  1. Circulation patterns in active lava lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, T. C.; Lev, E.

    2014-12-01

    Active lava lakes provide a unique window into magmatic conduit processes. We investigated circulation patterns of 4 active lava lakes: Kilauea's Halemaumau crater, Mount Erebus, Erta Ale and Nyiragongo, and in an artificial "lava lake" constructed at the Syracuse University Lava Lab. We employed visual and thermal video recordings collected at these volcanoes and use computer vision techniques to extract time-dependent, two-dimensional surface velocity maps. The large amount of data available from Halemaumau enabled us to identify several characteristic circulation patterns. One such pattern is a rapid acceleration followed by rapid deceleration, often to a level lower than the pre-acceleration level, and then a slow recovery. Another pattern is periodic asymmetric peaks of gradual acceleration and rapid deceleration, or vice versa, previously explained by gas pistoning. Using spectral analysis, we find that the dominant period of circulation cycles at approximately 30 minutes, 3 times longer than the dominant period identified previously for Mount Erebus. Measuring a complete surface velocity field allowed us to map and follow locations of divergence and convergence, therefore upwelling and downwelling, thus connecting the surface flow with that at depth. At Nyiragongo, the location of main upwelling shifts gradually, yet is usually at the interior of the lake, for Erebus it is usually along the perimeter yet often there is catastrophic downwelling at the interior; For Halemaumau upwelling/downwelling position is almost always on the perimeter. In addition to velocity fields, we developed an automated tool for counting crustal plates at the surface of the lava lakes, and found a correlation, and a lag time, between changes if circulation vigor and the average size of crustal plates. Circulation in the artificial basaltic lava "lake" was limited by its size and degree of foaming, yet we measured surface velocities and identify patterns. Maximum surface velocity

  2. Shallow outgassing changes disrupt steady lava lake activity, Kilauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Swanson, D. A.; Lev, E.

    2015-12-01

    Persistent lava lakes are a testament to sustained magma supply and outgassing in basaltic systems, and the surface activity of lava lakes has been used to infer processes in the underlying magmatic system. At Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i, the lava lake in Halema`uma`u Crater has been closely studied for several years with webcam imagery, geophysical, petrological and gas emission techniques. The lava lake in Halema`uma`u is now the second largest on Earth, and provides an unprecedented opportunity for detailed observations of lava lake outgassing processes. We observe that steady activity is characterized by continuous southward motion of the lake's surface and slow changes in lava level, seismic tremor and gas emissions. This normal, steady activity can be abruptly interrupted by the appearance of spattering - sometimes triggered by rockfalls - on the lake surface, which abruptly shifts the lake surface motion, lava level and gas emissions to a more variable, unstable regime. The lake commonly alternates between this a) normal, steady activity and b) unstable behavior several times per day. The spattering represents outgassing of shallowly accumulated gas in the lake. Therefore, although steady lava lake behavior at Halema`uma`u may be deeply driven by upwelling of magma, we argue that the sporadic interruptions to this behavior are the result of shallow processes occurring near the lake surface. These observations provide a cautionary note that some lava lake behavior is not representative of deep-seated processes. This behavior also highlights the complex and dynamic nature of lava lake activity.

  3. A comparative Study of Circulation Patterns at Active Lava Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Einat; Oppenheimer, Clive; Spampinato, Letizia; Hernandez, Pedro; Unglert, Kathi

    2016-04-01

    Lava lakes present a rare opportunity to study magma dynamics in a large scaled-up "crucible" and provide a unique natural laboratory to ground-truth dynamic models of magma circulation. The persistence of lava lakes allows for long-term observations of flow dynamics and of lava properties, especially compared to surface lava flows. There are currently five persistent lava lakes in the world: Halemaumau in Kilauea (Hawaii, USA), Erta Ale (Ethiopia), Nyiragongo (Congo), Erebus (Antarctica), and Villarica (Chile). Marum and Benbow craters of Ambrym volcano (Vanuatu) and Masaya (Nicaragua) have often hosted lava lakes as well. We use visible-light and thermal infrared time-lapse and video footage collected at all above lakes (except Villarica, where the lake is difficult to observe), and compare the circulation patterns recorded. We calculate lake surface motion from the footage using the optical flow method (Lev et al., 2012) to produce 2D velocity fields. We mined both the surface temperature field and the surface velocity field for patterns using machine learning techniques such as "self-organizing maps (SOMs)" and "principle component analysis (PCA)". We use automatic detection technique to study the configuration of crustal plates at the lakes' surface. We find striking differences among the lakes, in flow direction, flow speed, frequency of changes in flow direction and speed, location and consistency of upwelling and downwelling, and crustal plate configuration. We relate the differences to lake size, shallow conduit geometry, lava viscosity, crystal and gas content, and crust integrity.

  4. Thermal imaging of Erta 'Ale active lava lake (Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spampinato, L.; Oppenheimer, C.; Calvari, S.; Cannata, A.; Montalto, P.

    2009-04-01

    Active lava lakes represent the uppermost portion of a volume of convective magma exposed to the atmosphere, and provide open windows on magma dynamics within shallow reservoirs. Erta ‘Ale volcano located within the Danakil Depression in Ethiopia, hosts one of the few permanent convecting lava lakes, active at least since the last century. We report here the main features of Erta ‘Ale lake surface investigated using a hand-held infrared thermal camera between 11 and 12 November 2006. In both days, the lake surface was mainly characterized by efficient magma circulation reflecting in the formation of well-marked incandescent cracks and wide crust plates. These crossed the lake from the upwelling to the downwelling margin with mean speeds ranging between 0.01 and 0.15 m s-1. Hot spots opened eventually in the middle of crust plates and/or along cracks. These produced explosive activity lasting commonly between ~10 and 200 sec. Apparent temperatures at cracks ranged between ~700 and 1070˚C, and between ~300 and 500˚C at crust plates. Radiant power output of the lake varied between ~45 and 76 MW according to the superficial activity and continuous resurfacing of the lake. Time series analysis of the radiant power output data reveals cyclicity with a period of ~10 min. The combination of visual and thermal observations with apparent mean temperatures and convection rates allows us to interpret these signals as the periodic release of hot overpressured gas bubbles at the lake surface.

  5. Lava Lakes on Io?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Kamp, L. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Howell, R.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Kargel, J. S.; Radebaugh, J.; Turtle, E. P.; Perry, J.; Williams, D. A.; Carlson, R. W.; Doute, S.; Galileo NIMS Team

    2003-05-01

    At least 152 active volcanic centers have been identified on Jupiter's moon Io [Lopes et al., 2003, submitted to Icarus]. Eruptions at these centers include lava flows (``Promethean" type eruptions), explosive ``Pillanian" eruptions [Keszthelyi et al., 2001, JGR 106, 33,025-52] and volcanism confined within patera walls (``Lokian", Lopes et al., 2003). Understanding the Lokian eruption mechanism is particularly important because paterae are the most ubiquitous volcanic constructs on Io's surface [Radebaugh et al. 2001, JGR, 106, 33,005-33,020] and patera volcanism is the most common eruption type on Io. We use observations from Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) and compare them with images from Galileo's Solid State Imaging system (SSI) to map the distribution of thermal emission at several Ionian paterae. This allows us to examine how thermal emission correlates with visible features, and to investigate how thermal emission varies with time. Galileo's close fly-bys of Io from 1999 to 2001 allowed NIMS to observe the volcanoes at relatively high spatial resolution (1-30 km pixel). At these scales, observations of the several paterae reveal that the greatest thermal emission occurs at the edges. This can be explained as the crust of a lava lake breaking up against the base of the patera (caldera) walls, similar to what has been observed at lava lakes on Earth. Comparison with terrestrial analogs shows that several Ionian active paterae, such as Loki, Tupan, and Emakong, have thermal properties consistent with relatively inactive lava lakes on Earth. We discuss these results and their implications for eruption styles and resurfacing on Io. This work was supported in part by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program.

  6. Lava Lakes in Io's Paterae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, J.; McEwen, A. S.; Milazzo, M.; Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Geissler, P.

    2002-05-01

    New Galileo images and Galileo and Cassini temperature data lend credence to previous proposals that some of the paterae on Io contain lava lakes, similar in some ways to those observed on Earth. Galileo's October 2001 I32 flyby produced spectacular new high resolution observations of Io's paterae, their margins, and floors. Images reveal where lavas have filled Emakong Patera and overtopped its margins. Landslides from the peaks of Tohil Mons are not present on the adjacent floor of a dark patera, perhaps because they have slumped into a molten lava pit. Dark lavas have filled and drained back from colorful Tupan Patera, leaving a ring of material on its walls. This patera also shows evidence of interaction between molten sulfur and silicate lavas, a relationship observed at the terrestrial Poas Volcano (Francis et al., 1980, Nature 283, 754-756; Oppenheimer and Stevenson, 1990, La Recherche 21,1088-1090). The extremely uniformly dark materials in many other paterae could also be lava lakes. Pele Volcano on Io, in particular, has previously been considered a lava lake based on several characteristics (Davies et al., 2001, JGR 106,33,079-33,103). Recent analyses of eclipse images of Pele from Cassini reveal average temperatures of 1375 K, with variations on short (~10 minute) timescales, consistent with active fountaining in a lava lake. Similar oscillations around high temperatures over these time scales are seen in terrestrial lava lakes, such as at Kupaianaha (Flynn et al., GRL, 19,6461-6476, 1993) and Erta Ale (Bessard, Caillet and others, in progress). Nightside high resolution (60 m/pixel) images from Galileo I32 reveal a region of overturning and convection, with some areas reaching in excess of 1800 K, verifying very high-temperature components identified in high-resolution NIMS data (Lopes et al., 2001, JGR, 106, 33,053-33,078). This region is ringed with small hotspots, comparable to locations of breakup and fountaining at the margins of many terrestrial

  7. Mass flux measurements at active lava lakes: Implications for magma recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Andrew J. L.; Flynn, Luke P.; Rothery, David A.; Oppenheimer, Clive; Sherman, Sarah B.

    1999-04-01

    Remotely sensed and field data can be used to estimate heat and mass fluxes at active lava lakes. Here we use a three thermal component pixel model with three bands of Landsat thematic mapper (TM) data to constrain the thermal structure of, and flux from, active lava lakes. Our approach considers that a subpixel lake is surrounded by ground at ambient temperatures and that the surface of the lake is composed of crusted and/or molten material. We then use TM band 6 (10.42-12.42 μm) with bands 3 (0.63-0.69 μm) or 4 (0.76-0.90 μm) and 5 (1.55-1.75 μm) or 7 (2.08-2.35 μm), along with field data (e.g., lava lake area), to place limits on the size and temperature of each thermal component. Previous attempts to achieve this have used two bands of TM data with a two-component thermal model. Using our model results with further field data (e.g., petrological data) for lava lakes at Erebus, Erta 'Ale, and Pu'u 'O'o, we calculate combined radiative and convective fluxes of 11-20, 14-27 and 368-373 MW, respectively. These yield mass fluxes, of 30-76, 44-104 and 1553-2079 kg s-1, respectively. We also identify a hot volcanic feature at Nyiragongo during 1987 from which a combined radiative and convective flux of 0.2-0.6 MW implies a mass flux of 1-2 kg s-1. We use our mass flux estimates to constrain circulation rates in each reservoir-conduit-lake system and consider four models whereby circulation results in intrusion within or beneath the volcano (leading to endogenous or cryptic growth) and/or magma mixing in the reservoir (leading to recycling). We suggest that the presence of lava lakes does not necessarily imply endogenous or cryptic growth: lava lakes could be symptomatic of magma recycling in supraliquidus reservoirs.

  8. The Stability of Lava Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witham, F.; Llewellin, E. W.; Woods, A. W.; Gladstone, C.

    2007-12-01

    Lava lakes may exhibit complex cycles of filling and draining on time-scales of hours to weeks. Such activity is recorded at Pu`u `O`o, Hawai`i. Other examples, e.g. Erta Ale in Ethiopia, do not display these draining episodes; instead an 'equilibrium' system is observed in which the lake may persist for years. We present the results of a theoretical and experimental investigation of lava lakes and identify behavioural regimes distinguished by system geometry and gas content. Laboratory analogue modelling shows that even a simple conduit-lake system, driven by a constant gas flux, can display steady-state equilibrium or cyclic behaviour, depending on the rate of gas flux. A theoretical approach to the same system captures this range of behaviour. By testing the stability of an 'equilibrium' lake to small perturbations, we show that the degree of stability is controlled by the ratio of conduit to lake areas, and the gas volume fraction at the top of the conduit. Despite the simplicity of the modelled system, a rich spectrum of behaviour is found. The model predicts that a stable system must drain over time. This implies that lakes which exhibit ongoing degassing for years or decades (e.g. Erta Ale) either must have an exogenous supply of gas bubbles from depth, or an effective conduit convection mechanism must exist.

  9. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, Ashley G.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2011-01-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 μm) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale.

  10. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, A.G.; Keszthelyi, L.; McEwen, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 ??m) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale. ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Estimating eruption temperature from thermal emission spectra of lava fountain activity in the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) volcano lava lake: Implications for observing Io's volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Keszthelyi, Laszlo; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2011-11-01

    We have analysed high-spatial-resolution and high-temporal-resolution temperature measurements of the active lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to derive requirements for measuring eruption temperatures at Io's volcanoes. Lava lakes are particularly attractive targets because they are persistent in activity and large, often with ongoing lava fountain activity that exposes lava at near-eruption temperature. Using infrared thermography, we find that extracting useful temperature estimates from remote-sensing data requires (a) high spatial resolution to isolate lava fountains from adjacent cooler lava and (b) rapid acquisition of multi-color data. Because existing spacecraft data of Io's volcanoes do not meet these criteria, it is particularly important to design future instruments so that they will be able to collect such data. Near-simultaneous data at more than two relatively short wavelengths (shorter than 1 μm) are needed to constrain eruption temperatures. Resolving parts of the lava lake or fountains that are near the eruption temperature is also essential, and we provide a rough estimate of the required image scale.

  12. Autonomous thermal camera system for monitoring the active lava lake at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, N.; Oppenheimer, C.; Kyle, P.

    2014-02-01

    In December 2012, the Mount Erebus Volcano Observatory installed a thermal infrared camera system to monitor the volcano's active lava lake. The new system is designed to be autonomous, and capable of capturing images of the lava lake continuously throughout the year. This represents a significant improvement over previous systems which required the frequent attention of observatory researchers and could therefore only be operated during a few weeks of the annual field campaigns. The extreme environmental conditions at the summit of Erebus pose significant challenges for continuous monitoring equipment, and a custom-made system was the only viable solution. Here we describe the hardware and software of the new system in detail and report on a publicly available online repository where data will be archived. Aspects of the technical solutions we had to find in order to overcome the challenges of automating this equipment may be relevant in other environmental science domains where remote instrument operation is involved.

  13. Autonomous thermal camera system for monitoring the active lava lake at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, N.; Oppenheimer, C.; Kyle, P.

    2013-10-01

    In December 2012, the Mount Erebus Volcano Observatory installed a thermal infrared camera system to monitor the volcano's active lava lake. The new system is designed to be autonomous, and capable of capturing images of the lava lake continuously throughout the year. This represents a significant improvement over previous systems which required the frequent attention of observatory researchers and could therefore only be operated during a few weeks of the annual field campaigns. The extreme environmental conditions at the summit of Erebus pose significant challenges for continuous monitoring equipment, and a custom made system was the only viable solution. Here we describe the hardware and software of the new system in detail and report on a publicly-available online repository where data will be archived. Aspects of the technical solutions we had to find in order to overcome the challenges of automating this equipment may be relevant in other environmental science domains where remote instrument operation is involved.

  14. Lava lakes on Io: Observations of Io's volcanic activity from Galileo NIMS during the 2001 fly-bys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lopes, R.M.C.; Kamp, L.W.; Smythe, W.D.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Kargel, J.; Radebaugh, J.; Turtle, E.P.; Perry, J.; Williams, D.A.; Carlson, R.W.; Doute, S.

    2004-01-01

    Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) obtained its final observations of Io during the spacecraft's fly-bys in August (I31) and October 2001 (I32). We present a summary of the observations and results from these last two fly-bys, focusing on the distribution of thermal emission from Io's many volcanic regions that give insights into the eruption styles of individual hot spots. We include a compilation of hot spot data obtained from Galileo, Voyager, and ground-based observations. At least 152 active volcanic centers are now known on Io, 104 of which were discovered or confirmed by Galileo observations, including 23 from the I31 and I32 Io fly-by observations presented here. We modify the classification scheme of Keszthelyi et al. (2001, J. Geophys. Res. 106 (E12) 33 025-33 052) of Io eruption styles to include three primary types: promethean (lava flow fields emplaced as compound pahoehoe flows with small plumes 200 km high plumes and rapidly-emplaced flow fields), and a new style we call "lokian" that includes all eruptions confined within paterae with or without associated plume eruptions). Thermal maps of active paterae from NIMS data reveal hot edges that are characteristic of lava lakes. Comparisons with terrestrial analogs show that Io's lava lakes have thermal properties consistent with relatively inactive lava lakes. The majority of activity on Io, based on locations and longevity of hot spots, appears to be of this third type. This finding has implications for how Io is being resurfaced as our results imply that eruptions of lava are predominantly confined within paterae, thus making it unlikely that resurfacing is done primarily by extensive lava flows. Our conclusion is consistent with the findings of Geissler et al. (2004, Icarus, this issue) that plume eruptions and deposits, rather than the eruption of copious amounts of effusive lavas, are responsible for Io's high resurfacing rates. The origin and longevity of islands within ionian

  15. A Rare Window Into Magmatic Conduit Processes: Time Series Observations From Active Lava Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, E.; Ruprecht, P.; Patrick, M.; Oppenheimer, C.; Peters, N.; Spampinato, L.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Unglert, K.; Barreyre, T.

    2015-12-01

    Time-lapse thermal images of the lake surface are used to investigate the circulation and cooling patterns of three lava lakes: Kilauea's Halema'uma'u crater, Mount Erebus, and Nyiragongo. We report results for the time-dependent, two-dimensional velocity and temperature fields of the lake surface. These data sets constrain the locations of flow divergence (upwelling) and convergence (downwelling), the distribution of distinct "plates" and "rifts", the dominant time scales for changes in flow pattern at each lake, and the physical properties of the magma. Upwelling and downwelling locations are strikingly different between the three lakes. Upwelling at Nyiragongo and Erebus occurs dominantly in the interior of the lake, where it is occasionally interrupted by catastrophic downwellings. At Halema'uma'u upwelling and downwelling occur consistently along the perimeter. It remains to be seen whether these differences are dictated merely by the system's geometry or are indicative of intrinsic factors such as melt viscosity, temperature and volatile and crystal content, or of conduit processes such as gas pistoning or slug flow. The availability of high resolution data at Halema'uma'u allows as us to document the evolution of crustal plates and rifts and to investigate the physical properties of the lava and the crust. The physical properties of the lake's surface control lake cooling rates, and thus need to be included in lake circulation and thermal evolution models. We produce time-temperature cooling curves from surface temperature profiles normal to surface rifts and by tracking the cooling of intra-plate bubble bursts. By comparing observations to analytical cooling models, we estimate a porosity of > 80% during the high stand of the lake, slightly higher than estimates of 70% for the upper 120 meters based on gravity data, and close to the porosity of clasts ejected from the lake during recent minor explosions. Furthermore,we find that the number of surface plates

  16. Satellite observations of Lava Lake activity at Nyiragongo volcano, ex-Zaire, during the Rwandan refugee crisis.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, C

    1998-09-01

    In June 1994 the summit crater of Nyiragongo volcano, located in the Great Lakes region of central Africa, began to fill with new lava, ending nearly 12 years of quiescence. An earlier eruption of the volcano in 1977 had culminated in the catastrophic draining of a lava lake through fissures in the crater wall, feeding highly mobile lava flows which reached the outskirts of Goma and killed more than 70 people. By July 1994, as many as 20,000 Hutu refugees were arriving in Goma every hour, only 18 km south from the summit of Nyiragongo. The exodus brought more than one million people to the camps near the town raising fears of a repeat of the 1977 eruption. This paper examines the role that satellite remote sensing could have played in surveillance of the volcano during this time, and demonstrates the potential for monitoring this and other volcanoes in the future. Images recorded by the spaceborne Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)--freely available over the Internet--provide semi-quantitative information on the activity of the volcano. The aim of this paper is to promote the wider use of readily available technologies. PMID:9753815

  17. Dynamics of the Mount Nyiragongo lava lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgi, P.-Y.; Darrah, T. H.; Tedesco, D.; Eymold, W. K.

    2014-05-01

    The permanent and presently rising lava lake at Mount Nyiragongo constitutes a major potential geological hazard to the inhabitants of the Virunga volcanic region in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Rwanda. Based on two field campaigns in June 2010 and 2011, we estimate the lava lake level from the southeastern crater rim (~400 m diameter) and lava lake area (~46,550 m2), which constrains, respectively, the lava lake volume (~9 × 106 m3) and volume flow rate needed to keep the magma in a molten state (0.6 to 3.5 m3 s-1). A bidirectional magma flow model, which includes the characterization of the conduit diameter and funnel-shaped lava lake geometry, is developed to constrain the amount of magma intruded/emplaced within the magmatic chamber and rift-related structures that extend between Mount Nyiragongo's volcanic center and the city of Goma, DRC, since Mount Nyiragongo's last eruption (17 January 2002). Besides matching field data of the lava lake level covering the period 1977 to 2002, numerical solutions of the model indicate that by 2022, 20 years after the January 2002 eruption, between 300 and 1700 × 106 m3 (0.3 to 1.7 km3) of magma could have intruded/emplaced underneath the edifice, and the lava lake volume could exceed 15 × 106 m3.

  18. Hidden Outgassing Dynamics at Kilauea (Hawaii) Lava Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Bello, E.; Taddeucci, J.; Orr, T. R.; Houghton, B. F.; Scarlato, P.; Patrick, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    Lava lakes offer unique opportunities for understanding how magmatic volatiles physically escape from low-viscosity, vesicular magma in open-vent conditions, a process often referred to as magma outgassing. Large-scale lava convection movements and meter-scale bubble explosions, sometimes triggered by rock falls, are acknowledged outgassing processes but may not be the only ones. In 2013 we used high-frequency (50-500 Hz) thermal and visible imaging to investigate the short-timescale dynamics of the currently active Halema`uma`u lava lake. At that time, besides the dominant release of large bubbles, three types of peculiar outgassing features were observed on the lava lake surface. The first, diffusely observed throughout the observation experiment, consisted of prolonged (up to seconds) gas venting from 'spot vents'. These vents appeared to open and close without the ejection of material or bubble bursting, and were the site of hot gas emission. Spot vents were located both between and inside cooling plates, and followed the general circulation pattern together with the rest of the lava lake surface. The second feature, observed only once, consisted of the transient wobbling of the whole lava lake surface. This wobbling, with a wavelength of meters to tens of meters, was not related to any external trigger, and dampened soon without apparent consequences on the other lake dynamics. Finally, we observed large (meters) doming areas of the lake surface randomly fluctuating over seconds to minutes. These areas were either stationary or moved independently of the general lake surface circulation, and usually were not affected by other lake surface features (e.g., cooling plate boundaries). These three features, though trivial for the overall lake outgassing, testify that the lava lake has a complex shallow subsurface architecture, in which permeable channels and gas pockets act independently of the more common bubble bursts.

  19. Cooling of Kilauea Iki lava lake

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, R.G.

    1982-02-01

    In 1959 Kilauea Iki erupted leaving a 110 to 120 m lake of molten lava in its crater. The resulting lava lake has provided a unique opportunity to study the cooling dynamics of a molten body and its associated hydrothermal system. Field measurements taken at Kilauea Iki indicate that the hydrothermal system above the cooling magma body goes through several stages, some of which are well modeled analytically. Field measurements also indicate that during most of the solidification period of the lake, cooling from above is controlled by 2-phase convection while conduction dominates the cooling of the lake from below. A summary of the field work related to the study of the cooling dynamics of Kilauea Iki is presented. Quantitative and qualitative cooling models for the lake are discussed.

  20. Joint analysis of deformation, gravity, and lava lake elevation reveals temporal variations in lava lake density at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, Daniele; Poland, Michael; Patrick, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    We find a tight correlation between (i) changes in lava level within the summit eruptive vent at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, observed for at least 2 years since early 2011, and (ii) ground deformation in the vicinity of the vent. The observed correlation indicates that changing pressure within the shallow magma reservoir feeding the lava lake influences both deformation and lava level. However, those two parameters are related to chamber pressure through different properties, namely, the density of the lava filling the vent (for the lava level) and the size/position of the reservoir plus the elastic parameters of the host rock (for the deformation). Joint analyses in the time and frequency domains of lava level (determined from thermal camera imagery of the lava lake) and tilt measured on a borehole instrument (~2 km from the summit vent) reveal a good correlation throughout the studied period. The highest correlation occurs over periods ranging between 1 and 20 days. The ratio between lava level and tilt is not constant over time, however. Using data from a continuously recording gravimeter located near the rim of the summit eruptive vent, we demonstrate that the tilt-lava level ratio is controlled by the fluctuations in the density of the lava inside the vent (i.e., its degree of vesicularity). A second continuous gravimeter was installed near the summit eruptive vent in 2014, providing a new observation point for gravity change associated with summit lava lave activity to test models developed from the previously existing instrument. In addition, a continuous gravimeter was installed on the rim of the Puu Oo eruptive vent on Kilauea's East Rift Zone in 2013. Puu Oo is connected via the subvolcanic magma plumbing system to the summit eruptive vent and often deforms in concert with the summit. This growing network of continuously recording gravimeters at Kilauea can be used to examine correlations in gravity change associated with variations in eruptive activity

  1. Birth of a lava lake: Nyamulagira volcano 2011-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, D.; Campion, R.; Laiolo, M.; Cuoco, E.; Balagizi, C.; Ripepe, M.; Cigolini, C.; Tedesco, D.

    2016-03-01

    Since 1938, Nyamulagira volcano (Democratic Republic of Congo) has operated as a classic pressurized basaltic closed system, characterized by frequent dike-fed flank eruptions. However, on June 24, 2014, an active lava lake was observed in its summit, after a period of 76 years. The small lava lake is now exposed at the bottom of a pit-crater and is rising and growing. Based on satellite-derived infrared (IR) data, SO2 fluxes and periodic field surveys, we provide evidence that the development of the lava lake was gradual and occurred more than 2 years before it was first observed in the field. Notably, this process followed the voluminous 2011-2012 distal flank eruption and was coeval with weakening of the central rock column below the summit. Hence, the opening and development of the pit-crater favoured the continuous rise of fresh magma through the central conduit and promoted the gradual "re-birth" of the Nyamulagira lava lake. Budgeted volumes of magma erupted, and magma degassed at depth indicate that the formation of the lava lake is due to the draining and refilling of a shallow plumbing system (1-2 km depth), probably in response to the rift-parallel 2011-2012 distal eruption. We thus suggest that the transition from lateral to central activity did not result from a substantial change in the magma supply rate but, more likely, from the perturbation of the plumbing system (and related stress field) associated with the distal eruption. The processes observed at Nyamulagira are not unique and suggest that rift-fissure eruptions, in addition to triggering caldera collapses or lava lake drainages, may also induce a progressive resumption of central vent activity. Current activity at Nyamulagira represents a tangible and major hazard for the population living at the base of its southern flank.

  2. Insights into the dynamics of the Nyiragongo lava lake level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, Benoît; d'Oreye, Nicolas; Geirsson, Halldor; Kervyn, Matthieu; Kervyn, François

    2016-04-01

    Nyiragongo volcano, in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo, is among the most active volcanoes in Africa and on Earth. Since the first European observations in the late 19th Century, its eruptive activity mostly concentrated into its main crater, with the presence of a persistent lava lake from at least 1928 to 1977 and since 2002. The size, shape and elevation of this lava lake have evolved through time, modifying the topography of the main crater. In January 1977 and 2002, the uppermost magmatic system of Nyiragongo, including the lava lake, was drained during flank eruptions. These flank events caused major disasters, mostly due to the exceptionally fast-moving lava flows and the presence of a dense population living at foot of this volcano. Despite a large scientific interest and societal concern, the study of the eruptive activity of Nyiragongo remains limited by climate and vegetation conditions that, most of the time, limit use of satellite remote sensing techniques, and recurrent armed conflicts in the Kivu region, which sometimes prevent field access to the main crater. Here we focus on the dynamics of the Nyiragongo lava lake level and its relationship with the volcanic plumbing system by describing the historical and recent lava lake activity and presenting new quantitative observations using close-range photogrammetry, a Stereographic Time-Lapse Camera (STLC) system and high-resolution satellite SAR and InSAR remote sensing. Results highlight that, contrary to the interpretation found in some recent publications, the lava lake drainages appear to be the consequence and not the cause of the 1977 and 2002 flank eruptions. Two types of short-term lava lake level variations are observed. The first one corresponds to cyclic metre-scale variations attributed to gas piston activity. The STLC data recorded in September 2011 show hour-scale gas piston cycles reaching up to 3.8 m, which are interpreted to be related to gas accumulation and release in the

  3. An analogue experimental model of depth fluctuations in lava lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witham, Fred; Woods, Andrew W.; Gladstone, Charlotte

    2006-07-01

    Lava lakes, consisting of molten degassing lava in summit craters of active basaltic volcanoes, sometimes exhibit complex cycles of filling and emptying on time-scales of hours to weeks such as recorded at Pu’u’O’o in Hawaii and Oldoinyo Lengai in Tanzania. Here we report on a new series of analogue laboratory experiments of two-phase flow in a reservoir-conduit-lava lake system which spontaneously generates oscillations in the depth of liquid within the lake. During the recharge phase, gas supplied from a subsurface reservoir of degassing magma drives liquid magma up the conduit, causing the lake to fill. As the magmastatic pressure in the lake increases, the upward supply of magma, driven by the gas bubbles, falls. Eventually the upflow becomes unstable, and liquid drains downwards from the lake, driven by the magmastatic pressure of the overlying lake, suppressing the ascent of any more bubbles from the chamber. At a later stage, once the lake has drained sufficiently, the descent speed of liquid through the conduit decreases below the ascent speed of the bubbles, and the recharge cycle resumes. Application of a quantitative model of the experiments to the natural system is broadly consistent with field data.

  4. Lava Lakes on Io: New Perspectives from Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Tracy K. P.; Lopes, Rosaly M.

    2004-01-01

    Ionian paterae are a class of volcanic feature that are characterized by irregular craters with steep walls, flat floors, and arcuate margins that may or may not exhibit nesting. Loki (310 W, 12 N) is Io's largest patera at approx.200 km in diameter (Figure 1), and may account for 15% of Io's total heat flow. Earth-based infrared data, as well as information collected using the Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) and the Photopolarimeter Radiometer (PPR) have been used to interpret Loki s eruption style. Debate continues over whether Loki s occasional (periodic or not) temperature increases are due to an overturning lava lake within the patera, or to an eruption of surface flows on the patera floor. Interpretation of model results and comparisons with active terrestrial lava lakes suggest that Loki behaves quite differently from active lava lakes on Earth, and that surface flows (rather than an overturning lava lake) are a more likely explanation of Loki's thermal brightening.

  5. Patterns of behavior in Kilauea's Halema`uma`u lava lake during 2011 and 1911

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.

    2011-12-01

    The past three and a half years of activity in the Halema`uma`u vent, at the summit of Kilauea Volcano, have provided a robust observational dataset and allowed us to generalize on many aspects of behavior in the lava lake. The current lava lake normally has been 100-150 m in diameter and contained deep (70-220 m) within a slowly enlarging, fume-filled crater. The lava level fluctuates over both long- and short-term intervals, over a total height range of about 150 m. Over the long term (days to weeks) the lava level correlates directly with summit tilt at a consistent rate, sympathetic with the frequent summit deflation-inflation (DI) events, indicating the lava level is related, in large part, to the pressure state of the summit magma reservoir. On a short term, the lava level experiences rise-fall cycles ("gas pistoning") of 10-20 m height changes, with time spans of minutes to hours, which are due to shallow accumulation and release of gas. The lava lake also abruptly dropped about 150 m during the March 2011 east-rift intrusion and Kamoamoa eruption, presumably due to the rapid evacuation of magma from the summit reservoir. The lava surface is composed of large (decameter-scale) crustal plates, whose size is inversely related to the surface migration velocity. The surface crust moves at a relatively slow velocity (often 0.2-1 m/s), similar to velocities at other lava lakes on Kilauea (Mauna Ulu, Kupaianaha) and elsewhere worldwide (Erebus, Erta Ale), and usually in a direction that is maintained for months. Spattering is generally continuous and directly linked to the circulation pattern; spattering normally occurs at the spot of lava downwelling. Spattering intensity correlates directly with seismic tremor levels, suggesting that the bulk of summit tremor is related to gas release from the lava surface. These characteristics of the modern lava lake have both important similarities and differences compared to the Halema`uma`u lava lake observed by

  6. Controls on lava lake level at Halema`uma`u Crater, Kilauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.

    2013-12-01

    Lava level is a fundamental measure of lava lake activity, but very little continuous long-term data exist worldwide to explore this aspect of lava lake behavior. The ongoing summit eruption at Kilauea Volcano began in 2008 and is characterized by an active lava lake within the eruptive vent. Lava level has been measured nearly continuously at Kilauea for several years using a combination of webcam images, laser rangefinder, and terrestrial LIDAR. Fluctuations in lava level have been a common aspect of the eruption and occur over several timescales. At the shortest timescale, the lava lake level can change over seconds to hours owing to two observed shallow gas-related processes. First, gas pistoning is common and is driven by episodic gas accumulation and release from the surface of the lava lake, causing the lava level to rise and fall by up to 20 m. Second, rockfalls into the lake trigger abrupt gas release, and lava level may drop as much as 10 m as a result. Over days, cyclic changes in lava level closely track cycles of deflation-inflation (DI) deformation events at the summit, leading to level changes up to 50 m. Rift zone intrusions have caused large (up to 140 m) drops in lava level over several days. On the timescale of weeks to months, the lava level follows the long-term inflation and deflation of the summit region, resulting in level changes up to 140 m. The remarkable correlation between lava level and deflation-inflation cycles, as well as the long-term deformation of the summit region, indicates that the lava lake acts as a reliable 'piezometer' (a measure of liquid pressure in the magma plumbing system); therefore, assessments of summit pressurization (and rift zone eruption potential) can now be carried out with the naked eye. The summit lava lake level is closely mirrored by the lava level within Pu`u `O`o crater, the vent area for the 30-year-long eruption on Kilauea's east rift zone, which is 20 km downrift of the summit. The coupling of these

  7. Temperature Measurements in Carbonatite Lava Lakes and Flows from Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Maurice; Keller, Jorg

    1989-07-01

    The petrogenesis of carbonatites has important implications for mantle processes and for the magmatic evolution of mantle melts rich in carbon dioxide. Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania, is the only active carbonatite volcano on Earth. Its highly alkalic, sodium-rich lava, although different in composition from the more common calcium-rich carbonatites, provides the opportunity for observations of the physical characteristics of carbonatite melts. Temperature measurements on active carbonatitic lava flows and from carbonatitic lava lakes were carried out during a period of effusive activity in June 1988. Temperatures ranged from 491 degrees to 519 degrees C. The highest temperature, measured from a carbonatitic lava lake, was 544 degrees C. These temperatures are several hundred degrees lower than measurements from any silicate lava. At the observed temperatures, the carbonatite melt had lower viscosities than the most fluid basaltic lavas. The unusually low magmatic temperatures were confirmed with 1-atmosphere melting experiments on natural samples.

  8. Temperature measurements in carbonatite lava lakes and flows from oldoinyo lengai, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Krafft, M; Keller, J

    1989-07-14

    The petrogenesis of carbonatites has important implications for mantle processes and for the magmatic evolution of mantle melts rich in carbon dioxide. Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania, is the only active carbonatite volcano on Earth. Its highly alkalic, sodium-rich lava, although different in composition from the more common calcium-rich carbonatites, provides the opportunity for observations of the physical characteristics of carbonatite melts. Temperature measurements on active carbonatitic lava flows and from carbonatitic lava lakes were carried out during a period of effusive activity in June 1988. Temperatures ranged from 491 degrees to 519 degrees C. The highest temperature, measured from a carbonatitic lava lake, was 544 degrees C. These temperatures are several hundred degrees lower than measurements from any silicate lava. At the observed temperatures, the carbonatite melt had lower viscosities than the most fluid basaltic lavas. The unusually low magmatic temperatures were confirmed with 1-atmosphere melting experiments on natural samples. PMID:17787875

  9. Shallowly driven fluctuations in lava lake outgassing (gas pistoning), Kīlauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim; Sutton, A. J.; Lev, Einat; Thelen, Wes; Fee, David

    2016-01-01

    Lava lakes provide ideal venues for directly observing and understanding the nature of outgassing in basaltic magmatic systems. Kīlauea Volcano's summit lava lake has persisted for several years, during which seismic and infrasonic tremor amplitudes have exhibited episodic behavior associated with a rise and fall of the lava surface ("gas pistoning"). Since 2010, the outgassing regime of the lake has been tied to the presence or absence of gas pistoning. During normal behavior (no gas pistoning), the lake is in a "spattering" regime, consisting of higher tremor amplitudes and gas emissions. In comparison, gas piston events are associated with an abrupt rise in lava level (up to 20 m), during which the lake enters a "non-spattering" regime with greatly decreased tremor and gas emissions. We study this episodic behavior using long-term multidisciplinary monitoring of the lake, including seismicity, infrasound, gas emission and geochemistry, and time-lapse camera observations. The non-spattering regime (i.e. rise phase of a gas piston cycle) reflects gas bubbles accumulating near the top of the lake, perhaps as a shallow foam, while spattering regimes represent more efficient decoupling of gas from the lake. We speculate that the gas pistoning might be controlled by time-varying porosity and/or permeability in the upper portions of the lava lake, which may modulate foam formation and collapse. Competing models for gas pistoning, such as deeply sourced gas slugs, or dynamic pressure balances, are not consistent with our observations. Unlike other lava lakes which have cyclic behavior that is thought to be controlled by deeply sourced processes, external to the lake itself, we show an example of lava lake fluctuations driven by cycles of activity at shallow depth and close to the lake's surface. These observations highlight the complex and unsteady nature of outgassing from basaltic magmatic systems.

  10. Field temperature measurements at Erta'Ale Lava Lake, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgi, Pierre-Yves; Caillet, Marc; Haefeli, Steven

    2002-06-01

    The shield volcano Erta'Ale, situated in the Danakil Depression, Ethiopia, is known for its active lava lake. In February 2001, our team visited this lake, located inside an 80-m-deep pit, to perform field temperature measurements. The distribution and variation of temperature inside the lake were obtained on the basis of infrared radiation measurements performed from the rim of the pit and from the lake shores. The crust temperature was also determined from the lake shores with a thermocouple to calibrate the pyrometer. We estimated an emissivity of the basalt of 0.74 from this experiment. Through the application of the Stefan-Boltzmann law, we then obtained an estimate of the total radiative heat flux, constrained by pyrometer measurements of the pit, and visual observations of the lake activity. Taking into account the atmospheric convective heat flux, the convected magma mass flux needed to balance the energy budget was subsequently derived and found to represent between 510 and 580 kg s-1. The surface circulation of this mass flux was also analyzed through motion processing techniques applied to video images of the lake. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00445-002-0224-3.

  11. Can Satellite-Based Sensors, Hand-Held Thermal Imagers and Thermal Infrared Radiometers Calculate Reliable Eruption Rates at Active Lava Flows, Domes and Lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    Thermal data provide viable means of extracting eruption rates at active lava flows, domes and lakes. The initial algorithm, developed since 1994, uses total heat flux (Q), extracted from satellite-sensor-derived thermal images of the active lava body to extract eruption rate (E) using E = Q / ρ [c Δ T + f L]. Here ρ and c are lava density and specific heat capacity, Δ T is lava cooling, f is fractional crystallization and L is latent heat of crystallization. Later it was shown that this reduces to a linear relationship: E = a Q + b, where a and b are defined by values assumed for ρ , c, Δ T, f, and L. We present three case studies that: (1) demonstrate the variety of thermal data and activity styles that can be used in this approach, and (2) validate the approach through cross-checks with independent, field-based data: (I) Stromboli: Satellite and thermal imager-based lava flow eruption rates. A safe, easy and rapid method to calculate lava effusion rates using hand-held thermal image data was developed in June 2003 at Stromboli (Italy). FLIR data were used as input to the thermal effusion rate model, previously applied to satellite data, allowing automated effusion rate extraction. A comparison between a thermally-derived (0.2 - 0.9 m3/s) and dimensionally-derived (i.e. channel depth x width x velocity) effusion rate (0.6 m3/s) showed excellent agreement. In addition, the comparison between FLIR-derived effusion rates and satellite (AVHRR) derived values showed a good correlation (R = 0.9). (II) Santiaguito: Satellite-derived eruption rates for a lava dome A time series of 21 Landsat ETM+ and TM images acquired during 1986-2003, were used to calculate eruption rates at Santiaguito dome (Guatemala) to yield a time-averaged effusion rate of 0.4 m3/s. Field-based flow dimension and velocity measurements during 1987 and 2000-03 yielded a values of 0.6±0.3 and 0.5±0.2 m3/s which compared with an ETM+ derived values of 0.7±0.1 and 0.5±0.1 m3/s, respectively

  12. Explosive Volcanism in Io's Lava Lakes - The Key To Constraining Eruption Temperature?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; McEwen, A. S.

    2010-12-01

    Active lava lakes are open volcanic systems, where lava circulates between a magma chamber and the surface. Rare on Earth, lava lakes may be common on Io, the highly volcanic jovian moon (e.g., [1]). Io’s low atmospheric pressure means that activity within Io’s lava lakes may be explosive, exposing lava at near-liquid temperatures (currently poorly constrained for Io). Lava lakes are therefore important targets for future missions to Io [2, 3]. With this in mind, hand-held infrared imagers were used to collect thermal emission data from the phonolite Erebus (Antarctica) lava lake [4] and the basalt lava lake at Erta’Ale (Ethiopia). Temperature-area distributions and the integrated thermal emission spectra for each lava lake were determined from the data. These calculated spectra have been used to test models developed for analysis of remote sensing data of lava lakes and lava flows on both Earth and Io, where no ground-truth exists. The silicate cooling model [5] assumes, for the lava lake model variant, that the existing surface crust has been created at a fixed rate. Model output consists of a synthesized thermal emission spectrum, estimate of surface age range, and a rate of surface crust area formation. The cooling model provides accurate reproductions of actual thermal spectra and the total emitting area to within a few percent of actual emitting area. Model resurfacing rates broadly agree with observed behaviour at both lakes. Despite different composition lavas, the short-wavelength infrared thermal emission spectra from the two terrestrial lava lakes studied are very similar in shape, and, importantly, bear a striking similarity to spectra of Pele, an Io volcano that has been proposed to be a persistent, active lava lake [6] and which is the source of a 300-km high dust and gas plume. Our study of the cooling of the hottest lava exposed at Erta’Ale yields constraints on the ability of multispectral imagers to determine eruption temperature. We find

  13. Lava lake level as a gauge of magma reservoir pressure and eruptive hazard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Anderson, Kyle R.; Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.; Swanson, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Forecasting volcanic activity relies fundamentally on tracking magma pressure through the use of proxies, such as ground surface deformation and earthquake rates. Lava lakes at open-vent basaltic volcanoes provide a window into the uppermost magma system for gauging reservoir pressure changes more directly. At Kīlauea Volcano (Hawaiʻi, USA) the surface height of the summit lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater fluctuates with surface deformation over short (hours to days) and long (weeks to months) time scales. This correlation implies that the lake behaves as a simple piezometer of the subsurface magma reservoir. Changes in lava level and summit deformation scale with (and shortly precede) changes in eruption rate from Kīlauea's East Rift Zone, indicating that summit lava level can be used for short-term forecasting of rift zone activity and associated hazards at Kīlauea.

  14. Identification of variable convective regimes at Erta Ale Lava Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Andrew J. L.; Carniel, Roberto; Jones, Josh

    2005-04-01

    During February 17-19, 2002, we collected a combined thermal and seismic data set for persistent lava lake activity at Erta Ale volcano, Ethiopia. These data indicate that the lake cycled between periods characterized by low (0.01-0.08 m s -1) and high (0.1-0.4 m s -1) surface velocities, typically lasting tens to hundreds of minutes. These periods of high and low velocity motion define periods of vigorous and sluggish convection, respectively. Spectral analysis revealed that vigorous convection periods were characterized by high frequencies and energies in the thermal data and an increased presence of high-frequency energy in the seismic data. The data show that vigorous periods were characterized by formation of hot, short-lived, plastic crusts, and sluggish periods by cooler, longer lived, brittle crusts. Here, the higher transit velocity across the lake surface from upwelling zones of crust formation to downwelling zones of crust destruction during the vigorous periods decreases the crust lifetime. This in turn decreases the total cooling and thickening experienced by a plate of crust moving across the lake surface. Two scenarios can be envisaged to explain such convection cycles. The first relates variable convection rates to changes in the volume flux and rheology of magma entering the lake. In the second, cyclic convection is set up by the generation of convective instabilities within the lake. In this case, cooling of a surface layer generates a slow moving, viscous, increasingly dense convection layer at the lake surface which is consumed and replaced during overturn.

  15. Ground-based thermal imaging of lava lakes at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, J.; Oppenheimer, C.; Kyle, P. R.

    2008-11-01

    Mount Erebus, a large intraplate stratovolcano dominating Ross Island, Antarctica, hosts the world's only active phonolite lava lakes. The main manifestation of activity at Erebus volcano in December 2004 was as the presence of two convecting lava lakes within an inner crater. The long-lived Ray Lake, ~ 1400 m 2 in area, was the site of up to 10 small Strombolian eruptions per day. A new but short-lived, ~ 1000-1200 m 2 lake formed at Werner vent in December 2004 sourced by lava flowing from a crater formed in 1993 by a phreatic eruption. We measured the radiative heat flux from the two lakes in December 2004 using a compact infrared (IR) imaging camera. Daily thermal IR surveys from the Main Crater rim provide images of the lava lake surface temperatures and identify sites of upwelling and downwelling. The radiative heat outputs calculated for the Ray and Werner Lakes are 30-35 MW and 20 MW, respectively. We estimate that the magma flux needed to sustain the combined heat loss is ~ 250-710 kg s - 1 , that the minimum volume of the magma reservoir is 2 km 3, and that the radius of the conduit feeding the Ray lake is ~ 2 m.

  16. Origins and implications of zigzag rift patterns on lava lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Manga, Michael

    2006-06-01

    The distinctive rift patterns observed on newly formed lava lakes are very likely a product of interaction between heat transfer (cooling of lava) and deformation of the solid crust in response to applied stresses. One common pattern consists of symmetric "zigzag" rifts separating spreading plates. Zigzags can be characterized by two measurable parameters: an amplitude A, and an angle θ between segments that make up the zigzags. Similar patterns are observed in analog wax experiments in which molten wax acts as cooling and solidifying lava. We perform a series of these wax experiments to find the relationship between θ, A, and the cooling rate. We develop a model to explain the observed relationships: θ is determined by a balance of spreading and solidification speeds; the amplitude A is limited by the thickness of the solid wax crust. Theoretical predictions agree well with experimental data; this enables us to scale the model to basaltic lava lakes. If zigzag rifts are observed on the surface of lava lakes, and if physical properties of the lava crust can be measured or inferred by other means, measurements of θ and A make it possible to calculate crust-spreading velocity and crust thickness.

  17. Thermal insights into the dynamics of Nyiragongo lava lake from ground and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spampinato, L.; Ganci, G.; Hernández, P. A.; Calvo, D.; Tedesco, D.; Pérez, N. M.; Calvari, S.; Del Negro, C.; Yalire, M. M.

    2013-11-01

    present new insights into the short- and long-term thermal activity of the Nyiragongo lava lake by ground-based and satellite infrared thermal imagery recorded in the first half of 2012. This is the very first time in which FLIR camera and SEVIRI data have been compared at this volcano. Maximum temperatures recorded at the molten lava were of ~1180 K, whereas the lake skin remained always below ~734 K in areas far from the upwelling zone and below ~843 K in those proximal to the source region. Ground-based imagery yielded mean radiative power values between ~0.80 and 1.10 GW. Consistently, satellite observations showed similar mean values of 1.10 GW. Overall the thermal activity of the lava lake was quite variable along the three days of field measurements at both daily and intradaily scale. SEVIRI radiative power values retrieved for the January-June 2012 period revealed fluctuations within the same variability range suggesting that no significant changes of the lava lake area had occurred over the six months. Comparison with previous radiative power estimates showed that our data well agree with the general increasing trend recorded since the reappearance of the lava lake after the last flank eruption in 2002.

  18. Crystallization Processes and Magma Chamber Dynamics at the Mount Erebus Volcano Lava Lake: The Mineralogic Message

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, P. J.; Kyle, P. R.; Dunbar, N. W.

    2006-12-01

    Mount Erebus volcano, Antarctica, hosts a persistently convecting and degassing lake of crystal-rich (30-40 vol.% phenocrysts) phonolite magma, providing a direct view into an active, stable, upper-level magma chamber. Mineral phases in lava bombs ejected by small strombolian eruptions from the lava lake between 1972 and 2004 were examined. Detailed compositional profiles of Ti-magnetite and large (up to 10 cm) anorthoclase feldspar phenocrysts were obtained by electron microprobe (EMP). The EMP data provide insight into the controls on crystallization in the lava lake/shallow magmatic system as well as the processes occurring in the magma chamber. Ti-magnetite are uniform and unzoned. The anorthoclase are complexly compositionally zoned over a restricted range (An10.3-22.9Ab62.8-68.1Or11.4-27.2) and contain abundant melt inclusions (up to ~30 vol. %). Coupled, inverse variations of An and Or account for ~96% of major element compositional variability and independent Ab variations account for ~4%. The anorthoclase compositions and textures suggest crystallization proceeds at low degrees of effective undercooling and is controlled by decompression-induced degassing of water. Unlike microlites that form during a single episode of ascent and eruption, the anorthoclase phenocrysts record multiple episodes of decompression and rim growth due to shallow convection in the lava lake under variable PH2O conditions. Crystals contained within a single lava bomb do not have shared crystallization histories, suggesting that differential movement of crystals and melt occurs within the magma chamber and that lava bombs are a mechanical assembly of crystals brought together a short time before or during an eruption. Large temperature variations at the surface of the lava lake (~400°C) are not reflected in the crystal compositions. Apparently, the kinetics of mineral growth are too sluggish to record the transient cooling (estimated to be ~20 mins.) experienced by crystals at the

  19. Geochemistry and mineralogy of the phonolite lava lake, Erebus volcano, Antarctica: 1972 2004 and comparison with older lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Peter J.; Kyle, Philip R.; Dunbar, Nelia W.; Sims, Kenneth W. W.

    2008-11-01

    Mount Erebus, Antarctica, is a large (3794 m) alkaline open-conduit stratovolcano that hosts a vigorously convecting and persistently degassing lake of anorthoclase phonolite magma. The composition of the lake was investigated by analyzing glass and mineral compositions in lava bombs erupted between 1972 and 2004. Matrix glass, titanomagnetite, olivine, clinopyroxene, and fluor-apatite compositions are invariant and show that the magmatic temperature (˜ 1000°C) and oxygen fugacity (ΔlogFMQ = - 0.9) have been stable. Large temperature variations at the lake surface (~ 400-500°C) are not reflected in mineral compositions. Anorthoclase phenocrysts up to 10 cm in length feature a restricted compositional range (An 10.3-22.9Ab 62.8-68.1Or 11.4-27.2) with complex textural and compositional zoning. Anorthoclase textures and compositions indicate crystallization occurs at low degrees of effective undercooling. We propose shallow water exsolution causes crystallization and shallow convection cycles the anorthoclase crystals through many episodes of growth resulting in their exceptional size. Minor variations in eruptive activity from 1972 to 2004 are decoupled from magma compositions. The variations probably relate to changes in conduit geometry within the volcano and/or variable input of CO 2-rich volatiles into the upper-level magma chamber from deeper in the system. Eleven bulk samples of phonolite lava from the summit plateau that range in age from 0 ± 4 ka to 17 ± 8 ka were analyzed for major and trace elements. Small compositional variations are controlled by anorthoclase content. The lavas are indistinguishable from modern bulk lava bomb compositions and demonstrate that Erebus volcano has been erupting lava and tephra from the summit region with the same bulk composition for ˜ 17 ka.

  20. Mare ridges and lava lakes. [Apollo 17 investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The autointrusive hypothesis of the origin of several vagaries of prominent mare ridges is explained. Data are based on a comparison between the structure of a Hawaiian lava lake and the mare ridges. Resulting data suggest that these ridges may have formed as squeeze-ups and autointrusives in tension fractures over buried topography in the crust of luna lava lakes. Data also suggest that mare ridges may result from: (1) pressure ridges in flows, (2) compressional features resulting from subsidence of mare lava, (3) volcanic ring structures and extrusives, or loccoliths fed by lunar grid controlled dikes, (4) draped topography and fissure eruptives, (5) drag folds or tension-gash dikes caused by wrench faulting at depth, and (6) postmare thrust faults.

  1. Trace-element analyses of core samples from the 1967-1988 drillings of Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helz, Rosalind Tuthill

    2012-01-01

    This report presents previously unpublished analyses of trace elements in drill core samples from Kilauea Iki lava lake and from the 1959 eruption that fed the lava lake. The two types of data presented were obtained by instrumental neutron-activation analysis (INAA) and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (EDXRF). The analyses were performed in U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) laboratories from 1989 to 1994. This report contains 93 INAA analyses on 84 samples and 68 EDXRF analyses on 68 samples. The purpose of the study was to document trace-element variation during chemical differentiation, especially during the closed-system differentiation of Kilauea Iki lava lake.

  2. Lava lake surface characterization by thermal imaging: Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spampinato, L.; Oppenheimer, C.; Calvari, S.; Cannata, A.; Montalto, P.

    2008-12-01

    Active lava lakes represent the exposed, uppermost part of convecting magma systems and provide windows into the dynamics of magma transport and degassing. Erta 'Ale volcano located within the Danakil Depression in Ethiopia hosts one of the few permanent convecting lava lakes, probably active for a century or more. We report here on the main features of the lava lake surface based on observations from an infrared thermal camera made on 11 November 2006. Efficient magma circulation was reflected in the sustained transport of the surface, which was composed of pronounced incandescent cracks that separated wide plates of cooler crust. These crossed the lake from the upwelling to the downwelling margin with mean speeds ranging between 0.01 and 0.15 m s-1. Hot spots eventually opened in the middle of crust plates and/or along cracks. These produced mild explosive activity lasting commonly between ˜10 and ˜200 s. Apparent temperatures of cracks ranged between ˜700 and 1070°C, and of crust between ˜300 and 500°C. Radiant power output of the lake varied between ˜45 and 76 MW according to the superficial activity and continuous resurfacing of the lake. Time series analysis of the radiant power output data reveals cyclicity with a period of ˜10 min. The combination of visual and thermal observations with apparent mean temperatures and convection rates allows us to interpret these signals as the periodic release of hot overpressured gas bubbles at the lake surface.

  3. Plume composition changes during the birth of a new lava lake - Nyamulagira volcano, DR Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowski, Nicole; Giuffrida, Giovanni Bruno; Calabrese, Sergio; Scaglione, Sarah; Yalire, Mathieu; Liotta, Marcello; Brusca, Lorenzo; Arellano, Santiago; Rüdiger, Julian; Galle, Bo; Castro, Jonathan; Tedesco, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Nyamulagira, in the Virunga Volcanic Province (VVP), Democratic Republic of Congo, is one of the most active volcanoes in Africa. The volcano is located about 25 km north-northwest of Lake Kivu in the Western Branch of the East African Rift System (EARS) with a distance of only 15 km to Nyiragongo, which is well known for its decades-old active lava lake. Nyamulagira is a shield volcano with a 3058 m high and ~2000 m wide summit caldera. The volcano is characterized by frequent eruptions, which occur both from the summit crater and from the flanks (31 flank eruptions over the last 110 years). Due to the low viscosity lava, although significantly higher than the one of Nyiragongo, wide lava fields cover over 1100 km2 and lava flows often reach > 20 km length. More than 100 flank cones can be counted around the summit crater. A part from its frequent eruptions Nyamulagira had a long period of lava lake activity in the past, at least from 1912 to 1938. During the past decades, gas emissions from Nyamulagira have been only reported during eruptions. This changed in 2012, however, when Nyamulagira began emitting a persistent gas plume above its crater. By the end of 2014, and beginning in 2015, a lava lake was born, a feature that - as of the time of this writing - is still growing. To date, very little is known about gas emissions of Nyamulagira volcano with the only exception for SO2. Very few studies have been conducted regarding the volatile chemistry of Nyamulagira. We try to fill this gap by reporting gas composition measurements of Nyamulagira's volcanic plume during the birth of the lava lake, and in the first year of the lake's activity. Two field surveys have been carried out, the first one on November 1st, 2014 and the second one October 13th - 15th, 2015. Applying the broad toolbox of volcanic gas composition measurement techniques offered us the opportunity to characterize Nyamulagira's plume in excruciating detail. Nyamulagira is known to be a significant

  4. Observations of actively forming lava tubes and associated structures, Hawaii, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.

    1971-01-01

    A ground examination is made of lave tubes and channels. The surface morphology and the changes noted through lava flow activity are cited, and compared to earlier aerial observations. The lava activity was believed to be caused by a small lava lake exposed by the collapse of a crust covering it. Drainage of the lake was caused by a fissure erruption. New tubes or extensions of existing ones were noted from the flow. Molten lava was not seen in any tubes examined on the ground, but some of the flows were not sufficiently cooled to allow subsurface examination and survey of the tubes.

  5. Automated tracking of lava lake level using thermal images at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai’i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Swanson, Don; Orr, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Tracking the level of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater, at the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai’i, is an essential part of monitoring the ongoing eruption and forecasting potentially hazardous changes in activity. We describe a simple automated image processing routine that analyzes continuously-acquired thermal images of the lava lake and measures lava level. The method uses three image segmentation approaches, based on edge detection, short-term change analysis, and composite temperature thresholding, to identify and track the lake margin in the images. These relative measurements from the images are periodically calibrated with laser rangefinder measurements to produce real-time estimates of lake elevation. Continuous, automated tracking of the lava level has been an important tool used by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory since 2012 in real-time operational monitoring of the volcano and its hazard potential.

  6. The Bubble's Wake: Localized Rebound of Kīlauea's Summit Lava Lake Following Minor Bubble Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, T. R.; Houghton, B. F.; Taddeucci, J.; Del Bello, E.; Scarlato, P.; Patrick, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    One persistent mode of outgassing from Kīlauea's summit lava lake, which has been active since 2008, is characterized by dome-shaped upwellings of incandescent lava several meters across on the lake surface. These phenomena usually occur a few times per minute during the lava lake's typical north-to-south circulation regime, dampen and disappear within seconds, and produce few pyroclasts. Up until now, it has not been possible to determine if these upwellings were caused by the bursting of discrete bubbles or by rafts of smaller bubbles, though their slow speed and relative lack of pyroclasts suggested the latter. However, observations of these phenomena during 2013-14 using high-speed (200-500 Hz) cameras found a surprising result. Each dome-shaped upwelling was, instead, the aftermath of the bursting of a discrete bubble, which broke through the surface crust a few tenths of a second before the related upwelling and was roughly one-quarter to one-half its size. Thus, these upwellings appear to be the rebound of the lava lake surface into the void created by relatively minor, meter-scale bubble bursts. In some instances, the rebound even develops into a liquid jet. Rebound of the lava lake surface following wall rock collapses has been shown to be important for triggering transient explosive activity at Kīlauea since 2008. The dome-shaped upwellings described here are another example of lake-rebound dynamics at Kīlauea, though on a smaller scale. In light of the prevalence of these phenomena at Kīlauea, rebound of the magma column following disturbances at the magma free-surface could play a role in other volcanic systems as well.

  7. Terrestrial Lava Lake Physical Parameter Estimation Using a Silicate Cooling Model - Implications for a Return to the Volcanic Moon, Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley

    2010-05-01

    Active lava lakes are open volcanic systems, where lava circulates between a magma chamber and the surface. Rare on Earth, lava lakes may be common on Io, the highly volcanic moon of Jupiter (see [1]). Lava lakes are important targets for future missions to Io [2, 3] as they provide excellent targets at which to measure lava eruption temperature (see [2] for other targets). With this in mind, hand-held infrared imagers were used to collect in-situ thermal emission data from the anorthoclase phonolite lava lake at Erebus volcano (Antarctica) in December 2005 [1, 3] and the basalt lava lake at Erta'Ale volcano (Ethiopia) in September 2009. These data have been analysed to establish surface temperature and area distributions and the integrated thermal emission spectra for each lava lake. These spectra have been used to test models developed for analysis of remote sensing data of lava lakes and lava flows on both Earth and Io, where no ground-truth exists. The silicate cooling model [4] assumes, for the lava lake model variant, that the existing surface crust has been created at a fixed rate. Model output consists of a synthesized thermal emission spectrum, estimate of surface age range, and a rate of surface crust area formation. The cooling model provides accurate reproductions of actual thermal spectra and the total emitting area to within a few percent of actual emitting area. Despite different composition lavas, the integrated thermal emission spectra from the two terrestrial lava lakes studied are very similar in shape, and, importantly, bear a striking similarity to spectra of Pele, a feature on Io that has been proposed to be a persistent, active lava lake [1]. The 2005 Erebus lava lake had an area of ~820 m2 and a measured surface temperature distribution of 1090 K to 575 K with a broad peak from 730 K to 850 K [5]. Total heat loss was estimated to be 23.5 MW [5]. The model fit yielded an area of ~820 m2, temperatures from 1475 K to 699 K, and an average

  8. Modeling lava lake heat loss, rheology, and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Andrew J. L.

    2008-04-01

    Measurements at Erta Ale's lava lake and theoretical equations for lake rheology, density driven convection and thermally-driven plume ascent allow the constraint of lake dynamics. Cooling and crystallization expected from surface heat losses imply a viscosity increase from 150 Pa s to 300-1800 Pa s for cooled surface layers. Convection is expected to proceed vigorously under low viscosity conditions driving rapid (0.1-0.4 m s-1) surface motions and sluggishly under moderate-to-high viscosity conditions to drive slower motions (<0.08 m s-1). Convection is likely driven by small (~6 kg m-3) density differences, where surface cooling can influence lake rheology and explain variable rates of surface convective motion.

  9. Decadal persistence of cycles in lava lake motion at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Nial; Oppenheimer, Clive; Kyle, Philip; Kingsbury, Nick

    2014-06-01

    Studies of Erebus volcano's active lava lake have shown that many of its observable properties (gas composition, surface motion and radiant heat output) exhibit cyclic behaviour with a period of ∼10 min. We investigate the multi-year progression of the cycles in surface motion of the lake using an extended (but intermittent) dataset of thermal infrared images collected by the Mount Erebus Volcano Observatory between 2004 and 2011. Cycles with a period of ∼5-18 min are found to be a persistent feature of the lake's behaviour and no obvious long-term change is observed despite variations in lake level and surface area. The times at which gas bubbles arrive at the lake's surface are found to be random with respect to the phase of the motion cycles, suggesting that the remarkable behaviour of the lake is governed by magma exchange rather than an intermittent flux of gases from the underlying magma reservoir.

  10. Thermal Remote Sensing of Lava Lakes on Io and Earth (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; McEwen, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanology has been transformed by remote sensing. For decades, Earth's volcanoes have been studied in the infrared by a wide variety of instruments on spacecraft at widely varying spectral, spatial and temporal resolutions, for which techniques have been developed to interpret and understand ongoing volcanic eruptions. The study of volcanism on Io, the only Solar System body besides Earth known to have ongoing, high temperature, silicate-based effusive and explosive volcanic eruptions, requires new remote sensing techniques. The extraordinary volcanism allows us to examine Io's interior and composition from the material erupted onto the surface. For Io, the biggest question in the wake of NASA's Galileo mission concerns the eruption temperature of Io's dominant silicate lavas [1,2]. Constraining eruption temperature constrains magma composition, in turn a reflection of the composition, physical state and tidal heating within Io. However, the extraction of lava eruption temperature from remote sensing data is difficult. Detector saturation is likely except when the hot material fills a tiny fraction of a resolution element, unless instruments are designed for this objective. High temperature lava surfaces cool rapidly, so remote observations can miss the peak temperature. Observations at different wavelengths must be acquired nearly simultaneously to derive accurate temperatures of very hot and dynamic sources [3]. Uncertainties regarding hot lava emissivity [4] also reduce the confidence in derived temperatures. From studying thermal emission data from different styles of volcanic activity on Earth by remote sensing in conjunction with contemporaneous observations on the ground, it is found that only certain styles of volcanic activity are suitable for deriving liquid lava temperatures [3]. Active lava lakes are particularly useful, especially during a phase of lava fountaining. Examination and analysis of FLIR data obtained at the Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) basaltic

  11. Terrestrial laser scanning observations of geomorphic changes and varying lava lake levels at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Laura K.; Kyle, Philip R.; Oppenheimer, Clive; Frechette, Jedediah D.; Okal, Marianne H.

    2015-03-01

    A Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) instrument was used to image the topography of the Main Crater at Erebus volcano each December in 2008, 2009, and 2010. Our high-spatial resolution TLS scans provide unique insights into annual and decadal scale geomorphic evolution of the summit area when integrated with comparable data collected by an airborne instrument in 2001. We observe both a pattern of subsidence within the Inner Crater of the volcano and an ~ 3 m per-year drop in the lava lake level over the same time period that are suggestive of decreasing overpressure in an underlying magma reservoir. We also scanned the active phonolite lava lake hosted within the Inner Crater, and recorded rapid cyclic fluctuations in the level of the lake. These were sporadically interrupted by minor explosions by bursting gas bubbles at the lake surface. The TLS data permit calculation of lake level rise and fall speeds and associated rates of volumetric change within the lake. These new observations, when considered with prior determinations of rates of lake surface motion and gas output, are indicative of unsteady magma flow in the conduit and its associated variability in gas volume fraction.

  12. Crystallization of tholeiitic basalt in Alae Lava Lake, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, D.L.; Wright, T.L.; Moore, J.G.

    1966-01-01

    The eruption of Kilauea Volcano August 21-23, 1963, left 600,000 cubic meters of basaltic lava in a lava lake as much as 15 meters deep in Alae pit crater. Field studies of the lake began August 27 and include repeated core drilling, measurements of temperature in the crust and melt, and precise level surveys of the lake surface. The last interstitial melt in the lake solidified late in September 1964; by mid August 1965 the maximum temperature was 690??C at a depth of 11.5 meters. Pumice air-quenched from about 1140??C contains only 5 percent crystals - clinopyroxene, cuhedral olivine (Fo 80), and a trace of plagioclase, (An 70). Drill cores taken from the zone of crystallization in the lake show that olivine continued crystallizing to about 1070??C; below that it reacts with the melt, becoming corroded and mantled by pyroxene and plagioclase. Below 1070??C, pyroxene and plagioclase crystallized at a constant ratio. Ilmenite first appeared at about 1070??C and was joined by magnetite at about 1050??C; both increased rapidly in abundance to 1000??C. Apatite first appeared as minute needles in interstitial glass at 1000??C. Both the abundance and index of refraction of glass quenched from melt decreased nearly linearly with falling temperature. At 1070??C the quenched lava contains about 65 percent dark-brown glass with an index of 1.61; at 980??C it contains about 8 percent colorless glass with an index of 1.49. Below 980??C, the percentage of glass remained constant. Progressive crystallization forced exsolution of gases from the melt fraction; these formed vesicles and angular pores, causing expansion of the crystallizing lava and lifting the surface of the central part of the lake an average of 19.5 cm. The solidified basalt underwent pneumatolitic alteration, including deposition of cristobalite at 800??C, reddish alteration of olivine at 700??C, tarnishing of ilmenite at 550??C, deposition of anhydrite at 250??C, and deposition of native sulfur at 100??C

  13. The role of large bubbles detected from acoustic measurements on the dynamics of Erta 'Ale lava lake (Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouche, E.; Vergniolle, S.; Staudacher, T.; Nercessian, A.; Delmont, J.-C.; Frogneux, M.; Cartault, F.; Le Pichon, A.

    2010-06-01

    The activity at the surface of the lava lake on Erta 'Ale volcano (Ethiopia) shows that large bubbles are regularly breaking at a fixed position on the lava lake. This is also where the small lava fountains are sometimes produced. Since this location is likely to be directly above the volcanic conduit feeding the lava lake, we have done continuous measurements between March 22 and 26, 2003 to understand the degassing of a volcano in permanent activity. The bubble size has been first estimated from videos, which once combined with the acoustic pressure, can constrain the source of the sound. The gas volume and overpressure stayed roughly constant, between 36-700 m3 and 4 × 103-1.8 × 104 Pa, respectively. Simultaneous thermal measurements showed regular peaks, which occurred when the crust was broken by a large bubble, hence gave a direct indication on the typical return time between the bubbles (1 h). These spherical cap bubbles had a high Reynolds number, 4600-20000, therefore a wake, periodically unstable, formed and detached from the bubble bottom. The bubbly wake, if the detachment occurs close to the surface, can explain the duration of lava fountains, measured on the videos. The periodic arrival of bubbly wakes, which mostly detach from the driving spherical cap within the lava lake, could explain the absence of cooling at Erta 'Ale, Erebus (Antartica), Villarica (Chile) and Nyiragongo (Democratic Republic of Congo) without invoking a convective downflow of magma in the conduit, as previously done.

  14. Rheology of phonolitic magmas - the case of the Erebus lava lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Losq, Charles; Neuville, Daniel R.; Moretti, Roberto; Kyle, Philip R.; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2015-02-01

    Long-lived active lava lakes are comparatively rare and are typically associated with low-viscosity basaltic magmas. Erebus volcano, Antarctica, is unique today in hosting a phonolitic lava lake. Phonolitic magmas can erupt explosively, as in the 79 CE Plinian eruption of Vesuvius volcano, Italy, and it is therefore important to understand their physical properties. The phonolite at Erebus has slightly higher silica content than that at Vesuvius yet its present activity is predominantly non-explosive. As a contribution to understanding such contrasting eruptive behaviour, we focus on the rheological differences between these comparable magmas. In particular, we evaluate the viscosity of the Erebus phonolite magma by integrating new experimental data within a theoretical and empirical framework. The resulting model enables estimation of the Erebus melt viscosity as a function of temperature, crystal and water concentrations, with an uncertainty of, at most, ± 0.45 log (Pa s). Using reported ranges for these parameters, we predict that the magma viscosity in the upper region of the plumbing system of Erebus ranges between 105 and 107 Pas. This is substantially higher than has been hitherto considered with significant implications for modelling the dynamics of the lava lake, conduit and magma reservoir system. Our analysis highlights the generic challenges encountered in calculation of magma viscosity and presents an approach that can be applied to other cases.

  15. Seismic characteristics of variable convection at Erta ´Ale lava lake, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Joshua; Carniel, Roberto; Harris, Andrew J. L.; Malone, Steve

    2006-05-01

    The active summit lava lake of Erta ´Ale volcano, Ethiopia, offers a unique opportunity to study magma convection. In February 2002, we collected a multiparametric set of seismic, thermal and video data. These data indicate that the lake cycled between periods characterized by low (0.01-0.08 m s - 1 ) and high (0.1-0.4 m s - 1 ) convection rates, typically lasting tens to hundreds of minutes. Three seismometers placed around the active crater recorded continuous tremor with a dominant frequency of 2 Hz, and energy at frequencies from 0.8 to 12 Hz. Here, we characterize the seismic signature of each regime by its spectral content, wavefield polarization, and tremor source location. For both regimes, the wavefield is mostly rectilinear. Azimuths and incidence angles are consistent with P waves originating in one of two locations: the north edge of the active lava lake, or a region 100-150 m ENE of the lava lake. Because both regimes are dominated by a low frequency, rectilinearly polarized wavefield, we investigate the source location using a method that solves for location and isotropic source power by a weighted least-squares amplitude-based inversion of seismic data. We find that tremor source regions are unique to each convective regime, although some location overlap exists when tremor is located in short time windows. Wavefield composition suggests that the convective phases may share a common source process, but their differing locations indicate that either the source region is non-stationary, or a second source skews the location during the high convective phase. Tremor polarization and location suggests that the low-frequency tremor is caused by bubble coalescence and bursting in a conduit whose surface is the lava lake. The higher frequency signal associated with the high convective regime is associated with a scattered, more complex wavefield superimposed on the low-frequency background tremor, caused by bubble bursting and cracking of cooled crust at

  16. Sulfur, heat, and magma budget of Erta ‘Ale lava lake, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, C.; McGonigle, A. J. S.; Allard, P.; Wooster, M. J.; Tsanev, V.

    2004-06-01

    We report here the first measurements of the SO2 flux from Erta ‘Ale volcano (Ethiopia); the measurements were obtained in March 2003 with a portable ultraviolet spectrometer. Emission rates averaged 0.7 kg·s-1 from the active lava lake and 1.3 kg·s-1 from the whole volcano (including fumarolic emissions in the north part of the caldera). This modest output combined with an estimate of the melt sulfur content indicates a magma-supply rate of 350 650 kg·s-1 (˜0.13 0.25 m3·s-1). Radiant heat power from the lava lake, measured by infrared thermography, was found to vary between ˜5 and 30 MW according to activity of the lake surface and time elapsed since resurfacing events. We show that 8% 14% crystallization and/or 30 60 °C cooling of the upwelling magma reaching the lake, as well as degassing, are sufficient to increase magma density in the upper conduit and drive convection between the surface and a feeding reservoir. Fluctuations in the system, such as degree of vesiculation and magma supply rate, can be buffered by ascent or descent of the magma level within a flared vent region whose geometry directly controls lake surface area and hence heat loss.

  17. Intercomparison of gas emissions from the lava lakes of Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira, DR Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowski, Nicole; Calabrese, Sergio; Giuffrida, Giovanni; Scaglione, Sarah; Pandolfo, Francesco; Minani, Abel; Shamavu Mulumeoderhwa, Patient; Liotta, Marcello; Brusca, Lorenzo; D'Alessandro, Walter; Yalire, Mathiew; Arellano, Santiago; Galle, Bo; Tedesco, Dario

    2015-04-01

    From 25th of October to 5th of November 2014 field surveys were carried out at Nyiragongo and Nyamulagira volcanoes, DR Congo. These two volcanoes belong to the eight volcanoes in the Virunga volcanic chain. They have an altitude of about 3470 m.a.s.l. and 3060 m.a.s.l., respectively. The craters of the two volcanoes lie within a distance of less than 15 km and both have a diameter of about 1000 m and 2000 m, respectively showing a similar inner geometry containing several terraces inside. The lava lake of Nyamulagira is still under formation while Nyiragongo's lava lake is known since more than 100 years with short interruptions after the eruptions in 1977 and 2002. However, also Nyamulagira had a long period of lava lake activity, at least from 1912 to 1938. Both volcanoes are characterized by low SiO2 content of their lava, but Nyiragongo being exceptionally low in SiO2 and with significantly higher alkali content than Nyamulagira. There is a clear distinction between both lavas; a basaltic to tephritic one in the case of Nyamulagira and an often foidite one in the case of Nyiragongo. Also their volcanic activity has differed significantly during the last decades from each other. While Nyiragongo is famous for its permanent lava lake, Nyamulagira is characterized by frequent eruptions, which sum up to more than 40 since 1865. During our field survey we investigated and compared the gas composition and fluxes of both volcanoes in autumn 2014. The ground - based remote sensing technique - Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) using scattered sunlight, the in-situ Multi-GAS-instrument, as well as active alkaline and particle traps have been simultaneously applied at each crater of the two volcanoes during the field trip. Downwind installed DOAS instruments (appendant to NOVAC (Network of Observation of Volcanic and Atmospheric Change)) were used to determine SO2 emission fluxes. Among others, bromine monoxide/sulphur dioxide (BrO/SO2

  18. Erta Ale Lava Lake: Identification and Modelling of Variable Convective Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniel, R.; Harris, A. J.; Jones, J.

    2002-12-01

    After more than twenty years without access to Erta Ale volcano, field campaigns are once again feasible. Between February 15 and February 20, 2002, a combined thermal and seismic data set was recorded at Erta Ale volcano, Ethiopia, to study activity of the persistent lava lake. Analysis of continuous tremor and thermal fluctuations suggests that lava lake activity, as recorded by temperature variations, is related to seismic energy and spectral content. When we compare these parameters at timescales of minutes to hours, we find that correlations range from good to poor. However, these two parameters do not significantly correlate on timescales of a full day. Both thermal and seismic data indicate that the lava lake exhibits cyclical behavior between 20 to 80 minute periods characterized by low (~0.05 ms-1) and high (~0.2 ms-1) rates of convection, respectively. We use our measurements to constrain two models to explain these convection cycles. The first model relates variable convection rates to pulses in the rate at which magma is supplied to the lake. This model requires supply rates to cycle between high convection rate phases fed by a magma volume flux of 0.2 m3s-1 and low convection rate phases fed by a magma volume flux of 0.03 m3s-1. The second model assumes that supply to the lake is steady and that cyclic convection is set up by the generation of convective instabilities within the lake. In this case, cooling of the surface layer generates a slow moving, viscous convection cell at the lake surface overlying a faster moving convection cell of lower viscosity. Recharge of the lower cell increases the buoyancy of the lower layer, and eventually triggers an overturn event. At this point the surface of the low viscosity cell extends to the lake surface and the high viscosity cell sinks to be drained from the lake. We find that the second model, whereby cyclic convection is generated by processes acting within the lake, is more plausible.

  19. Implications of longeval lava lakes for geomorphological and plutonic processes at Erta 'Ale volcano, Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Clive; Francis, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Erta 'Ale volcano, sited within the Afar Triangle of Ethiopia, is one of the least visited of perennially active, subaerial volcanoes. Satellite images recorded over the past thirty years illustrate the sustained activity of the volcano and complement the few brief periods of field observation. We consider that Erta 'Ale's lava lakes have probably persisted for ≥ 90 years, placing them among the longest-lived yet recorded. Despite sustained surface heat fluxes of 100-400 MW, the net surface growth rate integrated over the interval 1968-1995 was only ≈ 10 kg s -1. We speculate that this minimal lava discharge cannot be used to infer a low magma supply rate to the volcano, since heat losses from die lava lakes inhibit eruption by increasing magma density. This implies growth of the underlying crust by formation of dikes and sills containing cumulates, accommodated, and possibly promoted, by regional extension and intrusion loading. Open vent degassing and rift kinematics are clearly reflected in Erta 'Ale's morphology which is characterised by very gentle (< 3 °) slopes and a summit caldera.

  20. Underwater observations of active lava flows from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tribble, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    Underwater observation of active submarine lava flows from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, in March-June 1989 revealed both pillow lava and highly channelized lava streams flowing down a steep and unconsolidated lava delta. The channelized streams were 0.7-1.5 m across and moved at rates of 1-3 m/s. The estimated flux of a stream was 0.7 m3/s. Jets of hydrothermal water and gas bubbles were associated with the volcanic activity. The rapidly moving channelized lava streams represent a previously undescribed aspect of submarine volcanism. -Author

  1. Phosphorus zoning in olivine of Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbrizio, Alessandro; Beckett, John R.; Baker, Michael B.; Stolper, Edward M.

    2010-05-01

    Kilauea Iki lava lake was formed when the lavas of the 1959 summit eruption of Kilauea volcano ponded in Kilauea Iki pit crater, as described by [1]. The main chamber of this lake has been drilled repeatedly from 1960 to 1981 as the lake has cooled and crystallized and partial descriptions of core can be found in [2-7]. The bulk of the core consists of a gray, olivine-phyric basalt matrix [3]. Rapid diffusion of divalent cations through olivine at magmatic temperatures can delete information on early-formed zoning and thus information on early magmatic history, recorded in olivine during its growth, is often largely lost [8-11]. In the last years many studies [8-11] have shown that natural olivine, terrestrial and extraterrestrial, from several localities and rock types can preserve a complex zoning in P (sometimes associated with Cr and Al). Simple crystallization experiments conducted by [10] and [11] were able to replicate these features (i.e., sector and oscillatory zoning). Here, we describe P, Cr and Al zoning in olivine from the 1981 drilling of Kilauea Iki lava lake hole #1 (KI81-1) [6]. Kα X-ray intensity maps and major and minor element quantitative analyses were obtained using the Caltech JEOL JXA-8200 electron microprobe. We acquired P, Cr, Al, Fe and Ti X-ray maps simultaneously at 15 kV and 400 nA, a beam diameter of 1 μm, pixel spacing of 1-2 μm, and count times of 420-1500 msec/step were used depending on the dimension of the crystal. 15 kV and 40 nA with a beam diameter of 1 μm were used to collect quantitative analyses. P2O5 contents of the Iki olivines range from below detection limit to 0.30 wt%. Zoning in phosphorus, based on X-ray intensity maps, was observed in all olivines we examined. The P zoning patterns of the olivines display several styles. P shows oscillatory zoning comparable to that seen in terrestrial and extraterrestrial igneous olivines and in experimentally grown olivine [8-11]; high P regions, inside the crystals, outline

  2. Terrestrial Photogrammetry of Active Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M.; Robson, S.

    2006-12-01

    In order to improve our understanding of how lavas flow, cool and stop, accurate and frequent DEMs and associated temperature measurements of active flows are required. We describe the use of terrestrial photogrammetric techniques which allow detailed measurements to be carried out rapidly, frequently and over relevant spatial scales. Furthermore, the equipment required is sufficiently small and light to be easily deployed in remote areas. Images of lava flows from Etna (Sicily) and Hawai'i have been acquired, representing cases involving different length scales, observation distances and advance rates. On Etna, flow-front regions and distal channels of aa flows were studied over distances of up to 400 m. Advance rates were relatively slow (< 4 m hr-1) over flow-fronts ~7 m in height and up to ~30 m in width. The slow rate of change allowed topographic surfaces to be constructed from images collected from multiple locations using a single camera. Sequential surfaces were uses to monitor variations in the volumetric flux at the flow fronts. On Hawai'i, smaller spatial scales were required (distances <30 m) to cover the advance and subsequent inflation of pahoehoe toes. In contrast to the Etna case, the higher rate of lava advance precluded the use of one roving camera to provide topographic data. Hence, DEMs were generated from image pairs acquired using two synchronised and tripod-mounted cameras. Image pairs were collected every minute and the resulting topography can be used to rectify simultaneously collected thermal data. The different problems associated with data collection and processing in these two cases are discussed. This includes image matching issues and factors resulting from the differences between the rubbly aa and the relatively smooth pahoehoe surfaces.

  3. Constraints on crystallization of basaltic magma: observations from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helz, Rosalind

    2013-04-01

    Kilauea Iki lava lake is a picritic (average MgO = 15.5%) magma body, approximately 135 m thick, which underwent extensive internal differentiation as it cooled and crystallized from its formation during the eruption of 1959 until final solidification in the mid-nineties. Observations of its initial state include data on the stages of filling of the lava lake, plus the sequence and temperature of lava compositions erupted. Drilling and core recovery (from 1960 to 1988) have documented the state of the lake at specific times, showing that the rate of growth of the upper crust was nearly linear (~2.5 m per year between 1962 and 1979), and that the overall pattern of cooling of the lava lake is consistent with conductive heat loss. Recovery and analysis of partially molten drill core has provided a detailed view of the cooling and differentiation history of the melts and minerals within the lake. Observations that may be relevant to older systems include: (1) documentation of when and to what extent olivine settling occurred in the lake; (2) the observation that the most differentiated part of the lake, which lies within the upper crust at a depth of 20-40 m, had completely crystallized by 1975, and (3) the observation that the position of the last interstitial melt was at 80-85 m down, or 62% of the way down in the lake, as would be predicted from conductive cooling. The lava lake lost heat through its roof faster than through the floor, with the result that the position of most-differentiated horizon is grossly offset from the position of the final melt. Circulation patterns in Kilauea Iki were initially driven by lava input during the eruption plus extensive loss of volatiles. These processes significantly affected the location of foundered crust within the lake, as well as the accumulation of coarse, pre-existing olivine phenocrysts between 50 and 95 m. Subsequently, two other major differentiation processes within the lake were driven by upward movement of low

  4. The Cooling Rate of an Active Aa Lava Flow Determined Using an Orbital Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Robert; Garbeil, Harold

    2010-05-01

    The surface temperature of an active lava flow is an important physical property to measure. Through its influence on lava crystallinity, cooling exerts a fundamental control on lava rheology. Remotely sensed thermal radiance data acquired by multispectral sensors such as Landsat Thematic Mapper and the Terra Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer, are of insufficient spectral and radiometric fidelity to allow for realistic determination of lava surface temperatures from Earth orbit. This paper presents results obtained from the analysis of active lava flows using hyperspectral data acquired by NASA's Earth Observing-1 Hyperion imaging spectrometer. The contiguous nature of the measured radiance spectrum in the 0.4-2.5 micron region means that, although sensor saturation most certainly occurs, unsaturated radiance data are always available from even the hottest, and most radiant, active lava flow surfaces. The increased number of wavebands available allows for the assumption of more complex flow surface temperature distributions in the radiance-to-temperature inversion processes. The technique is illustrated by using a hyperspectral image of the active lava lake at Erta Ale volcano, Ethiopia, a well characterized calibration target. We then go on to demonstrate how this approach can be used to constrain the surface cooling rate of an active lava flow at Mount Etna, Sicily, using three images acquired during a four day period in September 2004. The cooling rate of the active channel as determined from space falls within the limits commonly assumed in numerical lava flow models. The results provide insights into the temperature-radiance mixture modeling problem that will aid in the analysis of data acquired by future hyperspectral remote sensing missions, such as NASA's proposed HyspIRI mission.

  5. Correlation of cycles in Lava Lake motion and degassing at Erebus Volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Nial; Oppenheimer, Clive; Killingsworth, Drea Rae; Frechette, Jed; Kyle, Philip

    2014-08-01

    studies at Erebus volcano have recorded pulsatory behavior in many of the observable properties of its active lava lake. A strong correlation between the variations in surface speed of the lake and the composition of gas emitted has previously been noted. While previous studies have shown that the SO2 flux and the surface elevation exhibit pulsatory behavior with a similar period to that of the surface speed and gas composition, suggesting they are linked, a lack of overlap between the different measurements has prevented direct comparisons from being made. Using high time-resolution measurements of surface elevation, surface speed, gas composition, and SO2 flux, we demonstrate for the first time an unambiguous link between the cyclic behavior in each of these properties. We also show that the variation in gas composition may be explained by a subtle change in oxygen fugacity. The cycles are found to be in-phase with each other, with a small but consistent lag of 1-3 min between the peaks in surface elevation and surface speed. Explosive events are found to have no observable effect on the pulsatory behavior beyond the ˜5 min period required for lake refill. The close correspondences between the varying lake surface motion, gas flux and composition, and modeled oxygen fugacity suggest strong links between magma degassing, redox change, and the fluid dynamics of the shallow magmatic system.

  6. Cooling rate of some active lavas determined using an orbital imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Robert; Garbeil, Harold; Davies, Ashley G.

    2010-06-01

    The surface temperature of an active lava flow is an important physical property to measure. Through its influence on lava crystallinity, cooling exerts a fundamental control on lava rheology. Remotely sensed thermal radiance data acquired by multispectral sensors such as Landsat Thematic Mapper and the Terra Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer are of insufficient spectral and radiometric fidelity to allow for realistic determination of lava surface temperatures from Earth orbit. This paper presents results obtained from the analysis of active lava flows using hyperspectral data acquired by NASA's Earth Observing-1 Hyperion imaging spectrometer. The contiguous nature of the measured radiance spectrum in the 0.4-2.5 μm region means that, although sensor saturation most certainly occurs, unsaturated radiance data are always available from even the hottest, and most radiant, active lava flow surfaces. The increased number of wave bands available allows for the assumption of more complex flow surface temperature distributions in the radiance-to-temperature inversion processes. The technique is illustrated by using a hyperspectral image of the active lava lake at Erta Ale volcano, Ethiopia, a well-characterized calibration target, a time series of three Hyperion images of an active lava flow acquired during a 4 day period at Mount Etna, Sicily, as well as a lava flow erupted at Nyamuragira, Democratic Republic of Congo. The results provide insights into the temperature-radiance mixture modeling problem that will aid in the analysis of data acquired by future hyperspectral remote sensing missions, such as NASA's proposed HyspIRI mission.

  7. What can crystal size distributions and olivine compositions tell us about magma solidification processes inside Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinet, Nicolas; Higgins, Michael D.

    2011-12-01

    Lava lakes offer the opportunity to investigate magma solidification and can be considered as a proxy for small magma chambers. Here we present olivine compositions and crystal size distributions (CSDs) from scoria and drill core samples from Kilauea Iki lava lake, which formed during the 1959 eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Three chemically distinct olivine populations were distinguished, in the basis of their forsterite (Fo) content: (1) a high-Fo population (Fo 86-90); (2) an intermediate-Fo population (Fo 78-82); and (3) a minor low-Fo population (Fo 74-78). Populations 1 and 2 both have deformed and undeformed crystals. The third population may be the result of rejuvenation. Olivine in the lower 60 m of lake has a less Fo-rich composition and more crystals are deformed. The CSD analysis yields estimates of the average olivine residence time: 1-60 years. The shape of the olivine CSDs is fairly uniform with respect to depth. Curved CSDs are considered to be evidence of hybrid populations, partly or totally involving crystal or magma mixing. The turndown at the smallest sizes of most foundered crust and lake CSDs may be the result of coarsening, making this process active both before and after eruption. Our CSD modelling does not support significant crystal settling and overall convection in the lava lake, although small advective currents are known to have occurred. The olivine vertical stratification cannot be an original feature, which is consistent with supposed strong stirring of the lake magma due to intense activity over the 17 eruptive phases. It is also possible that independent basal feeding of the lake during the eruption may be needed to explain fully features of the chemical and mineralogical stratification.

  8. Source processes of near-field deformation accompanying recent lava lake level decrease at Nyiragongo, DR. Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geirsson, Halldor; Smets, Benoît; d'Oreye, Nicolas; Cayol, Valerie; Samsonov, Sergey; De Rauw, Dominique; Kervyn, Francois

    2016-04-01

    Nyiragongo volcano in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Central Africa, is one of the rare volcanoes that host a long-living lava lake. The evolution of this lava lake is very dynamic, with height changes spanning hundreds of meters over the past decades and including drastic height changes in relation to flank eruptions of the volcano in 1977 and 2002 (Smets et al., this meeting). Since September 30, 2011, the level of the lava lake has been progressively falling, reaching ~70 m below the lowest platform (termed "platform P3" hereafter) in July 2014. Platform P3 is constructed from successive overflows of the lava lake from 2002 to 2011, amounting to ~400 m thickness since the emptying of the lava lake following the 2002 flank eruption. Coinciding with the recent fall of the lava lake, differences of photogrammetry-derived DEM models, and InSAR time series, show a very near-field (out to ~200-300 m distance from the ~200 m-wide lava lake, i.e. on platform P3) deformation signal with up to meter-scale deformation near the crater. Ring-fractures have also formed in platform P3. Here we compare and contrast plausible models of processes contributing to this near-field deformation, including thermal contraction, elastic response, block rotation, structural weaknesses, and subsurface shape of the lava lake.

  9. 4D Micro-Piston Motion of Halemaumau Lava Lake Surface Measured with Ground-Based Tripod LiDAR, Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawden, G. W.; Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Howle, J.; Bond, S.; Thelen, W. A.; Kauahikaua, J. P.; Angeli, K.; Pelkie, A.; Molnia, B. F.

    2013-12-01

    We measured decimeter-scale oscillations in the elevation of the Halemaumau lava lake (HLL) surface at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, during a sequence of ground-based Tripod-LiDAR (T-LiDAR) laser scans September 13-14, 2012. Geodetically measuring elevational changes of a dynamic lava lake surface has inherent risks and technical challenges, including the ability to see the lake surface through the volcanic gases. We successfully penetrated most of the dense volcanic gases from the rim of the HLL using the Optech LR laser scanner 1-micron (1064 nm) laser (a wavelength that is not attenuated by water) to measure elevation changes of the surface of the active lava lake 164 meters below the scanner. We found that the average elevation of the entire lava lake surface oscillated with an average 10-cm amplitude across the HLL with increased amplitude (2-3 times larger) proximal to the downwelling portion of the lake. A temporal power-spectrum analysis of the T-LiDAR point cloud resolved an 8.4-second primary oscillation frequency with secondary frequencies at 3.3-second intervals from the primary (1.8, 5.1, 8.4, 11.7 seconds). Preliminary analysis of the seismic spectra shows a peak in the seismic signal at 7.8 seconds (0.13 hz) for the same time period. Qualitative assessment of time-lapse video of the lava lake surface visually confirms that the lava lake rises and falls about every 8 seconds with superimposed smaller-amplitude elevation changes approximately every 3 seconds. We suggest the term micro-pistoning to distinguish this behavior from the larger-scale gas pistoning events at Kilauea that take place over several minutes (Patrick, M. et al, Bull Volcanol, V73(9)pp 1179-1186, 2011).

  10. Diapiric transfer of melt in Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii: a quick, efficient process of igneous differentiation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helz, R.T.; Kirschenbaum, H.; Marinenko, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Kilauea Iki lava lake, formed in 1959, is a large pond of picritic basalt (average MgO content = 15.34% by weight), which has cooled and crystallized as a small, self-roofed magma chamber. Differentiation processes recognized as active in the lake include rather inefficient settling of the larger (2-10 mm) olivine phenocrysts, formation of segregation veins, and formation of diapir-like vertical olivine-rich bodies, all processes which occur in one or more of the other Kilauean lava lakes as well. In addition, most of the central part of Kilauea Iki has been affected by diapiric melt transfer. Diapiric melt transfer was active from 1960 to 1971 and has affected most of the central part of the lake from 13 m to at least 80 m. The process ran simultaneously with the other three main differentiation processes but started and stopped independently of the others. Calculations suggest that between 21 and 42 wt % liquid has been extracted from the depleted zone at 56-78 m in the center of the lake, making this a very efficient process of chemical differentiation. -from Authors

  11. Frequency and Size of Strombolian Eruptions from the Phonolitic Lava Lake at Erebus Volcano, Antarctica: Insights from Infrasound and Seismic Observations on Bubble Formation and Ascent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, H. M. M.; Kyle, P. R.; Fee, D.; Curtis, A.

    2015-12-01

    Erebus, an active intraplate volcano on Ross Island, commonly produces bubble burst Strombolian explosions from a long-lived, convecting phonolitic lava lake. Persistent lava lakes are rare, and provide direct insights into their underlying magmatic system. Erebus phonolite is H2O-poor and contains ~30% anorthoclase megacrysts. At shallow depths lab measurements suggest the magma has viscosities of ~107 Pa s. This has implications for magma and bubble ascent rates through the conduit and into the lava lake. The bulk composition and matrix glass of Erebus ejecta has remained uniform for many thousands of years, but eruptive activity varies on decadal and shorter time scales. Over the last 15 years, increased activity took place in 2005-2007, and more recently in the 2013 austral summer. In the 2014 austral summer, new infrasound sensors were installed ~700 m from the summit crater hosting the lava lake. These sensors, supplemented by the Erebus network seismic stations, recorded >1000 eruptions between 1 January and 7 April 2015, with an average infrasound daily uptime of 9.6 hours. Over the same time period, the CTBT infrasound station IS55, ~25 km from Erebus, detected ~115 of the >1000 locally observed eruptions with amplitude decreases of >100x. An additional ~200 eruptions were recorded during local infrasound downtime. This represents an unusually high level of activity from the Erebus lava lake, and while instrument noise influences the minimum observable amplitude each day, the eruption infrasound amplitudes may vary by ~3 orders of magnitude over the scale of minutes to hours. We use this heightened period of variable activity and associated seismic and acoustic waveforms to examine mechanisms for bubble formation and ascent, such as rise speed dependence and collapsing foam; repose times for the larger eruptions; and possible eruption connections to lava lake cyclicity.

  12. Degassing dynamics of basaltic lava lake at a top-ranking volatile emitter: Ambrym volcano, Vanuatu arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Patrick; Burton, Mike; Sawyer, Georgina; Bani, Philipson

    2016-08-01

    Persistent lava lakes are rare on Earth and provide volcanologists with a remarkable opportunity to directly investigate magma dynamics and degassing at the open air. Ambrym volcano, in Vanuatu, is one of the very few basaltic arc volcanoes displaying such an activity and voluminous gas emission, but whose study has long remained hampered by challenging accessibility. Here we report the first high temporal resolution (every 5 s) measurements of vigorous lava lake degassing inside its 300 m deep Benbow crater using OP-FTIR spectroscopy. Our results reveal a highly dynamic degassing pattern involving (i) recurrent (100-200 s) short-period oscillations of the volcanic gas composition and temperature, correlating with pulsated gas emission and sourced in the upper part of the lava lake, (ii) a continuous long period (∼8 min) modulation probably due to the influx of fresh magma at the bottom of the lake, and (iii) discrete CO2 spike events occurring in coincidence with the sequential bursting of meter-sized bubbles, which indicates the separate ascent of large gas bubbles or slugs in a feeder conduit with estimated diameter of 6 ± 1 m. This complex degassing pattern, measured with unprecedented detail and involving both coupled and decoupled magma-gas ascent over short time scales, markedly differs from that of quieter lava lakes at Erebus and Kilauea. It can be accounted for by a modest size of Benbow lava lake and its very high basalt supply rate (∼20 m3 s-1), favouring its rapid overturn and renewal. We verify a typical basaltic arc signature for Ambrym volcanic gas and, based on contemporaneous SO2 flux measurements, we evaluate huge emission rates of 160 Gg d-1 of H2O, ∼10 Gg d-1 of CO2 and ∼8 Gg d-1 of total acid gas (SO2, HCl and HF) during medium activity of the volcano in 2008. Such rates make Ambrym one of the three most powerful volcanic gas emitters at global scale, whose atmospheric impact at local and regional scale may be considerable.

  13. Structures and facies associated with the flow of subaerial basaltic lava into a deep freshwater lake: The Sulphur Creek lava flow, North Cascades, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, David S.; Scott, Kevin M.

    2009-09-01

    The ca. 8800 14C yrs BP Sulphur Creek lava flowed eastward 12 km from the Schriebers Meadow cinder cone into the Baker River valley, on the southeast flank of Mount Baker volcano. The compositionally-zoned basaltic to basaltic andesite lava entered, crossed and partially filled the 2-km-wide and > 100-m-deep early Holocene remnant of Glacial Lake Baker. The valley is now submerged beneath a reservoir, but seasonal drawdown permits study of the distal entrant lava. As a lava volume that may have been as much as 180 × 10 6 m 3 entered the lake, the flow invaded the lacustrine sequence and extended to the opposite (east) side of the drowned Baker River valley. The volume and mobility of the lava can be attributed to a high flux rate, a prolonged eruption, or both. Basalt exposed below the former level of the remnant glacial lake is glassy or microcrystalline and sparsely vesicular, with pervasive hackly or blocky fractures. Together with pseudopillow fractures, these features reflect fracturing normal to penetrative thermal fronts and quenching by water. A fine-grained hyaloclastite facies was probably formed during quench fragmentation or isolated magma-water explosions. Although the structures closely resemble those developed in lava-ice contact environments, establishing the depositional environment for lava exhibiting similar intense fracturing should be confirmed by geologic evidence rather than by internal structure alone. The lava also invaded the lacustrine sequence, forming varieties of peperite, including sills that are conformable within the invaded strata and resemble volcaniclastic breccias. The peperite is generally fragmental and clast- or matrix-supported; fine-grained and rounded fluidal margins occur locally. The lava formed a thickened subaqueous plug that, as the lake drained in the mid-Holocene, was exposed to erosion. The Baker River then cut a 52-m-deep gorge through the shattered, highly erodible basalt.

  14. New insights into eruptive activity and lava flow hazard at Nyamulagira volcano, D.R.C., from a new GIS-based lava flow map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, B.; Kervyn, M.; Kervyn, F.; D'Oreye, N.; Wauthier, C.

    2010-12-01

    Nyamulagira, located in the western branch of the East African Rift (EAR), is Africa’s most active volcano with one eruption every 2 - 4 years. A map of Nyamulagira lava flows was produced during the 1960’s by Thonnard et al. (1965). This map, which results from the mosaicking of several aerial photographs, contains locally some geographic inaccuracies. The photo-interpretation also led in places to the discrimination of lava units not corresponding to any flow boundaries in the field. Finally, 19 eruptions occurred since this first edition, which causes it to be outdated and of limited use to document the recent eruptive history. Recently, Smets et al. (2010) have produced a new map of lava flows using a combination of optical and radar satellite imagery. This map is GIS-based and can be quickly updated during/after each eruption. Using the new lava flow map of Nyamulagira and a compilation of bibliographic/field information of the last 31 eruptions, the evolution of eruptive activity since the early 1900’s was reconstructed and the volume of erupted lava estimated for each eruption from 1938 to 2010. The spatio-temporal evolution of eruptive activity suggests a strong control from the rift tectonics but also from inherited basement structures on the location, the fissure orientation and the relative lava volume for the successive eruptions. The time lapse after each eruption is strongly correlated with the erupted volume of lava. The 1938-40 eruption is a key event in the volcano recent history, as the corresponding caldera collapse led to an increase of flank eruptions. Nyamulagira flank eruptions systematically destroy large areas of the protected forest of the Virunga National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage in danger since 1994. The lava flows from distal eruptions or from exceptionally high effusion rate or volume events also threaten local population, mainly south of the main edifice near Lake Kivu.

  15. From the Sound of Erta Ale Lava Lake (Ethiopia) to Eruption Dynamics Into a Magma Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouche, E.; Vergniolle, S.

    2007-12-01

    The basaltic volcano of Erta Ale, located on the East African Rift, has a permanent lava lake whose behaviour presents similarity with a shallow magma reservoir. In March 2003, continuous measurements of acoustic pressure, images from video, temperature, seismicity and wind velocity were perfomed to quantify degassing of the lava lake in order to understand the eruptive behaviour of this volcano. The videos show that two types of gas bubbles break at the lava lake surface. Modelling acoustic pressure gives bubble overpressure and size. Bubbles are either large (radius 2 m) and overpressurised (4.104 Pa) or of intermediate size (radius 1 m) and weakly overpressurised (450 Pa). The large bubbles come from the conduit at the base of the lava lake whereas bubbles of intermediate size are produced by the destabilisation of a foam accumulated below the crust overlying the lava lake. Hence, their overpressure is related to capillary pressure of the rising small bubbles, suggesting that their diameter is 3.6 mm. The formation of bubbles of intermediate size is related to the local foam coalescence because of foam sluggish drainage. However, overpressure of intermediate size bubbles shows sudden peaks every eighteen hours, up to 6000 Pa. Each peak is related to a massive coalescence of a foam having reached its critical thickness. This involves a much larger number of bubbles than foam drainage, hence a much larger overpressure and energy. The rapid and massive coalescence leads to a sudden withdrawal of the foam. The disappearence of the foam suppress the buoyancy that sustained the cold and dense crust at the top of the lava lake, forcing the crust to sink. The average gas flux (6.10-3 m3s-1) is estimated over an eighteen-hour cycle from modelling the frequency of sound waves. Furthermore the diameter of the small bubbles deduced from the overpressure on synthetic waveforms can be combined with gas volume fraction observed on videos to estimate the gas flux between 3

  16. "Active" and "Passive" Lava Resurfacing Processes on Io: A Comparative Study of Loki Patera and Prometheus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Leone, G.; Wilson, L.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) data and ground based data of volcanism at Prometheus and Loki Patera on Io reveal very different mechanisms of lava emplacement at these two volcanoes. Data analyses show that the periodic nature of Loki Patera s volcanism from 1990 to 2001 is strong evidence that Loki s resurfacing over this period resulted from the foundering of a crust on a lava lake. This process is designated passive , as there is no reliance on sub-surface processes: the foundering of the crust is inevitable. Prometheus, on the other hand, displays an episodicity in its activity which we designate active . Like Kilauea, a close analog, Prometheus s effusive volcanism is dominated by pulses of magma through the nearsurface plumbing system. Each system affords views of lava resurfacing processes through modelling.

  17. Satellite observations reveal little inter-annual variability in the radiant flux from the Mount Erebus lava lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Robert; Pilger, Eric

    2008-11-01

    Satellite remote sensing represents a mature technology for long-term monitoring of volcanic activity at Mount Erebus, either independently or as a complement to field instrumentation. Observations made on 4290 discrete occasions over a six year period by NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) indicate that the radiant flux from the volcano's summit crater (and by inference, the lava lake contained therein), while variable on the time scale of days to weeks, has varied little on an inter-annual basis over this period. The average radiant flux from the lake during this time was 15 MW, with a maximum flux of 100 MW. Such heat flux time-series have been shown to act as a reliable proxy for general levels of activity at erupting volcanoes around the world, particularly when these time-series are of a long duration. The apparent stability of Erebus' power output is in marked contrast to fluxes observed at three other terrestrial volcanoes, Erta 'Ale (Ethiopia), Nyiragongo (Democratic Republic of Congo) and Ambrym (Vanuatu), which, while also hosting active lava lakes, all exhibit much greater variability in radiant flux over the same period of time. The results presented in this paper are confluent with those obtained from geochemical considerations of the Erebus' degassing regime, and confirm that remarkably stable open-system volcanism appears to be characteristic of this long-active volcano.

  18. Origin of phenocrysts and compositional diversity in pre-Mazama rhyodacite lavas, Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nakada, S.; Bacon, C.R.; Gartner, A.E.

    1994-01-01

    Phenocrysts in porphyritic volcanic rocks may originate in a variety of ways in addition to nucleation and growth in the matrix in which they are found. Porphyritic rhyodacite lavas that underlie the eastern half of Mount Mazama, the High Cascade andesite/dacite volcano that contains Crater Lake caldera, contain evidence that bears on the general problem of phenocryst origin. Phenocrysts in these lavas apparently formed by crystallization near the margins of a magma chamber and were admixed into convecting magma before eruption. About 20 km3 of pre-Mazama rhyodacite magma erupted during a relatively short period between ~400 and 500 ka; exposed pre-Mazama dacites are older and less voluminous. The rhyodacites formed as many as 40 lava domes and flows that can be assigned to three eruptive groups on the basis of composition and phenocryst content. -from Authors

  19. Continuous gravity measurements reveal a low-density lava lake at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carbone, Daniele; Poland, Michael P.; Patrick, Matthew R.; Orr, Tim R.

    2013-01-01

    On 5 March 2011, the lava lake within the summit eruptive vent at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, began to drain as magma withdrew to feed a dike intrusion and fissure eruption on the volcanoʼs east rift zone. The draining was monitored by a variety of continuous geological and geophysical measurements, including deformation, thermal and visual imagery, and gravity. Over the first ∼14 hours of the draining, the ground near the eruptive vent subsided by about 0.15 m, gravity dropped by more than 100 μGal, and the lava lake retreated by over 120 m. We used GPS data to correct the gravity signal for the effects of subsurface mass loss and vertical deformation in order to isolate the change in gravity due to draining of the lava lake alone. Using a model of the eruptive vent geometry based on visual observations and the lava level over time determined from thermal camera data, we calculated the best-fit lava density to the observed gravity decrease — to our knowledge, the first geophysical determination of the density of a lava lake anywhere in the world. Our result, 950 +/- 300 kg m-3, suggests a lava density less than that of water and indicates that Kīlaueaʼs lava lake is gas-rich, which can explain why rockfalls that impact the lake trigger small explosions. Knowledge of such a fundamental material property as density is also critical to investigations of lava-lake convection and degassing and can inform calculations of pressure change in the subsurface magma plumbing system.

  20. Mineral resources of the Devil's Garden Lava Bed, Squaw Ridge Lava Bed, and Four Craters Lava Bed Wilderness Study Areas, Lake County, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, W.J.; King, H.D.; Gettings, M.E. ); Johnson, F.L. )

    1988-01-01

    The Devel's Garden lava Bed, Squaw Ridge Lava Bed, and Four Craters Lava Bed Wilderness Study Areas include approximately 70,940 acres and are underlain entirely by Pleistocene or Holocene lava flows and associated sediments. There is no evidence of hydrothermal alteration in the study areas. No resources were identified in the study areas, but there is low potential for perlite resources in the southern part of the Devil's Garden Lava Bed and the northern half of the Squaw Ridge Lava Bed areas. All three study areas have low potential for geothermal resources and for oil and gas resources.

  1. A frozen record of density-driven crustal overturn in lava lakes: The example of Kilauea Iki 1959

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stovall, W.K.; Houghton, B.F.; Harris, A.J.L.; Swanson, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Lava lakes are found at basaltic volcanoes on Earth and other planetary bodies. Density-driven crustal foundering leading to surface renewal occurs repeatedly throughout the life of a lava lake. This process has been observed and described in a qualitative sense, but due to dangerous conditions, no data has been acquired to evaluate the densities of the units involved. Kilauea Iki pit crater in Hawai'i houses a lava lake erupted during a 2 month period in 1959. Part of the surface of the Kilauea Iki lake now preserves the frozen record of a final, incomplete, crustal-overturn cycle. We mapped this region and sampled portions of the foundering crust, as well as overriding and underlying lava, to constrain the density of the units involved in the overturn process. Overturn is driven by the advance of a flow front of fresh, low-density lava over an older, higher density surface crust. The advance of the front causes the older crust to break up, founder, and dive downwards into the lake to expose new, hot, low-density lava. We find density differences of 200 to 740 kg/m3 between the foundering crust and over-riding and under-lying lava respectively. In this case, crustal overturn is driven by large density differences between the foundering and resurfacing units. These differences lead, inevitably, to frequent crustal renewal: simple density differences between the surface crust and underlying lake lava make the upper layers of the lake highly unstable. ?? Springer-Verlag 2008.

  2. How to Produce Dacitic Melt at Kilauea: Evidence from Historic Kilauea Lava Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helz, R. L.

    2008-12-01

    Kilauea Volcano, perhaps the most thoroughly studied shield volcano in the world, has erupted only basaltic lava so far as is known. Summit lavas are olivine tholeiite, with MgO contents are typically 7 to 10 weight percent but can range up to 20 percent MgO. Lavas that have undergone fractionation of augite + plagioclase, in addition to olivine have erupted only along the rift zones, away from the summit reservoir. The most differentiated Kilauea lavas known are the earliest products of the 1955 eruption (MgO = 5.0-5.1%) and some lavas of the 1977 eruption (MgO = 5.3-5.4%). These eruptions occurred on the lower and middle east rift of the volcano, respectively. Recent drilling operations in Puna encountered a body of dacitic magma (Teplow and others, 2008), a composition far more differentiated than any known lava at Kilauea. Re-examination of the 1955 and 1960 lavas has established that the Puna area contains pockets of differentiated magma, but nothing as differentiated as dacite. However, the existence of such melts is an expected consequence of long-term storage of differentiated magma in the lower east rift zone. Results from three historic Kilauea lava lakes (the 1959 Kilauea Iki, 1963 Alae, and 1965 Makaopuhi lava lakes) show that such melt compositions are attainable by differentiation of Kilauean basalt. The composition of the Puna dacite lies closer to the liquid line of descent observed for Kilauea Iki than that of Alae or Makaopuhi. On MgO variation diagrams of Kilauea Iki differentiates, the new dacite plots close to a small group of samples formed by internal differentiation of the ferrodiabasic segregation veins (or sills) that make up 5-10% of the upper crust (cumulative thickness 3.3-5.7 m). These sills are similar in bulk composition to the early 1955 lava, a plausible immediate parent for the dacite, given its presence in the lower east rift in 1955-1960. The dacitic bodies form by melt separation when the host segregation vein is about 60

  3. Lava Lake Thermal Pattern Classification Using Self-Organizing Maps and Relationships to Eruption Processes at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzynski, A. M.; Anderson, S. W.; Morrison, K.; LeWinter, A. L.; Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Finnegan, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Nested within the Halema'uma'u Crater on the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, the active lava lake of Overlook Crater poses hazards to local residents and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park visitors. Since its formation in March 2008, the lava lake has enlarged to +28,500 m2 and has been closely monitored by researchers at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Time-lapse images, collected via visible and thermal infrared cameras, reveal thin crustal plates, separated by incandescent cracks, moving across the lake surface as lava circulates beneath. We hypothesize that changes in size, shape, velocity, and patterns of these crustal plates are related to other eruption processes at the volcano. Here we present a methodology to identify characteristic lava lake surface patterns from thermal infrared video footage using a self-organizing maps (SOM) algorithm. The SOM is an artificial neural network that performs unsupervised clustering and enables us to visualize the relationships between groups of input patterns on a 2-dimensional grid. In a preliminary trial, we input ~4 hours of thermal infrared time-lapse imagery collected on December 16-17, 2013 during a transient deflation-inflation deformation event at a rate of one frame every 10 seconds. During that same time period, we also acquired a series of one-second terrestrial laser scans (TLS) every 30 seconds to provide detailed topography of the lava lake surface. We identified clusters of characteristic thermal patterns using a self-organizing maps algorithm within the Matlab SOM Toolbox. Initial results from two SOMs, one large map (81 nodes) and one small map (9 nodes), indicate 4-6 distinct groups of thermal patterns. We compare these surface patterns with lava lake surface slope and crustal plate velocities derived from concurrent TLS surveys and with time series of other eruption variables, including outgassing rates and inflation-deflation events. This methodology may be applied to the continuous stream of

  4. Erta'Ale (Ethiopia) Lava Lake Thermal Emission Variability — What We Need to Measure to Answer the Biggest Open Question About Io's Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; McEwen, A. S.

    2011-03-01

    In order to determine the eruption temperature of Io's lavas, imagers need to obtain multispectral data very quickly in order to overcome wild variations in derived temperatures caused by rapid cooling and variation in volcanic activity.

  5. Origins and Implications of Zigzag Rift atterns on the surface of lava lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, L.; Manga, M.

    2005-12-01

    The distinctive rift patterns observed on newly formed lava lakes are very likely a product of interaction between heat transfer (cooling of lava) and the ability of the solid crust to deform in response to applied stresses. Ragnarsson et al. ( Phys Rev Lett. 1996) observed similar features in analog wax experiments. The experimental setup consisted of a layer of liquid wax heated from below and cooled from above to create a solid crust, which is then pulled apart to form a rift filled with liquid wax. Of particular interest for lava lakes is a regime in which "zigzag" shaped rifts form. We performed a similar series of analog wax experiments designed to characterize the symmetric zigzag rift patterns associated with the cooling and deformation of a newly formed crust layer. The experimental setup is similar to that in Manga and Sinton ( JGR 2004). We vary the wind speed, which controls the cooling rate, and pulling speed. The rifts are characterized by two quantities: the angle between rifts and a line perpendicular to the pulling direction Φ, and the amplitude of the zigzags A. We find experimentally the relationship between Φ, A and cooling rate. We also develop a model to explain the observed relationships: Φ is determined by a balance of pulling and solidification speeds, the latter being governed by wind speed (the primary control on cooling rate); the amplitude A is limited by the thickness of the solid wax crust. The theoretical model is based on a local energy balance in which the conductive heat flux through solidifying crust is balanced by convective and radiative heat loss to the overlying air. Model predictions agree well with experimental results. We can scale this model to basaltic lava lakes. Observed angles are consistent with model predictions. The critical thickness of the solid crust, limiting the amplitude of zigzags (and rift propagation) is a few centimeters, consistent with other estimates (Harris et al., JVGR 2005). The model enables us

  6. Acoustic source characterization of impulsive Strombolian eruptions from the Mount Erebus lava lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey; Aster, Richard; Jones, Kyle R.; Kyle, Philip; McIntosh, Bill

    2008-11-01

    We invert for acoustic source volume outflux and momentum imparted to the atmosphere using an infrasonic network distributed about the erupting lava lake at Mount Erebus, Ross Island, Antarctica. By modeling these relatively simple eruptions as monopole point sources we estimate explosively ejected gas volumes that range from 1,000 m 3 to 24,000 m 3 for 312 lava lake eruptions recorded between January 6 and April 13, 2006. Though these volumes are compatible with bubble volumes at rupture (as estimated from explosion video records), departures from isotropic radiation are evident in the recorded acoustic wavefield for many eruptions. A point-source acoustic dipole component with arbitrary axis orientation and strength provides precise fit to the recorded infrasound. This dipole source axis, corresponding to the axis of inferred short-duration material jetting, varies significantly between events. Physical interpretation of dipole orientation as being indicative of eruptive directivity is corroborated by directional emissions of ejecta observed in Erebus eruption video footage. Although three azimuthally distributed stations are insufficient to fully characterize the eruptive acoustic source we speculate that a monopole with a minor amount of oriented dipole radiation may reasonably model the primary features of the recorded infrasound for these eruptions.

  7. Lava Lake Level Drop and Related Ground Subsidence in the Nyiragongo Main Crater (D.R.Congo) Measured by Close-Range Photogrammetry and InSAR Time-Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, B.; d'Oreye, N.; Samsonov, S. V.; Nobile, A.; Geirsson, H.; Kervyn, F.

    2015-12-01

    Nyiragongo volcano is the most active African volcano and among the most active volcanoes on Earth. It is also among the infrequent volcanoes that host a long-lived lava lake. The morphology of the Nyiragongo main crater is characterized by 2 levels of remnant platforms partly preserved and attached to its inner flanks, which correspond to former lava lake levels, and by a bottom "active" platform, which delimits the current active lava lake. The elevation of the bottom platform increases through time, with successive lava lake overflows. After a period of low level between late 2010 and August 2011, the lava lake next came back to its highest level. However, on September 30, 2011, it started a long and progressive fall, reaching ~70 m below the bottom platform in July 2014. This recent evolution of the lava lake, which occurred at the same time period as eruptive events at the neighboring Nyamulagira volcano, was accompanied by a ground subsidence of the bottom platform, leading to the appearance of ring fissures. This ground deformation is restricted to the bottom platform and, hence, suggests a very shallow source for the observed movement. All these changes in the Nyiragongo main crater were recorded by time-series of photographs, allowing the 3D reconstruction of the crater using close-range photogrammetric techniques and, hence, a detailed measurement of the observed changes. The ground subsidence was also recorded by time-series of RADARSAT-2 and CosmoSky-Med SAR interferograms, providing more detailed information on the velocity of deformation. Based on field data and the photogrammetric and InSAR time-series measurements, several hypotheses on the cause(s) of these changes in the Nyiragongo crater are discussed. The present work also highlights the potential of close-range photogrammetry and high-resolution InSAR to study and monitor active volcanoes in Equatorial environment.

  8. A model of the geochemical and physical fluctuations of the lava lake at Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, Indira; Burgisser, Alain; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2015-12-01

    Erebus volcano, Antarctica, exhibits periodical surface fluctuations of both geochemical and physical nature. Modeling the physics driving the lake oscillation is a challenge, even with a relatively simple theoretical framework. We present a quantitative analysis that aims to reconcile both lake level and gas geochemical cycles. Our model is based on the assumption that the periodicity is caused by the regular release of magma batches and/or core annular flow that have a fixed volume of melt and ascend and degas in equilibrium. Results suggest that cycles are not caused by the mixing between magma residing in the lake and a deep magma but by two distinct deep sources that rise separately. These sources of bubbly magma come from at most 2-3 km depth and rise buoyantly. Individual batches detach from the rising magmas at depths of 20-250 m. The two batch types can coexist in a single conduit up to a depth of ~ 30 m, above which they rise alternately to release respectively 19 and 23 kg/s of gas at the lake surface every 10 min. The temperature of the descending flow is between 890 and 950 °C, which is roughly 100 °C colder than the ascending currents. Batch pairs have shapes likely constrained by the conduit width. Regardless of their shapes, the pairs reach very high porosities near the surface and have diameters of 4-14 m that are consistent with video observations showing spreading waves at the lake surface. The alternating arrival of these large batches suggests a lava lake mostly filled with gas-rich magma.

  9. Calculated viscosity-distance dependence for some actively flowing lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieri, David

    1987-01-01

    The importance of viscosity as a gauge of the various energy and momentum dissipation regimes of lava flows has been realized for a long time. Nevertheless, despite its central role in lava dynamics and kinematics, it remains among the most difficult of flow physical properties to measure in situ during an eruption. Attempts at reconstructing the actual emplacement viscosities of lava flows from their solidified topographic form are difficult. Where data are available on the position of an advancing flow front as a function of time, it is possible to calculate the effective viscosity of the front as a function of distance from the vent, under the assumptions of a steady state regime. As an application and test of an equation given, relevant parameters from five recent flows on Mauna Loa and Kilauea were utilized to infer the dynamic structure of their aggregate flow front viscosity as they advanced, up to cessation. The observed form of the viscosity-distance relation for the five active Hawaiian flows examined appears to be exponential, with a rapid increase just before the flows stopped as one would expect.

  10. Iron isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation in Kilauea Iki lava lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teng, F.-Z.; Dauphas, N.; Helz, R.T.

    2008-01-01

    Magmatic differentiation helps produce the chemical and petrographic diversity of terrestrial rocks. The extent to which magmatic differentiation fractionates nonradiogenic isotopes is uncertain for some elements. We report analyses of iron isotopes in basalts from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii. The iron isotopic compositions (56Fe/54Fe) of late-stage melt veins are 0.2 per mil (???) greater than values for olivine cumulates. Olivine phenocrysts are up to 1.2??? lighter than those of whole rocks. These results demonstrate that iron isotopes fractionate during magmatic differentiation at both whole-rock and crystal scales. This characteristic of iron relative to the characteristics of magnesium and lithium, for which no fractionation has been found, may be related to its complex redox chemistry in magmatic systems and makes iron a potential tool for studying planetary differentiation.

  11. Investigation of volcanic gas analyses and magma outgassing from Erta' Ale lava lake, Afar, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, T. M.

    1980-05-01

    The analyses of 18 volcanic gas samples collected over a two-hour period at 1075°C from Erta' Ale lava lake in December 1971 and of 18 samples taken over a half-hour period at 1125-1135°C in 1974 display moderately to intensely variable compositions. These variations result from imposed modifications caused by (1) atmospheric contamination and oxidation, (2) condensation and re-evaporation of water during collection, (3) analytical errors, and (4) chemical reactions between the erupted gases and a steel lead-in tube. Detailed examinations of the analyses indicate the erupted gases were at chemical equilibrium before collection. This condition was partially destroyed by the imposed modifications. High-temperature reaction equilibria were more completely preserved in the 1974 samples. Numerical procedures based on thermodynamic calculations have been used to restore each analysis to a composition representative of the erupted gases. These procedures have also been used to restore the anhydrous mean compositions reported for two series of collections taken at the lava lake in January 1973. The corrected analyses for 1971 and 1973 have similar compositions (69.6-71.3% H 2O, 1.6-2.4% H 2, 17.8-19.4% CO 2, 0.8-1.6% CO, 4.9-8.8% SO 2, 0.2-0.5% S 2, and 0.4-1.0% H 2S); those for 1974 were somewhat different (77.1% H 2O, 1.6% H 2, 11.7% CO 2, 0.5% CO, 7.4% SO 2, 0.3% S 2, 0.9% H 2S and 0.4% HCl). The O 2 and S 2 fugacities of all restored analyses are similar when compared at the same temperatures. O 2 fugacities are close to those of the quartz-magnetite-fayalite buffer. The restored analyses show no evidence of significant short-term (minutes, hours) variations in the compositions of the gases released from the lava lake, and evidence of long-term variations is limited. The restored analyses indicate the O 2 and S 2 potentials of the lava lake remained nearly constant from 1971 to 1974. However, there is a relative decrease in CO 2 between the 1973 and 1974 corrected

  12. Late Quaternary Spring-Fed Deposits of the Grand Canyon and Their Implication for Deep Lava-Dammed Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Darrell S.; O'Brien, Gary; Mead, Jim I.; Bright, Jordon; Umhoefer, Paul

    2002-11-01

    One of the most intriguing episodes in the Quaternary evolution of the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River, Arizona, was the development of vast lakes that are thought to have backed up behind lava erupted into the gorge. Stratigraphic evidence for these deep lava-dammed lakes is expectedly sparse. Possible lacustrine deposits at six areas in the eastern canyon yielded no compelling evidence for sediment deposited in a deep lake. At two of the sites the sediment was associated with late Quaternary spring-fed pools and marshes. Water-lain silt and sand at lower Havasu Creek was deposited ˜3000 cal yr ago. The deposit contains an ostracode assemblage similar to that living in the modern travertine-dammed pools adjacent to the outcrop. The second deposit, at Lees Ferry, formed in a spring-fed marsh ˜43,000 cal yr ago, as determined by 14C and amino acid geochronology. It contains abundant ostracode and mollusk fossils, the richest assemblages reported from the Grand Canyon to date. Our interpretation of these sediments as spring-fed deposits, and their relative youth, provides an alternative to the conventional view that deposits like these were formed in deep lava-dammed lakes that filled the Grand Canyon.

  13. Visibility of Active Lava Flows from Venus Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, N.

    2015-10-01

    I present a model of the signatures of active lava flows observable through spectral windows from orbit and data processing methods for isolating these signatures in near-infrared images.The model estimates the thermal emission of lava flows based on models for the analysis of remote observation of eruptions on Earth and Io, however adjusted to the different thermal environment of the Venus surface. This thermal emission radiation is only partially transmitted through the diffusely scattering cloud layer and moreover diluted over a diameter of 100 km, an area much larger than the size of most flows. Data processing methods to enhance the chance to detect these signatures include corrections for variable cloud opacity using other spectral bands, subtraction of background thermal emission, and spatial filtering. This model and the implementation of the data processing methods for VIRTIS IR data, arguably the most sensitive and extensive applicable dataset, indicate that only very large and intense eruptions could have been detected with existing data.

  14. Identification and dating of the Mono Lake excursion in lava flows from the Canary islands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, Hervé; Laj, Carlo; Carracedo, Juan-Carlos; Kissel, Catherine; Nomade, Sebastien; Perez-Torrado, Francisco; Wandres, Camille

    2010-05-01

    The Mono Lake geomagnetic excursion was defined from the study of lacustrine sections from Western North America [Denham, 1974; Liddicoat et al., 1979]. The proposed age for this excursion reported in the literature changed in time since the first observation and a debate was even very recently opened about the reliability of the dating at the original section at Wilson Creek. In ice cores, a peak in the production of cosmogenic isotopes is clearly observed about 7 ka after the peak associated to the Laschamp excursion. This younger peak, attributed to the Mono Lake occurs between the millennial climatic cycles 7 and 6 (Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles), around 34 kyr in the most recent Greenland ice age model. In addition, in other places, this excursion is described by an intensity low with only very rarely an associated directional shift, questioning the global character of this excursion. We present a coupled paleomagnetic and dating investigation conducted on four different lavas from the island of Tenerife (Spain) on the basis of preliminary K/Ar dating. From a paleomagnetic point of view, one of these sites is characterized by a direction largely deviated from the one calculated on the basis of an axial geocentric dipole field. The paleointensity values, determined using Thellier and Thellier method and the PICRIT03 set of criteria, is very low, about 8 µT. Two other sites are slightly deviated from the GAD value, in particular with lower inclinations. Paleointensity determinations from these lavas do not yet have a statistical significance and need to be completed but the first results indicate a value around 20 µT. Finally, the last site has a direction consistent with the GAD values and no reliable paleointensity determinations could be obtained so far. The preliminary K/Ar dating are now completed by Ar/Ar dating and their combination yield an average age of about 32 ka ± 2 ka for the four outcrops, not statistically distinguishable one from another. This

  15. Faults, Post-1720 Explosion Craters, and the Remains of a Lava Lake at Castro Bank Seamount (E Azores)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderman, R.; Barriga, F. J.; Nishimura, C.; Pacheco, J. M.; Vogt, P. R.; Gaspar, J. L.; Queiroz, G.; Santos, R.

    2003-12-01

    During 25-28 July 2003 the US Navy submarine NR-1 dove on the seamount D. Joao de Castro Bank, compiling reconnaissance sonar and visual data. Castro Bank sits along strike and between the eastern Azorian islands of Terceira and S. Miguel, occupying a seismically active region ˜60 km from each of these islands and apparently controlled by the same underlying tectonics as other islands found along the Azores' northern margin. Castro Bank's last recorded eruptions built a ˜1 km diameter ephemeral island in the 1720s. The bathimetry of the uppermost 40 m or so of the Bank is rather well known via single beam sonar, scuba diving and AUV surveys (IH, DOP/UA and ISR/IST, unpublished work). Our dives compiled data in concentric rings along contours, collecting side- and forward-looking sonar along an overall track length of ˜20 km, with the deepest ring approaching ˜200 m depth. To document key features we came near the sea floor and took videos in water with typical visibility of ˜10-15 m. This is the first progress report on our work, which found the edifice morphologically complex and irregular. We noted that the seamount was often covered by aerially extensive yellow-brown hyaloclastic tuffs that were presumably products of the 1720s eruption, but also cut by faults and fissures (with offsets of ten's of meters) exposing abundant areas of older edifice. The faults typically lacked sediment cover, and in one case a very fresh, sediment-free fault trended along the base of a steep cliff. This suggested the faults were much younger than the 1720 eruption, an observation in accord with intense seismicity recorded in this area. The faults provided exposures of older rocks, which included abundant breccia and lesser clearly identified pillows or thick lava flows. The NW quadrant contains two small, shallow, elliptical craters. These lie side-by-side and crosscut inferred 1720s-age tuffs. One crater held a lava lake, the body of which apparently withdrew or subsided

  16. The evolution of young silicic lavas at Medicine Lake Volcano, California: Implications for the origin of compositional gaps in calc-alkaline series lavas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, T.L.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    At Medicine Lake Volcano, California, the compositional gap between andesite (57-62 wt.% SiO2) and rhyolite (73-74 wt.% SiO2) has been generated by fractional crystallization. Assimilation of silicic crust has also occurred along with fractionation. Two varieties of inclusions found in Holocene rhyolite flows, hornblende gabbros and aphyric andesites, provide information on the crystallization path followed by lavas parental to the rhyolite. The hornblende gabbros are magmatic cumulate residues and their mineral assemblages are preserved evidence of the phases that crystallized from an andesitic precursor lava to generate the rhyolite lavas. The andesitic inclusions represent samples of a parental andesite and record the early part of the differentiation history. Olivine, plagioclase and augite crystallization begins the differentiation history, followed by the disappearance of olivine and augite through reaction with the liquid to form orthopyroxene and amphibole. Further crystallization of the assemblage plagioclase, amphibole, orthopyroxene, magnetite, and apatite from a high-SiO2 andesite leads to rhyolite. This final crystallization process occurs on a cotectic that is nearly horizontal in temperature-composition space. Since a large amount of crystallization occurs over a limited temperature interval, a compositional gap develops between rhyolite and high SiO2 andesite. Liquidus surfaces with shallow slopes in temperature-composition space are characteristic of several late-stage crystallization assemblages in the andesite to rhyolite compositional range. Experimentally produced plagioclase+ amphibole+orthopyroxene+magnetite and plagioclase+ augite+low-Ca pyroxene+magnetite cotectics have liquidus slopes that are nearly flat. At other calc-alkaline volcanic centers crystallization processes involving large compositional changes over small temperature intervals may also be important in the development of bimodal volcanism (i.e. the existence of a composition

  17. Mars Global Surveyor tests the Elysium Basin controversy: It's lava, not lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Edgett, K. S.; Malin, M. C.; Keszthelyi, L.; Lanagan, P.

    1998-10-01

    The Elysium Basin is a low, flat area that extends ~3000 km E-W and up to 700 km N-S, centered at 5 N, 195 W. Altimetric profiles reveal this to be one of the very flattest regions on Mars (Smith et al. 1998, Science 279, 1686). A controversy over the nature of the basin's surface and history has developed during the 1990s. This controversy has direct implications in the search for evidence of martian life and the selection of landing sites for upcoming Mars missions. Crater densities in the basin are among the very lowest on Mars, indicating a relatively young surface. Plescia (1990, Icarus, v. 88, p. 465-490) proposed that the plains were covered by low-viscosity volcanic flows, which filled previous water-cut channels. Scott and Chapman (1991, Proc. Lunar Planet. Sci., v. 21, p. 669-677) proposed that the basin was filled by a 1.5-km deep lake of water subsequent to the volcanism. To test the hypotheses about the recent geologic history of Elysium Basin, the Mars Orbital Camera (MOC) acquired images (3.6 to 20 m/pixel) in regions that were poorly resolved (>200 m/pixel) during the Viking mission. The MOC images were obtained during 8 orbits in April and June, 1998. The new images reveal what appears to be the surface of an extensive lava plains with ponded, flood-like flows. The surface in several locations (separated by 100s of km) is characterized by relatively dark plates that have separated from more extensive dark surfaces and moved laterally. The plates can be reconstructed like a jigsaw puzzle. There are also sinuous pressure ridges up to 10 meters wide and a few meters high (with slopes > 50 degrees) and shear structures. The surface appears pristine at this scale, unmodified by wind or water, although the color properties and thermal inertia indicate a coating of dust. The platey-textured lavas are also seen to extend well into the Marte Vallis channel system. The images show no evidence for lacustrine sediment or shorelines. These results confirm that

  18. Perspectives on basaltic magma crystallization and differentiation: Lava-lake blocks erupted at Mauna Loa volcano summit, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarter, R.L.; Fodor, R.V.; Trusdell, F.

    2006-01-01

    Explosive eruptions at Mauna Loa summit ejected coarse-grained blocks (free of lava coatings) from Moku'aweoweo caldera. Most are gabbronorites and gabbros that have 0-26??vol.% olivine and 1-29??vol.% oikocrystic orthopyroxene. Some blocks are ferrogabbros and diorites with micrographic matrices, and diorite veins (??? 2??cm) cross-cut some gabbronorites and gabbros. One block is an open-textured dunite. The MgO of the gabbronorites and gabbros ranges ??? 7-21??wt.%. Those with MgO > 10??wt.% have some incompatible-element abundances (Zr, Y, REE; positive Eu anomalies) lower than those in Mauna Loa lavas of comparable MgO; gabbros (MgO < 10??wt.%) generally overlap lava compositions. Olivines range Fo83-58, clinopyroxenes have Mg#s ??? 83-62, and orthopyroxene Mg#s are 84-63 - all evolved beyond the mineral-Mg#s of Mauna Loa lavas. Plagioclase is An75-50. Ferrogabbro and diorite blocks have ??? 3-5??wt.% MgO (TiO2 3.2-5.4%; K2O 0.8-1.3%; La 16-27??ppm), and a diorite vein is the most evolved (SiO2 59%, K2O 1.5%, La 38??ppm). They have clinopyroxene Mg#s 67-46, and plagioclase An57-40. The open-textured dunite has olivine ?????Fo83.5. Seven isotope ratios are 87Sr/86Sr 0.70394-0.70374 and 143Nd/144Nd 0.51293-0.51286, and identify the suite as belonging to the Mauna Loa system. Gabbronorites and gabbros originated in solidification zones of Moku'aweoweo lava lakes where they acquired orthocumulate textures and incompatible-element depletions. These features suggest deeper and slower cooling lakes than the lava lake paradigm, Kilauea Iki, which is basalt and picrite. Clinopyroxene geobarometry suggests crystallization at < 1??kbar P. Highly evolved mineral Mg#s, < 75, are largely explained by cumulus phases exposed to evolving intercumulus liquids causing compositional 'shifts.' Ferrogabbro and diorite represent segregation veins from differentiated intercumulus liquids filter pressed into rigid zones of cooling lakes. Clinopyroxene geobarometry suggests < 300??bar P

  19. Late Pleistocene granodiorite source for recycled zircon and phenocrysts in rhyodacite lava at Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2005-01-01

    Rhyodacite tephra and three lavas erupted ???27 ka, interpreted to be early leaks from the climactic magma chamber of Mount Mazama, contain ubiquitous resorbed crystals (antecrysts) that were recycled from young granodiorite and related plutonic rocks of the same magmatic system. The shallow composite pluton is represented by blocks ejected in the 7.7-ka climactic eruption that formed Crater Lake caldera. Plagioclase crystals in both rhyodacite and granodiorites commonly have cores with crystallographically oriented Fe-oxide needles exsolved at subsolidus conditions. At least 80% of plagioclase crystals in the rhyodacite are antecrysts derived from plutonic rocks. Other crystals in the rhyodacite, notably zircon, also were recycled. SIMS 238U- 230Th dating indicates that zircons in 4 granodiorite blocks crystallized at various times between ???20 ka and ???300 ka with concentrations of analyses near 50-70, ???110, and ???200 ka that correspond to periods of dacitic volcanism dated by K- Ar. U-Th ages of zircon from a rhyodacite sample yield similar results. No analyzed zircons from the granodiorite or rhyodacite are pre-Quaternary. Zircon minimum ages in blocks from different locations around the caldera reflect ages of nearby volcanic vents and may map the distribution of intrusions within a composite pluton. Survival of zircon in zircon-undersaturated hydrous magma and of Fe-oxide needles in plagioclase suggests that little time elapsed from entrainment of antecrysts to the ???27-ka eruption of the rhyodacite. The ???27-ka rhyodacite is an example of young silicic magma that preserved unstable antecrysts from a known source early during growth of a large high-level magma chamber. In contrast, the voluminous 7.7-ka climactic rhyodacite pumice is virtually lacking in zircon, indicating dissolution of any granodioritic debris in the intervening period. Mineralogical evidence of assimilation may be destroyed in hot, vigorously growing silicic magma bodies such as

  20. Diverse lavas from closely spaced volcanoes drawing from a common parent: Emmons Lake Volcanic Center, Eastern Aleutian Arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangan, M.; Miller, T.; Waythomas, C.; Trusdell, F.; Calvert, A.; Layer, P.

    2009-01-01

    Emmons Lake Volcanic Center (ELVC) on the lower Alaskan Peninsula is one of the largest and most diverse volcanic centers in the Aleutian Arc. Since the Middle Pleistocene, eruption of ~ 350 km3 of basalt through rhyolite has produced a 30 km, arc front chain of nested calderas and overlapping stratovolcanoes. ELVC has experienced as many as five major caldera-forming eruptions, the most recent, at ~ 27 ka, produced ~ 50 km3 of rhyolitic ignimbrite and ash fall. These violent silicic events were interspersed with less energetic, but prodigious, outpourings of basalt through dacite. Holocene eruptions are mostly basaltic andesite to andesite and historically recorded activity includes over 40 eruptions within the last 200 yr, all from Pavlof volcano, the most active site in the Aleutian Arc. Geochemical and geophysical observations suggest that although all ELVC eruptions derive from a common clinopyroxene + spinel + plagioclase fractionating high-aluminum basalt parent in the lower crust, magma follows one of two closely spaced, but distinct paths to the surface. Under the eastern end of the chain, magma moves rapidly and cleanly through a relatively young (~ 28 ka), hydraulically connected dike plexus. Steady supply, short magma residence times, and limited interaction with crustal rocks preserve the geochemistry of deep crustal processes. Below the western part of the chain, magma moves haltingly through a long-lived (~ 500 ka) and complex intrusive column in which many generations of basaltic to andesitic melts have mingled and fractionated. Buoyant, silicic melts periodically separate from the lower parts of the column to feed voluminous eruptions of dacite and rhyolite. Mafic lavas record a complicated passage through cumulate zones and hydrous silicic residues as manifested by disequilibrium phenocryst textures, incompatible element enrichments, and decoupling of REEs and HFSEs ratios. Such features are absent in mafic lavas from the younger part of the chain

  1. Geochemistry of Garibaldi Lake andesites and dacites indicates crustal contamination involved in formation of Northern Cascade arc lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martindale, M.; Mullen, E.; Weis, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Cascade Arc presents a unique setting for studying the controls on andesite genesis and the implications for growth and evolution of the continental crust. It is the type-locality for a ';hot' subduction zone, where the downgoing slab is young and subduction is relatively slow. The northern segment of the Cascade arc, the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt (GVB), hosts the youngest subducting crust in Cascadia and the termination of the subducting slab. These conditions may affect magma generation processes by reducing the amount of water reaching the area of melt generation [1,2] and imparting an adakitic signature to magmas generated there if the slab edge melts [3]. We provide insights on the origin of andesites and dacites from the Garibaldi Lake area using new high-precision Pb, Sr, Nd, Hf isotope ratios and trace element data. Andesites and dacites from the Garibaldi Lake area (The Black Tusk, Mt. Price, and The Table) are calc-alkaline and show evidence for crustal contamination such as positive correlations between Ba/Nb and SiO2. Silica variation diagrams show no systematic trend for any of the volcanic centres, suggesting the presence of distinct magma batches. Garibaldi Lake andesites and dacites have among the least radiogenic Pb isotope ratios of all Cascade arc lavas, and define a linear array in Pb-isotope space. This most likely reflects mixing between MORB-source mantle (similar to Gorda and Explorer plate sources) and locally subducting sediments [4]. However, relative to GVB basalts and lavas from the rest of the Cascades (High Cascades), the andesites and dacites have higher 207Pb/204Pb (15.55-15.56) for a given 206Pb/204Pb (18.66-18.74). The Garibaldi Lake lavas also have higher 87Sr/86Sr (0.7033-0.7036) and lower ɛNd (5.8-7.9) at a given 206Pb/204Pb than GVB basalts and High Cascades lavas but among the highest ɛNd for a given SiO2 for the whole of the Cascades. ɛHf values (10.5-13.5) are higher at a given SiO2 value for Garibaldi Lake evolved

  2. A Sinuous Tumulus over an Active Lava Tube at Klauea Volcano: Evolution, Analogs, and Hazard Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Tim R.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Patrick, Matthew R.; Wooten, Kelly M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflation of narrow tube-fed basaltic lava flows (tens of meters across), such as those confined by topography, can be focused predominantly along the roof of a lava tube. This can lead to the development of an unusually long tumulus, its shape matching the sinuosity of the underlying lava tube. Such a situation occurred during Klauea Volcanos (Hawaii, USA) ongoing East Rift Zone eruption on a lava tube active from July through November 2010. Short-lived breakouts from the tube buried the flanks of the sinuous, ridge-like tumulus, while the tumulus crest, its surface composed of lava formed very early in the flows emplacement history, remained poised above the surrounding younger flows. At least several of these breakouts resulted in irrecoverable uplift of the tube roof. Confined sections of the prehistoric Carrizozo and McCartys flows (New Mexico, USA) display similar sinuous, ridge-like features with comparable surface age relationships. We contend that these distinct features formed in a fashion equivalent to that of the sinuous tumulus that formed at Kilauea in 2010. Moreover, these sinuous tumuli may be analogs for some sinuous ridges evident in orbital images of the Tharsis volcanic province on Mars. The short-lived breakouts from the sinuous tumulus at Kilauea were caused by surges in discharge through the lava tube, in response to cycles of deflation and inflation (DI events) at Kilauea's summit. The correlation between DI events and subsequent breakouts aided in lava flow forecasting. Breakouts from the sinuous tumulus advanced repeatedly toward the sparsely populated Kalapana Gardens subdivision, destroying two homes and threatening others. Hazard assessments, including flow occurrence and advance forecasts, were relayed regularly to the Hawai?i County Civil Defense to aid their lava flow hazard mitigation efforts while this lava tube was active.

  3. The Behavior of Chalcophile and Siderophile Elements during Magmatic Differentiation as Observed in Kilauea Iki Lava Lake, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaney, A. T.; Rudnick, R. L.; Helz, R. L.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Ash, R. D.; Piccoli, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    In 1959, Kilauea Iki Lava Lake formed as a single pulse of picritic lava ponded in a preexisting crater. The lava cooled and differentiated over the following decades, providing an excellent natural laboratory to study basaltic differentiation. Major element, trace element, and data for numerous isotope systems of both eruption and drill core samples have been previously published. In this study, twelve chalcophile and siderophile elements (V, Ga, Ge, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, W, Tl, and Bi) were measured in sixteen whole rock samples using standard addition solution ICP-MS, which provides high precision data for elements that were previously undetectable. Samples ranging from 26.9 to 2.4 wt% MgO show that all of these elements display incompatible behavior throughout the lake as they increase exponentially with decreasing MgO wt%. Olivine and chromite are the only phases varying significantly in abundance in samples from 27 to 7 wt% MgO. Ferro-diabasic segregation veins and other internal differentiates (5.8 to 2.4 wt% MgO) consist of augite, plagioclase, Fe-Ti oxides, and an immiscible Cu-Fe sulfide phase. These veins are significantly more enriched in the listed elements than are the olivine basalts. Several elements (Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Tl) are well correlated with Cu (R2>0.84), which is assumed to be chalcophile in this system. Germanium appears to follow Ti while Ga, In, W, and Bi display incompatible behavior but don't directly correlate with other elements. Vanadium shows overall incompatible behavior but is depleted in extremely differentiated samples, suggesting it is sequestered in a late stage fractionating phase. Molybdenum, Sb, Tl, and Sn are also very well correlated (R2>0.95) with several incompatible lithophile elements (REE, Ba, Hf, Nb, Ta, Th). This suggests their overall behavior in Kilauea Iki Lava Lake isn't controlled by any fractionating phase, including sulfides, and they may behave in a more lithophile manner.

  4. The first second of volcanic eruptions from the Erebus volcano lava lake, Antarctica—Energies, pressures, seismology, and infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerst, A.; Hort, M.; Aster, R. C.; Johnson, J. B.; Kyle, P. R.

    2013-07-01

    We describe a multiparameter experiment at Erebus volcano, Antarctica, employing Doppler radar, video, acoustic, and seismic observations to estimate the detailed energy budget of large (up to 40 m-diameter) bubble bursts from a persistent phonolite lava lake. These explosions are readily studied from the crater rim at ranges of less than 500 m and present an ideal opportunity to constrain the dynamics and mechanism of magmatic bubble bursts that can drive Strombolian and Hawaiian eruptions. We estimate the energy budget of the first second of a typical Erebus explosion as a function of time and energy type. We constrain gas pressures and forces using an analytic model for the expansion of a gas bubble above a conduit that incorporates conduit geometry and magma and gas parameters. The model, consistent with video and radar observations, invokes a spherical bulging surface with a base diameter equal to that of the lava lake. The model has no ad hoc free parameters, and geometrical calculations predict zenith height, velocity, and acceleration during shell expansion. During explosions, the energy contained in hot overpressured gas bubbles is freed and partitioned into other energy types, where by far the greatest nonthermal energy component is the kinetic and gravitational potential energy of the accelerated magma shell (>109 J). Seismic source energy created by explosions is estimated from radar measurements and is consistent with source energy determined from seismic observations. For the generation of the infrasonic signal, a dual mechanism incorporating a terminally disrupted slug is proposed, which clarifies previous models and provides good fits to observed infrasonic pressures. A new and straightforward method is presented for determining gas volumes from slug explosions at volcanoes from remote infrasound recordings.

  5. The Basalt of Yellowjacket Butte, Another Large and Interesting Lava Flow at Medicine Lake Volcano, N. California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Champion, D. E.; Ramsey, D. W.; Lanphere, M. A.

    2005-12-01

    The late Pleistocene basalt of Yellowjacket Butte (BYB) covers ~300 km2 on the SE flank of Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) in the N CA Cascade Range. Combined field mapping, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, and Ar dating provide constraints on growth of this extensive basalt flow in space and time. Multiple vents on the upper S flank fed lobes via lava tubes to >30 km. Estimated volume of this compositionally-zoned plag-ol basalt is 4-5 km3, most in the earliest lobes. The E lobe is largest, covering >one 7.5' quadrangle. It contains 50.0-51.4% SiO2, 7.4-8.3% MgO, and ranges in Mg# from 62-66. The smaller SW lobe overlaps the E lobe in composition, but is somewhat less mafic (50.7-51.7% SiO2, 7.0-7.6 MgO, Mg# 61-64). Both display late, low-volume, high-Sr facies (400- 465 vs. 350-400 ppm for the main lobes). Overlying the high-Sr E and SW lavas are the Hole-in-Rock (HR) lobe and the youngest lava, the NW lobe. The HR lobe typically has higher and more variable SiO2 (50.4-53.1%), lower MgO (5.2-6.3%) and lower Mg# (50-55), whereas the NW lobe has the lowest SiO2} (49.3-50.7%) despite its mid-range MgO (6.8-7.8%) and Mg# (56-61). Sr concentration is similar in both youngest lobes (370-430 ppm), which are partly buried by late Holocene lava, but have ~subequal volumes, larger than either of the late high-Sr facies of E and SW lobes. BYB is distinct from other large MLV compositionally-zoned basalts in having little compositional variation in SiO2, despite considerable (although complex) variability in TiO2, FeO* (7.5-10.2%), K2 O (0.2-0.9%), and other elements. Paleomagnetic sampling at 19 sites indicates a correlation between stratigraphic position, chemical composition, and magnetic inclination (I) value. A >10° shift to shallower I values was found, while declination (D) values were essentially constant as the eruption progressed. The farthest-traveled early E lavas have the highest I (78-80°), whereas the SW and near E lavas have I=75-77°. TiO2 contents for these

  6. What Can Crystal Size Distributions and Olivine Compositions Tell Us About Magma Solidification Processes in Kilauea Iki Lava Lake, Hawaii?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinet, N.; Higgins, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    Lava lakes offer the opportunity to investigate magma solidification and can be considered as a proxy for small magma chambers or layered intrusions. Here we present data from Kilauea Iki Lava Lake, which formed during the near-summit 1959 picritic eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Microprobe geochemical analyses and crystal size distributions (CSDs) of olivine were determined from three eruption scoria samples, and 34 drill core samples taken from 1967 to 1988. The data provide valuable information on the dynamics and timescales of the intra-lake solidification processes, along with origin of, and temporal constraints on, the distinct olivine populations. Based on their core and rim forsterite (Fo) content, three distinct olivine populations were distinguished: (1) a high-Fo population (Fo85-88); (2) an intermediate-Fo population (Fo77-81); and (3) a low-Fo population (Fo72-76). Groups 1 and 2 both have deformed and undeformed crystals indicating that they formed partly within Kilauea plumbing system before the eruption. The second group seems to be associated with the ‘vertical olivine-rich bodies’ (VORBs) of Helz (1980). These structures raise magma from the lower part of the lake; hence they may have a contrasting composition maintained from the initial filling of the lake. The third population may be the result of rejuvenation within the lake during its cooling. Although the shape of the olivine CSDs is fairly uniform, we note significant variations that allow the recognition and quantification of multiple solidification processes. Our data display evidence of minor accumulation occurring by settling modified by convection currents. The concave-up curvature of at least half of the CSDs is strong evidence for mixing of magmas or crystal populations. The turndown at smallest sizes of the CSD, particularly present for samples at the edge of the lake, is thought to be the result of coarsening. Our CSD and crystal chemistry data suggest that the early

  7. Fractionation of the platinum-group elments and Re during crystallization of basalt in Kilauea Iki Lava Lake, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitcher, L.; Helz, R.T.; Walker, R.J.; Piccoli, P.

    2009-01-01

    Kilauea Iki lava lake formed during the 1959 summit eruption of Kilauea Volcano, then crystallized and differentiated over a period of 35??years. It offers an opportunity to evaluate the fractionation behavior of trace elements in a uniquely well-documented basaltic system. A suite of 14 core samples recovered from 1967 to 1981 has been analyzed for 5 platinum-group elements (PGE: Ir, Os, Ru, Pt, Pd), plus Re. These samples have MgO ranging from 2.4 to 26.9??wt.%, with temperatures prior to quench ranging from 1140????C to ambient (110????C). Five eruption samples were also analyzed. Osmium and Ru concentrations vary by nearly four orders of magnitude (0.0006-1.40??ppb for Os and 0.0006-2.01??ppb for Ru) and are positively correlated with MgO content. These elements behaved compatibly during crystallization, mostly likely being concentrated in trace phases (alloy or sulfide) present in olivine phenocrysts or included chromite. Iridium also correlates positively with MgO, although less strongly than Os and Ru. The somewhat poorer correlation for Ir, compared with Os and Ru, may reflect variable loss of Ir as volatile IrF6 in some of the most magnesian samples. Rhenium is negatively correlated with MgO, behaving as an incompatible trace element. Its behavior in the lava lake is complicated by apparent volatile loss of Re, as suggested by a decrease in Re concentration with time of quenching for lake samples vs. eruption samples. Platinum and Pd concentrations are negatively, albeit weakly, correlated with MgO, so these elements were modestly incompatible during crystallization of the major silicate phases. Palladium contents peaked before precipitation of immiscible sulfide liquid, however, and decline sharply in the most differentiated samples. In contrast, Pt appears to have been unaffected by sulfide precipitation. Microprobe data confirm that Pd entered the sulfide liquid before Re, and that Pt is not strongly chalcophile in this system. Occasional high Pt values

  8. Basaltic lava flows covering active aeolian dunes in the Paraná Basin in southern Brazil: Features and emplacement aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waichel, Breno L.; Scherer, Claiton M. S.; Frank, Heinrich T.

    2008-03-01

    Burial of active aeolian dunes by lava flows can preserve the morphology of the dunes and generate diverse features related to interaction between unconsolidated sediments and lavas. In the study area, located in southern Brazil, burial of aeolian deposits by Cretaceous basaltic lava flows completely preserved dunes, and generate sand-deformation features, sand diapirs and peperite-like breccia. The preserved dunes are crescentic and linear at the main contact with basalts, and smaller crescentic where interlayered with lavas. The various feature types formed on sediment surfaces by the advance of the flows reflect the emplacement style of the lavas which are compound pahoehoe type. Four feature types can be recognized: (a) type 1 features are related to the advance of sheet flows in dune-interdune areas with slopes > 5°, (b) type 2 is formed where the lava flows advance in lobes and climb the stoss slope of crescentic dunes (slopes 8-12°), (c) type 3 is generated by toes that descend the face of linear dunes (slopes 17-23°) and (d) type 4 occurs when lava lobes descend the stoss slope of crescentic dunes (slopes 10-15°). The direction of the flows, the disposition and morphology of the dunes and the ground slope are the main factors controlling formation of the features. The injection of unconsolidated sand in lava lobes forms diapirs and peperite-like breccias. Sand diapirs occur at the basal portion of lobes where the lava was more solidified. Peperite-like breccias occur in the inner portion where lava was more plastic, favoring the mingling of the components. The generation of both features is related to a mechanical process: the weight of the lava causes the injection of sand into the lava and the warming of the air in the pores of the sand facilitates this process. The lava-sediment interaction features presented here are consistent with previous reports of basalt lavas with unconsolidated arid sediments, and additional new sand-deformation features

  9. Assimilation of granite by basaltic magma at Burnt Lava flow, Medicine Lake volcano, northern California: Decoupling of heat and mass transfer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, T.L.; Kinzler, R.J.; Baker, M.B.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Lesher, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    At Medicine Lake volcano, California, andesite of the Holocene Burnt Lava flow has been produced by fractional crystallization of parental high alumina basalt (HAB) accompanied by assimilation of granitic crustal material. Burnt Lava contains inclusions of quenched HAB liquid, a potential parent magma of the andesite, highly melted granitic crustal xenoliths, and xenocryst assemblages which provide a record of the fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation process. Samples of granitic crustal material occur as xenoliths in other Holocene and Pleistocene lavas, and these xenoliths are used to constrain geochemical models of the assimilation process. A large amount of assimilation accompanied fractional crystallization to produce the contaminated Burnt lava andesites. Models which assume that assimilation and fractionation occurred simultaneously estimate the ratio of assimilation to fractional crystallization (R) to be >1 and best fits to all geochemical data are at an R value of 1.35 at F=0.68. Petrologic evidence, however, indicates that the assimilation process did not involve continuous addition of granitic crust as fractionation occurred. Instead, heat and mass transfer were separated in space and time. During the assimilation process, HAB magma underwent large amounts of fractional crystallization which was not accompanied by significant amounts of assimilation. This fractionation process supplied heat to melt granitic crust. The models proposed to explain the contamination process involve fractionation, replenishment by parental HAB, and mixing of evolved and parental magmas with melted granitic crust. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  10. Geochemistry of tholeiitic to alkaline lavas from the east of Lake Van (Turkey): Implications for a late Cretaceous mature supra-subduction zone environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Yavuz

    2016-08-01

    Arc-related rocks of the Yüksekova Complex extend from Kahramanmaraş to Hakkari throughout the Southeast Anatolia representing the remnants of the Southern Branch of Neotethys. The volcanic members of this zone from the eastern parts of Lake Van suggest three different types of rock chemistry; tholeiitic (type I), calc-alkaline (type II) and alkaline (type III). Tholeiitic and calc-alkaline members suggest a subduction-related environment with their HFS and LIL element distributions. RE and trace element systematics and modelings indicate that i) the intermediate and the felsic calc-alkaline rocks are the result of fractional crystallization from a basic endmember, ii) alkaline members have originated from enriched mantle source relative to the tholeiitic and calc-alkaline lavas. Overall data from Yüksekova Complex suggest a mature supra-subduction zone environment within the southern Neotethyan Ocean during Upper Cretaceous time. The existence of Lutetian OIB like asthenospheric lavas at the upper parts of the ophiolitic assemblage in the eastern parts of Lake Van proposes the end of the normal ophiolite formation and the possible continuation of the magmatism with OIB like lavas during Middle Eocene.

  11. The Lava sequence of the East African Rift escarpment in the Oldoinyo Lengai - Lake Natron sector, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukirchen, Florian; Finkenbein, Thomas; Keller, Jörg

    2010-12-01

    A 500 m sequence of horizontal lava flows forms the Gregory rift escarpment of the western rift shoulder between Lake Natron and Oldoinyo Lengai. A detailed volcanic stratigraphy of this >1.2 Ma evolution of the EAR in Northern Tanzania is presented. The sequence is formed by several distinct rock suites, with increasing alkalinity from base to top. Alkali olivine basalts of the Waterfall Sequence at the base are followed by a basanite series, and by a range of evolved nephelinites forming the upper part of the escarpment. Numerous dykes and Strombolian scoria deposits indicate local fissure eruptions as opposed to or in addition to more distant sources. Primitive compositions within each of the series indicate variable candidates for primary magmas. The composition of the basanite suite ranges from primitive mantle melts (high Mg#, Cr, Ni) to more evolved rocks, in particular hawaiites, generated by fractionation of olivine, pyroxene and magnetite. Inter-bedded within the basanite suite, one single olivine melilitite flow with high Mg# and abundant olivine and pyroxene megacrysts is the only primitive candidate for the nephelinite suite. However, in view of the large compositional gap and marked differences in incompatible element ratios, a relation between this flow and the nephelinites remains hypothetical. The variation within the evolved nephelinite series can be partly explained by fractionation of pyroxene, apatite, perovskite (and some nepheline), while magma mixing is indicated by zonation patterns of pyroxene. The most evolved nephelinite, however, differs significantly from all other nephelinites in major and trace elements. Thus the entire sequence is petrologically not a coherent evolution, rather the result of different mantle melts fractionating under variable conditions. Carved into the rift scarp of the study area west of Engare Sero is a young explosion crater, the Sekenge Crater. Sekenge Tuffs are olivine melilitites, similar to other craters and

  12. Lake-level rise in the late Pleistocene and active subaquatic volcanism since the Holocene in Lake Kivu, East African Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Kelly Ann; Smets, Benoît; De Batist, Marc; Hilbe, Michael; Schmid, Martin; Anselmetti, Flavio S.

    2014-09-01

    The history of Lake Kivu is strongly linked to the activity of the Virunga volcanoes. Subaerial and subaquatic volcanoes, in addition to lake-level changes, shape the subaquatic morphologic and structural features in Lake Kivu's Main Basin. Previous studies revealed that volcanic eruptions blocked the former outlet of the lake to the north in the late Pleistocene, leading to a substantial rise in the lake level and subsequently the present-day thermohaline stratification. Additional studies have speculated that volcanic and seismic activities threaten to trigger a catastrophic release of the large amount of gases dissolved in the lake. The current study presents a bathymetric mapping and seismic profiling survey that covers the volcanically active area of the Main Basin at a resolution that is unprecedented for Lake Kivu. New geomorphologic features identified on the lake floor can accurately describe related lake-floor processes for the first time. The late Pleistocene lowstand is observed at 425 m depth, and volcanic cones, tuff rings, and lava flows observed above this level indicate both subaerial and subaquatic volcanic activities during the Holocene. The geomorphologic analysis yields new implications on the geologic processes that have shaped Lake Kivu's basin, and the presence of young volcanic features can be linked to the possibility of a lake overturn.

  13. A Model for Variable Levee Formation Rates in an Active Lava Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaze, L. S.; Baloga, S. M.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Crisp, J.

    2004-01-01

    Channelized lava flows on Mars and the Earth often feature levees and collateral margins that change in volume along the path of the flow. Consistent with field observations of terrestrial flows, this suggests that the rate of levee formation varies with distance and other factors. Previous models have assumed a constant rate of levee growth, specified by a single parameter, lambda. The rate of levee formation for lava flows is a good indicator of the mass eruption rate and rheology of the flow. Insight into levee formation will help us better understand whether or not the effusion rate was constant during an eruption, and once local topography is considered, allows us to look at cooling and/or rheology changes downslope. Here we present a more realistic extension of the levee formation model that treats the rate of levee growth as a function of distance along the flow path. We show how this model can be used with a terrestrial flow and a long lava flow on Mars. The key statement of the new formulation is the rate of transfer from the active component to the levees (or other passive components) through an element dx along the path of the flow. This volumetric transfer equation is presented.

  14. A sinuous tumulus over an active lava tube at Kīlauea Volcano: Evolution, analogs, and hazard forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Tim R.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Patrick, Matthew R.; Wooten, Kelly M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflation of narrow tube-fed basaltic lava flows (tens of meters across), such as those confined by topography, can be focused predominantly along the roof of a lava tube. This can lead to the development of an unusually long tumulus, its shape matching the sinuosity of the underlying lava tube. Such a situation occurred during Kīlauea Volcano's (Hawai'i, USA) ongoing East Rift Zone eruption on a lava tube active from July through November 2010. Short-lived breakouts from the tube buried the flanks of the sinuous, ridge-like tumulus, while the tumulus crest, its surface composed of lava formed very early in the flow's emplacement history, remained poised above the surrounding younger flows. At least several of these breakouts resulted in irrecoverable uplift of the tube roof. Confined sections of the prehistoric Carrizozo and McCartys flows (New Mexico, USA) display similar sinuous, ridge-like features with comparable surface age relationships. We contend that these distinct features formed in a fashion equivalent to that of the sinuous tumulus that formed at Kīlauea in 2010. Moreover, these sinuous tumuli may be analogs for some sinuous ridges evident in orbital images of the Tharsis volcanic province on Mars. The short-lived breakouts from the sinuous tumulus at Kīlauea were caused by surges in discharge through the lava tube, in response to cycles of deflation and inflation (DI events) at Kīlauea's summit. The correlation between DI events and subsequent breakouts aided in lava flow forecasting. Breakouts from the sinuous tumulus advanced repeatedly toward the sparsely populated Kalapana Gardens subdivision, destroying two homes and threatening others. Hazard assessments, including flow occurrence and advance forecasts, were relayed regularly to the Hawai'i County Civil Defense to aid their lava flow hazard mitigation efforts while this lava tube was active.

  15. A sinuous tumulus over an active lava tube at Kīlauea Volcano: evolution, analogs, and hazard forecasts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Tim R.; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Patrick, Matthew R.; Wooten, Kelly M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflation of narrow tube-fed basaltic lava flows (tens of meters across), such as those confined by topography, can be focused predominantly along the roof of a lava tube. This can lead to the development of an unusually long tumulus, its shape matching the sinuosity of the underlying lava tube. Such a situation occurred during Kīlauea Volcano's (Hawai'i, USA) ongoing East Rift Zone eruption on a lava tube active from July through November 2010. Short-lived breakouts from the tube buried the flanks of the sinuous, ridge-like tumulus, while the tumulus crest, its surface composed of lava formed very early in the flow's emplacement history, remained poised above the surrounding younger flows. At least several of these breakouts resulted in irrecoverable uplift of the tube roof. Confined sections of the prehistoric Carrizozo and McCartys flows (New Mexico, USA) display similar sinuous, ridge-like features with comparable surface age relationships. We contend that these distinct features formed in a fashion equivalent to that of the sinuous tumulus that formed at Kīlauea in 2010. Moreover, these sinuous tumuli may be analogs for some sinuous ridges evident in orbital images of the Tharsis volcanic province on Mars. The short-lived breakouts from the sinuous tumulus at Kīlauea were caused by surges in discharge through the lava tube, in response to cycles of deflation and inflation (DI events) at Kīlauea's summit. The correlation between DI events and subsequent breakouts aided in lava flow forecasting. Breakouts from the sinuous tumulus advanced repeatedly toward the sparsely populated Kalapana Gardens subdivision, destroying two homes and threatening others. Hazard assessments, including flow occurrence and advance forecasts, were relayed regularly to the Hawai'i County Civil Defense to aid their lava flow hazard mitigation efforts while this lava tube was active.

  16. Morphometrical and geochronological constraints on the youngest eruptive activity in East-Central Europe at the Ciomadul (Csomád) lava dome complex, East Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karátson, Dávid; Telbisz, Tamás; Harangi, Szabolcs; Magyari, Enikő; Dunkl, István; Kiss, Balázs; Jánosi, Csaba; Veres, Daniel; Braun, Mihály; Fodor, Emőke; Biró, Tamás; Kósik, Szabolcs; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Lin, Ding

    2013-04-01

    The timing of Late Pleistocene volcanic activity of the Ciomadul (Csomád) dacitic lava dome complex, site of the youngest eruptions in the Carpathians, has been constrained by morphometric analysis and radiometric chronology. Peléan domes and asymmetric domes/coulées built up the volcano, including the central edifice that hosts the youngest twin craters of Mohoş (Mohos) peat bog and lake St. Ana (Szent Anna). A comparative digital elevation model (DEM)-based morphometric analysis of lava domes (29 worldwide examples including 5 domes from Ciomadul) shows that it is the mean slope of the upper dome flank that correlates best with age. Although the logarithmic relationship is only moderately strong (R = 0.80), slope characteristics of the Ciomadul domes fit to those of 10-100 ka old domes. These young ages contradict the previous K/Ar dates giving as old as 1 Ma ages on a number of domes, but are supported by ongoing U-Pb and (U-Th)/He zircon dating. The latter methods constrain the whole volcanic activity to the past 250 ka and the emplacement of most lava domes within the period of 150-100 ka. The volcanism at Ciomadul produced alternating effusive and explosive eruptions including lava dome collapses and successive crater formations. The latest, possibly subplinian explosive event formed the well-preserved St. Ana crater. Radiocarbon dating of organic remains from a sediment core that reached 11 m into the lacustrine infill of St. Ana suggests that the crater was formed prior to 26,000 years BP.

  17. Discovery of a Plains Caldera Complex and Extinct Lava Lake in Arabia Terra, Mars: Implications for the Discovery of Additional Highland Volcanic Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleacher, Jacob; Michalski, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Several irregularly shaped topographic depressions occur near the dichotomy boundary in northern Arabia Terra, Mars. The geomorphology of these features suggests that they formed by collapse, opposed to meteor impact. At least one depression (approx.55 by 85 km) displays geologic features indicating a complex, multi-stage collapse history. Features within and around the collapse structure indicate volcanic processes. The complex occurs within Hesperian ridged plains of likely volcanic origin and displays no crater rim or evidence for ejecta. Instead the depression consists of a series of circumferential graben and down-dropped blocks which also display upper surfaces similar to ridged plain lavas. Large blocks within the depression are tilted towards the crater center, and display graben that appear to have originally been linked with circumferential graben outside of the complex related to earlier collapse events. A nearly 700 m high mound exists along a graben within the complex that might be a vent. The deepest depression displays two sets of nearly continuous terraces, which we interpret as high-stands of a drained lava lake. These features appear similar to the black ledge described during the Kilauea Iki eruption in 1959. A lacustrine origin for the terraces seems unlikely because of the paucity of channels found in or around the depression that could be linked to aqueous surface processes. In addition, there is no obvious evidence for lacustrine sediments within the basin. Together with the presence of significant faulting that is indicative of collapse we conclude that this crater complex represents a large caldera formed in the Late Noachian to Early Hesperian. Other linear and irregular depressions in the region also might be linked to ancient volcanism. If that hypothesis is correct, it suggests that northern Arabia Terra could contain a large, previously unrecognized highland igneous province. Evacuation of magma via explosive and effusive activity

  18. Photogrammetric and Global Positioning System Measurements of Active Pahoehoe Lava Lobe Emplacement on Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Glaze, Lori S.; James, Mike R.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Fagents, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    Basalt is the most common rock type on the surface of terrestrial bodies throughout the solar system and -- by total volume and areal coverage -- pahoehoe flows are the most abundant form of basaltic lava in subaerial and submarine environments on Earth. A detailed understanding of pahoehoe emplacement processes is necessary for developing accurate models of flow field development, assessing hazards associated with active lava flows, and interpreting the significance of lava flow morphology on Earth and other planetary bodies. Here, we examine the active emplacement of pahoehoe lobes along the margins of the Hook Flow from Pu'u 'O'o on Kilauea, Hawaii. Topographic data were acquired between 21 and 23 February 2006 using stereo-imaging and differential global positing system (DGPS) measurements. During this time, the average discharge rate for the Hook Flow was 0.01-0.05 cubic m/s. Using stereogrammetric point clouds and interpolated digital terrain models (DTMs), active flow fronts were digitized at 1 minute intervals. These areal spreading maps show that the lava lobe grew by a series of breakouts tha t broadly fit into two categories: narrow (0.2-0.6 m-wide) toes that grew preferentially down-slope, and broad (1.4-3.5 m-wide) breakouts that formed along the sides of the lobe, nearly perpendicular to the down-flow axis. These lobes inflated to half of their final thickness within approx 5 minutes, with a rate of inflation that generally deceased with time. Through a combination of down-slope and cross-slope breakouts, lobes developed a parabolic cross-sectional shape within tens of minutes. We also observed that while the average local discharge rate for the lobe was generally constant at 0.0064 +/- 0.0019 cubic m/s, there was a 2 to 6 fold increase in the areal coverage rate every 4.1 +/- 0.6 minutes. We attribute this periodicity to the time required for the dynamic pressurization of the liquid core of the lava lobe to exceed the cooling-induced strength of the

  19. Chemical characteristics of the volcanic gases from Nyiragongo lava lake and the generation of CH 4-rich fluid inclusions in alkaline rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, T. M.

    1980-10-01

    Methods used previously to remove compositional modifications from volcanic gas analyses for Mount Etna and Erta'Ale lava lake have bean employed to estimate the gas phase composition at Nyiragongo lava lake, based on samples obtained in 1959. H 2O data were not reported in 11 of the 13 original analyses. The restoration methods have been used to estimate the H 2O contents of the samples and to correct the analyses for atmospheric contamination, loss of sulfur and for pre- and pest-collection oxidation of H 2S, S 2, and H 2. The estimated gas compositions are relatively CO 2-rich, low in total sulfur and reduced. They contain approximately 35-50% CO 2 45-55% H 2O, 1-2% SO 2, 1-2% H 2., 2-3% CO, 1.5-2.5% H 2S, 0.5% S 2 and 0.1% COS over,he collection temperature range 102° to 960° C. The oxygen fugacities of the gases are consistently about half an order of magnitude below quartz-magnetite-fayalite. The low total sulfur content and resulting low atomic S/C of the Nyiragongo gases appear to be related to the relatively low fO 2 of the crystallizing lava. At temperatures above 800°C and pressures of 1-1.5 k bar, the Nyiragongo gas compositions resemble those observed in primary fluid inclusions believed to have formed at similar temperatures and pressures in nephelines of intrusive alkaline rocks. Cooling to 300°C, with fO 2 buffered by the rock, results in gas compositions very rich in CH 4 (50-70%) and resembling secondary fluid inclusions formed at 200-500°C in alkaline rocks. Below 600°C the gases become supersaturated in carbon as graphite. These inferences are corroborated by several reports of hydrocarbons in plutonic alkaline rocks, and by the presence of CH 4-rich waters in Lake Kivu — a lake on the flanks of Nyiragongo volcano.

  20. Determining the rheology of active lava flows from photogrammetric image sequence processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Robson, S.; Pinkerton, H.

    2010-12-01

    We describe a photogrammetric approach used to determine the rheological properties of active lava flows based on stereo image sequences. Bulk rheological properties can be estimated from measurements of flow slope, velocity and dimensions and so, at flow-fronts, they can be calculated from sequential digital elevation models (DEMs) acquired as the flow advances over new ground. For useful flow parameters to be extracted, DEMs may need to be obtained at approximately minute intervals, over durations of up to multiple hours. To deliver such data, we use oblique stereo pair sequences captured by digital SLR cameras and a semi-automated DEM-generation pipeline. Although similar data could be acquired with a terrestrial laser scanner, with deployments in remote and hazardous regions the photogrammetric approach offers significant logistical advantages in terms of reduced equipment cost, bulk, weight and power requirements. We describe the application of the technique to an active lava flow on Mount Etna, Sicily, in 2006. Image sequences were acquired from two tripod-mounted cameras over a period of ~3 hours, as the flow-front advanced ~15 m. Photogrammetric control was provided by 11 targets placed in the scene, with their coordinates determined by dGPS. The cameras were synchronised by a shutter release cable and triggered by an external timer (intervalometer). Image pairs were obtained every minute with DEMs extraction carried out on every fourth epoch; 57 DEMs, with a 0.25-m resolution, were generated. We describe the challenges associated with data collection in this remote environment and the techniques required to automate the photogrammetric analysis and sequence-DEM generation.

  1. Io's Volcanism: Thermo-Physical Models of Silicate Lava Compared with Observations of Thermal Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Ashely G.

    1996-01-01

    Analyses of thermal infrared outbursts from the jovian satellite Io indicate that at least some of these volcanic events are due to silicate lava. Analysis of the January 9, 1990 outburst indicates that this was an active eruption consisting of a large lava flow (with mass eruption rate of order 10(exp 5) cubic m/sec) and a sustained area at silicate liquidus temperatures. This is interpreted as a series of fire fountains along a rift zone. A possible alternative scenario is that of an overflowing lava lake with extensive fire fountaining. The January 9, 1990 event is unique as multispectral observations with respect to time were obtained. In this paper, a model is presented for the thermal energy lost by active and cooling silicate lava flows and lakes on Io. The model thermal emission is compared with Earth-based observations and Voyager IRIS data. The model (a) provides an explanation of the thermal anomalies on Io's surface; (b) provides constraints on flow behavior and extent and infers some flow parameters; and (c) determines flow geometry and change in flow size with time, and the temperature of each part of the flow or lava lake surface as a function of its age. Models of heat output from active lava flows or inactive but recently emplaced lava flows or overturning lava lakes alone are unable to reproduce the observations. If the January 9, 1990 event is the emplacement of a lava flow, the equivalent of 27 such events per year would yield a volume of material sufficient, if uniformly distributed, to resurface all of Io at a rate of 1 cm/year.

  2. Lava dome morphometry and geochronology of the youngest eruptive activity in Eastern Central Europe: Ciomadul (Csomád), East Carpathians, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karátson, D.; Telbisz, T.; Harangi, Sz.; Magyari, E.; Kiss, B.; Dunkl, I.; Veres, D.; Braun, M.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanic evolution of the Ciomadul (Csomád) lava dome complex, site of the youngest (Late Pleistocene, late Marine Isotope Stage 3) eruptive activity in the Carpathians, has been studied by advanced morphometry and radiometric (U/Pb, U/He and 14C) geochronology. The volcano produced alternating effusive and intermittent explosive eruptions from individual domes, typical of common andesitic-dacitic lava domes. A comparative morphometry shows steep ≥30° mean slopes of domes' upper flank and the Csomád domes fit well to the 100-200 ka domes worldwide. Morphometric ages obtained from the mean slope vs age precipitation correlation results in ≤100 ka ages. The morphometric approach is supported by U/Pb and U/He chronology: preliminary results of zircon dating indicate ages ranging between 200(250) and 30 ka. The youngest ages of the data set obtained both from lavas and pumiceous pyroclastics argue for a more or less coeval effusive and explosive volcanism. Based also on volcanological data, we propose vulcanian eruptions and explosive dome collapses especially toward the end of volcanic activity. Moreover, radiometric chronology suggests that, possibly subsequently to the peripheral domes, a central lava dome complex built up ≤100 ka ago. This dome complex, exhibiting even more violent, up to sub-plinian explosions, emplaced pumiceous pyroclastic flow and fall deposits as far as 17 km. We propose that the explosive activity produced caldera-forming eruptions as well, creating a half-caldera. This caldera rim is manifested by the asymmetric morphology of the central edifice: the present-day elevated ridge of Ciomadul Mare (Nagy Csomád), encompassing the twin craters of Mohoş (Mohos) peat bog and Sf. Ana (Szent [St.] Anna). These latter craters may have been formed subsequently, ca. ~100-30 ka ago, after the caldera formation. Drilling of lacustrine sediments in the St. Anna crater shows that beneath the Holocene gyttja several meters of Late Pleistocene

  3. Constraints on Determining the Eruption Style and Composition of Terrestrial Lavas from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Robert; Glaze, Lori; Baloga, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    The surface temperatures of active lavas relate to cooling rates, chemistry, and eruption style. We analyzed 61 hyperspectral satellite images acquired by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) Hyperion imaging spectrometer to document the surface temperature distributions of active lavas erupted at 13 volcanoes. Images were selected to encompass the range of common lava eruption styles, specifically, lava fountains, flows, lakes, and domes. Our results reveal temperature distributions for terrestrial lavas that correlate with composition (i.e., a statistically significant difference in the highest temperatures retrieved for mafic lavas and intermediate and felsic lavas) and eruption style. Maximum temperatures observed for mafi c lavas are approx.200 C higher than for intermediate and felsic lavas. All eruption styles exhibit a low-temperature mode at approx.300 C; lava fountains and 'a' a flows also exhibit a higher-temperature mode at approx.700 C. The observed differences between the temperatures are consistent with the contrasting rates at which the lava surfaces are thermally renewed. Eruption styles that allow persistent and pervasive thermal renewal of the lava surface (e.g., fractured crusts on channel-fed 'a' a flows) exhibit a bimodal temperature distribution; eruption styles that do not (e.g., the continuous skin of pahoehoe lavas) exhibit a single mode. We conclude that insights into composition and eruption style can only be gained remotely by analyzing a large spatio-temporal sample of data. This has implications for determining composition and eruption style at the Jovian moon Io, for which no in situ validation is available.

  4. Lake-floor sediment texture and composition of a hydrothermally-active, volcanic lake, Lake Rotomahana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittari, A.; Muir, S. L.; Hendy, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    Young volcanic lakes undergo a transition from rapid, post-eruptive accumulation of volcaniclastic sediment to slower pelagic settling under stable lake conditions, and may also be influenced by sublacustrine hydrothermal systems. Lake Rotomahana is a young (129 year-old), hydrothermally-active, volcanic lake formed after the 1886 Tarawera eruption, and provides a unique insight into the early evolution of volcanic lake systems. Lake-bottom sediment cores, 20-46 cm in length, were taken along a transect across the lake and characterised with respect to stratigraphy, facies characteristics (i.e., grain size, componentry) and pore water silica concentrations. The sediments generally comprise two widespread facies: (i) a lower facies of light grey to grey, very fine lacustrine silt derived from the unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits that mantled the catchment area immediately after the eruption, which were rapidly reworked and redeposited into the lake basin; and (ii) an upper facies of dark, fine-sandy diatomaceous silt, that settled from the pelagic zone of the physically stable lake. Adjacent to sublacustrine hydrothermal vents, the upper dark facies is absent, and the upper part of the light grey to grey silt is replaced by a third localised facies comprised of hydrothermally altered pale yellow to yellowish brown, laminated silt with surface iron-rich encrustations. Microspheres, which are thought to be composed of amorphous silica, although some may be halloysite, have precipitated from pore water onto sediment grains, and are associated with a decrease in pore water silicon concentration. Lake Rotomahana is an example of a recently-stabilised volcanic lake, with respect to sedimentation, that shows signs of early sediment silicification in the presence of hydrothermal activity.

  5. Computer vision: automating DEM generation of active lava flows and domes from photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Varley, N. R.; Tuffen, H.

    2012-12-01

    ón-Caulle, images of the active lava flow were taken on foot from a ridge overlooking the flow. To assess the evolution of the flow front, two DEMs were derived from collections of ~400 images taken on different days. To scale and geo-reference the data, one image sequence was accompanied by simultaneous collection of a GPS track using a consumer handheld GPS unit; no control points were used. The second survey was then scaled and georeferenced to the first, using features identifiable in both image sets, giving an RMS error of ~0.22 m. DEM comparison then allows advance rates and mechanisms to be identified, and comparisons drawn with emplacement processes of basaltic flows. In both case studies, the SfM-MVS approach allowed DEM generation when access or lack of dedicated surveying equipment and expertise prevented standard techniques from being deployed.olima dome 2011: 3D point cloud data

  6. Lava Flow Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    1996-01-01

    This grant originally had four major tasks, all of which were addressed to varying extents during the course of the research: (1) Measure the fractal dimensions of lava flows as a function of topography, substrate, and rheology; (2) The nature of lava tube systems and their relation to flow fields; (3) A quantitative assessment of lava flow dynamics in light of the fractal nature of lava flow margins; and (4) Development and application of a new remote sensing tool based on fractal properties. During the course of the research, the project expanded to include the following projects: (1) A comparison of what we can-learn from remote sensing studies of lava flow morphology and from studies of samples of lava flows; (2) Study of a terrestrial analog of the nakhlites, one of the groups of meteorites from Mars; and (3) Study of the textures of Hawaiian basalts as an aid in understanding the dynamics (flow rates, inflation rates, thermal history) of flow interiors. In addition, during the first year an educational task (development and writing of a teacher's guide and activity set to accompany the lunar sample disk when it is sent to schools) was included.

  7. The Mono Lake excursion recorded in phonolitic lavas from Tenerife (Canary Islands): Paleomagnetic analyses and coupled K/Ar and Ar/Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissel, C.; Guillou, H.; Laj, C.; Carracedo, J. C.; Nomade, S.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Wandres, C.

    2011-08-01

    We present a coupled paleomagnetic/dating investigation conducted on three different lava flows from the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands; Spain) erupted during the Mono Lake excursion (MLE). Paleomagnetic analyses consist in zero field demagnetizations (AF and/or thermal) and of Thellier and Thellier experiments using the PICRIT-03 set of criteria to select reliable intensity determinations. One of the flows is characterized by a direction largely deviated from the one expected from an axial geocentric dipole (GAD) field. Its paleointensity value is very low (7.8 μT). The two other sites are characterized by inclinations slightly shallower than the GAD value and by low intensity values (about 12 and 21 μT; present value: 38 μT). The three K/Ar ages combined with two 40Ar/ 39Ar ages range from 32.0 to 33.2 ka and they are not statistically distinguishable from one another. It therefore appears that these lavas have recorded the MLE (the only excursion in this time interval) confirming its brief duration (shorter than the minimum age uncertainties available). The mean age is younger but, within the uncertainties, consistent with the age of the 10Be peak and of the marine intensity low when reported in the most recent ice age model. These new results are the first ones with radiometric dating produced from the northern hemisphere. Combined with existing cosmogenic, marine and volcanic paleomagnetic data, these results are discussed in terms of dating, and geometry of the earth magnetic field during the excursion.

  8. The Mono Lake Excursion Recorded in Phonolitic Lavas From Tenerife (Canary Islands): Paleomagnetic Analyses and Coupled K/Ar and Ar/Ar Dating.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissel, C.; Guillou, H.; Laj, C. E.; Carracedo, J. C.; Nomade, S.; Perez-Torrado, F.; Wandres, C.

    2011-12-01

    Studies of geomagnetic excursions is important for the knowledge of the geodynamo, and also because they may be used as precise time markers in various geological records (sediments, lavas and ice via their impact on the production of cosmogenic isotopes). In volcanic rocks, the identification of excursions is very challenging given the sporadic nature of the volcanic eruptions. However, it is a critical step because it allows absolute paleointensity determinations to be obtained, coupled with absolute dating methods. We present here a coupled paleomagnetic/dating investigation conducted on three different lava flows from the island of Tenerife (Canary Islands; Spain) erupted during the Mono Lake excursion (MLE). Paleomagnetic analyses consist in zero field demagnetizations (AF and/or thermal) and of Thellier and Thellier experiments using the PICRIT-03 set of criteria to select reliable intensity determinations. For dating, the unspiked K-Ar and the 40Ar/39Ar methods were coupled at LSCE for two of the flows and the third flow, with lower content in radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) was dated only using the unspiked K-Ar method. One of the flows is characterized by a direction largely deviated from the one expected from an axial geocentric dipole (GAD) field. Its paleointensity value is very low (7.8 μT). The two other sites are characterized by inclinations slightly shallower than the GAD value and by low intensity values (about 12 and 21 μT; present value: 38μT). The three K/Ar ages combined with two 40Ar/39Ar ages range from 32.0 to 33.2 ka and they are not statistically distinguishable from one another. It therefore appears that these lavas have recorded the MLE (the only excursion in this time interval) confirming its brief duration (shorter than the minimum age uncertainties available). The mean age is younger but, within the uncertainties and depending on the age of the standard we use, consistent with the age of the 10Be peak and of the marine intensity low when

  9. Selected caves and lava-tube systems in and near Lava Beds National Monument, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waters, Aaron Clement; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Rogers, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    Much of the north and south flanks of the Medicine Lake shield were built from molten lava transmitted through lava tubes. These tubes formed beneath the congealing surface of basalt flows in somewhat the same way that a brook may continue to flow beneath a cover of its own winter ice. As molten lava emerges from a vent and flows downslope, congealing lava from the top and sides of the central channel often forms a bridge over the lava stream. The sticking together of bits of lava spatter and fragile lava crusts strengthens the bridge in the manner that thin crusts of floating ice raft together to cover a brook during early stages of a winter freeze. Eruption of basalt lava, however, is a much more violent and spasmodic process than the steady gathering of water that feeds a brook. If liquid lava stops rising from its source deep within the earth, the still-molten lava moving beneath the crusted-over top of a lava flow will continue to drain downhill and may ultimately leave an open lavatube cave-often large enough for people to walk through. It is rare, however, to find such a simple scenario recorded intact among the hundreds of lava-tube caves in the monument. Even before the top and walls of a lava flow have time to cool during a pause in lava supply, a new and violent eruption of lava may refill the open tube, overflow its upper end, and spread a new lava flow beside or on top of the first flow. Even if the original tube is large enough to contain the renewed supply of lava, this tube must deliver the new lava beyond the end of its original flow and thus the lava field extends farther and farther downslope. If the gradient of flow flattens, the tube may subdivide into a number of smaller distributaries, which spread laterally over the more gently sloping ground. 

  10. Chasing lava: a geologist's adventures at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, Wendell A.

    2003-01-01

    A lively account of the three years (1969-1972) spent by geologist Wendell Duffield working at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory at Kilauea, one of the world's more active volcanoes. Abundantly illustrated in b&w and color, with line drawings and maps, as well. Volcanologists and general readers alike will enjoy author Wendell Duffield's report from Kilauea--home of Pele, the goddess of fire and volcanoes. Duffield's narrative encompasses everything from the scientific (his discovery that the movements of cooled lava on a lava lake mimic the movements of the earth's crust, providing an accessible model for understanding plate tectonics) to the humorous (his dog's discovery of a snake on the supposedly snake-free island) to the life-threatening (a colleague's plunge into molten lava). This charming account of living and working at Kilauea, one of the world's most active volcanoes, is sure to be a delight.

  11. Deriving Lava Eruption Temperatures on Io Using Lava Tube Skylights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; McEwen, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    The eruption temperature of Io's silicate lavas constrains Io's interior state and composition [1] but reliably measuring this temperature remotely is a challenge that has not yet been met. Previously, we established that eruption processes that expose large areas at the highest temperatures, such as roiling lava lakes or lava fountains, are suitable targets for this task [2]. In this study we investigate the thermal emission from lava tube skylights for basaltic and ultramafic composition lavas. Tube-fed lava flows are known on Io so skylights could be common. Unlike the surfaces of lava flows, lava lakes, and lava fountains which all cool very rapidly, skylights have steady thermal emission on a scale of days to months. The thermal emission from such a target, measured at multiple visible and NIR wavelengths, can provide a highly accurate diagnostic of eruption temperature. However, the small size of skylights means that close flybys of Io are necessary, requiring a dedicated Io mission [3]. We have modelled the thermal emission spectrum for different skylight sizes, lava flow stream velocities, end-member lava compositions, and skylight radiation shape factors, determining the flow surface cooling rates. We calculate the resulting thermal emission spectrum as a function of viewing angle. From the resulting 0.7:0.9 μm ratios, we see a clear distinction between basaltic and ultramafic compositions for skylights smaller than 20 m across, even if sub-pixel. If the skylight is not resolved, observations distributed over weeks that show a stationary and steady hot spot allow the presence of a skylight to be confidently inferred. This inference allows subsequent refining of observation design to improve viewing geometry of the target. Our analysis will be further refined as accurate high-temperature short-wavelength emissivity values become available [4]. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to

  12. Lava Lamp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leif, Todd R.

    2008-01-01

    This past semester I brought a Lava Lite[R] Lamp into my classroom. Why bring such a thing into class? Many of today's students are part of the "retro" movement. They buy clothes from the '60s, they wear their hair like people did in the '60s, and they look for the ideals and themes related to living in the 1960s. Physics education reform is also…

  13. Lava flow hazard at Nyiragongo volcano, D.R.C.. 1. Model calibration and hazard mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favalli, Massimiliano; Chirico, Giuseppe D.; Papale, Paolo; Pareschi, Maria Teresa; Boschi, Enzo

    2009-05-01

    The 2002 eruption of Nyiragongo volcano constitutes the most outstanding case ever of lava flow in a big town. It also represents one of the very rare cases of direct casualties from lava flows, which had high velocities of up to tens of kilometer per hour. As in the 1977 eruption, which is the only other eccentric eruption of the volcano in more than 100 years, lava flows were emitted from several vents along a N-S system of fractures extending for more than 10 km, from which they propagated mostly towards Lake Kivu and Goma, a town of about 500,000 inhabitants. We assessed the lava flow hazard on the entire volcano and in the towns of Goma (D.R.C.) and Gisenyi (Rwanda) through numerical simulations of probable lava flow paths. Lava flow paths are computed based on the steepest descent principle, modified by stochastically perturbing the topography to take into account the capability of lava flows to override topographic obstacles, fill topographic depressions, and spread over the topography. Code calibration and the definition of the expected lava flow length and vent opening probability distributions were done based on the 1977 and 2002 eruptions. The final lava flow hazard map shows that the eastern sector of Goma devastated in 2002 represents the area of highest hazard on the flanks of the volcano. The second highest hazard sector in Goma is the area of propagation of the western lava flow in 2002. The town of Gisenyi is subject to moderate to high hazard due to its proximity to the alignment of fractures active in 1977 and 2002. In a companion paper (Chirico et al., Bull Volcanol, in this issue, 2008) we use numerical simulations to investigate the possibility of reducing lava flow hazard through the construction of protective barriers, and formulate a proposal for the future development of the town of Goma.

  14. Seismic activity noted at Medicine Lake Highlands

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, D.

    1988-12-01

    The sudden rumble of earthquakes beneath Medicine Lake Highlands this fall gave geologists an early warning that one of Northern California's volcanoes may be stirring back to life. Researchers stressed that an eruption of the volcano is not expected soon. But the flurry of underground shocks in late September, combined with new evidence of a pool of molten rock beneath the big volcano, has led them to monitor Medicine Lake with new wariness. The volcano has been dormant since 1910, when it ejected a brief flurry of ash - worrying no one. A federal team plans to take measurements of Medicine Lake, testing for changes in its shape caused by underground pressures. The work is scheduled for spring because snows have made the volcano inaccessible. But the new seismic network is an effective lookout, sensitive to very small increases in activity.

  15. Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03658 Lava Flows

    These relatively young lava flows are part of Arsia Mons.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -22.5N, Longitude 242.3E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Lava Lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Todd R.

    2008-04-01

    This past semester I brought a Lava Lite® Lamp into my classroom. Why bring such a thing into class? Many of today's students are part of the "retro" movement. They buy clothes from the '60s, they wear their hair like people did in the '60s, and they look for the ideals and themes related to living in the 1960s. Physics education reform is also examining ideas from the "retro" world of science. This was the post-Sputnik era, a time when science was done by actually doing it and not necessarily by lecturing about it. Cliff Swartz, former TPT editor, once mentioned during a presentation at a Texas AAPT meeting, "The world of physics teaching is cyclic, like a swinging pendulum. We as physics teachers jump from `new ideas' back to our old ones, each generation testing what works best for them."

  17. Time-lapse Imaging of Active Lava Flows at Mt. Etna, Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Pinkerton, H.; Applegarth, L. J.; Hancock, A.; Slatcher, N.; Owen, J.; Calvari, S.; Ganci, G.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last ~6 years, remote time-lapse cameras have been deployed on Mt. Etna, Sicily, with a view to capturing the emplacement of a substantial lava flow field. Initial deployment of wildlife trail-style cameras in 2008 acquired data on lava channel processes during the 2008-9 eruption. In 2009, just in time to capture the dying phases of the eruption, an upgraded network of dSLRs was installed. The network has subsequently captured the steady growth of the New South East crater and the rapid emplacement of short-lived sheet flows that have accompanied the recent paroxysmal fire fountaining events. Most of the imagery has been acquired over distances of multiple kilometres, but the portability of the time-lapse setup has also allowed several opportunistic close range (hundreds of metres or less) deployments, to observe near-vent processes or effusion inside the Bocca Nuova crater. Here, we provide an overview of the equipment, and the approaches used to georeference the monoscopic time-lapse imagery through integrating with 3D data (e.g. existing DEMs, or data simultaneously collected by terrestrial laser scanner or photogrammetric techniques). The acquired observations of flow front emplacement, flow inflation, channel breaching and effusion rate variations that provide insight into the processes involved in long lived flow fields will be presented. Significant opportunities remain, for example, in the near real-time derivation of bulk rheological parameters, and integration with numerical flow models, and the challenges involved in using such imagery will be discussed.

  18. Linking lake variability, climate, and human activity in Basotu, Tanzania.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Lindsey; Westerberg, Lars-Ove; Risberg, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Lake Basotu (4.3697°S, 35.0728°E) is a crater lake in north-central Tanzania. This lake is an important source of freshwater for local people as no perennial rivers are present. Due to intensive agricultural methods and climatic factors, lake level has fluctuated greatly over time. A history of environmental variability of the past 1800 years was established using the diatom record, magnetic parameters, and carbon content from a three meter long sediment core. Fluctuations in modern lake extent (1973 - 2015) were calculated using archived Landsat images and compared to meteorological records and documents of activity around the lake to determine the greatest impacts and their consequences on this essential water resource. Variations in the paleo-record indicate that fluctuations in lake level are not abnormal, however human influence has likely increased the sensitivity of Lake Basotu to climatic fluctuations.

  19. Sequential digital elevation models of active lava flows from ground-based stereo time-lapse imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Robson, S.

    2014-11-01

    We describe a framework for deriving sequences of digital elevation models (DEMs) for the analysis of active lava flows using oblique stereo-pair time-lapse imagery. A photo-based technique was favoured over laser-based alternatives due to low equipment cost, high portability and capability for network expansion, with images of advancing flows captured by digital SLR cameras over durations of up to several hours. However, under typical field scale scenarios, relative camera orientations cannot be rigidly maintained (e.g. through the use of a stereo bar), preventing the use of standard stereo time-lapse processing software. Thus, we trial semi-automated DEM-sequence workflows capable of handling the small camera motions, variable image quality and restricted photogrammetric control that result from the practicalities of data collection at remote and hazardous sites. The image processing workflows implemented either link separate close-range photogrammetry and traditional stereo-matching software, or are integrated in a single software package based on structure-from-motion (SfM). We apply these techniques in contrasting case studies from Kilauea volcano, Hawaii and Mount Etna, Sicily, which differ in scale, duration and image texture. On Kilauea, the advance direction of thin fluid lava lobes was difficult to forecast, preventing good distribution of control. Consequently, volume changes calculated through the different workflows differed by ∼10% for DEMs (over ∼30 m2) that were captured once a minute for 37 min. On Mt. Etna, more predictable advance (∼3 m h-1 for ∼3 h) of a thicker, more viscous lava allowed robust control to be deployed and volumetric change results were generally within 5% (over ∼500 m2). Overall, the integrated SfM software was more straightforward to use and, under favourable conditions, produced results comparable to those from the close-range photogrammetry pipeline. However, under conditions with limited options for photogrammetric

  20. Lava flows and volcanic landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquini, Simone

    2016-04-01

    Lava flows constitute a large portion of the edifice of basaltic volcanoes. The substantial difference existing between the emplacement dynamics of different basaltic lava flows suggests a relation between the dominant flow dynamic and the overall shape of the ensuing volcano. Starting from the seminal works of Walker (1971, 1973) it is proposed that the rate of heat dissipation per unit volume of lava can be the founding principium at the roots of the emplacement dynamics of lava flows. Within the general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes, a conceptual model is presented, in which the dynamic of lava flows can evolve in a linear or in a nonlinear regime on the basis of the constraint active on the system: a low constraint promotes a linear dynamic (i.e. fluctuations are damped), a high constraint a nonlinear one (i.e. fluctuations are enhanced). Two cases are considered as end-members for a linear and a nonlinear dynamic in lava flows: the typical "Hawaiian" sheet flow and the classic "Etnean" channelized flow (respectively). In lava flows, the active constraint is directly proportional to the slope of the topography and to the thermal conductivity and thermal capacity of the surrounding environment, and is inversely proportional to the lava viscosity and to the supply rate. The constraint indicates the distance from the equilibrium conditions of the system, and determines the rate of heat dissipation per unit volume. In subaerial flows, the heat dissipated during the emplacement is well approximated by the heat lost through radiation, which can be retrieved through remote-sensing techniques and can be used to correlate dynamic and dissipation. The model presented recombines previously unrelated concepts regarding the dynamics and the thermal regimes observed in different lava flows, providing a global consistent picture. References Walker GPL (1971) Compound and simple lava flows and flood basalts. Bull Volcanol 35:579-590 Walker GPL (1973

  1. Lava flows vs. surface water: the geologic battle for the upper McKenzie valley, central Oregon Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligne, N. I.; Conrey, R. M.; Cashman, K. V.; Grant, G. E.; Amidon, W. H.

    2010-12-01

    Over the past several thousand years, a battle for the upper McKenzie valley in the central Oregon Cascades has raged between, on one side, lava flows from the Sand Mountain volcanic chain and Belknap volcano, and on the other side, surface water fed by prolific springs. The north-south oriented upper McKenzie valley marks the boundary between the (old) western Cascades and the (active) high Cascades. The McKenzie valley hosted a glacier in the Pleistocene. In the Holocene, the valley has become a natural destination and conduit for both lava flows and surface water: it is downhill from volcanic vents, and as it follows the boundary between low (west) and high (east) porosity terrains, groundwater sourced from the high Cascades is forced to emerge in the valley. New surface age exposure dates, in conjunction with 14C dating, indicate that about 3000 years ago multiple lava flows from the Sand Mountain volcanic chain entered the valley from the east. The entire eruptive episode lasted several hundred years and caused massive disturbances to the ancestral McKenzie river. In the early stages of the eruptive episode, a lava flow dammed the McKenzie river, forming Clear Lake (modern source of the McKenzie river) and drowning a Douglas Fir forest. Relic drowned trees suggest that Clear Lake formed in two stages, as trees tops in the deepest part of the lake are consistently rotted off at a depth of 20 meters below water level, while trees in the shallower parts of the lake are rotted off at the surface. This suggests a paleo-lake level 20 meters below modern levels; lake levels are suspected to have reached modern levels later in the course of the eruptive episode when subsequent Sand Mountain lava flows entered the lake. In the years since the Sand Mountain eruptive episode, the McKenzie river re-established itself by adopting a lava channel. Considerable water also flows through the lava flows, emerging as springs along the river channel. The river also hosts two

  2. Topographic and Thermal Investigations of Active Pahoehoe Lava Flows Using Coupled LiDAR/FLIR Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crown, D. A.; Anderson, S. W.; Finnegan, D. C.; LeWinter, A. L.; Ramsey, M.

    2012-12-01

    Pahoehoe lava flows consist of multiple overlapping and interfingering lobes and exhibit morphologically diverse surfaces characterized by channels, smooth-surfaced sheets, and numerous, small networks of interconnected pahoehoe toes. In order to analyze the different pahoehoe emplacement regimes, we have acquired simultaneous high-resolution topographic and thermal measurements of advancing and inflating flow lobes at high temporal frequency. These datasets allow the creation of flow lobe maps at regular intervals during flow emplacement that document morphologic, thermal, and morphometric characteristics of individual pahoehoe elements (e.g., pahoehoe toes) as well as compound pahoehoe features (e.g., toe networks, channels with lateral levees). These datasets reveal patterns in flow behavior and provide quantitative documentation of flow emplacement processes. Field investigations were conducted in February and March, 2012 on tube-fed pahoehoe flows in the Puu Oo flow field, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. We utilized a ground-based, full-waveform scanning LiDAR and FLIR SC645 thermal infrared camera, supplemented by high-definition video and time-lapse photography. The LiDAR scanner is capable of acquiring rapid, successive scans with reproducible 5 mm resolution data at a rate of 300 kHz. The FLIR camera acquires calibrated thermal images in the 7.5 - 13 mm range; the object temperature range is -20°C to +2000°C, with a thermal sensitivity of <0.05°C at 30°C. An RTK GPS was used to acquire precise locations of scan positions and to georeference LiDAR point cloud data to real-world coordinates. The combined LiDAR/FLIR system provides rapid acquisition of high-resolution spatial and high-precision thermal datasets for advancing pahoehoe flows.

  3. Great Lakes Environmental Issues. Earth Systems - Education Activities for Great Lakes Schools (ES-EAGLS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheaffer, Amy L., Ed.

    This activity book is part of a series designed to take a concept or idea from the existing school curriculum and develop it in the context of the Great Lakes using teaching approaches and materials appropriate for students in middle and high school. The subject of this book is environmental issues in the Great Lakes. Students learn about the…

  4. Life in the Great Lakes. Earth Systems - Education Activities for Great Lakes Schools (ES-EAGLS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheaffer, Amy L., Ed.

    This activity book is part of a series designed to take a concept or idea from the existing school curriculum and develop it in the context of the Great Lakes using teaching approaches and materials appropriate for students in middle and high school. The theme of this book is life in the Great Lakes. Students learn about shorebird adaptations,…

  5. Dreissenid mussels from the Great Lakes contain elevated thiaminase activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillitt, D.E.; Riley, S.C.; Evans, A.N.; Nichols, S.J.; Zajicek, J.L.; Rinchard, J.; Richter, C.A.; Krueger, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    We examined thiaminase activity in dreissenid mussels collected at different depths and seasons, and from various locations in Lakes Michigan, Ontario, and Huron. Here we present evidence that two dreissenid mussel species (Dreissena bugensis and D. polymorpha) contain thiaminase activity that is 5-100 fold greater than observed in Great Lakes fishes. Thiaminase activity in zebra mussels ranged from 10,600 to 47,900??pmol g- 1??min- 1 and activities in quagga mussels ranged from 19,500 to 223,800??pmol g- 1??min- 1. Activity in the mussels was greatest in spring, less in summer, and least in fall. Additionally, we observed greater thiaminase activity in dreissenid mussels collected at shallow depths compared to mussels collected at deeper depths. Dreissenids constitute a significant and previously unknown pool of thiaminase in the Great Lakes food web compared to other known sources of this thiamine (vitamin B1)-degrading enzyme. Thiaminase in forage fish of the Great Lakes has been causally linked to thiamine deficiency in salmonines. We currently do not know whether linkages exist between thiaminase activities observed in dreissenids and the thiaminase activities in higher trophic levels of the Great Lakes food web. However, the extreme thiaminase activities observed in dreissenids from the Great Lakes may represent a serious unanticipated negative effect of these exotic species on Great Lakes ecosystems.

  6. Lava effusion rates from hand-held thermal infrared imagery: an example from the June 2003 effusive activity at Stromboli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Andrew; Dehn, Jon; Patrick, Matt; Calvari, Sonia; Ripepe, Maurizio; Lodato, Luigi

    2005-12-01

    A safe, easy and rapid method to calculate lava effusion rates using hand-held thermal image data was developed during June 2003 at Stromboli Volcano (Italy). We used a Forward Looking Infrared Radiometer (FLIR) to obtain images of the active lava flow field on a daily basis between May 31 and June 16, 2003. During this time the flow field geometry and size (where flows typically a few hundred meters long were emplaced on a steep slope) meant that near-vertical images of the whole flow field could be captured in a single image obtained from a helicopter hovering, at an altitude of 750 m and ˜1 km off shore. We used these images to adapt a thermally based effusion rate method, previously applied to low and high spatial resolution satellite data, to allow automated extraction of effusion rates from the hand-held thermal infrared imagery. A comparison between a thermally-derived (0.23 0.87 m3 s-1) and dimensionally-derived effusion rate (0.56 m3 s-1) showed that the thermally-derived range was centered on the expected value. Over the measurement period, the mean effusion rate was 0.38±0.25 m3 s-1, which is similar to that obtained during the 1985 86 effusive eruption and the time-averaged supply rate calculated for normal (non-effusive) Strombolian activity. A short effusive pulse, reaching a peak of ˜1.2 m3 s-1, was recorded on June 3, 2003. One explanation of such a peak would be an increase in driving pressure due to an increase in the height of the magma contained in the central column. We estimate that this pulse would require the magma column to attain a height of ˜190 m above the effusive vent, which is approximately the elevation difference between the vent and the floor of the NE crater. Our approach gives an easy-to-apply method that has the potential to provide effusion rate time series with a high temporal resolution.

  7. Business and Education Linkage Activities. Lake County, Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flesher, Jeffrey W.

    A study was conducted to establish a baseline profile of business and education linkage activities in Lake County, Illinois. Data were collected through a survey questionnaire sent to 242 public and private K-12 schools in Lake County. Two rounds of mailings resulted in the return of 109 usable forms, or 45 percent of the population. Telephone…

  8. Project LAVA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Cheryl

    1998-01-01

    Describes a summer program for teachers in the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park in which teachers share in hands-on activities that demonstrate volcanic processes including volcanic hazards, plate tectonics, and earthquakes. (DDR)

  9. What factors control superficial lava dome explosivity?

    PubMed Central

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style and a major hazard on numerous volcanoes worldwide. Lava domes are built by slow extrusion of degassed, viscous magma and may be destroyed by gravitational collapse or explosion. The triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood: here we propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite precipitation. Both processes generate an impermeable and rigid carapace allowing overpressurisation of the inner parts of the lava dome by the rapid input of vesiculated magma batches. The relative thickness of the cristobalite-rich carapace is an inverse function of the external lava dome surface area. Explosive activity is thus more likely to occur at the onset of lava dome extrusion, in agreement with observations, as the likelihood of superficial lava dome explosions depends inversely on lava dome volume. This new result is of interest for the whole volcanological community and for risk management. PMID:26420069

  10. What factors control superficial lava dome explosivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-09-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style and a major hazard on numerous volcanoes worldwide. Lava domes are built by slow extrusion of degassed, viscous magma and may be destroyed by gravitational collapse or explosion. The triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood: here we propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite precipitation. Both processes generate an impermeable and rigid carapace allowing overpressurisation of the inner parts of the lava dome by the rapid input of vesiculated magma batches. The relative thickness of the cristobalite-rich carapace is an inverse function of the external lava dome surface area. Explosive activity is thus more likely to occur at the onset of lava dome extrusion, in agreement with observations, as the likelihood of superficial lava dome explosions depends inversely on lava dome volume. This new result is of interest for the whole volcanological community and for risk management.

  11. Fire and Ice: Lavas on Io, Cryolavas on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R. M.; Gregg, T. K.; Spencer, J. R.; Mitchell, K. L.; Williams, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Volcanic flows in our solar system are remarkably varied. Io and Titan are particularly good examples of relatively large bodies that have erupted a variety of flows, ranging from basaltic and possibly sulfur and ultramafic lavas on Io to mixtures of water and possibly ammonia and methanol on Titan. These exotic extraterrestrial flows can be much different from the examples we see on Earth, but the similarities are also striking. Understanding their eruption mechanisms is important for better constraining how effusive eruptions behave on Earth under present and past conditions. Io has exceptionally long lava flows, but these are rare compared to the most common form of Ionian volcanism; lava lakes and lava flows that are confined within calderas [Lopes et al., 2004, Icarus; Gregg and Lopes, Icarus, in press]. The largest lava flows on Io can be considered analogues to continental flood basalts on Earth, being hundreds of km long and containing many different flow units. The composition of these flows on Io is thought to be either basaltic or ultramafic. Galileo results showed the largest active flow in the Solar System at Amirani [300 km long; Kezthelyi et al., 2001, JGR 106] and recent observations by the New Horizons spacecraft showed a new flow at Masubi that is about 200 km long. Ionian flows at volcanoes such as Masubi, Maui, and Prometheus generate persistently active plumes and the movement of the Prometheus plume has been related to the growth of the lava flow [Kieffer et al. 2000, Science 288]. Sulfur flows are thought to exist on Io, but are largely a by-product of silicic volcanism. On Earth, sulfur flows are rare but have formed from melting hydrothermal sulfur deposits. Flows around Emakong on Io are thought to be sulfur flows [Williams et al., 2001, JGR 106], but to date there are no measurements that can confirm their composition. Ra Patera's flows at the time of the Voyager encounter was thought to be a site of sulfur volcanism [Pieri et al., 1984

  12. The association of lava dome growth with major explosive activity (VEI ≥ 4): DomeHaz, a global dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogburn, S. E.; Loughlin, S. C.; Calder, E. S.

    2015-05-01

    Investigation of the global eruptive records of particular types of volcanoes is a fundamental and valuable method of understanding what style of activity can be anticipated in the future and can highlight what might be expected or unusual in particular settings. This paper investigates the relationship between large explosions (volcanic explosivity index, VEI ≥ 4) and lava dome growth from 1000 AD to present and develops the DomeHaz database. DomeHaz contains information from 397 dome-forming episodes, including duration of dome growth, duration of pauses in extrusion, extrusion rates, and the timing and magnitude (VEI) of associated large explosions. Major explosive activity, when associated with dome growth, is more likely to occur before dome growth rather than during, or at the end of, dome-forming eruptions. In most cases where major explosive activity has been associated with dome growth, the eruptions occurred at basaltic andesite to andesitic volcanoes (the most common type of dome-forming volcano), but a greater proportion of dacitic and rhyolitic dome growth episodes were associated with large explosions. High extrusion rates (>10 m3 s-1) seem to be associated with large explosions and may inhibit degassing or destabilize existing domes, leading to explosive decompression. Large explosions may, alternatively, be followed by dome growth, which represents the clearing of residual magma from the conduit. Relationships extracted from the global record can be used to construct probability trees for new and ongoing dome-forming eruptions or can be used in conjunction with other types of event trees to aid in forecasting volcanic hazards during a crisis, especially for volcanoes where data are sparse.

  13. A novel heat flux study of a geothermally active lake - Lake Rotomahana, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Tontini, Fabio Caratori; Walker, Sharon L.; Fornari, Daniel J.

    2016-03-01

    A new technique for measuring conductive heat flux in a lake was adapted from the marine environment to allow for multiple measurements to be made in areas where bottom sediment cover is sparse, or even absent. This thermal blanket technique, pioneered in the deep ocean for use in volcanic mid-ocean rift environments, was recently used in the geothermally active Lake Rotomahana, New Zealand. Heat flow from the lake floor propagates into the 0.5 m diameter blanket and establishes a thermal gradient across the known blanket thickness and thereby provides an estimate of the conductive heat flux of the underlying terrain. This approach allows conductive heat flux to be measured over a spatially dense set of stations in a relatively short period of time. We used 10 blankets and deployed them for 1 day each to complete 110 stations over an 11-day program in the 6 × 3 km lake. Results show that Lake Rotomahana has a total conductive heat flux of about 47 MW averaging 6 W/m2 over the geothermally active lake. The western half of the lake has two main areas of high heat flux; 1) a high heat flux area averaging 21.3 W/m2 along the western shoreline, which is likely the location of the pre-existing geothermal system that fed the famous Pink Terraces, mostly destroyed during the 1886 eruption 2) a region southwest of Patiti Island with a heat flux averaging 13.1 W/m2 that appears to be related to the explosive rift that formed the lake in the 1886 Tarawera eruption. A small rise in bottom water temperature over the survey period of 0.01 °C/day suggests the total thermal output of the lake is ~ 112-132 MW and when compared to the conductive heat output suggests that 18-42% of the total thermal energy is by conductive heat transfer.

  14. Radio-echo sounding of 'active' Antarctic subglacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, M. J.; Ross, N.; Blankenship, D. D.; Young, D. A.; Greenbaum, J. S.; Richter, T.; Rippin, D. M.; Le Brocq, A. M.; Wright, A.; Bingham, R.; Corr, H.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jordan, T. A.; Smith, B. E.; Payne, A. J.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Bamber, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Repeat-pass satellite altimetry has revealed 124 discrete surface height changes across the Antarctic Ice Sheet, interpreted to be caused by subglacial lake discharges (surface lowering) and inputs (surface uplift). Few of these active lakes have been confirmed by radio-echo sounding (RES) despite several attempts, however. Over the last 5 years, major geophysical campaigns have acquired RES data from several 'active' lake sites, including the US-UK-Australian ICECAP programme in East Antactica and the UK survey of the Institute Ice Stream in West Antarctica. In the latter case, a targeted RES survey of one 'active' lake was undertaken. RES evidence of the subglacial bed beneath 'active' lakes in both East and West Antarctica will be presented, and the evidence for pooled subglacial water from these data will be assessed. Based on this assessment, the nature of 'active' subglacial lakes, and their associated hydrology and relationship with surrounding topography will be discussed, as will the likelihood of further 'active' lakes in Antarctica. Hydraulic potential map of the Byrd Glacier catchment with contours at 5 MPa intervals. Predicted subglacial flowpaths are shown in blue. Subglacial lakes known from previous geophysical surveys are shown as black triangles while the newly discovered 'Three-tier lakes' are shown in dashed black outline. Surface height change features within the Byrd subglacial catchment are shown in outline and are shaded to indicate whether they were rising or falling during the ICESat campaign. Those features are labelled in-line with the numbering system of Smith et al. (J. Glac. 2009).

  15. Emplacement and inflation of pahoehoe sheet flows: observations and measurements of active lava flows on Kilauea volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hon, K.; Kauahikaua, J.; Denlinger, R.; Mackay, K.

    1994-01-01

    Inflated pahoehoe sheet flows have a distinctive horizontal upper surface, which can be several hundred meters across, and are bounded to steep monoclinal uplifts. The inflated sheet flows studied ranged from 1 to 5 m in thickness, but initially propagated as thin sheets of fluid pahoehoe lava, generally 20-30 cm thick. The morphology of the lava as flow advanced is described. Inflated sheet flows from Kilauea and Mauna Loa are morphologically similar to some thick Icelandic and submarine sheet flows, suggesting a similar mechanism of emplacement. -from Authors

  16. Use of VNIR Camera System to Estimate Lava Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2012-12-01

    We present initial results from using a visible and near infrared (VNIR) camera as an optical pyrometer at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i. The basic concept of pyrometry simply converts the color of incandescent material into a temperature and has been used on Kilauea since the earliest days of regular volcano monitoring. However, these temperatures have always been lower than expected, raising the concern that the emissivity of lava at these wavelengths was not close to a blackbody. We carefully calibrated a system that uses 3 digital cameras with wavelengths similar to the green, red, and near-infrared channels of the Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emissions and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) VNIR instruments by imaging a high-temperature blackbody. Following techniques used to estimate lava temperatures on Jupiter's moon, Io, we obtained relationships between band ratios and blackbody temperatures. The green/red ratio provides good temperature estimates for any reasonable temperature above 1000 °C, while the red/NIR is useful from about 700-1200 °C. We also observed the glow from the lava lake in Halema`uma`u as reflected and scattered from the steam plume above it. We found that the temperatures inferred from the glow are much too high (~1400 °C) from the red/NIR ratios and much too low (<700 °C) from the green/red ratios. One possible explanation is that there are variations in the emissivity of molten lava at these wavelengths. However, we also know that there are wavelength dependent scattering properties of the plume cloud that are consistent with errors in these temperature estimates. Future work examining incandescent lava without the interference of a plume will be needed to better evaluate the emissivity of lava in this wavelength range. However, we have sufficient data to demonstrate the great utility of VNIR data acquired at night for determining if a volcano is actively erupting mafic lava. We propose that

  17. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  18. The influence of cross-sectional channel geometry on rheology and flux estimates for active lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Einat; James, Mike R.

    2014-07-01

    Lava rheology and effusion rate are critical factors in determining the evolution of lava flows. However, direct and accurate field measurements are difficult to carry out, and estimates are usually based on measurements of the flow's surface velocity and assumptions of sub-surface geometry. Using numerical flow models, we show that the potential for error due to geometry uncertainty is minimized if a semi-elliptical cross-sectional channel shape is assumed. Flow is simulated for isothermal Newtonian, temperature-dependent Newtonian, and isothermal power-law rheology lavas. For isothermal Newtonian lava, we find that the error in channel shape alone can make apparent viscosity estimates ˜3.5 times too large (e.g., for inappropriate use of the Jeffreys equation on a narrow semi-elliptical channel). For a temperature-dependent rheology, using an analytical approximation for Newtonian flow in a semi-elliptical geometry yields apparent viscosity and flux values that are more accurate than estimates which assume a rectangular geometry, for all channel shapes considered, including rectangular channels. Viscosity calculations for real channels on Mauna Loa and Mount Etna show that for a Newtonian rheology, a semi-elliptical analytical solution gives an approximation three times closer to the actual viscosity than a rectangle with the same depth while, if the lava is shear-thinning (power law exponent m = 0.6), a rectangular approximation is 15 % more accurate. Our results can be used to bracket possible viscosity and flux estimates when channel topography is poorly constrained.

  19. Subaerial and sublacustrine hydrothermal activity at Lake Rotomahana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucker, Valerie K.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Scott, Bradley J.; Wilson, Nathaniel J.; Walker, Sharon L.; Lupton, John E.

    2016-03-01

    Lake Rotomahana is a crater lake in the Okataina Volcanic Centre (New Zealand) that was significantly modified by the 1886 Tarawera Rift eruption. The lake is host to numerous sublacustrine hydrothermal vents. Water column studies were conducted in 2011 and 2014 along with sampling of lake shore hot springs and crater lakes in Waimangu Valley to complement magnetic, seismic, bathymetric and heat flux surveys. Helium concentrations below 50 m depth are higher in 2014 compared to 2011 and represent some of the highest concentrations measured, at 6 × 10- 7 ccSTP/g, with an end-member 3He/4He value of 7.1 RA. The high concentrations of helium, when coupled with pH anomalies due to high dissolved CO2 content, suggest the dominant chemical input to the lake is derived from magmatic degassing of an underlying magma. The lake shore hot spring waters show differences in source temperatures using a Na-K geothermometer, with inferred reservoir temperatures ranging between 197 and 232 °C. Water δ18O and δD values show isotopic enrichment due to evaporation of a steam heated pool with samples from nearby Waimangu Valley having the greatest enrichment. Results from this study confirm both pre-1886 eruption hydrothermal sites and newly created post-eruption sites are both still active.

  20. Lake Sediment Records on Climate Change and Human Activities in the Xingyun Lake Catchment, SW China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenxiang; Ming, Qingzhong; Shi, Zhengtao; Chen, Guangjie; Niu, Jie; Lei, Guoliang; Chang, Fengqin; Zhang, Hucai

    2014-01-01

    Sediments from Xinyun Lake in central Yunnan, southwest China, provide a record of environmental history since the Holocene. With the application of multi-proxy indicators (total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), δ13C and δ15N isotopes, C/N ratio, grain size, magnetic susceptibility (MS) and CaCO3 content), as well as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C datings, four major climatic stages during the Holocene have been identified in Xingyun′s catchment. A marked increase in lacustrine palaeoproductivity occurred from 11.06 to 9.98 cal. ka BP, which likely resulted from an enhanced Asian southwest monsoon and warm-humid climate. Between 9.98 and 5.93 cal. ka BP, a gradually increased lake level might have reached the optimum water depth, causing a marked decline in coverage by aquatic plants and lake productivity of the lake. This was caused by strong Asian southwest monsoon, and coincided with the global Holocene Optimum. During the period of 5.60–1.35 cal. ka BP, it resulted in a warm and dry climate at this stage, which is comparable to the aridification of India during the mid- and late Holocene. The intensifying human activity and land-use in the lake catchment since the early Tang Dynasty (∼1.35 cal. ka BP) were associated with the ancient Dian culture within Xingyun’s catchment. The extensive deforestation and development of agriculture in the lake catchment caused heavy soil loss. Our study clearly shows that long-term human activities and land-use change have strongly impacted the evolution of the lake environment and therefore modulated the sediment records of the regional climate in central Yunnan for more than one thousand years. PMID:25033404

  1. Active and Fossil Geothermal Activity at Lake Chapala, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zârate-del Vall, P.

    2002-12-01

    Geothermal systems are very abundant in the tectonically active zones of the earth's crust and the Citala rift, where Lake Chapala is located, is not the exception. The Lake Chapala basin is characterized by its paleo- and actual geothermal activity that includes: thermal springs, fossil sinter deposits and hydrothermal petroleum manifestations. Thermal springs occur both inside and outside the lake. The spring water in out-shore thermal springs around Lake Chapala is carbonate (Medina-Heredia A, 1986). To the NE area is San Luis Agua Caliente (69°C; ~ 240 mg L-1 [HCO3]1) in the NW at Jocotepec (36°C; ~263mg L-1 [HCO3]-); in the South we find Tuxcueca and Tizap n El Alto (30°C; 193 mg L-1 [HCO3]-). However, there is an exception, the spring water at the San Juan Cosal sector (North), which is sulfate (64-83°C; ~479 mg L-1, [SO4]-2). Examples of in-shore thermal springs are "Los Gorgos" (near South shore) and "El Fuerte" (near East shore and temporary "out-shore" because of actual severe drought); the characterisation of water of this in-shore sites is in progress. On the SE shore and five km NW from Regules village, outcrops a carbonate deposit named "La Calera". This carbonate fossil sinter outcrops 2 km in E-W direction and 600 m in N-S direction and overlays andesitic rock. With a thickness of approximately 5m and a roughly horizontal attitude, the carbonated sinter material is characterized by both massive and banded structure. When massive, it is colored in yellow brownish and grey and elsewhere it shows a pseudo-brecciated structure and when banded, alternated of yellow and dark millimetre bands can be seen; is characterized by vuggy porosity and silica (quartz and chalcedony) vein lets. Under microscope a pseudo-micritic texture is observed; vugs coated by iron oxides, are filled with calcite, and/or quartz, chalcedony and clay minerals. Six samples of carbonate of "La Calera" deposit were analysed for their stable isotopes (LODC-UParis VI). From δ 13

  2. Hydrothermal and tectonic activity in northern Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Stephenson, W.J.; Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Pierce, K.L.

    2003-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park is the site of one of the world's largest calderas. The abundance of geothermal and tectonic activity in and around the caldera, including historic uplift and subsidence, makes it necessary to understand active geologic processes and their associated hazards. To that end, we here use an extensive grid of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles (???450 km) to document hydrothermal and tectonic features and deposits in northern Yellowstone Lake. Sublacustrine geothermal features in northern Yellowstone Lake include two of the largest known hydrothermal explosion craters, Mary Bay and Elliott's. Mary Bay explosion breccia is distributed uniformly around the crater, whereas Elliott's crater breccia has an asymmetric distribution and forms a distinctive, ???2-km-long, hummocky lobe on the lake floor. Hydrothermal vents and low-relief domes are abundant on the lake floor; their greatest abundance is in and near explosion craters and along linear fissures. Domed areas on the lake floor that are relatively unbreached (by vents) are considered the most likely sites of future large hydrothermal explosions. Four submerged shoreline terraces along the margins of northern Yellowstone Lake add to the Holocene record or postglacial lake-level fluctuations attributed to "heavy breathing" of the Yellowstone magma reservoir and associated geothermal system. The Lake Hotel fault cuts through northwestern Yellowstone Lake and represents part of a 25-km-long distributed extensional deformation zone. Three postglacial ruptures indicate a slip rate of ???0.27 to 0.34 mm/yr. The largest (3.0 m slip) and most recent event occurred in the past ???2100 yr. Although high heat flow in the crust limits the rupture area of this fault zone, future earthquakes of magnitude ???5.3 to 6.5 are possible. Earthquakes and hydrothermal explosions have probably triggered landslides, common features around the lake margins. Few high-resolution seismic reflection surveys have

  3. Lava Flow at Kilauea, Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On July 21, 2007, the world's most active volcano, Kilauea on Hawaii's Big Island, produced a new fissure eruption from the Pu'u O'o vent, which fed an open lava channel and lava flows toward the east. Access to the Kahauale'a Natural Area Reserve was closed due to fire and gas hazards. The two Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) nighttime thermal infrared images were acquired on August 21 and August 30, 2007. The brightest areas are the hottest lava flows from the recent fissure eruption. The large lava field extending down to the ocean is part of the Kupaianaha field. The most recent activity there ceased on June 20, but the lava is still hot and appears bright on the images. Magenta areas are cold lava flows from eruptions that occurred between 1969 and 2006. Clouds are cold (black) and the ocean is a uniform warm temperature, and light gray in color. These images are being used by volcanologists at the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaii Volcano Observatory to help monitor the progress of the lava flows.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra spacecraft. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud

  4. Neutron activation analysis of sea-, lake-, and evaporated salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauser, G.; Sterba, J. H.; Poljanc, K.; Bichler, M.; Buchtela, K.

    2006-01-01

    Salt is essential for human nutrition. Recently, it has become popular in Europe to rather use exotic sea salt or lake salt instead of purified evaporated salt, because of an alleged higher content of trace elements. In this study the content of trace elements and their bioavailability of 19 samples of different types of salt and 1 sample of brine purification sludge were investigated using instrumental neutron activation analysis. In general, sea-, lake-, and evaporated salt are quite pure. Trace elements determined in salt were Al, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Rb, Sc, Sr, and Zn; some of them only in individual cases. It was found that, in general, the content of trace elements in sea- or lake salt was higher than in purified salt. Nevertheless, the use of sea- or lake salt does not contribute significantly to the human needs of essential trace elements, because their concentration in salt is too low or their compounds are not bioavailable.

  5. Olympus Mons Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 05 April 2002) Olympus Mons stands 26 km above the surrounding plains, which is three times taller than Mt. Everest, and is the tallest volcano in the solar system. Olympus Mons is also wider (585 km) than the state of Arizona. Although these are impressive dimensions an astronaut would find walking these slopes easy, as they are typically only 2 to 5 degrees. This image contains numerous lava flows, leveed lava channels, a discontinuous sinuous rille (thought to be a collapsed lava tube) and lava plains. Close examination of the sinuous rille reveals that portions of the roof of the lava tube have not completely collapsed. All of these features can be seen in basaltic (iron and magnesium rich black rock) volcanic regions on Earth like Hawaii and Iceland. Impact craters are scarce, indicating a relatively young age (several hundred million years old) for these surfaces.

  6. Early life recorded in archean pillow lavas.

    PubMed

    Furnes, Harald; Banerjee, Neil R; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Staudigel, Hubert; de Wit, Maarten

    2004-04-23

    Pillow lava rims from the Mesoarchean Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa contain micrometer-scale mineralized tubes that provide evidence of submarine microbial activity during the early history of Earth. The tubes formed during microbial etching of glass along fractures, as seen in pillow lavas from recent oceanic crust. The margins of the tubes contain organic carbon, and many of the pillow rims exhibit isotopically light bulk-rock carbonate delta13C values, supporting their biogenic origin. Overlapping metamorphic and magmatic dates from the pillow lavas suggest that microbial life colonized these subaqueous volcanic rocks soon after their eruption almost 3.5 billion years ago. PMID:15105498

  7. Broadband seismic measurements of degassing activity associated with lava effusion at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip; Asch, Guenter

    2008-01-01

    exhalations”). Eruptive activity increased in intensity in February, coinciding with an increasing occurrence of Type-II LP events. Type-III events were first observed at the end of February and during March, in coincidence with the formation of a new lava dome. Vulcanian eruptions occurred in April and May. These events typically exhibit broadband signatures extending over the full period range of the sensors and lasting 30–80 min.

  8. Volcanic evolution of an active magmatic rift segment on a 100 Kyr timescale: exposure dating of lavas from the Manda Hararo/Dabbahu segment of the Afar Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, S.; Williams, A.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Vye, C.; France, L.; Ayalew, D.; Yirgu, G.

    2012-12-01

    the 2005 rifting episode. This second magmatic centre supplies magma to the remaining 2/3 of the segment, but scarcely impacts its Northern termination (where the Dabbahu activity predominates) - except during extraordinary events when dykes are long enough to reach those parts, as in 2005. The eruption ages of the different lava units correlates with their degrees of differentiation, allowing different magmatic cycles of about a few tens of years each to be distinguished. During the first recorded magmatic cycle (~70 ka to ~55 ka), Dabbahu is built of wide-spreading pāhoehoe flows around localised eruptive centres. The resulting topography of the volcanic edifice remains low, and is only slightly affected by rift-related fault activity, with the development of minor scarps. The second recorded magmatic cycle (~50 ka to ~20 ka) coincides with a strong development of Dabbahu topography - underlined by the change in lava morphology with well channelized 'a'ā flows since 50 ka. Tectonic activity also clearly increases over this period, with the initiation of the major fault scarps of the rift, which have been dated at around 35 ka. Our study underlines the role of the magma supply and availability beneath Dabbahu in the evolution both topographies of Dabbahu volcano and of the rift depression morphology.

  9. Lava flows and domes

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J. )

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses emplacement of silicic domes and mafic lava flows. The authors have utilized the combination of field, experimental and theoretical methods to constrain various characteristics of recently-emplaced lavas, including dimensions, growth rates, surface morphology, deformation styles, rheology, and volatile contents. Filed measurements from numerous volcanoes are presented. Focus is on data from Mount St. Helens. The value of such investigations is addressed.

  10. Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Paytan, Adina; Lecher, Alanna L.; Dimova, Natasha; Sparrow, Katy J.; Kodovska, Fenix Garcia-Tigreros; Murray, Joseph; Tulaczyk, Slawomir; Kessler, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Methane emissions in the Arctic are important, and may be contributing to global warming. While methane emission rates from Arctic lakes are well documented, methods are needed to quantify the relative contribution of active layer groundwater to the overall lake methane budget. Here we report measurements of natural tracers of soil/groundwater, radon, and radium, along with methane concentration in Toolik Lake, Alaska, to evaluate the role active layer water plays as an exogenous source for lake methane. Average concentrations of methane, radium, and radon were all elevated in the active layer compared with lake water (1.6 × 104 nM, 61.6 dpm⋅m−3, and 4.5 × 105 dpm⋅m−3 compared with 1.3 × 102 nM, 5.7 dpm⋅m−3, and 4.4 × 103 dpm⋅m−3, respectively). Methane transport from the active layer to Toolik Lake based on the geochemical tracer radon (up to 2.9 g⋅m−2⋅y−1) can account for a large fraction of methane emissions from this lake. Strong but spatially and temporally variable correlations between radon activity and methane concentrations (r2 > 0.69) in lake water suggest that the parameters that control methane discharge from the active layer also vary. Warming in the Arctic may expand the active layer and increase the discharge, thereby increasing the methane flux to lakes and from lakes to the atmosphere, exacerbating global warming. More work is needed to quantify and elucidate the processes that control methane fluxes from the active layer to predict how this flux might change in the future and to evaluate the regional and global contribution of active layer water associated methane inputs. PMID:25775530

  11. Basaltic Lava Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Griffiths, R. W.; Kerr, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    In Hawaii, the mode of lava transport - through open channels or through insulating lava tubes - determines the thermal, rheological, and emplacement history of a lava flow. Most Hawaiian lavas are erupted at near-liquidus temperatures and are therefore crystal-poor; lava transport through open channels allows rapid cooling and consequent rapid increases in lava crystallinity. Solidified aa flows resulting from channelized flow are typically fine-grained throughout their thickness, indicating cooling of the entire flow thickness during transport. In contrast, transport of lava through insulating tubes permits flow over long distances with little cooling. Flows emerging from such tubes typically have pahoehoe flow surfaces with glassy crusts. Groundmass textures that coarsen from the flow rind to the interior reflect rates of post-emplacement, rather than syn-emplacement, cooling. To distinguish eruption conditions that result in lava channels from those that allow formation of lava tubes, we have performed a series of laboratory experiments involving injection of PEG 600 (a wax with a Newtonian rheology and freezing temperature of 19ºC) into cold water through both uniform and non-uniform sloping channels. In uniform channels, tube formation can be distinguished from open channel flow using a dimensionless parameter based on a solidification time scale, an advection time scale, and a Rayleigh number that describes convection by heat loss from crust-free shear zones. Theoretical analysis predicts that in the open channel regime, the width of the crust (dc) will vary with the channel width (W) as dc = W5/3. Crustal coverage of non-uniform channels in both laboratory experiments and field examples from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is consistent with this prediction. However, experiments in non-uniform channels illustrate additional controls on the surface coverage of lava channels. Most important is crustal extension resulting from flow acceleration through constrictions

  12. Lake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wien, Carol Anne

    2008-01-01

    The lake is blue black and deep. It is a glaciated finger lake, clawed out of rock when ice retracted across Nova Scotia in a northerly direction during the last ice age. The lake is narrow, a little over a mile long, and deep, 90 to 190 feet in places according to local lore, off the charts in others. The author loves to swim there, with a sense…

  13. Lake Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This quarterly publication of the State Historical Society of Iowa features articles and activities for elementary school students. This summer issue focuses on the topic of lake life. The issue includes the following features: (1) "Where the Lakes Are Map"; (2) "Letter from the Lake"; (3) "Lake People"; (4) "Spirit Lake"; (5) "Lake Manawa"; (6)…

  14. Land & Water Interactions in the Great Lakes. Earth Systems - Education Activities for Great Lakes Schools (ES-EAGLS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheaffer, Amy L., Ed.

    This activity book is part of a series designed to take a concept or idea from the existing school curriculum and develop it in the context of the Great Lakes using teaching approaches and materials appropriate for students in middle and high school. The subject of this book is land and water interactions. Students examine how the Great Lakes were…

  15. Great Lakes Climate and Water Movement. Earth Systems - Education Activities for Great Lakes Schools (ES-EAGLS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Heidi, Ed.; Sheaffer, Amy L., Ed.

    This activity book is part of a series designed to take a concept or idea from the existing school curriculum and develop it in the context of the Great Lakes using teaching approaches and materials appropriate for students in middle and high school. The theme of this book is Great Lakes climate and water movement. Students learn about land-sea…

  16. The foaming of lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.; Walton, W.

    1976-01-01

    Foaming is of great practical and theoretical significance for volcanic processes on the earth, the moon, and perhaps the meteorite parent bodies. The theory of foams agrees with steelmaking experience to indicate that their presence depends on the existence of solutes in the lavas which reduce the surface tension, and are not saturated. These solutes concentrate at the surface, and are called surfactants. The surfactant responsible for the formation of volcanic ash was not identified; it appears to be related to the oxygen partial pressure above the lava. This fact may explain why lunar and meteoritic melts are not observed to foam. Experimental studies are needed to clarify the process.

  17. Flood lavas on Earth, Io and Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keszthelyi, L.; Self, S.; Thordarson, T.

    2006-01-01

    Flood lavas are major geological features on all the major rocky planetary bodies. They provide important insight into the dynamics and chemistry of the interior of these bodies. On the Earth, they appear to be associated with major and mass extinction events. It is therefore not surprising that there has been significant research on flood lavas in recent years. Initial models suggested eruption durations of days and volumetric fluxes of order 107 m3 s-1 with flows moving as turbulent floods. However, our understanding of how lava flows can be emplaced under an insulating crust was revolutionized by the observations of actively inflating pahoehoe flows in Hawaii. These new ideas led to the hypothesis that flood lavas were emplaced over many years with eruption rates of the order of 104 m3 s-1. The field evidence indicates that flood lava flows in the Columbia River Basalts, Deccan Traps, Etendeka lavas, and the Kerguelen Plateau were emplaced as inflated pahoehoe sheet flows. This was reinforced by the observation of active lava flows of ??? 100 km length on Io being formed as tube-fed flow fed by moderate eruption rates (102-103 m3 s-1). More recently it has been found that some flood lavas are also emplaced in a more rapid manner. New high-resolution images from Mars revealed 'platy-ridged' flood lava flows, named after the large rafted plates and ridges formed by compression of the flow top. A search for appropriate terrestrial analogues found an excellent example in Iceland: the 1783-1784 Laki Flow Field. The brecciated Laki flow top consists of pieces of pahoehoe, not aa clinker, leading us to call this 'rubbly pahoehoe'. Similar flows have been found in the Columbia River Basalts and the Kerguelen Plateau. We hypothesize that these flows form with a thick, insulating, but mobile crust, which is disrupted when surges in the erupted flux are too large to maintain the normal pahoehoe mode of emplacement Flood lavas emplaced in this manner could have

  18. LAVA Applications to Open Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin C.; Housman, Jeff; Barad, Mike; Brehm, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Outline: LAVA (Launch Ascent Vehicle Aerodynamics); Introduction; Acoustics Related Applications; LAVA Applications to Open Rotor; Structured Overset Grids; Cartesian Grid with Immersed Boundary; High Speed Case; High Speed Case with Plate Low Speed Case.

  19. Monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities in mountain lakes: a case of the Fifth Triglav Lake in the Julian Alps.

    PubMed

    Ravnikar, Tina; Bohanec, Marko; Muri, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    The Fifth Triglav Lake is a remote mountain lake in the Julian Alps. The area of the Julian Alps where the lake is situated is protected by law and lies within the Triglav National Park. Mountain lakes in Slovenia were considered for a long time as pristine, unpolluted lakes, but analyses in the last decade revealed considerable human impact even in such remote places. Eutrophication or excessive accumulation of nutrients is the main problem of most lakes in the temperate climatic zone, also in Slovenia. Since the introduction of fish in 1991, the lake is going through a series of changes for which we do not know exactly where they lead, so the monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities are of great importance. For this purpose, a qualitative multiattribute decision model was developed with DEX method to assess ecological effects on the lake. The extent of the ecological effects on the lake is assessed using four main parameters: the trophic state, lake characteristics, environmental parameters, and anthropogenic stressors. Dependence of environmental impact on various external factors beyond human control, such as temperature, precipitation, retention time, and factors on which we have influence, such as the amount of wastewater and the presence of fish in the lake, were also evaluated. The following data were measured: chlorophyll a, nutrients, TP, oxygen, C/N ratio, nutrients in sediment, temperature, precipitation, retention time, and volume. We made assumptions about fish and wastewater, which we could not measure. The main contributions of this work are the designed model and the obtained findings for the Fifth Triglav Lake that can help not only scientists in understanding the complexity of lake-watershed systems and interactions among system components but also local authorities to manage and monitor the lake aquatic environment in an effective and efficient way. The model is flexible and can be also used for other lakes, assuming that the used

  20. Monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities in mountain lakes: a case of the Fifth Triglav Lake in the Julian Alps.

    PubMed

    Ravnikar, Tina; Bohanec, Marko; Muri, Gregor

    2016-03-01

    The Fifth Triglav Lake is a remote mountain lake in the Julian Alps. The area of the Julian Alps where the lake is situated is protected by law and lies within the Triglav National Park. Mountain lakes in Slovenia were considered for a long time as pristine, unpolluted lakes, but analyses in the last decade revealed considerable human impact even in such remote places. Eutrophication or excessive accumulation of nutrients is the main problem of most lakes in the temperate climatic zone, also in Slovenia. Since the introduction of fish in 1991, the lake is going through a series of changes for which we do not know exactly where they lead, so the monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities are of great importance. For this purpose, a qualitative multiattribute decision model was developed with DEX method to assess ecological effects on the lake. The extent of the ecological effects on the lake is assessed using four main parameters: the trophic state, lake characteristics, environmental parameters, and anthropogenic stressors. Dependence of environmental impact on various external factors beyond human control, such as temperature, precipitation, retention time, and factors on which we have influence, such as the amount of wastewater and the presence of fish in the lake, were also evaluated. The following data were measured: chlorophyll a, nutrients, TP, oxygen, C/N ratio, nutrients in sediment, temperature, precipitation, retention time, and volume. We made assumptions about fish and wastewater, which we could not measure. The main contributions of this work are the designed model and the obtained findings for the Fifth Triglav Lake that can help not only scientists in understanding the complexity of lake-watershed systems and interactions among system components but also local authorities to manage and monitor the lake aquatic environment in an effective and efficient way. The model is flexible and can be also used for other lakes, assuming that the used

  1. Geologic map of Medicine Lake volcano, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.

    2011-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano forms a broad, seemingly nondescript highland, as viewed from any angle on the ground. Seen from an airplane, however, treeless lava flows are scattered across the surface of this potentially active volcanic edifice. Lavas of Medicine Lake volcano, which range in composition from basalt through rhyolite, cover more than 2,000 km2 east of the main axis of the Cascade Range in northern California. Across the Cascade Range axis to the west-southwest is Mount Shasta, its towering volcanic neighbor, whose stratocone shape contrasts with the broad shield shape of Medicine Lake volcano. Hidden in the center of Medicine Lake volcano is a 7 km by 12 km summit caldera in which nestles its namesake, Medicine Lake. The flanks of Medicine Lake volcano, which are dotted with cinder cones, slope gently upward to the caldera rim, which reaches an elevation of nearly 8,000 ft (2,440 m). The maximum extent of lavas from this half-million-year-old volcano is about 80 km north-south by 45 km east-west. In postglacial time, 17 eruptions have added approximately 7.5 km3 to its total estimated volume of 600 km3, and it is considered to be the largest by volume among volcanoes of the Cascades arc. The volcano has erupted nine times in the past 5,200 years, a rate more frequent than has been documented at all other Cascades arc volcanoes except Mount St. Helens.

  2. Lava tubes - Potential shelters for habitats. [on moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, F.

    1985-01-01

    Natural caverns occur on the moon in the form of 'lava tubes', which are the drained conduits of underground lava rivers. The inside dimensions of these tubes measure tens to hundreds of meters, and their roofs are expected to be thicker than 10 meters. Consequently, lava tube interiors offer an environment that is naturally protected from the hazards of radiation and meteorite impact. Further, constant, relatively benign temperatures of -20 C prevail. These are extremely favorable environmental conditions for human activities and industrial operations. Significant operational, technological, and economical benefits might result if a lunar base were constructed inside a lava tube.

  3. Toward a model for leveed lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Many lava flows have two distinct volumetric components during emplacement. First, there is a component actively flowing in accordance with Newtonian or other constitutive relations. Second, there may be an inactive, stationary component that is no longer participating in the forward movement of the flow. Such passive components may take the form of flow-confining levees, solidified lateral margins, overspilling, plating, small ponds and sidestreams, or a lava tube. To describe the conservation of flow volume for the active component, governing equations are given and discussed.

  4. Lava tube shatter rings and their correlation with lava flux increases at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    Shatter rings are circular to elliptical volcanic features, typically tens of meters in diameter, which form over active lava tubes. They are typified by an upraised rim of blocky rubble and a central depression. Prior to this study, shatter rings had not been observed forming, and, thus, were interpreted in many ways. This paper describes the process of formation for shatter rings observed at Kīlauea Volcano during November 2005–July 2006. During this period, tilt data, time-lapse images, and field observations showed that episodic tilt changes at the nearby Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone, the shallow magmatic source reservoir, were directly related to fluctuations in the level of lava in the active lava tube, with periods of deflation at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō correlating with increases in the level of the lava stream surface. Increases in lava level are interpreted as increases in lava flux, and were coincident with lava breakouts from shatter rings constructed over the lava tube. The repetitive behavior of the lava flux changes, inferred from the nearly continuous tilt oscillations, suggests that shatter rings form from the repeated rise and fall of a portion of a lava tube roof. The locations of shatter rings along the active lava tube suggest that they form where there is an abrupt decrease in flow velocity through the tube, e.g., large increase in tube width, abrupt decrease in tube slope, and (or) sudden change in tube direction. To conserve volume, this necessitates an abrupt increase in lava stream depth and causes over-pressurization of the tube. More than a hundred shatter rings have been identified on volcanoes on Hawai‘i and Maui, and dozens have been reported from basaltic lava fields in Iceland, Australia, Italy, Samoa, and the mainland United States. A quick study of other basaltic lava fields worldwide, using freely available satellite imagery, suggests that they might be even more common than previously thought. If so, this confirms that episodic

  5. Nornahraun lava morphology and mode of emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Gro B. M.; Höskuldsson, Armann; Riishuus, Morten S.; Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Óskarsson, Birgir V.; Drouin, Vincent; Gallagher, Catherine; Askew, Rob; Moreland, William M.; Dürig, Tobias; Dumont, Stephanie; Þórdarson, Þór

    2015-04-01

    The ongoing Nornahraun eruption is the largest effusive eruption in Iceland since the Laki eruption in 1783-84, with an estimated lava volume of ~1.15 km3 covering an area of ~83.4 km2 (as of 5 JAN 2015). The eruption provides an unprecedented opportunity to study i) lava morphologies and their emplacement styles, ii) the transition from from open to closed lava pathways and iii) lava pond formation. Tracking of the lava advancement and morphology has been performed by GPS and GoPro cameras installed in 4×4 vehicles as well as video footage. Complimentary observations have been provided from aircraft platforms and by satellite data. Of particular importance for lava morphology observations are 1-12 m/pixel airborne SAR images (x-band). The Nornahraun flow field comprises a continuum of morphologies from pāhoehoe to 'a'ā, which have varied tem-porally and spatially. At the onset of the eruption 31 AUG, lava flows advanced rapidly (400-800 m/hr) from the 1.5 km long fissure as large slabby pāhoehoe [1-3] sheet lobes, 100-500 m wide and 0.3-1 m thick at the flow fronts. By 1 SEPT, the flows began channeling towards the NE constrained by the older Holuhraun I lava field and the to-pography of flood plain itself. A central open channel developed, feeding a 1-2 km wide active 'a'ā frontal lobe that advanced 1-2 km/day. In addition to its own caterpillar motion, the frontal lobe advanced in a series of 30-50 m long breakouts, predominantly slabby and rubbly pāhoehoe [4,5]. These breakouts had initial velocities of 10-30 m/hr and reached their full length within tens of minutes and subsequently inflated over hours. With the continuous advancement of the 'a'ā flow front, the breakouts were incorporated into the 'a'ā flow fronts and seldom preserved. At the margins of the frontal lava lobe, the breakouts were more sporadic, but predominantly rubbly pāhoehoe and slabby pāhoehoe, as at the flow front. The lava flow advanced ENE into Jökulsá á Fjöllum on 7 SEPT

  6. Olympus Mons Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-437, 30 July 2003

    Olympus Mons is the largest volcano on Mars. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the lava flows on the middle south flank of the giant volcano. Illuminated from the lower right, this picture is located near 16.4oN, 135.5oW.

  7. Lava flows are fractals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruno, B. C.; Taylor, G. J.; Rowland, S. K.; Lucey, P. G.; Self, S.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of a preliminary investigation of the fractal nature of the plan-view shapes of lava flows in Hawaii (based on field measurements and aerial photographs), as well as in Idaho and the Galapagos Islands (using aerial photographs only). The shapes of the lava flow margins are found to be fractals: lava flow shape is scale-invariant. This observation suggests that nonlinear forces are operating in them because nonlinear systems frequently produce fractals. A'a and pahoehoe flows can be distinguished by their fractal dimensions (D). The majority of the a'a flows measured have D between 1.05 and 1.09, whereas the pahoehoe flows generally have higher D (1.14-1.23). The analysis is extended to other planetary bodies by measuring flows from orbital images of Venus, Mars, and the moon. All are fractal and have D consistent with the range of terrestrial a'a and have D consistent with the range of terrestrial a'a and pahoehoe values.

  8. Large Lava Pond Complex on the Juan de Fuca Ridge: an Effusive, Energetic Eruption that Drained Away

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paduan, J. B.; Clague, D. A.; Davis, A. S.; Chadwick, W.; Cousens, B. L.; Embley, R. W.

    2005-12-01

    demonstrate that the eruptions were magmatic-gas-rich and mildly explosive to the end, with strombolian-like bursts and even fire fountains, though such activity had been presumed to be impossible at 2300m depth. We did not find obvious signs where the lavas went that drained from the ponds. A delta-like fan of partially drained and collapsed lobate flows extended from breaches in two adjacent levees, but since the pond floors are considerably deeper than the breaches and delta surface, the lake must have drained elsewhere after it breached the levees. The ridge axis outside the pond complex is severely tectonized, with numerous faults, gaping fissures, and shattered lavas of similar, unusually feldspar-rich composition, so there is no evidence that the ponds drained down-rift. We propose that the drained lava was recycled back into a crustal magma chamber below the ponds.

  9. What factors control the superficial lava dome explosivity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoit; Morgan, Daniel J.

    2015-04-01

    Dome-forming eruption is a frequent eruptive style; lava domes result from intermittent, slow extrusion of viscous lava. Most dome-forming eruptions produce highly microcrystallized and highly- to almost totally-degassed magmas which have a low explosive potential. During lava dome growth, recurrent collapses of unstable parts are the main destructive process of the lava dome, generating concentrated pyroclastic density currents (C-PDC) channelized in valleys. These C-PDC have a high, but localized, damage potential that largely depends on the collapsed volume. Sometimes, a dilute ash cloud surge develops at the top of the concentrated flow with an increased destructive effect because it may overflow ridges and affect larger areas. In some cases, large lava dome collapses can induce a depressurization of the magma within the conduit, leading to vulcanian explosions. By contrast, violent, laterally directed, explosions may occur at the base of a growing lava dome: this activity generates dilute and turbulent, highly-destructive, pyroclastic density currents (D-PDC), with a high velocity and propagation poorly dependent on the topography. Numerous studies on lava dome behaviors exist, but the triggering of lava dome explosions is poorly understood. Here, seven dome-forming eruptions are investigated: in the Lesser Antilles arc: Montagne Pelée, Martinique (1902-1905, 1929-1932 and 650 y. BP eruptions), Soufrière Hills, Montserrat; in Guatemala, Santiaguito (1929 eruption); in La Chaîne des Puys, France (Puy de Dome and Puy Chopine eruptions). We propose a new model of superficial lava-dome explosivity based upon a textural and geochemical study (vesicularity, microcrystallinity, cristobalite distribution, residual water contents, crystal transit times) of clasts produced by these key eruptions. Superficial explosion of a growing lava dome may be promoted through porosity reduction caused by both vesicle flattening due to gas escape and syn-eruptive cristobalite

  10. Fire, Lava Flows, and Human Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medler, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Richard Wrangham and others argue that cooked food has been obligate for our ancestors since the time of Homo erectus. This hypothesis provides a particularly compelling explanation for the smaller mouths and teeth, shorter intestines, and larger brains that separate us from other hominins. However, natural ignitions are infrequent and it is unclear how earlier hominins may have adapted to cooked food and fire before they developed the necessary intelligence to make or control fire. To address this conundrum, we present cartographical evidence that the massive and long lasting lava flows in the African Rift could have provided our ancestors with episodic access to heat and fire as the front edges of these flows formed ephemeral pockets of heat and ignition and other geothermal features. For the last several million years major lava flows have been infilling the African Rift. After major eruptions there were likely more slowly advancing lava fronts creating small areas with very specific adaptive pressures and opportunities for small isolated groups of hominins. Some of these episodes of isolation may have extended for millennia allowing these groups of early hominins to develop the adaptations Wrangham links to fire and cooked food. To examine the potential veracity of this proposal, we developed a series of maps that overlay the locations of prominent hominin dig sites with contemporaneous lava flows. These maps indicate that many important developments in hominin evolution were occurring in rough spatial and temporal proximity to active lava flows. These maps indicate it is worth considering that over the last several million years small isolated populations of hominins may have experienced unique adaptive conditions while living near the front edges of these slowly advancing lava flows.

  11. Olympus Mons Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-525, 26 October 2003

    This May 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows lava flows on the lower northern flanks of the large martian volcano, Olympus Mons. Located near 21.9oN, 132.9oW, the image features flows that moved down the north slope, toward the north/northeast (top/upper right). Sunlight illuminates this scene from the left/lower left; the picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  12. Lava Flows on Io: Modelling Cooling After Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Veeder, G. J.; Johnson, T. V.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    We have modeled the cooling of lava bodies on Io after solidification of the lava, a process that has been little explored since Carr (1986). With recent estimates of lava flow thicknesses on Io ranging from 1 m to 10 m, the modeling of thermal emission from active volcanism must take into account the cooling behaviour after the solidification of the lava, which we model using a finite-element model. Once a lava body is fully solidified, the surface temperature decreases faster, as heat loss is no longer buffered by release of latent heat. This is significant as observed surface temperature is often the only clue available to determine lava surface age. We also find that cooling from the base of the lava is an important process that accelerates the solidification of a flow and therefore subsequent cooling. It is necessary to constrain the cooling process in order to better understand temperature-area relationships on Io's surface and to carry out stochastic modelling of lava flow emplacement.

  13. Sulfhydrolase activity in sediments of wintergreen lake, kalamazoo county, michigan.

    PubMed

    King, G M; Klug, M J

    1980-05-01

    The hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl sulfate, p-nitrocatechol sulfate, and [S]sodium dodecyl sulfate was examined in anoxic sediments of Wintergreen Lake, Michigan. Significant levels of sulfhydrolase activity were observed in littoral, transition, and profundal sediment samples. Rates of sulfate formation suggest that the sulfhydrolase system would represent a major source of sulfate within these sediments. Sulfate formed by ester sulfate hydrolysis can support dissimilatory sulfate reduction as shown by the incorporation of S from labeled sodium dodecyl sulfate into H(2)S. Sulfhydrolase activity varied with sediment depth, was greatest in the littoral zone, and was sensitive to the presence of oxygen. Estimations of ester sulfate concentrations in sediments revealed large quantities of ester sulfate ( approximately 30% of total sulfur). Both total sulfur and ester sulfate concentrations varied with the sediment type and were two to three orders of magnitude greater than the inorganic sulfur concentration. PMID:16345573

  14. Arsia Mons Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This VIS image of lava flows to the west of Arsia Mons looks very similar to the lava flows south of Arsia Mons. It is very likely that the flows were occurring at the same time(s) in both areas.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.9, Longitude 228.5 East (131.5 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Identifying hazards associated with lava deltas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.

    2014-12-01

    Lava deltas, formed where lava enters the ocean and builds a shelf of new land extending from the coastline, represent a significant local hazard, especially on populated ocean island volcanoes. Such structures are unstable and prone to collapse—events that are often accompanied by small explosions that can deposit boulders and cobbles hundreds of meters inland. Explosions that coincide with collapses of the East Lae `Apuki lava delta at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i, during 2005-2007 followed an evolutionary progression mirroring that of the delta itself. A collapse that occurred when the lava-ocean entry was active was associated with a blast of lithic blocks and dispersal of spatter and fine, glassy tephra. Shortly after delta growth ceased, a collapse exposed hot rock to cold ocean water, resulting in an explosion composed entirely of lithic blocks and lapilli. Further collapse of the delta after several months of inactivity, by which time it had cooled significantly, resulted in no recognizable explosion deposit. Seaward displacement and subsidence of the coastline immediately inland of the delta was measured by both satellite and ground-based sensors and occurred at rates of several centimeters per month even after the lava-ocean entry had ceased. The anomalous deformation ended only after complete collapse of the delta. Monitoring of ground deformation may therefore provide an indication of the potential for delta collapse, while the hazard associated with collapse can be inferred from the level of activity, or the time since the last activity, on the delta.

  16. Mapping of a complex lava flow field using regular surveys with a portable thermal camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvari, S.; Lodato, L.; Garfi, G.; Spampinato, L.; Andronico, D.

    2003-04-01

    The use of a portable thermal camera has been applied to routine monitoring of the 2002 Etna flank eruption. The eruption started on 27 October with the opening of a field of fissures on the north and south flanks of the volcano. Abundant ash emission from the whole length of the 10 km long fissure covered the lava flow field, making it impossible to approach the active lava even with helicopters. Additionally, the northern lava flows were spreading into a forest, causing fire and impeding routine measures in field and lava flow mapping from the ground. This situation continued for several days. The only way to obtain an approximate mapping of the flow field was to use a thermal camera from helicopter, obtaining inclined images of the lava flow field. This allowed: (1) an estimation of the speed of the spreading lava and (2) of the position of the lava flow fronts, (3) evaluation of effusion rate, (4) daily covered area, and (5) organisation of evacuation plans for people living close to the area affected by flows. All these information were essential for civil protection purposes. Emission of lava flows from the north fissure stopped on 5 November 2002. During the following phase of the eruption, when lava flows spread for over two months only on the southern flank of the volcano, little ash emission from the craters allowed us a better view of the lava flow field. However, since the active flows were spreading on a limited surface, flanking and overlapping each other several times, distinction between active and inactive lava flows was made possible only by using a thermal camera. This device allowed us to distinguish active lava flows, inflating flow fronts, lava tubes and ephemeral vents, giving us a comprehensive view of the evolution of the lava flow field. It also helped us discover new vent opening from the base of the cinder cone, in a way to advice the Civil Protection authorities about the future path of new lava flows.

  17. Lava flow hazard at Nyiragongo Volcano, DRC. 2. Hazard reduction in urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, Giuseppe D.; Favalli, Massimiliano; Papale, Paolo; Boschi, Enzo; Pareschi, Maria Teresa; Mamou-Mani, Arthur

    2009-05-01

    Mt. Nyiragongo is one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world for the risk associated with the propagation of lava flows. In 2002 several vents opened along a huge system of fractures, pouring out lava which reached and destroyed a considerable part of Goma, a town of about 500,000 inhabitants on the shore of Lake Kivu. In a companion paper (Favalli et al. in Bull Volcanol, this issue, 2008) we employed numerical simulations of probable lava flow paths to evaluate the lava flow hazard on the flanks of the volcano, including the neighbouring towns of Goma (DRC) and Gisenyi (Rwanda). In this paper we use numerical simulations to investigate the possibility of significantly reducing the lava flow hazard in the city through the construction of protective barriers. These barriers are added to the DEM of the area as additional morphological elements, and their effect is evaluated by repeating numerical simulations with and without the presence of barriers. A parametric study on barrier location, size, shape and orientation led to the identification of barriers which maximize protection while minimizing their impact. This study shows that the highest hazard area corresponding to eastern Goma, which was largely destroyed by lava flows in 2002, cannot be effectively protected from future lava flows towards Lake Kivu and should be abandoned. On the contrary, the rest of the town can be sheltered from lava flows by means of two barriers that deviate or contain the lava within the East Goma sector. A proposal for the future development of the town is formulated, whereby “new” Goma is completely safe from the arrival of lava flows originating from vents outside its boundaries. The proposal minimizes the risk of further destruction in town due to future lava flows.

  18. A Relationship Between Microbial Activity in Soils and Phosphate Levels in Tributaries to Lake Champlain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larose, R.; Lee, S.; Lane, T.

    2015-12-01

    Lake Champlain is a large natural freshwater lake. It forms the western boundary of Vermont and drains over half of the state. It is bordered by the state of New York on its western side and drains to the north into Quebec, Canada. Lake Champlain is the source of fresh drinking water for over quarter of a million people and provides for the livelihoods and recreational opportunities of many well beyond its borders. The health of this lake is important. During the summer month's algae blooms plague the lake. These unsightly growths, which affect other aquatic organisms, are the result of excess phosphate flowing into the lake from many sources. Examining whether there is a relationship between microbial activity in the soils bordering tributaries to Lake Champlain and phosphate levels in those tributaries sheds insight into the origins and paths by which phosphate moves into Lake Champlain. Understanding the how phosphate moves into the water system may assist in mitigation efforts.Total Phosphate levels and Total Suspended Solids were measured in second and third order streams in the Lake Champlain Basin over a three-year period. In addition microbial activity was measured within the toe, bank and upland riparian zone areas of these streams during the summer months. In general in areas showing greater microbial activity in the soil(s) there were increased levels of phosphate in the streams.

  19. Arsia Mons Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The lava flows from Arsia Mons are some of the youngest flows in the region. The region of flows south of the volcano have had little modification and appear very similar in appearance to Hawaiian lava flows. This VIS image shows typical flows for the region. The flows are long, fairly narrow, overlapping, and with various surface features and textures.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -19.5, Longitude 240.1 East (119.9 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Eroding Lava Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today's image illustrates how radically the wind can affect the surface of Mars. The lava flows in this region have been covered by fine materials, and eroded by the sand blasting action of the wind. In this region the winds are blowing to the west, eroding the lava surface to form small east/west ridges and bumps. Given enough time the winds will change the appearance of the surface to such a large extent that all flow features will be erased.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -11.7, Longitude 220 East (140 West). 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Activity levels of some radionuclides in Mariout and Brullus lakes, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Dar, Mahmoud A; El Saharty, Abeer A

    2013-11-01

    Mariout and Brullus are two of the highly fish-productive lakes in the northern coast of Egypt along the Mediterranean Sea. They are widely used to drain industrial wastes, sewage and agriculture drainage. The activities of (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs were measured in the uppermost part of the surface sediments of the two lakes, using gamma-ray spectrophotometry. Brullus Lake recorded significantly higher (238)U and (232)Th and lower (40)K (17.22±2.49, 10.03±0.56 and 299.70±17.78 Bq kg(-1)) than Mariout Lake (12.65±1.53, 7.24±0.76 and 518.75±46.24 Bq kg(-1), respectively). Cesium-137 shows nearly equal activities in both lakes (3.33±0.46 and 3.68±0.70 Bq kg(-1), respectively). Activity distributions of (238)U and (232)Th in the sediments of Mariout Lake show a significant increase to the west, southwest and northeast, (40)K activity increased westwards, while the (137)Cs level was increased to the east and northeast, indicating agriculture drainage, industrial wastes and lands reclamation around the lake. At Brullus Lake, the activity trends of (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and(137)Cs were increasing to the west and south towards the agriculture and industrial waste-water-feeding drains. PMID:23630385

  2. Nyiragongo Volcano, Congo, Map View with Lava, Landsat / ASTER / SRTM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo erupted on January 17, 2002, and subsequently sent streams of lava into the city of Goma on the north shore of Lake Kivu. More than 100 people were killed, more than 12,000 homes were destroyed, and hundreds of thousands were forced to flee the broader community of nearly half a million people. This Landsat satellite image shows the volcano (right of center), the city of Goma, and surrounding terrain. Image data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite were used to supply a partial map of the recent lava flows (red overlay), including a complete mapping of their intrusion into Goma as of January 28, 2002. Lava is also apparent within the volcanic crater and at a few other locations. Thick (but broken) cloud cover during the ASTER image acquisition prevented a complete mapping of the lava distribution, but future image acquisitions should complete the mapping.

    Goma has a light pink speckled appearance along the shore of Lake Kivu. The city airport parallels, and is just right (east) of, the larger lava flow. Nyiragongo peaks at about 3,470 meters (11,380 feet) elevation and reaches almost exactly 2,000 meters (6,560 feet) above Lake Kivu. The shorter but much broader Nyamuragira volcano appears in the upper left.

    Goma, Lake Kivu, Nyiragongo, Nyamuragira and other nearby volcanoes sit within the East African Rift Valley, a zone where tectonic processes are cracking, stretching, and lowering the Earth's crust. Volcanic activity is common here, and older but geologically recent lava flows (magenta in this depiction) are particularly apparent on the flanks of the Nyamuragira volcano.

    The Landsat image used here was acquired on December 11, 2001, about a month before the eruption, and shows an unusually cloud-free view of this tropical terrain. Minor clouds and their shadows were digitally removed to clarify the view and topographic shading derived from the SRTM

  3. Transition from Effusive to Explosive Activity during Lava Dome Eruption: The Example of the 2010 of Merapi Volcano (Java, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drignon, M. J.; Arbaret, L.; Burgisser, A.; Komorowski, J. C.; Martel, C.; Putra, R.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the transition between effusive and explosive activity in dome-forming volcanoes remains a challenging question for eruption forecasting and eruptive scenario definition. The explosive activity of 26 Oct. and 5 Nov. during the 2010 eruption of Merapi volcano offers the opportunity to explore this transition by quantifying the mechanisms that led to the dome explosion. Forty-three pumice samples were analyzed by 1) scanning electron microscope for textural analysis and 2) elemental analyzer for water content. The SEM images were processed so as to determine the proportions of gas bubbles, microlites and glass in each sample. These data were combined with the glass water content to feed the simple physical model developed by Burgisser et al. [1,2] to calculate pre-explosive pressure, depth, and porosity level for each pyroclastic pumice sample. Preliminary results indicate that the water content in the melt is high, reaching 7 wt.%. These water contents yield a wide range of pre-eruptive pressures. Samples from 26 Oct. originated at pressures from a few MPa to 280 MPa. These pressures correspond to depths ranging from a few hundred meters to more than 10 km. This suggests that large overpressures were associated with conduit evacuation that reached unexpected depths. Samples from the 5 Nov. event range from ~10 to ~100 MPa. This suggests that this event also evacuated a large part of the volcanic conduit. Pre-explosive porosities of both events are low (<10 vol. %) along the depth of the entire conduit, which suggests extensive permeable outgassing of the magma-filed conduit prior to each explosive evacuation. Ongoing work includes analysis of melt CO2 content due to preliminary evidence that it played an important role in the 2010 Merapi eruption. The modeled conduit properties serve as baseline data for conduit flow modeling and building plausible eruptive scenarios. [1] Burgisser et al. (2010) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 194, 27-41. [2] Burgisser et

  4. Lava Flows in the Grand Canyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Over vast expanses of time, natural processes like floods and volcanoes deposit layers of rock on the Earth's surface. To delve down through layers of rock is to explore our planet's history. Sometimes rock layers are exposed through human activity, such as drilling or excavation. Other times, rivers carve through the rock. One of the best, and most well-known, examples of a river exposing ancient rocks is Colorado River in Arizona's Grand Canyon. What fewer people know is that the Grand Canyon also has a history of relatively recent (on geologic time scales) volcanism. The evidence--hardened lava--spills down the canyon walls all the way to the river. On June 22, 2003, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image of the Grand Canyon, near 36.2 degrees north latitude and 113.2 degrees west longitude. ASTER detects light visible to human eyes as well as 'invisible' infrared light. Because different minerals reflect different portions of the light spectrum, ASTER can see varying mineral compositions of the rocks it observes, as well as detecting vegetation. In this three-dimensional visualization, lava fields appear brownish gray, darker than the layers of limestone, sandstone and other rock in the canyon. Vegetation appears green, and sparsely vegetated areas appear mustard. Water in the Colorado River is blue-purple. Geologists estimate that between 1.8 million and 400,000 years ago, lava flows actually dammed the Colorado River more than a dozen times. Some of the lava dams were as high as 600 meters (about 1,969 feet), forming immense reservoirs. Over time, enough water and sediment built up to push the river flow over the tops of these dams and eventually erode them away. Today, remnants of these lava dams remain throughout the area, along with the much older rock layers they cover. Among the most well known examples of these 'frozen' lava cascades is Lava Falls, which spills down to the

  5. Summit Explosive Activity and Deformation: Constraints On The Etna SE Crater Through Tilt Variations During The 1998-2000 Lava Fountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorso, A.

    We investigate the relationships between the strain expected from the explosive action of a volcanic conduit, the paroxystic lava fountain events occurring recently at Etna, and the high precision continuous tilt signals recorded during such events with refer- ence to the ones occurring at the SE crater. Using both the inclusion and dislocation theories, it has been shown that the displacements expected from the explosive action of the volcanic conduits are defined by an equation which includes a term proportional to a line dilatation integral plus an integral that subtracts the effects proportional to a line of vertical double forces. Then, from these equations, it is possible to obtain the expected tilt. We conducted a comparison and an analysis with the tilt signals recorded at the Pizzi Deneri (PDN) volcanological observatory located in the high north-eastern flank of Mt. Etna. Here, an 80 m long-base mercury tiltmeter is installed along two partially underground tunnels. The instrument, utilising optical laser sensors for mea- suring the level changes at the extremities, is very stable with a real precision of 0.01 microradians. At the PDN distance from crater, as expected from the conduit theory, deformation effects can be very small and difficult to detect even if provoked by strong explosions. Nevertheless, in particular situations during the paroxystic activity of the June 24, 2000 (violent explosive phase with only 30 minutes duration, instrumental sampling of 1 data/minute) we recorded small (0.1-0.2 microradians) but very clear and significant tilt variations on the radial component. On the basis of the theoreti- cal equations, these variation allow us to fix constraints on the SE conduit geometry (diameter) and the characteristics of the surrounding medium (rigidity coefficient).

  6. Testing the potential of 10Be in varved sediments from two lakes for solar activity reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czymzik, Markus; Muscheler, Raimund; Brauer, Achim; Adolphi, Florian; Ott, Florian; Kienel, Ulrike; Dräger, Nadine; Slowinski, Michal; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran

    2015-04-01

    The potential of 10Be in annually laminated (varved) lake sediments for solar activity reconstruction is, to date, largely unexplored. It is hypothesized that 10Be contents in sediments from well-chosen lakes reflect the solar induced atmospheric production signal. The varved nature of these archives provides the chance to establish solar activity time-series with very high temporal precision. However, so far solar activity reconstruction from 10Be in varved lake sediments is hampered due to a lack of detailed knowledge of the process chain from production in the atmosphere to deposition on the lake floor. Calibrating 10Be time-series from varved lake sediments against complementary proxy records from the same sediment archive as well as instrumental meteorological and solar activity data will allow a process-based understanding of 10Be deposition in these lakes and a quantitative evaluation of their potential for solar activity reconstruction. 10Be concentration and flux time-series at annual resolution were constructed for the period 1983 to 2007 (approx. solar cycles 22 and 23) conducting accelerator mass spectrometry and varve chronology on varved sediments of Lakes Tiefer See and Czechowski, located on an east-west transect at a distance of about 450 km in the lowlands of northern-central Europe. 10Be concentrations vary between 0.9 and 1.8*108atoms/g, with a mean of 1.3*108atoms/g in Lake Tiefer See and between 0.6 and 1.6*108atoms/g, with a mean of 1*108atoms/g in Lake Czechowski. Calculated mean 10Be flux is 2.3*108atoms/cm2/year for Lake Tiefer See and 0.7*108atoms/cm2/year for Lake Czechowski. Calibrating the 10Be time-series against corresponding geochemical μ-XRF profiles, varve thickness and total organic carbon records as well as precipitation data from the nearby stations Schwerin for Lake Tiefer See and Koscierzyna for Lake Czechowski and a neutron monitor record of solar activity suggests (1) a complex interaction of varying processes influencing

  7. Centennial Scale Variations in Lake Productivity Linked to Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englebrecht, A.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Guilderson, T. P.; Ingram, L.; Byrne, R.

    2012-12-01

    Solar variations on both decadal and centennial timescales have been associated with climate phenomena (van Loon et al., 2004; Hodell et al., 2001; White et al., 1997). The energy received by the Earth at the peak of the solar cycle increases by <0.1%; so the question has remained of how this could be amplified to produce an observable climate response. Recent modeling shows that the response of the Earth's climate system to the 11-year solar cycle may be amplified through stratosphere and ocean feedbacks and has the potential to impact climate variability on a multidecadal to centennial timescales (Meehl et al., 2009). Here, we report a 1000-year record of changes in the stratigraphy and carbon isotope composition of varved lake sediment from Isla Isabela (22°N, 106°W) in the subtropical northeast Pacific. Stable carbon isotopes and carbonate stratigraphy can be used to infer surface productivity in the lake. Our analysis shows variations in primary productivity on centennial timescales and suggests that solar activity may be an important component of Pacific climate variability. A possible response during solar maxima acts to keep the eastern equatorial Pacific cooler and drier than usual, producing conditions similar to a La Niña event. In the region around Isla Isabela peak solar years were characterized by decreased surface temperatures and suppressed precipitation (Meehl et al., 2009), which enhance productivity at Isabela (Kienel et al. 2011). In the future, we plan to analyze the data using advanced time series analysis techniques like the wavelets together with techniques to handle irregularly spaced time series data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-571672

  8. Active lakes in Antarctica survive on a sedimentary substrate - Part 1: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, S. P.; Fricker, H. A.; Siegfried, M. R.

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade satellite observations have revealed that active subglacial lake systems are widespread under the Antarctic ice sheet, including the ice streams, yet we have insufficient understanding of the lake-drainage process to incorporate it into ice sheet models. Process models for drainage of ice-dammed lakes based on conventional "R-channels" incised into the base of the ice through melting are unable to reproduce the timing and magnitude of drainage from Antarctic subglacial lakes estimated from satellite altimetry given the low hydraulic gradients along which such lakes drain. We developed a process model in which channels are mechanically eroded into deformable subglacial sediment (till) instead ("T-channel"). When applied to the known lakes of the Whillans/Mercer system, the model successfully reproduced the key characteristics of estimated lake volume changes for the period 2003-2009. If our model is realistic, it implies that most active lakes are shallow and only exist in the presence of saturated sediment, explaining why they are difficult to detect with classical radar methods. It also implies that the lake-drainage process is sensitive to the composition and strength of the underlying till, suggesting that models could be improved with a realistic treatment of sediment - interfacial water exchange.

  9. The relative influences of climate and volcanic activity on Holocene lake development inferred from a mountain lake in central Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self, A. E.; Klimaschewski, A.; Solovieva, N.; Jones, V. J.; Andrén, E.; Andreev, A. A.; Hammarlund, D.; Brooks, S. J.

    2015-11-01

    A sediment sequence was taken from a closed, high altitude lake (informal name Olive-backed Lake) in the central mountain range of Kamchatka, in the Russian Far East. The sequence was dated by radiocarbon and tephrochronology and used for multi-proxy analyses (chironomids, pollen, diatoms). Although the evolution of Beringian climate through the Holocene is primarily driven by global forcing mechanisms, regional controls, such as volcanic activity or vegetation dynamics, lead to a spatial heterogeneous response. This study aims to reconstruct past changes in the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and to separate the climate-driven response from a response to regional or localised environmental change. Radiocarbon dates from plant macrophytes gave a basal date of 7800 cal yr BP. Coring terminated in a tephra layer, so sedimentation at the lake started prior to this date, possibly in the early Holocene following local glacier retreat. Initially the catchment vegetation was dominated by Betula and Alnus woodland with a mosaic of open, wet, aquatic and semi-aquatic habitats. Between 7800 and 6000 cal yr BP the diatom-inferred lake water was pH 4.4-5.3 and chironomid and diatom assemblages in the lake were initially dominated by a small number of acidophilic/acid tolerant taxa. The frequency of Pinus pumila (Siberian dwarf pine) pollen increased from 5000 cal yr BP and threshold analysis indicates that P. pumila arrived in the catchment between 4200 and 3000 cal yr BP. Its range expansion was probably mediated by strengthening of the Aleutian Low pressure system and increased winter snowfall. The diatom-inferred pH reconstructions show that after an initial period of low pH, pH gradually increased from 5500 cal yr BP to pH 5.8 at 1500 cal yr BP. This trend of increasing pH through the Holocene is unusual in lake records, but the initially low pH may have resulted directly or indirectly from intense regional volcanic activity during the mid-Holocene. The chironomid

  10. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  11. Detecting short period variations in lava flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Pinkerton, H.

    2009-04-01

    Although the underpinning processes that govern the flow of lava have been recognized for some time, modeling the evolution of lava flow fields remains problematic due to the difficulties in fully constraining inputs to flow models. One of the main parameters controlling the evolution of individual flows is effusion rate, and long period effusion rate changes, such as flow-waning prior to the cessation of an eruption, can now be routinely incorporated in simulations. However, effusion rates commonly vary over a wide range of timescales (from years to minutes) and, for short period changes, neither the cause nor the effects are well understood. Nevertheless, short period changes can result in inaccuracies in the input data for simulations and can be responsible for altering flow directions by either building or breaching flow levees. Hence, understanding the processes involved in such changes is important for flow modeling and, furthermore, could eventually provide insight into flow instabilities within the conduit or variability within degassing processes. Observations of short period (e.g. <1 hr) variations in lava flux have been made previously in the field but associated changes cannot be identified in effusion rate data because of the generally low sampling frequency of such data. During the last week of July 2008, trail cameras were used to obtain dense time series imagery of the active lava flow at Mount Etna, Sicily. The trail cameras were modified to capture timelapse imagery by adding an interval timer which triggered image capture every 10 minutes. During daylight, the cameras collected 5 M-pixel colour images and, during nighttime, they automatically switched to a 2 M-pixel camera which collected (uncalibrated) black and white infrared images. For the color images, haze, cloud and sunglare combined with the low contrast between the active lava and its surroundings, prevented useful analysis. However, the infrared images captured at night clearly

  12. Evaluation of Lava Tube Formation Mechanisms Using Three-Dimensional Mapping, and Viscosity Modeling: Lava Beds National Monument, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedecker, J.; Gant, M.

    2014-12-01

    This study explores the relationships between lava tube morphology, lava effusion rate estimates, and the mechanism of lava tube formation. Effusion rate estimates for extinct lava tubes were calculated using a combination of three-dimensional mapping of lava tube caves, and viscosity models utilizing whole-rock compositions (Giordano et al., 2008, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.), and petrographic data (Harris and Allen, 2008, J. Geophys. Res.). The mechanism of lava tube formation was evaluated using measured tube lengths and effusion rate estimates and comparing these data with observations from Hawaiian channel- and tube-fed flows (Pinkerton and Wilson, 1994, J. Volcanol. Geoth. Res.). Three-dimensional map data for lava tube caves were collected using a laser rangefinder to measure the cross-sectional shape and down-tube distance, and a tandem compass/inclinometer to measure the azimuth and inclination between survey stations in the tube. Total tube length consists of the mapped tube length plus the distance between collapse pits and trenches along the trend of the tube. Effusion rates were estimated using the Hagen-Poiseuille equation, measured mean cross-sectional radii and slope of lava tubes, and estimated effective viscosities of rock samples collected from mapped tubes at temperatures between 1080-1160 °C and water contents of 0-1 wt.%. A lava density of 1560 g/cm3was used for 0.40 vesicle fraction basalt. There is a positive correlation between measured tube lengths and cross-sectional radii (Fig. 1). We propose that this relationship reflects the positive correlation between flow lengths and effusion rates in active Hawaiian channel-fed flows. Measured tube lengths vs. effusion rate estimates were compared with data for Hawaiian channel-fed flows (Fig. 2). The two data sets overlap and have parallel trends. These results suggest that the lava tube caves studied formed by the roofing-over of channel-fed flows or had segments of channel-fed flow. We propose

  13. Active Lakes of the Recovery Ice Stream, East Antarctica: A Bedrock-Controlled Subglacial Hydrological System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricker, H. A.; Scambos, T. A.; Bell, R. E.; Carter, S. P.

    2014-12-01

    A connected system of active sub-glacial lakes was revealed beneath the Recovery Ice Stream, East Antarctica by ICESat laser altimetry acquired from 2003 to 2008. Here we combine repeat-track analysis of ICESat (2003-2009), Operation IceBridge laser altimetry and radio-echo sounding (RES; 2011 and 2012), and MODIS image differencing (2009-2011) to learn more about the surface and bedrock topographic setting of the lakes and the constraints on water flow through the system. IceBridge data reveal a ~1500 m deep, ~1000 km long bedrock trough under the main trunk of Recovery Ice Stream. We extend the lake activity time series to 2012 for the three lower lakes using IceBridge data: one lake underwent a large deflation between 2009 and 2011; another lake, which had been continuously filling between 2003 and 2010, started to drain after 2011. Hydrologic connections among the lakes appear to be direct and responsive. We reproduce the lake activity using a simple subglacial water model. The hydrologic system beneath Recovery Ice Stream is controlled by unusually pronounced bedrock topography (and not ice surface topography, as is the case for most Antarctic systems studied to date). We discuss potential causes of non-steady hydrologic behavior in major Antarctic catchments.

  14. Map Showing Lava Inundation Zones for Mauna Loa, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trusdell, F.A.; Graves, P.; Tincher, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The Island of Hawaii is composed of five coalesced basaltic volcanoes. Lava flows constitute the greatest volcanic hazard from these volcanoes. This report is concerned with lava flow hazards on Mauna Loa, the largest of the island shield volcanoes. Hilo lies 58 km from the summit of Mauna Loa, the Kona coast 33 km, and the southernmost point of the island 61 km. Hawaiian volcanoes erupt two morphologically distinct types of lava, aa and pahoehoe. The surfaces of pahoehoe flows are rather smooth and undulating. Pahoehoe flows are commonly fed by lava tubes, which are well insulated, lava-filled conduits contained within the flows. The surfaces of aa flows are extremely rough and composed of lava fragments. Aa flows usually form lava channels rather than lava tubes. In Hawaii, lava flows are known to reach distances of 50 km or more. The flows usually advance slowly enough that people can escape from their paths. Anything overwhelmed by a flow will be damaged or destroyed by burial, crushing, or ignition. Mauna Loa makes up 51 percent of the surface area of the Island of Hawaii. Geologic mapping shows that lava flows have covered more than 40 percent of the surface every 1,000 years. Since written descriptions of its activity began in A.D. 1832, Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times. Some eruptions begin with only brief seismic unrest, whereas others start several months to a year following increased seismic activity. Once underway, the eruptions can produce lava flows that reach the sea in less than 24 hours, severing roads and utilities. For example, the 1950 flows from the southwest rift zone reached the ocean in approximately three hours. The two longest flows of Mauna Loa are pahoehoe flows from the 50-kilometer-long 1859 and the 48-kilometer-long 1880-81 eruptions. Mauna Loa will undoubtedly erupt again. When it does, the first critical question that must be answered is: Which areas are threatened with inundation? Once the threatened areas are

  15. Anthropogenic activities affecting Arreo Lake (N Spain) during the last 2500 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corella, J.; Valero-Garces, B. L.; Stefanova, I.; El Amrani, A.; Morellón, M.; Rico, E.; González-Sampériz, P.; Moreno-Caballud, A.; Giralt, S.; Sigro, J.

    2010-12-01

    Arreo Lake is a small (288 ha surface area) karstic lake 25 m deep located at the northwestern edge of the Ebro Basin (NE Spain). The integration of sedimentary facies, element geochemistry, mineralogy, and biological proxies (pollen and diatoms), together with a robust chronological model provided by 15 AMS radiocarbon dating, 137Cs analyses, and varve counting, permitted a reconstruction of the main phases of anthropogenic activity affecting the Arreo Lake dynamic in the context of the climate variability in the Iberian Peninsula during the last two millennia. A high-resolution study of the lacustrine facies and diatoms, combined with their detailed comparison with recent regional instrumental climatic data (1952-2007), limnological monitoring of the lake (1992-2008), and recent land-use changes affecting the lake watershed show the strong influence of human activities in lake dynamics during the last 60 years. The main impacts are a large increase in sediment delivery to the lake after the 1980s, fluctuations in lake level caused by water extraction for irrigation, and changes in the mixing status of the lake. Littoral and distal sediment cores record the long history of the use of natural resources (salt, water, forest and farming) and their significant impacts in the lake during the last 2500 years. Periods of higher anthropogenic activities linked to increased salt production in the nearby Salinas de Añana during the Roman Period and the Early Middle Ages were coincident with deforestation and increased sediment delivery to the lake. The Modern period was characterized by an abrupt increase in the sedimentation rate. Forest expansion and reduced clastic input to the lake were synchronous with documented depopulation of the area during the Late Middle Ages and the 20th century. The synergy between climate and human activities is shown by the correspondence of increased human pressure and more favourable climate conditions, such as it is recorded during the

  16. King's Bowl Pit Crater, Lava Field and Eruptive Fissure, Idaho - A Multipurpose Volcanic Planetary Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, S. S.; Garry, B.; Kobs-Nawotniak, S. E.; Sears, D. W. G.; Borg, C.; Elphic, R. C.; Haberle, C. W.; Kobayashi, L.; Lim, D. S. S.; Sears, H.; Skok, J. R.; Heldmann, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    King's Bowl (KB) and its associated eruptive fissure and lava field on the eastern Snake River Plain, is being investigated by the NASA SSERVI FINESSE (Field Investigations to Enable Solar System Science and Exploration) team as a planetary analog to similar pits on the Moon, Mars and Vesta. The 2,220 ± 100 BP basaltic eruption in Craters of the Moon National Monument and Preserve represents early stages of low shield growth, which was aborted when magma supply was cut off. Compared to mature shields, KB is miniscule, with ~0.02 km3 of lava over ~3 km2, yet the ~6 km long series of fissures, cracks and pits are well-preserved for analog studies of volcanic processes. The termination of eruption was likely related to proximity of the 2,270 ± 50 BP eruption of the much larger Wapi lava field (~5.5 km3 over 325 km2 area) on the same rift. Our investigation extends early work by R. Greeley and colleagues, focusing on imagery, compositional variations, ejecta distribution, dGPS profiles and LiDAR scans of features related to: (1) fissure eruptions - spatter ramparts, cones, feeder dikes, extension cracks; (2) lava lake formation - surface morphology, squeeze-ups, slab pahoehoe lava mounds, lava drain-back, flow lobe overlaps; and (3) phreatic steam blasts - explosion pits, ejecta blankets of ash and blocks. Preliminary results indicate multiple fissure eruptions and growth of a basin-filled lava lake up to ~ 10 m thick with outflow sheet lava flows. Remnant mounds of original lake crust reveal an early high lava lake level, which subsided as much as 5 m as the molten interior drained back into the fissure system. Rapid loss of magma supply led to the collapse of fissure walls allowing groundwater influx that triggered multiple steam blasts along at least 500 m. Early blasts occurred while lake magma pressure was still high enough to produce squeeze-ups when penetrated by ejecta blocks. The King's Bowl pit crater exemplifies processes of a small, but highly energetic

  17. Support of LAVA Integration and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Marcus Algernon

    2014-01-01

    The Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA) subsystem is a part of the Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Analysis (RESOLVE) Payload that will fly to the lunar pole on the Resource Prospector Mission (RPM) in 2019. The purpose of the mission is to characterize the water on the surface and subsurface of the moon in various locations in order to map the distribution. This characterization of water will help to understand how feasible water is as a resource that can be used for drinking water, breathable air, and propellants in future missions. This paper describes the key support activities performed during a 10 week internship; specifically, troubleshooting the Near Infrared Spectrometer for the Surge Tank (NIRST) instrument count loss, contributing to a clamp to be used in the installation of Resistive Temperature Detectors (RTDs) to tubing, performing a failure analysis of the LAVA Fluid Subsystem (FSS), and finalizing trade studies for release.

  18. Nyiragongo volcano, Congo, Perspective View with Lava SRTM / ASTER / Landsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo erupted on January 17, 2002, and subsequently sent streams of lava into the city of Goma on the north shore of Lake Kivu. More than 100 people were killed, more than 12,000 homes were destroyed, and hundreds of thousands were forced to flee the broader community of nearly half a million people. This computer-generated visualization combines a Landsat satellite image and an elevation model from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) to provide a view of both the volcano and the city of Goma, looking slightly east of north. Additionally, image data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite were used to supply a partial map of the recent lava flows (red), including a complete mapping of their intrusion into Goma as of January 28, 2002. Lava is also apparent within the volcanic crater and at a few other locations. Thick (but broken) cloud cover during the ASTER image acquisition prevented a complete mapping of the lava distribution, but future image acquisitions should complete the mapping.

    Nyiragongo is the steep volcano on the right, Lake Kivu is in the foreground, and the city of Goma has a light pink speckled appearance along the shoreline. Nyiragongo peaks at about 3,470 meters (11,380 feet) elevation and reaches almost exactly 2,000 meters (6,560 feet) above Lake Kivu. The shorter but broader Nyamuragira volcano appears in the left background. Topographic expression has been exaggerated vertically by a factor of 1.5 for this visualization.

    Goma, Lake Kivu, Nyiragongo, Nyamuragira and other nearby volcanoes sit within the East African Rift Valley, a zone where tectonic processes are cracking, stretching, and lowering the Earth's crust. Volcanic activity is common here, and older but geologically recent lava flows (magenta in this depiction) are particularly apparent on the flanks of the Nyamuragira volcano.

    The Landsat image used here was acquired

  19. Wind, Water, and Lava

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 18 June 2003

    The three main geological agents acting on the Martian surface are visible in this image, within an outflow channel to the east of the Tharsis volcanos and north of Valles Marineris. In a wide channel previously eroded by water, linear features have been eroded into the rock by the wind. Later, lava flows embayed the streamlined rocks. A second, younger flow lobe is visible at the bottom of the image.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 17, Longitude 283.6 East (76.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Permeability of compacting porous lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, P. A.; Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Kennedy, B. M.; Hess, K.-U.; Aulock, F. W.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Vasseur, J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-03-01

    The highly transient nature of outgassing commonly observed at volcanoes is in part controlled by the permeability of lava domes and shallow conduits. Lava domes generally consist of a porous outer carapace surrounding a denser lava core with internal shear zones of variable porosity. Here we examine densification using uniaxial compression experiments on variably crystalline and porous rhyolitic dome lavas from the Taupo Volcanic Zone. Experiments were conducted at 900°C and an applied stress of 3 MPa to 60% strain, while monitoring acoustic emissions to track cracking. The evolution of the porous network was assessed via X-ray computed tomography, He-pycnometry, and relative gas permeability. High starting connected porosities led to low apparent viscosities and high strain rates, initially accompanied by abundant acoustic emissions. As compaction ensued, the lavas evolved; apparent viscosity increased and strain rate decreased due to strain hardening of the suspensions. Permeability fluctuations resulted from the interplay between viscous flow and brittle failure. Where phenocrysts were abundant, cracks had limited spatial extent, and pore closure decreased axial and radial permeability proportionally, maintaining the initial anisotropy. In crystal-poor lavas, axial cracks had a more profound effect, and permeability anisotropy switched to favor axial flow. Irrespective of porosity, both crystalline samples compacted to a threshold minimum porosity of 17-19%, whereas the crystal-poor sample did not achieve its compaction limit. This indicates that unconfined loading of porous dome lavas does not necessarily form an impermeable plug and may be hindered, in part by the presence of crystals.

  1. The Lava Morphology Database (LAMDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckyno, R. S.; de Silva, S. L.; Lopes, R. M.; Pieri, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    Many previous investigations of lava morphology have explored the relationship between flow properties (e.g., length, area, thickness) or flow features (e.g. lobation, flow ridging, aspect ratio), and process variables such as lava viscosity, yield strength, temperature, effusion rate, and local slope. Previous studies, however, have focused on individual attributes and features across a limited dataset of lava flows and have often noted the lack of a larger baseline dataset for comparison. Today, ready availability of high spatial and spectral resolution data for Earth’s volcanoes, coupled with computing advances, enable substantially enhanced network interaction between satellite analysis and field investigators around the world. We therefore propose a community effort, the Lava Morphology Database (LAMDA), to develop a comprehensive database for the morphology of terrestrial lava flows of varying composition, using GIS to integrate, georeference, and compare multiple datasets as well as automating many of the basic calculations. In a preliminary effort, we have measured and compiled lava flow features and attributes at 38 volcanoes including flow distance, surface area, aspect ratio, margin lobation, radii of curvature, height, and arc-length, corresponding cleft angle, flow surface ridging wavelength, lobe and landscape level slope, etc. As an example of the utility of this prototype database we present the initial results of an analysis of these data in light of existing viscosity and effusion rate based morphological models. Data resolution, computing power, and the number of field samples that can be practically analyzed have often necessitated that researchers assume that local slopes, viscosities, chemistries, and temperatures are constant across a flow. In contrast, LAMBDA will enable the exploration of factors that impact the emplacement of terrestrial lava flows at a much higher resolution than previous studies, as well as provide an extensive

  2. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin.

    Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy.

    The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks.

    As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography

  3. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (3-D)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin.

    Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy.

    The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks.

    As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography

  4. Altered former alkalic carbonatite lava from Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania: Inferences for calcite carbonatite lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, J. B.; Garson, M. S.; Roberts, B.

    1987-08-01

    The active volcano Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania, is well known for its extrusions of alkalic carbonatite lava, first witnessed in 1960. An older carbonatite flow from the volcano was originally also rich in Na and K, but replacement of nyerereite by pirssonite as a result of leaching of these elements (together with soluble components such as SO3, Cl, and Rb) and addition of Ca has resulted in a rock intermediate in bulk composition between the unique 1960 Lengai lavas and calcite-rich carbonatite flows reported from other localities. Further replacement of Na by Ca could theoretically result in a pure calcite rock, and we suggest that the partially altered alkalic lava described here is the “missing link” between lavas that are now calcitic but which had a high alkali content when originally extruded. The suggested link between alkali carbonate precursors and present-day calcium carbonate “lavas” explains the apparent paradox between the existence of calcite-rich “flows” and the experimental evidence that denies the possibility of hot, liquid calcium carbonate.

  5. Origin and deformation of high porosity bands in the Takanoobane Rhyolite lava of Aso volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, K.; Uno, K.

    2015-10-01

    In rhyolite lavas, the high porosity bands are often developed. They potentially act as pathways for gas movement to the lava surface. Since explosive activities of lavas are generally considered to be controlled by degassing system, understanding the origin and deformation process of the high porosity bands is important to assessing volcanic hazards. The Takanoobane rhyolite lava in the middle of Kyushu Island in SW Japan is effused at 51 ± 5 ka. The volume, flow length, and thickness are 0.14 km3, > 2 km, and about 90 m, respectively. The central crystalline part of the lava is characterized by the light-colored bands defined by the high porosity zone (HPZ). On the basis of geological and petrographical studies, we revealed that the HPZ was primary formed by ductile-brittle tearing of the lava (known as cavitation). According to the AMS results, the HPZs were subsequently stretched and flattened laterally during the concentric spreading of the lava. This deformation process could stretch the HPZ not only radially but also laterally. This effective stretching developed the HPZ into pervasive thin bands. Since the HPZs act as degassing pathways to the lava surface, the pervasive HPZ bands may play a role in providing volcanic gasses to void spaces created in surface fold hinges of rhyolite lavas. Thus, this degassing system may promote explosive activity of the lava surface.

  6. Temporal dynamics of active Archaea in oxygen-depleted zones of two deep lakes.

    PubMed

    Hugoni, Mylène; Domaizon, Isabelle; Taib, Najwa; Biderre-Petit, Corinne; Agogué, Hélène; Galand, Pierre E; Debroas, Didier; Mary, Isabelle

    2015-04-01

    Deep lakes are of specific interest in the study of archaeal assemblages as chemical stratification in the water column allows niche differentiation and distinct community structure. Active archaeal community and potential nitrifiers were investigated monthly over 1 year by pyrosequencing 16S rRNA transcripts and genes, and by quantification of archaeal amoA genes in two deep lakes. Our results showed that the active archaeal community patterns of spatial and temporal distribution were different between these lakes. The meromictic lake characterized by a stable redox gradient but variability in nutrient concentrations exhibited large temporal rearrangements of the dominant euryarchaeal phylotypes, suggesting a variety of ecological niches and dynamic archaeal communities in the hypolimnion of this lake. Conversely, Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I (MGI) largely dominated in the second lake where deeper water layers exhibited only short periods of complete anoxia and constant low ammonia concentrations. Investigations conducted on archaeal amoA transcripts abundance suggested that not all lacustrine Thaumarchaeota conduct the process of nitrification. A high number of 16S rRNA transcripts associated to crenarchaeal group C3 or the Miscellaneous Euryarchaeotic Group indicates the potential for these uncharacterized groups to contribute to nutrient cycling in lakes. PMID:25472601

  7. Correlation of volcanic activity with sulfur oxyanion speciation in a crater lake

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, B.

    1987-03-27

    The Yugama crater lake at Kusatsu-Shirane volcano, Japan, contains nearly 2200 tons (2800 parts per million) of polythionate ions (S/sub n/O/sub 6//sup 2 -/, where n = 4 to 9). Analytical data on lake water sampled before and during eruptions in 1982 showed that the concentrations of polythionates decreased and sulfate increased in response to the preeruption activities of the subaqueous fumaroles. These changes were observed 2 months before the first phreatic explosion on 26 October 1982. The monitoring of polythionates and sulfate in crater lake water is a promising means of anticipating potential volcanic eruption hazards.

  8. Owyhee River intracanyon lava flows: does the river give a dam?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ely, Lisa L.; Brossy, Cooper C.; House, P. Kyle; Safran, Elizabeth B.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Champion, Duane E.; Fenton, Cassandra R.; Bondre, Ninad R.; Orem, Caitlin A.; Grant, Gordon E.; Henry, Christopher D.; Turrin, Brent D.

    2013-01-01

    Rivers carved into uplifted plateaus are commonly disrupted by discrete events from the surrounding landscape, such as lava flows or large mass movements. These disruptions are independent of slope, basin area, or channel discharge, and can dominate aspects of valley morphology and channel behavior for many kilometers. We document and assess the effects of one type of disruptive event, lava dams, on river valley morphology and incision rates at a variety of time scales, using examples from the Owyhee River in southeastern Oregon. Six sets of basaltic lava flows entered and dammed the river canyon during two periods in the late Cenozoic ca. 2 Ma–780 ka and 250–70 ka. The dams are strongly asymmetric, with steep, blunt escarpments facing up valley and long, low slopes down valley. None of the dams shows evidence of catastrophic failure; all blocked the river and diverted water over or around the dam crest. The net effect of the dams was therefore to inhibit rather than promote incision. Once incision resumed, most of the intracanyon flows were incised relatively rapidly and therefore did not exert a lasting impact on the river valley profile over time scales >106 yr. The net long-term incision rate from the time of the oldest documented lava dam, the Bogus Rim lava dam (≤1.7 Ma), to present was 0.18 mm/yr, but incision rates through or around individual lava dams were up to an order of magnitude greater. At least three lava dams (Bogus Rim, Saddle Butte, and West Crater) show evidence that incision initiated only after the impounded lakes filled completely with sediment and there was gravel transport across the dams. The most recent lava dam, formed by the West Crater lava flow around 70 ka, persisted for at least 25 k.y. before incision began, and the dam was largely removed within another 35 k.y. The time scale over which the lava dams inhibit incision is therefore directly affected by both the volume of lava forming the dam and the time required for sediment

  9. The Water Volume Changes of Lake Manas and Its Response to Climate Change and Human Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Suning; Yang, Jingchun; Li, Youli

    2014-05-01

    The water volume changes of the lake basin in China's arid northwest region can sensitively reflect the impact of climate change and human activities in upper stream area. Lake Manas is a terminal lake of Manas Valley, a typical Valley in Northern Xinjiang. Just like other lakes, tectonic activities, such as water conservancy projects and agriculture irrigation projects, have great impacts on its evolution and change. We have a research on the response to climate change and human activities since 1950s, taking the Lake Manas for example. Collect aerial photographs and satellite imagery in year of 1958,1964,1979,1989,1999,2001,2003, with 1:50,000 topographic maps, 1:10000 DEM and other types of Figure and data of Lake Manas, we calculate the changes of the water volume of the Lake in 7different time period. According to the analysis of weather and hydrology records in the past 50 years, this author construct the correlation curves among the flow rate of Manas River, the temperature and precipitation in its upper steam area. This study shows that the development of contemporary Lake Manas could be divided to three stages: high-water period (in late the 1950s), extinct period (between 1970s and 1990s), and recovering season (in the early 21st century). The high-water period in late 1950s and the recovering season in early 21st century are mostly the results of excessive wet climate in the drainage basin, while the extinct period between the 1970s and the 1990s is mostly the result of man-made water projects in its upper stream area.The impact of climate change mainly in: the impact of climate change on runoff upstream determine the inflows of Lake Manas; the impact of downstream climate on the combination of water and heat determine the evaporation. The impact of human activities mainly in: the water conservancy projects upstream and agriculture irrigation projects since 1954 result in the extinct period between 1970s and 1990s in Lake Manas. Key Words: Lake Manas

  10. Disruption of tephra fall deposits caused by lava flows during basaltic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. J.; Thordarson, T.; Self, S.; Blake, S.

    2015-10-01

    Observations in the USA, Iceland and Tenerife, Canary Islands reveal how processes occurring during basaltic eruptions can result in complex physical and stratigraphic relationships between lava and proximal tephra fall deposits around vents. Observations illustrate how basaltic lavas can disrupt, dissect (spatially and temporally) and alter sheet-form fall deposits. Complexity arises through synchronous and alternating effusive and explosive activity that results in intercalated lavas and tephra deposits. Tephra deposits can become disrupted into mounds and ridges by lateral and vertical displacement caused by movement (including inflation) of underlying pāhoehoe lavas and clastogenic lavas. Mounds of tephra can be rafted away over distances of 100 s to 1,000 s m from proximal pyroclastic constructs on top of lava flows. Draping of irregular topography by fall deposits and subsequent partial burial of topographic depressions by later lavas can result in apparent complexity of tephra layers. These processes, deduced from field relationships, have resulted in considerable stratigraphic complexity in the studied proximal regions where fallout was synchronous or alternated with inflation of subjacent lava sheets. These mechanisms may lead to diachronous contact relationships between fall deposits and lava flows. Such complexities may remain cryptic due to textural and geochemical quasi-homogeneity within sequences of interbedded basaltic fall deposits and lavas. The net effect of these processes may be to reduce the usefulness of data collected from proximal fall deposits for reconstructing basaltic eruption dynamics.

  11. Lava flow hazard modeling during the 2014-2015 Fogo eruption, Cape Verde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappello, Annalisa; Ganci, Gaetana; Calvari, Sonia; Pérez, Nemesio M.; Hernández, Pedro A.; Silva, Sónia V.; Cabral, Jeremias; Del Negro, Ciro

    2016-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing techniques and lava flow forecasting models have been combined to enable a rapid response during effusive crises at poorly monitored volcanoes. Here we used the HOTSAT satellite thermal monitoring system and the MAGFLOW lava flow emplacement model to forecast lava flow hazards during the 2014-2015 Fogo eruption. In many ways this was one of the major effusive eruption crises of recent years, since the lava flows actually invaded populated areas. Combining satellite data and modeling allowed mapping of the probable evolution of lava flow fields while the eruption was ongoing and rapidly gaining as much relevant information as possible. HOTSAT was used to promptly analyze MODIS and SEVIRI data to output hot spot location, lava thermal flux, and effusion rate estimation. This output was used to drive the MAGFLOW simulations of lava flow paths and to continuously update flow simulations. We also show how Landsat 8 OLI and EO-1 ALI images complement the field observations for tracking the flow front position through time and adding considerable data on lava flow advancement to validate the results of numerical simulations. The integration of satellite data and modeling offers great promise in providing a unified and efficient system for global assessment and real-time response to effusive eruptions, including (i) the current state of the effusive activity, (ii) the probable evolution of the lava flow field, and (iii) the potential impact of lava flows.

  12. LAND USE ACTIVITIES AND WESTERN LAKE SUPERIOR WATER QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geographic Information Systems (GlS), computer systems which can analyze mapped information, can help reduce nonpoint source pollution in the Lake Superior basin by providing researchers and managers with a tool for predicting the consequences of land use change. n an EPA-funded ...

  13. Lava-substrate heat transfer: Laboratory experiments and thermodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C. W.; Wright, R.; Crawford, I.

    2012-12-01

    We have performed laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to investigate the heat transfer from a lava flow into various substrate materials, focusing on the effects of the differing thermophysical properties of substrate materials. Initial motivation for this project developed from the desire to understand the loss of solar wind volatiles embedded in lunar regolith deposits that were subsequently covered by a lava flow. The Moon lacks a significant atmosphere and magnetosphere, leaving the surface regolith exposed to bombardment by solar flare and solar wind particles, and by the cosmogenic products of galactic cosmic rays. Preservation of particle-rich regolith deposits may have occurred by the emplacement of an active lava flow on top of the regolith layer, provided the embedded particles survive heating by the lava. During future expeditions to the lunar surface, ancient regolith deposits could be sampled through surface drilling to extract the extra-lunar particles, revealing a history of the solar activity and galactic events not available on the Earth. This project also has important implications for terrestrial lava flows, particularly in the prediction of lava flow hazards. Lava erupted on Earth may be emplaced on various substrates, including solid lava rock, volcanic tephra, sands, soils, etc. The composition, grain size, consolidation, moisture content, etc. of these materials will vary greatly and have different effects on the cooling of the flow. Accounting for specific properties of the substrate could be an important improvement in lava flow models We have performed laboratory experiments in collaboration with the Department of Art and Art History at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in which ~5-6 kg of basalt, collected at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, is melted to ~1200 °C. The lava is poured into a device constructed of calcium silicate sheeting that has been filled with a solid or particulate substrate material and embedded with thermocouples

  14. Controls on lava-snow interactions from propogation styles during the 2012-13 Tolbachik eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Benjamin; Belousov, Alexander; Belousov, Marina

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of how volcanism interacts with hydrosphere/cryosphere is critical for understanding the functioning and evolution of the Earth, establishing volcanism-climate linkages, and estimations of related hazards. Until now, no special studies have been focused on interactions between snowpack and advancing incandescent lava during volcanic eruptions, even though snow is the most widely distributed form of solid H2O on the planet. It was thought a priori that snow might melt rapidly in front of active lava flows producing vigorous floods. Here we present results of unique field observations made in the snowpack in front of advancing basaltic lava flows during the 2012-13 eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Our observations in the first time demonstrate that in reality heat transfer through lava/snow boundary occurs relatively slowly, so that melting of the majority of the snow pack occurs over the span of several hours-days after emplacement of the lava flows, producing only local and sporadic meltwater floods. Two fundamentally different styles of lava propagation result in two strikingly different responses of snowpack: i) 'a'a lava advancing in a rolling caterpillar-track motion propagates on top of snowpack; the melt water accumulates in (saturates) the layer of snow buried underneath the lava flow and does not interact notably with the lava material, and ii) pahoehoe lava advancing as inflating lobes propagates beneath/inside snowpack, locally generating slowly growing 'snow-domes'; the melt water precipitates down into incandescent lava producing chilling and local thermal shock/quench fragmentation (minor hyaloclastite production). Our observations show that lava-snow interactions can vary significantly depending on styles of flow front advance. Lava flows emplaced over areas covered with snow bear features that can be distinguished in old stratigraphic sequences and used for paleoclimatic reconstructions on Earth, Mars and other planets.

  15. Results From NICLAKES Survey of Active Faulting Beneath Lake Nicaragua, Central American Volcanic Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, J.; Mann, P.; McIntosh, K.; Wulf, S.; Dull, R.; Perez, P.; Strauch, W.

    2006-12-01

    In May of 2006 we used a chartered ferry boat to collect 520 km of seismic data, 886 km of 3.5 kHz subbottom profiler data, and 35 cores from Lake Nicaragua. The lake covers an area of 7700 km2 within the active Central American volcanic arc, forms the largest lake in Central America, ranks as the twentieth largest freshwater lake in the world, and has never been previously surveyed or cored in a systematic manner. Two large stratovolcanoes occupy the central part of the lake: Concepcion is presently active, Maderas was last active less than 2000 years ago. Four zones of active faulting and doming of the lake floor were mapped with seismic and 3.5 kHz subbottom profiling. Two of the zones consist of 3-5-km-wide, 20-30-km-long asymmetric rift structures that trend towards the inactive cone of Maderas Volcano in a radial manner. The northeastern rift forms a 20-27-m deep depression on the lake bottom that is controlled by a north-dipping normal fault. The southwestern rift forms a 25-35-m deep depression controlled by a northeast-dipping normal fault. Both depressions contain mound-like features inferred to be hydrothermal deposits. Two zones of active faulting are associated with the active Concepcion stratovolcano. A 600-m-wide and 6-km-long fault bounded horst block extends westward beneath the lake from a promontory on the west side of the volcano. Like the two radial rift features of Maderas, the horst points roughly towards the active caldera of Concepcion. A second north-south zone of active faulting, which also forms a high, extends off the north coast of Concepcion and corresponds to a localized zone of folding and faulting mapped by previous workers and inferred by them to have formed by gravitational spreading of the flank of the volcano. The close spatial relation of these faults to the two volcanic cones in the lake suggests that the mechanism for faulting is a result of either crustal movements related to magma intrusion or gravitational sliding and is

  16. New Evidence for the Low-Pressure Origin of Lava-Hyaloclastite Sequences in South Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, T.; Hoskuldsson, A.; Miller, C. F.; Furbish, D. J.; Wallace, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    hyaloclastite that was incorporated into a meltwater lake-draining jökulhlaup. Ensuing subaerial lava from the ongoing eruption flowed onto still-plastic hyaloclastite and sank to its base. Thermal modeling suggests that influx of heat from the underlying lava resulted in increased fluid pressure in the hyaloclastite matrix. Fracturing of the chilled rind that had formed atop the lava permitted injection of lava into the overlying hyaloclastite. Diffusion of pressure away from the injection site dragged the matrix apart, facilitating propagation of lava upward to form the apophyses.

  17. Living at the border: A community and single-cell assessment of lake bacterioneuston activity

    PubMed Central

    Hörtnagl, Paul; Pérez, María Teresa; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the physicochemical properties of the surface microlayer (SML: first 900 μm) and its underlying water (ULW: 0.2–0.5-m depth) and compared the composition and activity of their bacterial communities in six lakes located across an altitude gradient. Activity was assessed at both the community level, by measuring leucine bulk incorporation, and at the single-cell level, by using microautoradiography. Catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to quantitatively assess the structure of the bacterial assemblage. Dissolved organic matter at the SML was significantly enriched in small-size molecules as compared to the ULW. Bacterial abundance in the SML ranged from 3.2 × 105 cells mL−1 to 3.2 × 106 cells mL−1 and was enriched in four out of six lakes when compared to the ULW. The SML and ULW showed lake-specific differences in bacterial community composition, although in most cases, both layers were dominated by Betaproteobacteria. This group also contributed the most to total activity in both layers in all lakes, followed by Actinobacteria. Despite large differences in environmental conditions among lakes, the fraction of active neustonic bacteria was very similar in most of them. Both bulk and single-cell activities are not necessarily lower in the SML than in the ULW, and well-adapted bacteria exist in the extreme conditions found in this habitat. PMID:20401318

  18. Identifying hazards associated with lava deltas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.

    2014-01-01

    Lava deltas, formed where lava enters the ocean and builds a shelf of new land extending from the coastline, represent a significant local hazard, especially on populated ocean island volcanoes. Such structures are unstable and prone to collapse—events that are often accompanied by small explosions that can deposit boulders and cobbles hundreds of meters inland. Explosions that coincide with collapses of the East Lae ‘Apuki lava delta at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, during 2005–2007 followed an evolutionary progression mirroring that of the delta itself. A collapse that occurred when the lava–ocean entry was active was associated with a blast of lithic blocks and dispersal of spatter and fine, glassy tephra. Shortly after delta growth ceased, a collapse exposed hot rock to cold ocean water, resulting in an explosion composed entirely of lithic blocks and lapilli. Further collapse of the delta after several months of inactivity, by which time it had cooled significantly, resulted in no recognizable explosion deposit. Seaward displacement and subsidence of the coastline immediately inland of the delta was measured by both satellite and ground-based sensors and occurred at rates of several centimeters per month even after the lava–ocean entry had ceased. The anomalous deformation ended only after complete collapse of the delta. Monitoring of ground deformation may therefore provide an indication of the potential for delta collapse, while the hazard associated with collapse can be inferred from the level of activity, or the time since the last activity, on the delta.

  19. Walker Lake, Nevada: sedimentation in an active, strike-slip related basin

    SciTech Connect

    Link, M.H.; Roberts, M.T.

    1984-04-01

    Walker Lake, Nevada, is in an active fault-controlled basin related to the right-lateral, northwest-trending Walker Lane Shear Zone on the western side of the Basin and Range province. The lake occurs in a half graben bounded on its west side by a high-angle normal fault zone along the Wassuk Range front. This fault zone may merge to the north into the Walker Lane fault system, which forms the northeast boundary of the basin. To the south of Walker Lake, the Wassuk front fault merges with an east-northeast trending left-lateral fault. The Walker Lake basin is interpreted to be a pull-apart basin formed within the triangular zone bounded by the Wassuk front, the Walker Lane, and left-lateral faults. The Walker River drainage basin occupies about 10,000 km/sup 2/ (3800 mi/sup 2/) in western Nevada and parts of California and is essentially a closed hydrologic system that drains from the crest of the Sierra Nevada in California and terminates in Walker Lake. Walker Lake trends north-northwest and is 27.4 km (17 mi) long and 8 km (5 mi) wide with water depths exceeding 30 m (100 ft). Lake Lahontan (Wisconsinian) shorelines ring Walker Lake and suggest water depths of 150 m (500 ft) above the present lake level. The lake is situated in an asymmetric basin with steep alluvial fans flanking the western shoreline (Wassuk Range) and gentle, areally more extensive fans flanking the eastern shoreline (Gillis Range). The Walker River delta enters the lake from the north and is a major sediment point source for the basin. Older dissected shoreline, alluvial fan, Gilbert delta, and beach ridge deposits were built largely of coarse-grained, locally derived materials. Stromatolites, oncolites, and tufas formed along the shorelines, whereas mud and organic sediments accumulated in the lake on the west side of the basin. Extensive submerged sand flats and local sand dunes occur on the east side of the basin.

  20. Diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs along depth profiles of arctic and subarctic lake water column and sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emitted from high-latitude lakes accounts for 2–6% of the global atmospheric CH4 budget. Methanotrophs in lake sediments and water columns mitigate the amount of CH4 that enters the atmosphere, yet their identity and activity in arctic and subarctic lakes are poorly understood. We used stable isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), pyrosequencing and enrichment cultures to determine the identity and diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs in the water columns and sediments (0–25 cm) from an arctic tundra lake (Lake Qalluuraq) on the north slope of Alaska and a subarctic taiga lake (Lake Killarney) in Alaska's interior. The water column CH4 oxidation potential for these shallow (~2m deep) lakes was greatest in hypoxic bottom water from the subarctic lake. The type II methanotroph, Methylocystis, was prevalent in enrichment cultures of planktonic methanotrophs from the water columns. In the sediments, type I methanotrophs (Methylobacter, Methylosoma and Methylomonas) at the sediment-water interface (0–1 cm) were most active in assimilating CH4, whereas the type I methanotroph Methylobacter and/or type II methanotroph Methylocystis contributed substantially to carbon acquisition in the deeper (15–20 cm) sediments. In addition to methanotrophs, an unexpectedly high abundance of methylotrophs also actively utilized CH4-derived carbon. This study provides new insight into the identity and activity of methanotrophs in the sediments and water from high-latitude lakes.

  1. Petrogenesis of basalt-trachyte lavas from Olmoti Crater, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollel, Godwin F.; Swisher, Carl C., III; McHenry, Lindsay J.; Feigenson, Mark D.; Carr, Michael J.

    2009-08-01

    Olmoti Crater is part of the Plio-Pleistocene Ngorongoro Volcanic Highland (NVH) in northern Tanzania to the south of Gregory Rift. The Gregory Rift is part of the eastern branch of the East African Rift System (EARS) that stretches some 4000 km from the Read Sea and Gulf of Aden in the north to the Zambezi River in Mozambique. Here, we (1) characterize the chemistry and mineral compositions of lavas from Olmoti Crater, (2) determine the age and duration of Olmoti volcanic activity through 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of Olmoti Crater wall lavas and (3) determine the genesis of Olmoti lavas and the relationship to other NVH and EARS volcanics and (4) their correlation with volcanics in the Olduvai and Laetoli stratigraphic sequences. Olmoti lavas collected from the lower part of the exposed crater wall section (OLS) range from basalt to trachyandesite whereas the upper part of the section (OUS) is trachytic. Petrography and major and trace element data reflect a very low degree partial melt origin for the Olmoti lavas, presumably of peridotite, followed by extensive fractionation. The 87Sr/ 86Sr data overlap whereas Nd and Pb isotope data are distinct between OLS and OUS samples. Interpretation of the isotope data suggests mixing of enriched mantle (EM I) with high-μ-like reservoirs, consistent with the model of Bell and Blenkinsop [Bell, K., Blenkinsop, J., 1987. Nd and Sr isotopic compositions of East African carbonatites: implications for mantle heterogeneity. Geology 5, 99-102] for East African carbonatite lavas. The isotope ratios are within the range of values defined by Oceanic Island Basalt (OIB) globally and moderate normalized Tb/Yb ratios (2.3-1.6) in these lavas suggest melting in the lithospheric mantle consistent with other studies in the region. 40Ar/ 39Ar incremental-heating analyses of matrix and anorthoclase separates from Olmoti OLS and OUS lavas indicate that volcanic activity was short in duration, lasting ˜200 kyr from 2.01 ± 0.03 Ma to 1.80 ± 0

  2. A Sourcebook of Marine Activities Developed in the Milwaukee Great Lakes Summer Education Program, 1977 and 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Richard E., Ed.

    Twenty-seven activities dealing with the marine environment of the Great Lakes are presented. Designed for junior and senior high school students, these activities develop awareness of the biological, physical, social, economical, and aesthetic dimensions of the Great Lakes. Field trips, films, discussion, and hands-on activities are used to teach…

  3. Characterizing active volcanic processes at Kilauea volcano using LiDAR scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeWinter, A. L.; Finnegan, D. C.; Patrick, M. R.; Anderson, S. W.; Orr, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    Active craters and lava lakes evolve in response to a variety of volcanic processes. Quantifying those changes can be difficult or even impossible, for safety reasons, due to the technical limitations of sensors that require a minimum standoff distance. In recent years, advancements in ground-based Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) scanners and accessibility to these systems have enhanced our ability to capture data in a diversity of volcanic settings at the highest spatial and temporal resolutions yet seen. Moreover, advancements in full-waveform digitization have significantly improved the ability to acquire data in environments where ash, steam, and sulfur dioxide emissions have historically hampered efforts. Kilauea's ongoing summit eruption, which began in March 2008, has been characterized in part by the evolution of its vent into a 160-meter diameter collapse crater holding an active lava lake. This process has been documented in detail by field and webcam observations, but has not been accurately quantified. Our research focuses on acquiring repeat, high-resolution full-waveform LiDAR data throughout 2012 to monitor changes in the geometry of Kilauea's active lava lake and the crater to which it is confined. We collected LiDAR data in February and July 2012, with plans for an additional survey in October 2012. Our results show changes in the shape of the vent walls and the shape and level of the confined lava lake. Specifically, the LiDAR data has revealed 1) changes in the lava lake level, corresponding to tiltmeter observations of pressure fluctuations in the summit magma reservoir, 2) enlargement of the vent cavity, due to frequent rock falls, and 3) modifications to the lake size and surrounding lava ledges due to competing processes of accretion and collapse. The rapid acquisition of repeat, high-resolution topographic data enables researchers to more accurately characterize shape and volume changes involved in a range of eruptive systems, while

  4. Subglacial lava propagation, ice melting and heat transfer during emplacement of an intermediate lava flow in the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oddsson, Björn; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Edwards, Benjamin R.; Thordarson, Thorvaldur; Magnússon, Eyjólfur; Sigurðsson, Gunnar

    2016-07-01

    During the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption in South Iceland, a 3.2-km-long benmoreite lava flow was emplaced subglacially during a 17-day effusive-explosive phase from April 18 to May 4. The lava flowed to the north out of the ice-filled summit caldera down the outlet glacier Gígjökull. The flow has a vertical drop of about 700 m, an area of ca. 0.55 km2, the total lava volume is ca. 2.5·107 m3 and it is estimated to have melted 10-13·107 m3 of ice. During the first 8 days, the lava advanced slowly (<100 m day-1), building up to a thickness of 80-100 m under ice that was initially 150-200 m thick. Faster advance (up to 500 m day-1) formed a thinner (10-20 m) lava flow on the slopes outside the caldera where the ice was 60-100 m thick. This subglacial lava flow was emplaced along meltwater tunnels under ice for the entire 3.2 km of the flow field length and constitutes 90 % of the total lava volume. The remaining 10 % belong to subaerial lava that was emplaced on top of the subglacial lava flow in an ice-free environment at the end of effusive activity, forming a 2.7 km long a'a lava field. About 45 % of the thermal energy of the subglacial lava was used for ice melting; 4 % was lost with hot water; about 1 % was released to the atmosphere as steam. Heat was mostly released by forced convection of fast-flowing meltwater with heat fluxes of 125-310 kWm-2.

  5. Post-11,000-year volcanism at Medicine Lake Volcano, Cascade Range, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Champion, D.E.; Miller, C.D.; Grove, T.L.; Trimble, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Eruptive activity during the past 11,000 years at Medicine Lake volcano has been episodic. Eight eruptions produced about 5.3 km3 of basaltic lava during an interval of a few hundred years about 10 500 years B.P. After a hiatus of about 6000 years, eruptive activity resumed with a small andesite eruption at about 4300 years B.P. Approximately 2.5 km3 of lava with compositions ranging from basalt to rhyolite vented in nine eruptions during an interval of about 3400 years in late Holocene time. The most recent eruption occurred about 900 years B.P. A compositional gap in SiO2 values of erupted lavas occurs between 58 and 63%. The gap is spanned by chilled magmatic inclusions in late Holocene silicic lavas. Late Holocene andesitic to rhyolitic lavas were probably derived by fractionation, assimilation, and mixing from high-alumina basalt parental magma, possibly from basalt intruded into the volcano during the early mafic episode. Eruptive activity is probably driven by intrusions of basalt that occur during E-W stretching of the crust in an extensional tectonic environment. Vents are typically aligned parallel or subparallel to major structural features, most commonly within 30?? of north. Intruded magma should provide adequate heat for commercial geothermal development if sufficient fluids can be found. -from Authors

  6. Bycatch, bait, anglers, and roads: quantifying vector activity and propagule introduction risk across lake ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Drake, D Andrew R; Mandrak, Nicholas E

    2014-06-01

    Long implicated in the invasion process, live-bait anglers are highly mobile species vectors with frequent overland transport of fishes. To test hypotheses about the role of anglers in propagule transport, we developed a social-ecological model quantifying the opportunity for species transport beyond the invaded range resulting from bycatch during commercial bait operations, incidental transport, and release to lake ecosystems by anglers. We combined a gravity model with a stochastic, agent-based simulation, representing a 1-yr iteration of live-bait angling and the dynamics of propagule transport at fine spatiotemporal scales (i.e., probability of introducing n propagules per lake per year). A baseline scenario involving round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) indicated that most angling trips were benign; irrespective of lake visitation, anglers failed to purchase and transport propagules (benign trips, median probability P = 0.99912). However, given the large number of probability trials (4.2 million live-bait angling events per year), even the rarest sequence of events (uptake, movement, and deposition of propagules) is anticipated to occur. Risky trips (modal P = 0.00088 trips per year; approximately 1 in 1136) were sufficient to introduce a substantial number of propagules (modal values, Poisson model = 3715 propagules among 1288 lakes per year; zero-inflated negative binomial model = 6722 propagules among 1292 lakes per year). Two patterns of lake-specific introduction risk emerged. Large lakes supporting substantial angling activity experienced propagule pressure likely to surpass demographic barriers to establishment (top 2.5% of lakes with modal outcomes of five to 76 propagules per year; 303 high-risk lakes with three or more propagules, per year). Small or remote lakes were less likely to receive propagules; however, most risk distributions were leptokurtic with a long right tail, indicating the rare occurrence of high propagule loads to most waterbodies

  7. Coastal lava flows from Mauna Loa and Hualalai volcanoes, Kona, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, J.G.; Clague, D.

    1987-01-01

    A major carbonate reef which drowned 13 ka is now submerged 150 m below sea level on the west coast of the island of Hawaii. A 25-km span of this reef was investigated using the submersible Makali'i. The reef occurs on the flanks of two active volcanoes, Mauna Loa and Hualalai, and the lavas from both volcanoes both underlie and overlie the submerged reef. Most of the basaltic lava flows that crossed the reef did so when the water was much shallower, and when they had to flow a shorter distance from shoreline to reef face. Lava flows on top of the reef have protected it from erosion and solution and now occur at seaward-projecting salients on the reef face. These relations suggest that the reef has retreated shoreward as much as 50 m since it formed. A 7-km-wide "shadow zone" occurs where no Hualalai lava flows cross the reef south of Kailua. These lava flows were probably diverted around a large summit cone complex. A similar "shadow zone" on the flank of Mauna Loa volcano in the Kealakekua Bay region is downslope from the present Mauna Loa caldera, which ponds Mauna Loa lava and prevents it from reaching the coastline. South of the Mauna Loa "shadow zone" the - 150 m reef has been totally covered and obscured by Mauna Loa lava. The boundary between Hualalai and Mauna Loa lava on land occurs over a 6-km-wide zone, whereas flows crossing the - 150 m reef show a sharper boundary offshore from the north side of the subaerial transition zone. This indicates that since the formation of the reef, Hualalai lava has migrated south, mantling Mauna Loa lava. More recently, Mauna Loa lava is again encroaching north on Hualalai lava. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Morphology, volcanism, and mass wasting in Crater Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Gardner, J.V.; Mayer, L.A.; Buktenica, M.W.; Dartnell, P.; Ramsey, D.W.; Robinson, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    Crater Lake was surveyed nearly to its shoreline by high-resolution multibeam echo sounding in order to define its geologic history and provide an accurate base map for research and monitoring surveys. The bathymetry and acoustic backscatter reveal the character of landforms and lead to a chronology for the concurrent filling of the lake and volcanism within the ca. 7700 calibrated yr B.P. caldera. The andesitic Wizard Island and central-plattform volcanoes are composed of sequences of lava deltas that record former lake levels and demonstrate simultaneous activity at the two vents. Wizard Island eruptions ceased when the lake was ~80 m lower than at present. Lava streams from prominent channels on the surface of the central platform descended to feed extensive subaqueous flow fields on the caldera floor. The Wizard Island and central-platform volcanoes, andesitic Merriam Cone, and a newly discovered probable lava flow on the eastern floor of the lake apparently date from within a few hundred years of caldera collapse, whereas a small rhydacite dome was emplaced on the flank of Wizard Island at ca. 4800 cal. yr B.P. Bedrock outcrops on the submerged caldera walls are shown in detail and, in some cases, can be correlated with exposed geologic units of Mount Mazama. Fragmental debris making up the walls elsewhere consists of narrow talus cones forming a dendritic pattern that leads to fewer, wider ridges downslope. Hummocky topography and scattered blocks up to ~280 m long below many of the embayments in the caldera wall mark debris-avalanche deposits that probably formed in single events and commonly are affected by secondary failures. The flat-floored, deep basins contain relatively fine-grained sediment transported from the debris aprons by sheet-flow turbidity currents. Crater Lake apparently filled rapidly (ca. 400-750 yr) until reaching a permeable layer above glaciated lava identified by the new survey in the northeast caldera wall at ~1845 m elevation

  9. LavaSIM: the effect of heat transfer in 3D on lava flow characteristics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, E.

    2013-12-01

    Characteristics of lava flow are governed by many parameters like lava viscosity, effusion rate, ground topography, etc. The accuracy and applicability of lava flow simulation code is evaluated whether the numerical simulation can reproduce these features quantitatively, which is important from both strategic and scientific points of views. Many lava flow simulation codes are so far proposed, and they are classified into two categories, i.e., the deterministic and the probabilistic models. LavaSIM is one of the former category models, and has a disadvantage of time consuming. But LavaSIM can solves the equations of continuity, motion, energy by step and has an advantage in the calculation of three-dimensional analysis with solid-liquid two phase flow, including the heat transfer between lava, solidified crust, air, water and ground, and three-dimensional convection in liquid lava. In other word, we can check the detailed structure of lava flow by LavaSIM. Therefore, this code can produce both channeled and fan-dispersive flows. The margin of the flow is solidified by cooling and these solidified crusts control the behavior of successive lava flow. In case of a channel flow, the solidified margin supports the stable central main flow and elongates the lava flow distance. The cross section of lava flow shows that the liquid lava flows between solidified crusts. As for the lava extrusion flow rate, LavaSIM can include the time function as well as the location of the vents. In some cases, some parts of the solidified wall may be broken by the pressure of successive flow and/or re-melting. These mechanisms could characterize complex features of the observed lava flows at many volcanoes in the world. To apply LavaSIM to the benchmark tests organized by V-hub is important to improve the lava flow evaluation technique.

  10. Volcanic Geology of Negit Island, Mono Lake, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursik, M.; Kobs, S.; Jayko, A.

    2008-12-01

    Negit Island, located in Mono Lake, eastern California, is a dacitic cumulodome with seven distinct lava flows emanating from at least four separate vent areas. Vent areas are dominated by en echelon northeast-trending fissures, indicating strong tectonic control. Neptunian(?) pyroclastic deposits on the north end of the island indicate an explosive subaqueous eruption early in island history. Northwestern shorelands, as well as a former landbridge to the island, retain a localized cap of rotated Pleistocene lake bottom sediment blocks, suggesting that proto-Negit was similar to modern Paoha Island, a nearby young structural dome draped with rotated lake bed blocks and explosive ejecta. In analogy with Paoha, the pyroclastic ejecta and blocks may thus indicate sublacustrine block landsliding with attendant eruption as an initial magmatic-structural dome grew, on which later lava domes and flows were superposed. What may be the oldest lava flow, in the center-west, is overlain by a deep orange-red soil, and three Mono Craters tephras. The well-developed soil indicates an extended period of chemical weathering before overlying tephra deposition. The southwestern end of the island is dominated by young lava flows and a prominent dome, which are not overlain by the most recent North Mono Craters tephra of 1350 A.D., consistent with earlier work indicating that parts of the island are younger than any eruption of the Mono Craters. The history of early structural doming with little or minimal eruptive activity at both Negit and Paoha Islands may have important implications for the current episode of noneruptive unrest and doming at nearby Long Valley caldera.

  11. Factors controlling lava dome morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan; Bridges, Nathan; Griffiths, Ross

    1991-01-01

    Research suggests that variations in lava dome morphology on different planets will depend much more critically on local gravity and the style of eruption than on the magma composition, ambient temperature, or the relative roles of convective and radiative cooling. Eruption style in turn reflects differences in tectonic conditions and the ability of magma to exsolve volatiles. Observed crude correlations between silica content and calculated yield strengths for terrestrial lava flows and domes probably are do to differences in extrusion rate and volatile solubility, rather than intrinsic rheological properties. Thus, even after taking the known effect of gravity into account, observed differences in gross dome morphology on different planets cannot by themselves be directly related to composition. Additional information such as the distribution of surface textures and structures, or spectroscopic data will be needed to conclusively establish dome compositions.

  12. Lava Flow Hazard Assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory: A Probabilistic Approach to Modeling Lava Flow Inundation with MOLASSES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallant, E.; Connor, C.; Richardson, J. A.; Wetmore, P. H.; Connor, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of a lava flow hazard assessment for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) using a new lava flow code, MOLASSES (MOdular LAva Simulation Software for Earth Science). INL is a nuclear research and development facility located on the eastern Snake River Plain with the potential for lava flow inundation from both monogenetic and polygenetic basaltic eruptions. Previously published inventories of observed surface vents and vents that are buried by younger lava flows and inferred from interpretation of borehole stratigraphy were used to created spatial density maps of vents within the INL region. Monte carlo simulations were run using the MOLASSES code to compare the difference between events initiated using only surface vents and events initiated using both the surface and the buried vents. We find that the inclusion of the buried vent locations drastically increases the number of site inundations and events initiating within INL boundaries. This highlights the need to seek out a more complete eruption record in an area of heavy prehistoric activity to better assess future hazard and associated risk.

  13. Constraining the activity of waves on Titan's polar lakes and seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, Jason M.; Barnes, Jason W.; Brown, Robert H.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, Roger N.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2015-04-01

    Saturn's moon Titan has an active hydrological cycle in which the primary working fluid, methane, is thought to transport between poles on seasonal timescales, driving much of the observed meteorology. Surface winds play a critical role in determining the evaporation rates of methane from Titan's polar lakes and seas. Observational constraints on these winds, however, are limited. Aeolian landforms, in particular sand dunes, characterize Titan's mid latitudes, providing evidence that winds at these latitudes have, at least in the geologically recent past, exceeded the threshold for saltation (which recent work has shown might be higher than previously predicted). The shoreline morphology of Titan's lone large southern lake, Ontario Lacus, has been interpreted as evidence for wave erosion. Evidence for wave activity on Titan's lakes and seas, however, has been notably absent in Cassini observations. Explanations that have been forwarded to explain the lack of waves include the possibility that the liquids that comprise Titan's lakes and seas are highly viscous or that seasonal winds have not exceeded the threshold for capillary wave formation (Hayes et al., 2012, Icarus 225). Only recently have Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) observations provided the first evidence of wave activity on Titan, in the north as Titan progresses towards northern summer (Barnes et al., 2014, Planetary Science 3). Herein, we use Cassini VIMS observations of the specular reflection of sunlight from Titan's lakes to infer the presence or absence of waves on Titan. We investigate observations acquired between 2012 and 2014. We find evidence for the presence of waves on Kraken Mare during a number of flybys, while specular reflections from the smaller Jingpo Lacus are more consistent with a smooth lake surface.

  14. Lava Flows around Olympus Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    At first glance, this image of lava flows around the large scarp of Olympus Mons shows little contrast in surface materials due to dust cover, but a closer look reveals textures characteristic of the variable surface roughness associated with different lava flows in this region. The lobate edges of the flows are distinctive, and permit the discrimination of many overlapping individual flows. On small scales, the surfaces of some flows look wrinkly and ropy, indicating a relatively fluid type of lava flow referred to as pahoehoe. Other surfaces appear more rough and broken, and might be referred to as a'a flows, which have higher viscosities and effusion rates compared to pahoehoe flows. The surface textures of lava flows can thus sometimes be used for comparative purposes to infer lava viscosity and effusion rates. There is also a bright streak in the wind shadow of the impact crater in the lower left of the image where dust that settles onto the surface is not easily scoured away.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and

  15. Gigantic self-confined pahoehoe inflated lava flows in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquare', G.; Bistacchi, A.

    2007-05-01

    The largest lava flows on Earth are pahoehoe basalts emplaced by inflation, a process which can change lava lobes initially a few decimetres thick into large lava sheets several metres thick. Inflation involves the initial formation of a thin, solidified, viscoelastic crust, under which liquid lava is continually added. This thermally efficient endogenous growth process explains the spread of huge volumes of lava over large, almost flat areas, as in the sheet flows which characterise the distal portions of Hawaiian volcanoes or some continental flood basalt provinces. Long, narrow, inflated pahoehoe flows have occasionally been described, either emplaced along pre-existing river channels or confined within topographic barriers. In this contribution we present previously unknown inflated pahoehoe lava flows following very long, narrow pathways over an almost flat surface, with no topographic confinement. Lava, which erupted in Late Quaternary times from the eastern tip of a 60 km long volcanic fissure in Argentina, formed several discrete flows extending as far as 180 km from the source. This fissure was characterized by a long-lasting and complex activity. Alkali-basaltic lava flows were emitted at the two extremities of the fissure system. In the intermediate section of the fissure, the Payun Matru, a great trachitic composite volcano, developed, giving rise to a large caldera which produced large pyroclastic flows. Alkali-basalts predate and postdate the trachitic activity, in fact at the end of the trachitic activity, new basaltic lava flows (mainly aa) were emitted from both ends of the fissure. We studied in details the youngest of the gigantic flows (Pampas Onduladas lava flow), which progressively develops through differing thermally-efficient flow mechanisms. The flow created a large shield volcanic structure at the eastern tip of the E-W fissure and spread to the E forming a very large and thick inflated pahoehoe sheet flow. Leaving the flanks of the

  16. OBJECTIVE ANALYSIS OF SPERM MOTILITY IN THE LAKE STURGEON, ACIPENSER FULVESCENS: ACTIVATION AND INHIBITION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An objective analysis of the duration of motility of sperm from the lake sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens, has been performed using computer-assisted sperm motion analysis at 200 frames/s. Motility was measured in both 1993 and 1994. The percentage of activated motile sperm and the...

  17. Gish Bar Patera, Io: Geology and Volcanic Activity, 1996-2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jason; Radebaugh, Jani; Lopes, Rosaly; McEwen, Alfred; Keszthelyi, Laszlo

    2003-01-01

    Since the two Voyagers passed by Jupiter in 1979, it has been known that volcanic activity is ubiquitous on the surface of Io. With over 400 volcanic centers, Io is even more volcanically active than the earth with massive flood basalt-style eruptions and komatitite lavas a common occurrence. Additionally, some volcanoes appear to be giant lava lakes, with violent activity churning the crust of the lake for periods of 20 years or more. Finally, sulfur is believed to play a large role in Io's volcanism, be it as a primary lava or as a secondary product of large, high-temperature eruptions. By studying one volcano in particular, Gish Bar Patera, one can observe many of these characteristics in one volcanic center.

  18. Quantitation of microorganic compounds in waters of the Great Lakes by adsorption on activated carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, Stacy L.; Kempe, Lloyd L.; Graham, E. S.; Beeton, Alfred M.

    1963-01-01

    Microorganic compounds in waters of Lakes Michigan and Huron have been sampled by adsorption on activated carbon in filters installed aboard the M/V Cisco and at the Hammond Bay Laboratory of the U.S. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. The organic compounds were eluted from the carbon according to techniques developed at the U.S. Public Health Service. On the assumption that chloroform eluates represent less polar compounds from industrial sources and alcohol eluates the more polar varieties of natural origin, plots of chloroform eluates against alcohol eluates appear to be useful in judging water qualities. Based upon these criteria, the data in this paper indicate that both the waters of northern Lake Michigan and of Lake Huron, in the vicinity of Hammond Bay, Michigan, are relatively free from pollution. The limnetic waters of Lake Michigan showed a particularly high ratio of alcohol to chloroform eluates. Data for monthly samples indicated that this ratio fluctuated seasonally. The periodicity of the fluctuations was similar to those of lake levels and water temperatures.

  19. Identifying non-point sources of endocrine active compounds and their biological impacts in freshwater lakes.

    PubMed

    Baker, Beth H; Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Ferrey, Mark; Barber, Larry B; Writer, Jeffery H; Rosenberry, Donald O; Kiesling, Richard L; Lundy, James R; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2014-10-01

    Contaminants of emerging concern, particularly endocrine active compounds (EACs), have been identified as a threat to aquatic wildlife. However, little is known about the impact of EACs on lakes through groundwater from onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS). This study aims to identify specific contributions of OWTS to Sullivan Lake, Minnesota, USA. Lake hydrology, water chemistry, caged bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), and larval fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) exposures were used to assess whether EACs entered the lake through OWTS inflow and the resultant biological impact on fish. Study areas included two OWTS-influenced near-shore sites with native bluegill spawning habitats and two in-lake control sites without nearby EAC sources. Caged bluegill sunfish were analyzed for plasma vitellogenin concentrations, organosomatic indices, and histological pathologies. Surface and porewater was collected from each site and analyzed for EACs. Porewater was also collected for laboratory exposure of larval fathead minnow, before analysis of predator escape performance and gene expression profiles. Chemical analysis showed EACs present at low concentrations at each study site, whereas discrete variations were reported between sites and between summer and fall samplings. Body condition index and liver vacuolization of sunfish were found to differ among study sites as did gene expression in exposed larval fathead minnows. Interestingly, biological exposure data and water chemistry did not match. Therefore, although results highlight the potential impacts of seepage from OWTS, further investigation of mixture effects and life history factor as well as chemical fate is warranted. PMID:24974177

  20. Determining lava rheology using video velocimetry and flow models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, E.; Spiegelman, M. W.; Wysocki, R.; Karson, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Flowing lava is one of the most common surface expressions of magmatic and volcanic processes, and thus provides an opportunity for measuring the physical properties of magma. However, direct and accurate field measurements are difficult to carry out, and thus flow models rely on estimates based from measurements of velocity and temperature made at the flow's surface. We demonstrate here how lava rheology can be assessed remotely using video velocimetry. We apply our method on lava flows of both laboratory and natural scales. Our experimental setup, part of the Syracuse University Lava Project (http://lavaproject.syr.edu) includes a large furnace capable of melting up to 450 kg of basalt. The lava is poured onto tilted planes or channels made of sand or steel to produce meters-long flows. This experimental setup is probably the only facility that allows such large scale controlled lava flows made of natural basaltic material. We document the lava using a high-resolution video camera, a forward-looking infrared (FLIR) camera and thermocouples. We employ Differential Optical Flow to extract surface velocity fields from video recordings of the experimental and natural flows. This technique uses the time-variations of the spatial gradients of the image intensity to estimate velocity between consecutive frames. An important benefit for using optical flow, compared with other velocimetry methods, is that it outputs a spatially coherent flow field rather than point measurements. We demonstrate that the optical flow results agree with other measures of the flow velocity, and estimate the error due to noise and time-variability to be under 30 percent of the measured velocity. Our forward flow models are obtained by solving the Stokes flow equations using the finite-element method. We explore a range of rheological parameters, including the lava's apparent viscosity, the power-law exponent m and the thermal activation energy. We find that for the high-temperature portion of

  1. Reconstruction of lava fields based on 3D and conventional images. Arenal volcano, Costa Rica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, S.; Duarte, E.; Fernandez, E.

    2007-05-01

    Conventional air photographs, multi-spectral images and a map scale 1:10 000 were used to upgrade Arenal volcano's lava field. Arenal volcano located in NW Costa Rica has been active for 39 years. Fifty two days after the initial explosive events that opened three craters on the west flank, lava flows were erupted from crater A (1050 m) in September, 1968 and continued flowing until November, 1973. These lavas were the most voluminous of the eruption and the effusion rate of lava was relatively high in this period. In April, 1974 lava flows were erupted from crater C (1460 m) and continue to present time. Younger lava flows extended over uncovered ground to the south and southwest in the 1980s and early 1990s and onto the northern slopes in the 1990s and 2000s. Lava flows are becoming shorter and narrower with time. Therefore, the centre of mass of the whole lava flow-field has migrated closer to the vent. Above crater C a cone has been growing steadily, reaching a height of 1670 m, 36 m higher than the prehistoric Arenal cone by 2004. After 39 years of continuous emission of lava flows, the profile of Arenal volcano consists of a duplet of cones whose summits are separated by less than 500 meters. Most of the build up around the new cone comes from varied lava flows. For near 30 years volcano monitoring staff (from OVSICORI-UNA) has recorded field observations of regular and extraordinary events, in paper. Several drafts maps have been used for teaching, academic presentations and for graphic explanations to specific audiences and to the general public. An upgraded version was needed. The purpose of this work is to present the most recent lava flows giving a visual presentation of them by computer methods. Combined SIG techniques (Arc View 3.3) and ERDAS produced a base map in which layers containing the recorded lava flows from the recent 16 years, were depicted. Each lava flow has its own characteristics: direction, year of origin, width, length, surface texture

  2. Emplacement of Long Lava Flows: Detailed Topography of the Carrizozo Basalt Lava Flow, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R; Johnston, A. K.

    2000-01-01

    The Carrizozo flow in south-central New Mexico was examined to obtain detailed topography for a long basaltic lava flow. This information will be helpful in evaluating emplacement models for long lava flows.

  3. Microbial processes and factors controlling their activities in alkaline lakes of the Mongolian plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namsaraev, Zorigto B.; Zaitseva, Svetlana V.; Gorlenko, Vladimir M.; Kozyreva, Ludmila P.; Namsaraev, Bair B.

    2015-11-01

    A striking feature of the Mongolian plateau is the wide range of air temperatures during a year, -30 to 30°C. High summer temperatures, atmospheric weathering and the arid climate lead to formation of numerous alkaline soda lakes that are covered by ice during 6-7 months per year. During the study period, the lakes had pH values between 8.1 to 10.4 and salinity between 1.8 and 360 g/L. According to chemical composition, the lakes belong to sodium carbonate, sodium chloride-carbonate and sodium sulfate-carbonate types. This paper presents the data on the water chemical composition, results of the determination of the rates of microbial processes in microbial mats and sediments in the lakes studied, and the results of a Principal Component Analysis of environmental variables and microbial activity data. Temperature was the most important factor that influenced both chemical composition and microbial activity. pH and salinity are also important factors for the microbial processes. Dark CO2 fixation is impacted mostly by salinity and the chemical composition of the lake water. Total photosynthesis and sulfate-reduction are impacted mostly by pH. Photosynthesis is the dominant process of primary production, but the highest rate (386 mg C/(L•d)) determined in the lakes studied were 2-3 times lower than in microbial mats of lakes located in tropical zones. This can be explained by the relatively short warm period that lasts only 3-4 months per year. The highest measured rate of dark CO2 assimilation (59.8 mg C/(L•d)) was much lower than photosynthesis. The highest rate of sulfate reduction was 60 mg S/(L•d), while that of methanogenesis was 75.6 μL CN4/(L•d) in the alkaline lakes of Mongolian plateau. The rate of organic matter consumption during sulfate reduction was 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that associated with methanogenesis.

  4. The Role of Late-Cenozoic Lava Flows in the Evolution of the Owyhee River Canyon, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brossy, C. C.; House, P. K.; Ely, L. L.; O'Connor, J. E.; Safran, E. B.; Bondre, N.; Champion, D. E.; Grant, G.

    2008-12-01

    Over the last 2 Ma, at least six lava flows entered the canyon of the Owyhee River in southeastern Oregon, dramatically and repeatedly altering the river's course and profile. A combination of geochronologic, geochemical, and paleomagnetic analyses accompanied by extensive field mapping shows that these lava flows erupted from upland vents 10s of km from the river, entered the canyon via tributary or rim, and formed blockages sufficient to create lakes. Thick deltas of pillow lavas and rising passage zones in the head of the dams and subaerial lavas downstream of the dam indicate effective damming. The presence of fine grained laminated sediments deposited in the lakes suggests the dams were fairly long lived. Pending OSL dates and ongoing field study of these sediments will shed light on the nature and duration of dam construction and removal. Lava-water interaction during dam construction was extensive, and thick pillow lava deltas are common. In contrast to rivers in other locations, we did not find evidence of pyroclastics such as cinders associated with the dams. The three oldest intracanyon lava flows: the lower undivided Bogus lavas (>1.92 ± 0.22 Ma), the Bogus Rim (1.92 ± 0.22 Ma), and the Greeley Bar lavas (>780 ka), all record the filling of a wide, deep canyon, damming of the Owyhee River, and creation of extensive lakes at elevations 230 to 310 m above the modern river. The three younger lava flows, the Clarks Butte (248 ± 45 ka), the Saddle Butte (~125 ka), and the West Crater (60-90 ka), record the occurrence of similar events but in a narrower, deeper canyon similar to the modern one. Overall, this array of late Cenozoic intracanyon lava flows provides key insights into the long-term incision history of the canyon, possibly including the effect of integration with the Snake River, and supports a model of long-term, regional landscape evolution that is strongly linked to lava-water interactions.

  5. Satellite Measurements of Lava Extrusion Rate at Volcán Reventador, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, D. W. D.; Biggs, J.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Vallejo Vargas, S.; Naranjo, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    The extrusion rate of lava at active volcanoes provides a principle control on the style of eruptive behavior and the extent of lava flows, while also providing information about magma supply to the volcano. Measurements of extrusion rate at active volcanoes are therefore important for assessing hazard, and improving understanding of volcanic systems. Volcán Reventador is an asymmetric stratovolcano in the Cordillera Real of Ecuador. The largest historically observed eruption at Reventador in 2002 has been followed by several periods of eruptive activity. Eruptions are characterised by effusion of andesitic to basaltic-andesitic lava flows, and Vulcanian explosions. The ongoing eruption at Reventador therefor provides an excellent target for investigating the link between effusion rate, explosivity, and lava flow behaviour. Satellite InSAR provides regular observations of the volcano, even during night or periods of cloud cover. We use a dataset of Radarsat-2 and TanDEM-X imagery, with intervals of 11 to 192 days, over the period 2011 to 2014 to measure the extent, thickness and volume of new lava flows at Reventador. We use radar amplitude and inteferometric coherence to map 25 individual lava flows, as well as pyroclastic deposits and changes in lava dome morphology. We observe 43 Mm3 of deposits over a three year period, giving an average effusion rate of 0.5 m3s-1. We do not observe any ground deformation due to magmatic sources at Reventador, therefore variations in lava effusion rate can be interpreted as changes in the magma supply to the volcano. We investigate the link between variations in effusion rate and the length, area, thickness, and aspect ratio of lava flows, and the explosive-effusive transition. We also characterise the relationship between lava flow age, thickness, and subsidence rate.

  6. Utility of Lava Tubes on Other Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walden, Bryce E.; Billings, T. L.; York, Cheryl Lynn; Gillett, S. L.; Herbert, M. V.

    1998-01-01

    On Mars, as on Earth, lava tubes are found in the extensive lava fields associated with shield volcanism. Lunar lava-tube traces are located near mare-highland boundaries, giving access to a variety of minerals and other resources, including steep slopes, prominent heights for local area communications and observation, large-surface areas in shade, and abundant basalt plains suitable for landing sites, mass-drivers, surface transportation, regolith harvesting, and other uses. Methods for detecting lava tubes include visual observations of collapse trenches and skylights, ground-penetrating radar, gravimetry, magnetometry, seismography, atmospheric effects, laser, lidar, infrared, and human or robotic exploration.

  7. The explosive origin of obsidian lava (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, J. M.; Bindeman, I. N.; Tuffen, H.; Schipper, C.

    2013-12-01

    melt (higher D/H) deeper in the conduit fluxed through the tuffisite veins. The D/H ratios and bulk H2O contents of bomb glasses define a continuous array that terminates in the lavas at D/H of about -145 ‰ and <0.2 wt.% H2O. This degassing trend is well fit by a mixed closed-and-open system process, whereby 'batches' of exsolved vapour are repetitively formed and rapidly extracted in explosive pulses. The episodic and frequent release of gas from fragmental magma domains in otherwise coherently rising magma is shown to be time effective and consistent with observed timelines of explosive-effusive activity at Chaitén and Cordón Caulle.

  8. Decreased glutathione S-transferase expression and activity and altered sex steroids in Lake Apopka brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallagher, E.P.; Gross, T.S.; Sheehy, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    A number of freshwater lakes and reclaimed agricultural sites in Central Florida have been the receiving waters for agrochemical and municipal runoff. One of these sites, Lake Apopka, is also a eutrophic system that has been the focus of several case studies reporting altered reproductive activity linked to bioaccumulation of persistent organochlorine chemicals in aquatic species. The present study was initiated to determine if brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus) from the north marsh of Lake Apopka (Lake Apopka Marsh) exhibit an altered capacity to detoxify environmental chemicals through hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated conjugation as compared with bullheads from a nearby reference site (Lake Woodruff). We also compared plasma sex hormone concentrations (testosterone, 17-?? estradiol, and 11 keto-testosterone) in bullheads from the two sites. Female bullheads from Lake Apopka had 40% lower initial rate GST conjugative activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 50% lower activity towards p-nitrobutyl chloride (NBC), 33% lower activity toward ethacrynic acid (ECA), and 43% lower activity toward ??5-androstene-3,17-dione (??5-ADI), as compared with female bullheads from Lake Woodruff. Enzyme kinetic analyses demonstrated that female bullheads from Lake Apopka had lower GST-catalyzed CDNB clearance than did female Lake Woodruff bullheads. Western blotting studies of bullhead liver cytosolic proteins demonstrated that the reduced GST catalytic activities in female Lake Apopka bullheads were accompanied by lower expression of hepatic GST protein. No site differences were observed with respect to GST activities or GST protein expression in male bullheads. Female Lake Apopka bullheads also had elevated concentrations of plasma androgens (testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone) as compared with females from Lake Woodruff. In contrast, male Lake Apopka bullheads had elevated levels of plasma estrogen but similar levels of androgens as compared with

  9. Temperature and Structure of Active Eruptions from a Handheld Camcorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, Jani; Carling, Greg T.; Saito, Takeshi; Dangerfield, Anne; Tingey, David G.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Lopes, Rosaly M.; Howell, Robert R.; Diniega, Serina; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2014-11-01

    A commercial handheld digital camcorder can operate as a high-resolution, short-wavelength, low-cost thermal imaging system for monitoring active volcanoes, when calibrated against a laboratory heated rock of similar composition to the given eruptive material. We utilize this system to find full pixel brightness temperatures on centimeter scales at close but safe proximity to active lava flows. With it, observed temperatures of a Kilauea tube flow exposed in a skylight reached 1200 C, compared with pyrometer measurements of the same flow of 1165 C, both similar to reported eruption temperatures at that volcano. The lava lake at Erta Ale, Ethiopia had crack and fountain temperatures of 1175 C compared with previous pyrometer measurements of 1165 C. Temperature calibration of the vigorously active Marum lava lake in Vanuatu is underway, challenges being excessive levels of gas and distance from the eruption (300 m). Other aspects of the fine-scale structure of the eruptions are visible in the high-resolution temperature maps, such as flow banding within tubes, the thermal gradient away from cracks in lake surfaces, heat pathways through pahoehoe crust and temperature zoning in spatter and fountains. High-resolution measurements such as these reveal details of temperature, structure, and change over time at the rapidly evolving settings of active lava flows. These measurement capabilities are desirable for future instruments exploring bodies with active eruptions like Io, Enceladus and possibly Venus.

  10. Highly Active Microbial Communities in the Ice and Snow Cover of High Mountain Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Felip, M.; Sattler, B.; Psenner, R.; Catalan, J.

    1995-01-01

    An exploratory study carried out in Pyrenean and Alpine lakes shows that a rich, active microbial community lives in the slush layers of the winter cover of such lakes in spite of the low temperature and the seasonal occurrence of the habitat. Bacteria were very diverse in morphology, with filaments reaching up to 100 (mu)m long; flagellates, both autotrophic (chrysophytes, cryptophytes, dinoflagellates, and volvocales) and heterotrophic, and ciliates were abundant, reaching biovolume values up to 2.7 x 10(sup6) (mu)m(sup3) ml(sup-1). Species composition was very variable, with dominance depending on date and depth. Although many species were typical of lake plankton communities, some were restricted to the slush, for instance the predatory ciliates Dileptus sp. and Lacrymaria sp., and others were restricted to the surface pools, such as the snow algae Chlamydomonas nivalis. Microbial biomasses and usually bacterial and algal activities were greater in the slush layers than in the lake water. Photosynthesis rate in the upper cover layers reached values up to 0.5 (mu)g of C liter(sup-1) h(sup-1), and high bacterial activities up to 226 pmol of leucine incorporated liter(sup-1) h(sup-1) and 25 pmol of thymidine incorporated liter(sup-1) h(sup-1) were measured. For most species, lake water flooding the ice and snow cover could provide an inoculum. Differential growth depending on the environmental conditions (nutrients, organic matter, light) of a particular slush layer could provide dominance of different groups or species. However, there was no obvious colonizing mechanism for those species not appearing either in plankton or in communities on top of the snowpack. PMID:16535056

  11. Highly active microbial communities in the ice and snow cover of high mountain lakes.

    PubMed

    Felip, M; Sattler, B; Psenner, R; Catalan, J

    1995-06-01

    An exploratory study carried out in Pyrenean and Alpine lakes shows that a rich, active microbial community lives in the slush layers of the winter cover of such lakes in spite of the low temperature and the seasonal occurrence of the habitat. Bacteria were very diverse in morphology, with filaments reaching up to 100 (mu)m long; flagellates, both autotrophic (chrysophytes, cryptophytes, dinoflagellates, and volvocales) and heterotrophic, and ciliates were abundant, reaching biovolume values up to 2.7 x 10(sup6) (mu)m(sup3) ml(sup-1). Species composition was very variable, with dominance depending on date and depth. Although many species were typical of lake plankton communities, some were restricted to the slush, for instance the predatory ciliates Dileptus sp. and Lacrymaria sp., and others were restricted to the surface pools, such as the snow algae Chlamydomonas nivalis. Microbial biomasses and usually bacterial and algal activities were greater in the slush layers than in the lake water. Photosynthesis rate in the upper cover layers reached values up to 0.5 (mu)g of C liter(sup-1) h(sup-1), and high bacterial activities up to 226 pmol of leucine incorporated liter(sup-1) h(sup-1) and 25 pmol of thymidine incorporated liter(sup-1) h(sup-1) were measured. For most species, lake water flooding the ice and snow cover could provide an inoculum. Differential growth depending on the environmental conditions (nutrients, organic matter, light) of a particular slush layer could provide dominance of different groups or species. However, there was no obvious colonizing mechanism for those species not appearing either in plankton or in communities on top of the snowpack. PMID:16535056

  12. Raman spectroscopy of volcanic lavas and inclusions of relevance to astrobiological exploration.

    PubMed

    Jorge-Villar, Susana E; Edwards, Howell G M

    2010-07-13

    Volcanic eruptions and lava flows comprise one of the most highly stressed terrestrial environments for the survival of biological organisms; the destruction of botanical and biological colonies by molten lava, pyroclastic flows, lahars, poisonous gas emissions and the deposition of highly toxic materials from fumaroles is the normal expectation from such events. However, the role of lichens and cyanobacteria in the earlier colonization of volcanic lava outcrops has now been recognized. In this paper, we build upon earlier Raman spectroscopic studies on extremophilic colonies in old lava flows to assess the potential of finding evidence of biological colonization in more recent lava deposits that would inform, first, the new colonization of these rocks and also provide evidence for the relict presence of biological colonies that existed before the volcanism occurred and were engulfed by the lava. In this research, samples were collected from a recent expedition to the active volcano at Kilauea, Hawaii, which comprises very recent lava flows, active fumaroles and volcanic rocks that had broken through to the ocean and had engulfed a coral reef. The Raman spectra indicated that biological and geobiological signatures could be identified in the presence of geological matrices, which is encouraging for the planned exploration of Mars, where it is believed that there is evidence of an active volcanism that perhaps could have preserved traces of biological activity that once existed on the planet's surface, especially in sites near the old Martian oceans. PMID:20529949

  13. Results from NICLAKES Survey of Active Faulting Beneath Lake Managua,Central American Volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, K.; Funk, J.; Mann, P.; Perez, P.; Strauch, W.

    2006-12-01

    Lake Managua covers an area of 1,035 km2 of the Central American volcanic arc and is enclosed by three major stratovolcanoes: Momotombo to the northwest was last active in AD 1905, Apoyeque in the center on the Chiltepe Peninsula was last active ca. 4600 years BP, and Masaya to the southeast was last active in AD 2003. A much smaller volcano in the lake (Momotombito) is thought to have been active <4500 yrs B.P. In May of 2006, we used a chartered barge to collect 330 km of 3.5 kHz profiler data along with coincident 274 km of sidescan sonar and 27 km of seismic reflection data. These data identify three zones of faulting on the lake floor: 1) A zone of north-northeast-striking faults in the shallow (2.5-7.5 m deep) eastern part of the lake that extends from the capital city of Managua, which was severely damaged by shallow, left-lateral strike-slip displacements on two of these faults in 1931 (M 5.6) and 1972 (M 6.2): these faults exhibit a horst and graben character and include possible offsets on drowned river valleys 2) a semicircular rift zone that is 1 km wide and can be traced over a distance of 30 km in the central part of the lake; the rift structure defines the deepest parts of the lake ranging from 12 to 18 m deep and is concentric about the Apoyeque stratocone/Chiltepe Peninsula; and 3) a zone of fault scarps defining the northwestern lake shore that may correlate to the northwestern extension of the Mateare fault zone, a major scarp-forming fault that separates the Managua lowlands from the highlands south and west of the city. Following previous workers, we interpret the northeast- trending group of faults in the eastern part of the lake as part of a 15-km-long discontinuity where the trend of the volcanic arc is offset in a right-lateral sense. The semi-circular pattern of the rift zone that is centered on Chiltepe Peninsula appears to have formed as a distal effect of either magma intrusion or withdrawal from beneath this volcanic complex. The

  14. Algal and Bacterial Activities in Acidic (pH 3) Strip Mine Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Gyure, Ruth A.; Konopka, Allan; Brooks, Austin; Doemel, William

    1987-01-01

    Reservoir 29 and Lake B are extremely acid lakes (epilimnion pHs of 2.7 and 3.2, respectively), because they receive acidic discharges from coal refuse piles. They differ in that the pH of profundal sediments in Reservoir 29 increased from 2.7 to 3.8 during the period of thermal stratification, whereas permanently anoxic sediments in Lake B had a pH of 6.2. The pH rise in Reservoir 29 sediments was correlated with a temporal increase in H2S concentration in the anaerobic hypolimnion from 0 to >1 mM. The chlorophyll a levels in the epilimnion of Reservoir 29 were low, and the rate of primary production was typical of an oligotrophic system. However, there was a dense 10-cm layer of algal biomass at the bottom of the metalimnion. Production by this layer was low owing to light limitation and possibly H2S toxicity. The specific photosynthetic rates of epilimnetic algae were low, which suggests that nutrient availability is more important than pH in limiting production. The highest photosynthetic rates were obtained in water samples incubated at pH 2.7 to 4. Heterotrophic bacterial activity (measured by [14C]glucose metabolism) was greatest at the sediment/water interface. Bacterial production (assayed by thymidine incorporation) was as high in Reservoir 29 as in a nonacid mesotrophic Indiana lake. PMID:16347430

  15. Accumulation of fossil fuels and metallic minerals in active and ancient rift lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, E.I.

    1983-01-01

    A study of active and ancient rift systems around the world suggests that accumulations of fossil fuels and metallic minerals are related to the interactions of processes that form rift valleys with those that take place in and around rift lakes. The deposition of the precursors of petroleum, gas, oil shale, coal, phosphate, barite, Cu-Pb-Zn sulfides, and uranium begins with erosion of uplifted areas, and the consequent input of abundant nutrients and solute loads into swamps and tectonic lakes. Hot springs and volcanism add other nutrients and solutes. The resulting high biological productivity creates oxidized/reduced interfaces, and anoxic and H2S-rich bottom waters which preserves metal-bearing organic tissues and horizons. In the depositional phases, the fine-grained lake deposits are in contact with coarse-grained beach, delta, river, talus, and alluvial fan deposits. Earthquake-induced turbidites also are common coarse-grained deposits of rift lakes. Postdepositional processes in rifts include high heat flow and a resulting concentration of the organic and metallic components that were dispersed throughout the lakebeds. Postdepositional faulting brings organic- and metal-rich sourcebeds in contact with coarse-grained host and reservoir rocks. A suite of potentially economic deposits is therefore a characteristic of rift valleys. ?? 1983.

  16. Mount St. Helens Lava Domes, Then and Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, J.; Anderson, S. W.

    2004-12-01

    When the Mount St. Helens (MSH) lava dome grew from 1980-1986, little was known about how volatiles, vesicularity or crystallinity were distributed in domes, or about overall patterns of growth. Six years of MSH observations, coupled with comparative petrologic, structural, and analog laboratory studies of domes at Soufriere of St. Vincent, Augustine, Redoubt, Merapi, Montserrat, Santiaguito, and elsewhere have provided a much better foundation for evaluating the 2004 eruptive activity. One of the main goals of the earlier studies was to differentiate intrusive processes from those operating when magma ascends near and onto the volcano's surface. Here we use some of our earlier isotopic, petrographic and remote sensing observations of textures and volatiles to speculate about the processes operating in 2004. We earlier linked variations in lava textures to degassing processes operating during ascent and emplacement. MSH lava was extruded in a relatively dense state. When the water content was high enough, hot, ductile lava beneath the quenched outer rind of the dome vesiculated during surface flow, creating a 1 to 2 meter thick scoriaceous carapace. Post-1983 lavas lacked this scoria because the dome had reached a critical size and strength, resulting in lower short-term eruption rates and extensive degassing of lava en route to the surface. Observations of a dense "fin" in October 2004 suggest that this initial dome-building magma experienced thorough degassing as it broke a new path to the crater floor. We also used hydrogen isotope analyses of water in 1980-86 dome samples to infer degassing processes occurring in the source magma chamber and conduit system. Water content and hydrogen isotopic values of dome samples varied according to texture, position on the flow, and repose period prior to eruption. We saw two trends: (1) lava from lobes emplaced after longer repose intervals were deuterium-enriched, and (2) within individual lobes, relatively dry, smooth

  17. Experimental Insights on Natural Lava-Ice/Snow Interactions and Their Implications for Glaciovolcanic and Submarine Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, B. R.; Karson, J.; Wysocki, R.; Lev, E.; Bindeman, I. N.; Kueppers, U.

    2012-12-01

    Lava-ice-snow interactions have recently gained global attention through the eruptions of ice-covered volcanoes, particularly from Eyjafjallajokull in south-central Iceland, with dramatic effects on local communities and global air travel. However, as with most submarine eruptions, direct observations of lava-ice/snow interactions are rare. Only a few hundred potentially active volcanoes are presently ice-covered, these volcanoes are generally in remote places, and their associated hazards make close observation and measurements dangerous. Here we report the results of the first large-scale experiments designed to provide new constraints on natural interactions between lava and ice/snow. The experiments comprised controlled effusion of tens of kilograms of melted basalt on top of ice/snow, and provide insights about observations from natural lava-ice-snow interactions including new constraints for: 1) rapid lava advance along the ice-lava interface; 2) rapid downwards melting of lava flows through ice; 3) lava flow exploitation of pre-existing discontinuities to travel laterally beneath and within ice; and 4) formation of abundant limu o Pele and non-explosive vapor transport from the base to the top of the lava flow with minor O isotope exchange. The experiments are consistent with observations from eruptions showing that lava is more efficient at melting ice when emplaced on top of the ice as opposed to beneath the ice, as well as the efficacy of tephra cover for slowing melting. The experimental extrusion rates are as within the range of those for submarine eruptions as well, and reproduce some features seen in submarine eruptions including voluminous production of gas rich cavities within initially anhydrous lavas and limu on lava surfaces. Our initial results raise questions about the possibility of secondary ingestion of water by submarine and glaciovolcanic lava flows, and the origins of apparent primary gas cavities in those flows. Basaltic melt moving down

  18. On the relationship between age of lava flows and radar backscattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, R. G.; Cooley, P.; Schenck, L. R.

    1986-01-01

    The observation that older lava flows have lower backscatter in radar images is assessed with multiwavelength/polarization scatterometer data with incidence angles from 15 to 50 deg. Backscatter decreases over time because surface roughness decreases due to infilling with dust and mechanical weathering of the rocks. Pahoehoe lavas in the Snake River Plain with ages of 2.1, 7,4, and 12.0 K yr are best separated with 2.25 cm wavelength data. Blocky obsidian flows at Medicine Lake Highland and Newberry Volcano with ages of 0.9, 1.1 and 1.4 K yr are best separated with 6.3 cm wavelength data. Two Pleistocene flows at the Snake River Plain are best separated with 19.0 cm wavelength data. Incidence angles from 20 to 35 deg are best. These data indicate it may be possible to separate lava flows into eruptive periods using calibrated multiwavelength radar backscatter data.

  19. Microbial diversity and activity in seafloor brine lake sediments (Alaminos Canyon block 601, Gulf of Mexico).

    PubMed

    Crespo-Medina, M; Bowles, M W; Samarkin, V A; Hunter, K S; Joye, S B

    2016-09-01

    The microbial communities thriving in deep-sea brines are sustained largely by energy rich substrates supplied through active seepage. Geochemical, microbial activity, and microbial community composition data from different habitats at a Gulf of Mexico brine lake in Alaminos Canyon revealed habitat-linked variability in geochemistry that in turn drove patterns in microbial community composition and activity. The bottom of the brine lake was the most geochemically extreme (highest salinity and nutrient concentrations) habitat and its microbial community exhibited the highest diversity and richness indices. The habitat at the upper halocline of the lake hosted the highest rates of sulfate reduction and methane oxidation, and the largest inventories of dissolved inorganic carbon, particulate organic carbon, and hydrogen sulfide. Statistical analyses indicated a significant positive correlation between the bacterial and archaeal diversity in the bottom brine sample and NH4+ inventories. Other environmental factors with positive correlation with microbial diversity indices were DOC, H2 S, and DIC concentrations. The geochemical regime of different sites within this deep seafloor extreme environment exerts a clear selective force on microbial communities and on patterns of microbial activity. PMID:27444236

  20. BOOST H2O - Field Training Activities for Hydrologic Science near Lake Iznik, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derin, Y.; Hatipoglu, E.; Sunnetci, M. O.; Tanyas, H.; Unal Ercan, H.; Aktuna, Z.; Agouridis, C.; Fryar, A. E.; Milewski, A.; Schroeder, P.; Ece, O. I.; Yilmaz, K. K.

    2013-12-01

    Field activities are often the best pedagogy for reinforcing principles learned in the classroom. As part of the 'Building Opportunity Out of Science and Technology: Helping Hydrologic Outreach (BOOST H2O)' project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of State, six graduate students from three Turkish universities, four U.S. professors, and two Turkish professors participated in a week of training activities during May-June 2013. Field activities took place in the Lake Iznik region in western Turkey. The lake basin is geologically complex, with fault-controlled hydrogeology, and land use is dominated by agriculture, particularly olive cultivation. Professors trained the students (four females and two males) on concepts and techniques in surface-water and groundwater hydrology, water quality, and related computer software. Activities included stream gauging (using top-setting rods and a current meter), geomorphic assessment of streams (slope, cross-sections, and bed-clast size), measuring depth to water in wells, and collection of water samples from springs, wells, and the lake. Measurements of pH, temperature, electrical conductivity, and alkalinity were performed along with sampling for stable isotope (oxygen and hydrogen) analysis. The students visited local villages, farms, surface-water intakes, and recreational springs for a holistic approach towards integrated water resource management. Results were discussed in the context of lithology, tectonics, land use, and other human impacts.

  1. Propagation style controls lava-snow interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, B. R.; Belousov, A.; Belousova, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding interactions between volcanic eruptions and the cryosphere (a.k.a. glaciovolcanism) is important for climate reconstructions as well as for hazard mitigation at ice-clad volcanoes. Here we present unique field observations of interactions between snowpack and advancing basaltic lava flows during the 2012-13 eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Our observations show that lava-snow heat transfer is slow, and that styles of lava propagation control snowpack responses. ‧A‧a and sheet lava flows advance in a rolling caterpillar-track motion on top of the rigid, snowpack substrate with minor lava-snow interaction. In contrast, pahoehoe lava propagates by inflation of lobes beneath/inside the snowpack, producing rigorous lava-snow interaction via meltwater percolation down into the incandescent lava causing production of voluminous steam, rapid surface cooling and thermal shock fragmentation. The textures produced by pahoehoe-snowpack interactions are distinctive and, where observed at other sites, can be used to infer syn-eruption seasonality and climatic conditions.

  2. Propagation style controls lava-snow interactions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, B R; Belousov, A; Belousova, M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding interactions between volcanic eruptions and the cryosphere (a.k.a. glaciovolcanism) is important for climate reconstructions as well as for hazard mitigation at ice-clad volcanoes. Here we present unique field observations of interactions between snowpack and advancing basaltic lava flows during the 2012-13 eruption at Tolbachik volcano, Kamchatka, Russia. Our observations show that lava-snow heat transfer is slow, and that styles of lava propagation control snowpack responses. 'A'a and sheet lava flows advance in a rolling caterpillar-track motion on top of the rigid, snowpack substrate with minor lava-snow interaction. In contrast, pahoehoe lava propagates by inflation of lobes beneath/inside the snowpack, producing rigorous lava-snow interaction via meltwater percolation down into the incandescent lava causing production of voluminous steam, rapid surface cooling and thermal shock fragmentation. The textures produced by pahoehoe-snowpack interactions are distinctive and, where observed at other sites, can be used to infer syn-eruption seasonality and climatic conditions. PMID:25514031

  3. Emplacement of the final lava dome of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Katharine F.; Anderson, Steven W.; Diefenbach, Angela K.; Wessels, Rick L.; Henton, Sarah M.

    2013-06-01

    After more than 8 months of precursory activity and over 20 explosions in 12 days, Redoubt Volcano, Alaska began to extrude the fourth and final lava dome of the 2009 eruption on April 4. By July 1 the dome had filled the pre-2009 summit crater and ceased to grow. By means of analysis and annotations of time-lapse webcam imagery, oblique-image photogrammetry techniques and capture and analysis of forward-looking infrared (FLIR) images, we tracked the volume, textural, effusive-style and temperature changes in near-real time over the entire growth period of the dome. The first month of growth (April 4-May 4) produced blocky intermediate- to high-silica andesite lava (59-62.3 wt.% SiO2) that initially formed a round dome, expanding by endogenous growth, breaking the surface crust in radial fractures and annealing them with warmer, fresh lava. On or around May 1, more finely fragmented and scoriaceous andesite lava (59.8-62.2 wt.% SiO2) began to appear at the top of the dome coincident with increased seismicity and gas emissions. The more scoriaceous lava spread radially over the dome surface, while the dome continued to expand from endogenous growth and blocky lava was exposed on the margins and south side of the dome. By mid-June the upper scoriaceous lava had covered 36% of the dome surface area. Vesicularity of the upper scoriaceous lava range from 55 to 66%, some of the highest vesicularity measurements recorded from a lava dome. We suggest that the stability of the final lava dome primarily resulted from sufficient fracturing and clearing of the conduit by preceding explosions that allowed efficient degassing of the magma during effusion. The dome was thus able to grow until it was large enough to exceed the magmastatic pressure in the chamber, effectively shutting off the eruption.

  4. Natural-Scale Lava Flow Experiments on Video: Variations with Temperature, Slope, and Effusion Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J. A.; Wysocki, R.; Edwards, B. R.; Lev, E.

    2013-12-01

    Investigations of active basaltic lava flows and analog materials show that flow dynamics and final flow morphology are strongly determined by the rapidly evolving rheology of the lava crust which constrains the downslope advance of the lava flow. The non-dimensional factor Ψ (ratio of the time scale of crust formation to advective heat loss) provides a useful means of comparing different flows. The key parameters that control Ψ include the melt viscosity, temperature, effusion rate, and slope. Experimental lava flows, up to several meters long created in the Syracuse University Lava Project permit these variables to be investigated independently and in combination in volume-limited flows (<450 kg, 0.5 m3). Video results show lava is very sensitive to relatively small variations in these variables under experimental conditions. For example, experiments 1.1 Ga Keewenan basalt from the Mid-Continent Rift and 200 Ma basalt from the Palisades Sill show very different flow rates and flow morphologies for meter-scale flows on dry sand slopes between 5° and 20°, with all other variables held constant. Similar differences result from varying the effusion rate (~10-4m3s-1) or temperature (1050°-1250°C) on a constant slope. In addition, videos document the development of a wide range of reproducible lava flow structures found in natural lava flows including folds, shear zones, lava tubes, inflated lobes, break-outs, and bubbles (limu o'Pele), that provide additional information on lava crust development. New, continuous flow (cooling-limited) experiments show downslope variations under constant flow conditions.

  5. Active shoreline of Ontario Lacus, Titan: A morphological study of the lake and its surroundings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wall, S.; Hayes, A.; Bristow, C.; Lorenz, R.; Stofan, E.; Lunine, J.; Le, Gall A.; Janssen, M.; Lopes, R.; Wye, L.; Soderblom, L.; Paillou, P.; Aharonson, O.; Zebker, H.; Farr, Tom; Mitri, G.; Kirk, R.; Mitchell, Ken; Notarnicola, C.; Casarano, D.; Ventura, B.

    2010-01-01

    Of more than 400 filled lakes now identified on Titan, the first and largest reported in the southern latitudes is Ontario Lacus, which is dark in both infrared and microwave. Here we describe recent observations including synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images by Cassini's radar instrument (??= 2 cm) and show morphological evidence for active material transport and erosion. Ontario Lacus lies in a shallow depression, with greater relief on the southwestern shore and a gently sloping, possibly wave-generated beach to the northeast. The lake has a closed internal drainage system fed by Earth-like rivers, deltas and alluvial fans. Evidence for active shoreline processes, including the wave-modified lakefront and deltaic deposition, indicates that Ontario is a dynamic feature undergoing typical terrestrial forms of littoral modification. Copyright ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Internal fabric development in complex lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Závada, Prokop; Kratinová, Zuzana; Kusbach, Vladimír; Schulmann, Karel

    2009-03-01

    Viscous lava extrusions were modeled using plaster of Paris with admixed magnetite dust which served as a tracer of the internal anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility fabric in model lava domes. Used analogue material showed pseudoplastic behavior and yield strength level proportional to increasing mixing ratio of plaster powder and water. A series of models ranging from simple gravity flows to complex lava domes showing combined endogenous and exogenous growth were created by intrusion of plaster into a sandbox. The similarity of model bodies is compared with natural lava domes on the basis of dynamic scaling analysis. Growth dynamics, exogenous growth and internal fabric development in natural lava domes is critically discussed using the experimental results.

  7. On siphons and sediments: A new model for draining active subglacial lakes in Antarctica informed with satellite radar and laser altimeter observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, S. P.; Fricker, H. A.; Siegfried, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    With the advent of repeat-pass satellite-based surface altimetry over much of Antarctica, approximately 130 new subglacial lakes have been discovered entirely from observations of surface uplift and subsidence; these are commonly referred to as "active lakes". In contrast to the ~160 lakes detected by radar sounding ("RES" lakes), which are typically in mountains bedrock terrain near the ice divide and static with residence times spanning millenia, active lakes are typically located in fast flowing ice streams far from the divides, and have short residence times. To understand how water transfers through active lake systems we have developed a new model based on earlier theoretical work and informed by lake-volume estimates inferred from of ice surface displacements detected by satellite radar and laser altimetry. We find that although the overall pattern of filling and drainage is similar to that for ice dammed lakes in alpine regions via channels thermally eroded into the ice that then creeps shut as water pressure declines, Antarctic lake drainage is better simulated by invoking a channel mechanically eroded into the underlying sediment. The necessity of an erodable deformable substrate to explain lake drainage suggests that the distribution of active lakes is an indicator for the presence of sediment. Furthermore the process of lake drainage appears quite sensitive to the composion and strength of the underlying till. We explore these possibilities by testing the model on subglacial lakes in both East and West Antarctica, including Recovery Glacier and MacAyeal Ice stream.

  8. Lava tubes from the Paraná-Etendeka Continental Flood Basalt Province: Morphology and importance to emplacement models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waichel, Breno L.; Tratz, Eliza B.; Pietrobelli, Gisele; Jerram, Dougal A.; Calixto, Geovane R.; Bacha, Rafael R.; Tomazzolli, Edison R.; da Silva, Wellington B.

    2013-12-01

    Lava tubes are a common feature in active volcanic areas around the world. They are related to pahoehoe and 'a'ā lava flow fields, that are predominantly basaltic, and form as the most efficient mechanism to transport lava in insulated fedder pathways. Continental Flood Basalt Provinces (CFBs) are thick volcanic sequences of predominantly basaltic lava flows and flow fields, which cover huge areas and are often related to continental breakup. The proposed emplacement model for CFB's is synonymous with the inflation processes observed in modern active flows. Although pahoehoe and 'a'ā lava flows are recognized in CFB's provinces, good examples of lava tubes, pipes or tube systems are rarely reported. Lava feeder systems (tube/pipes) are a common feature of modern pahoehoe flow systems so it would be expected to find good examples in CFB's provinces formed by the same emplacement processes. Here we describe the morphology of two lava tube systems discovered in the Paraná CFB Province in Southern Brazil. Comparisons are made with active systems and the importance of CFB lava tube systems, and their recognition in the rock record, are discussed in the context of the current emplacement model.

  9. Lake Geneva sediments: Archive for past environmental changes and human activity during the last 3000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, Katrina; Corella, Juan Pablo; Girardclos, Stéphanie

    2013-04-01

    Lake sediments are excellent archives of environmental changes in the watershed and provide high-resolution records of regional paleohydrological variability. Lake Geneva is the largest peri-alpine lake in western Europe, with a maximal water depth of 309 m. It is part of the Rhone river system and was formed during the Pleistocene by glacial erosion. Our study focuses on the deepest part of the lake basin, where sedimentation is mainly controlled by fluvial input from the Rhone and Dranse rivers. These two river systems are sensitive to regional climate variations in the alpine realm and to human activity that affect the discharge regime and sediment delivery to the lake. In Lake Geneva, high resolution seismic reflection profiles reveal two distinct units in the late Holocene sedimentation history. One unit (Unit 1) consists of a succession of five large lens-shaped seismic sub-units, characterized by transparent/chaotic seismic facies with irregular lower boundaries, interpreted as mass-movement deposits. These sub-units are interbedded within parallel, continuous, high-amplitude reflections, interpreted as the 'background' lake sediment. The second unit (Unit 2) consists of 5 m-thick 'background' seismic facies with parallel geometry. It displays alternating dm-thick chaotic/transparent and continuous, high amplitude reflections, which are interpreted as hemipelagic layers punctuated by turbidites. This turbidite layers, are interpreted as floods- and mass movement-related deposits. Four 7- to 12-m long sediment cores were retrieved with a modified Kullenberg system from the deepest part of Lake Geneva. The sedimentary sequence spans the last 3000 years. Magnetic susceptibility and density were measured by Geotek Multisensor Core Logger at 0.5 cm resolution. X-ray fluorescence was carried out using an Avaatech core scanner from the University of Barcelona at 1-cm resolution. This technique provides semi-quantitative information of the sediment elemental

  10. Establishing the geometry and nature of sediments trapped in either natural or artificial dam lakes in contrasted drainage basins from Western Europe (French Massif Central and Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapron, Emmanuel; Chassiot, Léo; Zouzou, Claude; Simonneau, Anaelle; Galop, Didier; Di Giovanni, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Lacustrine sedimentary archives from artificial dam lakes are poorly documented both in terms of basin fill geometries and dominating sedimentary processes. In order to better understand their sensitivities to regional environmental changes, we performed a similar multidisciplinary study of French natural and artificial dam lakes in contrasted drainage basins from the volcanic Massif Central (lakes Aydat and Crégut) and two granitic sectors of the northern Pyrenees (lakes Fourcat and Orédon). Our approach combined high-resolution sub bottom profiling (14 kHz and 4 kHz chirp) and a detailed study of sediment cores based on qualitative and quantitative analysis (radiographies, sediment physical and chemical properties) together with radionuclide and radiocarbon dates. In all cases either changes in land uses within the drainage basin or the flooding of natural lakes by dams and the production of hydroelectricity induced changes in sedimentation rates and modes. Human activities affecting either the catchment or the lake itself favored enhanced clastic sediment supply in the lake basins and/or higher and fluctuating lake levels. Subaquatic slopes failures are also identified in Lake Aydat formed by a lava flow 8.5 kYrs ago and in glacial lakes Crégut (Massif Central) and Orédon (Pyrenees) now used to produce hydroelectricity and suggest that lake level changes and ground accelerations during earthquakes can remobilize distinct sectors of the basin fills and not only deltaic environments.

  11. The effect of mayfly (Hexagenia spp.) burrowing activity on sediment oxygen demand in western Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, William J.; Soster, Frederick M.; Matisoff, Gerald; Schloesser, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies support the hypothesis that large numbers of infaunal burrow-irrigating organisms in the western basin of Lake Erie may increase significantly the sediment oxygen demand, thus enhancing the rate of hypolimnetic oxygen depletion. We conducted laboratory experiments to quantify burrow oxygen dynamics and increased oxygen demand resulting from burrow irrigation using two different year classes of Hexagenia spp. nymphs from western Lake Erie during summer, 2006. Using oxygen microelectrodes and hot film anemometry, we simultaneously determined oxygen concentrations and burrow water flow velocities. Burrow oxygen depletion rates ranged from 21.7 mg/nymph/mo for 15 mm nymphs at 23 °C to 240.7 mg/nymph/mo for 23 mm nymphs at 13 °C. Sealed microcosm experiments demonstrated that mayflies increase the rate of oxygen depletion by 2-5 times that of controls, depending on size of nymph and water temperature, with colder waters having greater impact. At natural population densities, nymph pumping activity increased total sediment oxygen demand 0.3-2.5 times compared to sediments with no mayflies and accounted for 22-71% of the total sediment oxygen demand. Extrapolating laboratory results to the natural system suggest that Hexagenia spp. populations may exert a significant control on oxygen depletion during intermittent stratification. This finding may help explain some of the fluctuations in Hexagenia spp. population densities in western Lake Erie and suggests that mayflies, by causing their own population collapse irrespective of other environmental conditions, may need longer term averages when used as a bio-indicator of the success of pollution-abatement programs in western Lake Erie and possibly throughout the Great Lakes.

  12. Geosphere-Biosphere Interactions in Bio-Activity Volcanic Lakes: Evidences from Hule and Rìo Cuarto (Costa Rica)

    PubMed Central

    Cabassi, Jacopo; Tassi, Franco; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara; Calabrese, Sergio; Rouwet, Dmitri; Chiodini, Giovanni; Marasco, Ramona; Chouaia, Bessem; Avino, Rosario; Vaselli, Orlando; Pecoraino, Giovannella; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Bicocchi, Gabriele; Caliro, Stefano; Ramirez, Carlos; Mora-Amador, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Hule and Río Cuarto are maar lakes located 11 and 18 km N of Poás volcano along a 27 km long fracture zone, in the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Both lakes are characterized by a stable thermic and chemical stratification and recently they were affected by fish killing events likely related to the uprising of deep anoxic waters to the surface caused by rollover phenomena. The vertical profiles of temperature, pH, redox potential, chemical and isotopic compositions of water and dissolved gases, as well as prokaryotic diversity estimated by DNA fingerprinting and massive 16S rRNA pyrosequencing along the water column of the two lakes, have highlighted that different bio-geochemical processes occur in these meromictic lakes. Although the two lakes host different bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic groups, water and gas chemistry in both lakes is controlled by the same prokaryotic functions, especially regarding the CO2-CH4 cycle. Addition of hydrothermal CO2 through the bottom of the lakes plays a fundamental priming role in developing a stable water stratification and fuelling anoxic bacterial and archaeal populations. Methanogens and methane oxidizers as well as autotrophic and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria responsible of organic carbon recycling resulted to be stratified with depth and strictly related to the chemical-physical conditions and availability of free oxygen, affecting both the CO2 and CH4 chemical concentrations and their isotopic compositions along the water column. Hule and Río Cuarto lakes were demonstrated to contain a CO2 (CH4, N2)-rich gas reservoir mainly controlled by the interactions occurring between geosphere and biosphere. Thus, we introduced the term of bio-activity volcanic lakes to distinguish these lakes, which have analogues worldwide (e.g. Kivu: D.R.C.-Rwanda; Albano, Monticchio and Averno: Italy; Pavin: France) from volcanic lakes only characterized by geogenic CO2 reservoir such as Nyos and Monoun (Cameroon). PMID

  13. Geosphere-biosphere interactions in bio-activity volcanic lakes: evidences from Hule and Rìo Cuarto (Costa Rica).

    PubMed

    Cabassi, Jacopo; Tassi, Franco; Mapelli, Francesca; Borin, Sara; Calabrese, Sergio; Rouwet, Dmitri; Chiodini, Giovanni; Marasco, Ramona; Chouaia, Bessem; Avino, Rosario; Vaselli, Orlando; Pecoraino, Giovannella; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Bicocchi, Gabriele; Caliro, Stefano; Ramirez, Carlos; Mora-Amador, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Hule and Río Cuarto are maar lakes located 11 and 18 km N of Poás volcano along a 27 km long fracture zone, in the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Both lakes are characterized by a stable thermic and chemical stratification and recently they were affected by fish killing events likely related to the uprising of deep anoxic waters to the surface caused by rollover phenomena. The vertical profiles of temperature, pH, redox potential, chemical and isotopic compositions of water and dissolved gases, as well as prokaryotic diversity estimated by DNA fingerprinting and massive 16S rRNA pyrosequencing along the water column of the two lakes, have highlighted that different bio-geochemical processes occur in these meromictic lakes. Although the two lakes host different bacterial and archaeal phylogenetic groups, water and gas chemistry in both lakes is controlled by the same prokaryotic functions, especially regarding the CO2-CH4 cycle. Addition of hydrothermal CO2 through the bottom of the lakes plays a fundamental priming role in developing a stable water stratification and fuelling anoxic bacterial and archaeal populations. Methanogens and methane oxidizers as well as autotrophic and heterotrophic aerobic bacteria responsible of organic carbon recycling resulted to be stratified with depth and strictly related to the chemical-physical conditions and availability of free oxygen, affecting both the CO2 and CH4 chemical concentrations and their isotopic compositions along the water column. Hule and Río Cuarto lakes were demonstrated to contain a CO2 (CH4, N2)-rich gas reservoir mainly controlled by the interactions occurring between geosphere and biosphere. Thus, we introduced the term of bio-activity volcanic lakes to distinguish these lakes, which have analogues worldwide (e.g. Kivu: D.R.C.-Rwanda; Albano, Monticchio and Averno: Italy; Pavin: France) from volcanic lakes only characterized by geogenic CO2 reservoir such as Nyos and Monoun (Cameroon). PMID

  14. Genesis of recent silicic magmatism in the Medicine Lake Highland, California - Evidence from cognate inclusions found at Little Glass Mountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertzman, S. A.; Williams, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Sparse, granular inclusions of early-formed minerals found within the Little Glass Mountain rhyolite flows in northern California are shown to provide a means of characterizing the physical conditions, at depth, beneath the Medicine Lake Highland during the latest phase of volcanic activity. Mineral compositions, in combination with thermodynamic calculations and experiments, suggest crystalization at a pressure of 5,200 bars within a 966-836 C temperature range; implying that mineral segregation and equilibration occurred at a depth of 15-18 km beneath the surface. In addition, mass balance calculations indicate that the Medicine Lake flow is a close approximation to the parental magma for the latest silicic lavas.

  15. Lava Flows near Pavonis Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 29 September 2003

    The Tharsis province of Mars was the main center of volcanism on the planet. This THEMIS visible image shows lava flows that appear to be originating from linear vents just east of Pavonis Mons, the middle of the three giant Tharsis volcanoes. A large volume of lava also appears to be flowing out of a smaller series of pits on the far eastern side of the image, towards the bottom.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 2.1, Longitude 253.1 East (106.9 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Lava Flows and Surface Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 17 November 2003

    The striking surface textures observed in this THEMIS image taken south of the volcano Arsia Mons are from different erupted lava flows. Many flows extend for several kilometers and are observed to crosscut previous existing flows. The variable surface textures could result from older and younger lava flows, differences in the composition and vessicularity of magma, or different degrees of weathering.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -20.4, Longitude 242.2 East (117.8 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Geochemical constraints on possible subduction components in lavas of Mayon and Taal Volcanoes, Southern Luzon, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castillo, P.R.; Newhall, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    Mayon is the most active volcano along the east margin of southern Luzon, Philippines. Petrographic and major element data indicate that Mayon has produced a basaltic to andesitic lava series by fractional crystallization and magma mixing. Trace element data indicate that the parental basalts came from a heterogeneous mantle source. The unmodified composition of the mantle wedge is similar to that beneath the Indian Ocean. To this mantle was added a subduction component consisting of melt from subducted pelagic sediment and aqueous fluid dehydrated from the subducted basaltic crust. Lavas from the highly active Taal Volcano on the west margin of southern Luzon are compositionally more variable than Mayon lavas. Taal lavas also originated from a mantle wedge metasomatized by aqueous fluid dehydrated from the subducted basaltic crust and melt plus fluid derived from the subducted terrigenous sediment. More sediment is involved in the generation of Taal lavas. Lead isotopes argue against crustal contamination. Some heterogeneity of the unmodified mantle wedge and differences in whether the sediment signature is transferred into the lava source through an aqueous fluid or melt phase are needed to explain the regional compositional variation of Philippine arc lavas. ?? Oxford University Press 2004; all rights reserved.

  18. Solidification and morphology of submarine lavas - A dependence on extrusion rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffiths, Ross W.; Fink, Jonathan H.

    1992-01-01

    The results of recent laboratory experiments with wax extruded beneath relatively cold water may be extrapolated to predict the surface morphology of submarine lavas as a function of the extrusion rate and melt viscosity. The experiments with solidifying wax indicated that the surface morphology was controlled by a single parameter, the ratio of the time taken for the surface to solidify, and a time scale for lateral flow. For submarine basalts a solution of the cooling problem (which is dominated by conduction in the lava but convective heat transfer in the water) and estimates of lava viscosities place this parameter within the empirically determined 'pillowing' regime over a wide range of extrusion rates. This results is consistent with the observation that pillow basalts are the most common products of submarine eruptions. Smoother surfaces corresponding to the various types of submarine sheet flows are predicted for sufficiently rapid extrusion of basaltic magma. Still higher eruption rates in regions of low topographic relief may produce submarine lava lakes. Minimum emplacement times can be calculated for submarine volcanic constructs of a single lava flow type.

  19. A Preliminary Study on Geological Structure and Seismological Activity in Fuxian Lake and Neighbouring Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jun; Lou, Ke

    2008-06-01

    The area around the Fuxian Lake is in the west branch of the Xiaojiang faulted zone, and is one of the regions with potential seismic activities. Destructive earthquakes with magnitudes larger than 5 (with intensity grade VI) happened in the region in history, and the region was affected many times by earthquakes with magnitudes larger than 6 occurring in neighbouring regions. From the analyses of geological structure of seismology and the characteristics of the seismic activities in recent years, the Fuxian Lake and the regions nearby are possible potential locations of epicenter for magnitude 7 to 7.5 earthquakes in the future. Therefore, according to the rules and regulations stipulated in "Anti Seismic and Natural Disaster Reduction Act", "Ordinance of Anti Seismic and Natural Disaster Reduction of Yuxi City", it is suggested that Yunnan Observatory should carry out evaluation of the seismic security in its construction of the Fuxian Lake Solar Observatory in accordance with the national technical standards decribed in "Technical Specifications for Evaluation of Seismic Security at Engineering Sites"

  20. Lava flow texture LiDAR signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whelley, P.; Garry, W. B.; Scheidt, S. P.; Irwin, R. P., III; Fox, J.; Bleacher, J. E.; Hamilton, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution point clouds and digital elevation models (DEMs) are used to investigate lava textures on the Big Island of Hawaii. An experienced geologist can distinguish fresh or degraded lava textures (e.g., blocky, a'a and pahoehoe) visually in the field. Lava texture depends significantly on eruption conditions, and it is therefore instructive, if accurately determined. In places where field investigations are prohibitive (e.g., Mercury, Venus, the Moon, Mars, Io and remote regions on Earth) lava texture must be assessed from remote sensing data. A reliable method for differentiating lava textures in remote sensing data remains elusive. We present preliminary results comparing properties of lava textures observed in airborne and terrestrial Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data. Airborne data, in this study, were collected in 2011 by Airborne 1 Corporation and have a ~1m point spacing. The authors collected the terrestrial data during a May 2014 field season. The terrestrial scans have a heterogeneous point density. Points close to the scanner are 1 mm apart while 200 m in the distance points are 10 cm apart. Both platforms offer advantages and disadvantages beyond the differences in scale. Terrestrial scans are a quantitative representation of what a geologist sees "on the ground". Airborne scans are a point of view routinely imaged by other remote sensing tools, and can therefore be quickly compared to complimentary data sets (e.g., spectral scans or image data). Preliminary results indicate that LiDAR-derived surface roughness, from both platforms, is useful for differentiating lava textures, but at different spatial scales. As all lava types are quite rough, it is not simply roughness that is the most advantageous parameter; rather patterns in surface roughness can be used to differentiate lava surfaces of varied textures. This work will lead to faster and more reliable volcanic mapping efforts for planetary exploration as well as terrestrial

  1. Reply. [To comment on 'Formation of Venusian canali: Considerations of lava types and their thermal behaviors' by T. K. P. Gregg and R. Greeley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Tracy K. P.; Greeley, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Treiman (this issue) argues that the melting temperature of carbonatite used by Gregg and Greeley (1993) is too low, and that values presented for other thermophysical properties for carbonatite lava are more appropriate for carbonatite rock. With the exception of the mechanical solidification temperature, values presented by Gregg and Greeley (1993) were taken directly, or calculated, from values presented within the works by Dawson et al. (1990) and Keller and Krafft (1990). Because a mechanical solidification temperature for carbonatite lavas was not presented in those works, we estimated one based on extrusion temperature, Venusian surface pressure, and the temperatures measured in cooling carbonatite lava lakes. We have reexamined values shown for properties of carbonatite lavas used by Gregg and Greeley (1993), and concur that Treiman's arguments (Treiman, this issue) are valid. Here, we present results of analyses described in Gregg and Greeley 1993, using values for the properties of carbonatite lavas obtained from Treiman and Schedl (1983) and Norton and Pinkerton (1990).

  2. A network of active subglacial lakes under Recovery Ice Stream from ICESat, IceBridge and image differencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricker, H. A.; Abdi, A.; Bell, R. E.; Carter, S. P.; Creyts, T. T.; Scambos, T.; Tinto, K. J.; Wolovick, M.

    2012-12-01

    We examine the tectonic setting and recent activity of a network of six large, active subglacial lakes under the main truck of Recovery Ice Stream, East Antarctica, first discovered in 2007 using ICESat data. During the ICESat mission (2003-2009), the four upstream lakes along the main trunk of the ice stream were observed to be draining while the lower lakes were predominately filling. In 2011, NASA's Operation IceBridge flew ice penetrating radio echo sounding (RES) data, gravity and laser altimetry along specific ICESat tracks, providing one more snapshot in time of elevation, and insights into the structure of the bedrock basin beneath the lakes. Other lines provide new constraints on the structure of the ice stream and bounding tectonics. The data show that the six lakes are separated into two distinct sections by a steep ice ridge - the ice thickness is 2500m over the lower section which contains two lakes, both at the edges of the deep bedrock basin, and 3000-3500m in the upper section. The bedrock has a upward-sloping bed along-flow in both sections. The four lakes in the upper section are smaller and closely connected hydrologically; the upstream lake in the lower section appears to be connected with the upper section. The lowermost lake (~200 km from the grounding line) has different characteristics to other active lakes examined throughout Antarctica; while its elevation change signature looks similar, it has a sharp change in surface elevation (~30m) in its centre, and it does not lie in a surface trough. The maximum elevation change coincides with a bedrock bump observed by RES. This lake underwent a large uniform surface elevation increase of ~8 m between 2003 and 2008, then a decrease of ~1m between 2008 and 2009, and there has been no detectable activity since. MODIS image differencing across this lake extends the surface changes beyond the ICESat spatial sampling and provides a more complete picture of surface deformation during the data gap.

  3. Active-source seismic imaging below Lake Malawi (Nyasa) from the SEGMeNT project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shillington, D. J.; Scholz, C. A.; Gaherty, J. B.; Accardo, N. J.; McCartney, T.; Chindandali, P. R. N.; Kamihanda, G.; Trinhammer, P.; Wood, D. A.; Khalfan, M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Nyblade, A.; Mbogoni, G. J.; Mruma, A. H.; Salima, J.; Ferdinand-Wambura, R.

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the controls on the initiation and development of magmatism and segmentation in young rift systems. The northern Lake Malawi (Nyasa) rift in the East African Rift System is an early stage rift exhibiting pronounced tectonic segmentation, which is defined in the upper crust by ~100-km-long border faults. Very little volcanism is associated with rifting; the only surface expression of magmatism occurs in an accommodation zone between segments to the north of the lake in the Rungwe Volcanic Province. The SEGMeNT (Study of Extension and maGmatism in Malawi aNd Tanzania) project is a multidisciplinary, multinational study that is acquiring a suite of geophysical, geological and geochemical data to characterize deformation and magmatism in the crust and mantle lithosphere along 2-3 segments of this rift. As a part of the SEGMeNT project, we acquired seismic reflection and refraction data in Lake Malawi (Nyasa) in March-April 2015. Over 2000 km of seismic reflection data were acquired with a 500 to 2580 cu in air gun array from GEUS/Aarhus and a 500- to 1500-m-long seismic streamer from Syracuse University over a grid of lines across and along the northern and central basins. Air gun shots from MCS profiles and 1000 km of additional shooting with large shot intervals were also recorded on 27 short-period and 6 broadband lake bottom seismometers from Scripps Oceanographic Institute as a part of the Ocean Bottom Seismic Instrument Pool (OBSIP) as well as the 55-station onshore seismic array. The OBS were deployed along one long strike line and two dip lines. We will present preliminary data and results from seismic reflection and refraction data acquired in the lake and their implications for crustal deformation within and between rift segments. Seismic reflection data image structures up to ~5-6 km below the lake bottom, including syntectonic sediments, intrabasinal faults and other complex horsts. Some intrabasinal faults in both the northern and

  4. Temporal Chemical Data for Sediment, Water, and Biological Samples from the Lava Cap Mine Superfund Site, Nevada County, California-2006-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Andrea L.; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Tufano, Kate; White, Richard III

    2010-01-01

    the possibility of future movement of tailings, and began an assessment of the risks posed by physical and chemical hazards at the site. The EPA's assessment identified arsenic (As) as the primary hazard of concern. Three main exposure routes were identified: inhalation/ingestion of mine tailings, dermal absorption/ingestion of As in lake water from swimming, and ingestion of As-contaminated ground water or surface water. Lost Lake is a private lake which is completely surrounded by low-density residential development. Prior to the dam failure, the lake was used by the local residents for swimming and boating. An estimated 1,776 people reside within one mile of the lake, and almost all residents of the area use potable groundwater for domestic use. Risk factors for human exposure to As derived from mine wastes were high enough to merit placement of the mine site and surrounding area on the National Priority List (commonly called ?Superfund?). The Lava Cap Mine Superfund site (LCMS) encompasses approximately 33 acres that include the mine site, the stretch of Little Clipper Creek between the mine and Lost Lake, the lake itself, and the area between the lake and the confluence of Little Clipper Creek with its parent stream, Clipper Creek. The area between the two creeks is named the ?deposition area? due to the estimated 24 m thick layer of tailings that were laid down there during and after active mining. The lobate structure of Lost Lake is also due to deposition in this area. The deposition area and Lost Lake are together estimated to contain 382,277 m3 of tailings. The primary goals of the EPA have been to minimize tailings movement downstream of Lost Lake and to ensure that residents in the area have drinking water that meets national water quality standards. EPA has officially decided to construct a public water supply line to deliver safe water to affected residences, since some residential wells in the area have As concentrations above the curr

  5. Crater Lake Revealed: Using GIS to Visualize and Analyze Postcaldera Volcanoes Beneath Crater Lake, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, D. W.; Robinson, J. E.; Dartnell, P.; Bacon, C. R.; Gardner, J. V.; Mayer, L. A.; Buktenica, M. W.

    2001-12-01

    formed at ~90, 250, and 480 years after the lake began to fill. Combining volume calculations determined with GIS and age information from the lake filling model, oldest to youngest Wizard Island minimum eruption rates are 8.4x106 m3/yr, 6.5x106 m3/yr, and 3.6x106 m3/yr. These are comparable to rates calculated for the central platform volcano using the same approach. The minimum eruption rate for the entire 4 km3 of postcaldera andesite erupted from ~90 to 480 years after caldera formation is 8.4x106 m3/yr, which is comparable to historic rates of lava effusion at arc volcanoes. The cessation of postcaldera volcanic activity at Crater Lake, ~4,900 years ago, is marked by subaqueous extrusion of a 0.074 km3 rhyodacite dome on the east flank of Wizard Island.\\J.V. Gardner et. al., 2001, USGS Water Resources Investigations Report 01-4046; http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/pacmaps\\M. Nathenson et. al., 2001, Models for the Filling of Crater Lake, Oregon (this meeting)

  6. Lava Flows in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 5, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image covering a portion of the Solis Planum region, southeast of the Tharsis volcanoes. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    Multiple layers of lava flows in this region show temperature differences, as well as some potential compositional differences. The temperature variations between these flows are likely caused by differences in their surface texture. The compositional variation could be due to differences in the make-up of the lava when it erupted onto the surface or might only reflect differences in the amount of dust covering these flows.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -30.1, Longitude 275.9 East (84.1 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is

  7. Evidence for Amazonian highly viscous lavas in the southern highlands on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brož, Petr; Hauber, Ernst; Platz, Thomas; Balme, Matt

    2015-04-01

    We have identified small-scale volcanic edifices, two cones and three domes with associated flows, within Terra Sirenum, a region situated in the martian southern highlands. Based on thermal, morphological, and morphometrical properties, and the determination of absolute model ages, we conclude that these features were formed by volcanic activity of viscous lavas in the mid-Amazonian epoch, relatively recently in martian history. If our hypothesis is correct, this small volcanic field represents rare evidence of young volcanic activity in the martian highlands in which martian equivalents of terrestrial lava domes and coulées might be present. On Earth, such landforms are usually formed by highly viscous evolved lavas, i.e., andesitic to rhyolitic, for which observational evidence is sparse on Mars. Hence, this field might be one of only a few where martian evolved lavas might be investigated in detail.

  8. EVOLUTION IN LAKE TAI ECOSYSTEMS AS A RESULT OF GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES AND HUMAN ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large lakes evolve continuously through interaction with the physical, chemical, and biological environments of the surrounding watershed and lakes. ecent evidence from Lake Tai shows global climate and sea level changes led to a major change in Lake Tai from brackish to a freshw...

  9. Identification of functionally active aerobic methanotrophs in sediments from an arctic lake using stable isotope probing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Catranis, Catharine; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Arctic lakes are a significant source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4), but the role that methane oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) play in limiting the overall CH4 flux is poorly understood. Here, we used stable isotope probing (SIP) techniques to identify the metabolically active aerobic methanotrophs in upper sediments (0–1 cm) from an arctic lake in northern Alaska sampled during ice-free summer conditions. The highest CH4 oxidation potential was observed in the upper sediment (0–1 cm depth) with 1.59 μmol g wet weight-1 day-1 compared with the deeper sediment samples (1–3 cm, 3–5 cm and 5–10 cm), which exhibited CH4 oxidation potentials below 0.4 μmol g wet weight-1 day-1. Both type I and type II methanotrophs were directly detected in the upper sediment total communities using targeted primer sets based on 16S rRNA genes. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and functional genes (pmoA and mxaF) in the 13C-DNA from the upper sediment indicated that type I methanotrophs, mainly Methylobacter, Methylosoma, Methylomonas and Methylovulum miyakonense, dominated the assimilation of CH4. Methylotrophs, including the genera Methylophilus and/or Methylotenera, were also abundant in the 13CDNA. Our results show that a diverse microbial consortium acquired carbon from CH4 in the sediments of this arctic lake.

  10. Geomagnetic polarity zones for icelandic lavas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dagley, P.; Wilson, R.L.; Ade-Hall, J. M.; Walker, G.P.L.; Haggerty, S.E.; Sigurgeirsson, T.; Watkins, N.D.; Smith, P.J.; Edwards, J.; Grasty, R.L.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of cores collected from a sequence of lavas in Eastern Iceland has made possible an accurate calculation of the average rate of reversal of the Earth's magnetic field. ?? 1967 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. Geomorphic Classification of Lava Flows on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieri, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The lava flows on Io are classified into the following categories: broad, filamental, digitate, intercalated, sheet, and contained. Each classification is described according to flow distribution, geomorphology, color, thickness, and source.

  12. Lunar lava tube radiation safety analysis.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Giovanni; Wilson, J W; Clowdsley, M S; Nealy, J E; Humes, D H; Clem, J M

    2002-12-01

    For many years it has been suggested that lava tubes on the Moon could provide an ideal location for a manned lunar base, by providing shelter from various natural hazards, such as cosmic radiation, meteorites, micrometeoroids, and impact crater ejecta, and also providing a natural environmental control, with a nearly constant temperature, unlike that of the lunar surface showing extreme variation in its diurnal cycle. An analysis of radiation safety issues on lunar lava tubes has been performed by considering radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) interacting with the lunar surface, modeled as a regolith layer and rock. The chemical composition has been chosen as typical of the lunar regions where the largest number of lava tube candidates are found. Particles have been transported all through the regolith and the rock, and received particles flux and doses have been calculated. The radiation safety of lunar lava tubes environments has been demonstrated. PMID:12793728

  13. Lava Tube Exploration Robot and Payload Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, H. S.; Parness, A. J.; Boston, P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Merging science and engineering from the ground up to co-develop a comprehensive instrument/robot package for exploration of and scientific data collection within lava tubes that target analog sites on the Moon and Mars.

  14. Lunar lava tube radiation safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Angelis, Giovanni; Wilson, J. W.; Clowdsley, M. S.; Nealy, J. E.; Humes, D. H.; Clem, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    For many years it has been suggested that lava tubes on the Moon could provide an ideal location for a manned lunar base, by providing shelter from various natural hazards, such as cosmic radiation, meteorites, micrometeoroids, and impact crater ejecta, and also providing a natural environmental control, with a nearly constant temperature, unlike that of the lunar surface showing extreme variation in its diurnal cycle. An analysis of radiation safety issues on lunar lava tubes has been performed by considering radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and Solar Particle Events (SPE) interacting with the lunar surface, modeled as a regolith layer and rock. The chemical composition has been chosen as typical of the lunar regions where the largest number of lava tube candidates are found. Particles have been transported all through the regolith and the rock, and received particles flux and doses have been calculated. The radiation safety of lunar lava tubes environments has been demonstrated.

  15. Taylor instability in rhyolite lava flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, B. A.; Krantz, W. B.; Fink, J. H.; Dickinson, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    A refined Taylor instability model is developed to describe the surface morphology of rhyolite lava flows. The effect of the downslope flow of the lava on the structures resulting from the Taylor instability mechanism is considered. Squire's (1933) transformation is developed for this flow in order to extend the results to three-dimensional modes. This permits assessing why ridges thought to arise from the Taylor instability mechanism are preferentially oriented transverse to the direction of lava flow. Measured diapir and ridge spacings for the Little and Big Glass Mountain rhyolite flows in northern California are used in conjunction with the model in order to explore the implications of the Taylor instability for flow emplacement. The model suggests additional lava flow features that can be measured in order to test whether the Taylor instability mechanism has influenced the flows surface morphology.

  16. Mysterious Lava Mineral on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This graph or spectrum captured by the Moessbauer spectrometer onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the presence of three different iron-bearing minerals in the soil at the rover's landing site. One of these minerals has been identified as olivine, a shiny green rock commonly found in lava on Earth. The other two have yet to be pinned down. Scientists were puzzled by the discovery of olivine because it implies the soil consists at least partially of ground up rocks that have not been weathered or chemically altered. The black line in this graph represents the original data; the three colored regions denote individual minerals and add up to equal the black line.

    The Moessbauer spectrometer uses two pieces of radioactive cobalt-57, each about the size of pencil erasers, to determine with a high degree of accuracy the composition and abundance of iron-bearing minerals in martian rocks and soil. It is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or 'arm.'

  17. Shifts in Identity and Activity of Methanotrophs in Arctic Lake Sediments in Response to Temperature Changes

    PubMed Central

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) flux to the atmosphere is mitigated via microbial CH4 oxidation in sediments and water. As arctic temperatures increase, understanding the effects of temperature on the activity and identity of methanotrophs in arctic lake sediments is important to predicting future CH4 emissions. We used DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), and pyrosequencing analyses to identify and characterize methanotrophic communities active at a range of temperatures (4°C, 10°C, and 21°C) in sediments (to a depth of 25 cm) sampled from Lake Qalluuraq on the North Slope of Alaska. CH4 oxidation activity was measured in microcosm incubations containing sediments at all temperatures, with the highest CH4 oxidation potential of 37.5 μmol g−1 day−1 in the uppermost (depth, 0 to 1 cm) sediment at 21°C after 2 to 5 days of incubation. Q-PCR of pmoA and of the 16S rRNA genes of type I and type II methanotrophs, and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes in 13C-labeled DNA obtained by SIP demonstrated that the type I methanotrophs Methylobacter, Methylomonas, and Methylosoma dominated carbon acquisition from CH4 in the sediments. The identity and relative abundance of active methanotrophs differed with the incubation temperature. Methylotrophs were also abundant in the microbial community that derived carbon from CH4, especially in the deeper sediments (depth, 15 to 20 cm) at low temperatures (4°C and 10°C), and showed a good linear relationship (R = 0.82) with the relative abundances of methanotrophs in pyrosequencing reads. This study describes for the first time how methanotrophic communities in arctic lake sediments respond to temperature variations. PMID:22522690

  18. A "GLIMPCE" of the deep crust beneath the Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Alan G.; Cannon, W. F.; Milkereit, B.; Hutchinson, D. R.; Davidson, A.; Behrendt, J. C.; Spencer, C.; Lee, M. W.; Morel-á-l'Huissier, P.; Agena, W. F.

    Approximately 1350 km of multichannel seismic reflection data and an equivalent amount of seismic refraction data have been collected across the North American Great Lakes. The seismic surveys, sponsored by the Great Lakes International Multidisciplinary Program on Crustal Evolution (GLIMPCE), were designed to resolve the deep crustal structure of the 1.89-1.82 Ga Penokean orogen, the 1.3-1.0 Ga Grenville orogen and the 1.11-1.09 Ga Mid-continent rift system. In north-central Lake Huron a band of gently east-dipping reflections at about 18-20 km depth separates a complex and highly reflective lower crustal layer from a markedly less reflective upper crustal layer. The lower layer is interpreted as attenuated crust of the Superior cratonic margin and the upper layer is assumed to be composed of continental margin deposits of the Huron supergroup, an exotic mass that collided with the cratonic margin during the Penokean orogeny, and younger granites and rhyolites. The intervening band of gently east-dipping reflections may delineate a master decollement zone, active during the Penokean orogeny. All structures in north-central Lake Huron are truncated abruptly at the western end of Georgian Bay by the Grenville Front, represented by the westernmost event of a spectacular series of moderately east-dipping reflections. These reflections, which extend from the surface to about 55 km depth, are interpreted as discontinuities between gneissic and migmatitic rocks of varying lithology. Where exposed in the Grenville front tectonic zone, the different rock units are commonly juxtaposed along mylonite zones with a northwest thrust sense. Moho may deepen by 5-10 km along a narrow region just southeast of the Grenville front. Seismic reflection data from Lake Superior reveal an extraordinary thickness of Keweenawan mafic lavas and sedimentary rocks deposited in a number of discrete grabens/half-grabens of the Midcontinent (Keweenawan) rift system. Total vertical thickness of

  19. Use of active barriers to reduce eutrophication problems in urban lakes.

    PubMed

    Hart, B; Roberts, S; James, R; Taylor, J; Donnert, D; Furrer, R

    2003-01-01

    Excessive concentration of phosphorus is one of the main causes of algal blooms and eutrophic conditions in lakes. In many urban lakes, it appears that a large proportion of the phosphorus in the water column comes from the sediments, particularly when these are anaerobic. Sub-aqueous capping is a relatively new method that has become an attractive option for isolating contaminated sediments from the environment, thus preventing or delaying the release of contaminants into surface waters. Active barrier materials (i.e. capping layers that consist of one or more reactive components) are gaining increasing attention for their greater efficiency in inactivating contaminants held in sediment layers. This paper reports laboratory bioreactor experiments to test the effectiveness of three forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in reducing the release of phosphorus from anaerobic sediment from Lake Carramar, a small urban lake in Melbourne. Two of the CaCO3 active barrier materials tested proved to be quite effective, the most effective materials being the fine particle size, precipitated forms of CaCO3. Over the 20-day experimental period, a 2% layer of the German material SoCal reduced the amount of phosphorus released by almost 100 times over that occurring with no barrier. The Australian product ESCal, while not as effective as the SoCal, still reduced the phosphorus released by around 15 times that with no barrier. A finely ground Lilydale limestone was essentially ineffective in reducing phosphorus release from the sediments. A preliminary cost-benefit analysis suggests that SoCal is unlikely to be attractive for use in Australia, given the estimated application cost of around 3,800 dollars per tonne. However, although the ESCal is slightly less effective in retaining phosphorus, its potential application cost estimated at 2,000 dollars per tonne, makes it an attractive option. On the basis of these most promising preliminary results, we intend to further test the use of

  20. Geochemical aspects of some Japanese lavas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpotts, J. A.; Martin, W.; Schnetzler, C. C.

    1971-01-01

    K, Rb, Sr, Ba and rare-earth concentrations in some Japanese lavas have been determined by mass-spectrometric stable-isotope dilution. The samples fall into three rare-earth groups corresponding to tholeiitic, high alumina and alkali basalts. Japanese tholeiites have trace element characteristics similar to those of oceanic ridge tholeiites except for distinctly higher relative concentrations of Ba. Japanese lavas may result from various degrees of partial fusion of amphibole eclogite.

  1. Assessment of relative tectonic activity in the Trichonis Lake graben (Western Greece) using geomorphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karymbalis, Efthimios; Valkanou, Kanella; Fubelli, Giandomenico; Ferentinou, Maria; Giles, Philip; Papanastassiou, Dimitris; Gaki-Papanastassiou, Kalliopi; Tsanakas, Konstantinos

    2016-04-01

    In tectonically active areas fluvial systems and mountain fronts are controlled by the type, geometry, and recent activity of faults. The aim of this study is to investigate the contribution of neotectonics to the development of the fluvial landscape of the broader Trichonis Lake area (located in western continental Greece) through quantitative geomorphological analysis. The Trichonis Lake graben is a well-known tectonic depression of Quaternary age, which cuts across the early Tertiary NW-SE fold and thrust structures of the Pindos Mountain belt. It strikes WNW-ESE for a distance of 32 km and has a width of 10 km. The graben at the north and south flanks of the lake is bounded by E-W and NW-SE trending faults. Recent seismic activity (a shallow earthquake sequence in 1975 and a 2007 earthquake swarm) showed the existence of a NNW-SSE normal fault that dips to the NE and bounds the south-eastern shore of the lake. The studied catchments are developed on the hanging walls of these active normal faults. To evaluate the relative tectonic activity in the study area, various morphometric indices were measured for 35 catchments (slope of the valley sides of the catchment, hypsometric integral, catchment asymmetry factor, relief ratio, Melton's ruggedness number, stream-gradient index, ratio of valley floor width to valley height, and catchment shape) and 20 mountain fronts (mountain-front sinuosity index) around the lake. For the measurement of the geomorphometric variables a digital elevation model (DEM) with 2-m spatial resolution was derived from topographic maps at 1:5000 scale with 4-m contour lines, and a series of maps showing the spatial distribution of the variables were produced in a GIS environment. For each morphometric variable the catchments were classified into three classes. The combination of these morphometric variables allowed us to yield two new indices of relative tectonic activity (named IRTA - Index of Relative Tectonic Activity and IAT - Index of

  2. Real-time satellite monitoring of Nornahraun lava flow NE Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Þórðarson, Þorvaldur; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Davis, Ashley; Schneider, David; Wright, Robert; Kestay, Laszlo; Hamilton, Christopher; Harris, Andrew; Coppola, Diego; Tumi Guðmundsson, Magnús; Durig, Tobias; Pedersen, Gro; Drouin, Vincent; Höskuldsson, Friðrik; Símonarson, Hreggviður; Örn Arnarson, Gunnar; Örn Einarsson, Magnús; Riishuus, Morten

    2015-04-01

    An effusive eruption started in Holuhraun, NE Iceland, on 31 August 2014, producing the Nornahraun lava flow field which had, by the beginning of 2015, covered over 83 km2. Throughout this event, various satellite images have been analyzed to monitor the development, active areas and map the lava extent in close collaboration with the field group, which involved regular exchange of direct observations and satellite based data for ground truthing and suggesting possible sites for lava sampling. From the beginning, satellite images in low geometric but high temporal resolution (NOAA AVHRR, MODIS) were used to monitor main regions of activity and position new vents to within 1km accuracy. As they became available, multispectral images in higher resolution (LANDSAT 8, LANDSAT 7, ASTER, EO-1 ALI) were used to map the lava channels, study lava structures and classify regions of varying activity. Hyper spectral sensors (EO-1 HYPERION), though with limited area coverage, have given a good indication of vent and lava temperature and effusion rates. All available radar imagery (SENTINEL-1, RADARSAT, COSMO SKYMED, TERRASAR X) have been used for studying lava extent, landscape and roughness. The Icelandic Coast Guard has, on a number of occasions, provided high resolution radar and thermal images from reconnaissance flights. These data sources compliment each other well and have improved analysis of events. Whilst classical TIR channels were utilized to map the temperature history of the lava, SWIR and NIR channels caught regions of highest temperature, allowing an estimate of the most active lava channels and even indicating potential changes in channel structure. Combining thermal images and radar images took this prediction a step further, improving interpretation of both image types and studying the difference between open and closed lava channels. Efforts are underway of comparing different methods of estimating magma discharge and improving the process for use in real

  3. Shifts in identity and activity of methanotrophs in arctic lake sediments in response to temperature changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) flux to the atmosphere is mitigated via microbial CH4 oxidation in sediments and water. As arctic temperaturesincrease, understanding the effects of temperature on the activity and identity of methanotrophs in arctic lake sediments is importantto predicting future CH4 emissions. We used DNA-based stable-isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), andpyrosequencing analyses to identify and characterize methanotrophic communities active at a range of temperatures (4°C, 10°C,and 21°C) in sediments (to a depth of 25 cm) sampled from Lake Qalluuraq on the North Slope of Alaska. CH4 oxidation activitywas measured in microcosm incubations containing sediments at all temperatures, with the highest CH4 oxidation potential of37.5 mol g1 day1 in the uppermost (depth, 0 to 1 cm) sediment at 21°C after 2 to 5 days of incubation. Q-PCR of pmoA and ofthe 16S rRNA genes of type I and type II methanotrophs, and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes in 13C-labeled DNA obtained bySIP demonstrated that the type I methanotrophs Methylobacter, Methylomonas, and Methylosoma dominated carbon acquisitionfrom CH4 in the sediments. The identity and relative abundance of active methanotrophs differed with the incubation temperature.Methylotrophs were also abundant in the microbial community that derived carbon from CH4, especially in the deeper sediments(depth, 15 to 20 cm) at low temperatures (4°C and 10°C), and showed a good linear relationship (R0.82) with the relativeabundances of methanotrophs in pyrosequencing reads. This study describes for the first time how methanotrophiccommunities in arctic lake sediments respond to temperature variations.

  4. Does human activity impact the natural antibiotic resistance background? Abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in 21 Swiss lakes.

    PubMed

    Czekalski, Nadine; Sigdel, Radhika; Birtel, Julia; Matthews, Blake; Bürgmann, Helmut

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are emerging environmental contaminants, known to be continuously discharged into the aquatic environment via human and animal waste. Freshwater aquatic environments represent potential reservoirs for ARG and potentially allow sewage-derived ARG to persist and spread in the environment. This may create increased opportunities for an eventual contact with, and gene transfer to, human and animal pathogens via the food chain or drinking water. However, assessment of this risk requires a better understanding of the level and variability of the natural resistance background and the extent of the human impact. We have analyzed water samples from 21 Swiss lakes, taken at sampling points that were not under the direct influence of local contamination sources and analyzed the relative abundance of ARG using quantitative real-time PCR. Copy numbers of genes mediating resistance to three different broad-spectrum antibiotic classes (sulfonamides: sul1, sul2, tetracyclines: tet(B), tet(M), tet(W) and fluoroquinolones: qnrA) were normalized to copy numbers of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. We used multiple linear regression to assess if ARG abundance is related to human activities in the catchment, microbial community composition and the eutrophication status of the lakes. Sul genes were detected in all sampled lakes, whereas only four lakes contained quantifiable numbers of tet genes, and qnrA remained below detection in all lakes. Our data indicate higher abundance of sul1 in lakes with increasing number and capacity of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in the catchment. sul2 abundance was rather related to long water residence times and eutrophication status. Our study demonstrates the potential of freshwater lakes to preserve antibiotic resistance genes, and provides a reference for ARG abundance from lake systems with low human impact as a baseline for assessing ARG contamination in lake water. PMID:25913323

  5. Hydrothermal Petroleum in Active Continental Rift: Lake Chapala, Western Mexico, Initial Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarate-del Valle, P. F.; Simoneit, B. R.; Ramirez-Sanchez, H. U.

    2003-12-01

    Lake Chapala in western Mexico is located partially in the Citala Rift, which belongs to the well-known neotectonic Jalisco continental triple junction. The region is characterized by active volcanism (Ceboruco, Volcan de Fuego), tectonic (1995 earthquake, M=8, 40-50 mm to SW) and hydrothermal (San Juan Cosala & Villa Corona spas and La Calera sinter deposit) activities. Hydrothermal petroleum has been described in active continental rift (East African Rift) and marine spreading zones (Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California). In 1868 the Mexican local press reported that manifestations of bitumen were appearing in front of the Columba Cap on the mid south shore of Lake Chapala. This bitumen is linked to the lake bottom and when the water level decreases sufficiently it is possible to access these tar bodies as islands. Because of these manifestations the Mexican oil company (PEMEX) drilled an exploration well (2,348m) at Tizapan El Alto without success. Hydrothermal activity is evident in the tar island zone as three in-shore thermal springs (26.8 m depth, 48.5° C, pH 7.8 and oriented N-S). The preliminary analyses by GC-MS of the tar from these islands indicate hydrothermal petroleum derived from lake sedimentary organic matter, generated at low temperatures (150° -200° C). The tars contain no n-alkanes, no PAH or other aromatics, but a major UCM of branched and cyclic hydrocarbons and mature biomarkers derived from lacustrine biota. The biomarkers consist of mainly 17α (H),21β (H)-hopanes ranging from C27 to C34 (no C28), gammacerane, tricyclic terpanes (C20-C26), carotane and its cracking products, and drimanes (C14-C16). The biomarker composition indicates an organic matter source from bacteria and algae, typical of lacustrine ecosystems. 14C dating of samples from two tar islands yielded ages exceeding 40 kyrs, i.e., old carbon from hydrothermal/tectonic remobilization of bitumen from deeper horizons to the surface. The occurrence of hydrothermal petroleum in

  6. Lava Flows On Ascraeus Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Ascraeus Mons Volcano: Like Earth, Mars has many volcanoes and volcanic features. This high-resolution view shows some of the lava flows near the summit of Ascraeus Mons, one of the three giant shield volcanoes known as the 'Tharsis Montes'. Volcanoes form when magma (molten rock) erupts out onto the surface of a planet. Based on Viking-era observations, Ascraeus Mons is considered to be one of the tallest volcanoes on Mars... its summit is more than 11 km (6.8 miles) above the surrounding plain. The summit is more than 23 km (14 miles) higher in elevation than the place where Mars Pathfinder landed in July 1997.

    Description of MOC Image: This picture shows an area that is about 20 km (12 miles) higher in elevation than the Mars Pathfinder landing site. The picture shows three main features: (1) a crater at the center-right, (2) a sinuous, discontinuous channel across the upper half, and (3) a rough and pitted, elevated surface across the lower half of the image.

    (1) Crater at center right. Distinguishing meteor craters from volcanic craters can sometimes be a challenge on Mars. This particular crater was most likely formed by meteor impact because it has a raised rim and a faint radial ejecta pattern around the outside of it. This crater is 600 m (2000 feet) across, about 3/4 the size of the famous 'Meteor Crater' near Winslow, Arizona.

    (2) Sinuous channel. The type of discontinuous channel running across the upper half of the image is sometimes referred to as a 'sinuous rille'. These are common on the volcanic plains of the Moon and among volcanoes and volcanic plains on Earth. Such a channel was once a lava tube. It is running down the middle of an old lava flow. The 'tube' looks like a 'channel' because its roof has collapsed. The discontinuous nature of this channel is the result of the collapse, or 'cave-in' of what was once the roof of the lava tube. It is common for certain types of relatively fluid lavas to form

  7. A geologic and hydrologic reconnaissance of Lava Beds National Monument and vicinity, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotchkiss, W.R.

    1968-01-01

    Lava Beds National Monument is on the Modoc Plateau in Modoc and Siskiyou Counties. The principal geologic units in the vicinity are volcanic rocks, which in places are highly permeable and poorly permeable lake sedimentary deposits, all probably post-Oligocene in age. Yields and specific capacities of wells in the unconfined water body within volcanic rocks and lake deposits range widely, but in general are low in the lake deposits and higher in the volcanic rocks. A confined water body occurring in volcanic rocks underlying the lake deposits yields large quantities of water to three wells in the study area. Dissolved-solids content of ground water generally increases in proportion to the thickness of lake deposits penetrated and to proximity of the lake deposits. Water from wells drilled in the volcanic rocks several miles from the lake deposits and from wells penetrating the confined water body in volcanic rocks underlying the lake deposits contains small to moderate quantities of dissolved solids. Ground-water supplies can be developed almost anywhere in the study area by drilling wells to depths below the water table. In addition, there is a reasonable possibility of developing wells in a confined water body underlying the water-table system.

  8. Keck Geology Consortium Lava Project: Undergraduate Research Linking Natural and Experimental Basaltic Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J. A.; Hazlett, R. W.; Wysocki, R.; Bromfield, M. E.; Browne, N. C.; Davis, N. C.; Pelland, C. G.; Rowan, W. L.; Warner, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Undergraduate students in the Keck Geology Consortium Lava Project participated in a month-long investigation of features of basaltic lava flows from two very different perspectives. The first half of the project focused on field relations in basaltic lava flows from the 1984 Krafla Fires eruption in northern Iceland. Students gained valuable experience in the collection of observations and samples in the field leading to hypotheses for the formation of selected features related to lava flow dynamics. Studies focused on a wide range of features including: morphology and heat loss in lava tubes (pyroducts), growth and collapse of lava ponds and overflow deposits, textural changes of lava falls (flow over steep steps), spaced spatter cones from flows over wet ground, and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility related to flow kinematics. In the second half of the program students designed, helped execute, documented, and analyzed features similar to those they studied in the field with large-scale (50-250 kg) basaltic lava flows created in the Syracuse University Lava Project (http://lavaproject.syr.edu). Data collected included video from multiple perspectives, infrared thermal (FLIR) images, still images, detailed measurements of flow dimensions and rates, and samples for textural and magnetic analyses. Experimental lava flow features provided critical tests of hypotheses generated in the field and a refined understanding of the behavior and final morphology of basaltic lava flows. The linked field and experimental studies formed the basis for year-long independent research projects under the supervision of their faculty mentors, leading to senior theses at the students' respective institutions.

  9. Geothermal activity at continental rift Citala, Western Mexico, where Lake Chapala is emplaced: past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zárate-del Valle, P. F.

    2003-04-01

    Lake Chapala is a tectonic lake developed on a continental rift named Citala (CRC) which belongs to a tectonically active zone in Western Mexico: the so-called Jalisco continental triple junction. Fossil sinter deposit, thermal spring, hydrothermal (hy) petroleum manifestation and hy alteration halo characterized the Lake Chapala basin. On the SE shore, outcrops a carbonate deposit named ``La Calera" (LC) which consists of a carbonate fossil sinter that measures 2 km in E-W direction and 600 m in N-S direction and overlays andesitic rock. With a thickness of approximately 5 m and a roughly horizontal attitude, the LC is characterized by a two-fold structure: when massive, it is colored in yellow brownish and grey and elsewhere it shows a pseudo-brecciated structure and when banded, yellow and dark millimetre alternated bands can be seen. The LC is marked by vuggy porosity and silica (quartz and chalcedony) vein lets. Under microscope a pseudo-micritic texture is observed; vugs coated by iron oxides, are filled with calcite, and/or quartz, chalcedony and clay minerals. Six samples of LC were analysed (LODC-UParis VI) for their stable isotopes (δ18O and δ13C): From δ13C{PDB} values we have two sets of data: -8.03 to -8.69 ppm that means a no contribution of organic carbon (oc) and -0.35 to -0.75 ppm meaning an important contribution of oc; from δ18O{PDB} values: -8.5 to -10.27 ppm we deduced a deposit in meteoric water with a temperature deposition higher than the surface. The CRC is characterized also by the presence of hydrothermal petroleum (hp): Inside the Chapala and ˜2 km from SE shore (Los Arcos) there are some small spots made of hp which look like islands (<3-4 m^2) linked to the bottom of the lake which consist of solid bitumen. Thermal springs (ths) occur both inside and outside the lake Chapala: the water in out-shore ths is of carbonate type (69^oC; ˜ 240 mg L-1 [HCO_3]^-; with one exception: the ths at the San Juan Cosalá spa (N shore), which is

  10. The April 2007 earthquake swarm near Lake Trichonis and implications for active tectonics in western Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiratzi, A.; Sokos, E.; Ganas, A.; Tselentis, A.; Benetatos, C.; Roumelioti, Z.; Serpetsidaki, A.; Andriopoulos, G.; Galanis, O.; Petrou, P.

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the properties of the April 2007 earthquake swarm (Mw 5.2) which occurred at the vicinity of Lake Trichonis (western Greece). First we relocated the earthquakes, using P- and S-wave arrivals to the stations of the Hellenic Unified Seismic Network (HUSN), and then we applied moment tensor inversion to regional broad-band waveforms to obtain the focal mechanisms of the strongest events of the 2007 swarm. The relocated epicentres, cluster along the eastern banks of the lake, and follow a distinct NNW-ESE trend. The previous strong sequence close to Lake Trichonis occurred in June-December 1975. We applied teleseismic body waveform inversion, to obtain the focal mechanism solution of the strongest earthquake of this sequence, i.e. the 31 December 1975 (Mw 6.0) event. Our results indicate that: a) the 31 December 1975 Mw 6.0 event was produced by a NW-SE normal fault, dipping to the NE, with considerable sinistral strike-slip component; we relocated its epicentre: i) using phase data reported to ISC and its coordinates are 38.486°N, 21.661°E; ii) using the available macroseismic data, and the coordinates of the macroseismic epicentre are 38.49°N, 21.63°E, close to the strongly affected village of Kato Makrinou; b) the earthquakes of the 2007 swarm indicate a NNW-SSE strike for the activated main structure, parallel to the eastern banks of Lake Trichonis, dipping to the NE and characterized by mainly normal faulting, occasionally combined with sinistral strike-slip component. The 2007 earthquake swarm did not rupture the well documented E-W striking Trichonis normal fault that bounds the southern flank of the lake, but on the contrary it is due to rupture of a NW-SE normal fault that strikes at a ˜ 45° angle to the Trichonis fault. The left-lateral component of faulting is mapped for the first time to the north of the Gulf of Patras which was previously regarded as the boundary for strike-slip motions in western Greece. This result signifies the

  11. Magma ascent dynamic through Ti diffusion in magnetites. Application to lava dome-forming eruptions. Implications to lava dome superifical explosivity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Morgan, Dan J.

    2016-04-01

    Superficial lava dome explosivity represents a major hazard during lava dome growth. But the origin of this explosive activity remains unclear until recently. By using geochemical (residual water content, silica abundance) and textural (vesicularity, microcristallinity) data, we constrain the occurrence of such hazard to the beginning of the lava dome activity. During the first stages of growth, the lava dome is small enough to develop an impermeable carapace that isolates a less degassed batch of magma inside, thus allowing an internal overpressurization of the volcano (Boudon et al., 2015). This study more precisely details the petrology and the texture of titano-magnetites as archive of magma ascent dynamic within the conduit. Titano-magnetites may exhibit two types of textures: exsolved or "limpid". When they are exsolved, no time constrain may be extracted as they re-equilibrate. On the contrary, when they are unexsolved, major element distribution, in particular Ti, may act as a powerful tool to decipher magma dynamic (differentiation, mixing) and estimate time that corresponds to the magma ascent time. The composition and elemental diffusion profiles are acquired by EPMA, following textural investigations by SEM. The time is then obtained by modelling the profile as a diffusion profile using the intracristalline diffusion coefficients published in literature. We applied this methodology to examples of lava dome superficial explosivity on Montagne Pelée in Martinique (Lesser Antilles Arc), and on Puy Chopine volcano in La Chaine des Puys, (French Massif Central). More precisely, the first phase of the Puy Chopine lava dome growth experienced a superficial explosion, as for Montagne Pelée, the first stages of the 1902 eruption (several superficial explosions occurred) and the 650 y. BP eruption (two superficial explosions destroyed the growing lava dome). We show that, for a single event, the vesiculated, undegassed batch of magma responsible of the

  12. Topographic and Stochastic Influences on Pahoehoe Lava Lobe Emplacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Christopher W.; Glaze, Lori S.; James, Mike R.; Baloga, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    A detailed understanding of pahoehoe emplacement is necessary for developing accurate models of flow field development, assessing hazards, and interpreting the significance of lava morphology on Earth and other planetary surfaces. Active pahoehoe lobes on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, were examined on 21-26 February 2006 using oblique time-series stereo-photogrammetry and differential global positioning system (DGPS) measurements. During this time, the local discharge rate for peripheral lava lobes was generally constant at 0.0061 +/- 0.0019 m3/s, but the areal coverage rate of the lobes exhibited a periodic increase every 4.13 +/- 0.64 minutes. This periodicity is attributed to the time required for the pressure within the liquid lava core to exceed the cooling induced strength of its margins. The pahoehoe flow advanced through a series of down slope and cross-slope breakouts, which began as approximately 0.2 m-thick units (i.e., toes) that coalesced and inflated to become approximately meter-thick lobes. The lobes were thickest above the lowest points of the initial topography and above shallow to reverse facing slopes, defined relative to the local flow direction. The flow path was typically controlled by high-standing topography, with the zone directly adjacent to the final lobe margin having an average relief that was a few centimeters higher than the lava inundated region. This suggests that toe-scale topography can, at least temporarily, exert strong controls on pahoehoe flow paths by impeding the lateral spreading of the lobe. Observed cycles of enhanced areal spreading and inflated lobe morphology are also explored using a model that considers the statistical likelihood of sequential breakouts from active flow margins and the effects of topographic barriers.

  13. Melt fractionation during pāhoehoe flow lobe emplacement, Heiðin há lava, SW Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkola, Paavo; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2016-04-01

    Melt segregations are vesicular formations of evolved melts generated by in situ closed system fractionation of a host lava. Although they are common in p¯a hoehoe flows, pillow basalts, lava lakes and shallow intrusions, their development is not fully understood. In addition, as the melt segregations are often confined to the scale of a single outcrop, they can be seen as an easily approachable analogue to the crystal-melt fractionation processes generating evolved magmas in the Earth's crust. An eight meter high p¯a hoehoe flow lobe in Heiðin há lava, SW Iceland, was sampled in order to understand the development of the elaborate segregation structures within. The sampled outcrop is a cross-section of a typical Icelandic p¯a hoehoe lava, belonging to a large post-glacial lava shield on Reykjanes Peninsula. The lava core is striped by melt segregations in the form of vertical vesicle cylinders 1-7 cm in diameter, which feed horizontal vesicle sheets higher up in the upper lava core and lower crust. Whole-rock major and trace element results for the 20 samples from the Heiðin há lava reveal a homogenous olivine tholeiitic host lava intersected by segregations of varying composition. The vesicle cylinders in the flow core are only mildly differentiated, but the segregated melt evolves upwards to horizontal vesicle sheets, from which some have experienced an additional enrichment possibly by a gas filter-pressing of the residual liquid in the horizontal sheet. The most evolved segregations are extremely Fe-rich with 19.5 % FeOtot in comparison to the average of 12.4 % FeOtot in the host lava. Consequently, MgO drops from the host lava's 9.5 % to 4.4 % in the segregation sheets. In addition, segregations are enriched by a factor of ˜2-2.5 in TiO2, K2O, P2O5 and incompatible elements Zr, Nb, Y and V. As a consequence of the closed system behavior, geochemical trends are evident between the host lava, vesicle cylinders, and vesicle sheets of different types.

  14. Late Quaternary slip rate and seismic hazards of the West Klamath Lake fault zone near Crater Lake, Oregon Cascades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, C.R.; Lanphere, M.A.; Champion, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    Crater Lake caldera is at the north end of the Klamath graben, where this N10??W-trending major Basin and Range structure impinges upon the north-south-trending High Cascades volcanic arc. East-facing normal faults, typically 10-15 km long, form the West Klamath Lake fault zone, which bounds the graben on its west side. The fault zone terminates on the south near the epicentral area of the September 1993 Klamath Falls earthquakes. It continues north past Crater Lake as the Annie Spring fault, which is within ~1 km of the west caldera rim, and Red Cone Spring fault. We have determined a long-term vertical slip rate of 0.3 mm/yr for these two faults using high-precision K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar age measurements on offset lava flows ranging in age from ca. 35 to 300 ka. Holocene offset reported by Hawkins et al. and epicenters of eight MW 2 earthquakes in 1994 and 1995 indicate that the West Klamath Lake fautl zone is active. Empirical relations between earthquake magnitudes and scarp heights or fault lengths suggest that the fault zone is capable of producing earthquakes as large as MW 7 1/4 . Earthquakes on these or other faults of the zone could trigger landslides and rockfalls from the walls of the caldera, possibly resulting in large waves on Crater Lake.

  15. [Vertical distribution and relationship between 210Pb(ex) activities and nutrients in sediment cores of two different eutrophication level lakes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Hao; Gu, Zhu-Jun; Zhang, Ming-Li

    2014-07-01

    The 210Pb(ex) activities and nutrient (TOC, TN and TP) contents in sediment cores of Fuxian Lake and Dianchi Lake were measured by traditional methods, as well as their vertical distribution and relationship were also comparatively analyzed in this paper. The study results indicated that the vertical distributions of 210Pb(ex) and nutrients were significantly different between Fuxian Lake and Dianchi Lake. The variation amplitude of 210Pb(ex) activities in Dianchi Lake was higher than that in Fuxian Lake. The disordered distribution characteristics of 210Pb(ex) in Dianchi Lake surface sediments were closely related to physicochemical migration of lead caused by human activities. The variation trends of nutrients in sediment cores were corresponded to local natural evolution and human activities in different historical periods. Relationship between 210Pb(ex) activities and nutrients were mainly affected by the nutrition level of lakes. The greater the lake eutrophication level was, the stronger the correlation was found. To the individual nutrient indicators, similar characteristics were shown in the two lakes, and the order was TOC > TP > TN. PMID:25244838

  16. Mapping of Daedalia Planum Lava Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Carli, Cristian; Massironi, Matteo; Pasquarè, Giorgio; Sgavetti, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Daedalia Planum is one of the Tharsis volcanic plains and is located southwest of the Arsia Mons. MOLA, THEMIS, MOC and OMEGA data have been analysed, providing a multi-scale characterisation of this Martian lava field. According to Mars Global Surveyor's MOLA data, the flanks of Arsia have an average slope <5°, while the surrounding regions, including Daedalia Planum, have slopes <0,5° and commonly <0,1°. Mars Odyssey/THEMIS VIS and IR images show a plain covered by a huge number of lava flows. Older and larger lava flows on the field have a length greater than ~1500 km. Moreover most of the Daedalia flows are associated to wrinkly and ropy surfaces, typical of pahoehoe lavas. On the base of the morphology differences among the flows and through stratigraphic relationships we performed a geological map of the area. MEX/OMEGA spectra were collected in different areas of the lava field. Besides the similar absorption bands OMEGA spectra showed also some differences in reflectance and spectral slope. The spectral map created using the SAM classification reveals that these spectral variations are generally in agreement with the lava flows mapped previously on the base of the flows morphology and stratigraphy. This suggested that such variability is related with different surface textures of the lava flow. Moreover in some cases spectral map highlighted the presence of spectral subunits inside the same stratigraphic unit, due likely to a different mineralogy or rock textures. Therefore spectral analysis revealed useful to improve the geological mapping of the Daedalia Planum region.

  17. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (Approximate True Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin.

    Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy.

    The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks.

    As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography

  18. Lava Flows On Ascraeus Mons Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Ascraeus Mons Volcano: Like Earth, Mars has many volcanoes and volcanic features. This high-resolution view shows some of the lava flows near the summit of Ascraeus Mons, one of the three giant shield volcanoes known as the 'Tharsis Montes'. Volcanoes form when magma (molten rock) erupts out onto the surface of a planet. Based on Viking-era observations, Ascraeus Mons is considered to be one of the tallest volcanoes on Mars... its summit is more than 11 km (6.8 miles) above the surrounding plain. The summit is more than 23 km (14 miles) higher in elevation than the place where Mars Pathfinder landed in July 1997.

    Description of MOC Image: This picture shows an area that is about 20 km (12 miles) higher in elevation than the Mars Pathfinder landing site. The picture shows three main features: (1) a crater at the center-right, (2) a sinuous, discontinuous channel across the upper half, and (3) a rough and pitted, elevated surface across the lower half of the image.

    (1) Crater at center right. Distinguishing meteor craters from volcanic craters can sometimes be a challenge on Mars. This particular crater was most likely formed by meteor impact because it has a raised rim and a faint radial ejecta pattern around the outside of it. This crater is 600 m (2000 feet) across, about 3/4 the size of the famous 'Meteor Crater' near Winslow, Arizona.

    (2) Sinuous channel. The type of discontinuous channel running across the upper half of the image is sometimes referred to as a 'sinuous rille'. These are common on the volcanic plains of the Moon and among volcanoes and volcanic plains on Earth. Such a channel was once a lava tube. It is running down the middle of an old lava flow. The 'tube' looks like a 'channel' because its roof has collapsed. The discontinuous nature of this channel is the result of the collapse, or 'cave-in' of what was once the roof of the lava tube. It is common for certain types of relatively fluid lavas to form

  19. Map showing lava-flow hazard zones, Island of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Thomas L.; Chun, Jon Y.F.; Exposo, Jean; Heliker, Christina; Hodge, Jon; Lockwood, John P.; Vogt, Susan M.

    1992-01-01

    This map shows lava-flow hazard zones for the five volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii. Volcano boundaries are shown as heavy, dark bands, reflecting the overlapping of lava flows from adjacent volcanoes along their common boundary. Hazard-zone boundaries are drawn as double lines because of the geologic uncertainty in their placement. Most boundaries are gradational, and the change In the degree of hazard can be found over a distance of a mile or more. The general principles used to place hazard-zone boundaries are discussed by Mullineaux and others (1987) and Heliker (1990). The differences between the boundaries presented here and in Heliker (1990) reflect new data used in the compilation of a geologic map for the Island of Hawaii (E.W. Wolfe and Jean Morris, unpub. data, 1989). The primary source of information for volcano boundaries and generalized ages of lava flows for all five volcanoes on the Island of Hawaii is the geologic map of Hawaii (E.W. Wolfe and Jean Morris, unpub. data, 1989). More detailed information is available for the three active volcanoes. For Hualalai, see Moore and others (1987) and Moore and Clague (1991); for Mauna Loa, see Lockwood and Lipman (1987); and for Kilauea, see Holcomb (1987) and Moore and Trusdell (1991).

  20. Preferential Weathering of Carbonatite Lava at Ol Doinyo Lengai, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, C. H.; Harpp, K. S.; Geist, D.; Bosselait, M.

    2014-12-01

    Although carbonatites have been produced since the Archean and are preserved in the geologic record, the East African Rift is home to the only active carbonatite volcano, at Ol Doinyo Lengai. It has long been known that the natrocarbonatites become strongly weathered the first time they are exposed to rain. We studied the weathering patterns in the field and have determined the mineralogical transformations via petrography and XRD. Mass transport is assessed by XRF and ICP-MS analyses. Water preferentially dissolves specific minerals in the pristine lava, permeating through earlier layers of flow to form stalactites, which have differing mineralogical composition. These hang both from the host flow and from the bottom of underlying earlier flows. The weathering product is characterized by trona, a hydrated carbonate mineral, as well as the sodium sulfate mineral aphthitalite. Data from XRD analysis of the carbonatite lava confirm transformation of its original minerals, nyerereite and gregoryite, into secondary hydrated carbonate minerals gaylussite and pirssonite (e.g., Zaitsev and Keller, 2006). This transformation is attributed to the instability of the erupted minerals at atmospheric conditions. Data from XRF analysis indicate a 4-fold increase in the amount of sodium present in the stalactite as well as a 8-fold increase in potassium. Trace element analysis by ICP-MS indicates significantly elevated levels of vanadium, copper, and rubidium in the weathering product, whereas strontium, barium, lanthanum, and cesium are left behind in high concentrations in the carbonatite lava. Our results provide further evidence supporting the proposal by Dawson et al. (1987) that calcium carbonate dominated lava flows result from extensive weathering of sodic carbonatite flows.

  1. The eruption in Holuhraun, NE Iceland 2014-2015: Real-time monitoring and influence of landscape on lava flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jónsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Thordarson, Thor; Bartolini, Stefania; Becerril, Laura; Marti Molist, Joan; Þorvaldsson, Skúli; Björnsson, Daði; Höskuldsson, Friðrik

    2016-04-01

    The largest eruption in Iceland since the Laki 1783-84 event began in Holuhraun, NE Iceland, on 31 August 2014, producing a lava flow field which, by the end of the eruption on February 27th 2015, covered 84,5 km2 with volume of 1,44 km3. Throughout the event, various satellite images (NOAA AVHRR, MODIS, SUOMI NPP VIIRS, ASTER, LANDSAT7&8, EO-1 ALI & HYPERION, RADARSAT-2, SENTINEL-1, COSMO SKYMED, TERRASAR X) were analysed to monitor the development of activity, identify active flow fronts and channels, and map the lava extent in close collaboration with the on-site field group. Aerial photographs and radar images from the Icelandic Coast Guard Dash 8 aircraft supported this effort. By the end of 2015, Loftmyndir ehf had produced a detailed 3D model of the lava using aerial photographs from 2013 and 2015. The importance of carrying out real-time monitoring of a volcanic eruption is: i) to locate sites of elevated temperature that may be registering new areas of activity within the lava or opening of vents or fissures. ii) To establish and verify timing of events at the vents and within the lava. iii) To identify potential volcanic hazard that can be caused by lava movements, eruption-induced flash flooding, tephra fallout or gas pollution. iv) to provide up-to-date regional information to field groups concerning safety as well as to locate sites for sampling lava, tephra and polluted water. v) to produce quantitative information on magma discharge and lava flow advance, map the lava extent, document the flow morphology and plume/tephra dispersal. During the eruption, these efforts supported mapping of the extent of the lava every 3-4 days on average underpinning the time series of magma discharge calculations. Digitial elevation models from before and after the event, combined with the real-time data series, supports detailed analysis of how landscape affects lava flow in a flat terrain (<0,4°), and provides important input to further developing lava flow models

  2. 78 FR 56655 - Foreign-Trade Zone (FTZ) 203-Moses Lake, Washington; Notification of Proposed Production Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Production Activity; AREVA Inc. (Fuel Rod Assemblies); Richland, Washington The Moses Lake Public Corporation... rod assemblies. Pursuant to 15 CFR 400.14(b), FTZ activity would be limited to the specific foreign... that applies to fuel rod assemblies (duty rate--3.3%) for the foreign status inputs noted...

  3. Lake Layers: Stratification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brothers, Chris; And Others

    This teacher guide and student workbook set contains two learning activities, designed for fifth through ninth grade students, that concentrate on lake stratification and water quality. In the activities students model the seasonal temperature changes that occur in temperate lakes and observe the resulting stratification of lake waters. Students…

  4. Holocene Activity of the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden Fault in Lake Enriquillo Derived from Seismic Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, J. K.; McHugh, C. M.; Hornbach, M. J.; Mann, P.; Wright, V. D.; Gurung, D.

    2013-12-01

    BP. Unit 3: acoustically transparent is 5-10 m thick. This unit shows top-lap terminations with the overlying strata and is interpreted as marine. Based on coral reef ages it was deposited during the Holocene 10 to 2 ka BP. Unit 4: laminated strata is ~ 5 m thick and downlaps offshore forming progradational packages. Pending Pb-210 ages from LE sediment cores a correlation between the two basins is proposed. During the latest Pleistocene sea level lowstand LE was separated from the BPP and the global ocean. The BPP was only partly connected to the sea. Sedimentation in both basins was dominated by wet and dry climate. The initial rise to high-stand of sea level into the BPP was at 14 ka BP. LE marine incursion was at 9.7 ka BP. At 2.8 ka BP LE became separated from the BPP possibly due to increased alluvial fan sedimentation. Evaporative conditions dominated the lake from 2.8 ka BP to the present and the lake waters lowered to ~43 m below sea level. We interpret the top laminated strata as deposited during the evaporative stage of the lake. Sediment progradation resulted from increased sedimentation due to lowering of base level. There is no evidence of tectonic activity in the BPP during the Holocene. In contrast, there are breaks in the Holocene strata in LE. So the EPGF is technically active across LE.

  5. Lava entering water: the different behaviour of aa and pahoehoe at the Nesjahraun, Thingvellir, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, J. A.; Mitchell, N.; Mochrie, F.; Cassidy, M.; Pinkerton, H.

    2009-12-01

    The Nesjahraun is a basaltic lava flow that erupted 1800 years ago from a subaerial fissure extending NE from the Hengill central volcano along the Thingvellir graben. The Nesjahraun entered the lake "Thingvallavatn" on its southern shore and exemplifies lava flowing into water in a relatively sheltered, lacustrine environment. This study combines airborne LiDAR, sidescan sonar, and CHIRP seismic data with field observations to investigate the behaviour of the lava as it entered the water. The early stages of the eruption produced pahoehoe sheet lava that is exposed as stacks of thin, vesicular, flows (5-20 cm thick) resting upon and surrounding low (<5 m) piles of coarse, unconsolidated, variably-oxidised spatter. Clefts, 2-5 m wide, spaced ~50 m apart, and with subhorizontal striations on the walls, extend <50 m inland from the lake. They likely represent channels or collapsed tubes along which lava was delivered into the water. A circular littoral cone, Eldborg, formed when water infiltrated a lava tube. Offshore, the water deepens quickly, suggesting that this part of the flow ends as a steep talus ramp. Later, the flow focussed into an aa channel that split along the shore into individual flow lobes 1-50 m wide. Aa clinker is exposed on the water's edge, as well as glassy sand and gravel containing irregularly-shaped intrusions. The cores of the flow lobes contain coherent, but hackly-fractured lava. Mounds of lapilli-sized scoria and the large double cone of Grámelur were formed in littoral explosions. The aa flow can be identified over 1 km offshore in the CHIRP and sidescan data, the latter suggesting that the flow lobes remained coherent while flowing down a gradient of <10 degrees. The Nesjahraun demonstrates that, even in the absence of ocean waves, littoral explosions are ubiquitous, that pahoehoe flows advance by construction of a talus ramp, and that with a high flux and shallow gradient, it is possible for aa flows to penetrate water and to remain

  6. History of human impact on Lake Kutubu, Papua New Guinea: The geochemical signatures of oil and gas mining activities in sediments.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Larissa; Haberle, Simon G; Maher, William A; Krikowa, Frank; Zawadzki, Atun; Heijnis, Henk

    2016-04-01

    Lake Kutubu, a large tropical lake in Papua New Guinea, is well known for its ecological importance; however, there have been recent changes to the pristine nature of this lake due to activities associated with the largest oil and gas project in PNG. The aim of this study was to determine the geochemical profile of sediment cores of Lake Kutubu and to comprehend the contamination changes undergone in this lake due to mining activities utilising the hydraulic fracturing method. Sediment core profiles of Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Cd, Ba, Ce, Pb and U, grain size and dating analyses were conducted for five sites in the lake. Grain size and dating demonstrated that the northwest side of Lake Kutubu has sediments of allocthonous origin while the southeast sediments are of autochthonous origin. Ba was the element with the largest changes in concentrations since 1990 and the best tracer of mining activities near the lake. Sites KTB 02 and KTB 10 northwest of the lake showed the most distinct changes in element concentrations. Element enrichment factors (EF = 2.8, 4.2 and 3.2 respectively) demonstrated that Mn, Se and Ba have undergone a moderate enrichment in the lake since mining activities started. Ni, Cd and Se concentrations exceed sediment guidelines in some samples. No guideline is available for Ba, and special attention should be given to this element in this lake. This study demonstrated that Lake Kutubu oil/gas extraction activities are significant sources of elements to this lake and highlights the need for studies on the partitioning and speciation of elements to understand organism metal exposure. PMID:26826474

  7. Littoral hydrovolcanic explosions: a case study of lava seawater interaction at Kilauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattox, Tari N.; Mangan, Margaret T.

    1997-01-01

    A variety of hydrovolcanic explosions may occur as basaltic lava flows into the ocean. Observations and measurements were made during a two-year span of unusually explosive littoral activity as tube-fed pahoehoe from Kilauea Volcano inundated the southeast coastline of the island of Hawai`i. Our observations suggest that explosive interactions require high entrance fluxes (≥4 m 3/s) and are most often initiated by collapse of a developing lava delta. Two types of interactions were observed. "Open mixing" of lava and seawater occurred when delta collapse exposed the mouth of a severed lava tube or incandescent fault scarp to wave action. The ensuing explosions produced unconsolidated deposits of glassy lava fragments or lithic debris. Interactions under "confined mixing" conditions occurred when a lava tube situated at or below sea level fractured. Explosions ruptured the roof of the tube and produced circular mounds of welded spatter. We estimate a water/rock mass ratio of 0.15 for the most common type of littoral explosion and a kinetic energy release of 0.07-1.3 kJ/kg for the range of events witnessed.

  8. Mapping the distribution of vesicular textures on silicic lavas using the Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ondrusek, Jaime; Christensen, Philip R.; Fink, Jonathan H.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the effect of vesicularity on TIMS (Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner) imagery independent of chemical variations, we studied a large rhyolitic flow of uniform composition but textural heterogeneity. The imagery was recalibrated so that the digital number values for a lake in the scene matched a calculated ideal spectrum for water. TIMS spectra for the lava show useful differences in coarsely and finely vesicular pumice data, particularly in TIMS bands 3 and 4. Images generated by ratioing these bands accurately map out those areas known from field studies to be coarsely vesicular pumice. These texture-related emissivity variations are probably due to the larger vesicles being relatively deeper and separated by smaller septa leaving less smooth glass available to give the characteristic emission of the lava. In studies of inaccessible lava flows (as on Mars) areas of coarsely vesicular pumice must be identified and avoided before chemical variations can be interpreted. Remotely determined distributions of vesicular and glassy textures can also be related to the volatile contents and potential hazards associated with the emplacement of silicic lava flows on Earth.

  9. New Geochemical and Isotopic Data on São Jorge Island Submarine Lavas (Azores)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, L. P.; França, Z.; Madureira, P.

    2012-12-01

    Dredging operations performed on the Azores Archipelago, during LEG 1 of cruise EMEPC/Açores/G3/2007 (Lourenço et al., 2008), recovered the first lava samples on São Jorge Island south flank, at approximately 1200m depth. Subsequent EMEPC cruises in 2008 and 2009, EMEPC/Açores/LUSO/G3/2008 (Calado et al., 2008) and EMEPC/Açores/LUSO/G3/2009 respectively, using the Luso ROV, carried out four successful geological surveys along São Jorge south flank, at depths between 800 and 1000m, recovering more lava samples. New geochemical and isotopic data on the lavas recovered in the 2008 and 2009 cruises is reported and will be compared with the existing data from the 2007 cruise and the onshore lavas (Ribeiro, 2011). The island of São Jorge is located in the Central Island Group of the Azores Archipelago, exhibiting an elongated shape, 55km long and 6.75km wide, which extends along the main regional tectonic direction (N120°). The imposing geomorphology of the island, which formed mainly by fissural volcanic activity, continues on its submarine flanks, along abrupt cliffs, rooting the island in the Azores Plateau. The lavas from the 2007 cruise, which dredge the southeast end of the island, are alkaline basaltic pillow lavas, with MgO>7.5% and with a geochemical and isotopic signature similar to the composition of the onshore lavas located immediately north of this locations (Ribeiro, 2011). The 2008 ROV survey collected samples closer to the western side of São Jorge, on a site south of Rosais Village, while the 2009 ROV survey covered the central part of São Jorge south flank, on a site south of Urzelina Village, a site south of Manadas Village and a site south of Fajã da Fragueira. These lavas are alkaline basalts and hawaiites with enrichment in LREE and in incompatible trace elements. The basalts have MgO between 6.8 and 6.2%, and average (La/Sm)n ratios of 2.1 and (La/Yb)n ratios ranging between 6.3 and 9.6. The hawaiites, which reveal some degree of magma

  10. Studies of fluid instabilities in flows of lava and debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan H.

    1987-01-01

    At least two instabilities have been identified and utilized in lava flow studies: surface folding and gravity instability. Both lead to the development of regularly spaced structures on the surfaces of lava flows. The geometry of surface folds have been used to estimate the rheology of lava flows on other planets. One investigation's analysis assumed that lava flows have a temperature-dependent Newtonian rheology, and that the lava's viscosity decreased exponentially inward from the upper surface. The author reviews studies by other investigators on the analysis of surface folding, the analysis of Taylor instability in lava flows, and the effect of surface folding on debris flows.

  11. Vertical Distribution of Functional Potential and Active Microbial Communities in Meromictic Lake Kivu.

    PubMed

    İnceoğlu, Özgul; Llirós, Marc; Crowe, Sean A; García-Armisen, Tamara; Morana, Cedric; Darchambeau, François; Borges, Alberto V; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Servais, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    The microbial community composition in meromictic Lake Kivu, with one of the largest CH4 reservoirs, was studied using 16S rDNA and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) pyrosequencing during the dry and rainy seasons. Highly abundant taxa were shared in a high percentage between bulk (DNA-based) and active (RNA-based) bacterial communities, whereas a high proportion of rare species was detected only in either an active or bulk community, indicating the existence of a potentially active rare biosphere and the possible underestimation of diversity detected when using only one nucleic acid pool. Most taxa identified as generalists were abundant, and those identified as specialists were more likely to be rare in the bulk community. The overall number of environmental parameters that could explain the variation was higher for abundant taxa in comparison to rare taxa. Clustering analysis based on operational taxonomic units (OTUs at 0.03 cutoff) level revealed significant and systematic microbial community composition shifts with depth. In the oxic zone, Actinobacteria were found highly dominant in the bulk community but not in the metabolically active community. In the oxic-anoxic transition zone, highly abundant potentially active Nitrospira and Methylococcales were observed. The co-occurrence of potentially active sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the anoxic zone may suggest the presence of an active yet cryptic sulfur cycle. PMID:25912922

  12. Cold active hydrolytic enzymes production by psychrotrophic Bacilli isolated from three sub-glacial lakes of NW Indian Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ajar Nath; Sachan, Shashwati Ghosh; Verma, Priyanka; Kaushik, Rajeev; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The diversity of culturable, cold-active enzymes producing Bacilli was investigated from three sub-glacial lakes of north western Indian Himalayas. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) using three restriction enzymes Alu I, Msp I, and Hae III led to the clustering of 136 Bacilli into 26, 23, and 22 clusters at 75% similarity index from Chandratal Lake, Dashair Lake, and Pangong Lake, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing led to the identification of 35 Bacilli that could be grouped in seven families viz.: Bacillaceae (48%), Staphylococcaceae (14%), Bacillales incertae sedis (13%), Planococcaceae (12%), Paenibacillaceae (9%), Sporolactobacillaceae (3%), and Carnobacteriaceae (1%), which included twelve different genera Bacillus, Desemzia, Exiguobacterium, Jeotgalicoccus, Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus, Planococcus, Pontibacillus, Sinobaca, Sporosarcina, Staphylococcus, and Virgibacillus. Based on their optimal temperature for growth, 35 Bacilli were grouped as psychrophilic (11 strains), psychrotrophic (17 strains), or psychrotolerant (7 strains), respectively. The representative isolates from each cluster were screened for cold-active enzyme activities. Amylase, β-glucosidase, pectinase, and protease activities at 4 °C were detected in more than 80% of the strains while approximately 40, 31, 23, 14, 11, and 9% of strains possessed cellulase, xylanase, β-galactosidase, laccase, chitinase, and lipase activity, respectively. Among 35 Bacilli, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus marisflavi, Exiguobacterium indicum, Paenibacillus terrae, Pontibacillus sp., Sporosarcina globispora, and Sporosarcina psychrophila were efficient producers of different cold-active enzymes. These cold-adapted Bacilli could play an important role in industrial and agricultural processes. PMID:26933936

  13. Embryotoxicity, teratogenicity and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in Forster's terns on Green Bay, Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Rattner, B.A.; Sileo, L.; Docherty, D.E.; Kubiak, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    Known reproductive problems, including congenital malformations and poor hatching success, exist for the state endangered Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri) in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Twenty Forster's tern eggs were collected from separate nests at (i) a natural colony with documented reproductive problems, situated at Green Bay, Lake Michigan, and (ii) an inland colony at Lake Poygan (control) where reproduction was documented as normal. Eggs from the two locations were placed in the same laboratory incubator and candled throughout incubation. Hatching success of Green Bay eggs was 52% of that for controls. Several early embryonic deaths occurred, but most mortality occurred close to the time of hatching. Liver microsomal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity was elevated approximately threefold in Green Bay hatchlings compared to controls. Green Bay terns that hatched weighed less than controls, had an increased liver to body weight ratio, and had a shorter femur length. Two Green Bay embryos that failed to hatch had anomalies, one with a crossed beak and one with poor ossification of the foot. One Green Bay hatchling had an abnormally ossified ilium. These effects were observed in eggs where there were measureable levels of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase inducers including polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins.

  14. Embryotoxicity, teratogenicity, and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in Forster's terns on Green Bay, Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Rattner, B.A.; Sileo, L.; Docherty, D.; Kubiak, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    Known reproductive problems, including congenital malformations and poor hatching success, exist for the state endangered Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri) in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Twenty Forster's tern eggs were collected from separate nests at a natural colony with documented reproductive problems, situated at Green Bay, Lake Michigan, and an inland colony at Lake Poygan (control) where reproduction was documented as normal. Eggs from the two locations were placed in the same laboratory incubator and candled throughout incubation. Hatching success of Green Bay eggs was 52% of that for controls. Several early embryonic deaths occurred, but most mortality occurred close to the time of hatching. Liver microsomal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity was elevated approximately threefold in Green Bay hatchlings compared to controls. Green Bay terns that hatched weighed less than controls, had an increased liver to body weight ratio, and had a shorter femur length. Two Green Bay embryos that failed to hatch had anomalies, one with a crossed beak and one with poor ossification of the foot. One Green Bay hatchling had an abnormally ossified ilium. These effects were observed in eggs where there were measureable levels of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase inducers including polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins.

  15. Embryotoxicity, teratogenicity, and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in Forster's terns on Green Bay, Lake Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.J.; Rattner, B.A.; Sileo, L.; Docherty, D.; Kubiak, T.J.

    1987-02-01

    Known reproductive problems, including congenital malformations and poor hatching success, exist for the state endangered Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri) in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Twenty Forster's tern eggs were collected from separate nests at (i) a natural colony with documented reproductive problems, situated at Green Bay, Lake Michigan, and (ii) an inland colony at Lake Poygan (control) where reproduction was documented as normal. Eggs from the two locations were placed in the same laboratory incubator and candled throughout incubation. Hatching success of Green Bay eggs was 52% of that for controls. Several early embryonic deaths occurred, but most mortality occurred close to the time of hatching. Liver microsomal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity was elevated approximately threefold in Green Bay hatchlings compared to controls. Green Bay terns that hatched weighed less than controls, had an increased liver to body weight ratio, and had a shorter femur length. Two Green Bay embryos that failed to hatch had anomalies, one with a crossed beak and one with poor ossification of the foot. One Green Bay hatchling had an abnormally ossified ilium. These effects were observed in eggs where there were measurable levels of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase inducers including polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins.

  16. Embryotoxicity, teratogenicity, and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in Forster's terns on Green Bay, Lake Michigan.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D J; Rattner, B A; Sileo, L; Docherty, D; Kubiak, T J

    1987-02-01

    Known reproductive problems, including congenital malformations and poor hatching success, exist for the state endangered Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri) in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Twenty Forster's tern eggs were collected from separate nests at a natural colony with documented reproductive problems, situated at Green Bay, Lake Michigan, and an inland colony at Lake Poygan (control) where reproduction was documented as normal. Eggs from the two locations were placed in the same laboratory incubator and candled throughout incubation. Hatching success of Green Bay eggs was 52% of that for controls. Several early embryonic deaths occurred, but most mortality occurred close to the time of hatching. Liver microsomal aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity was elevated approximately threefold in Green Bay hatchlings compared to controls. Green Bay terns that hatched weighed less than controls, had an increased liver to body weight ratio, and had a shorter femur length. Two Green Bay embryos that failed to hatch had anomalies, one with a crossed beak and one with poor ossification of the foot. One Green Bay hatchling had an abnormally ossified ilium. These effects were observed in eggs where there were measureable levels of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase inducers including polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins. PMID:3803335

  17. LAVA: lithography analysis using virtual access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chang; Yang, Rona; Cheng, Jeffery; Chien, Peter; Wen, Victor; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1998-06-01

    A web site allowing remote operation of the SPLAT, SAMPLE, TEMPEST and SIMPL simulators has been developed to promote collaborative work on lithography and in particular on EUV technology. Based on the extensive use of platform independent programming languages, LAVA is accessible from all modern computing platforms. The software supporting the web site is available to others in creating similar web site sites and in making simulators such as those from other universities 'play' together. The web site explores new paradigms in remote operation of lithography simulators and introduces more application-oriented modes of interaction with technologists. The LAVA web site URL is http://cuervo.eecs.berkeley.edu/Volcano/

  18. Experimental Compaction of Pumiceous Dome Lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J.; Ashwell, P. A.; Lavalleé, Y.; Kennedy, B. M.; Hess, K. U.; Cole, J.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2012-04-01

    Lava dome stability is reliant on pore pressure, which varies according to the evolution of the permeable porous network. Here, we present experimental results of porosity and permeability evolution during compaction of aphiric (from Ngongotaha volcano) and crystal-bearing (from Tarawera volcano) pumiceous, rhyolitic lavas from Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand. The Ngongotaha sample has 55 % porosity and is from the crystal-free dome carapace erupted ~200 ka following caldera collapse at Rotorua Caldera. Two sample sets from Tarawera are crystalline, pumiceous clasts from a dome-collapse generated block and ash flow at Okataina Caldera ~1314 AD, and contain 50 and 25 % pores. This study tests the validity of the 'permeable foam' model by comparing properties of the experimentally compacted pumice to denser material seen in the exposed cores of Tarawera and Ngongotaha. Cylindrical samples were deformed under conditions similar to lava dome settings, under a constant, low axial stress of 2.8 MPa at 800-900oC (above the measured calorimetric glass transition temperatures). Deformation ensued to a total axial strain of 60% and the porosity and permeability of the samples were measured at strain increments of 10 %. Samples display different resultant strains under the same applied stress and exhibit strain-hardening behaviour during compaction. The development of textures and microstructures is characterised using petrographic analysis and x-ray computed tomography. Porosity reduces steadily with increasing strain, but reaches a minimum of 20 % porosity at 40-50 % strain (irrespective of starting porosity or crystallinity), after which further strain is accommodated by barrelling of the sample. A rapid reduction in permeability along the primary axis occurs during the initial stage of compression and continues to decrease with increasing strain and densification of the lava. Permeability development differs between lava types due to the influence of crystallinity on the

  19. Lava tube morphology on Etna and evidence for lava flow emplacement mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvari, Sonia; Pinkerton, Harry

    1999-06-01

    Lava tubes play a pivotal role in the formation of many lava flow fields. A detailed examination of several compound `a`a lava flow fields on Etna confirmed that a complex network of tubes forms at successively higher levels within the flow field, and that tubes generally advance by processes that include flow inflation and tube coalescence. Flow inflation is commonly followed by the formation of major, first-order ephemeral vents which, in turn, form an arterial tube network. Tube coalescence occurs when lava breaks through the roof or wall of an older lava tube; this can result in the unexpected appearance of vents several kilometers downstream. A close examination of underground features allowed us to distinguish between ephemeral vent formation and tube coalescence, both of which are responsible for abrupt changes in level or flow direction of lava within tubes on Etna. Ephemeral vent formation on the surface is frequently recorded underground by a marked increase in size of the tube immediately upstream of these vents. When the lining of an inflated tube has collapsed, `a`a clinker is commonly seen in the roof and walls of the tube, and this is used to infer that inflation has taken place in the distal part of an `a`a lava flow. Tube coalescence is recognised either from the compound shape of tube sections, or from breached levees, lava falls, inclined grooves or other structures on the walls and roof. Our observations confirm the importance of lava tubes in the evolution of extensive pahoehoe and `a`a flow fields on Etna.

  20. Geology of selected lava tubes in the Bend Area, Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greely, R.

    1971-01-01

    Longitudinal profiles representing 5872.5 m of mapped lava tubes and a photogeologic map relating lava tubes to surface geology, regional structure and topography are presented. Three sets of lava tubes were examined: (1) Arnold Lava Tube System (7km long) composed of collapsed and uncollapsed tube segments and lava ponds, (2) Horse Lava Tube System (11 km long) composed of parallel and anastomosing lava tube segments, and (3) miscellaneous lava tubes. Results of this study tend to confirm the layered lava hypothesis of Ollier and Brown (1965) for lava tube formation; however, there are probably several modes of formation for lava tubes in general. Arnold System is a single series of tubes apparently formed in a single basalt flow on a relatively steep gradient. The advancing flow in which the tubes formed was apparently temporarily halted, resulting in the formation of lava ponds which were inflated and later drained by the lava tube system. Horse System probably formed in multiple, interconnected flows. Pre-flow gradient appears to have been less than for Arnold System, and resulted in meandrous, multiple tube networks.

  1. Volcanic activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milazzo, M.P.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Radebaugh, J.; Davies, A.G.; Turtle, E.P.; Geissler, P.; Klaasen, K.P.; Rathbun, J.A.; McEwen, A.S.

    2005-01-01

    Galileo's Solid State Imager (SSI) observed Tvashtar Catena four times between November 1999 and October 2001, providing a unique look at a distinctive high latitude volcanic complex on Io. The first observation (orbit I25, November 1999) resolved, for the first time, an active extraterrestrial fissure eruption; the brightness temperature was at least 1300 K. The second observation (orbit I27, February 2000) showed a large (??? 500 km 2) region with many, small, hot, regions of active lava. The third observation was taken in conjunction with Cassini imaging in December 2000 and showed a Pele-like, annular plume deposit. The Cassini images revealed an ???400 km high Pele-type plume above Tvashtar Catena. The final Galileo SSI observation of Tvashtar (orbit I32, October 2001), revealed that obvious (to SSI) activity had ceased, although data from Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) indicated that there was still significant thermal emission from the Tvashtar region. In this paper, we primarily analyze the style of eruption during orbit I27 (February 2000). Comparison with a lava flow cooling model indicates that the behavior of the Tvashtar eruption during I27 does not match that of simple advancing lava flows. Instead, it may be an active lava lake or a complex set of lava flows with episodic, overlapping eruptions. The highest reliable color temperature is ???1300 K. Although higher temperatures cannot be ruled out, they do not need to be invoked to fit the observed data. The total power output from the active lavas in February 2000 was at least 1011 W. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of inflated submarine and sub-lacustrine Pahoehoe lava flows using high-resolution bathymetric and lidar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, A.; Soule, S. A.; Le Saout, M.; Allemand, P.

    2012-12-01

    The summit of the East Pacific Rise (EPR), 16°N, is investigated based -among others- on high-resolution bathymetry acquired using the AUV Aster-X, and photos and videos collected using the submersible Nautile (Ifremer). HR bathymetry reveals submarine tumuli and inflated smooth lava flows at the summit of the ridge, emplaced on sub-horizontal terrains. They are primarily composed of jumbled and lobate flows with occurrences of sheet flows, and pillows close to the flow margins. They are 5 to 15 meters -high, and their surface ranges 0.2 to 1.5 km2. Their surface is either planar or depressed, likely due to lava drainback during eruption. At their margins, planar slabs of lava, few meters wide, slope down from the top of the flow, at angles ranging 40 to 80°. A series of cracks, 0,5 to 1.5 m deep, separate the horizontal surface of the flow from their inclined flanks. These cracks parallel the sinuous edges of the flows, suggesting the flow flanks tilted outward. Tumuli are also observed. Some of these smooth flows form 80 to 750 m -long sinuous ridges, suggesting the existence of lava tubes. Their morphology indicates that these flows experienced inflationary emplacement styles, but at a much larger scale than Pahoehoe lavas in Hawaii and La Réunion Island. In these two islands, indeed, inflation structures are typically less than 2 meters high and only several tens of meters in length at maximum, suggesting that their mechanism of emplacement and inflation is significantly different. Conversely, we observe comparable inflation flows in Iceland and in Idaho and Oregon, also emplaced onto sub-horizontal terrains. We use high-resolution aerial photographs and lidar data to investigate their morphology. In the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), quaternary basaltic plains volcanism produced monogenetic coalescent shields, and phreatomagmatic basaltic eruptions that are directly related to proximity of magmatism to the Snake River or Pleistocene lakes. For example

  3. Analysis of inflated submarine and sub-lacustrine Pahoehoe lava flows using high-resolution bathymetric and lidar data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, A.; Van Vliet-Lanoe, B.; Soule, S. A.; Allemand, P.; Le Saout, M.; Delacourt, C.

    2013-12-01

    The summit of the East Pacific Rise (EPR), 16°N, is investigated based -among others- on high-resolution bathymetry acquired using the AUV Aster-X, and photos and videos collected using the submersible Nautile (Ifremer). HR bathymetry reveals submarine tumuli and inflated smooth lava flows at the summit of the ridge, emplaced on sub-horizontal terrains. They are primarily composed of jumbled and lobate flows with occurrences of sheet flows, and pillows close to the flow margins. They are 5 to 15 meters -high, and their surface ranges 0.2 to 1.5 km2. Their surface is either planar or depressed, likely due to lava topographic downdraining during eruption. At their margins, planar slabs of lava, few meters wide, slope down from the top of the flow, at angles ranging 40 to 80°. A series of cracks, 0,5 to 1.5 m deep, separate the horizontal surface of the flow from their inclined flanks. These cracks parallel the sinuous edges of the flows, suggesting the flow flanks tilted outward. Tumuli are also observed. Some of these smooth flows form 80 to 750 m -long sinuous ridges, suggesting the existence of lava tubes. Their morphology indicates that these flows experienced inflationary emplacement styles, but at a much larger scale than Pahoehoe lavas in Hawaii and La Réunion Islands. In these two islands, indeed, inflation structures are typically less than 2 meters high and only several tens of meters in length at maximum, suggesting that their mechanism of emplacement and inflation is significantly different. Conversely, we observe comparable inflation flows in Iceland and in Idaho and Oregon, also emplaced onto sub-horizontal terrains. We use high-resolution aerial photographs and lidar data to investigate their morphology. In the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), quaternary basaltic plains volcanism produced monogenetic coalescent shields, and phreatomagmatic basaltic eruptions that are directly related to proximity of magmatism to the Snake River or Pleistocene lakes

  4. Development of lava tubes in the light of observations at Mauna Ulu, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.W.; Holcomb, R.T.; Tilling, R.I.; Christiansen, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    During the 1969-1974 Mauna Ulu eruption on Kilauea's upper east rift zone, lava tubes were observed to develop by four principal processes: (1) flat, rooted crusts grew across streams within confined channels; (2) overflows and spatter accreted to levees to build arched roofs across streams; (3) plates of solidified crust floating downstream coalesced to form a roof; and (4) pahoehoe lobes progressively extended, fed by networks of distributaries beneath a solidified crust. Still another tube-forming process operated when pahoehoe entered the ocean; large waves would abruptly chill a crust across the entire surface of a molten stream crossing through the surf zone. These littoral lava tubes formed abruptly, in contrast to subaerial tubes, which formed gradually. All tube-forming processes were favored by low to moderate volume-rates of flow for sustained periods of time. Tubes thereby became ubiquitous within the pahoehoe flows and distributed a very large proportionof the lava that was produced during this prolonged eruption. Tubes transport lava efficiently. Once formed, the roofs of tubes insulate the active streams within, allowing the lava to retain its fluidity for a longer time than if exposed directly to ambient air temperature. Thus the flows can travel greater distances and spread over wider areas. Even though supply rates during most of 1970-1974 were moderate, ranging from 1 to 5 m3/s, large tube systems conducted lava as far as the coast, 12-13 km distant, where they fed extensive pahoehoe fields on the coastal flats. Some flows entered the sea to build lava deltas and add new land to the island. The largest and most efficient tubes developed during periods of sustained extrusion, when new lava was being supplied at nearly constant rates. Tubes can play a major role in building volcanic edifices with gentle slopes because they can deliver a substantial fraction of lava erupted at low to moderate rates to sites far down the flank of a volcano. We

  5. High-resolution mapping of the 1998 lava flows at Axial Seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, B.; Clague, D. A.; Embley, R. W.; Caress, D. W.; Paduan, J. B.; Sasnett, P.

    2011-12-01

    Axial Seamount (an active hotspot volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge) last erupted in 1998 and produced two lava flows (a "northern" and a "southern" flow) along the upper south rift zone separated by a distance of 4 km. Geologic mapping of the 1998 lava flows has been carried out with a combination of visual observations from multiple submersible dives since 1998, and with high-resolution bathymetry, most recently collected with the MBARI mapping AUV (the D. Allan B.) since 2007. The new mapping results revise and update the previous preliminary flow outlines, areas, and volumes. The high-resolution bathymetry (1-m grid cell size) allows eruptive fissures fine-scale morphologic features to be resolved with new and remarkable clarity. The morphology of both lava flows can be interpreted as a consequence of a specific sequence of events during their emplacement. The northern sheet flow is long (4.6 km) and narrow (500 m), and erupted in the SE part of Axial caldera, where it temporarily ponded and inflated on relatively flat terrain before draining out southward toward steeper slopes. The inflation and drain-out of this sheet flow by ~ 3.5 m over 2.5 hours was previously documented by a monitoring instrument that was caught in the lava flow. Our geologic mapping shows that the morphology of the northern sheet flow varies along its length primarily due to gradients in the underlying slope and processes active during flow emplacement. The original morphology of the sheet flow where it ponded is lobate, with pillows near the margins, whereas the central axis of drain-out and collapse is floored with lineated, ropy, and jumbled lava morphologies. The southern lava flow, in contrast, is mostly pillow lava where it cascaded down the steep slope on the east flank of the south rift zone, but also has a major area of collapse where lava ponded temporarily near the rift axis. These results show that submarine lava flows have more subsurface hydraulic connectivity than has

  6. 9. CRATER RIM DRIVE NEAR THURSTON LAVA TUBE. VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CRATER RIM DRIVE NEAR THURSTON LAVA TUBE. VIEW OF CRENELATED LAVA STONE GUARD WALL AND ROCK CUT OPPOSITE. NOTE CATTLE GUARD ACROSS ROAD PARTIALLY PAVED OVER. - Crater Rim Drive, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  7. High-fluid component in some recent lavas from the southern Cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, N. W.; Asmerom, Y.

    2011-12-01

    There is a long-standing fluid paradox in Cascade magmatism. High fluid contributions to Cascade, especially southern Cascade, magmas are inferred from fluid inclusion and trace element data. The U-series isotopic data, which are time-sensitive to fluid addition, so far argue against recent fluid addition. Here we present U-Th and Sr isotopic data on young (Holocene) lavas from Lassen and Mt Shasta volcanic fields and surrounding areas. Andesitic lavas from Shasta have 232Th/238U ratios between 2.6 -2.7 and similar to those reported previously, have (230Th/238U) (activity ratio) close to secular equilibrium, 1.01 -1.03. A Holocene rhyodacite flow from Lassen has a 232Th/238U ratio of 2.9 and (230Th/238U) near secular equilibrium (0.99), similar to lavas from Shasta reported here and elsewhere. In contrast, basaltic andesite lavas from the Cinder Cone at Lassen show large U enrichments, 232Th/238U ratios between 1.4 - 1.7 and (230Th/238U) between 0.61 - 0.74. These are the highest 238U over 230Th enrichments seen in Cascade lavas, similar to many other arc lavas. Lavas from Lassen despite large differences in bulk composition of U/Th and (230Th/238U) have similar 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.703954 - 0.704137). These Sr isotopic ratios are similar to values from other southern Cascade lavas. In contrast, the Shasta lavas have low 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.702905 -0.703118), within the range of local MORB. The salient feature of our data is the large 238U enrichment seen in the young basaltic andesite Lassen lavas. The similarity in Sr isotopic composition between the more evolved lavas and the Cinder Cone lavas argue against source variation to explain the U enrichment in the later. Another possibility is that the differences in the (230Th/238U) reflect magma differentiation - residence time-scales. The magma differentiation - residence time required to explain the difference in (230Th/238U) is unreasonably large, assuming the eruption ages are correct. More importantly, the

  8. Boundary conditions of an active West Antarctic subglacial lake: implications for storage of water beneath the ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, M. J.; Ross, N.; Corr, H.; Smith, B.; Jordan, T.; Bingham, R. G.; Ferraccioli, F.; Rippin, D. M.; Le Brocq, A.

    2014-01-01

    Repeat-pass ICESat altimetry has revealed 124 discrete surface height changes across the Antarctic Ice Sheet, interpreted to be caused by subglacial lake discharges (surface lowering) and inputs (surface uplift). Few of these active lakes have been confirmed by radio-echo sounding (RES) despite several attempts (notable exceptions are Lake Whillans and three in the Adventure Subglacial Trench). Here we present targeted RES and radar altimeter data from an "active lake" location within the upstream Institute Ice Stream, into which at least 0.12 km3 of water was previously calculated to have flowed between October 2003 and February 2008. We use a series of transects to establish an accurate depiction of the influences of bed topography and ice surface elevation on water storage potential. The location of surface height change is downstream of a subglacial hill on the flank of a distinct topographic hollow, where RES reveals no obvious evidence for deep (> 10 m) water. The regional hydropotential reveals a sink coincident with the surface change, however. Governed by the location of the hydrological sink, basal water will likely "drape" over topography in a manner dissimilar to subglacial lakes where flat strong specular RES reflections are measured. The inability of RES to detect the active lake means that more of the Antarctic ice sheet bed may contain stored water than is currently appreciated. Variation in ice surface elevation data sets leads to significant alteration in calculations of the local flow of basal water indicating the value of, and need for, high-resolution altimetry data in both space and time to establish and characterise subglacial hydrological processes.

  9. Boundary conditions of an active West Antarctic subglacial lake: implications for storage of water beneath the ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, M. J.; Ross, N.; Corr, H.; Smith, B.; Jordan, T.; Bingham, R.; Ferraccioli, F.; Rippin, D.; Le Brocq, A.

    2013-06-01

    Repeat-pass IceSat altimetry has revealed 124 discrete surface height changes across the Antarctic Ice Sheet, interpreted to be caused by subglacial lake discharges (surface lowering) and inputs (surface uplift). Few of these active lakes have been confirmed by radio-echo sounding (RES) despite several attempts (notable exceptions are Lake Whillans and three in the Adventure Subglacial Trench). Here we present targeted RES and radar altimeter data from an "active lake" location within the upstream Institute Ice Stream, into which 0.12 km3 of water is calculated to have flowed between October 2003 and February 2008. We use a series of transects to establish an accurate appreciation of the influences of bed topography and ice-surface elevation on water storage potential. The location of surface height change is over the downslope flank of a distinct topographic hollow, where RES reveals no obvious evidence for deep (> 10 m) water. The regional hydropotential reveals a sink coincident with the surface change, however. Governed by the location of the hydrological sink, basal water will likely "drape" over existing topography in a manner dissimilar to subglacial lakes where flat strong specular RES reflections are measured. The inability of RES to detect the active lake means that more of the Antarctic ice sheet bed may contain stored water than is currently appreciated. Variation in ice surface elevation datasets leads to significant alteration in calculations of the local flow of basal water indicating the value of, and need for, high resolution RES datasets in both space and time to establish and characterise subglacial hydrological processes.

  10. Quantitative constraints on the growth of submarine lava pillars from a monitoring instrument that was caught in a lava flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, William W.

    2003-11-01

    Lava pillars are hollow, vertical chimneys of solid basaltic lava that are common features within the collapsed interiors of submarine sheet flows on intermediate and fast spreading mid-ocean ridges. They are morphologically similar to lava trees that form on land when lava overruns forested areas, but the sides of lava pillars are covered with distinctive, evenly spaced, thin, horizontal lava crusts, referred to hereafter as "lava shelves." Lava stalactites up to 5 cm long on the undersides of these shelves are evidence that cavities filled with a hot vapor phase existed temporarily beneath each crust. During the submarine eruption of Axial Volcano in 1998 on the Juan de Fuca Ridge a monitoring instrument, called VSM2, became embedded in the upper crust of a lava flow that produced 3- to 5-m-high lava pillars. A pressure sensor in the instrument showed that the 1998 lobate sheet flow inflated 3.5 m and then drained out again in only 2.5 hours. These data provide the first quantitative constraints on the timescale of lava pillar formation and the rates of submarine lava flow inflation and drainback. They also allow comparisons to lava flow inflation rates observed on land, to theoretical models of crust formation on submarine lava, and to previous models of pillar formation. A new model is presented for the rhythmic formation of alternating lava crusts and vapor cavities to explain how stacks of lava shelves are formed on the sides of lava pillars during continuous lava drainback. Each vapor cavity is created between a stranded crust and the subsiding lava surface. A hot vapor phase forms within each cavity as seawater is syringed through tiny cracks in the stranded crust above. Eventually, the subsiding lava causes the crust above to fail, quenching the hot cavity and forming the next lava crust. During the 1998 eruption at Axial Volcano, this process repeated itself about every 2 min during the 81-min-long drainback phase of the eruption, based on the thickness

  11. Experimental constraints on the rheology and mechanical properties of lava erupted in the Holuhraun area during the 2014 rifting event at Bárðarbunga, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, Yan; Kendrick, Jackie; Wall, Richard; von Aulock, Felix; Kennedy, Ben; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn

    2015-04-01

    A fissure eruption began at Holuhraun on 16 August 2014, following magma drainage from the Bárðarbunga volcanic system (Iceland). Extrusion initiated as fire fountaining along a segment of the fracture and rapidly localised to a series of small, aligned cones containing a lava lake that over spilled at both ends, feeding a large lava field. The lava composition and flow behaviour put some constraints on its rheology and mechanical properties. The lava erupted is a nearly aphyric basalt containing approximately 2-3% plagioclase with traces of olivine and pyroxene in a quenched groundmass composed of glass and 20-25% microlites. The transition from fire fountaining to lava flow leads to lava with variable vesicularities; pyroclasts expelled during fire fountaining reach up to 80% vesicles whilst the lava contain up to 45% vesicles. Textures in the lava vary from a'a to slabby pahoehoe, and flow thicknesses from several meters to few centimetres. Tension gashes, crease structures and shear zones in the upper lava carapace reveal the importance of both compressive and tensional stresses. In addition, occasional frictional marks at the base of the lava flow as well as bulldozing of sediments along the flow hint at the importance of frictional properties of the rocks during lava flow. Flow properties, textures and failure modes are strongly dependent on the material properties as well as the local conditions of stress and temperature. Here we expand our field observation with preliminary high-temperature experimental data on the rheological and mechanical properties of the erupted lava. Dilatometric measurements are used to constrain the thermal expansion coefficient of the lava important to constrain the dynamics of cooling of the flow. Micropenetration is further employed to determine the viscosity of the melt at super-liquidus temperature, which is compared to the temperature-dependence of viscosity as constrained by geochemistry. Lastly, uniaxial compression and

  12. Earthen barriers to control lava flows in the 2001 eruption of Mt. Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberi, F.; Brondi, F.; Carapezza, M. L.; Cavarra, L.; Murgia, C.

    2003-04-01

    Preceded by four days of intense seismicity and marked ground deformation, a new eruption of Mt. Etna started on 17 July and lasted until 9 August 2001. It produced lava emission and strombolian and phreatomagmatic activity from four different main vents located on a complex fracture system extending from the southeast summit cone for about 4.5 km southwards, from 3000 to 2100 m elevation (a.s.l.). The lava emitted from the lowest vent cut up an important road on the volcano and destroyed other rural roads and a few isolated country houses. Its front descended southwards to about 4 km distance from the villages of Nicolosi and Belpasso. A plan of intervention, including diversion and retaining barriers and possibly lava flow interruption, was prepared but not activated because the flow front stopped as a consequence of a decrease in the effusion rate. Extensive interventions were carried out in order to protect some important tourist facilities of the Sapienza and Mts. Silvestri zones (1900 m elevation) from being destroyed by the lava emitted from vents located at 2700 m and 2550 m elevation. Thirteen earthen barriers (with a maximum length of 370 m, height of 10-12 m, base width of 15 m and volume of 25 000 m 3) were built to divert the lava flow away from the facilities towards a path implying considerably less damage. Most of the barriers were oriented diagonally (110-135°) to the direction of the flow. They were made of loose material excavated nearby and worked very nicely, resisting the thrust of the lava without any difficulty. After the interventions carried out on Mt. Etna in 1983 and in 1991-1992, those of 2001 confirm that earthen barriers can be very effective in controlling lava flows.

  13. Great Lakes: Chemical Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1976-01-01

    The Tenth Great Lakes Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society met to assess current Chemical Research activity in the Great Lakes Basin, and addressed to the various aspects of the theme, Chemistry of the Great Lakes. Research areas reviewed included watershed studies, atmospheric and aquatic studies, and sediment studies. (BT)

  14. Seismogenic lavas and explosive eruption forecasting.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Y; Meredith, P G; Dingwell, D B; Hess, K-U; Wassermann, J; Cordonnier, B; Gerik, A; Kruhl, J H

    2008-05-22

    Volcanic dome-building episodes commonly exhibit acceleration in both effusive discharge rate and seismicity before explosive eruptions. This should enable the application of material failure forecasting methods to eruption forecasting. To date, such methods have been based exclusively on the seismicity of the country rock. It is clear, however, that the rheology and deformation rate of the lava ultimately dictate eruption style. The highly crystalline lavas involved in these eruptions are pseudoplastic fluids that exhibit a strong component of shear thinning as their deformation accelerates across the ductile to brittle transition. Thus, understanding the nature of the ductile-brittle transition in dome lavas may well hold the key to an accurate description of dome growth and stability. Here we present the results of rheological experiments with continuous microseismic monitoring, which reveal that dome lavas are seismogenic and that the character of the seismicity changes markedly across the ductile-brittle transition until complete brittle failure occurs at high strain rates. We conclude that magma seismicity, combined with failure forecasting methods, could potentially be applied successfully to dome-building eruptions for volcanic forecasting. PMID:18497822

  15. Valleys and Lava Flows near Olympus Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on board the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft has been documenting a variety of landforms in the volcanic Tharsis region, including these valleys and associated lava flows on the plains southeast of Olympus Mons. Lava flows are visible in the upper left quarter of this image, but meandering valleys with streamlined 'islands' dominate the scene. The valleys might have been carved by running water, but extremely fluid lava or mud might also have flowed through the channels. The exact role of each type of fluid--water, mud, or lava--remains to be determined. Illumination is from the right. The area shown is 7.3 km (4.5 mi) wide by 12 km (7.5 mi)long.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  16. White Sands, Carrizozo Lava Beds, NM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A truly remarkable view of White Sands and the nearby Carrizozo Lava Beds in southeast NM (33.5N, 106.5W). White Sands, site of the WW II atomic bomb development and testing facility and later post war nuclear weapons testing that can still be seen in the cleared circular patterns on the ground.

  17. Geology of the Tyrrhenus Mons Lava Flow Field, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crown, David A.; Mest, Scott C.

    2014-11-01

    The ancient, eroded Martian volcano Tyrrhenus Mons exhibits a central caldera complex, layered flank deposits dissected by radial valleys, and a 1000+ km-long flow field extending to the southwest toward Hellas Planitia. Past studies suggested an early phase of volcanism dominated by large explosive eruptions followed by subsequent effusive activity at the summit and to the southwest. As part of a new geologic mapping study of northeast Hellas, we are examining the volcanic landforms and geologic evolution of the Tyrrhenus Mons flow field, including the timing and nature of fluvial activity and effects on volcanic units. New digital geologic mapping incorporates THEMIS IR (100 m/pixel) and CTX (5 m/pixel) images as well as constraints from MOLA topography.Mapping results to-date include delineation of the boundaries of the flow field, identification and mapping of volcanic and erosional channels within the flow field, and mapping and analysis of lava flow lobes. THEMIS IR and CTX images allow improved discrimination of the numerous flow lobes that are observed in the flow field, including refinement of the margins of previously known flows and identification of additional and smaller lobes. A prominent sinuous rille extending from Tyrrhenus Mons’ summit caldera is a major feature that supplied lava to the flow field. Smaller volcanic channels are common throughout the flow field; some occur in segments along crests of local topographic highs and may delineate lava tubes. In addition to volcanic channels, the flow field surface is characterized by several types of erosional channels, including wide troughs with scour marks, elongate sinuous channels, and discontinuous chains of elongate pits and troughs. High-resolution images reveal the widespread and significant effects of fluvial activity in the region, and further mapping studies will examine spatial and temporal interactions between volcanism and fluvial processes.

  18. Style, Magnitude, and Rate of Deccan Lava Super-eruptions at K-T Boundary Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self, S.; Jay, A. E.; Widdowson, M.; Kelley, S. P.

    2005-12-01

    A study of 100s of individual lava flow units exposed in sections through the upper part of the main Deccan basaltic lava pile includes flow fields that were being erupted across the K-T boundary, about 65 Ma ago. Pahoehoe flow fields (the products of one eruption), each commonly 50 m, and exceptionally 80 m, thick, dominate the pile in the central Western Ghats region. The main landscape-builders are inflated sheet lobes between 15-30 m (occasionally 50 m) thick, with subordinate smaller inflated lobes and units down to the size of toes. These are typical tholeiitic pahoehoe sheet lobes, similar to those found in many other flood basalt provinces. Defining flow fields by several criteria permits an estimate of how many eruptions built up this portion of the Deccan pile, which is 30-40 in number. Based on the extent of the formations, some of the lava fields may be the longest yet described on Earth (1000 km). All formations studied have the same style lava flows, and, thus, fissure-fed, pahoehoe-flow-forming effusive volcanism dominated. Evidence from inter-flow horizons suggests extensive explosive activity also accompanied some eruptions (cf. Icelandic eruptions such as Eldgja AD 934). The 1,200-m-thick lava pile can be assigned to Deccan Group formations in the Wai Sub-group (WSG) by compositional fingerprinting, to the paleomagnetic timescale by polarity and declination measurements, and, by cross-correlation, to the radiometric time scale. During eruptions that built up the WSG lavas, which encompass the K-T boundary and the slightly younger paleomagnetic chron 29R-N boundary, the widespread nature of the formations attests that enormous volumes of lava were produced during each eruption. Volumes of eruptive units (flow fields) exceeded 2,000, and probably 5,000, cubic km of lava, and this was likely repeated in most eruptive events, each lasting many years. The age span of the WSG series of lava eruptions was so short that it falls within the errors of

  19. Lava penetrating water: the different behaviours of pāhoehoe and `a`ā at the Nesjahraun, Þingvellir, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, John Alexander; Mitchell, Neil Charles; Mochrie, Fiona; Cassidy, Michael; Pinkerton, Harry

    2012-01-01

    The Nesjahraun is a basaltic lava flow erupted from a subaerial fissure, extending NE along the Þingvellir graben from the Hengill central volcano that produced pāhoehoe lava followed by `a`ā. The Nesjahraun entered Iceland's largest lake, Þingvallavatn, along its southern shore during both phases of the eruption and exemplifies lava flowing into water in a lacustrine environment in the absence of powerful wave action. This study combines airborne light detection and ranging, sidescan sonar and Chirp seismic data with field observations to investigate the behaviour of the lava as it entered the water. Pāhoehoe sheet lava was formed during the early stages of the eruption. Along the shoreline, stacks of thin (5-20 cm thick), vesicular, flows rest upon and surround low (<5 m) piles of coarse, unconsolidated, variably oxidised spatter. Clefts within the lava run inland from the lake. These are 2-5 m wide, >2 m deep, ˜50 m long, spaced ˜50 m apart and have sub-horizontal striations on the walls. They likely represent channels or collapsed tubes along which lava was delivered into the water. A circular rootless cone, Eldborg, formed when water infiltrated a lava tube. Offshore from the pāhoehoe lavas, the gradient of the flow surface steepens, suggesting a change in flow regime and the development of a talus ramp. Later, the flow was focused into a channel of `a`ā lava, ˜200-350 m wide. This split into individual flow lobes 20-50 m wide along the shore. `A`ā clinker is exposed on the water's edge, as well as glassy sand and gravel, which has been locally intruded by small (<1 m), irregularly shaped, lava bodies. The cores of the flow lobes contain coherent, but hackly fractured lava. Mounds consisting predominantly of scoria lapilli and the large paired half-cone of Grámelur were formed in phreatomagmatic explosions. The `a`ā flow can be identified underwater over 1 km offshore, and the sidescan data suggest that the flow lobes remained coherent flowing

  20. Lava flows composition of the Daedalia Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, Cristian; Giacomini, Lorenza; Sgavetti, Maria; Massironi, Matteo

    2010-05-01

    Daedalia Planum is a large lava plain, consisting of more than 1500 km lava flows emplaced over an almost flat terrain in the south-east area of Arsia Mons. The morphology of this region has been studied by Giacomini et al. (Planet.SpaceSci., 2009) and revealed the presence of various features indicative of inflation mechanisms. Thirteen morphologic units have been delineated and the stratigraphic relationships among these units have been established by the authors. Several compositional data indicate that most of the Mars surface appears to consist of tholeiitic basalts where rocks previously identified as andesite may be basaltic rocks coated with alteration rinds (McSween et al., Science, 2009). Some primitive alkaline olivine-rich basaltic rocks have been also recognized by rover exploration (McSween et al., J.Geophys.Res., 2006). The visible and near-infrared reflectance spectra contain electronic absorptions characteristic of mafic minerals including pyroxenes and olivine. These minerals, together with plagioclase, are the major components of lava's rocks. We have analyzed data acquired by the OMEGA orbiter spectrometer of the Mars Express mission. Several OMEGA's images have been studied collecting sets of spectra from each of the thirteen geological units. The spectra indicate a relatively uniform composition of the lavas, characterized by two wide absorption bands (I and II) at about 1000 and 2000 nm, respectively. These spectral features are diagnostic of the presence of pyroxenes, and the continuum removed spectra permit us to recognize the presence of two different pyroxenes . The precise minima positions of band I, between 950 and 1000 nm, and of band II, between 1800 and 2000 nm, suggest the presence in this region of low calcium and subcalcium clinopyroxene, like pigeonite and augite, with variable relative abundances. The presence of these types of pyroxenes suggests a tholeiitic composition of the Daedalia Planum long lava flows, in agreement with

  1. The hydrothermal alteration of cooling lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Jessica L.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Calder, Eliza S.; Valentine, Greg A.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrothermal alteration is a recognized cause of volcanic instability and edifice collapse, including that of lava domes or dome complexes. Alteration by percolating fluids transforms primary minerals in dome lavas to weaker secondary products such as clay minerals; moreover, secondary mineral precipitation can affect the porosity and permeability of dome lithologies. The location and intensity of alteration in a dome depend heavily on fluid pathways and availability in conjunction with heat supply. Here we investigate postemplacement lava dome weakening by hydrothermal alteration using a finite element numerical model of water migration in simplified dome geometries. This is combined with the rock alteration index (RAI) to predict zones of alteration and secondary mineral precipitation. Our results show that alteration potential is highest at the interface between the hot core of a lava dome and its clastic talus carapace. The longest lived alteration potential fields occur in domes with persistent heat sources and permeabilities that allow sufficient infiltration of water for alteration processes, but not so much that domes cool quickly. This leads us to conclude that alteration-induced collapses are most likely to be shallow seated and originate in the talus or talus/core interface in domes which have a sustained supply of magmatic heat. Mineral precipitation at these zones of permeability contrast could create barriers to fluid flow, potentially causing gas pressurization which might promote deeper seated and larger volume collapses. This study contributes to our knowledge of how hydrothermal alteration can affect lava domes and provides constraints on potential sites for alteration-related collapses, which can be used to target hazard monitoring.

  2. CO2 emission from lake-filled Katanuma crater, Narugo volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padron, E.; Hernandez Perez, P. A.; Mori, T.; Perez, N.

    2010-12-01

    Narugo volcano is composed by four dacitic Holocene age lava domes surrounding the 400 m wide lake-filled Katanuma crater. A large caldera, 5.5 x 7 km NW of the city of Sendai was formed by paroxysmal eruptions 45 ka ago and after this activity, lava flows and lava domes were formed in the inner part of the caldera. The only known eruption at Narugo in historical time occurred in 837 AD. Katanuma is known as one of the most acidic lakes in the world and boiling springs, water vapour and volcanic gases are discharged from the lake botton. As a result of this degassing, a relatively intense volcanic gas emission is observed along the lake surface in the form of gas bubbles. To compute the total CO2 degassing rate through Katanuma water lake surface, a CO2 emission survey was carried out on August 2010. CO2 efflux measurements were performed on the water surface by means of a portable NDIR sensor at 86 sampling sites, following a modified floating device of the accumulation chamber method.CO2 efflux values ranged between 16 and 14300 g m-2 d-1. CO2 efflux map was constructed using sequential Gaussian simulation. An important CO2 degassing structure was observed at the water surface, located on its west half part, with a N-S trending. An averaged map of 200 equiprobable simulations allowed us to compute 35.2 ± 4.1 t/d of CO2 released to the atmosphere through the water surface on a area of 0.14 km2. These results suggest clearly that monitoring CO2 emission rate from lake-filled Katanuma crater will contribute to improve the Narugo volcano surveillance program as well as our knowledge on the global CO2 emission from volcanic lakes, which is actually estimated about 136 Mt year-1 (Pérez et al., 2010). Reference: Pérez et al., 2010. CVL 7 Workshop Costa Rica, March 2010.

  3. Holocene glacier activity on Kerguelen Island: preliminary results from a novel proglacial lake sediment record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Støren, Eivind; Bakke, Jostein; Arnaud, Fabien; Poulenard, Jérôme; Fanget, Bernard; Malet, Emmanuel; Sabatier, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Polar-regions are changing rapidly as greenhouse warming is continuing with huge impact on e.g. sea ice extent and snow cover. This change triggers teleconnections to low latitude areas challenging societies and human activity. We have, however, very little quantitative information of past climate in the Polar-regions that can be used to evaluate the potential responses and the response patterns to forcing changes and changes in boundary conditions. Whatever anthropogenic changes may occur in the future, they will be superimposed on, and interact with, natural climate variations due to all the forcing we are aware of. This means we need to better document past climate/environmental variability of the Polar-regions. Especially in the Southern Ocean there are few time series recording past climate due to few suitable land areas and the few Sub-Antarctic Islands is remote and has cumbersome logistics. Continuous terrestrial records from this region are therefore urgently needed for constraining future scenarios from earth system models. Glaciers and ice caps are still ubiquitous in the Polar-regions, although they are rapidly shrinking due to the on-going warming. The continuous sedimentary records produced by glaciers, which are stored in downstream lakes, represent supreme archives of past variability wherefrom quantitative information of key climate system components can be extracted. Kerguelen Island is located within the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and the Southern Westerly wind belt and contains several glaciers and smaller ice caps. Terrestrial archives recording past history of the glaciers at Kerguelen thus have a unique potential to record past changes in oceanic and atmospheric circulation patterns from southern mid-latitudes. Here we present preliminary results from the first distal glacier-fed lake that is sampled from Kerguelen Island. A 2.8 m long sediment core was obtained from Lac Guynemer (121masl.) located at the Peninsule Loranchet at the

  4. High-resolution water column survey to identify active sublacustrine hydrothermal discharge zones within Lake Rotomahana, North Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Sharon L.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Fornari, Daniel; Tivey, Maurice A.; Stucker, Valerie K.

    2016-03-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles were used to conduct a high-resolution water column survey of Lake Rotomahana using temperature, pH, turbidity, and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) to identify active hydrothermal discharge zones within the lake. Five areas with active sublacustrine venting were identified: (1) the area of the historic Pink Terraces; (2) adjacent to the western shoreline subaerial "Steaming Cliffs," boiling springs and geyser; (3) along the northern shoreline to the east of the Pink Terrace site; (4) the newly discovered Patiti hydrothermal system along the south margin of the 1886 Tarawera eruption rift zone; and (5) a location in the east basin (northeast of Patiti Island). The Pink Terrace hydrothermal system was active prior to the 1886 eruption of Mount Tarawera, but venting along the western shoreline, in the east basin, and the Patiti hydrothermal system appear to have been initiated in the aftermath of the eruption, similar to Waimangu Valley to the southwest. Different combinations of turbidity, pH anomalies (both positive and negative), and ORP responses suggest vent fluid compositions vary over short distances within the lake. The seasonal period of stratification limits vertical transport of heat to the surface layer and the hypolimnion temperature of Lake Rotomahana consequently increases with an average warming rate of ~ 0.010 °C/day due to both convective hydrothermal discharge and conductive geothermal heating. A sudden temperature increase occurred during our 2011 survey and was likely the response to an earthquake swarm just 11 days prior.

  5. Indications of human activity from amino acid and amino sugar analyses on Holocene sediments from lake Lonar, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, P.; Gaye, B.; Wiesner, M.; Prasad, S.; Basavaiah, N.; Stebich, M.; Anoop, A.; Riedel, N.; Brauer, A.

    2012-04-01

    proteinogenic to non-proteinogenic AAs. This indicates a strong increase in aquatic production which seems to be the result of eutrophication likely caused by human activity like forest clearance and agricultural land use. This hypothesis is corroborated by the dating of more than 10 temple ruins surrounding the lake, which were built in the 12thcentury, indicating early urbanisation.

  6. Sensibility analysis of VORIS lava-flow simulations: application to Nyamulagira volcano, Democratic Republic of Congo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syavulisembo, A. M.; Havenith, H.-B.; Smets, B.; d'Oreye, N.; Marti, J.

    2015-03-01

    Assessment and management of volcanic risk are important scientific, economic, and political issues, especially in densely populated areas threatened by volcanoes. The Virunga area in the Democratic Republic of Congo, with over 1 million inhabitants, has to cope permanently with the threat posed by the active Nyamulagira and Nyiragongo volcanoes. During the past century, Nyamulagira erupted at intervals of 1-4 years - mostly in the form of lava flows - at least 30 times. Its summit and flank eruptions lasted for periods of a few days up to more than two years, and produced lava flows sometimes reaching distances of over 20 km from the volcano, thereby affecting very large areas and having a serious impact on the region of Virunga. In order to identify a useful tool for lava flow hazard assessment at the Goma Volcano Observatory (GVO), we tested VORIS 2.0.1 (Felpeto et al., 2007), a freely available software (http://www.gvb-csic.es) based on a probabilistic model that considers topography as the main parameter controlling lava flow propagation. We tested different Digital Elevation Models (DEM) - SRTM1, SRTM3, and ASTER GDEM - to analyze the sensibility of the input parameters of VORIS 2.0.1 in simulation of recent historical lava-flow for which the pre-eruption topography is known. The results obtained show that VORIS 2.0.1 is a quick, easy-to-use tool for simulating lava-flow eruptions and replicates to a high degree of accuracy the eruptions tested. In practice, these results will be used by GVO to calibrate VORIS model for lava flow path forecasting during new eruptions, hence contributing to a better volcanic crisis management.

  7. Generation of pyroclastic flows by explosive interaction of lava flows with ice/water-saturated substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, Alexander; Behncke, Boris; Belousova, Marina

    2011-04-01

    We describe a new type of secondary rootless phreatomagmatic explosions observed at active lava flows at volcanoes Klyuchevskoy (Russia) and Etna (Italy). The explosions occurred at considerable (up to 5 km) distances from primary volcanic vents, generally at steep (15-35°) slopes, and in places where incandescent basaltic or basaltic-andesitic lava propagated over ice/water-saturated substrate. The explosions produced high (up to 7 km) vertical ash/steam-laden clouds as well as pyroclastic flows that traveled up to 2 km downslope. Individual lobes of the pyroclastic flow deposits were up to 2 m thick, had steep lateral margins, and were composed of angular to subrounded bomb-size clasts in a poorly sorted ash-lapilli matrix. Character of the juvenile rock clasts in the pyroclastic flows (poorly vesiculated with chilled and fractured cauliflower outer surfaces) indicated their origin by explosive fragmentation of lava due to contact with external water. Non-juvenile rocks derived from the substrate of the lava flows comprised up to 75% in some of the pyroclastic flow deposits. We suggest a model where gradual heating of a water-saturated substrate under the advancing lava flow elevates pore pressure and thus reduces basal friction (in the case of frozen substrate water is initially formed by thawing of the substrate along the contact with lava). On steep slope this leads to gravitational instability and sliding of a part of the active lava flow and water-saturated substrate. The sliding lava and substrate disintegrate and intermix, triggering explosive "fuel-coolant" type interaction that produces large volume of fine-grained clastic material. Relatively cold steam-laden cloud of the phreatomagmatic explosion has limited capacity to transport upward the produced clastic material, thus part of it descends downslope in the form of pyroclastic flow. Similar explosive events were described for active lava flows of Llaima (Chile), Pavlof (Alaska), and Hekla (Iceland

  8. Microbial Metabolic Activity and Bioavailability of Dissolved Organic Matter Under the Impact of Intense UV Radiation in Pony Lake, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieser, M.; Foreman, C. M.; McKnight, D. M.; Miller, P. L.; Chin, Y.

    2006-12-01

    over the austral summer as the lake transitioned from fully ice covered to ice free. Bacterial numbers ranged from 1.10 x 106 4.09 x 107 cells ml-1 in ice core samples and from 2.15 x 105 to 3.22 x 107 cell ml-1 in ice free Pony Lake due to seasonal shifts in melting as well as alternations in the DOM pool. Secondary production was higher in the ice free lake compared to the ice core samples. 24 h exposure experiments of natural bacterial assemblages to in situ sunlight demonstrated that tritiated thymidine incorporation was significantly less than compared to dark controls. Our findings indicate that the intense solar radiation in Antarctica effects the microbial community, alters DOM bioavailability and composition and the microorganisms are not only over-wintering in the frozen ice cover of Pony Lake, they are metabolically active.

  9. Geochemistry of Axial seamount lavas: Magmatic relationship between the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.M.; Morgan, C.; Lilas, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Axial seamount, located along the central portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and at the eastern end of the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain, is the current center of the Cobb hotspot. Lava chemistry and bathymetry indicate that Axial seamount is a discrete volcanic unit, with a more productive shallow magmatic plumbing system separate from the adjacent ridge segments. Despite this classic association of spreading center and hotspot volcanic activity, there is no evidence in the lavas for geochemical or isotopic enrichment typical of hotspot or mantle plume activity. The differences in composition between the Axial seamount lavas and the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas are attributed to melting processes rather than to any fundamental differences in their mantle source compositions. The higher magma production rates, higher Sr, and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas relative to the ridge lavas are thought to be a consequence of melt initiation at greater depths. The melting column producing the seamount lavas is thought to be initiated in the stability field of spinel peridotite, whereas the ridge lavas are produced from a melting column initiated at shallower levels, possibly within or close to the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. Implicit in this interpretation is the conclusion that the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas, and by analogy most MORB, are generated at shallow mantle levels, mostly within the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. This interpretation also requires that for the upwelling mantle to intersect the solidus at different depths, the mantle supplying Axial seamount must be hotter than the rest of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Axial seamount, therefore, reflects a thermal anomaly in the mantle, rather than a geochemically enriched ocean island basalt type mantle plume.

  10. Paleomagnetism and Rock Magnetic Properties from Quaternary Lavas and Tuffs of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlan, S. S.; Morgan, L. A.

    2008-12-01

    We report paleomagnetic and rock magnetic from rhyolite lava flows, ignimbrites, and basalt flows associated with the Yellowstone Caldera, within and surrounding Yellowstone National Park. These data were collected in order to understand sources of magnetic variations observed in high resolution aeromagnetic data reported by Finn and Morgan (2002), and to better understand the evolution of the Yellowstone magmatic system. Most paleomagnetic samples are from volcanic rocks of the third eruptive cycle (1.2 Ma to 0.070 Ma), including the ca. 0.640 Ma Lava Creek Tuff, postcaldera rhyolite flows, and contemporaneous marginal or post-caldera basalt flows. Magnetic intensities for samples ranged from 0.12 A/m to 5.9 A/m, with volume susceptibilities of 2.14x10-4 to 1.45x10-3 SI; Q ratios range from 0.67 to 23.8. As expected, most sites yield well-defined paleomagnetic directions of north declination and moderate positive inclination consistent with remanence acquisition during the Brunhes polarity chron. However, a few sites from older units such as the rhyolites of the Harlequin Lake (0.839 ± 0.007 Ma) and Lewis Canyon (0.853 ± 0.008 Ma) flows, and the basalts from the Junction Butte flow (at Tower Falls, 2.16 ± 0.04 Ma) and Hepburn Mesa (2.2 Ma) yield reverse polarity magnetizations (40Ar/39Ar dates from Obradovich, 1992, and Harlan, unpublished (Hepburn Mesa flow)). Rock magnetic behavior, including high coercivities during AF demagnetization, high laboratory unblocking temperatures, and susceptibility vs. temperature determinations indicate that remanence in the rhyolitic samples is carried by a combination of single or pseudo-single domain magnetite and/or hematite; in the basalt flows magnetite and high-Ti titanomagnetite carrys the remanence. Paleomagnetic results from 46 sites in 27 separate flows yields a grand mean direction with a declination of 356.9° and inclination of 61.9° (k = 35.2, α95 = 4.8°). VGPs calculated from the site-mean directions yield a

  11. A new tree-ring date for the ``floating island'' lava flow, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, David K.; Hoblitt, Richard P.; Lawrence, Donald B.

    1990-09-01

    Anomalously narrow and missing rings in trees 12 m from Mount St. Helens' “floating island” lava flow, and synchronous growth increases in trees farther from the flow margin, are evidence that this andesitic flow was extruded between late summer 1799 and spring 1800 a.d., within a few months after the eruption of Mount St. Helens' dacitic layer T tephra. For ease of reference, we assign here an 1800 a.d. date to this flow. The new date shows that the start of Mount St. Helens' Goat Rocks eruptive period (1800 1857 a.d.) resembled the recent (1980 1986) activity in both petrochemical trends and timing. In both cases, an initial explosive eruption of dacite was quickly succeeded by the eruption of more mafic lavas; dacite lavas then reappeared during an extended concluding phase of activity. This behavior is consistent with a recently proposed fluid-dynamic model of magma withdrawal from a compositionally zoned magma chamber.

  12. Geochemistry of Intra-Transform Lavas from the Galápagos Transform Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, T. A.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Harpp, K. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Galápagos plume has profoundly affected the development and evolution of the nearby (<250 km) Galápagos Transform Fault (GTF), a ~100km right-stepping offset in the Galápagos Spreading Center (GSC). The GTF can be divided into two sections that represent different stages of transform evolution: the northern section exhibits fully developed transform fault morphology, whereas the southern section is young, and deformation is more diffuse. Both segments are faulted extensively and include numerous small (<0.5km3) monogenetic volcanic cones, though volcanic activity is more common in the south. To examine the composition of the mantle source and melting conditions responsible for the intra-transform lavas, as well as the influence of the plume on GTF evolution, we present major element, trace element, and radiogenic isotope analysis of samples collected during SON0158, EWI0004, and MV1007 cruises. Radiogenic isotope ratio variations in the Galápagos Archipelago require four distinct mantle reservoirs across the region: PLUME, DM, FLO, and WD. We find that Galápagos Transform lavas are chemically distinct from nearby GSC lavas and neighboring seamounts. They have radiogenic isotopic compositions that lie on a mixing line between DM and PLUME, with little to no contribution from any other mantle reservoirs despite their geographic proximity to WD-influenced lavas erupted along the GSC and at nearby (<50km away) seamounts. Within the transform, lavas from the northern section are more enriched in radiogenic isotopes than lavas sampled in the southern section. Transform lavas are anomalously depleted in incompatible trace elements (ITEs) relative to GSC lavas, suggesting unique melting conditions within the transform. Isotopic variability along the transform axis indicates that mantle sources and/or melting mechanisms vary between the northern and southern sections, which may relate to their distances from the plume or the two-stage development and evolution of

  13. Accelerometer-derived activity correlates with volitional swimming speed in lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiem, J.D.; Dawson, J.W.; Gleiss, A.C.; Martins, E.G.; Haro, Alexander J.; Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Danylchuk, A.J.; Wilson, R.P.; Cooke, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying fine-scale locomotor behaviours associated with different activities is challenging for free-swimming fish.Biologging and biotelemetry tools can help address this problem. An open channel flume was used to generate volitionalswimming speed (Us) estimates of cultured lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens Rafinesque, 1817) and these were paired withsimultaneously recorded accelerometer-derived metrics of activity obtained from three types of data-storage tags. This studyexamined whether a predictive relationship could be established between four different activity metrics (tail-beat frequency(TBF), tail-beat acceleration amplitude (TBAA), overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA), and vectorial dynamic body acceleration(VeDBA)) and the swimming speed of A. fulvescens. Volitional Us of sturgeon ranged from 0.48 to 2.70 m·s−1 (0.51–3.18 bodylengths (BL) · s−1). Swimming speed increased linearly with all accelerometer-derived metrics, and when all tag types werecombined, Us increased 0.46 BL·s−1 for every 1 Hz increase in TBF, and 0.94, 0.61, and 0.94 BL·s−1 for every 1g increase in TBAA,ODBA, and VeDBA, respectively. Predictive relationships varied among tag types and tag-specific parameter estimates of Us arepresented for all metrics. This use of acceleration data-storage tags demonstrated their applicability for the field quantificationof sturgeon swimming speed.

  14. Ice-Confined Basaltic Lava Flows: Review and Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilling, I.; Edwards, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    Basaltic lavas that are interpreted as having been emplaced in subglacial or ice-confined subaerial settings are known from several localities in Iceland, British Columbia and Antarctica. At least four different types of observations have been used to date to identify emplacement of basaltic lavas in an ice-rich environment: i) gross flow morphology, ii) surface structures, iii) evidence for ice-confined water during emplacement, and iv) lava fracture patterns. Five types of ice-confined lava are identified: sheets, lobes, mounds, linear ridges and sinuous ridges. While the appearance of lavas is controlled by the same factors as in the submarine environment, such as the geometry and configuration of vents and lava tubes, flow rheology and rates, and underlying topography, the presence of ice can lead to distinct features that are specific to the ice-confined setting. Other types have very similar or identical equivalents in submarine environment, albeit with some oversteepening/ice contact surfaces. Ice-confined lavas can form as (1) subaerial or subaqueous lavas emplaced against ice open to the air, (2) subaqueous lavas emplaced into pre-existing sub-ice drainage networks, and (3) subaqueous lavas emplaced into ponded water beneath ice. Their surface structures reflect the relationship between rates of lava flow emplacement at the site of ice-water-lava contact, ice melting and water drainage. Variations in local lava flow rates could be due to lava cooling, constriction, inflation, tube development, ice melting, ice collapse, lava collapse, changes in eruption rate etc. Episodes of higher lava flow rate would favour direct ice contact and plastic compression against the ice, generating oversteepened and/or overthickened chilled margins, cavities in the lava formed by melting of enveloped ice blocks (cryolith cavities) and structures such as flattened pillows and lava clasts embedded into the glassy margins. Melting back of the confining ice generates space to

  15. Emplacement of Hawaiian Lava Flows - the Perspective From Twenty Years of Observations at Kilauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cashman, K. V.; Kauahikaua, J. P.

    2002-12-01

    The past two decades at Kilauea Volcano have been a time of nearly continuous lava flow activity that has provided enormous scope for observing the ways in which basaltic lava flows advance, evolve, and develop feeder systems (channels and tube) and flow fields. Technological advances have allowed direct measurements of the physical conditions of lava flow emplacement (lava flux, velocity, tube development, etc.). Concurrent studies of lava samples document changes in flow composition, crystallinity and vesicularity, that reflect the physical state of the lava under different transport and emplacement conditions. Finally, analog studies of solidifying flows and fluid suspensions permit parameterization of flow and cooling characteristics in simple systems that provide important underpinnings to physical interpretations of active flow processes. Key to all aspects of lava flow emplacement are the combined effects of flow advance rate, cooling and the rheological changes that lava undergoes during solidification. When flow advance is sufficiently slow, local shear at flow margins is not sufficient to prevent crust formation and the flow surface quickly solidifies to smooth pahoehoe. Flow is transported through internal lava tubes and flow fields grow by inflation or surface breakouts. Lava flowing beneath a crust remains hot and fluid and may thermally erode its base. In Hawaii, the length of tube-fed pahoehoe flows is commonly limited only by a flow reaching the ocean. When flow advance is sufficiently rapid, flows are transported through open channels with lateral shear zones at the flow margin that remain free of crust. Initial rates of flow advance are controlled primarily by the eruptive flux and at high flux rates flows may advance quickly for several kilometers. Cooling from the crust-free surface is radiative and rapid, as is the resulting crystallization of the interior lava. The addition of crystals, and accompanying loss of bubbles, causes an increase in

  16. Ancient lakes on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldspiel, J. M.; Squyres, S. W.

    1989-01-01

    The valley systems in Mars' ancient cratered terrain provide strong evidence for a warmer and wetter climate very early in planetary history. The valley systems in some instances debouch into closed depressions that could have acted as local ponding basins for the flow. A survey of the Martian equatorial region shows that numerous local depressions at the confluence of valley systems exist. These depressions (approximately 100 km) typically are characterized by many valleys flowing into them and few or none flowing out. If ponding did take place, these basin would have contained lakes for some period during Mars' early warmer epoch. Although the collection basins are numerous, location of ones that have not suffered significant subsequent geologic modification is difficult. Some morphologic features suggest that volcanic lavas may have filled them subsequent to any early fluvial activity. Two detailed maps of valley systems and local ponding basins in USGC 1:2,000,000 subquadrangles were completed and a third is in progress. The completed regions are in Mare Tyrrhenum (MC-22 SW) and Margarifter Sinus (MC-19 SE), and the region in progress is in Iapygia (MC-21 NW). On the maps, the valley systems and interpreted margins of ponding basins are indicated. The depressions are of interest for two reasons. First, the depressions were surely the sites in which the materials eroded from the valleys were deposited. Such sediments could preserve important information about the physical conditions at the time of deposition. Second, the sediments could preserve evidence of water-atmosphere interactions during the early period of the Martian climate. Atmospheric carbon dioxide would dissolve in water, and solid carbonate minerals would tend to precipitate out to form carbonate sedimentary deposits. Formation of carbonates in this manner might account for some of the CO2 lost from the early more dense atmosphere.

  17. Risk Transmission Indicator of Schistosomiasis Japonicum Considering Human Activities in Lake and Marshland Regions- A Case Study of Poyang Lake, Jiangxi Province, P.R. China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marie, Tiphanie; Yesou, Herve; Huber, Claire; De Fraipont, Paul; Uribe, Carlos; Lacaux, Jean-Pierre; Lafaye, Murielle; Lai, Xijun; Desnos, Yves-Louis

    2013-01-01

    This paper present the method used to determine the areas where schistosomiasis transmission is the higher. A primary work was necessary to this study: identification of potential presence of schistosomiasis japonicum’s vector in Poyang lakeshore area (Jiangxi Province, P.R. China). Results obtained from its first work were crossing with the most risky human activities and with villages to elaborate a level of transmission risk. The first parameter determined concern fishing, which was identified like the most risky activity for schistosomiasis transmission, and fish traps were digitalized using a very high resolution ALOS data. The second parameter is about the risky areas for buffalo grazing, and vector potential presence areas were crossed with village proximity to determine the most risky areas for human transmission. The third parameter built is a level of risk for each village digitalized around Poyang Lake, taking into account the proximity and level of potential presence of vector’s areas.

  18. Bringing the Volcano to the Students: The Syracuse University LAVA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karson, J.; Wysocki, B.; Kissane, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    A collaborative effort between the Department of Earth Sciences and Sculpture Department at Syracuse University has resulted in the facility to make natural-scale lava flows in a laboratory environment for K-university students and the general public. Using a large, gas-fired, furnace with a tilting crucible, basaltic gravel is heated at temperatures of 1100° to 1300°C resulting in up to 800 lbs of homogeneous, basaltic lava. Lava is poured over a variety of surfaces including rock slab, wet or dry sand, ice and dry ice. A ceramic funnel permits pouring into and under water. Differing set-ups provide analogs for a wide range of terrestrial, marine, and extraterrestrial lava flows. Composition is held constant, but varying key parameters such as temperature, pouring (effusion) rate, and slope result in different flow morphologies including ropey to toey pahoehoe, inflated flows, channelized flows with levees, and hyaloclastites. Typical flows are 2-4 m long and < 1 m wide. The cooled flows are dissected to document variations in vesicle and crystal densities. In general, the flows produce massive, glassy basalt with internal structures that mimic flows from natural environments. Byproducts of the process include abundant Pelee's hair and tears. Experiments are underway to quantify the variables associated with different morphologies, but the spectacular lava flows are also being integrated into class experiences. Students and instructors from K-12 classes as well as university classes are spectators and active participants in the lava flow events, commonly proposing experiments before or during flows. Lava flows are incorporated into labs for Earth Science classes and also used for artistic creations in the Sculpture program. Although students have access to still images and video of natural lava flows from active volcanoes, there is no substitute for "being there" and experiencing the spectacle of viscous, incandescent orange, lava flowing over the surface in a

  19. Magnetic links among lava flows, tuffs and the underground plumbing system in a monogenetic volcano, derived from magnetics and paleomagnetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Trigo-Huesca, Alfonso; Pérez-Cruz, Ligia

    2012-12-01

    A combined study using magnetics and paleomagnetism of the Toluquilla monogenetic volcano and associated lavas and tuffs from Valsequillo basin in Central Mexico provides evidence on a 'magnetic' link between the lavas, ash tuffs and the underground volcanic conduit system. Paleomagnetic analyses show that the lava and ash tuff carry reverse polarity magnetizations, which correlate with the inversely polarized dipolar magnetic anomaly over the volcano. The magnetizations in the lava and tuff show similar southward declinations and upward inclinations, supporting petrological inferences that the tuff was emplaced while still hot and indicating a temporal correlation for lava and tuff emplacement. Modeling of the dipolar anomaly gives a reverse polarity source magnetization associated with a vertical prismatic body with southward declination and upward inclination, which correlates with the reverse polarity magnetizations in the lava and tuff. The study documents a direct correlation of the paleomagnetic records with the underground magmatic conduit system of the monogenetic volcano. Time scale for cooling of the volcanic plumbing system involves a longer period than the one for the tuff and lava, suggesting that magnetization for the source of dipolar anomaly may represent a long time average as compared to the spot readings in the lava and tuff. The reverse polarity magnetizations in lava and tuff and in the underground source body for the magnetic anomaly are interpreted in terms of eruptive activity of Toluquilla volcano at about 1.3 Ma during the Matuyama reverse polarity C1r.2r chron.

  20. Shatter Complex Formation in the Twin Craters Lava Flow, Zuni-Bandera Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Meerscheidt, H. C.; Bleacher, J. E.; Brand, B. D.; deWet, A.; Samuels, R.; Hamilton, C.; Garry, W. B.; Bandfield, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    . Prominent ';a';a channels travel around the bluff, leaving a 'wake' of uncovered ground on the downstream side. We interpret this shatter area to have been a branching tube network within an active sheet. The limestone bluff acted as an obstacle that caused a backup of lava within the tubes, driving episodes of shattering. The mounds likely represent earlier solidified sections between active, possibly braided, tube branches, which remained as mounds within the shatter area after the adjacent crust subsided. When lava broke out from the pressurized sheet-like lobe, it formed the ';a';a channels. This section of the flow field is interpreted using inferences from shatter ring formation, but is perhaps better termed a shatter sheet or shatter complex. This study has implications for understanding lava flow dynamics at constriction points, as well as the evolution and morphology of shatter rings.

  1. Voluminous submarine lava flows from Hawaiian volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, R.T.; Moore, J.G.; Lipman, P.W.; Belderson, R.H.

    1988-05-01

    The GLORIA long-range sonar imaging system has revealed fields of large lava flows in the Hawaiian Trough east and south of Hawaii in water as deep as 5.5 km. Flows in the most extensive field (110 km long) have erupted from the deep submarine segment of Kilauea's east rift zone. Other flows have been erupted from Loihi and Mauna Loa. This discovery confirms a suspicion, long held from subaerial studies, that voluminous submarine flows are erupted from Hawaiian volcanoes, and it supports an inference that summit calderas repeatedly collapse and fill at intervals of centuries to millenia owing to voluminous eruptions. These extensive flows differ greatly in form from pillow lavas found previously along shallower segments of the rift zones; therefore, revision of concepts of volcano stratigraphy and structure may be required.

  2. Flow direction determination of lava flows.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. I.; Rhodes, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    The flow direction technique, previously applied to ash-flow sheets, can be used to determine direction of movement and locate eruptive centers for lava flows. The method provides statistically stronger and more consistent flow direction data for lava than ash-flow tuff. The accuracy and reliability of the technique was established on the porphyritic basaltic andesite of Mount Taylor, New Mexico, which erupted from a known center, the Mount Taylor Amphitheater. The technique was then applied to volcanic units with unknown sources: the John Kerr Peak Quartz Latite and mid-Tertiary andesite flows in the Mogollon Mountains, both in southwestern New Mexico. The flow direction technique indicated flow patterns and suggested source areas for each rock unit. In the Mogollon Mountains flow direction measurements were supported by independent directional criteria such as dips of cross beds, stratigraphic thickening, facies changes, and megascopic textures.-

  3. The Preservation of Organic Matter and its Signatures at Experimental Lava Flow Interfaces: Implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junium, C. K.; Karson, J. A.; Kahan, T.

    2015-12-01

    The oxidizing nature of Martian soils suggests that the preservation of organic molecules or any direct evidence for life at the surface may not be possible. Future rover missions will need to focus on a variety localitions including those that provide the best possibility for the preservation of organic matter. Volcanic glass and basalt flow surfaces are favored environments for microbial colonization on Earth and this may have been similar on an early Mars. Trace metals and nutrients from easily weathered surface would have provided nutrients as well as substrates for chemolithoautotrophs. In regions of igneous activity, successive flows could overrun microbial communities, trapping potential organic signatures between flows. Here we present experimental evidence for the preservation of organic matter between lava flows and that flow interfaces may be excellent sites for exploratory efforts in the search for Martian biosignatures. We performed a series of experiments using the infrastructure of the Syracuse Lava Project that allows for natural-scale lava flows of up to several hundred kilograms. We subjected cyanobacterial organic matter to overrun by lava under a variety of conditions. In all cases organic matter was preserved between lava flows as chars on the overrun 'colonized" lava and as thin shiny carbon coatings on the overriding flow. The carbon coatings are likely the result of rapid heating and pyrolysis of organic matter that sears to the underside of the overriding lava. Controls yielded no positive signatures for organic matter. We also tested the degree to which the organic matter could be detected remotely using technologies that are found on the Mars Science Laboratory or planned for future missions. We employed elemental and stable isotopes analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. Elemental analysis demonstrated that organic carbon and nitrogen remain in the charred material and that the carbon and nitrogen isotopes of the chars do not deviate

  4. Modeling steam pressure under martian lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dundas, Colin M.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2013-01-01

    Rootless cones on Mars are a valuable indicator of past interactions between lava and water. However, the details of the lava–water interactions are not fully understood, limiting the ability to use these features to infer new information about past water on Mars. We have developed a model for the pressurization of a dry layer of porous regolith by melting and boiling ground ice in the shallow subsurface. This model builds on previous models of lava cooling and melting of subsurface ice. We find that for reasonable regolith properties and ice depths of decimeters, explosive pressures can be reached. However, the energy stored within such lags is insufficient to excavate thick flows unless they draw steam from a broader region than the local eruption site. These results indicate that lag pressurization can drive rootless cone formation under favorable circumstances, but in other instances molten fuel–coolant interactions are probably required. We use the model results to consider a range of scenarios for rootless cone formation in Athabasca Valles. Pressure buildup by melting and boiling ice under a desiccated lag is possible in some locations, consistent with the expected distribution of ice implanted from atmospheric water vapor. However, it is uncertain whether such ice has existed in the vicinity of Athabasca Valles in recent history. Plausible alternative sources include surface snow or an aqueous flood shortly before the emplacement of the lava flow.

  5. A new simulation approach for modeling inflated pahoehoe lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloga, S. M.; Glaze, L. S.; Hamilton, C.

    2013-12-01

    Pahoehoe lavas are recognized as an important landform on Earth, Mars and Io. Observations of such flows on Earth indicate that when flow rates are very low and emplacement occurs on very low slopes, the process is dominated by random effects. Existing models for lobate a`a lava flows that assume viscous fluid flow on an inclined plane are not appropriate for dealing with the numerous random factors present in pahoehoe emplacement. We present a new model that incorporates a simulation approach to quantifying the influence of random and ambient factors on the evolving three-dimensional shape and morphology of pahoehoe lobes. To simulate pahoehoe lava emplacement, we consider the movement of small parcels of lava with a volume equal to the size of a typical toe (70 x 70 x 20 cm3). The model develops a set of probabilistic rules for determining the location and direction of movement for each parcel. Unlike the classical random walk of Brownian motion, many parcels may remain dormant, but fluid, for multiple time steps. The net effect of this approach is that parcels tend to accumulate preferentially within the lobe producing cross-sectional topographic profiles with a medial ridge. The randomness of parcel volume transfers within the lobe interior as well as at the margins qualitatively reflects inflation processes observed in the field. This new model predicts that greater than 75% of pahoehoe lobe volume is contributed through inflation for typical lobes. The influences on planform shape and topographic cross-sectional profiles of total volume, source area and shape, topographic confinement, and sequential breakouts at the lobe margins, have been explored with the stochastic model. The model provides a means for assessing the relative importance of these processes through comparisons with field data. A major conclusion of this work is that sequential breakouts at the lobe margins are an important process controlling the final topographic distribution of observed

  6. Interannual active layer thermal and dynamics evolution at the crater Lake CALM site, Deception Island (Antarctica).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Miguel; Vieira, Gonzalo; Ángel De Pablo, Miguel; Molina, Antonio; Abramov, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    Deception Island, is an active strato-volcano on South Shetland Archipelago of Antarctica (62° 55' 0″ S, 60° 37' 0″ W), is a cold region with harsh remote and hostile environmental conditions. The permafrost and active layer existence, and the cold climate conditions together with volcanic material with height water content inside made this region of the Earth a perfect site to study the active layer and permafrost evolution involved in the Circumpolar Active Layer South (CALM-S) program. The active layer is measured in late January or firs february (during the end of the thaw period) at the "Crater Lake" CALM site (62°58'06.7''; 60°40'44.8'') on Deception Island, Antarctica, at the period 2006 to 2014 we obtained a mean annual value of 29,7±2 cm. In this paper, we describe the spatial active layer thickness distribution and report the reduction on the mean thickness between February 2006 and 2014. Below the active layer, permafrost could be also reported (with a mean thickness of 4.5± 0.5 m.) based on the temperature data acquired by sensors installed at different depth inside the soil; three different shallow boreholes was drilled (1.0 m., 1.6 m., 4.5 m. in depth) and we have been registered its temperature gradient at the 2010 to 2013 period. Here we use all those data 1) to describe the thermal behavior of the permafrost at the CALM site, and 2) to describe its evolution (aggradation/degradation) along fourteen years of continuous measurements. We develop this study, to known the thermal behavior of the permafrost and the active layer related with the air/soil interaction being one of the most important factors the snow layer that was measured by the installation of termo-snowmeters with the complement of an automatic digital camera during the 2008 to 2014 period. On the other hand, the pyroclastics soil materials has a very high values of water content then the latent heat in the freezing/thawing process controls the active layer evolution and the

  7. Galileo SSI Observations of Volcanic Activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milazzo, M. P.; Keszthely, L. P.; Radebaugh, J.; Davies, A. G.; Turtle, E. P.; Geissler, P.; Klaasen, K. P.; McEwen, A. S.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: We report on the analysis of the Galileo SSI's observations of the volcanic activity at Tvashtar Catena, Io as discussed by Milazzo et al. Galileo's Solid State Imager (SSI) observed Tvashtar Catena (63 deg N, 120 deg W) four times between November 1999 and October 2001, providing a unique look at the distinctive high latitude volcanism on Io. The November 1999 observation spatially resolved, for the first time, an active extraterrestrial fissure eruption. The brightness temperature of the lavas at the November 1999 fissure eruption was 1300 K. The second observation (orbit I27, February 2000) showed a large (approx. 500 sq km) region with many, small spots of hot, active lava. The third observation was taken in conjunction with a Cassini observation in December 2000 and showed a Pele-like plume deposition ring, while the Cassini images revealed a 400 km high Pele-type plume above the Catena. The final Galileo SSI observation of Tvashtar was acquired in October 2001, and all obvious (to SSI) activity had ceased, although data from Galileo's Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) indicated that there was still significant thermal emission from the Tvashtar region. We have concentrated on analyzing the style of eruption during orbit I27 (February 2000). Comparison with a lava flow cooling model indicates that the behavior of the Tvashtar eruption during I27 does not match that of "simple" advancing lava flows. Instead, it may be an active lava lake or a complex set of lava flows with episodic, overlapping (in time and space) eruptions.

  8. Characterization of pharmaceutically active compounds in Dongting Lake, China: Occurrence, chiral profiling and environmental risk.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ruixue; Wang, Bin; Lu, Shaoyong; Zhang, Yizhe; Yin, Lina; Huang, Jun; Deng, Shubo; Wang, Yujue; Yu, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Twenty commonly used pharmaceuticals including eight chiral drugs were investigated in Dongting Lake, China. The contamination level was relatively low on a global scale. Twelve pharmaceuticals were identified. The most abundant compound was caffeine followed by diclofenac, DEET, mefenamic acid, fluoxetine, ibuprofen and carbamazepine with mean concentrations from 2.0 to 80.8ngL(-1). Concentrations between East and West Dongting Lake showed spatial difference, with the West Dongting Lake less polluted. The relatively high ratio of caffeine versus carbamazepine (over 50) may indicate there was possible direct discharge of domestic wastewater into the lake. This is the first study presenting a survey allowing for comprehensive analysis of multiclass achiral and chiral pharmaceuticals including beta-blockers, antidepressants and anti-inflammatory drugs in freshwater lake. The enantiomeric compositions presented racemic to weakly enantioselective, with the highest enantiomeric fraction (EF) of 0.63 for fluoxetine. Meanwhile, venlafaxine was identified and evaluated the environment risk in surface water in China for the first time. The results of risk assessment suggested that fluoxetine, venlafaxine and diclofenac acid might pose a significant risk to aquatic organisms in Dongting Lake. The resulting data will be useful to enrich the research of emerging pollutants in freshwater lake and stereochemistry for environment investigations. PMID:27016674

  9. Abundance, Activity, and Diversity of Ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in Oligotrophic Alpine Lakes of Yosemite National Park, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beman, J.; Hayden, C.

    2013-12-01

    Lakes play critical roles in biogeochemical cycles as integrators of carbon and nitrogen cycling across watersheds. They are also ';sentinels' that may be strongly affected by environmental change--yet the responses of lake biogeochemical processes are dictated by microbial communities that we still know little about. We quantified nitrification rates, carbon respiration rates, and the abundance and diversity of involved microbes, within lakes located along an elevational gradient in Yosemite National Park, USA. Temperature, atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition, and exposure to UV all vary along this transect, allowing us to test how these variables may act together to influence microbial biogeochemical processes. We found surprisingly high abundances of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB)--despite low nutrient conditions and high light levels that may favor other organisms, and/or inhibit AOB. We also examined community composition and diversity of AOB and ammonia-oxidizjng archaea (AOA) using Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, and measured ammonia oxidation rates using 15N tracer. All of these data are indicative of active N cycling by a dynamic microbial community. In Yosemite and other wilderness areas, atmospheric N deposition supplies a critical nutrient that may alter naturally nutrient-poor ecosystems; in the Sierra Nevada, much of this deposition occurs in the form of ammonium, suggesting a key role for nitrification in converting deposited N into more mobile forms. Our data indicate that oligotrophic alpine lakes may be nitrification hotspots in Yosemite.

  10. An Initial Report of Research Into the Identification of Lava Flows at the Broken Top and North Crater Cinder Cones in the Craters of the Moon Lava Field by Their Chemical and Petrographic Composition (the Great Rift of Idaho, Snake River Plain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendyel, P.; Koronovsky, N.

    2013-12-01

    Craters of the Moon lava field was formed during the Great Rift of Idaho volcanic activity for more than 15 Ka. There are still unsolved questions about chemical and petrographic compositions of lava flows inside the Craters of the Moon lava field, their relative and absolute ages, and depths of their magma generation chambers. The research undertaken by the author is based on results of field work, petrographic and microprobe analysis of lava samples, and published materials on the Great Rift and adjacent territories. The chemical and petrographic composition of North Crater and Broken Top cinder cones and lava flows, and the South Highway and Blue Dragon lava flows was analyzed. The North Crater lava flow and cinder cone mainly consist of trachybasalts and basaltic trachyandesite. The South Highway lava flow can be divided into three groups of flow and cinder, which are 1) dacite-trachydacite-trachyte; 2) basalt-trachybasalt, and 3) andesite-trachyandesite. The main lava flow of Broken Top is composed of trachybasalt and basaltic trachyandesite. The cinder cone of Broken Top consists of basaltic andesite and basaltic trachyandesite. It is shown that the chemical composition of glass, olivine and the spinel group minerals is unique in each lava flow or cinder cone, which serves as a tool to identify each lava flow. Depths of magma generation were estimated for North Crater, South Highway, Broken Top and Blue Dragon lava flows. It was determined that during the evolution of volcanic activity of the Great Rift the depth of magma generation has decreased. This is explained by the decompression which took place as the Great Rift stretched, allowing the magma chamber to rise closer to the surface. This can be observed in the eruptive and non-eruptive fissures that run parallel to the rift.

  11. Diversity and Dynamics of Active Small Microbial Eukaryotes in the Anoxic Zone of a Freshwater Meromictic Lake (Pavin, France)

    PubMed Central

    Lepère, Cécile; Domaizon, Isabelle; Hugoni, Mylène; Vellet, Agnès; Debroas, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Microbial eukaryotes play a crucial role in ecosystem functioning and oxygen is considered to be one of the strongest barriers against their local dispersal. However, diversity of microbial eukaryotes in freshwater habitats with oxygen gradients has previously received very little attention. We applied high-throughput sequencing (V4 region of the 18S rRNA gene) in conjunction with quantitative PCR (DNA and RNA) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses, to provide an unique spatio-temporal analysis of microbial eukaryotes diversity and potential activity in a meromictic freshwater lake (lake Pavin). This study revealed a high genetic diversity of unicellular eukaryotes in the permanent anoxic zone of lake Pavin and allowed the discrimination of active vs. inactive components. Forty-two percent of the OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units) are exclusively present in the monimolimnion, where Alveolata (Ciliophora and Dinophyceae) and Fungi (Dikarya and Chytrids) are the most active phyla and are probably represented by species capable of anaerobic metabolism. Pigmented eukaryotes (Haptophyceae and Chlorophyceae) are also present and active in this zone, which opens up questions regarding their metabolism. PMID:26904006

  12. Analysis of the hydrological response of a tropical terminal lake, Lake Abiyata (Main Ethiopian Rift Valley) to changes in climate and human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legesse, Dagnachew; Vallet-Coulomb, Christine; Gasse, Françoise

    2004-02-01

    Integrated dynamic water and chloride balance models with a catchment-scale hydrological model (PRMS) are used to investigate the response of a terminal tropical lake, Lake Abiyata, to climate variability and water use practices in its catchment. The hydrological model is used to investigate the response of the catchment to different climate and land-use change scenarios that are incorporated into the lake model. Lake depth-area-volume relationships were established from lake bathymetries. Missing data in the time series were filled using statistical regression techniques. Based on mean monthly data, the lake water balance model produced a good agreement between the simulated and observed levels of Lake Abiyata for the period 1968-83. From 1984 onwards the simulated lake level is overestimated with respect to the observed one, while the chloride concentration is largely underestimated. This discrepancy is attributed to human use of water from the influent rivers or directly from the lake. The simulated lake level and chloride concentration are in better agreement with observed values (r2 = 0.96) when human water use for irrigation and salt exploitation are included in the model. A comparison of the simulation with and without human consumption indicates that climate variability controls the interannual fluctuations and that the human water use affects the equilibrium of the system by strongly reducing the lake level. Sensitivity analysis based on a mean climatic year showed that, after prolonged mean climatic conditions, Lake Abiyata reacts more rapidly to an abrupt shift to wetter conditions than to dry conditions. This study shows the significant sensitivity of the level and salinity of the terminal Lake Abiyata to small changes in climate or land use, making it a very good recorder of environmental changes that may occur in the catchment at different time scales.

  13. Clinker formation in basaltic lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk de Vrie, B.; Loock, S.; Henot, J.

    2007-12-01

    Basaltic lava flows are classified according their surface morphology. They can be either aa, displaying a rough clinkery surface or pahoehoe, displaying a smooth clinkerless surface. These two surface types differ also in their emplacement and rheology, and can be differentiated in a shear-strain rate vs. apparent viscosity diagram (Hon & al., 2003). To understand clinker formation, one way is to see how a pahoehoe lava converts to an aa through shear-viscosity changes. Two possibilities occur: 1) the viscosity can increase (e.g. by levee formation) and clinkers will be formed by torque on the flow edges, or 2) the shear-strain will increase (lava influx increasing, topographic obstacles, slope change) and clinker will be formed by crust-breakage. These two clinker formatting processes are called magmatic fragmentation. Clinker will be formed on the summit and to the edges of the flow and they will appear at the base of its according the caterpillar motion usually associated with flows. However, in the Chaîne des Puys (French), basal clinker appears without top clinker (i.e. a pahoehoe lava flow with basal clinker) and thus another explanation is needed to explain them. Clinker samples were collected in different emplacement contexts and different part of flows. The SEM analysis of these samples and comparisons with ash samples from the literature show classical magmatic fragmentation textures (stepped fractures, non- synchronic fractures) in three aa lava flows. However, in one pahoehoe flow there are typical phreatomagmatic textures (blocky shapes, adhering fine particles). There are also shearing structures, such as microfaults in an intermediate flow. Thus, there are at least three different ways to form clinker: 1) classically by fragmentation at the flow base and the edges; 2) by phreatomagmatism at the base flow; 3) by shearing at the flow base and the edges. Basal shearing structures include fault gauges and welded clasts, indicating possible shear

  14. Exploration and discovery in Yellowstone Lake: Results from high-resolution sonar imaging, seismic reflection profiling, and submersible studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Lovalvo, D.A.; Johnson, S.Y.; Stephenson, W.J.; Pierce, K.L.; Harlan, S.S.; Finn, C.A.; Lee, G.; Webring, M.; Schulze, B.; Duhn, J.; Sweeney, R.; Balistrieri, L.

    2003-01-01

    Discoveries from multi-beam sonar mapping and seismic reflection surveys of the northern, central, and West Thumb basins of Yellowstone Lake provide new insight into the extent of post-collapse volcanism and active hydrothermal processes occurring in a large lake environment above a large magma chamber. Yellowstone Lake has an irregular bottom covered with dozens of features directly related to hydrothermal, tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary processes. Detailed bathymetric, seismic reflection, and magnetic evidence reveals that rhyolitic lava flows underlie much of Yellowstone Lake and exert fundamental control on lake bathymetry and localization of hydrothermal activity. Many previously unknown features have been identified and include over 250 hydrothermal vents, several very large (>500 m diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters, many small hydrothermal vent craters (???1-200 m diameter), domed lacustrine sediments related to hydrothermal activity, elongate fissures cutting post-glacial sediments, siliceous hydrothermal spire structures, sublacustrine landslide deposits, submerged former shorelines, and a recently active graben. Sampling and observations with a submersible remotely operated vehicle confirm and extend our understanding of the identified features. Faults, fissures, hydrothermally inflated domal structures, hydrothermal explosion craters, and sublacustrine landslides constitute potentially significant geologic hazards. Toxic elements derived from hydrothermal processes also may significantly affect the Yellowstone ecosystem. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  15. Exploration and discovery in Yellowstone Lake: results from high-resolution sonar imaging, seismic reflection profiling, and submersible studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. A.; Shanks, W. C.; Lovalvo, D. A.; Johnson, S. Y.; Stephenson, W. J.; Pierce, K. L.; Harlan, S. S.; Finn, C. A.; Lee, G.; Webring, M.; Schulze, B.; Dühn, J.; Sweeney, R.; Balistrieri, L.

    2003-04-01

    'No portion of the American continent is perhaps so rich in wonders as the Yellow Stone' (F.V. Hayden, September 2, 1874) Discoveries from multi-beam sonar mapping and seismic reflection surveys of the northern, central, and West Thumb basins of Yellowstone Lake provide new insight into the extent of post-collapse volcanism and active hydrothermal processes occurring in a large lake environment above a large magma chamber. Yellowstone Lake has an irregular bottom covered with dozens of features directly related to hydrothermal, tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary processes. Detailed bathymetric, seismic reflection, and magnetic evidence reveals that rhyolitic lava flows underlie much of Yellowstone Lake and exert fundamental control on lake bathymetry and localization of hydrothermal activity. Many previously unknown features have been identified and include over 250 hydrothermal vents, several very large (>500 m diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters, many small hydrothermal vent craters (˜1-200 m diameter), domed lacustrine sediments related to hydrothermal activity, elongate fissures cutting post-glacial sediments, siliceous hydrothermal spire structures, sublacustrine landslide deposits, submerged former shorelines, and a recently active graben. Sampling and observations with a submersible remotely operated vehicle confirm and extend our understanding of the identified features. Faults, fissures, hydrothermally inflated domal structures, hydrothermal explosion craters, and sublacustrine landslides constitute potentially significant geologic hazards. Toxic elements derived from hydrothermal processes also may significantly affect the Yellowstone ecosystem.

  16. Seismic activity and water level fluctuations in the artificial lakes of Aliakmonas river (NW Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Panagiota; Chouliaras, Gerasimos; Drakatos, George

    2015-04-01

    The Public Power Corporation (PPC) of Greece has established four dammed reservoirs, downstream of each other on Aliakmonas River in North Western Greece (namely the artificial lakes of Ilarionas, Polyphyto, Sfikia and Asomata). In addition to the monitoring of the reservoir water levels the PPC has also installed a dense seismological network in the wider area. In this investigation the correlation between the local seismic activity and the water level fluctuations at the Ilarionas and Polyphyto reservoirs is studied. On October 25th, 1984, during the Asomata reservoir initial filling, a Ms=5.4 earthquake occurred in the region which was characterized by weak seismicity, until the strong earthquake of Ms=6.5 that occurred on May 13th, 1995, at a distance of 18 km from the southern edge of the Polyphyto reservoir. More recently, on July 2nd and 3rd, 2013, two moderate earthquakes (Ml=4.7 and Ml=4.6) occurred, almost a year after the filling of the Ilarionas reservoir in 2012. In addition to these events, fourteen earthquakes with magnitudes equal or greater to Ml=4 have also been detected in the wider area of the Aliakmonas reservoir.

  17. Cyclic Geochemical Variation in Prehistoric and Historic Lavas, Sakura-jima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A.; Harpp, K. S.; Forbes, J.; Nagle, A.

    2014-12-01

    Sakura-jima volcano, on Kyushu Island, is one of Japan's most active volcanic centers. It has been in an eruptive phase since 1955, primarily in the Vulcanian style. Prior to its current activity, Sakura-jima had 11 prehistoric and 4 historic lava-producing events, after its initiation 12-13,000 years ago (Moriwaki, 1992). We present geochemical analyses of a suite of lavas collected from all the mapped historic eruptions and a representative suite of pre-historic eruptions. Lavas vary from andesite to dacite (60.6-66.7 wt.% SiO2), with typical phenocryst assemblages of 20% plagioclase, 5% pyroxenes, and <5% magnetite. Major and trace element studies of historic eruptions indicate that Sakura-jima lavas have become steadily more mafic since 1475 (Yanagi et al., 1991; Arakawa et al., 1998). Consideration of prehistoric lavas, however, suggests that the variations are cyclic, shifting from more felsic to more mafic compositions at least twice during this period of activity. Previous researchers hypothesized a cumulate plug in the magma chamber that gradually sinks, allowing basaltic magma to ascend into a shallower chamber where it fractionates (Yanagi et al., 1991). Alternatively, Arakawa et al. (1998) propose a model in which magmas from two chambers, one basaltic and one dacitic, are injected into a third, shallower chamber where they mix. To test these models, we performed Sr and Pb isotopic analysis on a subset of prehistoric and historic Sakura-jima lavas. The 87Sr/86Sr, 206Pb/204Pb, and 207Pb/204Pb ratios decrease steadily from the oldest prehistoric lavas to the youngest historic lavas, in direct contrast to the cyclic variations of the major and trace elements. None of the isotopic ratios correlate strongly with major element compositions. Thus it appears that the simple AFC mechanisms to which the major and trace element variations were originally attributed are not the only process responsible for the cyclic behavior. One of the simplest alternative

  18. Recovery of datable charcoal beneath young lavas: lessons from Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockwood, J.P.; Lipman, P.W.

    1980-01-01

    Field studies in Hawaii aimed at providing a radiocarbon-based chronology of prehistoric eruptive activity have led to a good understanding of the processes that govern the formation and preservation of charcoal beneath basaltic lava flows. Charcoal formation is a rate-dependent process controlled primarily by temperature and duration of heating, as well as by moisture content, density, and size of original woody material. Charcoal will form wherever wood buried by lava is raised to sufficiently high temperatures, but owing to the availability of oxygen it is commonly burned to ash soon after formation. Wherever oxygen circulation is sufficiently restricted, charcoal will be preserved, but where atmospheric oxygen circulates freely, charcoal will only be preserved at a lower temperature, below that required for charcoal ignition or catalytic oxidation. These factors cause carbonized wood, especially that derived from living roots, to be commonly preserved beneath all parts of pahoehoe flows (where oxygen circulation is restricted), but only under margins of aa. Practical guidelines are given for the recovery of datable charcoal beneath pahoehoe and aa. Although based on Hawaiian basaltic flows, the guidelines should be applicable to other areas. -Authors

  19. Using Lava Tube Skylights To Derive Lava Eruption Temperatures on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-11-01

    The eruption temperature of Io’s silicate lavas constrains Io’s interior state and composition [1]. We have examined the theoretical thermal emission from lava tube skylights above basaltic and ultramafic lava channels. Assuming that tube-fed lava flows are common on Io, skylights could also be common. Skylights present steady thermal emission on a scale of days to months. We find that the thermal emission from such a target, measured at multiple visible and NIR wavelengths, can provide a highly accurate diagnostic of eruption temperature. However, the small size of skylights means that close flybys of Io are necessary, requiring a dedicated Io mission [2]. Observations would ideally be at night or in eclipse. We have modelled the thermal emission spectrum for different skylight sizes, lava flow stream velocities, end-member lava compositions, and skylight radiation shape factors, determining the resulting flow surface cooling rates. We calculate the resulting thermal emission spectrum as a function of viewing geometry. From the resulting 0.7:0.9 μm ratios, we see a clear distinction between basaltic and ultramafic compositions for skylights smaller than 20 m across, even if sub-pixel. Our analysis will be further refined as accurate high-temperature short-wavelength emissivity values become available [3]. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. We thank the NASA OPR Program for support. References: [1] Keszthelyi et al. (2007) Icarus 192, 491-502 [2] McEwen et al. (2015) The Io Volcano Observer (IVO) LPSC-46 abstract 1627 [3] Ramsey and Harris (2015) IAVCEI-2015, Prague, Cz. Rep., abstract IUGG-3519.

  20. Crater lake and post-eruption hydrothermal activity, El Chichón Volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casadevall, Thomas J.; de la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Rose, William I., Jr.; Bagley, Susan; Finnegan, David L.; Zoller, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Explosive eruptions of Volcán El Chichón in Chiapas, Mexico on March 28 and April 3–4, 1982 removed 0.2 km3 of rock to form a 1-km-wide 300-m-deep summit crater. By late April 1982 a lake had begun to form on the crater floor, and by November 1982 it attained a maximum surface area of 1.4 × 105 m2 and a volume of 5 × 106 m3. Accumulation of 4–5 m of rainfall between July and October 1982 largely formed the lake. In January 1983, temperatures of fumaroles on the crater floor and lower crater walls ranged from 98 to 115°C; by October 1983 the maximum temperature of fumarole emissions was 99°C. In January 1983 fumarole gas emissions were greater than 99 vol. % H2O with traces of CO2, SO2, and H2S. The water of the lake was a hot (T = 52–58°C), acidic (pH = 0.5), dilute solution (34,046 mg L−1 dissolved solids; Cl/S = 20.5). Sediment from the lake contains the same silicate minerals as the rocks of the 1982 pyroclastic deposits, together with less than 1% of elemental sulfur. The composition and temperature of the lake water is attributed to: (1) solution of fumarole emissions; (2) reaction of lake water with hot rocks beneath the lake level; (3) sediments washed into the lake from the crater walls; (4) hydrothermal fluids leaching sediments and formational waters in sedimentary rocks of the basement; (5) evaporation; and (6) precipitation.

  1. Lake Effects: The Lake Superior Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beery, Tom; And Others

    This curriculum guide was launched in response to a need for Lake Superior-specific educational materials and contains lessons and activities that can be used to teach about Lake Superior. The lessons in this book are divided into four sections. Each of the first three sections has a background section that provides basic information about Lake…

  2. Dryness of ephemeral lakes and consequences for dust activity: the case of the Hamoun drainage basin, southeastern Iran.

    PubMed

    Rashki, A; Kaskaoutis, D G; Goudie, A S; Kahn, R A

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the influence of changes in the water coverage in the Hamoun dry-bed lakes on visibility, dust outbreaks, aerosol loading and land-atmospheric fluxes over the region covering the period 1985-2005. The Hamoun basin, located on the southeastern Iran and western Afghanistan borders, has been recognized as one of the major dust source regions in south Asia and is covered by shallow, marshy lakes that are fed by the Helmand and Farahrood rivers. When the water in watersheds that support the lakes is drawn down for natural or human-induced reasons, the end result is a decrease in the water coverage in the basin, or even complete dryness as occurred in 2001. Then, strong seasonal winds, mainly in summer, blow fine sand and silt off the exposed lakebed, enhancing dust activity and aerosol loading over the region. Satellite (Landsat) and meteorological observations reveal that the water levels in the Hamoun lakes exhibit considerable inter-annual variability during the period 1985-2005 strongly related to anomalies in precipitation. This is the trigger for concurrent changes in the frequency of the dusty days, aerosol loading and deterioration of visibility over the region, as satellite (TOMS, MODIS, MISR) observations reveal. On the other hand, soil moisture and latent heat, obtained via model (GLDAS_noah-10) simulations are directly linked with water levels and precipitation over the region. The desiccation of the Hamoun lakes in certain years and the consequent increase in frequency and intensity of dust storms are serious concerns for the regional climate, ecosystems and human health. PMID:23831801

  3. Aeolian sand preserved in Silver Lake: a new signal of Holocene high stands of Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Loope, Walter L.

    2005-01-01

    Aeolian sand within lake sediment from Silver Lake, Michigan can be used as a proxy for the timing of high lake levels of Lake Michigan.We demonstrate that the sand record from Silver Lake plotted as percent weight is in-phase with the elevation curve of Lake Michigan since the mid-Holocene Nipissing Phase. Because fluctuations in Lake Michigan's lake level are recorded in beach ridges, and are a response to climate change, the aeolian sand record within Silver Lake is also a proxy for climate change. It appears that increases in dune activity and lake sand are controlled by similar climatic shifts that drive fluctuations in lake level of Lake Michigan. High lake levels destabilize coastal bluffs that drive dune sand instability, and along with greater wintertime storminess, increase niveo-aeolian transport of sand across lake ice. The sand is introduced into the lake each spring as the ice cover melts.

  4. Effects of sediment and turbulence on alkaline phosphatase activity and photosynthetic a