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Sample records for active layer depth

  1. Depth heterogeneity of fully aromatic polyamide active layers in reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Coronell, Orlando; Mariñas, Benito J; Cahill, David G

    2011-05-15

    We studied the depth heterogeneity of fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layers in commercial reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes by quantifying near-surface (i.e., top 6 nm) and volume-averaged properties of the active layers using X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), respectively. Some membranes (e.g., ESPA3 RO) had active layers that were depth homogeneous with respect to the concentration and pK(a) distribution of carboxylic groups, degree of polymer cross-linking, concentration of barium ion probe that associated with ionized carboxylic groups, and steric effects experienced by barium ion. Other membranes (e.g., NF90 NF) had active layers that were depth heterogeneous with respect to the same properties. Our results therefore support the existence of both depth-homogeneous and depth-heterogeneous active layers. It remains to be assessed whether the depth heterogeneity consists of gradually changing properties throughout the active layer depth or of distinct sublayers with different properties.

  2. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Brent D.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Graham, David E.; Gu, Baohua; Hubbard, Susan S.; Liang, Liyuan; Wu, Yuxin; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Wilson, Cathy; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-03-24

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) for analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.

  3. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, B. D.; Throckmorton, H. M.; Graham, D. E.; Gu, B.; Hubbard, S. S.; Liang, L.; Wu, Y.; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, E. M.; Phelps, T. J.; Wilson, C. J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) for analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.

  4. Influence of Plant Communities on Active Layer Depth in Boreal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, James; Estop Aragones, Cristian; Thierry, Aaron; Hartley, Iain; Murton, Julian; Charman, Dan; Williams, Mathew; Phoenix, Gareth

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation plays a crucial role in determining active layer depth (ALD) and hence the extent to which permafrost may thaw under climate change. Such influences are multifaceted and include, for example, promotion of shallow ALD by insulation from moss or shading by plant canopies in summer, or trapping of snow in evergreen tree canopies that reduces snow insulation of soil in winter. However, while the role of different vegetation components are understood at a conceptual level, quantitative understanding of the relative importance of different vegetation components and how they interact to determine active layer depth is lacking. In addition, major abiotic factors such as fire and soil hydrological properties will considerably influence the role of vegetation in mediating ALD, though again this is not well understood. To address this we surveyed 60 plots across 4 sites of contrasting vegetation and fire status, encompassing a range of soil moisture and organic matter thickness, in the discontinuous permafrost zone near Yellowknife, NT, Canada. In each plot we measured ALD and a range of vegetation and soil parameters to understand how key characteristics of the understory and canopy vegetation, and soil properties influence ALD. Measurements included moss depth, tree canopy LAI, understory LAI, understory height, vegetation composition, soil organic matter depth, slope and soil moisture. By undertaking these surveys in sites with contrasting hydrological conditions in both burned and unburned areas we have also been able to determine which characteristics of the vegetation and soil are important for protecting permafrost, which characteristics emerge as the most important factors across sites (i.e. irrespective of site conditions) and which factors have site (ecosystem) specific influences. This work provides a major insight into how ecosystem properties influence ALD and therefore also how changes in ecosystems properties arising from climate change may influence

  5. Influence of Plant Communities on Active Layer Depth in Boreal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoenix, G. K.; Fisher, J. P.; Estop-Aragones, C.; Thierry, A.; Hartley, I. P.; Murton, J.; Charman, D.; Williams, M.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation plays a crucial role in determining active layer depth (ALD) and hence also the extent that permafrost may thaw under climate change. Such influences are multifaceted and include, for example, promotion of shallow ALD by insulation from moss or shading by plant canopies in summer, or trapping of snow in evergreen tree canopies that reduces snow insulation of soil in winter. However, while the role of different vegetation components are understood at a conceptual level, quantitative understanding of the relative importance of different vegetation components and how they interact to determine active layer depth is lacking. In addition, major abiotic factors such as fire and soil hydrological properties will considerably influence the role of vegetation in mediating ALD, though again this is not well understood. To address this we surveyed multiple plots across 4 sites of contrasting vegetation and fire status, including a range of soil moisture and organic matter thickness, in the discontinuous permafrost zone near Yellowknife, NT, Canada. In each plot we measured ALD and a range of vegetation and soil parameters to understand how key characteristics of the understory and canopy vegetation, and soil properties influence ALD. Measurements included moss depth, tree canopy LAI, understory LAI, understory height, vegetation composition, soil organic matter depth, slope and soil moisture. By undertaking these surveys in sites with contrasting hydrological conditions in both burned and unburned areas we have also been able to determine which characteristics of the vegetation and soil are important for protecting permafrost, which characteristics emerge as the most important factors across sites (i.e. irrespective of site conditions) and which factors have site (ecosystem) specific influences. This work provides a major insight into how ecosystem properties influence ALD and therefore also how changes in ecosystems properties arising from climate change may

  6. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    DOE PAGES

    Newman, Brent D.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Graham, David E.; Gu, Baohua; Hubbard, Susan S.; Liang, Liyuan; Wu, Yuxin; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; et al

    2015-03-24

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) formore » analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.« less

  7. Modeling Active Layer Depth Over Permafrost for the Arctic Drainage Basin and the Comparison to Measurements at CALM Field Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelke, C.; Zhang, T.; Serreze, M.; Armstrong, R.

    2002-12-01

    A finite difference model for one-dimensional heat conduction with phase change is applied to investigate soil freezing and thawing processes over the Arctic drainage basin. Calculations are performed on the 25~km~x~25~km resolution NSIDC EASE-Grid. NCEP re-analyzed sigma-0.995 surface temperature with a topography correction, and SSM/I-derived weekly snow height are used as forcing parameters. The importance of using an annual cycle of snow density for different snow classes is emphasized. Soil bulk density and the percentages of silt/clay and sand/gravel are from the SoilData System of the International Geosphere Biosphere Programme. In addition, we parameterize a spatially and vertically variable peat layer and modify soil bulk density and thermal conductivity accordingly. Climatological soil moisture content is from the Permafrost/Water Balance Model (P/WBM) at the University of New Hampshire. The model domain is divided into 3~layers with distinct thermal properties of frozen and thawed soil, respectively. Calculations are performed on 54~model nodes ranging from a thickness of 10~cm near the surface to 1~m at 15~m depth. Initial temperatures are chosen according to the grid cell's IPA permafrost classification on EASE grid. Active layer depths, simulated for the summers of 1999 and 2000, compare well to maximal thaw depths measured at about 60 Circumarctic Active Layer Monitoring Network (CALM) field sites. A remaining RMS-error between modeled and measured values is attributed mainly to scale discrepancies (100~m~x~100~m vs. 25~km~x~25~km) based on differences in the fields of air temperature, snow height, and soil bulk density. For the whole pan-Arctic land mass and the time period 1980 through 2001, this study shows the regionally highly variable active layer depth, frozen ground depth, lengths of freezing and thawing periods, and the day of year when the maxima are reached.

  8. Decomposition of old organic matter as a result of deeper active layers in a snow depth manipulation experiment

    PubMed Central

    Taneva, Lina; Trumbore, Susan E.; Welker, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    A snow addition experiment in moist acidic tussock tundra at Toolik Lake, Alaska, increased winter snow depths 2–3 m, and resulted in a doubling of the summer active layer depth. We used radiocarbon (∆14C) to (1) determine the age of C respired in the deep soils under control and deepened active layer conditions (deep snow drifts), and (2) to determine the impact of increased snow and permafrost thawing on surface CO2 efflux by partitioning respiration into autotrophic and heterotrophic components. ∆14C signatures of surface respiration were higher in the deep snow areas, reflecting a decrease in the proportion of autotrophic respiration. The radiocarbon age of soil pore CO2 sampled near the maximum mid-July thaw depth was approximately 1,000 years in deep snow treatment plots (45–55 cm thaw depth), while CO2 from the ambient snow areas was ~100 years old (30-cm thaw depth). Heterotrophic respiration ∆14C signatures from incubations were similar between the two snow depths for the organic horizon and were extremely variable in the mineral horizon, resulting in no significant differences between treatments in either month. Radiocarbon ages of heterotrophically respired C ranged from <50 to 235 years BP in July mineral soil samples and from 1,525 to 8,300 years BP in August samples, suggesting that old soil C in permafrost soils may be metabolized upon thawing. In the surface fluxes, this old C signal is obscured by the organic horizon fluxes, which are significantly higher. Our results indicate that, as permafrost in tussock tundra ecosystems of arctic Alaska thaws, carbon buried up to several thousands of years ago will become an active component of the carbon cycle, potentially accelerating the rise of CO2 in the atmosphere. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00442-009-1556-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20084398

  9. Study of the Northern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau Permafrost Active Layer Depth Rate Using Satellite Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Su, X.; Shum, C. K.; Kim, J. W.; Kuo, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau is the world's largest and the highest plateau with distinct and competing surface and subsurface processes. It is the Third Pole and the World Water Tower, owing to its vast ice reservoir with the largest number of glaciers in the world, and covered by a large (1.3 to 1.6 million km2) layer of discontinuous and sporadic alpine permafrost. The thawing over Tibetan Plateau permafrost regions is thought to be more severe compared with other high latitude permafrost regions by the fact that the permafrost is warm. During the past few decades, 82% of Tibetan Plateau glaciers have retreated and 10% permafrost has degraded. The overall mean active layer depth (ALD) rate increase over the Plateau is 1.4 cm yr-1, 1980-2001, based on model studies and comparison with in situ borehole data. Here we report on the work in progress to quantify ALD rate increase in the northern Tibetan Plateau near the Tibetan national highway, using multi-band SAR/InSAR for improved the thermokarst surface classification, Envisat radar altimetry and ALOS-1 InSAR observed land subsidence, ALD modeling for the various thermokarst surface to relate to subsidence measurements, and the associated validations using available in situ borehole subsidence measurements.

  10. Improved Boundary Layer Depth Retrievals from MPLNET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Jasper R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Molod, Andrea M.; Joseph, Everette

    2013-01-01

    Continuous lidar observations of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) depth have been made at the Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) site in Greenbelt, MD since April 2001. However, because of issues with the operational PBL depth algorithm, the data is not reliable for determining seasonal and diurnal trends. Therefore, an improved PBL depth algorithm has been developed which uses a combination of the wavelet technique and image processing. The new algorithm is less susceptible to contamination by clouds and residual layers, and in general, produces lower PBL depths. A 2010 comparison shows the operational algorithm overestimates the daily mean PBL depth when compared to the improved algorithm (1.85 and 1.07 km, respectively). The improved MPLNET PBL depths are validated using radiosonde comparisons which suggests the algorithm performs well to determine the depth of a fully developed PBL. A comparison with the Goddard Earth Observing System-version 5 (GEOS-5) model suggests that the model may underestimate the maximum daytime PBL depth by 410 m during the spring and summer. The best agreement between MPLNET and GEOS-5 occurred during the fall and they diered the most in the winter.

  11. The Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost Database: metadata statistics and prospective analysis on future permafrost temperature and active layer depth monitoring site distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biskaborn, B. K.; Lanckman, J.-P.; Lantuit, H.; Elger, K.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Cable, W. L.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-03-01

    The Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P) provides the first dynamic database associated with the Thermal State of Permafrost (TSP) and the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) programs, which extensively collect permafrost temperature and active layer thickness data from Arctic, Antarctic and Mountain permafrost regions. The purpose of the database is to establish an "early warning system" for the consequences of climate change in permafrost regions and to provide standardized thermal permafrost data to global models. In this paper we perform statistical analysis of the GTN-P metadata aiming to identify the spatial gaps in the GTN-P site distribution in relation to climate-effective environmental parameters. We describe the concept and structure of the Data Management System in regard to user operability, data transfer and data policy. We outline data sources and data processing including quality control strategies. Assessment of the metadata and data quality reveals 63% metadata completeness at active layer sites and 50% metadata completeness for boreholes. Voronoi Tessellation Analysis on the spatial sample distribution of boreholes and active layer measurement sites quantifies the distribution inhomogeneity and provides potential locations of additional permafrost research sites to improve the representativeness of thermal monitoring across areas underlain by permafrost. The depth distribution of the boreholes reveals that 73% are shallower than 25 m and 27% are deeper, reaching a maximum of 1 km depth. Comparison of the GTN-P site distribution with permafrost zones, soil organic carbon contents and vegetation types exhibits different local to regional monitoring situations on maps. Preferential slope orientation at the sites most likely causes a bias in the temperature monitoring and should be taken into account when using the data for global models. The distribution of GTN-P sites within zones of projected temperature change show a high

  12. Layered compression for high-precision depth data.

    PubMed

    Miao, Dan; Fu, Jingjing; Lu, Yan; Li, Shipeng; Chen, Chang Wen

    2015-12-01

    With the development of depth data acquisition technologies, access to high-precision depth with more than 8-b depths has become much easier and determining how to efficiently represent and compress high-precision depth is essential for practical depth storage and transmission systems. In this paper, we propose a layered high-precision depth compression framework based on an 8-b image/video encoder to achieve efficient compression with low complexity. Within this framework, considering the characteristics of the high-precision depth, a depth map is partitioned into two layers: 1) the most significant bits (MSBs) layer and 2) the least significant bits (LSBs) layer. The MSBs layer provides rough depth value distribution, while the LSBs layer records the details of the depth value variation. For the MSBs layer, an error-controllable pixel domain encoding scheme is proposed to exploit the data correlation of the general depth information with sharp edges and to guarantee the data format of LSBs layer is 8 b after taking the quantization error from MSBs layer. For the LSBs layer, standard 8-b image/video codec is leveraged to perform the compression. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed coding scheme can achieve real-time depth compression with satisfactory reconstruction quality. Moreover, the compressed depth data generated from this scheme can achieve better performance in view synthesis and gesture recognition applications compared with the conventional coding schemes because of the error control algorithm. PMID:26415171

  13. Influence of increasing active-layer depth and continued permafrost degradation on carbon, water and energy fluxes over two forested permafrost landscapes in the Taiga Plains, NWT, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentag, O.; Baltzer, J.; Chasmer, L. E.; Detto, M.; Marsh, P.; Quinton, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    Recent research suggests an increase in active-layer depth (ALD) in the continuous permafrost zone and degradation of the discontinuous permafrost zone into seasonally frozen. Increasing ALD and continued permafrost degradation will have far-reaching consequences for northern ecosystems including altered regional hydrology and the exposure of additional soil organic carbon (C) to microbial decomposition. These changes might cause positive or negative net feedbacks to the climate system by altering important land surface properties and/or by releasing stored soil organic C to the atmosphere as CO2 and/or CH4. Knowledge gaps exist regarding the links between increasing ALD and/or permafrost degradation, regional hydrology, vegetation composition and structure, land surface properties, and CO2 and CH4 sink-source strengths. The goal of our interdisciplinary project is to shed light on these links by providing a mechanistic understanding of permafrost-thawing consequences for hydrological, ecophysiological and biogeochemical processes at two forested permafrost landscapes in the Taiga Plains, NWT, Canada: Scotty Creek and Havikpak Creek in the discontinuous and in the continuous permafrost zones, respectively (Fig.). The sites will be equipped with identical sets of instrumentation (start: 2013), to measure landscape-scale net exchanges of CO2, CH4, water and energy with the eddy covariance technique. These measurements will be complemented by repeated surveys of surface and frost table topography and vegetation, by land cover-type specific fluxes of CO2 and CH4 measured with a static chamber technique, and by remote sensing-based footprint analysis. With this research we will address the following questions: What is the net effect of permafrost thawing-induced biophysical and biogeochemical feedbacks to the climate system? How do these two different types of feedback differ between the discontinuous and continuous permafrost zones? Is the decrease (increase) in net CO

  14. A comparison of hydrographically and optically derived mixed layer depths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zawada, D.G.; Zaneveld, J.R.V.; Boss, E.; Gardner, W.D.; Richardson, M.J.; Mishonov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Efforts to understand and model the dynamics of the upper ocean would be significantly advanced given the ability to rapidly determine mixed layer depths (MLDs) over large regions. Remote sensing technologies are an ideal choice for achieving this goal. This study addresses the feasibility of estimating MLDs from optical properties. These properties are strongly influenced by suspended particle concentrations, which generally reach a maximum at pycnoclines. The premise therefore is to use a gradient in beam attenuation at 660 nm (c660) as a proxy for the depth of a particle-scattering layer. Using a global data set collected during World Ocean Circulation Experiment cruises from 1988-1997, six algorithms were employed to compute MLDs from either density or temperature profiles. Given the absence of published optically based MLD algorithms, two new methods were developed that use c660 profiles to estimate the MLD. Intercomparison of the six hydrographically based algorithms revealed some significant disparities among the resulting MLD values. Comparisons between the hydrographical and optical approaches indicated a first-order agreement between the MLDs based on the depths of gradient maxima for density and c660. When comparing various hydrographically based algorithms, other investigators reported that inherent fluctuations of the mixed layer depth limit the accuracy of its determination to 20 m. Using this benchmark, we found a ???70% agreement between the best hydrographical-optical algorithm pairings. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Online Detection of Mixed Layer Depth for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, S.; Estlin, T.; Castano, R.; Woodward, G.; Gierach, M. M.; Thompson, A. F.; Schaffer, S.

    2015-12-01

    The accurate determination of the mixed layer depth (MLD) plays a crucial role in studying ocean dynamics and climate change. Various methods to estimate MLD have been proposed [1, 2]. However there is no current consensus on the best model, which leads to large uncertainty in the estimation. The variability, coupled with the complexity of physical, chemical and biological processes involved and the uncertainty and instabilities of the upper ocean surface, makes estimating MLD a challenging task. MLD varies significantly, even across a small spatial area (< 10km), and this depth is fluctuating, even over a short period of time (< 24 hrs), depending on the season. This abstract describes our proposed online algorithm for detecting mixed layer depth that would operate onboard an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). Using an online method permits a more adaptive approach to estimating MLD. Our proposed algorithm is based on an ensemble approach, which includes data mining techniques for real-time peak and change detection, learned seasonal variability profile, combined with MLD estimation criteria in [1]. In this study, we analyze measurements using glider data collected from the OSMOSIS (Ocean Surface Mixing, Ocean Submesoscale Interaction Study) project, concatenated into a year-long time series [3]. The glider data consists of nine full-depth moorings, which were deployed in a 15 km by 15 km box at the Porcupine Abyssal Plain in the northeast Atlantic, centered at 16.2°W, 48.7°N. Our algorithm utilizes direct measurements of salinity, temperature, depth and time and the design is based on the spatial and temporal variability of MLD learned. We will present our initial work on tracking the MLD based on real-time simulations using the OSMOSIS glider data and discussed for the case of deploying on a single AUV. Using an online algorithm for estimating MLD in-situ enables the system to rapidly adapt to the variability in a real-world environment and also allows for

  16. Comparison of Climatological Planetary Boundary Layer Depth Estimates Using the GEOS-5 AGCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath-Spangler, Erica Lynn; Molod, Andrea M.

    2014-01-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) processes, including those influencing the PBL depth, control many aspects of weather and climate and accurate models of these processes are important for forecasting changes in the future. However, evaluation of model estimates of PBL depth are difficult because no consensus on PBL depth definition currently exists and various methods for estimating this parameter can give results that differ by hundreds of meters or more. In order to facilitate comparisons between the Goddard Earth Observation System (GEOS-5) and other modeling and observational systems, seven PBL depth estimation methods are used to produce PBL depth climatologies and are evaluated and compared here. All seven methods evaluate the same atmosphere so all differences are related solely to the definition chosen. These methods depend on the scalar diffusivity, bulk and local Richardson numbers, and the diagnosed horizontal turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Results are aggregated by climate class in order to allow broad generalizations. The various PBL depth estimations give similar midday results with some exceptions. One method based on horizontal turbulent kinetic energy produces deeper PBL depths in the winter associated with winter storms. In warm, moist conditions, the method based on a bulk Richardson number gives results that are shallower than those given by the methods based on the scalar diffusivity. The impact of turbulence driven by radiative cooling at cloud top is most significant during the evening transition and along several regions across the oceans and methods sensitive to this cooling produce deeper PBL depths where it is most active. Additionally, Richardson number-based methods collapse better at night than methods that depend on the scalar diffusivity. This feature potentially affects tracer transport.

  17. Hydrothermal regimes of the dry active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Mamoru; Zhang, Yinsheng; Kadota, Tsutomu; Ohata, Tetsuo

    2006-04-01

    Evaporation and condensation in the soil column clearly influence year-round nonconductive heat transfer dynamics in the dry active layer underlying semiarid permafrost regions. We deduced this from heat flux components quantified using state-of-the-art micrometeorological data sets obtained in dry and moist summers and in winters with various snow cover depths. Vapor moves easily through large pores, some of which connect to the atmosphere, allowing (1) considerable active layer warming driven by pipe-like snowmelt infiltration, and (2) direct vapor linkage between atmosphere and deeper soils. Because of strong adhesive forces, water in the dry active layer evaporates with great difficulty. The fraction of latent heat to total soil heat storage ranged from 26 to 45% in dry and moist summers, respectively. These values are not negligible, despite being smaller than those of arctic wet active layer, in which only freezing and thawing were considered.

  18. [Impact of depth and moisture to diesel degradation in sand layer of vadose zone].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Zhao, Yong-Sheng; Qu, Zhi-Hui; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Wei; Long, Bei-Sheng; Jiao, Li-Na; Xu, Chao

    2011-02-01

    Through the experiment simulated sand columns, the biodegradation characteristics of diesel in sand layers (including fine sand, medium sand and coarse sand) with different depths and moisture contents were studied. The results show that the depth and moisture content of medium are important factors in affecting the efficiency of diesel degradation. In the same medium conditions, the higher moisture content of the medium, the higher biological activity, and biological degradation efficiency of diesel are observed. The nature of medium affects the efficiency of diesel degradation in vadose zone. The finer particles of the medium, the higher ability of diesel degradation is. It is expressed as: fine sand > medium sand > coarse sand. Volatilization and biodegradation are important factors in affecting natural attenuation of diesel in vadose zone.

  19. Dynamics of active layer in wooded palsas of northern Quebec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Mélanie; Payette, Serge

    2014-02-01

    Palsas are organic or mineral soil mounds having a permafrost core. Palsas are widespread in the circumpolar discontinuous permafrost zone. The annual dynamics and evolution of the active layer, which is the uppermost layer over the permafrost table and subjected to the annual freeze-thaw cycle, are influenced by organic layer thickness, snow depth, vegetation type, topography and exposure. This study examines the influence of vegetation types, with an emphasis on forest cover, on active layer dynamics of palsas in the Boniface River watershed (57°45‧ N, 76°00‧ W). In this area, palsas are often colonized by black spruce trees (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.). Thaw depth and active layer thickness were monitored on 11 wooded or non-wooded mineral and organic palsas in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Snow depth, organic layer thickness, and vegetation types were assessed. The mapping of a palsa covered by various vegetation types and a large range of organic layer thickness were used to identify the factors influencing the spatial patterns of thaw depth and active layer. The active layer was thinner and the thaw rate slower in wooded palsas, whereas it was the opposite in more exposed sites such as forest openings, shrubs and bare ground. Thicker organic layers were associated with thinner active layers and slower thaw rates. Snow depth was not an important factor influencing active layer dynamics. The topography of the mapped palsa was uneven, and the environmental factors such as organic layer, snow depth, and vegetation types were heterogeneously distributed. These factors explain a part of the spatial variation of the active layer. Over the 3-year long study, the area of one studied palsa decreased by 70%. In a context of widespread permafrost decay, increasing our understanding of factors that influence the dynamics of wooded and non-wooded palsas and understanding of the role of vegetation cover will help to define the response of discontinuous permafrost landforms

  20. Depth

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan J; van Doorn, Andrea J; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the fact that human observers often appear to apply mental transformations that involve depths in distinct visual directions. This implies that a comparison of empirically determined depths between observers involves pictorial space as an integral entity, whereas comparing pictorial depths as such is meaningless. We describe the formal structure of pictorial space purely in the phenomenological domain, without taking recourse to the theories of optics which properly apply to physical space—a distinct ontological domain. We introduce a number of general ways to design and implement methods of geodesy in pictorial space, and discuss some basic problems associated with such measurements. We deal mainly with conceptual issues. PMID:23145244

  1. Depth.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan J; van Doorn, Andrea J; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the fact that human observers often appear to apply mental transformations that involve depths in distinct visual directions. This implies that a comparison of empirically determined depths between observers involves pictorial space as an integral entity, whereas comparing pictorial depths as such is meaningless. We describe the formal structure of pictorial space purely in the phenomenological domain, without taking recourse to the theories of optics which properly apply to physical space-a distinct ontological domain. We introduce a number of general ways to design and implement methods of geodesy in pictorial space, and discuss some basic problems associated with such measurements. We deal mainly with conceptual issues.

  2. The spacing of Langmuir circulation in water and layers of all depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hsi-Heng; Phillips, William R. C.

    2004-11-01

    The instability to Langmuir circulation in surface layers bounded by a strong thermocline compared with water of finite depth bounded by a rigid bottom is considered. The instability mechanism is CL2 and the problem is posited in the context of weak shear beneath aligned irrotational surface gravity waves; the waves may be long, comparable with or short relative to the layer depth and the layer may be stratified. Of interest is the onset spacing of the cells in the presence of various boundary conditions, specifically, Dirichlet, Neumann and Cauchy. In accord with Cox & Leibovich's (1993) findings in shallow water with long waves, we find for all depths and wavelengths that stress free boundary conditions at the top and bottom of the layer give rise to onset at zero wavenumber while Cauchy boundary conditions (top and bottom) ensure nonzero onset wavenumbers. Nonzero onset wavenumbers also occur in water of finite depth (Dirichlet at the bottom) for both Neumann and Cauchy free surface conditions. However, the rigid bottom has a stabilizing effect and significantly higher Rayleigh numbers (and spanwise wavenumbers) are required for onset compared with layers of equal depth.

  3. Matched-field depth estimation for active sonar.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Granger; Krolik, Jeffrey L

    2004-02-01

    This work concerns the problem of estimating the depth of a submerged scatterer in a shallow-water ocean by using an active sonar and a horizontal receiver array. As in passive matched-field processing (MFP) techniques, numerical modeling of multipath propagation is used to facilitate localization. However, unlike passive MFP methods where estimation of source range is critically dependent on relative modal phase modeling, in active sonar source range is approximately known from travel-time measurements. Thus the proposed matched-field depth estimation (MFDE) method does not require knowledge of the complex relative multipath amplitudes which also depend on the unknown scatterer characteristics. Depth localization is achieved by modeling depth-dependent relative delays and elevation angle spreads between multipaths. A maximum likelihood depth estimate is derived under the assumption that returns from a sequence of pings are uncorrelated and the scatterer is at constant depth. The Cramér-Rao lower bound on depth estimation mean-square-error is computed and compared with Monte Carlo simulation results for a typical range-dependent, shallow-water Mediterranean environment. Depth estimation performance to within 10% of the water column depth is predicted at signal-to-noise ratios of greater than 10 dB. Real data results are reported for depth estimation of an echo repeater to within 10-m accuracy in this same shallow water environment.

  4. Multilevel depth and image fusion for human activity detection.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bingbing; Pei, Yong; Moulin, Pierre; Yan, Shuicheng

    2013-10-01

    Recognizing complex human activities usually requires the detection and modeling of individual visual features and the interactions between them. Current methods only rely on the visual features extracted from 2-D images, and therefore often lead to unreliable salient visual feature detection and inaccurate modeling of the interaction context between individual features. In this paper, we show that these problems can be addressed by combining data from a conventional camera and a depth sensor (e.g., Microsoft Kinect). We propose a novel complex activity recognition and localization framework that effectively fuses information from both grayscale and depth image channels at multiple levels of the video processing pipeline. In the individual visual feature detection level, depth-based filters are applied to the detected human/object rectangles to remove false detections. In the next level of interaction modeling, 3-D spatial and temporal contexts among human subjects or objects are extracted by integrating information from both grayscale and depth images. Depth information is also utilized to distinguish different types of indoor scenes. Finally, a latent structural model is developed to integrate the information from multiple levels of video processing for an activity detection. Extensive experiments on two activity recognition benchmarks (one with depth information) and a challenging grayscale + depth human activity database that contains complex interactions between human-human, human-object, and human-surroundings demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed multilevel grayscale + depth fusion scheme. Higher recognition and localization accuracies are obtained relative to the previous methods. PMID:23996589

  5. Cone-shell Raman spectroscopy (CSRS) for depth-sensitive measurements in layered tissue.

    PubMed

    Khan, Khan Mohammad; Majumder, Shovan Kumar; Gupta, Pradeep Kumar

    2015-11-01

    We report the development of a depth-sensitive Raman spectroscopy system using the configuration of cone-shell excitation and cone detection. The system uses a 785 nm diode laser and three identical axicons for Raman excitation of the target sample in the form of a hollow conic section. The Raman scattered light from the sample, passed through the same (but solid) conic section, is collected for detection. Apart from its ability of probing larger depths (~ few mm), an important attraction of the system is that the probing depths can be varied by simply varying the separation between axicons in the excitation arm. Furthermore, no adjustment is required in the sample arm, which is a significant advantage for noncontact, depth-sensitive measurement. Evaluation of the performance of the developed setup on nonbiological phantom and biological tissue sample demonstrated its ability to recover Raman spectra of layers located at depths of ~2-3 mm beneath the surface.

  6. Wind, mixed-layer depth and Chl-a variability in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gille, S. T.; Carranza, M. M.; Franks, P. J. S.; Girton, J. B.; Johnson, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean, contains some of the ocean's deepest mixed layers and is under the constant influence of strong winds and buoyancy forcing. Phytoplankton growth is hypothesized to be co-limited by iron and light. Because deep mixed layers can transport phytoplankton below the depth of the euphotic zone, light levels depend on mixed-layer depth. We use satellite winds from multiple wind sensors, combined with Argo data, to show that deep mixed layers are generally correlated with strong winds over the Southern Ocean. These deep mixed layers correspond to cold sea surface temperatures. This might also be expected to lead to nutrient upwelling and high chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), as measured by satellite ocean color sensors. However, Chl-a is less strongly correlated with wind speed than SST is, particularly at the mesoscale, and in summer Chl-a is not well correlated with mixed-layer depth. Using new in situ observations of subsurface Chl-a from sensors on southern elephant seals, EM-APEX floats, and bio-optical Argo floats, we find that Chl-a typically has a subsurface maximum in spring, summer, and fall. As a result satellite-sensed Chl-a is an inadequate measure of total biomass within the mixed layer. Satellite Chl-a and integrated Chl-a over the euphotic zone are negatively correlated with MLD from fall through spring, and uncorrelated during the summer. However, integrated Chl-a within the mixed layer shows significant positive correlations with MLD in all seasons. The fact that the deep Chl-a maximum sits at the base of the MLD, closer to the nutrient (or iron) maximum than the light maximum, suggests nutrient limitation plays a greater role than light limitation in governing productivity, and that wind and buoyancy forcing likely govern the mixing processes at the base of the mixed layer that control phytoplankton growth.

  7. Interaction between the aerosol direct effect in the lower troposphere and the planetary boundary layer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Virginia Ruth

    The planetary boundary layer (PBL) limits the vertical mixing of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere. The PBL depth and its change over time affect weather, surface air quality and radiative forcing. While model simulations have suggested that the column optical properties of aerosol are associated with changes in the PBL depth in turn, there are few long-term measurements of PBL depth with which to validate the theory. Of the existing methods to detect the PBL depth from atmospheric profiles, many require supporting information from multiple instruments or cannot adapt to changing atmospheric conditions. This study combines two common methods for PBL depth detection (wavelet covariance and iterative curve-fitting) in order to produce more reliable PBL depths for micropulse lidar backscatter (MPL). The combined algorithm is also flexible enough to use with radiosonde and atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI) data. PBL depth retrievals from these three instruments collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are compared to one another to show the robustness of the algorithm. The comparisons were made for different times of day, four seasons, and variable sky conditions. While considerable uncertainties exist in PBL detection using all three types of measurements, the agreement among the PBL products is promising, and the different measurements have complementary advantages. The best agreement in the seasonal cycle occurs in winter, and the best agreement in the diurnal cycle when the boundary-layer regime is mature and changes slowly. PBL depths from instruments with higher temporal resolution (MPL and AERI) are of comparable accuracy to radiosonde-derived PBL depths. The new PBL depth measurements for SGP are compared to MPL-derived PBL depths from a multiyear lidar deployment at the Hefei Radiation Observatory (HeRO), and the column aerosol optical depth (AOD) for each site is considered. A one

  8. Penetration depth of linear polarization imaging for two-layer anisotropic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ran; Zeng, Nan; Li, Dongzhi; Yun, Tianliang; He, Yonghong; Ma, Hui

    2011-08-01

    Polarization techniques can suppress multiply scattering light and have been demonstrated as an effective tool to improve image quality of superficial tissues where many cancers start to develop. Learning the penetration depth behavior of different polarization imaging techniques is important for their clinical applications in diagnosis of skin abnormalities. In the present paper, we construct a two-layer sample consisting of isotropic and anisotropic media and examine quantitatively using both experiments and Monte Carlo simulations the penetration depths of three different polarization imaging methods, i.e., linear differential polarization imaging (LDPI), degree of linear polarization imaging (DOLPI), and rotating linear polarization imaging (RLPI). The results show that the contrast curves of the three techniques are distinctively different, but their characteristic depths are all of the order of the transport mean free path length of the top layer. Penetration depths of LDPI and DOLPI depend on the incident polarization angle. The characteristic depth of DOLPI, and approximately of LDPI at small g, scales with the transport mean free path length. The characteristic depth of RLPI is almost twice as big as that of DOLPI and LDPI, and increases significantly as g increases.

  9. Interaction between aerosol and the planetary boundary layer depth at sites in the US and China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, V. R.

    2015-12-01

    The depth of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) defines a changing volume into which pollutants from the surface can disperse, which affects weather, surface air quality and radiative forcing in the lower troposphere. Model simulations have also shown that aerosol within the PBL heats the layer at the expense of the surface, changing the stability profile and therefore also the development of the PBL itself: aerosol radiative forcing within the PBL suppresses surface convection and causes shallower PBLs. However, the effect has been difficult to detect in observations. The most intensive radiosonde measurements have a temporal resolution too coarse to detect the full diurnal variability of the PBL, but remote sensing such as lidar can fill in the gaps. Using a method that combines two common PBL detection algorithms (wavelet covariance and iterative curve-fitting) PBL depth retrievals from micropulse lidar (MPL) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are compared to MPL-derived PBL depths from a multiyear lidar deployment at the Hefei Radiation Observatory (HeRO). With aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements from both sites, it can be shown that a weak inverse relationship exists between AOD and daytime PBL depth. This relationship is stronger at the more polluted HeRO site than at SGP. Figure: Mean daily AOD vs. mean daily PBL depth, with the Nadaraya-Watson estimator overlaid on the kernel density estimate. Left, SGP; right, HeRO.

  10. Estimate of Boundary-Layer Depth Over Beijing, China, Using Doppler Lidar Data During SURF-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Meng; Gao, Zhiqiu; Miao, Shiguang; Chen, Fei; LeMone, Margaret A.; Li, Ju; Hu, Fei; Wang, Linlin

    2016-09-01

    Planetary boundary-layer (PBL) structure was investigated using observations from a Doppler lidar and the 325-m Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) meteorological tower in the centre of Beijing during the summer 2015 Study of Urban-impacts on Rainfall and Fog/haze (SURF-2015) field campaign. Using six fair-weather days of lidar and tower data under clear to cloudy skies, we evaluate the ability of the Doppler lidar to probe the urban boundary-layer structure, and then propose a composite method for estimating the diurnal cycle of the PBL depth using the Doppler lidar. For the convective boundary layer (CBL), a threshold method using vertical velocity variance (σ _w^2 >0.1 m2s^{-2}) is used, since it provides more reliable CBL depths than a conventional maximum wind-shear method. The nocturnal boundary-layer (NBL) depth is defined as the height at which σ _w^2 decreases to 10 % of its near-surface maximum minus a background variance. The PBL depths determined by combining these methods have average values ranging from ≈ 270 to ≈ 1500 m for the six days, with the greatest maximum depths associated with clear skies. Release of stored and anthropogenic heat contributes to the maintenance of turbulence until late evening, keeping the NBL near-neutral and deeper at night than would be expected over a natural surface. The NBL typically becomes more shallow with time, but grows in the presence of low-level nocturnal jets. While current results are promising, data over a broader range of conditions are needed to fully develop our PBL-depth algorithms.

  11. Oceanic upper mixed layer depth determination by the use of satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Xiao-Hai; Schubel, J. R.; Pritchard, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed to determine the oceanic daily mean mixed layer depth from satellite observations and a mixed layer thermal inertia (MLTI) model. The algorithms were developed to use remotely-sensed values of sea surface temperature, albedo, and surface wind speeds to calculate the thermal inertia and to predict changes in subsurface diurnal mixed layer depth. The MLTI model, based on a mixed layer model of the upper ocean, has been used to simulate the diurnal mixing process and thermal inertia distribution in the Sargasso Sea around 34 deg N, 70 deg W. Sea surface temperature and albedo have been obtained from the NOAA7-AVHRR images. Surface wind speeds have been derived from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) aboard Nimbus 7. Image processing was performed for images gathered between June and July 1982. The daily mean mixed layer depths predicted by the MLTI model agree well with data gathered at the LOTUS mooring located in the Sargasso Sea. This suggests that vertical mixing is the dominant physical process that controls the thermal inertia distribution in the midocean, far from major current systems, and that remote sensing is a promising tool to study such upper ocean processes.

  12. Earth thermal history simulations with layering at various depths in the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costin, S.; Butler, S.

    2009-05-01

    Understanding Earth's heat energy budget over all of geological time presents a number of challenges. The current measured surface heat flow is significantly greater than the geochemically estimated internal heating rate which requires a significant degree of mantle secular cooling. This degree of secular cooling is difficult to obtain if the mantle lost heat efficiently at early times. One possible mechanism to decrease convective efficiency at early times is mantle layering at 660-km depth. Also, the persistence of Earth's magnetic field over the last 3.5 Gyrs combined with the relatively high estimates for the current core temperature require that either the core was initially much hotter than the mantle, or that there is radioactive internal heating in the mantle, or that a mechanism, such as a stagnant lower mantle layer acts to significantly decrease the heat flow efficiency from the core to the mantle. In this contribution we will present simulations with mantle layering at 660-km depth and demonstrate that mantle layering is not an effective mechanism for storing mantle heat at early times. Simulations with a stagnant layer in D', that persists over much of Earth's history, will also be presented and we will demonstrate that as long as this layer is not strongly enriched in radioactive elements, it can act to substantially increase the predicted age of the inner core and allow a long lived geodynamo.

  13. Background Subtraction Based on Color and Depth Using Active Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sanchez, Enrique J.; Diaz, Javier; Ros, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Depth information has been used in computer vision for a wide variety of tasks. Since active range sensors are currently available at low cost, high-quality depth maps can be used as relevant input for many applications. Background subtraction and video segmentation algorithms can be improved by fusing depth and color inputs, which are complementary and allow one to solve many classic color segmentation issues. In this paper, we describe one fusion method to combine color and depth based on an advanced color-based algorithm. This technique has been evaluated by means of a complete dataset recorded with Microsoft Kinect, which enables comparison with the original method. The proposed method outperforms the others in almost every test, showing more robustness to illumination changes, shadows, reflections and camouflage. PMID:23857259

  14. The effects of temporal variability of mixed layer depth on primary productivity around Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissett, W. Paul; Meyers, Mark B.; Walsh, John J.; Mueller-Karger, Frank E.

    1994-01-01

    Temporal variations in primary production and surface chlorophyll concentrations, as measured by ship and satellite around Bermuda, were simulated with a numerical model. In the upper 450 m of the water column, population dynamics of a size-fractionated phytoplankton community were forced by daily changes of wind, light, grazing stress, and nutrient availability. The temporal variations of production and chlorophyll were driven by changes in nutrient introduction to the euphotic zone due to both high- and low-frequency changes of the mixed layer depth within 32 deg-34 deg N, 62 deg-64 deg W between 1979 and 1984. Results from the model derived from high-frequency (case 1) changes in the mixed layer depth showed variations in primary production and peak chlorophyll concentrations when compared with results from the model derived from low-frequency (case 2) mixed layer depth changes. Incorporation of size-fractionated plankton state variables in the model led to greater seasonal resolution of measured primary production and vertical chlorophyll profiles. The findings of this study highlight the possible inadequacy of estimating primary production in the sea from data of low-frequency temporal resolution and oversimplified biological simulations.

  15. Mixed Layer Depth Trends in the Bay of Biscay over the Period 1975–2010

    PubMed Central

    Costoya, Xurxo; deCastro, Maite; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Santos, Fran

    2014-01-01

    Wintertime trends in mixed layer depth (MLD) were calculated in the Bay of Biscay over the period 1975–2010 using the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) package. The reliability of the SODA database was confirmed correlating its results with those obtained from the experimental Argo database over the period 2003–2010. An iso-thermal layer depth (TLD) and an iso-pycnal layer depth (PLD) were defined using the threshold difference method with ΔT = 0.5°C and Δσθ = 0.125 kg/m3. Wintertime trends of the MLD were calculated using winter extended (December-March) anomalies and annual maxima. Trends calculated for the whole Bay of Biscay using both parameters (TLD and PLD) showed to be dependent on the area. Thus, MLD became deeper in the southeastern corner and shallower in the rest of the area. Air temperature was shown to play a key role in regulating the different spatial behavior of the MLD. Negative air temperature trends localized in the southeastern corner coincide with MLD deepening in this area, while, positive air temperature trends are associated to MLD shoaling in the rest of the bay. Additionally, the temperature trend calculated along the first 700 m of the water column is in good agreement with the different spatial behavior revealed for the MLD trend. PMID:24922066

  16. Mixed Layer Depth Seasonality within the Coral Sea Based on Argo Data

    PubMed Central

    Jaffrés, Jasmine B. D.

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide deployment of Argo floats has enabled much more detailed studies of global and regional seas over the last decade. Here, the seasonal variability of the mixed layer depth (MLD) within the Coral Sea was examined with CTD profiles from Argo floats. Multiple threshold values for both temperature and density have been employed to determine the most suitable threshold values for the Coral Sea. A threshold value of 0.04 kg/m3 for density and 0.2°C for temperature appear the most fitting for this region. Although MLD and isothermal layer depth (ILD) coincide quite well in most cases, the relatively common presence of temporary, non-seasonal barrier layers induces an ILD that is significantly deeper than the MLD. Consequently, an MLD estimation based on density is more appropriate. A distinct seasonality in the MLD is evident throughout the Coral Sea, but is generally more pronounced in higher southern latitudes (20–30°S). Salinity inversions are rare and mainly occur in the south-eastern Coral Sea, while barrier layers are more commonly associated with the north-eastern Coral Sea, a region characterised by high rainfall. The significance of regional currents is evident in the north-western Coral Sea, where temperature and ocean heat content is relatively low due to a northward moving boundary current. Shallow bathymetry, in turn, is linked to the absence of Argo data on the continental shelf and in the central Coral Sea. PMID:23593368

  17. A Curriculum Activities Guide to In-Depth Environmental Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, John T., Ed.; And Others

    This guide is the fourth in a series of four books emphasizing student-oriented problem solving related to environmental matters. It utilizes a three-level activity approach: awareness, transitional, and operational. The intent is to provide investigations that will motivate students to pursue in-depth studies, thus encouraging them to generate…

  18. Climatology of the mixed layer depth in the East/Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, SeHan; Jang, Chan Joo; Oh, Im Sang; Park, JongJin

    2012-08-01

    A climatology for the mixed layer depth (MLD) in the East/Japan Sea was produced using temperature profile data collected from 1931 to 2005. MLD is defined as the depth at which the temperature differs from that at 10 m depth by 0.2 °C. It varies seasonally with a range of about 20 m, a minimum, near the subpolar front (SPF, 38°-41°N), 60-100 m in south of 38°N and north of 41°N, and about 200 m near the winter convection region (132°-135°E & 41°-43°N). The weaker seasonality near the SPF seems to result from year-round strong stratification sustained largely by advected warm water of the East Korean Warm Current and a result of complex dynamic process of frontogenesis including lateral dynamics or wind-induced friction. The temperature-based MLD does not show any significant difference (mostly less than 20 m) from the density-based values over most of the East/Japan Sea except a few localized regions near the Russian and Japanese coasts where barrier layers form from late fall through early spring. This study confirms that atmospheric forcing largely dominates the overall magnitude of MLD seasonal variability in most of the East/Japan Sea.

  19. Estimation of Mixed Layer Depth in the Gulf of Aden: A New Approach

    PubMed Central

    Alsaafani, M. A.; Alraddadi, T. M.; Albarakati, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    The mixed layer depth (MLD) in Gulf of Aden is analyzed using vertical high resolution (1m) profiles of both temperature and density. Firstly, we examined threshold and gradient methods for estimating the MLD. Close evaluation with individual profiles reveals the failure of both methods for most of the profiles. Furthermore, the curvature method, a relatively recent approach to define ocean MLDs, is established for open water profiles but for marginal seas, like the Gulf of Aden, it detects shallower depths than the actual MLD. These considerable differences motivated us to introduce a new approach of MLD identification, which is developed based on curvature method and is called segment method. Our segment method produces adequate MLD estimates for more than 95% of the profiles and overcomes major limitations of conventional methods. It is less biased and least scattered compared to other methods with a correlation coefficient > 0.95. The mixed layer in Gulf of Aden displays significant seasonal variability and is deeper in winter. Throughout the year, the western part of gulf experiences deeper mixed layer than the eastern part. Regional eddies dominate Gulf of Aden’s MLD pattern during all seasons. PMID:27788181

  20. Comparison of GEOS-5 AGCM Planetary Boundary Layer Depths Computed with Various Definitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath-Spangler, E. L.; Molod, A.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate models of planetary boundary layer (PBL) processes are important for forecasting weather and climate. The present study compares seven methods of calculating PBL depth in the GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) over land. These methods depend on the eddy diffusion coefficients, bulk and local Richardson numbers, and the turbulent kinetic energy. The computed PBL depths are aggregated to the Koppen climate classes, and some limited comparisons are made using radiosonde profiles. Most methods produce similar midday PBL depths, although in the warm, moist climate classes, the bulk Richardson number method gives midday results that are lower than those given by the eddy diffusion coefficient methods. Additional analysis revealed that methods sensitive to turbulence driven by radiative cooling produce greater PBL depths, this effect being most significant during the evening transition. Nocturnal PBLs based on Richardson number are generally shallower than eddy diffusion coefficient based estimates. The bulk Richardson number estimate is recommended as the PBL height to inform the choice of the turbulent length scale, based on the similarity to other methods during the day, and the improved nighttime behavior.

  1. Influence of cutting parameters on the depth of subsurface deformed layer in nano-cutting process of single crystal copper.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanlong; Bai, Qingshun; Chen, Jiaxuan; Su, Hao; Wang, Zhiguo; Xie, Wenkun

    2015-12-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation is performed to study the nano-cutting process of single crystal copper realized by single-point diamond cutting tool in this paper. The centro-symmetry parameter is adopted to characterize the subsurface deformed layers and the distribution and evolution of the subsurface defect structures. Three-dimensional visualization and measurement technology are used to measure the depth of the subsurface deformed layers. The influence of cutting speed, cutting depth, cutting direction, and crystallographic orientation on the depth of subsurface deformed layers is systematically investigated. The results show that a lot of defect structures are formed in the subsurface of workpiece during nano-cutting process, for instance, stair-rod dislocations, stacking fault tetrahedron, atomic clusters, vacancy defects, point defects. In the process of nano-cutting, the depth of subsurface deformed layers increases with the cutting distance at the beginning, then decreases at stable cutting process, and basically remains unchanged when the cutting distance reaches up to 24 nm. The depth of subsurface deformed layers decreases with the increase in cutting speed between 50 and 300 m/s. The depth of subsurface deformed layer increases with cutting depth, proportionally, and basically remains unchanged when the cutting depth reaches over 6 nm.

  2. Differences in the efficacy of climate forcings explained by variations in atmospheric boundary layer depth.

    PubMed

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century and a large component of that warming has been attributed to increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. There are also numerous processes that introduce strong, regionalized variations to the overall warming trend. However, the ability of a forcing to change the surface air temperature depends on its spatial and temporal distribution. Here we show that the efficacy of a forcing is determined by the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere, which in cold and dry climates is defined by the depth of the planetary boundary layer. This can vary by an order of magnitude on different temporal and spatial scales, and so we get a strongly amplified temperature response in shallow boundary layers. This must be accounted for to assess the efficacy of a climate forcing, and also implies that multiple climate forcings cannot be linearly combined to determine the temperature response. PMID:27221757

  3. Differences in the efficacy of climate forcings explained by variations in atmospheric boundary layer depth

    PubMed Central

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century and a large component of that warming has been attributed to increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. There are also numerous processes that introduce strong, regionalized variations to the overall warming trend. However, the ability of a forcing to change the surface air temperature depends on its spatial and temporal distribution. Here we show that the efficacy of a forcing is determined by the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere, which in cold and dry climates is defined by the depth of the planetary boundary layer. This can vary by an order of magnitude on different temporal and spatial scales, and so we get a strongly amplified temperature response in shallow boundary layers. This must be accounted for to assess the efficacy of a climate forcing, and also implies that multiple climate forcings cannot be linearly combined to determine the temperature response. PMID:27221757

  4. Differences in the efficacy of climate forcings explained by variations in atmospheric boundary layer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, Richard; Esau, Igor

    2016-05-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century and a large component of that warming has been attributed to increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. There are also numerous processes that introduce strong, regionalized variations to the overall warming trend. However, the ability of a forcing to change the surface air temperature depends on its spatial and temporal distribution. Here we show that the efficacy of a forcing is determined by the effective heat capacity of the atmosphere, which in cold and dry climates is defined by the depth of the planetary boundary layer. This can vary by an order of magnitude on different temporal and spatial scales, and so we get a strongly amplified temperature response in shallow boundary layers. This must be accounted for to assess the efficacy of a climate forcing, and also implies that multiple climate forcings cannot be linearly combined to determine the temperature response.

  5. Depths to the magnetic layer bottom in the South China Sea area and their tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Feng; Shi, Xiaobin; Zhou, Zuyi; Li, Jiabiao; Geng, Jianhua; Chen, Bing

    2010-09-01

    The depths to the magnetic layer bottom (Zb) in the South China Sea (SCS) area are estimated by computing radially averaged amplitude spectra of total field magnetic anomalies. We test different sizes of moving windows in which the spectra are calculated to better understand how window sizes affect the depth estimations. Apart from lowering the resolutions of estimated Zb, larger windows do not necessarily incur presumable increases in Zb in the SCS area. Although the centroid method is taken as our primary technique for estimating Zb, for cross check, the spectral peak and the non-linear inversion methods are also applied to those windows where spectral peaks do appear. In a single window we may find discrepancy in Zb estimated from different techniques, but for all windows showing spectral peaks, the estimated Zb from one technique are grossly correlated with those from another. Our results show that most parts of the central SCS ocean basin and the northern continent-ocean transition (COT) zone have significantly smaller Zb than the surrounding continental blocks. In the surrounding continental regions Zb are averaged at about 34 km, a depth close to the Moho depth. The average Zb is about 22 km in the central basin, but this value is much larger than the Moho depth, signifying that the uppermost 10 km or so of the mantle beneath the central basin is also magnetized. The strong faulting and recent magmatism within the COT zone can account for the small Zb near the northern continental margin. The estimated Zb are also found very correlative to surface heat flow. This observation verifies dominant contributions to surface heat flow from incoming mantle heat flow due to thermal conduction. The positive correlations observed among Zb from different techniques as well as the good correlation between surface heat flow and Zb support the reasoning that our estimated Zb are within an acceptable range of accuracy.

  6. The effect of skin-depth interfacial defect layer in perovskite solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebremichael, Bizuneh; Mola, Genene Tessema

    2016-08-01

    The hole transport buffer layer (HTL) known as PEDOT:PSS is found to be sensitive to polar solvents often used in the preparation of solution-processed perovskite-based solar cell. We employed {CH}3 {NH}3 {PbI}3 perovskite absorber sandwiched between two charge transport layers to analyze the effect of precursor solvent. By introducing skin-depth interfacial defect layer (IDL) on PEDOT:PSS film we studied the overall performance of the devices using one-dimensional device simulator. Both enhanced conductivity and variations in valence band offset (VBO) of IDL were considered to analyze device performance. A power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the devices was found to grow by 35 % due to increased conductivity of IDL by a factor of 1000. Furthermore, we noted a drastic reduction in PCE of the device by reducing the work function of IDL by more than 0.3eV . The thickness of interfacial defect layer was also analyzed and found to decrease the PCE of the devices by 18 % for fourfold increase in IDL thickness. The analysis was remarkably reproduced the experimentally generated device parameters and will help to understand the underlying physical process in perovskite-based solar cell.

  7. Comparison of stable boundary layer depth estimation from sodar and profile mast.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieudonne, Elsa; Anderson, Philip

    2015-04-01

    The depth of the atmospheric turbulent mixing layer next to the earths surface, hz, is a key parameter in analysis and modeling of the interaction of the atmosphere with the surface. The transfer of momentum, heat, moisture and trace gases are to a large extent governed by this depth, which to a first approximation acts as a finite reservoir to these quantities. Correct estimates of the evolution of hz assists the would allow accurate prognosis of the near-surface accumulation of these variables, that is, wind speed, temperature, humidity and tracer concentration. Measuring hz however is not simple, especially where stable stratification acts to reduce internal mixing, and indeed, it is not clear whether hz is similar for momentum, heat and tracer. Two methods are compared here, to assess their similarity: firstly using acoustic back-scatter is used as an indicator of turbulent strength, the upper limit implying a change to laminar flow and the top of the boundary layer. Secondly, turbulence kinetic energy profiles, TKE(z), are extrapolated to estimate z for TKE(z) = 0, again implying laminar flow. Both techniques have the implied benefit of being able to run continually (via sodar and turbulence mast respectively) with the prospect of continual, autonomous data analysis generating time series of hz. This report examines monostatic sodar echo and sonic anemometer-derived turbulence profile data from Halley Station on the Brunt Ice Shelf Antarctica, during the austral winter of 2003. We report that the two techniques frequently show significant disagreement in estimated depth, and still require manual intervention, but further progress is possible.

  8. Towards Depth-Resolved Optical Imaging of Cardiac Electrical Activity.

    PubMed

    Walton, Richard D; Bernus, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of arrhythmias are likely to be complex three-dimensional phenomena. Yet, the lack of high-resolution three-dimensional imaging techniques, both in the clinic and the experimental lab, limits our ability to better understand the mechanisms of such arrhythmias. Optical mapping using voltage-sensitive dyes is a widely used tool in experimental electrophysiology. It has been known for decades that even in its most basic application, epi-fluorescence, the optical signal contains information from within a certain intramural volume. Understanding of this fundamental property of optical signals has paved the way towards novel three-dimensional optical imaging techniques. Here, we review our current understanding of the three-dimensional nature of optical signals; how penetration depths of cardiac optical imaging can be improved by using novel imaging modalities and finally, we highlight new techniques inspired from optical tomography and aiming at full depth-resolved optical mapping of cardiac electrical activity. PMID:26238062

  9. Efficient active depth sensing by laser speckle projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xuanwu; Wang, Guijin; Shi, Chenbo; Liao, Qingmin

    2014-01-01

    An active depth sensing approach by laser speckle projection system is proposed. After capturing the speckle pattern with an infrared digital camera, we extract the pure speckle pattern using a direct-global separation method. Then the pure speckles are represented by Census binary features. By evaluating the matching cost and uniqueness between the real-time image and the reference image, robust correspondences are selected as support points. After that, we build a disparity grid and propose a generative graphical model to compute disparities. An iterative approach is designed to propagate the messages between blocks and update the model. Finally, a dense depth map can be obtained by subpixel interpolation and transformation. The experimental evaluations demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach.

  10. Calculation of depth-dependent elemental concentration with X-ray fluorescence using a layered calibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherase, M. R.; Fleming, D. E. B.

    2011-05-01

    Depth-dependent elemental concentration can be assessed using either multiple-angle or confocal X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements. This work presents a different approach based on a layered calibration method. The depth-dependent elemental concentration was modeled as multiple layers of uniform elemental concentrations. The unknown elemental concentration in each layer can be calculated using a single-angle XRF measurement, layered calibration data, and a priori knowledge of the concentration behavior as a function of depth. The method was verified using a commercial portable X-ray spectrometer and four-layer stacks of polyester resin discs doped with various concentrations of arsenic. This approach is particularly suitable for quantitative in vivo measurements of arsenic and selenium concentrations in the human skin since minimal ionizing radiation exposure constrains the number of XRF measurements.

  11. Enhancing the platinum atomic layer deposition infiltration depth inside anodic alumina nanoporous membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Vaish, Amit Krueger, Susan; Dimitriou, Michael; Majkrzak, Charles; Vanderah, David J.; Chen, Lei; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2015-01-15

    Nanoporous platinum membranes can be straightforwardly fabricated by forming a Pt coating inside the nanopores of anodic alumina membranes (AAO) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, the high-aspect-ratio of AAO makes Pt ALD very challenging. By tuning the process deposition temperature and precursor exposure time, enhanced infiltration depth along with conformal coating was achieved for Pt ALD inside the AAO templates. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and small angle neutron scattering were employed to analyze the Pt coverage and thickness inside the AAO nanopores. Additionally, one application of platinum-coated membrane was demonstrated by creating a high-density protein-functionalized interface.

  12. Relating Aerosol Mass and Optical Depth in the Summertime Continental Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, C. A.; Wagner, N.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Attwood, A. R.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Brown, S. S.; McComiskey, A. C.; Gordon, T. D.; Welti, A.; Carlton, A. G.; Murphy, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD), the column-integrated ambient aerosol light extinction, is determined from satellite and ground-based remote sensing measurements. AOD is the parameter most often used to validate earth system model simulations of aerosol mass. Relating aerosol mass to AOD, however, is problematic due to issues including aerosol water uptake as a function of relative humidity (RH) and the complicated relationship between aerosol physicochemical properties and light extinction. Measurements of aerosol microphysical, chemical, and optical properties help to constrain the relationship between aerosol mass and optical depth because aerosol extinction at ambient RH is a function of the abundance, composition and size distribution of the aerosol. We use vertical profiles of humidity and dry aerosol extinction observed in the southeastern United States (U.S.) to examine the relationship between submicron aerosol mass concentration and extinction at ambient RH. We show that the κ-Köhler parameterization directly, and without additional Mie calculations, describes the change in extinction with varying RH as a function of composition for both aged aerosols typical of the polluted summertime continental boundary layer and the biomass burning aerosols we encountered. We calculate how AOD and the direct radiative effect in the eastern U.S. have likely changed due to trends in aerosol composition in recent decades. We also examine the sensitivity of AOD to the RH profile and to aerosol composition, size distribution and abundance.

  13. Revisiting the Rectifier: New Observations of Covariance Between Terrestrial Carbon Cycling and Boundary Layer Depth (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, S.; McGrath-Spangler, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Covariance between land-surface carbon fluxes and vertical mixing in the atmosphere is among the strongest determinants of the spatial distribution of atmospheric CO2 in the lower troposphere. Differences in the magnitude of this "CO2 rectifier effect" among different tracer transport models has been shown to explain most of the variability in estimates of terrestrial carbon sinks over the northern (vs tropical) continents. We present a new analysis of the magnitude of the CO2 rectifier using a climatology of PBL depth estimated using vertical profiles of LIDAR backscatter from the CALIPSO satellite. Millions of separate soundings of PBL depth were matched with hourly estimates of photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration from the Simple Biosphere Model (SiB3) at the same locations and times over more than 6 years. Strong covariance between net carbon flux and atmospheric mixing were observed over the northern continents, especially over Boreal Asia. Negative covariance is observed over monsoon regions, which is especially strong over India. Covariance of net carbon flux with the reciprocal of PBL depth has the units of CO2 tendency (ppm per month), and can be expressed as rectifier forcing. Satellite sampling of this quantity reveals spatially-coherent patterns as strong as +/- 10 ppm per month over Siberia and India. We computed rectifier forcing with NASA's Modern Era Reanalysis (MERRA) for the same locations and times sampled by CALIPSO from 2006-2012. Comparison of the MERRA and CALIPSO data reveal that the spatial patterns and magnitudes are similar over the northern continents, but much weaker in MERRA than CALIPSO over the tropics. Using MERRA to compute the rectifier effect for SiB fluxes in GEOS-Chem allows us to establish a quantitative relationship between rectifier forcing and response that is evaluated against the CALIPSO boundary layer data. We propose a framework for model intercomparison and evaluation that can leverage the rich new data set.

  14. Effects of High-frequency Wind Sampling on Simulated Mixed Layer Depth and Upper Ocean Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong; Liu, W. Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on a near-global ocean model are studied by forcing the model with a 12 hourly averaged wind product and its 24 hourly subsamples in separate experiments. The differences in mixed layer depth and sea surface temperature resulting from these experiments are examined, and the underlying physical processes are investigated. The 24 hourly subsampling not only reduces the high-frequency variability of the wind but also affects the annual mean wind because of aliasing. While the former effect largely impacts mid- to high-latitude oceans, the latter primarily affects tropical and coastal oceans. At mid- to high-latitude regions the subsampled wind results in a shallower mixed layer and higher sea surface temperature because of reduced vertical mixing associated with weaker high-frequency wind. In tropical and coastal regions, however, the change in upper ocean structure due to the wind subsampling is primarily caused by the difference in advection resulting from aliased annual mean wind, which varies with the subsampling time. The results of the study indicate a need for more frequent sampling of satellite wind measurement and have implications for data assimilation in terms of identifying the nature of model errors.

  15. Optimisation of glaciological parameters for ice core chronology by implementing counted layers between identified depth levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazin, L.; Lemieux-Dudon, B.; Landais, A.; Guillevic, M.; Kindler, P.; Parrenin, F.; Martinerie, P.

    2014-08-01

    A~recent coherent chronology has been built for 4 Antarctic ice cores and the NorthGRIP (NGRIP) Greenland ice core (Antarctic Ice Core Chronology 2012, AICC2012) using a bayesian approach for ice core dating (Datice). When building the AICC2012 chronology, and in order to prevent any confusion with official ice cores chronology, it has been imposed that the AICC2012 chronology for NGRIP should respect exactly the GICC05 chronology based on layer counting. However, such a strong tuning did not satisfy the hypothesis of independence of background parameters and observations for the NGRIP core as required by Datice. We present here the implementation in Datice of a new type of markers that is better suited to constraints deduced from layer counting: the markers of age-difference. Using this type of markers for NGRIP in a 5 cores dating exercise with Datice, we have performed several sensitivity tests and show that the new ice core chronologies obtained with these new markers do not differ by more than 400 years from AICC2012 for Antarctic ice cores and by more than 130 years from GICC05 for NGRIP over the last 60 000 years. With this new parameterization, the accumulation rate and lock-in depth associated with NGRIP are more coherent with independent estimates than those obtained in AICC2012. While these new chronologies should not be used yet as new ice core chronologies, the improved methodology presented here should be considered in the next coherent ice core dating exercise.

  16. Intraspecific Differences in Lipid Content of Calanoid Copepods across Fine-Scale Depth Ranges within the Photic Layer

    PubMed Central

    Zarubin, Margarita; Farstey, Viviana; Wold, Anette; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Genin, Amatzia

    2014-01-01

    Copepods are among the most abundant and diverse groups of mesozooplankton in the world's oceans. Each species has a certain depth range within which different individuals (of the same life stage and sex) are found. Lipids are accumulated in many calanoid copepods for energy storage and reproduction. Lipid content in some species increases with depth, however studies so far focused mostly on temperate and high-latitude seasonal vertically migrating copepods and compared lipid contents among individuals either from coarse layers or between diapausing, deep-dwelling copepods and individuals found in the photic, near-surface layer. Here we examined whether lipid contents of individual calanoid copepods of the same species, life stage/sex differ between finer depth layers within the upper water column of subtropical and Arctic seas. A total of 6 calanoid species were collected from samples taken at precise depths within the photic layer in both cold eutrophic and warm oligotrophic environments using SCUBA diving, MOCNESS and Multinet. Measurements of lipid content were obtained from digitized photographs of the collected individuals. The results revealed significant differences in lipid content across depth differences as small as 12–15 meters for Mecynocera clausi C5 and Ctenocalanus vanus C5 (Red Sea), Clausocalanus furcatus males and two clausocalanid C5s (Mediterranean Sea), and Calanus glacialis C5 (Arctic). We suggest two possible explanations for the differences in lipid content with depth on such a fine scale: predator avoidance and buoyancy. PMID:24667529

  17. Intraspecific differences in lipid content of calanoid copepods across fine-scale depth ranges within the photic layer.

    PubMed

    Zarubin, Margarita; Farstey, Viviana; Wold, Anette; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Genin, Amatzia

    2014-01-01

    Copepods are among the most abundant and diverse groups of mesozooplankton in the world's oceans. Each species has a certain depth range within which different individuals (of the same life stage and sex) are found. Lipids are accumulated in many calanoid copepods for energy storage and reproduction. Lipid content in some species increases with depth, however studies so far focused mostly on temperate and high-latitude seasonal vertically migrating copepods and compared lipid contents among individuals either from coarse layers or between diapausing, deep-dwelling copepods and individuals found in the photic, near-surface layer. Here we examined whether lipid contents of individual calanoid copepods of the same species, life stage/sex differ between finer depth layers within the upper water column of subtropical and Arctic seas. A total of 6 calanoid species were collected from samples taken at precise depths within the photic layer in both cold eutrophic and warm oligotrophic environments using SCUBA diving, MOCNESS and Multinet. Measurements of lipid content were obtained from digitized photographs of the collected individuals. The results revealed significant differences in lipid content across depth differences as small as 12-15 meters for Mecynocera clausi C5 and Ctenocalanus vanus C5 (Red Sea), Clausocalanus furcatus males and two clausocalanid C5s (Mediterranean Sea), and Calanus glacialis C5 (Arctic). We suggest two possible explanations for the differences in lipid content with depth on such a fine scale: predator avoidance and buoyancy. PMID:24667529

  18. Intraspecific differences in lipid content of calanoid copepods across fine-scale depth ranges within the photic layer.

    PubMed

    Zarubin, Margarita; Farstey, Viviana; Wold, Anette; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Genin, Amatzia

    2014-01-01

    Copepods are among the most abundant and diverse groups of mesozooplankton in the world's oceans. Each species has a certain depth range within which different individuals (of the same life stage and sex) are found. Lipids are accumulated in many calanoid copepods for energy storage and reproduction. Lipid content in some species increases with depth, however studies so far focused mostly on temperate and high-latitude seasonal vertically migrating copepods and compared lipid contents among individuals either from coarse layers or between diapausing, deep-dwelling copepods and individuals found in the photic, near-surface layer. Here we examined whether lipid contents of individual calanoid copepods of the same species, life stage/sex differ between finer depth layers within the upper water column of subtropical and Arctic seas. A total of 6 calanoid species were collected from samples taken at precise depths within the photic layer in both cold eutrophic and warm oligotrophic environments using SCUBA diving, MOCNESS and Multinet. Measurements of lipid content were obtained from digitized photographs of the collected individuals. The results revealed significant differences in lipid content across depth differences as small as 12-15 meters for Mecynocera clausi C5 and Ctenocalanus vanus C5 (Red Sea), Clausocalanus furcatus males and two clausocalanid C5s (Mediterranean Sea), and Calanus glacialis C5 (Arctic). We suggest two possible explanations for the differences in lipid content with depth on such a fine scale: predator avoidance and buoyancy.

  19. Human activities recognition with RGB-Depth camera using HMM.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Amandine; Charpillet, François

    2013-01-01

    Fall detection remains today an open issue for improving elderly people security. It is all the more pertinent today when more and more elderly people stay longer and longer at home. In this paper, we propose a method to detect fall using a system made up of RGB-Depth cameras. The major benefit of our approach is its low cost and the fact that the system is easy to distribute and install. In few words, the method is based on the detection in real time of the center of mass of any mobile object or person accurately determining its position in the 3D space and its velocity. We demonstrate in this paper that this information is adequate and robust enough for labeling the activity of a person among 8 possible situations. An evaluation has been conducted within a real smart environment with 26 subjects which were performing any of the eight activities (sitting, walking, going up, squatting, lying on a couch, falling, bending and lying down). Seven out of these eight activities were correctly detected among which falling which was detected without false positives.

  20. Estimating Active Layer Thickness from Remotely Sensed Surface Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Schaefer, K. M.; Zhang, T.; Wahr, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    We estimate active layer thickness (ALT) from remotely sensed surface subsidence during thawing seasons derived from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements. Ground ice takes up more volume than ground water, so as the soil thaws in summer and the active layer deepens, the ground subsides. The volume of melted ground water during the summer thaw determines seasonal subsidence. ALT is defined as the maximum thaw depth at the end of a thawing season. By using InSAR to measure surface subsidence between the start and end of summer season, one can estimate the depth of thaw over a large area (typically 100 km by 100 km). We developed an ALT retrieval algorithm integrating InSAR-derived surface subsidence, observed soil texture, organic matter content, and moisture content. We validated this algorithm in the continuous permafrost area on the North Slope of Alaska. Based on InSAR measurements using ERS-1/2 SAR data, our estimated values match in situ measurements of ALT within 1--10 cm at Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) sites within the study area. The active layer plays a key role in land surface processes in cold regions. Current measurements of ALT using mechanical probing, frost/thaw tubes, or inferred from temperature measurements are of high quality, but limited in spatial coverage. Using InSAR to estimate ALT greatly expands the spatial coverage of ALT observations.

  1. Wind-Speed Profile and Roughness Sublayer Depth Modelling in Urban Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccioni, Armando; Monti, Paolo; Leuzzi, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new formulation for the wind-speed profile in the urban boundary layer, which can be viewed as a generalisation of the commonly used logarithmic law. The model is based on the assumption that the role played by the classical aerodynamic roughness length and the displacement height in the logarithmic law is taken by a sole variable, the local length scale, which follows a pattern of exponential decrease with height. Starting from wind-speed profiles collected at Villa Pamphili park, Rome, Italy, an empirical fit is used to determine the model parameters. The results show that the local length scale depends also on the friction velocity and that, with appropriate normalization, it reduces to a family of curves that spreads according to the planar area fraction. Another novel aspect is the estimation of the roughness sublayer depth, which can be expressed as a function of the friction velocity and morphometric quantities such as the building height and the planar area fraction. It is also found that the rate of growth with height of the Prandtl mixing length linked to the new formulation is, just above the canopy, lower than the canonical value 0.41, and approaches the latter value well above the roughness sublayer. The model performance is tested by comparison with laboratory and field data reported in the literature.

  2. Analysis of Phase Distribution in Thin Surface Layers Comparable to the Penetration Depth of X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenak, P.; Shani, E.

    2012-11-01

    After hydrogen concentration, gradients in austenitic-type stainless steels, formed during electrochemical charging and followed by hydrogen loss during aging at room temperature, surface stresses, and martensitic phases α'-bcc and ɛ-hcp, developed. Phase quantitative X-ray surface analysis of distributions of martensitic phases in a thin layer, comparable to the penetration depth of X-rays, based on diffraction data taken for various diffraction reflections (2 θ, Bragg's angles) and with various radiations ( λ-wavelengths) was applied for various degrees of the type steel in the surface layers. An examination of the relationships between γ-phase transitions in a number of stainless steels and their γ stability revealed that the stability of the γ phase increased (S stability factor changed from 26.5 in AISI 321 to 44 in AISI 310), the amount of α'-martensites (from 25 pct in AISI 347 to 0 pct in AISI 310) decreased, and ɛ-martensites (from 48 pct in AISI 310 to 77 pct in AISI 321) increased, while the depth (from 6.2 μm in AISI 321 to 3 μm in AISI 310) of the martensitic phases decreased. Deformation and fracture experiments were carried out at room temperature in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope with single-axis tilt tensile stage and environmental cell. The principal effect of hydrogen was to decrease the stress required for dislocation motion, for phase transformation of the austenite, and for crack propagation. Formation of ɛ- and α'-martensite was noted along the fracture surfaces and in front of the crack tip. The cracks propagated through the ɛ-martensite plates, which formed along the active slip planes, while α' phase was always found in the high stress regions.

  3. The Anterior Chamber Depth and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jacky W. Y.; Yau, Gordon S. K.; Woo, Tiffany T. Y.; Yick, Doris W. F.; Tam, Victor T. Y.; Yuen, Can Y. F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the correlation of anterior chamber depth (ACD) with the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, age, axial length (AL), and spherical equivalent in children. Subjects. Consecutive subjects aged 4 to 18 were recruited. Visually disabling eye conditions were excluded. Only the right eye was included for analysis. The ACD was correlated with RNFL thickness, age, spherical equivalent, and AL for all subjects. Subjects were then divided into 3 groups based on their postcycloplegic spherical equivalent: myopes (<−1.0 D), emmetropes (≥−1.0 to ≤+1.0 D), and hyperopes (>+1.0 D). The ACD was compared among the 3 groups before and after age adjustment. Results. In 200 subjects (mean age 7.6 ± 3.3 years), a deeper ACD was correlated with thinner global RNFL (r = −0.2, r2 = 0.06, P = 0.0007), older age (r = 0.4, r2 = 0.1, P < 0.0001), myopic spherical equivalent (r = −0.3, r2 = 0.09, P < 0.0001), and longer AL (r = 0.5, r2 = 0.2, P < 0.0001). The ACD was deepest in myopes (3.5 ± 0.4 mm, n = 67), followed by emmetropes (3.4 ± 0.3, n = 60) and then hyperopes (3.3 ± 0.2, n = 73) (all P < 0.0001). After age adjustment, myopes had a deeper ACD than the other 2 groups (all P < 0.0001). Conclusions. In children, a deeper ACD was associated with thinner RNFL thickness, older age, more myopic spherical equivalent, and longer AL. Myopes had a deeper ACD than emmetropes and hyperopes. PMID:25431789

  4. Enhancing the comprehension of mixed layer depth control on the Mediterranean phytoplankton phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, HéLoïSe; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Migon, Christophe; Claustre, Hervé; Testor, Pierre; D'Alcalã, Maurizio Ribera; Lavezza, Rosario; Houpert, LoïC.; Prieur, Louis

    2013-07-01

    Phytoplankton phenology is primarily affected by physical forcing. However, its quantification is far from being completely understood. Among the physical forcing factors, the mixed layer depth (MLD) is considered to have the strongest impact on phytoplankton dynamics, and consequently, on their phenology. The role of MLD variations in shaping the phytoplankton phenology was explored in the Mediterranean Sea, a basin displaying contrasting phenological regimes. A database of MLD estimations was merged with ocean color chlorophyll concentrations ([Chl]SAT) to generate concomitant annual MLD and [Chl]SAT cycles. Several indices were calculated to quantitatively analyze these cycles. The relevance of indices summarizing the temporal difference between main characteristics of MLD and [Chl]SAT cycles was emphasized. As previously observed, two dominant phenological regimes coexist in the Mediterranean Sea. The first is marked by a typical spring bloom, as in temperate regions. The second displays a low seasonality and an absence of an intense [Chl]SAT peak as in subtropical areas. The MLD is shown to play a key role in determining the dominant phenological regime in a given area. Results also show that regions having low seasonality display concomitant MLD and [Chl]SAT maxima, whereas [Chl]SAT peaks are generally observed 30 days after MLD peaks in regions with strongest seasonality. Over the whole basin, [Chl]SAT increase starts 1 month after the initiation of MLD deepening. Finally, after examining the impact of MLD on light and nutrient availability for phytoplankton, mechanisms were proposed to explain the time lags between MLD and [Chl]SAT increase and MLD and [Chl]SAT maxima.

  5. Prospects for application of robotic mechano-hydraulical excavation of gas-bearing coal layers at great depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryanov, V. N.; Pavlova, L. D.

    2016-10-01

    In the paper the scientific basis for robotic technology of excavation prone to gas- dynamic phenomena of a coal layer with high gas-bearing capacity at great depths is developed. The constructive scheme of automated remote-controlled mining robot, that fractures coal by high-pressure hydraulic jets in the gas polluted environment, is proposed.

  6. C and N depth profiles of SiCN layers determined with nuclear reaction analyses and AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Link, F.; Baumann, H.; Bethge, K.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Bruns, M.

    1998-04-01

    Si 1C xN y layers were prepared by sequential implantation of 40 keV 13C- and 50 keV 15N-ions into c-Si <1 1 1> samples near RT. The carbon and nitrogen depth distributions were measured using the resonant nuclear (p,γ) reactions 15N(p,αγ) 12C at Eres=429 keV and 13C(p,γ) 14N at Eres=1748 keV, respectively. The measured raw data of depth profiling (gamma yield versus the proton beam energy) are converted to concentration-depth profiles of the elements C, N and Si with a common depth scale by using a new developed computer algorithm. These concentration profiles are compared with those obtained with Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and non-Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (n-RBS).

  7. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  8. Layer-by-layer nanoencapsulation of camptothecin with improved activity.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Gaurav; Pattekari, Pravin; Joshi, Chaitanya; Shutava, Tatsiana; DeCoster, Mark; Levchenko, Tatyana; Torchilin, Vladimir; Lvov, Yuri

    2014-04-25

    160 nm nanocapsules containing up to 60% of camptothecin in the core and 7-8 polyelectrolyte bilayers in the shell were produced by washless layer-by-layer assembly of heparin and block-copolymer of poly-l-lysine and polyethylene glycol. The outer surface of the nanocapsules was additionally modified with polyethylene glycol of 5 kDa or 20 kDa molecular weight to attain protein resistant properties, colloidal stability in serum and prolonged release of the drug from the capsules. An advantage of the LbL coated capsules is the preservation of camptothecin lactone form with the shell assembly starting at acidic pH and improved chemical stability of encapsulated drug at neutral and basic pH, especially in the presence of albumin that makes such formulation more active than free camptothecin. LbL nanocapsules preserve the camptothecin lactone form at pH 7.4 resulting in triple activity of the drug toward CRL2303 glioblastoma cell. PMID:24508806

  9. Layer-by-layer nanoencapsulation of camptothecin with improved activity

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Gaurav; Pattekari, Pravin; Joshi, Chaitanya; Shutava, Tatsiana; DeCoster, Mark; Levchenko, Tatyana; Torchilin, Vladimir; Lvov, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    160 nm nanocapsules containing up to 60% of camptothecin in the core and 7–8 polyelectrolyte bilayers in the shell were produced by washless layer-by-layer assembly of heparin and block-copolymer of poly-L-lysine and polyethylene glycol. The outer surface of the nanocapsules was additionally modified with polyethylene glycol of 5 kDa or 20 kDa molecular weight to attain protein resistant properties, colloidal stability in serum and prolonged release of the drug from the capsules. An advantage of the LbL coated capsules is the preservation of camptothecin lactone form with the shell assembly starting at acidic pH and improved chemical stability of encapsulated drug at neutral and basic pH, especially in the presence of albumin that makes such formulation more active than free camptothecin. LbL nanocapsules preserve the camptothecin lactone form at pH 7.4 resulting in triple activity of the drug toward CRL2303 glioblastoma cell. PMID:24508806

  10. DEPTH CONTINUOUS HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY PROFILING USING AN ACTIVE SOURCE PENETROMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, M.; Elsworth, D.

    2009-12-01

    A method is developed to recover depth-continuous hydraulic conductivity profiles of an unconsolidated saturated aquifer using an active source penetrometer, the Hydraulic Profiling Tool (HPT). The tool yields estimates of K through continuous injection of fluid in the subsurface from a small port on the probe shaft while controlled measurements of net applied fluid pressure required to maintain a specified flow rate (typically 350 mL/min) are recorded. The tool gathers these data of flow rate and measured applied pressure during halted and constant-rate penetration (typically 2cm/sec) of the probe. The analysis is developed in two parts, first to explore the interplay between advective effects controlled by penetration rate and secondly flow volume effects controlled by the targeted flow rate. These two effects are analyzed through their respective influence on the measured applied pressure response in ΔP/σv’-Q/ΔP space, which shows a linear relationship for the flow rate to applied pressure response when Q/ΔP > 1 and when Q/ΔP < 1 the response tends towards an asymptotic limit representing soil failure limits as ΔP/σv’ > 1. The analysis shows that penetration rate does not significantly influence the applied pressure response at the tested penetration rates (0 ≤ U(cm/s)≤ 4). The targeted applied flow rate does however influence the applied pressure response as flow rates less than ~300 mL/min show a scattering of the data in ΔP/σv’-Q/ΔP space, where above 300 mL/min the data begins to form a linear response. A targeted flow rate of QT = 400mL/min is suggested as a suitable flow rate based on this analysis. Measurements of hydraulic conductivity are then obtained for the HPT data through the derivation of an equation based on a recast form of Darcy’s law where considerations of the flow geometry as K = (QHPT/ΔP)(δw/πΦ). K profiles obtained for the HPT system are then compared against K profiles obtained from an independent method (PSU

  11. Relationship between the seasonal change in fluorescent dissolved organic matter and mixed layer depth in the subtropical western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Yuko; Hama, Takeo; Ishii, Masao; Saito, Shu

    2010-06-01

    Spatial and temporal distributions of marine humic-like fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOMM) were determined in the subtropical western North Pacific to evaluate the controlling factors of FDOMM behaviors. The observations were conducted at 4 stations (15-30°N) along 137°E in a subtropical area between January 2006 and April 2007. The florescence intensity of FDOMM was low (0.14-0.25 quinine sulfate units (QSU)) in the surface layer probably due to photodegradation, and increased with depth (0.90-1.10 QSU at 1000 m), irrespective of season and station. In the surface layer, the thickness of the water mass with low fluorescence intensity (<0.3 QSU) showed the seasonal change by being deeper in winter and shallower in summer, depending on the mixed layer depth (MLD). The average fluorescence intensity within the mixed layer also varied seasonally at midlatitudes; the intensity in summer was 40.8-53.8% of that in winter. Since the MLD was very much shallower in summer than in winter, FDOMM in the mixed layer would be kept within a shallow depth during the summer where intensive photodegradation could occur. The concentration of total organic carbon (TOC) was at its maximum at the water surface and decreased with depth, being adverse to FDOMM. Thus, the ratio of fluorescence intensity to TOC concentration was lowest (0.002-0.003) in surface water, which implies that FDOMM is not quantitatively important to the dissolved organic carbon pool. However, considering the possible difference in the stabilities of FDOMM against photochemical and microbial degradation, it is conceivable that photobleached FDOMM is one of the important organic groups constituting marine dissolved organic matter.

  12. Time-resolved spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for depth analysis of diffusely scattering layers.

    PubMed

    Iping Petterson, Ingeborg E; Dvořák, Patrick; Buijs, Joost B; Gooijer, Cees; Ariese, Freek

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study is to use time-resolved (TR) Raman spectroscopy, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS), and a combination of these approaches to obtain high quality Raman spectra from materials hidden underneath an opaque layer. Both TR Raman and SORS are advanced techniques that allow for an increased relative selectivity of photons from deeper layers within a sample. Time-resolved detection reduces fluorescence background, and the selectivity for the second layer is improved. By combining this with spatially offset excitation we additionally increased selectivity for deeper layers. Test samples were opaque white polymer blocks of several mm thicknesses. Excitation was carried out with a frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser at 460 nm, 3 ps pulse width and 76 MHz repetition rate. Detection was either with a continuous-wave CCD camera or in time-resolved mode using an intensified CCD camera with a 250 ps gate width. The Raman photons were collected in backscatter mode, with or without lateral offset. By measuring the delay of the Raman signal from the second layer (polyethylene terephthalate/PET/Arnite), the net photon migration speeds through Teflon, polythene, Delrin and Nylon were determined. Raman spectra could be obtained from a second layer of PET through Teflon layers up to 7 mm of thickness. The ability to obtain chemical information through layers of diffusely scattering materials has powerful potential for biomedical applications.

  13. Invivo depth-resolved birefringence measurements of the human retinal nerve fiber layer by polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Cense, Barry; Chen, Teresa C; Park, B Hyle; Pierce, Mark C; de Boer, Johannes F

    2002-09-15

    To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of in vivo depth-resolved birefringence measurements of the human retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) by use of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). Because glaucoma causes nerve fiber layer damage, which may cause loss of retinal birefringence, PS-OCT is a potentially useful technique for the early detection of glaucoma. We built a fiber-based PS-OCT setup that produces quasi-real-time images of the human retina in vivo . Preliminary measurements of a healthy volunteer showed that the double-pass phase retardation per unit depth of the RNFL near the optic nerve head is 39+/-6( degrees )/100microm . PMID:18026517

  14. Convergent crater circulations on Mars: Influence on the surface pressure cycle and the depth of the convective boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Daniel; Barnes, Jeffrey R.

    2015-09-01

    Modeling of slope flow circulations in idealized axisymmetric craters is used to understand (1) the large surface pressure amplitude observed in Gale Crater by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station and (2) the shallow convective boundary layer (CBL) suggested by Curiosity imagery. Air temperatures vary within craters with greater amplitudes than outside them, becoming warmer/colder during day/night. This crater circulation effect is most significant over the depth of the crater (key parameter). Within the idealized craters, a surface pressure cycle develops (in the real atmosphere it is enhanced). Partially caused by thermal expansion, a "surge" of mass away from the craters develops during daytime. Over crater floors, the CBL depth is inhibited by a capping inversion from the adiabatic warming of widespread daytime subsidence. For a variety of craters (radius, depth, and with or without a central mound), the results are very similar. In real-atmosphere simulations over canyons or large basins, similar circulations are seen.

  15. Hydrographic and mixed layer depth variability on the shelf in the northern Gulf of Alaska, 1974 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Nandita; Royer, T. C.; Grosch, C. E.

    2005-11-01

    A time series of hydrographic measurements, temperature and salinity versus depth, on the shelf in the northern Gulf of Alaska (GAK 1) is used to determine the seasonal and interannual variability of the hydrography and mixed layer depth from 1974 through mid-1998. This is one of the first opportunities to incorporate salinity into the mixed layer depth (MLD) determination in this region where the density is highly dependent on salinity. The MLD changes seasonally from about 40 m in summer to more than 160 m in winter. This has potential implications for vertical fluxes of nutrients via winter MLD, leading to their annual replenishment. Spectral analysis of MLDs show that the time series have similar periodicities to the hydrography (decadal and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)). The MLD trend during 1974-1998 has a slight increase in the deepest winter MLD that is, however, not statistically significant at the 90% level. This is in contrast to previous studies which found a significant shoaling of the winter MLD in the offshelf region of the Gulf of Alaska at Ocean Station P (OSP) [Freeland, H., Denman, K., Wong, C.S., Whitney, F., Jacques, R., 1997. Evidence of change in the winter mixed layer in the northeast Pacific Ocean. Deep Sea Research 44, 2117-2129]. This difference in the response of the marine system is consistent with an increase in the circulation of the Alaskan Gyre with enhanced upwelling in the central gulf (OSP) and enhanced downwelling along the coast (GAK 1).

  16. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers.

    PubMed

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-08-23

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers' global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces. PMID:27503887

  17. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers.

    PubMed

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-08-23

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers' global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces.

  18. Compositional mantle layering revealed by slab stagnation at ~1,000 km depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, M. D.; Nakagawa, T.; Schmerr, N. C.; Ritsema, J.; Motoki, M.

    2015-12-01

    Improved constraints on lower-mantle composition are fundamental to understand the accretion, differentiation and thermochemical evolution of our planet. Whereas cosmochemical arguments indicate that lower-mantle rocks may be enriched in Si relative to upper-mantle pyrolite, seismic tomography images suggest whole-mantle convection and efficient mantle mixing. This study reconciles cosmochemical and geophysical constraints using the stagnation of some slab segments at ~1,000 km depth as the key observation. Whereas slab stagnation at ~660 km depth is well explained by the effects of the spinel-perovskite endothermic phase transition, flattening of slabs in the uppermost lower mantle remains poorly understood. Through numerical modeling of subduction, we show that enrichment of the lower mantle in intrinsically dense basaltic heterogeneity can render slabs neutrally buoyant at ~1,000 km depth. Slab stagnation (at ~660 and ~1,000 km depth) as well as unimpeded slab sinking to great depths can only coexist as three different modes of slab sinking behavior on Earth if the basalt fraction is ~8% higher in the lower than in the upper mantle, equivalent to a lower-mantle Mg/Si of ~1.18. Geodynamic models demonstrate that such a moderate compositional gradient can be sustained by compositional filtering of both slabs and plumes as they cross the transition zone, and thus persist over billions of years of whole-mantle convection. Whereas basaltic heterogeneity tends to get trapped in the transition zone and ultimately sink into the lower mantle, harzburgitic heterogeneity tends to rise into the uppermost mantle.

  19. Depth-selective imaging of macroscopic objects hidden behind a scattering layer using low-coherence and wide-field interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sungsoo; Kang, Sungsam; Yoon, Changhyeong; Ko, Hakseok; Choi, Wonshik

    2016-08-01

    Imaging systems targeting macroscopic objects tend to have poor depth selectivity. In this Letter, we present a 3D imaging system featuring a depth resolution of 200 μm, depth scanning range of more than 1 m, and view field larger than 70×70 mm2. For depth selectivity, we set up an off-axis digital holographic imaging system using a light source with a coherence length of 400 μm. A prism pair was installed in the reference beam path for long-range depth scanning. We performed imaging macroscopic targets with multiple different layers and also demonstrated imaging targets hidden behind a scattering layer.

  20. Estimating the absorption coefficient of the bottom layer in four-layered turbid mediums based on the time-domain depth sensitivity of near-infrared light reflectance.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chie; Shimada, Miho; Tanikawa, Yukari; Hoshi, Yoko

    2013-09-01

    Expanding our previously proposed "time segment analysis" for a two-layered turbid medium, this study attempted to selectively determine the absorption coefficient (μa) of the bottom layer in a four-layered human head model with time-domain near-infrared measurements. The difference curve in the temporal profiles of the light attenuation between an object and a reference medium, which are obtained from Monte Carlo simulations, is divided into segments along the time axis, and a slope for each segment is calculated to obtain the depth-dependent μa(μaseg). The reduced scattering coefficient (μs') of the reference is determined by curve fitting with the temporal point spread function derived from the analytical solution of the diffusion equation to the time-resolved reflectance of the object. The deviation of μaseg from the actual μa is expressed by a function of the ratio of μaseg in an earlier time segment to that in a later segment for mediums with different optical properties and thicknesses of the upper layers. Using this function, it is possible to determine the μa of the bottom layer in a four-layered epoxy resin-based phantom. These results suggest that the method reported here has potential for determining the μa of the cerebral tissue in humans.

  1. Atom-scale depth localization of biologically important chemical elements in molecular layers

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Emanuel; Scoppola, Ernesto; Drnec, Jakub; Mocuta, Cristian; Felici, Roberto; Novikov, Dmitri; Fragneto, Giovanna; Daillant, Jean

    2016-01-01

    In nature, biomolecules are often organized as functional thin layers in interfacial architectures, the most prominent examples being biological membranes. Biomolecular layers play also important roles in context with biotechnological surfaces, for instance, when they are the result of adsorption processes. For the understanding of many biological or biotechnologically relevant phenomena, detailed structural insight into the involved biomolecular layers is required. Here, we use standing-wave X-ray fluorescence (SWXF) to localize chemical elements in solid-supported lipid and protein layers with near-Ångstrom precision. The technique complements traditional specular reflectometry experiments that merely yield the layers’ global density profiles. While earlier work mostly focused on relatively heavy elements, typically metal ions, we show that it is also possible to determine the position of the comparatively light elements S and P, which are found in the most abundant classes of biomolecules and are therefore particularly important. With that, we overcome the need of artificial heavy atom labels, the main obstacle to a broader application of high-resolution SWXF in the fields of biology and soft matter. This work may thus constitute the basis for the label-free, element-specific structural investigation of complex biomolecular layers and biological surfaces. PMID:27503887

  2. Architectural evolution of the Nojima fault and identification of the activated slip layer by Kobe earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hidemi; Omura, Kentaro; Matsuda, Tatsuo; Ikeda, Ryuji; Kobayashi, Kenta; Murakami, Masaki; Shimada, Koji

    2007-07-01

    Evolutionary history of Nojima Fault zone is clarified by comprehensive examinations of petrological, geophysical, and geochemical characterizations on a fault zone in deep-drilled core penetrating the Nojima Fault. On the basis of the results, we reconstruct a whole depth profile of the architecture of the Nojima Fault and identify the primal slip layer activated by 1995 Kobe earthquake. The deepest part (8- to 12-km depth) of the fault zone is composed of thin slip layers of pseudotachylite (5 to 10 mm thick each, 10 cm in total). Middle depth (4- to 8-km depth) of the fault zone is composed of fault core (6 to 10 m thick), surrounded by thick (100 m thick) damage zone, characterized by zeolite precipitation. The shallow part of the fault zone (1- to 4-km depth) is composed of distributed narrow shear zones, which are characterized by combination of thin (0.5 cm thick each, 10 cm in total) ultracataclasite layers at the core of shear zones, surrounded by thicker (1 to 3 m thick) damage zones associated with carbonate precipitation. An extremely thin ultracataclasite layer (7 mm thick), activated by the 1995 Kobe earthquake, is clearly identified from numerous past slip layers, overprinting one of the shear zones, as evidenced by conspicuous geological and geophysical anomalies. The Nojima Fault zone was 10 to 100 times thicker at middle depth than that of shallower and deeper depths. The thickening would be explained as a combination of physical and chemical effects as follows. (1) Thickening of "fault core" at middle depth would be attributed to normal stress dependence on thickness of the shear zone and (2) an extreme thickening of "damage zone" in middle depth of the crust would result from the weakening of the fault zone due to super hydrostatic fluid pressure at middle depths. The high fluid pressure would result from faster sealing with low-temperature carbonate at the shallower fault zone.

  3. The effect of stochastic wind on the infinite depth Ekman layer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenazy, Yosef; Gildor, Hezi; Bel, Golan

    2015-08-01

    The seminal model for the effect of winds on surface ocean currents was proposed by Ekman more than a century ago. It demonstrated the non-trivial effect of the Earth's rotation on surface ocean currents driven by constant wind. Here we show that this model is ill-defined when forced by a more realistic stochastic wind - the component of the stochastic wind that resonates with the Coriolis frequency leads to the divergence (singularity) of the surface and depth-integrated currents. The addition of a linear friction term to the model suppresses this unphysical singularity. We present explicit solutions for the surface and depth-integrated currents for wind stress with exponentially decaying and oscillating temporal correlations and show that the wind's temporal correlations and the friction drastically affect, and can even diminish, the resonance. Winds and currents from the Gulf of Elat are compared with the model's predictions.

  4. Compositional mantle layering revealed by slab stagnation at ~1000-km depth.

    PubMed

    Ballmer, Maxim D; Schmerr, Nicholas C; Nakagawa, Takashi; Ritsema, Jeroen

    2015-12-01

    Improved constraints on lower-mantle composition are fundamental to understand the accretion, differentiation, and thermochemical evolution of our planet. Cosmochemical arguments indicate that lower-mantle rocks may be enriched in Si relative to upper-mantle pyrolite, whereas seismic tomography images suggest whole-mantle convection and hence appear to imply efficient mantle mixing. This study reconciles cosmochemical and geophysical constraints using the stagnation of some slab segments at ~1000-km depth as the key observation. Through numerical modeling of subduction, we show that lower-mantle enrichment in intrinsically dense basaltic lithologies can render slabs neutrally buoyant in the uppermost lower mantle. Slab stagnation (at depths of ~660 and ~1000 km) and unimpeded slab sinking to great depths can coexist if the basalt fraction is ~8% higher in the lower mantle than in the upper mantle, equivalent to a lower-mantle Mg/Si of ~1.18. Global-scale geodynamic models demonstrate that such a moderate compositional gradient across the mantle can persist can in the presence of whole-mantle convection. PMID:26824060

  5. Compositional mantle layering revealed by slab stagnation at ~1000-km depth

    PubMed Central

    Ballmer, Maxim D.; Schmerr, Nicholas C.; Nakagawa, Takashi; Ritsema, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Improved constraints on lower-mantle composition are fundamental to understand the accretion, differentiation, and thermochemical evolution of our planet. Cosmochemical arguments indicate that lower-mantle rocks may be enriched in Si relative to upper-mantle pyrolite, whereas seismic tomography images suggest whole-mantle convection and hence appear to imply efficient mantle mixing. This study reconciles cosmochemical and geophysical constraints using the stagnation of some slab segments at ~1000-km depth as the key observation. Through numerical modeling of subduction, we show that lower-mantle enrichment in intrinsically dense basaltic lithologies can render slabs neutrally buoyant in the uppermost lower mantle. Slab stagnation (at depths of ~660 and ~1000 km) and unimpeded slab sinking to great depths can coexist if the basalt fraction is ~8% higher in the lower mantle than in the upper mantle, equivalent to a lower-mantle Mg/Si of ~1.18. Global-scale geodynamic models demonstrate that such a moderate compositional gradient across the mantle can persist can in the presence of whole-mantle convection. PMID:26824060

  6. Method and apparatus for the evaluation of a depth profile of thermo-mechanical properties of layered and graded materials and coatings

    DOEpatents

    Finot, Marc; Kesler, Olivera; Suresh, Subra

    1998-01-01

    A technique for determining properties such as Young's modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, and residual stress of individual layers within a multi-layered sample is presented. The technique involves preparation of a series of samples, each including one additional layer relative to the preceding sample. By comparison of each sample to a preceding sample, properties of the topmost layer can be determined, and residual stress at any depth in each sample, resulting from deposition of the top layer, can be determined.

  7. Trapping and depth profile of tritium in surface layers of metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, M.; Chen, Z.; Nisimura, K.; Akamaru, S.; Torikai, Y.; Hatano, Y.; Ashikawa, N.; Oya, Y.; Okuno, K.; Hino, T.

    2011-10-01

    Tritium amount retained in surface layers and release behavior from surface layers were examined using SS316L samples exposed to plasmas in the Large Helical Device and a commercial Cu-Be alloy plate. BIXS analyses and observation by SEM indicate that carbon and titanium deposited on the plasma-facing surface of the SS316L samples. Larger amount of tritium was trapped in the plasma-facing surface in comparison with the polished surface. Higher enrichment of tritium in surface layers was similarly found in the polished surface of both samples. The amount of surface tritium in both samples was almost same, while the bulk concentration of tritium in Cu-Be was much lower than that in SS316L. Tritium release from the SS316L and Cu-Be samples into water was examined by immersion experiments. Tritium elution was observed for both samples, but changes in the residual tritium amount in surface layers were different from each other.

  8. Seismic evidence for an extensive gas-bearing layer at shallow depth, offshore from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boucher, G.; Reimnitz, E.; Kempema, E.

    1981-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection data, recorded offshore from Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, were processed digitally to determine the reflectivity structure of the uppermost layers of the seafloor. A prominent reflector, found at 27 m below the mud line (water depths 7-9 m), has a negative reflection coefficient greater than 0.5. The large acoustic impedance contrast, coupled with a report of gas encountered at a corresponding depth in a nearby drillhole, shows that the reflector is the upper boundary of a zone containing gas. The gas exists in sandy gravel capped by stiff, silty clay. Analysis of unprocessed conventional high-resolution records from the region indicates that the gas-bearing layer may extend over an area of at least 50 km2 at a depth of 20-35 m below the mud line. Similar-appearing reflectors (Reimnitz, 1972), previously unexplained, occur in patches over wide regions of the shelf where offshore oil development is beginning at a rapid pace. This suggests the exercise of caution with respect to possible hazards from shallow gas pockets.

  9. Molecular depth profiling of organic photovoltaic heterojunction layers by ToF-SIMS: comparative evaluation of three sputtering beams.

    PubMed

    Mouhib, T; Poleunis, C; Wehbe, N; Michels, J J; Galagan, Y; Houssiau, L; Bertrand, P; Delcorte, A

    2013-11-21

    With the recent developments in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), it is now possible to obtain molecular depth profiles and 3D molecular images of organic thin films, i.e. SIMS depth profiles where the molecular information of the mass spectrum is retained through the sputtering of the sample. Several approaches have been proposed for "damageless" profiling, including the sputtering with SF5(+) and C60(+) clusters, low energy Cs(+) ions and, more recently, large noble gas clusters (Ar500-5000(+)). In this article, we evaluate the merits of these different approaches for the in depth analysis of organic photovoltaic heterojunctions involving poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the electron donor and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as the acceptor. It is demonstrated that the use of 30 keV C60(3+) and 500 eV Cs(+) (500 eV per atom) leads to strong artifacts for layers in which the fullerene derivative PCBM is involved, related to crosslinking and topography development. In comparison, the profiles obtained using 10 keV Ar1700(+) (∼6 eV per atom) do not indicate any sign of artifacts and reveal fine compositional details in the blends. However, increasing the energy of the Ar cluster beam beyond that value leads to irreversible damage and failure of the molecular depth profiling. The profile qualities, apparent interface widths and sputtering yields are analyzed in detail. On the grounds of these experiments and recent molecular dynamics simulations, the discussion addresses the issues of damage and crater formation induced by the sputtering and the analysis ions in such radiation-sensitive materials, and their effects on the profile quality and the depth resolution. Solutions are proposed to optimize the depth resolution using either large Ar clusters or low energy cesium projectiles for sputtering and/or analysis.

  10. Medium energy ion scattering for the high depth resolution characterisation of high-k dielectric layers of nanometer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, J. A.; Reading, M. A.; Bailey, P.; Noakes, T. Q. C.; Adelmann, C.; Popovici, M.; Tielens, H.; Conard, T.; de Gendt, S.; van Elshocht, S.

    2013-09-01

    Medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) using, typically, 100-200 keV H+ or He+ ions derives it ability to characterise nanolayers from the fact that the energy after backscattering depends (i) on the elastic energy loss suffered in a single collision with a target atom and (ii) on the inelastic energy losses on its incoming and outgoing trajectories. From the former the mass of the atom can be determined and from the latter its depth. Thus MEIS yields depth dependent compositional and structural information, with high depth resolution (sub-nm near the surface) and good sensitivity for all but the lighter masses. It is particularly well suited for the depth analysis of high-k multilayers of nanometer thickness. Accurate quantification of the depth distributions of atomic species can be obtained using suitable spectrum simulation. In the present paper, important aspects of MEIS including quantification, depth resolution and spectrum simulation are briefly discussed. The capabilities of the technique in terms of the high depth resolution layer compositional and structural information it yields, is illustrated with reference to the detailed characterisation of a range of high-k nanolayer and multilayer structures for current microelectronic devices or those still under development: (i) HfO2 and HfSiOx for gate dielectric applications, including a TiN/Al2O3/HfO2/SiO2/Si structure, (ii) TiN/SrTiO3/TiN and (iii) TiO2/Ru/TiN multilayer structures for metal-insulator-metal capacitors (MIMcaps) in DRAM applications. The unique information provided by the technique is highlighted by its clear capability to accurately quantify the composition profiles and thickness of nanolayers and complex multilayers as grown, and to identify the nature and extent of atom redistribution (e.g. intermixing, segregation) during layer deposition, annealing and plasma processing. The ability makes it a valuable tool in the development of the nanostructures that will become increasingly important as

  11. Modeling the impacts of organic layer depth on forest stand recovery from disturbance in the North American boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trugman, A. T.; Medvigy, D.; Fenton, N.; Bergeron, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The boreal forest contains over 30 percent of Earth's terrestrial carbon, stored mainly as organic matter in soils. Warming temperatures have decreased the fire return interval at many locations, potentially opening more boreal forest space to early-successional deciduous species. However, previous observational studies have shown that the residual forest organic layer depth after a fire can be directly related to fire severity and that this organic layer depth plays a critical role in determining post-fire secondary succession in the North American boreal forest. In this study, we use a numerical model constrained by field data to evaluate: (1) the extent to which the organic layer inhibits deciduous seedling establishment; (2) whether differences in seedling establishment after mild and severe burns affect mature forest structure and composition on decadal to century time scales. Our modeling experiments were carried out with the Ecosystem Demography model version 2 (ED2) terrestrial biosphere model. ED2 is designed to explicitly track the growth and mortality of individual trees, which compete for light, water, and nutrients using an open nitrogen cycle. Our simulations feature parameterizations for aspen and black spruce species-types as well as a new dynamic soil organic layer module with species-specific litter decay rates. The updated boreal forest model is validated using several datasets across the North American boreal forest that range from daily carbon and energy fluxes to multi-century basal area chronosequences including: (1) sub-daily to monthly eddy covariance measurements taken in Delta Junction, Alaska and Manitoba, Canada; (2) decade-long forest inventory data from the Cooperative Alaska Forest Inventory taken throughout the Alaskan boreal forest; and (3) multi-century basal area chronosequences measured in Manitoba and Quebec. We then use the model to identify the controls that the soil organic layer exerts on secondary succession between aspen

  12. Depth distribution and composition of seed banks under different tree layers in a managed temperate forest ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godefroid, Sandrine; Phartyal, Shyam S.; Koedam, Nico

    2006-05-01

    In the present work we examined the composition and distribution across three soil layers of the buried soil seed bank under three different overstory types ( Fagus sylvatica, Quercus robur, Pinus sylvestris) and in logging areas in a 4383-ha forest in central Belgium. The objectives were: (1) to investigate whether species composition and species richness of soil seed banks are affected by different forest stands; (2) to examine how abundant are habitat-specific forest species in seed banks under different planted tree layers. The study was carried out in stands which are replicated, managed in the same way (even-aged high forest), and growing on the same soil type with the same land-use history. In the investigated area, the seed bank did show significant differences under oak, beech, pine and in logging areas, respectively in terms of size, composition and depth occurrence. All species and layers taken together, the seed bank size ranked as follows: oakwood > beechwood > logging area > pinewood. The same pattern was found for forest species. Seed numbers of Betula pendula, Calluna vulgaris, Dryopteris dilatata and Rubus fruticosus were significantly higher under the beech canopy. Carex remota, Impatiens parviflora and Lotus sp. showed a significantly denser seed bank in logging areas, while Digitalis purpurea seeds were significantly more abundant in soils under the oak canopy. The fact that the seed bank of an originally homogeneous forest varies under different planted stands highlights that a long period of canopy conversion can affect the composition and depth of buried seeds.

  13. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Depth Profiling of Electrochemically Prepared Thin Oxide Layers on Duplex Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donik, Črtomir; Kocijan, Aleksandra; Mandrino, Djordje; Jenko, Monika

    2011-10-01

    The surface oxidation of duplex stainless steel (DSS 2205) was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The experiments were performed on the alloy after controlled oxidation in a chloride-enriched solution at controlled potentials. The evolution of the passive film formed on the DSS in a chloride solution was studied using cyclic voltammetry with XPS surface characterization at selected potentials. The evolution of the oxide films and its specific compositions formed on the DSS was studied as a function of depth. Fe/Cr oxidized layers and oxide thicknesses were observed and correlated with the various potentiostatic potentials. The importance of Mo and Cr inside the oxide films in this article is studied and described, whereas their role in the protective layer, as oxides, is significant.

  14. Depth-dependent phase change in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} epitaxial layers under ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mejai, N.; Debelle, A. Thomé, L.; Sattonnay, G.; Gosset, D.; Dargis, R.; Clark, A.

    2015-09-28

    Epitaxial Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin layers with the cubic structure were irradiated with 4-MeV Au{sup 2+} ions in the 10{sup 13}–10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} fluence range. X-ray diffraction indicates that ion irradiation induces a cubic to monoclinic phase change. Strikingly, although the energy-deposition profile of the Au{sup 2+} ions is constant over the layer thickness, this phase transformation is depth-dependent, as revealed by a combined X-ray diffraction and ion channeling analysis. In fact, the transition initiates very close to the surface and propagates inwards, which can be explained by an assisted migration process of irradiation-induced defects. This result is promising for developing a method to control the thickness of the rare-earth oxide crystalline phases.

  15. Depth-dependent erodibility: representing burnt soils as a two-layered cohesive/non-cohesive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyman, P.; Sheridan, G. J.; Moody, J. A.; Smith, H. G.; Lane, P. N.

    2011-12-01

    Immediately after wildfire there is an abundant supply of non-cohesive ash, soil and gravel which is easily entrained by overland flow. Under these conditions the sediment flux on hillslopes can be assumed to be equal to the transport capacity of the flow. However, the supply of material is finite and at some point the hillslope could shift towards a system where entrainment is restricted by armouring and soil cohesion. In this study we test the notion that burnt hillslopes can be represented as a two-layered system of non-cohesive and cohesive soils. Using a combination of i) shear vane measurements, ii) confined hillslope flow experiments and iii) a laboratory flume, we demonstrate how erosion on burnt hillslopes primarily takes place in a distinct layer of non-cohesive soil with erosion properties that are very different to the underlying soil matrix. Shear vane measurements were taken at 5 soil depths at more than 50 points along transects in order to quantify the depth and spatial distribution of non-cohesive soil in two small (0.5 ha) and steep (30 deg) convergent basins (SE Australia) that were burnt at high severity. The measurements showed that the recently burnt hillslopes were mantled with non-cohesive soil to an average depth of 18mm and 20mm at the two sites which were situated in different geologic terrain but in similar eucalyptus dominated forests. In the hillslope flow experiments, the rapid entrainment of non-cohesive material resulted in very high sediment concentration (50-60% by volume) in the initial surge from the test area. During the flow experiments the sediment concentration decreased exponentially with time until the erosion rate reached a steady state reflecting the erodibility of the underlying cohesive soil. The formation of shallow rills and the presence of large clasts (>16cm) within the test area resulted in incomplete removal of the non-cohesive material at shear stress < 50 Ncm-2. At shear stress > 50 Ncm-2 all material was

  16. Effects of spatial variation of skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers on optical mapping of brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuping; Shibahara, Nanae; Kuramashi, Daishi; Okawa, Shinpei; Kakuta, Naoto; Okada, Eiji; Maki, Atsushi; Yamada, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the effects of anatomical variation in human heads on the optical mapping of brain activity, we perform simulations of optical mapping by solving the photon diffusion equation for layered-models simulating human heads using the finite element method (FEM). Particularly, the effects of the spatial variations in the thicknesses of the skull and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layers on mapping images are investigated. Mapping images of single active regions in the gray matter layer are affected by the spatial variations in the skull and CSF layer thicknesses, although the effects are smaller than those of the positions of the active region relative to the data points. The increase in the skull thickness decreases the sensitivity of the images to active regions, while the increase in the CSF layer thickness increases the sensitivity in general. The images of multiple active regions are also influenced by their positions relative to the data points and by their depths from the skin surface.

  17. Characterization of cathode keeper wear by surface layer activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the erosion rates of the discharge cathode keeper in a 30 cm NSTAR configuration ion thruster were measured using a technique known as Surface Layer Activation (SLA). This diagnostic technique involves producing a radioactive tracer in a given surface by bombardment with high energy ions. The decrease in activity of the tracer material may be monitored as the surface is subjected to wear processes and correlated to a depth calibration curve, yielding the eroded depth. Analysis of the activities was achieved through a gamma spectroscopy system. The primary objectives of this investigation were to reproduce erosion data observed in previous wear studies in order to validate the technique, and to determine the effect of different engine operating parameters on erosion rate. The erosion profile at the TH 15 (23 kw) setting observed during the 8200 hour Life Demonstration Test (LDT) was reproduced. The maximum keeper erosion rate at this setting was determined to be 0.085 pm/hr. Testing at the TH 8 (1.4 kw) setting demonstrated lower erosion rates than TH 15, along with a different wear profile. Varying the keeper voltage was shown to have a significant effect on the erosion, with a positive bias with respect to cathode potential decreasing the erosion rate significantly. Accurate measurements were achieved after operating times of only 40 to 70 hours, a significant improvement over other erosion diagnostic methods.

  18. Characterization of oxide layers on amorphous Zr-based alloys by Auger electron spectroscopy with sputter depth profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baunack, S.; Mudali, U. Kamachi; Gebert, A.

    2005-09-01

    Amorphous Zr-Cu-Ni-Al-[Ti, Nb] ribbons prepared by melt spinning under argon atmosphere were subjected to electrochemical investigations. Passive films developed at potentiostatic anodic polarization in sulphuric acid solution were investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and sputter depth profiling. Changes in the shape of the Auger peaks have been analyzed by factor analysis of the spectra obtained during depth profiling. Pronounced changes in shape and position occur for the Zr, Al, and Ti Auger transitions, but not for Cu and Ni. At least three different peak shapes for O(KVV) were found and attributed to different oxygen binding states. The alloy composition has no significant effect on the thickness and composition of the oxide layer. In multi-element alloys preferential sputtering is a common phenomenon. In the steady state of sputtering, a significant depletion in Cu is found. At the oxide/metal interface, a distinct enrichment of copper is found for all alloys and treatments. The degree of this Cu enrichment depends on the pretreatment. It is higher for the electrochemically-passivated samples than for samples with oxide layers grown during melt spinning.

  19. Validation of ASH Optical Depth and Layer Height from IASI using Earlinet Lidar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balis, D.; Siomos, N.; Koukouli, M.; Clarisse, L.; Carboni, E.; Ventress, L.; Grainger, R.; Mona, L.; Pappalardo, G.

    2016-06-01

    The 2010 eruptions of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull attracted the attention of the public and the scientific community to the vulnerability of the European airspace to volcanic eruptions. The European Space Agency project "Satellite Monitoring of Ash and Sulphur Dioxide for the mitigation of Aviation Hazards", called for the creation of an optimal End-to-End System for Volcanic Ash Plume Monitoring and Prediction. This system is based on improved and dedicated satellite-derived ash plume and sulphur dioxide level assessments, as well as an extensive validation, using among others ground-based measurements (Koukouli et al., 2014). The validation of volcanic ash levels and height extracted from IASI/MetopA is presented in this work with emphasis on the ash plume height and ash optical depth levels. European Aerosol Research Lidar Network [EARLINET] lidar measurements are compared to different satellite estimates for two eruptive episodes. The validation results are extremely promising within the estimated uncertainties of each of the comparative datasets.

  20. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow

    PubMed Central

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity. PMID:27597999

  1. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity. PMID:27597999

  2. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity.

  3. Quantification of Hydrogen Concentrations in Surface and Interface Layers and Bulk Materials through Depth Profiling with Nuclear Reaction Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Markus; Ohno, Satoshi; Ogura, Shohei; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-29

    Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) via the resonant (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C reaction is a highly effective method of depth profiling that quantitatively and non-destructively reveals the hydrogen density distribution at surfaces, at interfaces, and in the volume of solid materials with high depth resolution. The technique applies a (15)N ion beam of 6.385 MeV provided by an electrostatic accelerator and specifically detects the (1)H isotope in depths up to about 2 μm from the target surface. Surface H coverages are measured with a sensitivity in the order of ~10(13) cm(-2) (~1% of a typical atomic monolayer density) and H volume concentrations with a detection limit of ~10(18) cm(-3) (~100 at. ppm). The near-surface depth resolution is 2-5 nm for surface-normal (15)N ion incidence onto the target and can be enhanced to values below 1 nm for very flat targets by adopting a surface-grazing incidence geometry. The method is versatile and readily applied to any high vacuum compatible homogeneous material with a smooth surface (no pores). Electrically conductive targets usually tolerate the ion beam irradiation with negligible degradation. Hydrogen quantitation and correct depth analysis require knowledge of the elementary composition (besides hydrogen) and mass density of the target material. Especially in combination with ultra-high vacuum methods for in-situ target preparation and characterization, (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C NRA is ideally suited for hydrogen analysis at atomically controlled surfaces and nanostructured interfaces. We exemplarily demonstrate here the application of (15)N NRA at the MALT Tandem accelerator facility of the University of Tokyo to (1) quantitatively measure the surface coverage and the bulk concentration of hydrogen in the near-surface region of a H2 exposed Pd(110) single crystal, and (2) to determine the depth location and layer density of hydrogen near the interfaces of thin SiO2 films on Si(100).

  4. Gravity Currents Propagating Up a Slope in a Uniform Ambient and a Two-Layer Stratified Ambient Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marleau, Larissa; Flynn, Morris; Sutherland, Bruce

    2014-11-01

    Bottom propagating gravity currents resulting from full- and partial-depth lock-release experiments are investigated as they propagate up a slope within a uniform and a two-layer stratified ambient. For the former case we adapt the theory of Shin et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 521, 2004) and derive a relationship for the deceleration of the front as a function of the slope angle and gravity current density. Experimental results show that the shape of the gravity current is self-similar as it decelerates over relatively steep slopes. The evolution of a gravity current in a two-layer ambient is complicated by the excitation of and interaction with a solitary wave. If the initial gravity current speed is subcritical to the wave speed, the current eventually stops abruptly while the wave continues at constant speed. If supercritical, turbulence at the current head is suppressed as it approaches the interface at the leading edge of the wave and the is re-established as the head becomes in direct contact with the upper layer.

  5. Active depth-guiding handheld micro-forceps for membranectomy based on CP-SSOCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Gyeong Woo; Lee, Phillip; Gonenc, Berk; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Kang, Jin U.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a handheld motion-compensated micro-forceps system using common-path swept source optical coherence tomography with highly accurate depth-targeting and depth-locking for Epiretinal Membrane Peeling. Two motors and a touch sensor were used to separate the two independent motions: motion compensation and tool-tip manipulation. A smart motion monitoring and guiding algorithm was devised for precise and intuitive freehand control. Ex-vivo bovine eye experiments were performed to evaluate accuracy in a bovine retina retinal membrane peeling model. The evaluation demonstrates system capabilities of 40 um accuracy when peeling the epithelial layer of bovine retina.

  6. Influences and interactions of inundation, peat, and snow on active layer thickness

    DOE PAGES

    Atchley, Adam L.; Coon, Ethan T.; Painter, Scott L.; Harp, Dylan R.; Wilson, Cathy J.

    2016-05-18

    The effect of three environmental conditions: 1) thickness of organic soil, 2) snow depth, and 3) soil moisture content or water table height above and below the soil surface, on active layer thickness (ALT) are investigated using an ensemble of 1D thermal hydrology models. Sensitivity analyses of the ensemble exposed the isolated influence of each environmental condition on ALT and their multivariate interactions. The primary and interactive influences are illustrated in the form of color maps of ALT change. Results show that organic layer acts as a strong insulator, and its thickness is the dominant control of ALT, but themore » strength of the effect of organic layer thickness is dependent on the saturation state. Snow depth, subsurface saturation, and ponded water depth are strongly codependent and positively correlated to ALT.« less

  7. The Two-Column Aerosol Project: Phase I—Overview and impact of elevated aerosol layers on aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Burton, Sharon P.; Cairns, Brian; Chand, Duli; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Dunagan, Stephen; Ferrare, Richard A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hubbe, John; Jefferson, Anne; Johnson, Roy; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Kollias, Pavlos; Lamer, Katia; Lantz, Kathleen; Mei, Fan; Miller, Mark A.; Michalsky, Joseph; Ortega, Ivan; Pekour, Mikhail; Rogers, Ray R.; Russell, Philip B.; Redemann, Jens; Sedlacek, Arthur J.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Schmid, Beat; Shilling, John E.; Shinozuka, Yohei; Springston, Stephen R.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Tyrrell, Megan; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Volkamer, Rainer; Zelenyuk, Alla; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2016-01-01

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique study designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate a number of important climate science questions, including those related to aerosol mixing state and aerosol radiative forcing. The study was designed to sample the atmosphere between and within two atmospheric columns; one fixed near the coast of North America (over Cape Cod, MA) and a second moveable column over the Atlantic Ocean several hundred kilometers from the coast. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed at the base of the Cape Cod column, and the ARM Aerial Facility was utilized for the summer and winter intensive observation periods. One important finding from TCAP is that four of six nearly cloud-free flight days had aerosol layers aloft in both the Cape Cod and maritime columns that were detected using the nadir pointing second-generation NASA high-spectral resolution lidar (HSRL-2). These layers contributed up to 60% of the total observed aerosol optical depth (AOD). Many of these layers were also intercepted by the aircraft configured for in situ sampling, and the aerosol in the layers was found to have increased amounts of biomass burning material and nitrate compared to aerosol found near the surface. In addition, while there was a great deal of spatial and day-to-day variability in the aerosol chemical composition and optical properties, no systematic differences between the two columns were observed.

  8. Global monthly sea surface nitrate fields estimated from remotely sensed sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and modeled mixed layer depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga, Lionel; Pahlow, Markus; Oschlies, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Information about oceanic nitrate is crucial for making inferences about marine biological production and the efficiency of the biological carbon pump. While there are no optical properties that allow direct estimation of inorganic nitrogen, its correlation with other biogeochemical variables may permit its inference from satellite data. Here we report a new method for estimating monthly mean surface nitrate concentrations employing local multiple linear regressions on a global 1° by 1° resolution grid, using satellite-derived sea surface temperature, chlorophyll, and modeled mixed layer depth. Our method is able to reproduce the interannual variability of independent in situ nitrate observations at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series, the Hawaii Ocean Time series, the California coast, and the southern New Zealand region. Our new method is shown to be more accurate than previous algorithms and thus can provide improved information on temporal and spatial nutrient variations beyond the climatological mean at regional and global scales.

  9. Study of the mixed layer depth variations within the north Indian Ocean using a 1-D model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, K. N.; Sharma, Rashmi; Agarwal, Neeraj; Agarwal, Vijay K.; Weller, R. A.

    2004-08-01

    Mixed layer depth (MLD) over the north Indian Ocean (30°S to 30°N and 40°E to 110°E) is computed using the simple one-dimensional model of [1986] forced by satellite-derived parameters (winds and chlorophyll). Seasonal chlorophyll observations obtained from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner allow us to examine how biology interacts with physics in the upper ocean by changing the absorption of light and thus the heating by penetrative solar radiation, an effect we refer to as biological heating. Our analysis focus mainly on two aspects: the importance of varying biology in the model simulations relative to runs with constant biology and secondly, the contribution of biology to the seasonal variability of the MLD. The model results are compared with observations from a surface mooring deployed for 1 year (October 1994 to October 1995) in the central Arabian Sea and also with available conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) observations from the Arabian Sea during the period 1994-1995. The effect of biological heating on the upper ocean thermal structure in central Arabian Sea is found to be greatest in August. In other months it is either the wind, which is the controlling factor in mixed layer variations, or the density variations due to winter cooling and internal dynamics. A large number of CTD observations collected under the Joint Global Ocean Flux study and World Ocean Circulation Experiment have been used to validate model results. We find an overall improvement by approximately 2-3 m in root-mean-square error in MLD estimates when seasonally varying chlorophyll observations are used in the model.

  10. Correlation between depth of cure and temperature rise of a light-activated resin.

    PubMed

    Hansen, E K; Asmussen, E

    1993-06-01

    The temperature rise, caused by 10 different curing units, in a prepolymerized resin specimen was examined. For all units, the temperature increase in a 60-s cycle followed a logarithmic curve, with the most effective light sources giving the highest temperature rise. In the surface layer the change of temperature ranged between 3.6 and 29.2 degrees C, and 3.2 mm below the irradiated surface between 1.5 and 12.3 degrees C. The use of a 2-mm-thick isolating layer of glass ionomer resulted in a significant reduction in the temperature increase. The correlation between the depth of cure and the temperature rise was of an exponential or power nature; i.e., a small increase of the depth of cure was followed by a disproportionately high increase in temperature.

  11. Complex use of the diffraction techniques in depth profiling of the crystal lattice parameter and composition of InGaAs/GaAs gradient layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidakova, M. V.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Yagovkina, M. A.; Klimko, G. V.; Sorokin, S. V.; Sedova, I. V.; Ivanov, S. V.; Romanov, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    A technique is proposed for testing thick (1 μm and larger) gradient layers with the composition and relaxation degree alternating over the layer depth on the basis of comparative analysis of X-ray scattered intensity maps in the reciprocal space and depth profiles of the crystal lattice parameters obtained by electron microdiffraction. The informativity of the proposed technique is demonstrated using the example of an In x Ga1- x As/GaAs layer with linear depth variation in x. Complex representation of the diffraction data in the form of the depth-profiled reciprocal space map allows taking into account the additional relaxation caused by thinning electron microscopy specimens.

  12. Method and apparatus for the evaluation of a depth profile of thermo-mechanical properties of layered and graded materials and coatings

    DOEpatents

    Finot, M.; Kesler, O.; Suresh, S.

    1998-12-08

    A technique for determining properties such as Young`s modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, and residual stress of individual layers within a multi-layered sample is presented. The technique involves preparation of a series of samples, each including one additional layer relative to the preceding sample. By comparison of each sample to a preceding sample, properties of the topmost layer can be determined, and residual stress at any depth in each sample, resulting from deposition of the top layer, can be determined. 11 figs.

  13. A defense in depth approach to radiation protection for 125I production activities.

    PubMed

    Culp, T; Potter, C A

    2001-08-01

    Not all operational radiation protection situations lend themselves to simple solutions. Often a Radiation Protection Program must be developed and implemented for difficult situations. A defense in depth approach to radiation protection was developed for 125I production activities. Defense in depth relies on key radiation protection elements that tend to be mutually supportive and in combination provide reasonable assurance that the overall desired level of protection has been provided. For difficult situations, defense in depth can provide both a reasonable and appropriate approach to radiation protection.

  14. Melanin as an active layer in biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Piacenti da Silva, Marina Congiu, Mirko Oliveira Graeff, Carlos Frederico de; Fernandes, Jéssica Colnaghi Biziak de Figueiredo, Natália Mulato, Marcelo

    2014-03-15

    The development of pH sensors is of great interest due to its extensive application in several areas such as industrial processes, biochemistry and particularly medical diagnostics. In this study, the pH sensing properties of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET) based on melanin thin films as active layer are investigated and the physical mechanisms related to the device operation are discussed. Thin films were produced from different melanin precursors on indium tin oxide (ITO) and gold substrates and were investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in the pH range from 2 to 12. EGFETs with melanin deposited on ITO and on gold substrates showed sensitivities ranging from 31.3 mV/pH to 48.9 mV/pH, depending on the melanin precursor and the substrate used. The pH detection is associated with specific binding sites in its structure, hydroxyl groups and quinone imine.

  15. Sensitivity of remote sensing-derived phytoplankton productivity to mixed layer depth: Lessons from the carbon-based productivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milutinović, Svetlana; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Johannessen, Johnny A.; Johannessen, Truls

    2009-12-01

    Mixed layer depth (MLD) has long been recognized as having an important influence on underwater light budget and, thus, net primary productivity (NPP) of phytoplankton. The depth- and wavelength-integrated carbon-based productivity model (DWI CbPM) is one of a few productivity algorithms that explicitly use information on MLD to estimate ocean NPP from remote sensing observations. This study evaluates the sensitivity of NPP estimates from the DWI CbPM to MLD input by using MLD fields from four different ocean models. Owing to the effect of MLD on light availability, the model NPP is generally inversely related to MLD, but the strength of this relationship is highly variable. In most of the ocean, it exhibits a seasonal character. In summer, NPP at middle and high latitudes can show substantial sensitivity to subtle changes in MLD, but is largely robust to strong MLD variability in winter. An opposite seasonal pattern is encountered in subtropical ocean gyres. A lack of seasonality is observed in tropical areas, among which only the equatorial Pacific displays strong response of NPP to small or moderate changes in MLD. We find that the spatial and temporal variability of the MLD-NPP relationship can be explained by nonlinearity and light saturation/limitation thresholds indicated in the DWI CbPM, as well as the influence of surface irradiance (I0) and diffuse attenuation coefficient for downwelling light at 490 nm (Kd(490)). NPP is sensitive to varying MLD only if coincidental I0 and Kd(490) values are such that combined with the coexisting differences in MLD estimates, they have potential to give effective differences in light saturation/limitation of photosynthesis.

  16. Active-polarization-controlled long-depth focus generated by orthogonal nanoslit array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lilin; Li, Yuanjie; Sun, Aihui; Xiong, Zhicheng; Liu, Cheng; Kong, Yan; Wang, Shouyu

    2016-08-01

    In order to realize long-range directional excitation and coupling, active-polarization-controlled Bessel beams with an orthogonal nanoslit array are proposed. Excited with left or right circular polarization light, long-depth focus from Bessel beams can be generated with different propagation directions. Moreover, multiple long-depth foci are also designed according to dual-conical phase settings. Proved with numerical simulations, it is considered that the active-polarization-controlled system can be potentially used in future logic photonic and plasmonic systems for optical switching and multichannel coupling.

  17. Depth-resolved ARPES of buried layers and interfaces via soft x-ray standing-wave excited photoemission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Alexander; Minar, Jan; Plucinski, Lukasz; Huijben, Mark; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Yang, See-Hun; Schneider, Claus; Ebert, Hubert; Fadley, Charles

    2012-02-01

    We introduce a new depth-selective photoemission technique, achieved by combining soft x-ray ARPES with standing-wave (SW) excited photoelectron spectroscopy, wherein the intensity profile of the exciting x-ray radiation is tailored within the sample. This effect is accomplished by setting-up an x-ray standing-wave field within the sample by growing it on a synthetic periodic multilayer mirror substrate, which in first-order Bragg reflection acts as the standing-wave generator. The antinodes of the standing wave function as epicenters for photoemission and can be moved vertically through the buried layers and interfaces by scanning the x-ray incidence angle. The new SW-ARPES technique is then applied to the investigation of the electronic properties of the buried interface within a magnetic tunnel junction La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/SrTiO3. The experimental results are compared to the state-of-art one-step photoemission theory including matrix element effects.

  18. Interannual-decadal variability of wintertime mixed layer depths in the North Pacific detected by an ensemble of ocean syntheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Takahiro; Fujii, Yosuke; Kuragano, Tsurane; Kosugi, Naohiro; Sasano, Daisuke; Kamachi, Masafumi; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Masuda, Shuhei; Sato, Kanako; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Hernandez, Fabrice; Ferry, Nicolas; Guinehut, Stéphanie; Martin, Matthew; Andrew Peterson, K.; Good, Simon A.; Valdivieso, Maria; Haines, Keith; Storto, Andrea; Masina, Simona; Köhl, Armin; Yin, Yonghong; Shi, Li; Alves, Oscar; Smith, Gregory; Chang, You-Soon; Vernieres, Guillaume; Wang, Xiaochun; Forget, Gael; Heimbach, Patrick; Wang, Ou; Fukumori, Ichiro; Lee, Tong; Zuo, Hao; Balmaseda, Magdalena

    2015-08-01

    The interannual-decadal variability of the wintertime mixed layer depths (MLDs) over the North Pacific is investigated from an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of an ensemble of global ocean reanalyses. The first leading EOF mode represents the interannual MLD anomalies centered in the eastern part of the central mode water formation region in phase opposition with those in the eastern subtropics and the central Alaskan Gyre. This first EOF mode is highly correlated with the Pacific decadal oscillation index on both the interannual and decadal time scales. The second leading EOF mode represents the MLD variability in the subtropical mode water (STMW) formation region and has a good correlation with the wintertime West Pacific (WP) index with time lag of 3 years, suggesting the importance of the oceanic dynamical response to the change in the surface wind field associated with the meridional shifts of the Aleutian Low. The above MLD variabilities are in basic agreement with previous observational and modeling findings. Moreover the reanalysis ensemble provides uncertainty estimates. The interannual MLD anomalies in the first and second EOF modes are consistently represented by the individual reanalyses and the amplitudes of the variabilities generally exceed the ensemble spread of the reanalyses. Besides, the resulting MLD variability indices, spanning the 1948-2012 period, should be helpful for characterizing the North Pacific climate variability. In particular, a 6-year oscillation including the WP teleconnection pattern in the atmosphere and the oceanic MLD variability in the STMW formation region is first detected.

  19. Polymelous layer chick displaying additional malformations of the hind gut: case report and in-depth review of related literature.

    PubMed

    Hirschberg, R M; Saleh, M; Kaiser, S; Lierz, M; Hafez, H M; Bragulla, H H

    2012-08-01

    A case report of a male 6-day-old male layer chick featuring incomplete polymelia of the hind limbs and hindgut malformations is presented. The chick was submitted to computed tomography (CT) examination and subsequent anatomical dissection. Apart from the two supernumerary hind limbs, the anatomical dissection revealed additional hindgut alterations: three uniform-sized caeca flanked the ileum, and the rectum branched into paired cloacae. The supernumerary hind limbs were localized caudal to the normal hind limbs in an inverted position and were attached to pelvic girdle elements and to a curtate pygostyle. They featured a prominent unpaired femur besides paired tibiotarsi, tarsometatarsi and species-specific phalanges of the toes. Additionally, two separate bones attached to the caudoventral aspect of the regular hip bones were developed. The supernumerary limbs were in part mobile and received nerve and vascular supply. Digital 3D-reconstruction based on the CT datasets revealed the osseous components of the malformed body parts. The possible morphogenesis including an in-depth literature review and the clinical implications of the reported malformations are discussed. PMID:22250842

  20. Evaluation of the variable depth resolution of active dynamic thermography on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prindeze, Nicholas J.; Hoffman, Hilary A.; Carney, Bonnie C.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Loew, Murray H.; Shupp, Jeffrey W.

    2015-06-01

    Active dynamic thermography (ADT) is an imaging technique capable of characterizing the non-homogenous thermal conductance of damaged tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine optimal stimulation parameters and quantify the optical resolution of ADT through various depths of human skin. Excised tissue from plastic surgery operations was collected immediately following excision. A total of 12 thin to thick split-thickness grafts were harvested from 3 patients. Grafts were placed on top of a 3D printed resolution chart and thermal stimulation was applied from a 300W halogen lamp array for between 0.5-10 seconds to determine optimal parameters. Video was captured with a thermal camera, and analysis was performed by reconstructing an image from thermal gradients. In this study ADT resolved 0.445+/-0 lp/mm at a depth of 0.010", 0.356+/-0.048 lp/mm at a depth of 0.015", 0.334+/-0.027 lp/mm at a depth of 0.020" and 0.265+/-0.022 lp/mm at a depth of 0.025". The stimulus energy required for maximum resolution at each depth was 3- 4s, 8s, 12s and 12s respectively. ADT is a sensitive technique for imaging dermal structure, capable of resolving detail as fine as 1124 μm, 1427 μm, 1502 μm and 1893 μm in thin to thick split-thickness skin grafts respectively. This study has characterized a correlation between stimulus input and maximal resolution at differing depths of skin. It has also defined the functional imaging depth of ADT to below the sub-cutis, well below conventional spectrophotometric techniques.

  1. Dynamics of the Thermal State of Active Layer at the Alaska North Slope and Northern Yakutia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodov, A. L.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Marchenko, S.; Shiklomanov, N. I.; Fedorov-Davydov, D.

    2010-12-01

    Dynamics of the active layer is one of the most important indexes, reflecting permafrost response to the modern climate changes. Monitoring of active layer thickness dynamics is the main goal of CALM (Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring) project. But, from different points of view, it is very important to know not only maximal depth of seasonal thawing but also dynamics of thermal field of active layer and duration of its staying in the unfrozen state. Current research was aimed on the analyzing data of temperature measurements have been done during the more then 10 years at the North Slope of Brooks Range (Alaska) and 2 years at the selected sites at the Northern Yakutia (Russia) and its comparison with the 17 to 10 years records of active layer thickness dynamics at the corresponding sites (http://www.udel.edu/Geography/calm/data/north.html). The area of investigation characterized by the typical tundra landscape and different kinds of micro topography. Reported observation sites located at the latitudinal range from 68.5 to 70.3N in Alaska and 70.5 to 71.75N in the Northern Yakutia. Observation have been done using the 1 meter long MRC probe with 11 sensors (every 10 cm) and single Campbell SCI A107 sensors in Alaska and 2-channel HOBO U23 data loggers with TMC-HD thermistors in the Northern Yakutia. Analyses of CALM data show what most observation sites in Alaska (except located near the Brooks Range and at the Arctic Ocean coast) do not subjected to the significant sustainable changes of active layer thickness over the last 10 years. At the same time active layer thickness at the Yakutian sites was increasing. Temperature observations show decreasing of the mean annual temperature at the average depth of active layer bottom at the Alaskan sites. But, because of general trend to increasing of period of thawing it does not lead to the decreasing of active layer thickness. Recent equipment deployment at the Tiksi and Allaikha sites (Northern Yakutia) does not

  2. A waveguide invariant adaptive matched filter for active sonar target depth classification.

    PubMed

    Goldhahn, Ryan; Hickman, Granger; Krolik, Jeffrey

    2011-04-01

    This paper addresses depth discrimination of a water column target from bottom clutter discretes in wideband active sonar. To facilitate classification, the waveguide invariant property is used to derive multiple snapshots by uniformly sub-sampling the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) coefficients of a single ping of wideband active sonar data. The sub-sampled target snapshots are used to define a waveguide invariant spectral density matrix (WI-SDM), which allows the application of adaptive matched-filtering based approaches for target depth classification. Depth classification is achieved using a waveguide invariant minimum variance filter (WI-MVF) which matches the observed WI-SDM to depth-dependent signal replica vectors generated from a normal mode model. Robustness to environmental mismatch is achieved by adding environmental perturbation constraints (EPC) derived from signal covariance matrices averaged over the uncertain channel parameters. Simulation and real data results from the SCARAB98 and CLUTTER09 experiments in the Mediterranean Sea are presented to illustrate the approach. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) for robust waveguide invariant depth classification approaches are presented which illustrate performance under uncertain environmental conditions. PMID:21476638

  3. A waveguide invariant adaptive matched filter for active sonar target depth classification.

    PubMed

    Goldhahn, Ryan; Hickman, Granger; Krolik, Jeffrey

    2011-04-01

    This paper addresses depth discrimination of a water column target from bottom clutter discretes in wideband active sonar. To facilitate classification, the waveguide invariant property is used to derive multiple snapshots by uniformly sub-sampling the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) coefficients of a single ping of wideband active sonar data. The sub-sampled target snapshots are used to define a waveguide invariant spectral density matrix (WI-SDM), which allows the application of adaptive matched-filtering based approaches for target depth classification. Depth classification is achieved using a waveguide invariant minimum variance filter (WI-MVF) which matches the observed WI-SDM to depth-dependent signal replica vectors generated from a normal mode model. Robustness to environmental mismatch is achieved by adding environmental perturbation constraints (EPC) derived from signal covariance matrices averaged over the uncertain channel parameters. Simulation and real data results from the SCARAB98 and CLUTTER09 experiments in the Mediterranean Sea are presented to illustrate the approach. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) for robust waveguide invariant depth classification approaches are presented which illustrate performance under uncertain environmental conditions.

  4. Thin-Layer Chromatography: Four Simple Activities for Undergraduate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anwar, Jamil; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that can be used to introduce thin-layer chromatography at the undergraduate level in relatively less developed countries and that can be performed with very simple and commonly available apparati in high schools and colleges. Activities include thin-layer chromatography with a test-tube, capillary feeder, burette, and rotating…

  5. Sporadic E-Layers and Meteor Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, Obid

    2016-07-01

    In average width it is difficult to explain variety of particularities of the behavior sporadic layer Es ionospheres without attraction long-lived metallic ion of the meteoric origin. Mass spectrometric measurements of ion composition using rockets indicate the presence of metal ions Fe+, Mg+, Si+, Na+, Ca+, K+, Al+ and others in the E-region of the ionosphere. The most common are the ions Fe+, Mg+, Si+, which are primarily concentrated in the narrow sporadic layers of the ionosphere at altitudes of 90-130 km. The entry of meteoric matter into the Earth's atmosphere is a source of meteor atoms (M) and ions (M +) that later, together with wind shear, produce midlatitude sporadic Es layer of the ionosphere. To establish the link between sporadic Es layer and meteoroid streams, we proceeded from the dependence of the ionization coefficient of meteors b on the velocity of meteor particles in different meteoroid streams. We investigated the dependence of the critical frequency f0Es of sporadic E on the particle velocity V of meteor streams and associations. It was established that the average values of f0Es are directly proportional to the velocity V of meteor streams and associations, with the correlation coefficient of 0.53 < R < 0.74. Thus, the critical frequency of the sporadic layer Es increases with the increase of particle velocity V in meteor streams, which indicates the direct influence of meteor particles on ionization of the lower ionosphere and formation of long-lived metal atoms M and ions M+ of meteoric origin.

  6. Depth sounding lidar: an overview of Swedish activities and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove K.; Koppari, Kurt R.

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes the depth sounding activities in Sweden. These include the development of a helicopter borne lidar called FLASH as well as instrumentation for in situ measurement of the optical water parameters as well as modeling efforts of depth sounding lidar performance. The FLASH system has been further developed into two operational systems called Hawk Eye with Saab Dynamics as the main contractor and Optech Inc. as the main subcontractor. Data collection and evaluation from Hawk Eye will be discussed. The Swedish Defence Research Establishment (FOA) was a member of the Hawk Eye project team together with the National Maritime Administration, the Royal Swedish Navy and the Defence Material Administration. Together with the Swedish Maritime Administration, FOA has been engaged in analysis of lidar data to determine system performance and possible ways to optimize that in relation to lidar parameters and anticipated bottom depth and topography. Examples from that analysis will be presented. The test analysis so far strongly supports the depth sounding lidar technology as being a rapid and accurate sounder fulfilling the requirement by International Maritime Office on depth accuracy.

  7. Active Layer Soil Carbon and Nutrient Mineralization, Barrow, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stan D. Wullschleger; Holly M. Vander Stel; Colleen Iversen; Victoria L. Sloan; Richard J. Norby; Mallory P. Ladd; Jason K. Keller; Ariane Jong; Joanne Childs; Deanne J. Brice

    2015-10-29

    This data set consists of bulk soil characteristics as well as carbon and nutrient mineralization rates of active layer soils manually collected from the field in August, 2012, frozen, and then thawed and incubated across a range of temperatures in the laboratory for 28 day periods in 2013-2015. The soils were collected from four replicate polygons in each of the four Areas (A, B, C, and D) of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Soil samples were coincident with the established Vegetation Plots that are located in center, edge, and trough microtopography in each polygon. Data included are 1) bulk soil characteristics including carbon, nitrogen, gravimetric water content, bulk density, and pH in 5-cm depth increments and also by soil horizon, 2) carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus mineralization rates for soil horizons incubated aerobically (and in one case both aerobically and anaerobically) for 28 days at temperatures that included 2, 4, 8, and 12 degrees C. Additional soil and incubation data are forthcoming. They will be available when published as part of another paper that includes additional replicate analyses.

  8. Active millimeter wave detection of concealed layers of dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, N. J.; Baker, J. G.; Rezgui, N. D.; Southgate, M.; Alder, J. F.

    2007-04-01

    Extensive work has been published on millimetre wave active and passive detection and imaging of metallic objects concealed under clothing. We propose and demonstrate a technique for revealing the depth as well as the outline of partially transparent objects, which is especially suited to imaging layer materials such as explosives and drugs. The technique uses a focussed and scanned FMCW source, swept through many GHz to reveal this structure. The principle involved is that a parallel sided dielectric slab produces reflections at both its upper and lower surfaces, acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer. This produces a pattern of alternating reflected peaks and troughs in frequency space. Fourier or Burg transforming this pattern into z-space generates a peak at the thickness of the irradiated sample. It could be argued that though such a technique may work for single uniform slabs of dielectric material, it will give results of little or no significance when the sample both scatters the incident radiation and gives erratic reflectivities due to its non-uniform thickness and permittivity . We show results for a variety of materials such as explosive simulants, powder and drugs, both alone and concealed under clothing or in a rucksack, which display strongly directional reflectivities at millimeter wavelengths, and whose location is well displayed by a varying thickness parameter as the millimetre beam is scanned across the target. With this system we find that samples can easily be detected at standoff distances of at least 4.6m.

  9. Study of the possibility of increasing the probing depth by the method of reflection confocal microscopy upon immersion clearing of near-surface human skin layers

    SciTech Connect

    Meglinskii, I V; Bashkatov, A N; Genina, Elina A; Tuchin, Valerii V; Churmakov, D Yu

    2002-10-31

    The possibility of increasing the human-skin probing depth by the method of reflection confocal microscopy (RCM) upon decreasing the amplitude of spatial fluctuations of the refractive index of the upper skin layers is considered. A change in the probing depth is estimated by analysing the spatial distribution of the probability density of the effective optical paths of detected photons calculated by the Monte Carlo method. The results of the numerical simulation are interpreted within the framework of the possible application of RCM to the study of the human skin exposed to an immersion liquid compatible to it. A diffusion of the immersion agent into the skin depth involves the equalising of the refractive indices of the structural elements of near-surface skin layers, which in turn causes a decrease in the scattering intensity and a certain increase in the transparency of the upper tissue layers. It is shown that a decrease in the light scattering in the near-surface skin layers leads to a significant increase in the probing depth obtained with the RCM technique.

  10. Observing mixed layer depth, nitrate and chlorophyll concentrations in the northwestern Mediterranean: A combined satellite and NO3 profiling floats experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Lavigne, Hélöise; Besson, Florent; Claustre, Hervé; Coppola, Laurent; Garcia, Nicole; Laës-Huon, Agathe; Le Reste, Serge; Malardé, Damien; Migon, Christophe; Morin, Pascal; Mortier, Laurent; Poteau, Antoine; Prieur, Louis; Raimbault, Patrick; Testor, Pierre

    2014-09-01

    Two profiling floats, equipped with nitrate concentration sensors were deployed in the northwestern Mediterranean from summer 2012 to summer 2013. Satellite ocean color data were extracted to evaluate surface chlorophyll concentration at float locations. Time series of mixed layer depths and nitrate and chlorophyll concentrations were analyzed to characterize the interplay between the physical-chemical and biological dynamics in the area. Deep convection (mixed layer depth > 1000 m) was observed in January-February, although high-nitrate surface concentrations could be already observed in December. Chlorophyll increase is observed since December, although high values were observed only in March. The early nitrate availability in subsurface layers, which is likely due to the permanent cyclonic circulation of the area, appears to drive the bloom onset. The additional nitrate supply associated to the deep convection events, although strengthening the overall nitrate uptake, seems decoupled of the December increase of chlorophyll.

  11. Study on depth-related microstructure and wear property of rare earth nitrocarburized layer of M50NiL steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, M. F.; Zhang, C. S.; Sun, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The quenched M50NiL steel was plasma nitrocarburized at 500 °C with rare earth (RE) addition. The RE nitrocarburized layer of M50NiL steel was removed stepwise (0 μm, 12 μm, 65 μm and 100 μm from the surface) and characterized using SEM equipped with EDS, XRD and microhardness tester respectively. Depth-related wear behavior of the RE nitrocarburized layer of M50NiL steel was investigated using pin-on-disk tribometer. The results show that the surface layer (0 μm from the surface) mainly consists of α‧N,C (expanded martensite), γ‧-Fe4(N,C), ɛ-Fe2-3(N,C) and a trace of Fe3O4 phase. The phase structure of the inner layers is single α‧N,C or α‧-Fe. There is a lower steady stage for all the depth-related friction coefficients of the layers due to the generation of the compact oxide film. The layer 12 μm from the surface has the lowest wear rate which is 2.4660 × 10-5 mm3 N-1 m-1. The work hardening effect only occurred on the layer 100 μm from the surface. The wear mechanisms of the layers transformed from mild abrasive and oxidative wear (0 μm from the surface) to severe adhesive and oxidative wear (100 μm from the surface) due to different phase structures and hardness. The oxygen content of the wear scar increases as the flash temperature rises and the hardness decreases when the layer comes inwards. The highest wolfram content for the layer 65 μm from the surface results in the dual role of the wear mechanism and hardness.

  12. Active unjamming of confluent cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. Motivated by these observations, we have studied a model of dense tissues that combines self-propelled particle models and vertex models of confluent cell layers. In this model, referred to as self-propelled Voronoi (SPV), cells are described as polygons in a Voronoi tessellation with directed noisy cell motility and interactions governed by a shape energy that incorporates the effects of cell volume incompressibility, contractility and cell-cell adhesion. Using this model, we have demonstrated a new density-independent solid-liquid transition in confluent tissues controlled by cell motility and a cell-shape parameter measuring the interplay of cortical tension and cell-cell adhesion. An important insight of this work is that the rigidity and dynamics of cell layers depends sensitively on cell shape. We have also used the SPV model to test a new method developed by our group to determine cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces, hence providing the spatio-temporal distribution of stresses in motile dense tissues. This work was done with Dapeng Bi, Lisa Manning and Xingbo Yang. MCM was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184 and by the Simons Foundation.

  13. Using Vertical electrical sounding survey and refraction seismic survey for determining the geological layers depths, the structural features and assessment groundwater in Aqaba area in South Jordan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akawwi, Emad; Alzoubi, Abdallah; Ben Abraham, Zvi; Rahamn Abo Alades, Abdel; Alrzouq, Rami; Tiber, Gidon; Neimi, Tina

    2010-05-01

    The study area is the Aqaba region (Southern wadi Araba basin). Aqaba region area located at 87900 and 89000 North and 147000 and 158000 East (Palestine grid). Tectonically Aqaba area lies within the tectonic plate boundary along the Arabian and African plate slide. This plate boundary comprises numerous and shot fault segments. The main aims of this study are to assessing the groundwater potential and its quality, to explain the subsurface geological conditions and support the ongoing geological, environmental and hydrogeological studies. Therefore, it was anticipated that the results of the geophysical surveying will give many different important parameters as The subsurface geological features, thicknesses of the different lithological units, depth to the bed rocks and depth to the water table. The groundwater can apply an important role in ensuring sustainable water supply in the area. This study was carried out in order to assess groundwater condition, geological layers thicknesses and structural features in Aqaba area by using vertical electrical sounding (VES) surveys and refraction seismic techniques. There are three geoelectrical cross section were carried out at different sites by using the Schlumberger array. The first cross section indicated three layers of different resistivity. The second cross section indicated four layers of different resistivity. The third geoelectrical cross sections indicated three layers. The refraction seismic method also has been conducted in the same area as VES. About 12 refraction seismic profiles have been carried out in the study area. The length of the first profile was 745 m at the direction N-S. This profile indicated two different layers with a different velocities. The length of the second profile was 1320 m with E-W direction. This profile indicated two different layers. The length of the third profile was about 515 m with a direction SE-NW. It recognized two different layers with a different velocities. The fourth

  14. Microbial activities at the benthic boundary layer in the Aegean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, A.; Tholosan, O.; Garcin, J.; Polychronaki, T.; Tselepides, A.; Buscail, R.; Duineveld, G.

    2003-05-01

    During the Aegean Sea component of the EU MTP-MATER project, benthic samples were acquired along a depth gradient from two continental margins in the Aegean Sea. Sampling was undertaken during spring and summer 1997 and the microbial metabolic activities measured (Vmax for aminopeptidase activity, 14C-glutamate respiration and assimilation) displayed seasonal variability even in deep-sea conditions. The metabolic rates encountered in the North Aegean (average depth 566±234 m), were approximately five-fold higher than in the deeper (1336±140 m) Southern part of the Aegean. The aminopeptidase rates, however, were the exception with higher values recorded in the more oligotrophic sediments of the Southern stations (1383±152 vs. 766±297 nmol MCA cm -2 h -1). A discrepancy in bacterial metabolism also appeared in the near bottom waters. In the Southern stations, 80% of the glutamate uptake was used for energy yielding processes and only 20% devoted to biomass production, while in the North Aegean, most of the used glutamate was incorporated into bacterial cells. During the early burial stages, bacterial mineralization rates estimated from 14C-glutamate respiration decreased drastically compared to the rates of biopolymer hydrolysis estimated by aminopeptidase assays. Thus, at the 2-cm depth layer, these rates were only 32 and up to 77% of the corresponding average values, respectively, in the superficial layer. Such a discrepancy between the evolution of these two metabolic activities is possibly due to the rapid removal of readily utilizable monomers in the surface deposits. The correlation between bacterial respiration and total organic carbon, or total organic nitrogen, is higher in the surficial sediment (0-2 and 2-4 cm) than in the underlying layer. Conversely, it is only at 4-cm depth layer that the hydrolysis rates appear correlated with organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations. This pattern confirms the drastic degradation of organic matter during the

  15. An Active Area Model of Rapid Infiltration Response at Substantial Depth in the Unsaturated Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, L.; Nimmo, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    In a porous medium subject to preferential flow, response to surface water infiltration can occur rapidly even at substantial depth in the unsaturated zone. In a ponding experiment at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) the profile of undisturbed natural soil, seasonally dry at the start, was observed to approach field saturation throughout a 2 meter depth within 6 hours (Nimmo and Perkins, 2007). Traditional use of Richards' equation would require an unrealistically large unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of 40 m/day to capture the observed non-classic wetting behavior. Here we present a model for rapid flow using an active area concept similar to the active fracture model (Liu and others, 1998, WRR 34:2633-2646). The active area concept is incorporated within the preferential flow domain (which allows rapid downward movement) of a dual-domain model that also contains a diffuse-flow domain in which flow can be described by Richards' equation. Development of the active area model is motivated by observation of rapid wetting at substantial depth, as well as a phenomenon in which deep flow is observed before shallow flow. In this model water movement in the preferential domain can be physically conceptualized as laminar flow in free-surface films of constant average thickness. For a given medium, the preferential domain is characterized by an effective areal density (area per unit bulk volume) that describes the free-surface film capacity of the domain as a function of depth. The active area is defined as a portion of the effective areal density that dictates the depth and temporal distribution of domain-exchange and new infiltration within the preferential domain. With the addition of the active area concept, the model is capable of simulating non-diffusive vertical transport patterns. Advantages of the model include simulating rapid response for a variety of infiltration types, including ponding and rain events, as well as modeling relatively rapid aquifer

  16. Kinetics of Ion Transport in Perovskite Active Layers and Its Implications for Active Layer Stability.

    PubMed

    Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A; Adhikari, Ramesh Y; Karak, Supravat; Liu, Feng; Lahti, Paul M; Russell, Thomas P; Tuominen, Mark T; Venkataraman, D

    2015-10-14

    Solar cells fabricated using alkyl ammonium metal halides as light absorbers have the right combination of high power conversion efficiency and ease of fabrication to realize inexpensive but efficient thin film solar cells. However, they degrade under prolonged exposure to sunlight. Herein, we show that this degradation is quasi-reversible, and that it can be greatly lessened by simple modifications of the solar cell operating conditions. We studied perovskite devices using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with methylammonium (MA)-, formamidinium (FA)-, and MA(x)FA(1-x) lead triiodide as active layers. From variable temperature EIS studies, we found that the diffusion coefficient using MA ions was greater than when using FA ions. Structural studies using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) show that for MAPbI3 a structural change and lattice expansion occurs at device operating temperatures. On the basis of EIS and PXRD studies, we postulate that in MAPbI3 the predominant mechanism of accelerated device degradation under sunlight involves thermally activated fast ion transport coupled with a lattice-expanding phase transition, both of which are facilitated by absorption of the infrared component of the solar spectrum. Using these findings, we show that the devices show greatly improved operation lifetimes and stability under white-light emitting diodes, or under a solar simulator with an infrared cutoff filter or with cooling. PMID:26414066

  17. In situ comparison of activity in two deep-sea scavenging fishes occupying different depth zones

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M. A.; Priede, I. G.; Bagley, P. M.

    1999-01-01

    The activity of two scavenging deep-sea fishes occupying the same niche in overlapping depth zones were compared by in situ measurements of swimming speeds, tail-beat frequencies and by arrival time at baits. At 4800 m on the Porcupine Abyssal Plain, the grenadier Coryphaenoides (Nematonurus) armatus was the dominant scavenger, arriving at baits after 30 min, and swimming at relatively slow speeds of 0.17 body lengths (BL) sec-1. At 2500 m in the relatively food rich Porcupine Seabight both C. (N.) armatus and the blue-hake, Antimora rostrata, were attracted to bait, but A. rostrata was always the first to arrive and most of the bait was consumed before the C. (N.) armatus arrived. A. rostrata swam at mean speeds of 0.39 BL sec-1, similar to related shallow water species at equivalent temperatures. Observations on tail-beat frequency from video sequences confirmed the greater activity of A. rostrata. The data indicate that, given sufficient food supply, high pressure and low temperature do not limit activity levels of demersal deep-sea fishes. Low activity of C. (N.) armatus is an adaptation to poor food supply in the abyss, where these fishes dominate, but prevents it competing with the more active A. rostrata in shallower depths.

  18. Active notch filter network with variable notch depth, width and frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. M. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An active notch filter having independently adjustable notch frequency, width, and depth is provided by three equal capacitors connected in series with an operational amplifier (connected in a voltage follower configuration), a potentiometer across the series connected capacitors for notch depth adjustment, and a potentiometer (for notch frequency connected across the center capacitor); with its tap connected to receive a voltage feedback signal from a variable voltage divider comprised of another potentiometer for notch width. Adjusting the voltage dividing potentiometer will independently set the notch width, and adjusting the tap on the potentiometer across the center capacitor will independently adjust the notch frequency of the filter. A second operational amplifier connected in a voltage follower configuration may be used to connect the voltage divider output to the adjustable tap of the potentiometer across the center capacitor.

  19. Activity recognition from video using layered approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, Charles A.; Irvine, John M.; Young, Mon; Stefanidis, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The adversary in current threat situations can no longer be identified by what they are, but by what they are doing. This has lead to a large increase in the use of video surveillance systems for security and defense applications. With the quantity of video surveillance at the disposal of organizations responsible for protecting military and civilian lives comes issues regarding the storage and screening the data for events and activities of interest. Activity recognition from video for such applications seeks to develop automated screening of video based upon the recognition of activities of interest rather than merely the presence of specific persons or vehicle classes developed for the Cold War problem of "Find the T72 Tank". This paper explores numerous approaches to activity recognition, all of which examine heuristic, semantic, and syntactic methods based upon tokens derived from the video. The proposed architecture discussed herein uses a multi-level approach that divides the problem into three or more tiers of recognition, each employing different techniques according to their appropriateness to strengths at each tier using heuristics, syntactic recognition, and HMM's of token strings to form higher level interpretations.

  20. Influences and interactions of inundation, peat, and snow on active layer thickness: Modeling Archive

    DOE Data Explorer

    Scott Painter; Ethan Coon; Cathy Wilson; Dylan Harp; Adam Atchley

    2016-04-21

    This Modeling Archive is in support of an NGEE Arctic publication currently in review [4/2016]. The Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) was used to simulate thermal hydrological conditions across varied environmental conditions for an ensemble of 1D models of Arctic permafrost. The thickness of organic soil is varied from 2 to 40cm, snow depth is varied from approximately 0 to 1.2 meters, water table depth was varied from -51cm below the soil surface to 31 cm above the soil surface. A total of 15,960 ensemble members are included. Data produced includes the third and fourth simulation year: active layer thickness, time of deepest thaw depth, temperature of the unfrozen soil, and unfrozen liquid saturation, for each ensemble member. Input files used to run the ensemble are also included.

  1. Hepatic biotransformation and antioxidant enzyme activities in Mediterranean fish from different habitat depths.

    PubMed

    Ribalta, C; Sanchez-Hernandez, J C; Sole, M

    2015-11-01

    Marine fish are threatened by anthropogenic chemical discharges. However, knowledge on adverse effects on deep-sea fish or their detoxification capabilities is limited. Herein, we compared the basal activities of selected hepatic detoxification enzymes in several species (Solea solea, Dicentrarchus labrax, Trachyrhynchus scabrus, Mora moro, Cataetix laticeps and Alepocehalus rostratus) collected from the coast, middle and lower slopes of the Blanes Canyon region (Catalan continental margin, NW Mediterranean Sea). The xenobiotic-detoxifying enzymes analysed were the phase-I carboxylesterases (CbEs), and the phase-II conjugation activities uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase (UDPGT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). Moreover, some antioxidant enzyme activities, i.e., catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and glutathione reductase (GR), were also included in this comparative study. Because CbE activity is represented by multiple isoforms, the substrates α-naphthyl acetate (αNA) and ρ-nitrophenyl acetate (ρNPA) were used in the enzyme assays, and in vitro inhibition kinetics with dichlorvos were performed to compare interspecific CbE sensitivity. Activity of xenobiotic detoxification enzymes varied among the species, following a trend with habitat depth and body size. Thus, UDPGT and some antioxidant enzyme activities decreased in fish inhabiting lower slopes of deep-sea, whereas UDPGT and αNA-CbE activities were negatively related to fish size. A trend between CbE activities and the IC50 values for dichlorvos suggested S. solea and M. moro as potentially more sensitive to anticholinesterasic pesticides, and T. scabrus as the most resistant one. A principal component analysis considering all enzyme activities clearly identified the species but this grouping was not related to habitat depth or phylogeny. Although these results can be taken as baseline levels of the main xenobiotic detoxification enzymes in Mediterranean fish, further research is

  2. Mesoporous layer-by-layer ordered nanohybrids of layered double hydroxide and layered metal oxide: highly active visible light photocatalysts with improved chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Gunjakar, Jayavant L; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Hyo Na; Kim, In Young; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2011-09-28

    Mesoporous layer-by-layer ordered nanohybrids highly active for visible light-induced O(2) generation are synthesized by self-assembly between oppositely charged 2D nanosheets of Zn-Cr-layered double hydroxide (Zn-Cr-LDH) and layered titanium oxide. The layer-by-layer ordering of two kinds of 2D nanosheets is evidenced by powder X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional high resolution-transmission electron microscopy. Upon the interstratification process, the original in-plane atomic arrangements and electronic structures of the component nanosheets remain intact. The obtained heterolayered nanohybrids show a strong absorption of visible light and a remarkably depressed photoluminescence signal, indicating an effective electronic coupling between the two component nanosheets. The self-assembly between 2D inorganic nanosheets leads to the formation of highly porous stacking structure, whose porosity is controllable by changing the ratio of layered titanate/Zn-Cr-LDH. The resultant heterolayered nanohybrids are fairly active for visible light-induced O(2) generation with a rate of ∼1.18 mmol h(-1) g(-1), which is higher than the O(2) production rate (∼0.67 mmol h(-1) g(-1)) by the pristine Zn-Cr-LDH material, that is, one of the most effective visible light photocatalysts for O(2) production, under the same experimental condition. This result highlights an excellent functionality of the Zn-Cr-LDH-layered titanate nanohybrids as efficient visible light active photocatalysts. Of prime interest is that the chemical stability of the Zn-Cr-LDH is significantly improved upon the hybridization, a result of the protection of the LDH lattice by highly stable titanate layer. The present findings clearly demonstrate that the layer-by-layer-ordered assembly between inorganic 2D nanosheets is quite effective not only in improving the photocatalytic activity of the component semiconductors but also in synthesizing novel porous LDH-based hybrid materials with improved chemical

  3. Sporadic Layer es and Siesmic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, Obid; Blokhin, Alexandr; Kalashnikova, Tatyana

    2016-07-01

    To determine the influence of seismogenic disturbances on the calm state of the iono-sphere and assess the impact of turbulence development in sporadic-E during earthquake prepa-ration period we calculated the variation in the range of semitransparency ∆fES = f0ES - fbES. The study was based primarily on the ionograms obtained by vertical sounding of the ionosphere at Dushanbe at nighttime station from 15 to 29 August 1986. In this time period four successive earthquakes took place, which serves the purpose of this study of the impact of seis-mogenic processes on the intensity of the continuous generation of ionospheric turbulence. Analysis of the results obtained for seismic-ionospheric effects of 1986 earthquakes at station Dushanbe has shown that disturbance of ionospheric parameters during earthquake prepa-ration period displays a pronounced maximum with a duration of t = 1-6 hours. Ionospheric effects associated with the processes of earthquake preparation emerge quite predictably, which verifies seismogenic disturbances in the ionosphere. During the preparation of strong earthquakes, ionograms of vertical sounding produced at station Dushanbe - near the epicenter area - often shown the phenomenon of spreading traces of sporadic Es. It is assumed that the duration of manifestation of seismic ionospheric precursors in Du-shanbe τ = 1 - 6 hours may be associated with deformation processes in the Earth's crust and var-ious faults, as well as dissimilar properties of the environment of the epicentral area. It has been shown that for earthquakes with 4.5 ≤ M ≤ 5.5 1-2 days prior to the event iono-spheric perturbations in the parameters of the sporadic layer Es and an increase in the value of the range of semitransparency Es - ΔfEs were observed, which could lead to turbulence at altitudes of 100-130 km.

  4. Depth profiles of bacterioplankton assemblages and their activities in the Ross Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celussi, Mauro; Cataletto, Bruno; Fonda Umani, Serena; Del Negro, Paola

    2009-12-01

    The identification of bacterial community structure has led, since the beginning of the 1990s, to the idea that bacterioplankton populations are stratified in the water column and that diverse lineages with mostly unknown phenotypes dominate marine microbial communities. The diversity of depth-related assemblages is also reflected in their patterns of activities, as bacteria affiliated to different groups can express different activities in a given ecosystem. We analysed bacterial assemblages (DGGE fingerprinting) and their activities (prokaryotic carbon production, protease, phosphatase, chitinase, beta-glucosidase and lipase activities) in two areas in the Ross Sea, differing mainly in their productivity regime: two stations are located in the Terra Nova Bay polynya area (highly productive during summer) and two close to Cape Adare (low phytoplankton biomass and activity). At every station a pronounced stratification of bacterial assemblages was identified, highlighting epipelagic communities differing substantially from the mesopelagic and the bathypelagic communities. Multivariate analysis suggested that pressure and indirectly light-affected variables (i.e. oxygen and fluorescence) had a great effect on the bacterial communities outcompeting the possible influences of temperature and dissolved organic carbon concentration. Generally activities decreased with depth even though a signal of the Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) at one of the northern stations corresponded to an increase in some of the degradative activities, generating some 'hot spots' in the profile. We also found that similar assemblages express similar metabolic requirements reflected in analogous patterns of activity (similar degradative potential and leucine uptake rate). Furthermore, the presence of eukaryotic chloroplasts' 16S rDNA in deep samples highlighted how in some cases the dense surface-water formation (in this case High Salinity Shelf Water—HSSW) and downwelling can affect, at least

  5. Deformation of the Calabrian Arc subduction complex and its relation to STEP activity at depth.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polonia, Alina; Wortel, Rinus; Nijholt, Nicolai; Govers, Rob; Torelli, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Propagating tear faults at the edge of subducted slabs ("Subduction transform edge propagator", STEP) are an intrinsic part of lithospheric plate dynamics. The surface expression of a STEP is generally not known yet, and is expected to vary significantly from one region to the other. We choose the Sicily -Calabria-Ionian Sea region, of which the lithosphere-upper mantle structure has the characteristics of a STEP zone, as a study area. The area has a very prominent accretionary wedge, the formation and subsequent deformation of which presumably were affected by the STEP activity at depth. In this contribution, we use seismic data on the near surface structure and deformation in combination with numerical model results to investigate the relation between deep STEP activity and near surface expression. Prominent features in the surface tectonics are the Malta escarpment (with predominantly normal faulting), the newly identified Ionian Fault and Alfeo-Etna fault system, and a distinct longitudinal division of the wedge into a western and an eastern lobe (Polonia et al., Tectonics, 2011). The two lobes are characterized by different structural style, deformation rates and basal detachment depths. Numerical model results indicate that the regional lithospheric structure, such as the orientation of the eastern passive (albeit subsequently activated) margin of Sicily relative to the Calabrian subduction zone, has a profound effect on possible fault activity along the Malta escarpment. Fault activity along the above primary fault structures may have varied in time, implying the possibility of intermittent activity. Interpreting seismicity in the context of a possible STEP, and the accompanying deformation zone at or near the surface, is not (yet) straightforward. Although direct evidence for recognizing all aspects of STEP activity is - as usual - lacking, a comparison with two well-known STEP regions, the northern part of the Tonga subduction zone and southern part of the

  6. Impact of Using Assimilated Data for Evaluating Performance of Active CO2 Optical Depth Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, S. A.; Harrison, F. W.; Lin, B.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E. V.; Yang, M. M.; Choi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    NASA has recently conducted multiple DC-8 flight campaigns of candidate instruments for the future Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. For each campaign, the precision and accuracy of the remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 differential absorption optical depths from the candidate instruments were evaluated with respect to corresponding CO2 optical depths derived from in situ profiles of atmospheric state variables including atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios, temperature (T), pressure (p), and humidity (q) and radiative transfer calculations using the HITRAN spectroscopic database in combination with recent measurements of spectral line parameters. To enable this evaluation, the DC-8 flights were designed to include multiple overpasses of a comparison location where the aircraft performed a spiral ascent or descent and captured the in situ profiles using a suite of onboard instruments. However large segments of some flights took place far from spiral locations and therefore had no coincident in situ measurements of the atmospheric state (CO2, T, p, q). For these situations meterological analysis data from the Goddard Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) GEOS-5 gridded data have been used to assimilate atmospheric state profiles for use in the CO2 optical depth derivation. We use the location of the DC-8 spirals to identify all of the GMAO GEOS-5 gridded profiles that would compare with each spiral and report their differences with respect to the DC-8 in situ profiles. We show how these differences affect the in situ derived CO2 optical depth for the three campaigns and the impacts of these differences on the precision and accuracy evaluations of the remote CO2 measurements.

  7. Active layer thermal regime at different vegetation covers at Lions Rump, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Ivan C. C.; Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto G. R.; Fernandes, Raphael B. A.; Pereira, Thiago T. C.; Nieuwendam, Alexandre; Pereira, Antônio Batista

    2014-11-01

    Climate change impacts the biotic and abiotic components of polar ecosystems, affecting the stability of permafrost, active layer thickness, vegetation, and soil. This paper describes the active layer thermal regimes of two adjacent shallow boreholes, under the same soil but with two different vegetations. The study is location in Lions Rump, at King George Island, Maritime Antarctic, one of the most sensitive regions to climate change, located near the climatic limit of Antarctic permafrost. Both sites are a Turbic Cambic Cryosol formed on andesitic basalt, one under moss vegetation (Andreaea gainii, at 85 m a.s.l.) and another under lichen (Usnea sp., at 86 m a.s.l.), located 10 m apart. Ground temperature at same depths (10, 30 and 80 cm), water content at 80 cm depth and air temperature were recorded hourly between March 2009 and February 2011. The two sites showed significant differences in mean annual ground temperature for all depths. The lichen site showed a higher soil temperature amplitude compared to the moss site, with ground surface (10 cm) showing the highest daily temperature in January 2011 (7.3 °C) and the lowest daily temperature in August (- 16.5 °C). The soil temperature at the lichen site closely followed the air temperature trend. The moss site showed a higher water content at the bottommost layer, consistent with the water-saturated, low landscape position. The observed thermal buffering effect under mosses is primarily associated with higher moisture onsite, but a longer duration of the snowpack (not monitored) may also have influenced the results. Active layer thickness was approximately 150 cm at low-lying moss site, and 120 cm at well-drained lichen site. This allows to classify these soils as Cryosols (WRB) or Gelisols (Soil Taxonomy), with evident turbic features.

  8. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  9. A Depth Video Sensor-Based Life-Logging Human Activity Recognition System for Elderly Care in Smart Indoor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Ahmad; Kamal, Shaharyar; Kim, Daijin

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in depth video sensors technologies have made human activity recognition (HAR) realizable for elderly monitoring applications. Although conventional HAR utilizes RGB video sensors, HAR could be greatly improved with depth video sensors which produce depth or distance information. In this paper, a depth-based life logging HAR system is designed to recognize the daily activities of elderly people and turn these environments into an intelligent living space. Initially, a depth imaging sensor is used to capture depth silhouettes. Based on these silhouettes, human skeletons with joint information are produced which are further used for activity recognition and generating their life logs. The life-logging system is divided into two processes. Firstly, the training system includes data collection using a depth camera, feature extraction and training for each activity via Hidden Markov Models. Secondly, after training, the recognition engine starts to recognize the learned activities and produces life logs. The system was evaluated using life logging features against principal component and independent component features and achieved satisfactory recognition rates against the conventional approaches. Experiments conducted on the smart indoor activity datasets and the MSRDailyActivity3D dataset show promising results. The proposed system is directly applicable to any elderly monitoring system, such as monitoring healthcare problems for elderly people, or examining the indoor activities of people at home, office or hospital. PMID:24991942

  10. A depth video sensor-based life-logging human activity recognition system for elderly care in smart indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Ahmad; Kamal, Shaharyar; Kim, Daijin

    2014-07-02

    Recent advancements in depth video sensors technologies have made human activity recognition (HAR) realizable for elderly monitoring applications. Although conventional HAR utilizes RGB video sensors, HAR could be greatly improved with depth video sensors which produce depth or distance information. In this paper, a depth-based life logging HAR system is designed to recognize the daily activities of elderly people and turn these environments into an intelligent living space. Initially, a depth imaging sensor is used to capture depth silhouettes. Based on these silhouettes, human skeletons with joint information are produced which are further used for activity recognition and generating their life logs. The life-logging system is divided into two processes. Firstly, the training system includes data collection using a depth camera, feature extraction and training for each activity via Hidden Markov Models. Secondly, after training, the recognition engine starts to recognize the learned activities and produces life logs. The system was evaluated using life logging features against principal component and independent component features and achieved satisfactory recognition rates against the conventional approaches. Experiments conducted on the smart indoor activity datasets and the MSRDailyActivity3D dataset show promising results. The proposed system is directly applicable to any elderly monitoring system, such as monitoring healthcare problems for elderly people, or examining the indoor activities of people at home, office or hospital.

  11. Physical Activity in South Asians: An In-Depth Qualitative Study to Explore Motivations and Facilitators

    PubMed Central

    Jepson, Ruth; Harris, Fiona M.; Bowes, Alison; Robertson, Roma; Avan, Ghizala; Sheikh, Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Background People of South Asian backgrounds living in the UK have a five-fold increased risk of diabetes and a two-fold increased risk of heart disease when compared to the general population. Physical activity can reduce the risk of premature death from a range of conditions. The aim of the study was to explore the motivating and facilitating factors likely to increase physical activity for South Asian adults and their families, in order to develop successful interventions and services. Methodology/Principal Findings This was a qualitative study using focus groups and in-depth interviews. Participants were 59 purposively selected Bangladeshi-, Indian- and Pakistani-origin men and women with an additional 10 key informants. The setting was three urban areas of Scotland: Aberdeen, Glasgow and Edinburgh. We undertook a theoretically informed thematic analysis of data. Study participants described engaging in a range of physical activities, particularly football and the gym for men, and walking and swimming for women. The main motivators for taking part in physical activity were external motivators – i.e. undertaking physical activity as a means to an end, which included the opportunities that physical activity provided for social activity and enjoyment. The goals of weight reduction and improving mental and physical health and were also mentioned. Role models were seen as important to inspire and motivate people to undertake activities that they may otherwise lack confidence in. Few people undertook physical activity for its own sake (intrinsic motivation). Conclusions/Significance Attempts at promoting physical activity in people of South Asian origin need to take account of the social context of people's lives and the external motivators that encourage them to engage in physical activity. Undertaking group based physical activity is important and can be facilitated through religious, community, friendship or family networks. Role models may also prove

  12. Active layer temperature in two Cryosols from King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Roberto F. M.; Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto G. R.; Poelking, Everton L.; Simas, Felipe N. B.; Fernandes Filho, Elpidio I.; Bockheim, James G.

    2012-06-01

    This study presents soil temperature and moisture regimes from March 2008 to January 2009 for two active layer monitoring (CALM-S) sites at King George Island, Maritime Antarctica. The monitoring sites were installed during the summer of 2008 and consist of thermistors (accuracy of ± 0.2 °C), arranged vertically with probes at different depths and one soil moisture probe placed at the bottommost layer at each site (accuracy of ± 2.5%), recording data at hourly intervals in a high capacity datalogger. The active layer thermal regime in the studied period for both soils was typical of periglacial environments, with extreme variation in surface temperature during summer resulting in frequent freeze and thaw cycles. The great majority of the soil temperature readings during the eleven month period was close to 0 °C, resulting in low values of freezing and thawing degree days. Both soils have poor thermal apparent diffusivity but values were higher for the soil from Fildes Peninsula. The different moisture regimes for the studied soils were attributed to soil texture, with the coarser soil presenting much lower water content during all seasons. Differences in water and ice contents may explain the contrasting patterns of freezing of the studied soils, being two-sided for the coarser soil and one-sided for the loamy soil. The temperature profile of the studied soils during the eleven month period indicates that the active layer reached a maximum depth of approximately 92 cm at Potter and 89 cm at Fildes. Longer data sets are needed for more conclusive analysis on active layer behaviour in this part of Antarctica.

  13. Influences and interactions of inundation, peat, and snow on active layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Coon, Ethan T.; Painter, Scott L.; Harp, Dylan R.; Wilson, Cathy J.

    2016-05-01

    Active layer thickness (ALT), the uppermost layer of soil that thaws on an annual basis, is a direct control on the amount of organic carbon potentially available for decomposition and release to the atmosphere as carbon-rich Arctic permafrost soils thaw in a warming climate. We investigate how key site characteristics affect ALT using an integrated surface/subsurface permafrost thermal hydrology model. ALT is most sensitive to organic layer thickness followed by snow depth but is relatively insensitive to the amount of water on the landscape with other conditions held fixed. The weak ALT sensitivity to subsurface saturation suggests that changes in Arctic landscape hydrology may only have a minor effect on future ALT. However, surface inundation amplifies the sensitivities to the other parameters and under large snowpacks can trigger the formation of near-surface taliks.

  14. Lidar observations of the diurnal variations in the depth of urban mixing layer: a case study on the air quality deterioration in Taipei, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chou, Charles C-K; Lee, C-T; Chen, W-N; Chang, S-Y; Chen, T-K; Lin, C-Y; Chen, J-P

    2007-03-01

    An aerosol light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system was used to measure the depth of the atmospheric mixing layer over Taipei, Taiwan in the spring of 2005. This paper presents the variations of the mixing height and the mixing ratios of air pollutants during an episode of air quality deterioration (March 7-10, 2005), when Taipei was under an anti-cyclonic outflow of a traveling high-pressure system. It was found that, during those days, the urban mixing height reached its daily maximum of 1.0-1.5 km around noon and declined to 0.3-0.5 km around 18:00 (LST). In terms of hourly averages, the mixing height increased with the ambient temperature linearly by a slope of 166 m/degrees C in daytime. The consistency between the changes in the mixing height and in the ambient temperature implied that the mixing layer dynamics were dominated by solar thermal forcing. As the cap of the mixing layer descended substantially in the afternoon, reduced dispersion in the shallow mixing layer caused the concentrations of primary air pollutants to increase sharply. Consequently, the pollutant concentration exhibited an anti-correlation with the mixing height. While attentions are usually focused on the pollution problems occurring in a morning inversion layer, the results of this study indicate that the air pollution and its health impacts could be even more severe as the mixing layer is getting shallow in the afternoon.

  15. Active layer thermal monitoring at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, R. F. M.; Schaefer, C. E. G. R.; Simas, F. N. B.; Francelino M., R.; Fernandes-Filho, E. I.; Lyra, G. B.; Bockheim, J. G.

    2014-07-01

    International attention to the climate change phenomena has grown in the last decade; the active layer and permafrost are of great importance in understanding processes and future trends due to their role in energy flux regulation. The objective of the this paper is to present active layer temperature data for one CALM-S site located at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica over an fifth seven month period (2008-2012). The monitoring site was installed during the summer of 2008 and consists of thermistors (accuracy of ± 0.2 °C), arranged vertically with probes at different depths, recording data at hourly intervals in a~high capacity data logger. A series of statistical analysis were performed to describe the soil temperature time series, including a linear fit in order to identify global trend and a series of autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models were tested in order to define the best fit for the data. The controls of weather on the thermal regime of the active layer have been identified, providing insights about the influence of climate chance over the permafrost. The active layer thermal regime in the studied period was typical of periglacial environment, with extreme variation at the surface during summer resulting in frequent freeze and thaw cycles. The active layer thickness (ALT) over the studied period showed variability related to different annual weather conditions, reaching a maximum of 117.5 cm in 2009. The ARIMA model was considered appropriate to treat the dataset, enabling more conclusive analysis and predictions when longer data sets are available. Despite the variability when comparing temperature readings and active layer thickness over the studied period, no warming trend was detected.

  16. Active-layer thermal monitoring on the Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, R. F. M.; Schaefer, C. E. G. R.; Simas, F. M. B.; Francelino, M. R.; Fernandes-Filho, E. I.; Lyra, G. B.; Bockheim, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    International attention to climate change phenomena has grown in the last decade; the active layer and permafrost are of great importance in understanding processes and future trends due to their role in energy flux regulation. The objective of this paper is to present active-layer temperature data for one Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring South hemisphere (CALM-S) site located on the Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, maritime Antarctica over an 57-month period (2008-2012). The monitoring site was installed during the summer of 2008 and consists of thermistors (accuracy of ±0.2 °C), arranged vertically with probes at different depths, recording data at hourly intervals in a high-capacity data logger. A series of statistical analyses was performed to describe the soil temperature time series, including a linear fit in order to identify global trends, and a series of autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models was tested in order to define the best fit for the data. The affects of weather on the thermal regime of the active layer have been identified, providing insights into the influence of climate change on permafrost. The active-layer thermal regime in the studied period was typical of periglacial environments, with extreme variation in surface during the summer resulting in frequent freeze and thaw cycles. The active-layer thickness (ALT) over the studied period shows a degree of variability related to different annual weather conditions, reaching a maximum of 117.5 cm in 2009. The ARIMA model could describe the data adequately and is an important tool for more conclusive analysis and predictions when longer data sets are available. Despite the variability when comparing temperature readings and ACT over the studied period, no trend can be identified.

  17. EEG and MEG: sensitivity to epileptic spike activity as function of source orientation and depth.

    PubMed

    Hunold, A; Funke, M E; Eichardt, R; Stenroos, M; Haueisen, J

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of neuronal activity from epileptic patients reveal situations in which either EEG or MEG or both modalities show visible interictal spikes. While different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the spikes in EEG and MEG have been reported, a quantitative relation of spike source orientation and depth as well as the background brain activity to the SNR has not been established. We investigated this quantitative relationship for both dipole and patch sources in an anatomically realistic cortex model. Altogether, 5600 dipole and 3300 patch sources were distributed on the segmented cortical surfaces of two volunteers. The sources were classified according to their quantified depths and orientations, ranging from 20 mm to 60 mm below the skin surface and radial and tangential, respectively. The source time-courses mimicked an interictal spike, and the simulated background activity emulated resting activity. Simulations were conducted with individual three-compartment boundary element models. The SNR was evaluated for 128 EEG, 102 MEG magnetometer, and 204 MEG gradiometer channels. For superficial dipole and superficial patch sources, EEG showed higher SNRs for dominantly radial orientations, and MEG showed higher values for dominantly tangential orientations. Gradiometers provided higher SNR than magnetometers for superficial sources, particularly for those with dominantly tangential orientations. The orientation dependent difference in SNR in EEG and MEG gradually changed as the sources were located deeper, where the interictal spikes generated higher SNRs in EEG compared to those in MEG for all source orientations. With deep sources, the SNRs in gradiometers and magnetometers were of the same order. To better detect spikes, both EEG and MEG should be used. PMID:27328313

  18. EEG and MEG: sensitivity to epileptic spike activity as function of source orientation and depth.

    PubMed

    Hunold, A; Funke, M E; Eichardt, R; Stenroos, M; Haueisen, J

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of neuronal activity from epileptic patients reveal situations in which either EEG or MEG or both modalities show visible interictal spikes. While different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the spikes in EEG and MEG have been reported, a quantitative relation of spike source orientation and depth as well as the background brain activity to the SNR has not been established. We investigated this quantitative relationship for both dipole and patch sources in an anatomically realistic cortex model. Altogether, 5600 dipole and 3300 patch sources were distributed on the segmented cortical surfaces of two volunteers. The sources were classified according to their quantified depths and orientations, ranging from 20 mm to 60 mm below the skin surface and radial and tangential, respectively. The source time-courses mimicked an interictal spike, and the simulated background activity emulated resting activity. Simulations were conducted with individual three-compartment boundary element models. The SNR was evaluated for 128 EEG, 102 MEG magnetometer, and 204 MEG gradiometer channels. For superficial dipole and superficial patch sources, EEG showed higher SNRs for dominantly radial orientations, and MEG showed higher values for dominantly tangential orientations. Gradiometers provided higher SNR than magnetometers for superficial sources, particularly for those with dominantly tangential orientations. The orientation dependent difference in SNR in EEG and MEG gradually changed as the sources were located deeper, where the interictal spikes generated higher SNRs in EEG compared to those in MEG for all source orientations. With deep sources, the SNRs in gradiometers and magnetometers were of the same order. To better detect spikes, both EEG and MEG should be used.

  19. Comparison of thickness, grade, and depth of radioactive layers as determined by gamma-ray logging and by core sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunker, Carl M.

    1959-01-01

    Thickness, grade, and depth data were obtained by analyzing gamma-ray logs and core samples from 56 diamond drill holes penetrating uranium deposits in the Colorado Plateau. The data from the two methods were compared to determine variations found in gamma-ray log interpretation and chemical and radiometric analyses of the drill core. Correlations within each parameter varied among the drilling areas analyzed. Gamma-ray interpretations of grade compared to chemical analyses were within the range of -10 to +25 percent. Most depth measurements determined by gamma-ray log interpretation compared to drill core measurement were within 0.5 percent. Results of the study indicate a need for better thickness definition in both gamma-ray logging and core scanning equipment.

  20. On Active Layer Environments and Processes in Western Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. D.; Meiklejohn, I.; Nel, W.

    2012-12-01

    The current understanding of Antarctic permafrost is poor, particularly regarding its evolution, the current thermal characteristics, and relationships with pedogenesis, hydrology, geomorphic, dynamics, biotic activity and response to global changes. Results from borehole temperature measurements over a four-year period in Western Dronning Maud Land suggest that the active layer depth is dependent on the substrate, latitude, altitude and the volume of ground exposed; the latter alludes to the potential impact of surrounding ice on the ground thermal regime. The active layer depths at the monitoring sites, varied between 16 cm at Vesleskarvet, a small nunatak at 850 masl to 28 cm in granitic till at Jutulsessen (1 270 masl). The mean near surface (1.5 cm depth) ground temperatures from 2009 to 2012 in the region have a narrow range from -16.4°C at 850m to -17.5°C at 1270 masl. Permafrost temperatures for the same locations vary between -16.3°C and -18.3°C. While little variability exists between the mean temperatures at the study locations, each site is distinct and seasonal and shorter-term frost cycles have produced landforms that are characteristic of both permafrost and diurnal frost environments. One of the key aspects of investigation is the control that the active layer has on autochthonous blockfield development in the region. The, thus far, exploratory research is being used to understand controls on the landscape and the relationship between distribution and abundance of biota. Given the rapidly changing climates in the region, improving knowledge of what drives patterns of biodiversity at a local and regional scale is vital to assess consequences of environmental change.

  1. Diversity of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria in a permafrost active layer soil of the Lena Delta, Siberia.

    PubMed

    Liebner, Susanne; Rublack, Katja; Stuehrmann, Torben; Wagner, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    With this study, we present first data on the diversity of aerobic methanotrophic bacteria (MOB) in an Arctic permafrost active layer soil of the Lena Delta, Siberia. Applying denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and cloning of 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) and pmoA gene fragments of active layer samples, we found a general restriction of the methanotrophic diversity to sequences closely related to the genera Methylobacter and Methylosarcina, both type I MOB. In contrast, we revealed a distinct species-level diversity. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene, two new clusters of MOB specific for the permafrost active layer soil of this study were found. In total, 8 out of 13 operational taxonomic units detected belong to these clusters. Members of these clusters were closely related to Methylobacter psychrophilus and Methylobacter tundripaludum, both isolated from Arctic environments. A dominance of MOB closely related to M. psychrophilus and M. tundripaludum was confirmed by an additional pmoA gene analysis. We used diversity indices such as the Shannon diversity index or the Chao1 richness estimator in order to compare the MOB community near the surface and near the permafrost table. We determined a similar diversity of the MOB community in both depths and suggest that it is not influenced by the extreme physical and geochemical gradients in the active layer. PMID:18592300

  2. Depth of the biologically active zone in upland habitats at the Hanford Site, Washington: Implications for remediation and ecological risk management.

    PubMed

    Sample, Bradley E; Lowe, John; Seeley, Paul; Markin, Melanie; McCarthy, Chris; Hansen, Jim; Aly, Alaa H

    2015-01-01

    Soil invertebrates, mammals, and plants penetrate and exploit the surface soil layer (i.e., the biologically active zone) to varying depths. As the US Department of Energy remediates radioactive and hazardous wastes in soil at the Hanford Site, a site-specific definition of the biologically active zone is needed to identify the depth to which remedial actions should be taken to protect the environment and avoid excessive cleanup expenditures. This definition may then be considered in developing a point of compliance for remediation in accordance with existing regulations. Under the State of Washington Model Toxic Control Act (MTCA), the standard point of compliance for soil cleanup levels with unrestricted land use is 457 cm (15 ft) below ground surface. When institutional controls are required to control excavations to protect people, MTCA allows a conditional point of compliance to protect biological resources based on the depth of the biologically active zone. This study was undertaken to identify and bound the biologically active zone based on ecological resources present at the Hanford Site. Primary data were identified describing the depths to which ants, mammals, and plants may exploit the surface soil column at the Hanford Site and other comparable locations. The maximum depth observed for harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex spp.) was 270 cm (8.9 ft), with only trivial excavation below 244 cm (8 ft). Badgers (Taxidea taxus) are the deepest burrowing mammal at the Hanford Site, with maximum burrow depths of 230 cm (7.6 ft); all other mammals did not burrow below 122 cm (4 ft). Shrubs are the deepest rooting plants with rooting depths to 300 cm (9.8 ft) for antelope bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata). The 2 most abundant shrub species did not have roots deeper than 250 cm (8.2 ft). The deepest rooted forb had a maximum root depth of 240 cm (7.9 ft). All other forbs and grasses had rooting depths of 200 cm (6.6 ft) or less. These data indicate that the biologically

  3. Depth of the biologically active zone in upland habitats at the Hanford Site, Washington: Implications for remediation and ecological risk management.

    PubMed

    Sample, Bradley E; Lowe, John; Seeley, Paul; Markin, Melanie; McCarthy, Chris; Hansen, Jim; Aly, Alaa H

    2015-01-01

    Soil invertebrates, mammals, and plants penetrate and exploit the surface soil layer (i.e., the biologically active zone) to varying depths. As the US Department of Energy remediates radioactive and hazardous wastes in soil at the Hanford Site, a site-specific definition of the biologically active zone is needed to identify the depth to which remedial actions should be taken to protect the environment and avoid excessive cleanup expenditures. This definition may then be considered in developing a point of compliance for remediation in accordance with existing regulations. Under the State of Washington Model Toxic Control Act (MTCA), the standard point of compliance for soil cleanup levels with unrestricted land use is 457 cm (15 ft) below ground surface. When institutional controls are required to control excavations to protect people, MTCA allows a conditional point of compliance to protect biological resources based on the depth of the biologically active zone. This study was undertaken to identify and bound the biologically active zone based on ecological resources present at the Hanford Site. Primary data were identified describing the depths to which ants, mammals, and plants may exploit the surface soil column at the Hanford Site and other comparable locations. The maximum depth observed for harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex spp.) was 270 cm (8.9 ft), with only trivial excavation below 244 cm (8 ft). Badgers (Taxidea taxus) are the deepest burrowing mammal at the Hanford Site, with maximum burrow depths of 230 cm (7.6 ft); all other mammals did not burrow below 122 cm (4 ft). Shrubs are the deepest rooting plants with rooting depths to 300 cm (9.8 ft) for antelope bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata). The 2 most abundant shrub species did not have roots deeper than 250 cm (8.2 ft). The deepest rooted forb had a maximum root depth of 240 cm (7.9 ft). All other forbs and grasses had rooting depths of 200 cm (6.6 ft) or less. These data indicate that the biologically

  4. Variation in blood serum antifreeze activity of Antarctic Trematomus fishes across habitat temperature and depth.

    PubMed

    Fields, Lauren G; DeVries, Arthur L

    2015-07-01

    High latitude waters in the Southern Ocean can be near their freezing point and remain ice-covered throughout the year whereas lower latitude Southern Ocean waters have seasonal ice coverage and comparatively large (6 °C) annual temperature changes. The genus Trematomus (suborder Notothenioidei) is regarded primarily as a high latitude group because of its abundance there, they also inhabit the warmer regions in smaller numbers. Freeze avoidance in the notothenioids is linked to the presence of two antifreeze proteins (AFPs); the antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) and antifreeze potentiating protein (AFPP), both of which adsorb to internal ice crystals inhibiting growth. Both high and low latitude trematomids possess sufficient AFP to lower their blood freezing point below that of seawater (-1.9 °C). We investigated the contributions of AFGPs and AFPP to the blood freezing point depression to determine how they varied with depth, water temperature, and the presence of ice. High latitude trematomids had lower blood freezing points than those inhabiting lower latitude waters indicating differences in their freeze avoidance capacities. Lower freezing points were associated with higher levels of antifreeze activity due to higher levels of both AFGP and AFPP. Populations of Trematomus hansoni and Trematomus bernacchii from shallow depths appear more freeze avoidant than populations inhabiting deep, ice-free water based on their lower freezing points and higher antifreeze activities. Gel electrophoresis of the trichloroacetic acid-soluble AFGPs indicates that only high molecular weight isoforms, which contribute more to AFGP activity, vary across species as well as between individuals of a species. PMID:25770668

  5. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis Of Microbial Communities From Active Layer And Permafrost After Short-Term Thaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chauhan, A.; Saarunya, G.; Murphy, J.; Williams, D.; Layton, A. C.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Sanders, R.; Lau, C. M.; myneni, S.; Phelps, T. J.; Fountain, A. G.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    .Permafrost areas occupy 20-25% of the Earth and extend of 1 km depths. The total number of prokaryotes and their biomass in cold regions are estimated to be 1 x 1030 cells and 140 x1015 g of C, respectively. Thus these environments serve as a reservoir of microbial and biogeochemical activity, which is likely to increase upon thawing. We are currently performing long-term thawing experiments at 4o C on 18, geochemically well-characterized, 1 meter long, intact cores consisting of active-layer (0-70 cm depth) and permafrost, collected from a 7 meter diameter ice-wedge polygon located at the McGill Arctic Research Station on Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada. The organic carbon content of these cores averages ~1% at depth but increases to 5.4% in the top 10 cm. The cores were subdivided into four treatment groups: saturated cores (thawed while receiving artificial rain), drained cores (being thawed under natural hydrological conditions), dark cores (thawed under natural hydrological conditions with no light input) and control cores (maintain permafrost table at 70 cm depth). Over the course of 10 weeks the cores were progressively thawed from -4oC to 4oC from the top down to simulate spring thaw conditions in the Arctic. The temperatures at 5 cm, 35 cm, 65 cm, and below the permafrost table in the core were recorded continuously. Pore water and gas samples from 4 depths in each core were collected every two weeks and analyzed for pH, anions, cations, H2, CH4, CO, O2, N2, CO2 and δ13C of CO2. Headspace gas samples were collected weekly and analyzed for the same gases as the pore gases. Sediment sub-samples from the 4 depths were collected and total community genomic DNA (gDNA) was isolated using FastDNA SPIN kit followed by Qiagen column purification. The average yield of gDNA was ~3.5 μg/g of soil for the upper 5 cm active layers and decreased to ~1.5 μg/g of soil in the permafrost. The bacterial 16S copy numbers estimated by real-time quantitative PCR

  6. Temperature-activated layer-breathing vibrations in few-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Lui, Chun Hung; Ye, Zhipeng; Keiser, Courtney; Xiao, Xun; He, Rui

    2014-08-13

    We investigated the low-frequency Raman spectra of freestanding few-layer graphene (FLG) at varying temperatures (400-900 K) controlled by laser heating. At high temperature, we observed the fundamental Raman mode for the lowest-frequency branch of rigid-plane layer-breathing mode (LBM) vibration. The mode frequency redshifts dramatically from 81 cm(-1) for bilayer to 23 cm(-1) for 8-layer. The thickness dependence is well described by a simple model of coupled oscillators. Notably, the LBM Raman response is unobservable at room temperature, and it is turned on at higher temperature (>600 K) with a steep increase of Raman intensity. The observation suggests that the LBM vibration is strongly suppressed by molecules adsorbed on the graphene surface but is activated as desorption occurs at high temperature.

  7. Passive and active control of boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenchuck, Daniel Mark

    It is well known that laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition is initiated by the formation of Tollmien-Schlichting laminar instability waves. The amplification rates of these waves are strongly dependent on the shape of the boundary layer velocity profile. Consequently, the transition process can be controlled by modifying the velocity profile. This can be accomplished by controlling the pressure gradient (dp/dx), using boundary layer suction, installing surface roughness elements, or by surface heating or cooling. Methods used to modify the transition process through changes in the mean velocity profile are called "passive" in this paper. There exists a large set of experiments and theory on the application of passive methods for boundary layer control. In the present work only surface heating will be addressed.Transition measurements were made on a heated flat plate in water. Results are presented for several plate wall temperature distributions. An increase by a factor of 2.5 in transition Reynolds number was observed for a 5°C isothermal wall overheat. Buoyancy effects on transition were minimal due to the small Richardson and Grashof numbers encountered in the experiments.The amplification of laminar instability waves is comparatively to process, taking place over many boundary layer thicknesses. After the slow amplification of the laminar instability waves, transition occurs by a strong three dimensional dynamic instability. It appears possible to attenuate (or reinforce) the instability waves by introducing amplitude-and phase-controlled perturbations into the laminar boundary layer using feedback control system. This method is called "active" control and forms the larger part of the research reported in this thesis.A combination of sensors, activators and feedback control electronics is required for active control. The sensors used in the experiments are flush-mounted hot film wall shear robes. A new type of activator was developed using thin, flush

  8. Rapid, automated measurement of layer thicknesses on steel coin blanks using laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy depth profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Asimellis, George; Giannoudakos, Aggelos; Kompitsas, Michael

    2007-02-20

    We report application of a near-real-time method to determine layer thickness on electroplated coin blanks. The method was developed on a simple laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) arrangement by monitoring relative emission-line intensities from key probe elements via successive laser ablation shots. This is a unique LIBS application where no other current spectroscopic method (inductively coupled plasma or x-ray fluorescence) can be applied effectively. Method development is discussed, and results with precalibrated coins are presented.

  9. Active Layer Thawing and Freeze-Back in Svalbard using DC Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, A.; Juliussen, H.; Christiansen, H. H.

    2009-04-01

    The thawing of the active layer has an important impact on the permafrost below, since the state of the uppermost soil layers determines how large surface temperature fluctuations are translated to deeper ground. Latent heat and combined liquid water and energy transport during the thawing season influence the energy exchange between permafrost and atmosphere. A first step to a better understanding of these processes is to determine the depth of the active layer and its thermal state the best possible way. Borehole temperatures give a very accurate measure of the ground thermal state but are, like active layer depths from mechanical probing, single point measurements. Geophysical imaging methods, such as DC resistivity tomography, allow for a 2d-image of subsurface soil properties, but should be supplemented with point temperature measurements as the results might be ambiguous. In spring and late summer 2007 electrode arrays have been permanently installed in three different permafrost landforms in Svalbard (a gently sloping solifluction sheet, a valley bottom loess terrace and a vertical sandstone rockwall) as a part of the IPY-project - ‘Permafrost Observatory Project: A Contribution to the Thermal State of Permafrost in Norway and Svalbard' TSP Norway. With a spacing of 20cm and a total array length of 16m this allows for a maximum measurement depth of about 2.5m. During most parts of IPY measurements were carried on a more or less regular basis - ideally in a two weeks interval. While measurements in the rockwall suffered from permanent loosening of the electrodes in the brittle sandstone, the measurements on the loess terrace and the solifluction slope were only interrupted during the very cold spring conditions as grounding errors occurred. Hence field work focused on the loess terrace and the solifluction sheet - the former consisting of silt and fine clay; the latter characterized by its high water content and a rather heterogeneous grain size

  10. Waveguide invariant active sonar target detection and depth classification in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhahn, Ryan A.

    vital to maintaining low false alarm rates in active sonar. Moreover, because of the non-stationarity of the active sonar return, classification is most typically achieved using a single snapshot of test data. As an aid to classification, the waveguide invariant property is used to derive multiple snapshots by uniformly sub-sampling the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) coefficients of a single ping of wideband active sonar data. The sub-sampled target snapshots are used to define a waveguide-invariant spectral density matrix (WI-SDM) which allows the application of adaptive matched-filtering based approaches for target depth classification. Depth classification is performed by a waveguide-invariant minimum variance filter (WI-MVF) which matches the observed WI-SDM to depth-dependent signal replica vectors generated from a normal mode model. Robustness to environmental mismatch is achieved by adding environmental perturbation constraints (EPC) and averaging the signal replica vectors over the unknown channel parameters. Simulation and real data results from the SCARAB98, CLUTTER07, and CLUTTER09 experiments in the Mediterranean Sea are presented to illustrate the approach.

  11. Explosive Volcanic Activity at Extreme Depths: Evidence from the Charles Darwin Volcanic Field, Cape Verdes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Devey, C. W.; Hansteen, T. H.; Freundt, A.; Kutterolf, S.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions on the deep sea floor have traditionally been assumed to be non-explosive as the high-pressure environment should greatly inhibit steam-driven explosions. Nevertheless, occasional evidence both from (generally slow-) spreading axes and intraplate seamounts has hinted at explosive activity at large water depths. Here we present evidence from a submarine field of volcanic cones and pit craters called Charles Darwin Volcanic Field located at about 3600 m depth on the lower southwestern slope of the Cape Verdean Island of Santo Antão. We examined two of these submarine volcanic edifices (Tambor and Kolá), each featuring a pit crater of 1 km diameter, using photogrammetric reconstructions derived from ROV-based imaging followed by 3D quantification using a novel remote sensing workflow, aided by sampling. The measured and calculated parameters of physical volcanology derived from the 3D model allow us, for the first time, to make quantitative statements about volcanic processes on the deep seafloor similar to those generated from land-based field observations. Tambor cone, which is 2500 m wide and 250 m high, consists of dense, probably monogenetic medium to coarse-grained volcaniclastic and pyroclastic rocks that are highly fragmented, probably as a result of thermal and viscous granulation upon contact with seawater during several consecutive cycles of activity. Tangential joints in the outcrops indicate subsidence of the crater floor after primary emplacement. Kolá crater, which is 1000 m wide and 160 m deep, appears to have been excavated in the surrounding seafloor and shows stepwise sagging features interpreted as ring fractures on the inner flanks. Lithologically, it is made up of a complicated succession of highly fragmented deposits, including spheroidal juvenile lapilli, likely formed by spray granulation. It resembles a maar-type deposit found on land. The eruption apparently entrained blocks of MORB-type gabbroic country rocks with

  12. Cortical activation associated with determination of depth order during transparent motion perception: A normalized integrative fMRI-MEG study.

    PubMed

    Natsukawa, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2015-10-01

    When visual patterns drifting in different directions and/or at different speeds are superimposed on the same plane, observers perceive transparent surfaces on planes of different depths. This phenomenon is known as transparent motion perception. In this study, cortical activities were measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) to reveal the cortical dynamics associated with determination of depth order during transparent motion perception. In addition, offline eye movement measurements were performed to determine the latencies of the start of both pursuit eye movements and depth attention that are important in determination of the depth order. MEG and fMRI data were analyzed by a normalized integrative fMRI-MEG method that enables reconstruction of time-varying dipole moments of activated regions from MEG signals. Statistical analysis of fMRI data was performed to identify activated regions. The activated regions were used as spatial constraints for the reconstruction using the integrative fMRI-MEG method. We focused on the period between latencies (216-405 ms) determined by eye movement experiment, which are related to determination of the depth order. The results of integrative analysis revealed that significant neural activities were observed in the visual association area, the human middle temporal area, the intraparietal sulcus, the lateral occipital cortex, and the anterior cingulate cortex between 216 and 405 ms. These results suggest that initial eye movement and accompanying cortical activations during focused duration play an important role in determining the depth order during transparent motion perception.

  13. Motionless active depth from defocus system using smart optics for camera autofocus applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, M. Junaid; Riza, Nabeel A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a motionless active Depth from Defocus (DFD) system design suited for long working range camera autofocus applications. The design consists of an active illumination module that projects a scene illuminating coherent conditioned optical radiation pattern which maintains its sharpness over multiple axial distances allowing an increased DFD working distance range. The imager module of the system responsible for the actual DFD operation deploys an electronically controlled variable focus lens (ECVFL) as a smart optic to enable a motionless imager design capable of effective DFD operation. An experimental demonstration is conducted in the laboratory which compares the effectiveness of the coherent conditioned radiation module versus a conventional incoherent active light source, and demonstrates the applicability of the presented motionless DFD imager design. The fast response and no-moving-parts features of the DFD imager design are especially suited for camera scenarios where mechanical motion of lenses to achieve autofocus action is challenging, for example, in the tiny camera housings in smartphones and tablets. Applications for the proposed system include autofocus in modern day digital cameras.

  14. Active microwave remote sensing of an anisotropic random medium layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. K.; Kong, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A two-layer anisotropic random medium model has been developed to study the active remote sensing of the earth. The dyadic Green's function for a two-layer anisotropic medium is developed and used in conjunction with the first-order Born approximation to calculate the backscattering coefficients. It is shown that strong cross-polarization occurs in the single scattering process and is indispensable in the interpretation of radar measurements of sea ice at different frequencies, polarizations, and viewing angles. The effects of anisotropy on the angular responses of backscattering coefficients are also illustrated.

  15. Dichothermal layer deepening in relation with halocline depth change associated with northward shrinkage of North Pacific western subarctic gyre in early 2000s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Akira; Wakita, Masahide; Watanabe, Shuichi

    2016-02-01

    In the western subarctic North Pacific, a wind-driven cyclonic circulation, called the western subarctic gyre (WSAG), exists. We examined year-to-year changes of the gyre and hydrographic structures, applying the altimetry-based gravest empirical mode (AGEM) method to hydrographic and altimetric sea surface height (SSH) data, and relation to the in situ variation of the temperature minimum layer, i.e., the dichothermal layer, depth at station K2 (47∘ N, 160∘ E). The AGEM-based geostrophic volume transport and the streamfunction of the WSAG in the top 1000-dbar layer show that the gyre changes substantially. From the late 1990s to the mid-2000s, the gyre shrunk northward. Due to the shrinkage, the halocline bottom, which is equivalent to the top of the main pycnocline, deepens at K2 outside the central part of the gyre. The downward displacement of the dichothermal layer at K2 was found to be significantly related to that of the underlying halocline due to the northward shrinkage of the WSAG.

  16. Effect of atmospheric mixing layer depth variations on urban air quality and daily mortality during Saharan dust outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Pandolfi, M.; Tobias, A.; Alastuey, A.; Sunyer, J.; Schwartz, J.; Lorente, J.; Pey, J.; Querol, X.

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have shown that the outbreaks of Saharan dust over southern European countries can cause negative health effects. The reasons for the increased toxicity of airborne particles during dust storms remain to be understood although the presence of biogenic factors carried by dust particles or the interaction between dust and man-made air pollution have been hypothesized as possible causes. Intriguingly, recent findings have also demonstrated that during Saharan dust outbreaks the local man-made particulates can have stronger effects on health than during days without outbreaks. We show that the thinning of the mixing layer (ML) during Saharan dust outbreaks, systematically described here for the first time, can trigger the observed higher toxicity of ambient local air. The mixing layer height (MLH) progressively reduced with increasing intensity of dust outbreaks thus causing a progressive accumulation of anthropogenic pollutants and favouring the formation of new fine particles or specific relevant species likely from condensation of accumulated gaseous precursors on dust particles surface. Overall, statistically significant associations of MLH with all-cause daily mortality were observed. Moreover, as the MLH reduced, the risk of mortality associated with the same concentration of particulate matter increased due to the observed pollutants accumulation. The association of MLH with daily mortality and the effect of ML thinning on particle toxicity exacerbated when Saharan dust outbreaks occurred suggesting a synergic effect of atmospheric pollutants on health which was amplified during dust outbreaks. Moreover, the results may reflect higher toxicity of primary particles which predominate on low MLH days. PMID:25051327

  17. Depth profiling of oxidized a-C:D Layers on Be -- A comparison of {sup 4}He RBS and {sup 28}Si ERD analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, J.; Mayer, M.; Walsh, D.; Wampler, W.R.

    1997-06-01

    In applications dealing with the deposition of amorphous hydrogenated carbon layers or in the determination of the composition of deposited layers on the walls of nuclear fusion plasma experiments, the analysis of mixtures of light elements on heavy substrates is necessary. Depth profiling by means of RBS is often difficult due to the overlap of the backscattering intensities of different constituents from different depths. The erosion and reaction of deposited amorphous deuterated carbon (a-C:D) films with a Be substrate due to annealing in air poses an analytical challenge especially if simultaneously the exchange of hydrogen isotopes should be monitored. The analysis of the different recoiling atoms from collisions with heavy ions in Elastic Recoil Detection (ERD) can provide a tool which resolves all constituents in a single analysis. In the present study the composition of intermixed layers on Be containing H, D, Be, C and O has been analyzed using conventional {sup 4}He RBS at 2.2 MeV together with 2.5 MeV {sup 4}He ERD for hydrogen isotope analysis. At these energies, an overlap of signals from different constituents could be avoided in most cases. As alternative method heavy ion ERD using Si{sup 7+} ions extracted from a 5 MeV Tandem Van de Graff accelerator was investigated. At a scattering angle of 30{degree} Si ions could not be scattered into the detector and a solid state detector without protecting foil could be used. Even in the intermixed layers at terminal energies of 5 MeV the heavy constituents could be separated while signals from recoiling hydrogen and deuterium atoms could be resolved on top of the signal from the Be substrate. For the analysis of the RBS and ERD data the newly developed spectra simulation program SIMNRA has been used which includes a large data bank for scattering and nuclear reaction cross sections. The depth profiles of all constituents extracted from the simulation are compared for both methods.

  18. Activity budgets derived from time-depth recorders in a diving mammal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodkin, J.L.; Monson, D.H.; Esslinger, G.G.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a method to convert continuously collected time–depth data from archival time–depth recorders (TDRs) into activity budgets for a benthic-foraging marine mammal. We used data from 14 TDRs to estimate activity-specific time budgets in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) residing near Cross Sound, southeast Alaska, USA. From the TDRs we constructed a continuous record of behavior for each individual over 39–46 days during summer of 1999. Behaviors were classified as foraging (diving to the bottom), other diving (traveling, grooming, interacting), and nondiving (assumed resting). The overall average activity budget (proportion of 24-hr/d) was 0.37 foraging (8.9 hr/d), 0.11 in other diving (2.6 hr/d), and 0.52 nondiving time (12.5 hr/d). We detected significant differences in activity budgets among individuals and between groups within our sample. Historically, the sea otter population in our study area had been expanding and sequentially reoccupying vacant habitat since their reintroduction to the area in the 1960s, and our study animals resided in 2 adjacent yet distinct locations. Males (n = 5) and individuals residing in recently occupied habitat (n = 4) spent 0.28–0.30 of their time foraging (6.7–7.2 hr/d), 0.17–0.18 of their time in other diving behaviors (4.1–4.3 hr/d), and 0.53–0.54 of their time resting (12.7–13.0 hr/d). In contrast, females (n = 9) and individuals residing in longer occupied habitat (n = 10) spent 0.40 of their time foraging (9.6 hr/d), 0.08–0.09 of their time in other diving behaviors (1.9–2.2 hr/d), and 0.51–0.52 of their time resting (12.2–12.5 hr/d). Consistent with these differences, sea otters residing in more recently occupied habitat captured more and larger clams (Saxidomus spp., Protothaca spp., Macoma spp., Mya spp.,Clinocardium spp.) and other prey, and intertidal clams were more abundant and larger in this area. We found that TDRs provided data useful for measuring activity time budgets

  19. Estimating 3D variation in active-layer thickness beneath arctic streams using ground-penetrating radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brosten, T.R.; Bradford, J.H.; McNamara, J.P.; Gooseff, M.N.; Zarnetske, J.P.; Bowden, W.B.; Johnston, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    We acquired three-dimensional (3D) ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data across three stream sites on the North Slope, AK, in August 2005, to investigate the dependence of thaw depth on channel morphology. Data were migrated with mean velocities derived from multi-offset GPR profiles collected across a stream section within each of the 3D survey areas. GPR data interpretations from the alluvial-lined stream site illustrate greater thaw depths beneath riffle and gravel bar features relative to neighboring pool features. The peat-lined stream sites indicate the opposite; greater thaw depths beneath pools and shallower thaw beneath the connecting runs. Results provide detailed 3D geometry of active-layer thaw depths that can support hydrological studies seeking to quantify transport and biogeochemical processes that occur within the hyporheic zone.

  20. Active layer hydrology for Imnavait Creek, Toolik, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    In the annual hydrologic cycle, snowmelt is the most significant event at Imnavait Creek located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Precipitation that has accumulated for more than 6 months on the surface melts in a relatively short period of 7 to 10 days once sustained melting occurs. During the ablation period, runoff dominates the hydrologic cycle. Some meltwater goes to rewetting the organic soils in the active layer. The remainder is lost primarily because of evaporation, since transpiration is not a very active process at this time. Following the snowmelt period, evapotranspiration becomes the dominate process, with base flow contributing the other watershed losses. It is important to note that the water initally lost by evapotranspiration entered the organic layer during melt. This water from the snowpack ensures that each year the various plant communities will have sufficient water to start a new summer of growth.

  1. Mapping Active-Layer Thickness in an Urbanized Environment: The Barrow Urban Heat Island Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klene, A. E.; Hinkel, K. M.; Nelson, F. E.; Shiklomanov, N. I.

    2003-12-01

    Local and global changes in the Arctic climate may have profound impacts on hydrology, soil stability, and infrastructure, such as roads, buildings, and water, gas, or oil pipelines. These changes will be manifested in large part through permafrost, which can influence virtually all physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring in the soil. The "Barrow Urban Heat Island Study" (BUHIS) is an ongoing project in northern Alaska that examines the effects of urbanization on air and soil temperatures in and around Barrow. At 4600 residents, Barrow is the largest native settlement in the circumarctic region and the northernmost urban area in the United States. Initiated in summer 2001, BUHIS is recording temperature and thaw depth at more than 60 locations throughout the village, the developing suburbs, and surrounding undisturbed tundra. This paper describes one part of study examining the active layer and anthropogenic influences on its thickness. Summer air and soil temperature data, together with digital vegetation and soil maps, are used as input to a modified Stefan solution to map depth of thaw over an area of 100 square kilometers that includes both the village of Barrow and the surrounding tundra. Maps representing end-of-summer conditions for 2001 provide the first spatial/temporal representation of active-layer variability within an urbanized area. Increasing urban development in Arctic regions is causing information about changes accompanying industrial development and urbanization to become more vital, particularly given the possibility of a warming climate.

  2. Layered shielding design for an active neutron interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    The use of source and detector shields in active neutron interrogation can improve detector signal. In simulations, a shielded detector with a source rotated π/3 rad relative to the opening decreased neutron flux roughly three orders of magnitude. Several realistic source and detector shield configurations were simulated. A layered design reduced neutron and secondary photon flux in the detector by approximately one order of magnitude for a deuterium-tritium source. The shield arrangement can be adapted for a portable, modular design.

  3. SII-DAC drilling activity: Higher efficiency and shallower well depth combine to boost drilling totals

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough, J.

    1983-09-05

    Improvements in drilling efficiency in conjunction with the trend toward shallower drilling have pushed well counts and footage figures far above those proportionate with today's rig count. Since the fourth quarter of 1981, the average well depth has declined by 11% from 4,800 to 4,300 ft. Second quarter 1983 totals, 19,869 wells and 85,422,953 ft, indicate that drilling activity continues to hover at near record levels despite low equipment utilization rates and the general environment of slow business. Last quarter was the eighth busiest in history as measured by footage recorded. During 1982, reporting lag was the principal factor making well counts appear too high. At the present time, gains in rig productivity coupled with this natural reporting lag are impacting the data. Drilling rigs are completing more wells and producing more footage than ever before. Historically, the average rig completes 20-22 wells in a year's time. Current output is running 40 wells/year. About 100,000 ft/year/ rig is average and 120,000 denotes an exceptional year. Today's apparent figure exceeds 169,000. All of these figures are approximations, however, because of the 5-6 month data lag. Fourth quarter 1982 rig count produced many of this quarter's reported wells. The average rig count at that time was 2,530 vs. second quarter 1983 of 1,920.

  4. Gravity travelling waves for two superposed fluid layers, one being of infinite depth: a new type of bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Iooss, Gérard; Lombardi, Eric; Sun, Shu Ming

    2002-10-15

    In this paper, we study the travelling gravity waves in a system of two layers of perfect fluids, the bottom one being infinitely deep, the upper one having a finite thickness h. We assume that the flow is potential and the dimensionless parameters are the ratio between densities rho = rho(2)/rho(1) and lambda = gh/c(2). We study special values of the parameters such that lambda(1 - rho) is near 1(-), where a bifurcation of a new type occurs. We formulate the problem as a spatial reversible dynamical system, where U = 0 corresponds to a uniform state (velocity c in a moving reference frame), and we consider the linearized operator around 0. We show that its spectrum contains the entire real axis (essential spectrum), with, in addition, a double eigenvalue in 0, a pair of simple imaginary eigenvalues +/-ilambda at a distance O(1) from 0, and for lambda(1 - rho) above 1, another pair of simple imaginary eigenvalues tending towards 0 as lambda(1 - rho) --> 1(+). When lambda(1 - rho)

  5. Gravity travelling waves for two superposed fluid layers, one being of infinite depth: a new type of bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Iooss, Gérard; Lombardi, Eric; Sun, Shu Ming

    2002-10-15

    In this paper, we study the travelling gravity waves in a system of two layers of perfect fluids, the bottom one being infinitely deep, the upper one having a finite thickness h. We assume that the flow is potential and the dimensionless parameters are the ratio between densities rho = rho(2)/rho(1) and lambda = gh/c(2). We study special values of the parameters such that lambda(1 - rho) is near 1(-), where a bifurcation of a new type occurs. We formulate the problem as a spatial reversible dynamical system, where U = 0 corresponds to a uniform state (velocity c in a moving reference frame), and we consider the linearized operator around 0. We show that its spectrum contains the entire real axis (essential spectrum), with, in addition, a double eigenvalue in 0, a pair of simple imaginary eigenvalues +/-ilambda at a distance O(1) from 0, and for lambda(1 - rho) above 1, another pair of simple imaginary eigenvalues tending towards 0 as lambda(1 - rho) --> 1(+). When lambda(1 - rho)

  6. An Integrated Observational and Model Synthesis Approach to Examine Dominant Environmental Controls on Active Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchley, A. L.; Coon, E.; Painter, S. L.; Harp, D. R.; Wilson, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The active layer thickness (ALT) - the annual maximum depth of soil with above 0°C temperatures - in part determines the volume of carbon-rich stores available for decomposition and therefore potential greenhouse gas release into the atmosphere from Arctic tundra. However, understanding and predicting ALT in polygonal tundra landscapes is difficult due to the complex nature of hydrothermal atmospheric-surface-subsurface interactions in freezing/thawing soil. Simply deconvolving effects of single environmental controls on ALT is not possible with measurements alone as processes act in concert to drive thaw depth formation. Process-rich models of thermal hydrological dynamics, conversely, are a valuable tool for understanding the dominant controls and uncertainties in predicting permafrost conditions. By integrating observational data with known physical relationships to form process-rich models, synthetic experiments can then be used to explore a breadth of environmental conditions encountered and the effect of each environmental attribute may be assessed. Here a process rich thermal hydrology model, The Advanced Terrestrial Simulator, has been created and calibrated using observed data from Barrow, AK. An ensemble of 1D thermal hydrologic models were simulated that span a range of three environmental factors 1) thickness of organic rich soil, 2) snow depth, and 3) soil moisture content, to investigate the role of each factor on ALT. Results show that organic layer thickness acts as a strong insulator and is the dominant control of ALT, but the strength of the effect of organic layer thickness is also dependent on the saturation state. Using the ensemble results, the effect of peat thickness on ALT was then examined on a 2D domain. This work was supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project LDRD201200068DR and by the The Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project. NGEE-Arctic is supported by the Office of Biological and

  7. Thermal regime of active layer at two lithologically contrasting sites on James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrbáček, Filip; Nývlt, Daniel; Láska, Kamil

    2016-04-01

    Antarctic Peninsula region (AP) represents one of the most rapidly warming parts of our planet in the last 50 years. Despite increasing research activities along both western and eastern sides of AP in last decades, there is still a lot of gaps in our knowledge relating to permafrost, active layer and its thermal and physical properties. This study brings new results of active layer monitoring on James Ross Island, which is the largest island in northern AP. Its northern part, Ulu Peninsula, is the largest ice-free area (more than 200 km2) in the region. Due its large area, we focused this study on sites located in different lithologies, which would affect local thermal regime of active layer. Study site (1) at Abernethy Flats area (41 m a.s.l.) lies ~7 km from northern coast. Lithologically is formed by disintegrated Cretaceous calcareous sandstones and siltstones of the Santa Marta Formation. Study site (2) is located at the northern slopes of Berry Hill (56 m a.s.l.), about 0.4 km from northern coastline. Lithology is composed of muddy to intermediate diamictites, tuffaceous siltstones to fine grained sandstones of the Mendel Formation. Data of air temperature at 2 meters above ground and the active layer temperatures at 75 cm deep profiles were obtained from both sites in period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014. Small differences were found when comparing mean air temperatures and active temperatures at 5 and 75 cm depth in the period 2012-2014. While the mean air temperatures varied between -7.7 °C and -7.0 °C, the mean ground temperatures fluctuated between -6.6 °C and -6.1 °C at 5 cm and -6.9 °C and -6.0 °C at 75 cm at Abernethy Flats and Berry Hill slopes respectively. Even though ground temperature differences along the profiles weren't pronounced during thawing seasons, the maximum active layer thickness was significantly larger at Berry Hill slopes (80 to 82 cm) than at Abernethy Flats (52 to 64 cm). We assume this differences are affected by

  8. Desert shrub responses to experimental modification of precipitation seasonality and soil depth: relationship to the two-layer model and ecohydrological niche

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germino, Matthew J.; Reinhardt, Keith

    2013-01-01

    1. Ecohydrological niches are important for understanding plant community responses to climate shifts, particularly in dry lands. According to the two-layer hypothesis, selective use of deep-soil water increases growth or persistence of woody species during warm and dry summer periods and thereby contributes to their coexistence with shallow-rooted herbs in dry ecosystems. The resource-pool hypothesis further suggests that shallow-soil water benefits growth of all plants while deep-soil water primarily enhances physiological maintenance and survival of woody species. Few studies have directly tested these by manipulating deep-soil water availability and observing the long-term outcomes. 2. We predicted that factors promoting infiltration and storage of water in deep soils, specifically greater winter precipitation and soil depth, would enhance Artemisia tridentata (big sagebrush) in cold, winter-wet/summer-dry desert. Sagebrush responses to 20 years of winter irrigation were compared to summer- or no irrigation, on plots having relatively deep or shallow soils (2 m vs. 1 m depths). 3. Winter irrigation increased sagebrush cover, and crown and canopy volumes, but not density (individuals/plot) compared to summer or no irrigation, on deep-soil plots. On shallow-soil plots, winter irrigation surprisingly decreased shrub cover and size, and summer irrigation had no effect. Furthermore, multiple regression suggested that the variations in growth were related (i) firstly to water in shallow soils (0-0.2 m) and secondly to deeper soils (> 1 m deep) and (ii) more by springtime than by midsummer soil water. Water-use efficiency increased considerably on shallow soils without irrigation and was lowest with winter irrigation. 4. Synthesis. Sagebrush was more responsive to the seasonal timing of precipitation than to total annual precipitation. Factors that enhanced deep-water storage (deeper soils plus more winter precipitation) led to increases in Artemisia tridentata that

  9. Surface activation of CNT Webs towards layer by layer assembly of biosensors.

    PubMed

    Musameh, Mustafa; Huynh, Chi P; Hickey, Mark; Kyratzis, Ilias Louis

    2016-04-25

    Several surface activation methods such as chemical, electrochemical and plasma have been used for enhancing the electrochemical performance of carbon based electrodes for various applications. However, some of these surface activation methods may not be useful depending on the chemical and physical properties of the activated surface. Herein we investigate the surface activation of carbon nanotube (CNT) webs by electrochemical and plasma techniques to enhance their electrochemical performance and enable the fabrication of a biosensor using the layer-by-layer (LBL) approach. The pretreated CNT webs were characterized by SEM, TEM, Raman, XPS and electrochemical methods. TEM images and Raman analysis showed an increase in the level of surface defects upon pretreatment with higher number of defects after electrochemical pretreatment. XPS analysis showed an increase in the level of oxygen functional groups after pretreatment (4 to 5 times increase) which resulted in enhanced water wettability especially for plasma pretreated CNT webs. The pretreated CNT web electrodes also showed an enhanced electrochemical activity towards the oxidation and reduction of different redox probes with higher sensitivity for the electrochemically pretreated CNT web electrode that was accompanied by a higher level of noise in amperometric measurements. A highly linear response was obtained for the untreated and the electrochemically pretreated CNT web electrodes towards the amperometric detection of NADH (R(2) of 0.9996 and 0.9986 respectively) while a non-linear response was observed for the plasma pretreated CNT web electrode (R(2) of 0.8538). The pretreated CNT web electrodes enabled the fabrication of a LBL biosensor for alcohol detection with highest operational stability obtained for the plasma pretreated CNT web surface.

  10. Noncontacting laser photocarrier radiometric depth profilometry of harmonically modulated band bending in the space-charge layer at doped SiO{sub 2}-Si interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelis, Andreas; Batista, Jerias; Gibkes, Juergen; Pawlak, Michael; Pelzl, Josef

    2005-04-15

    Laser infrared photocarrier radiometry (PCR) was used with a harmonically modulated low-power laser pump and a superposed dc superband-gap optical bias (a secondary laser beam) to control and monitor the space-charge-layer (SCL) width in oxidized p-Si-SiO{sub 2} and n-Si-SiO{sub 2} interfaces (wafers) exhibiting charged interface-state related band bending. Applying the theory of PCR-SCL dynamics [A. Mandelis, J. Appl. Phys. 97, 083508 (2005)] to the experiments yielded various transport parameters of the samples as well as depth profiles of the SCL exhibiting complete ( p-type Si) or partial (n-type Si) band flattening, to a degree controlled by widely different minority-carrier capture cross section at each interface. The uncompensated charge density at the interface was also calculated from the theory.

  11. Impact of atmospheric boundary layer depth variability and wind reversal on the diurnal variability of aerosol concentration at a valley site.

    PubMed

    Pal, S; Lee, T R; Phelps, S; De Wekker, S F J

    2014-10-15

    The development of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) plays a key role in affecting the variability of atmospheric constituents such as aerosols, greenhouse gases, water vapor, and ozone. In general, the concentration of any tracers within the ABL varies due to the changes in the mixing volume (i.e. ABL depth). In this study, we investigate the impact on the near-surface aerosol concentration in a valley site of 1) the boundary layer dilution due to vertical mixing and 2) changes in the wind patterns. We use a data set obtained during a 10-day field campaign in which a number of remote sensing and in-situ instruments were deployed, including a ground-based aerosol lidar system for monitoring of the ABL top height (zi), a particle counter to determine the number concentration of aerosol particles at eight different size ranges, and tower-based standard meteorological instruments. Results show a clearly visible decreasing trend of the mean daytime zi from 2900 m AGL (above ground level) to 2200 m AGL during a three-day period which resulted in increased near-surface pollutant concentrations. An inverse relationship exists between the zi and the fine fraction (0.3-0.7 μm) accumulation mode particles (AMP) on some days due to the dilution effect in a well-mixed ABL. These days are characterized by the absence of daytime upvalley winds and the presence of northwesterly synoptic-driven winds. In contrast, on the days with an onset of an upvalley wind circulation after the morning transition, the wind-driven local transport mechanism outweighs the ABL-dilution effect in determining the variability of AMP concentration. The interplay between the ABL depth evolution and the onset of the upvalley wind during the morning transition period significantly governs the air quality in a valley and could be an important component in the studies of mountain meteorology and air quality.

  12. Impact of atmospheric boundary layer depth variability and wind reversal on the diurnal variability of aerosol concentration at a valley site.

    PubMed

    Pal, S; Lee, T R; Phelps, S; De Wekker, S F J

    2014-10-15

    The development of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) plays a key role in affecting the variability of atmospheric constituents such as aerosols, greenhouse gases, water vapor, and ozone. In general, the concentration of any tracers within the ABL varies due to the changes in the mixing volume (i.e. ABL depth). In this study, we investigate the impact on the near-surface aerosol concentration in a valley site of 1) the boundary layer dilution due to vertical mixing and 2) changes in the wind patterns. We use a data set obtained during a 10-day field campaign in which a number of remote sensing and in-situ instruments were deployed, including a ground-based aerosol lidar system for monitoring of the ABL top height (zi), a particle counter to determine the number concentration of aerosol particles at eight different size ranges, and tower-based standard meteorological instruments. Results show a clearly visible decreasing trend of the mean daytime zi from 2900 m AGL (above ground level) to 2200 m AGL during a three-day period which resulted in increased near-surface pollutant concentrations. An inverse relationship exists between the zi and the fine fraction (0.3-0.7 μm) accumulation mode particles (AMP) on some days due to the dilution effect in a well-mixed ABL. These days are characterized by the absence of daytime upvalley winds and the presence of northwesterly synoptic-driven winds. In contrast, on the days with an onset of an upvalley wind circulation after the morning transition, the wind-driven local transport mechanism outweighs the ABL-dilution effect in determining the variability of AMP concentration. The interplay between the ABL depth evolution and the onset of the upvalley wind during the morning transition period significantly governs the air quality in a valley and could be an important component in the studies of mountain meteorology and air quality. PMID:25105753

  13. Four-layer depth-of-interaction PET detector for high resolution PET using a multi-pixel S8550 avalanche photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Oda, Ichiro; Shibuya, Kengo; Yoshida, Eiji; Yamaya, Taiga; Kitamura, Keishi; Murayama, Hideo

    2010-09-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are being used as photodetectors in positron emission tomography (PET) because they have many advantages over photomultipliers (PMTs) typically used in PET detectors. We have developed a PET detector that consists of a multi-pixel APD and a 6×6×4 array of 1.46×1.46 mm 2×4.5 m LYSO crystals for a small animal PET scanner. The detector can identify four-layer depth of interaction (DOI) with a position-sensitive APD coupled to the backside of a crystal array by just an optimized reflector arrangement. Since scintillation lights are shared among many pixels by the method, weaker signals in APD pixels far from the interacting crystals are affected by noise. To evaluate the performance of the four-layer DOI detector with the APD and the influence of electrical noise on our method, we constructed a prototype DOI detector and tested its performance. We found, except for crystal elements on the edge of the crystal array, all crystal elements could be identified from the 2D position histogram. An energy resolution of 16.9% was obtained for the whole crystal array of the APD detector. The results of noise dependence of detector performances indicated that the DOI detector using the APD could achieve sufficient performance even when using application-specific integrated circuits.

  14. Experiments on the active control of transitional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, P. A.; Rioual, J.-L.; Fisher, M. J.

    Experimental results are presented which demonstrate that the streamwise position of the transition region of a flat plate boundary layer can be actively controlled. The means of control is through the application of suction through the surface of the plate, a progressive increase in suction rate being capable of producing transition at progressively larger distances downstream from the plate leading edge. A simple digital feedback regulator based on an integral control law is shown to be most effective in regulating the position of transition, an error signal being derived from measurements of pressure fluctuations on the surface of the plate.

  15. Depth-of-interaction measurement in a single-layer crystal array with a single-ended readout using digital silicon photomultiplier.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Sun; Lee, Jae Sung

    2015-08-21

    We present the first experimental evaluation of a depth-of-interaction (DOI) positron emission tomography (PET) detector using a digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM). To measure DOI information from a mono-layer array of scintillation crystals with a single-ended readout, our group has previously proposed and developed a new method based on light spread using triangular reflectors. Since this method relies on measurement of the light distribution, dSiPM, which has a fully digital interface, has several merits for our DOI measurement. The DOI PET detector comprised of a dSiPM sensor (DPC-3200-22-44) coupled with a 14   ×   14 array of 2 mm  ×  2 mm  ×  20 mm unpolished LGSO crystals. All crystals were covered with triangular reflectors. To obtain a good performance of the DOI PET detector, several parameters of detector were selected as a preliminary experiment. Detector performance was evaluated with the selected parameters and the optimal experimental setup, and a DOI measurement was conducted by irradiating the crystal block at five DOI positions spaced at intervals of 4 mm. Maximum-likelihood estimation was employed for DOI positioning and the optimal DOI estimation scheme was also investigated in this study. As a result, the DOI PET detector showed clear crystal identification. The energy resolution (full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)) averaged over all depths was 10.21%  ±  0.15% at 511 keV, and time resolution averaged over all depths was 1198.61   ±   39.70 ps FWHM. The average DOI positioning accuracy for all depths was 74.22%  ±  6.77%, which equates to DOI resolution of 4.67 mm. Energy and DOI resolutions were uniform over all crystal positions except for the back parts of the array. Furthermore, additional simulation studies were conducted to verify the results of our DOI measurement method that is combined with dSiPM technology. In conclusion, our continuous DOI PET detector

  16. Microbial Activity in Active and Upper Permafrost Layers in Axel Heiberg Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Allan, J.; Cheng, K.; Chourey, K.; Hettich, R. L.; Layton, A.; Liu, X.; Murphy, J.; Mykytczuk, N. C.; Phelps, T. J.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Saarunya, G.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Whyte, L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2011-12-01

    Data on microbial communities and their metabolic activity in Arctic wetlands and underlying permafrost sediments is lacking. Samples were collected from different depths of a cryosol (D1, D2) and upper permafrost (D3) at the Axel Heiberg Island in July 2009. Upper cryosol has lower H2O but higher C and N content when compared to deeper horizons including upper permafrost layer. Deep cryosol and upper permafrost contained SO42- (155 and 132 ppm) and NO3- (0.12 and 0.10 ppm), respectively. The phylogenetic analyses of the environmental 16S rRNA genes showed the putative SRB were more abundant in permafrost (8%) than in cryosols, D1 (0.2%) and D2 (1.1%). Putative denitrifying bacteria varied along depth with near 0.1% in D1 and a significant increase in D2 (2.7%) and D3 (2.2%). Methanogens were not detected; methanotrophs were present at low levels in D3 (1%). Two sets of microcosms were set up. Firstly, anaerobic microcosms, amended with 10 mM glucose, sulfate or nitrate, were cultivated at varying temperatures (15o, 6o, and 0o C) for 10 months. Metabolic activity was monitored by measuring CO2 and CH4 every 3 months. A total of 89.5% of the D3-originated microcosms showed higher activity in comparison to cryosols in first 3 months. CH4 was not detected in these microcosms, whereas CO2 production was higher at 15o C or with glucose. Metaproteomics analyses of microcosms with higher levels of CO2 production indicated the presence of stress responsive proteins (e.g. DnaK, GroEL) and proteins essential for energy production and survival under carbon starvation (e.g. F0F1 ATP synthase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase). These proteins have been previously shown to be up-regulated at low temperatures by permafrost bacteria. Metaproteomics data based on the draft sequences indicated the presence of proteins from the genera Bradyrhizobium, Sphingomonas, Lysinibacillus and Methylophilaceae and these bacteria were also detected by pyrosequencing. Secondly, a duplicate set of anaerobic

  17. Geochemical drivers of organic matter decomposition in the active layer of Arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, E.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; Mann, B.; Graham, D. E.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Gu, B.; Liang, L.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic tundra soils store large quantities of organic carbon that are susceptible to decomposition and release to the atmosphere as CO2 and CH4. Decomposition rates are limited by cold temperatures and widespread anoxia; however, ongoing changes in soil temperature, thaw depth, and water saturation are expected to influence rates and pathways of organic matter decomposition. In order to predict greenhouse gas releases from high-latitude ecosystems, it is necessary to identify how geochemical factors (e.g. terminal electron acceptors, carbon substrates) influence CO2 and CH4 production in tundra soils. This study evaluates spatial patterns of aqueous geochemistry in the active layer of low- to high-centered polygons located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory in northern Alaska. Pore waters from saturated soils were low in sulfate and nitrate but contained abundant Fe which may serve a major terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic microbial metabolism. Relatively high concentrations of soluble Fe accumulated in the middle of the active layer near the boundary between the organic and mineral horizon, and we infer that Fe-oxide reduction and dissolution in the mineral horizon produced soluble Fe that diffused upwards and was stabilized by complexation with dissolved organic matter. Fe concentrations in the bulk soil were higher in organic than mineral horizons due to the presence of these organic-Fe complexes and Fe-oxide precipitates. Dissolved CH4 increased with increasing proportions of dissolved Fe(III) in saturated soils from transitional and low-centered polygons. The opposite trend was observed in drier soils from flat- and high-centered polygons where deeper oxidation fronts may inhibit methanogenesis. Using multiple spectroscopic and molecular methods (e.g. UV-Vis, Fourier transform infrared, ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry), we also observed that pore waters from the middle of the active layer contained more aromatic organics than in mineral

  18. Measurement of in-field variability for active seeding depth applications in southeastern U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Planting remains one of the most important if not the most important field operation with mistakes potentially impacting profitability. Planter performance is defined by the ability of the planter to accurately place seed into the soil at an adequate and pre-determined depth. However, planter perfor...

  19. Optical activity of transparent polymer layers characterized by spectral means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosutchi, Andreea Irina; Dimitriu, Dan Gheorghe; Zelinschi, Carmen Beatrice; Breaban, Iuliana; Dorohoi, Dana Ortansa

    2015-06-01

    The method based on the channeled spectrum, validated for inorganic optical active layers, is used now to determine the optical activity of some transparent polymer solutions in different solvents. The circular birefringence, the dispersion parameter and the specific rotation were estimated in the visible range by using the measurements of wavelengths in the channeled spectra of Hydroxypropyl cellulose in water, methanol and acetic acid. The experiments showed the specific rotation dependence on the polymer concentration and also on the solvent nature. The decrease of the specific rotation in the visible range with the increase in wavelength was evidenced. The method has some advantages as the rapidity of the experiments and the large spectral range in which it can be applied. One disadvantage is the fact that the channeled spectrum does not allow to establish the rotation sense of the electric field intensity.

  20. Validation of ash optical depth and layer height retrieved from passive satellite sensors using EARLINET and airborne lidar data: the case of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balis, Dimitris; Koukouli, Maria-Elissavet; Siomos, Nikolaos; Dimopoulos, Spyridon; Mona, Lucia; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Marenco, Franco; Clarisse, Lieven; Ventress, Lucy J.; Carboni, Elisa; Grainger, Roy G.; Wang, Ping; Tilstra, Gijsbert; van der A, Ronald; Theys, Nicolas; Zehner, Claus

    2016-05-01

    The vulnerability of the European airspace to volcanic eruptions was brought to the attention of the public and the scientific community by the 2010 eruptions of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull. As a consequence of this event, ash concentration thresholds replaced the "zero tolerance to ash" rule, drastically changing the requirements on satellite ash retrievals. In response to that, the ESA funded several projects aiming at creating an optimal end-to-end system for volcanic ash plume monitoring and prediction. Two of them, namely the SACS-2 and SMASH projects, developed and improved dedicated satellite-derived ash plume and sulfur dioxide level assessments. The validation of volcanic ash levels and height extracted from the GOME-2 and IASI instruments on board the MetOp-A satellite is presented in this work. EARLINET lidar measurements are compared to different satellite retrievals for two eruptive episodes in April and May 2010. Comparisons were also made between satellite retrievals and aircraft lidar data obtained with the UK's BAe-146-301 Atmospheric Research Aircraft (managed by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements, FAAM) over the United Kingdom and the surrounding regions. The validation results are promising for most satellite products and are within the estimated uncertainties of each of the comparative data sets, but more collocation scenes would be desirable to perform a comprehensive statistical analysis. The satellite estimates and the validation data sets are better correlated for high ash optical depth values, with correlation coefficients greater than 0.8. The IASI retrievals show a better agreement concerning the ash optical depth and ash layer height when compared with the ground-based and airborne lidar data.

  1. Temporal and spectral cloud screening of polar winter aerosol optical depth (AOD): impact of homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds and crystal layers on climatological-scale AODs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Norman T.; Baibakov, Konstantin; Hesaraki, Sareh; Ivanescu, Liviu; Martin, Randall V.; Perro, Chris; Chaubey, Jai P.; Herber, Andreas; Duck, Thomas J.

    2016-10-01

    We compared star-photometry-derived, polar winter aerosol optical depths (AODs), acquired at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada, and Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, with GEOS-Chem (GC) simulations as well as ground-based lidar and CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization) retrievals over a sampling period of two polar winters. The results indicate significant cloud and/or low-altitude ice crystal (LIC) contamination which is only partially corrected using temporal cloud screening. Spatially homogeneous clouds and LICs that remain after temporal cloud screening represent an inevitable systematic error in the estimation of AOD: this error was estimated to vary from 78 to 210 % at Eureka and from 2 to 157 % at Ny-Ålesund. Lidar analysis indicated that LICs appeared to have a disproportionately large influence on the homogeneous coarse-mode optical depths that escape temporal cloud screening. In principle, spectral cloud screening (to yield fine-mode or submicron AODs) reduces pre-cloud-screened AODs to the aerosol contribution if one assumes that coarse-mode (super-micron) aerosols are a minor part of the AOD. Large, low-frequency differences between these retrieved values and their GC analogue appeared to be often linked to strong, spatially extensive planetary boundary layer events whose presence at either site was inferred from CALIOP profiles. These events were either not captured or significantly underestimated by the GC simulations. High-frequency AOD variations of GC fine-mode aerosols at Ny-Ålesund were attributed to sea salt, while low-frequency GC variations at Eureka and Ny-Ålesund were attributable to sulfates. CALIOP profiles and AODs were invaluable as spatial and temporal redundancy support (or, alternatively, as insightful points of contention) for star photometry retrievals and GC estimates of AOD.

  2. Active Flow Control on a Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Susan Althoff; Owens, Lewis R.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Allan, Brian G.; Schuster, Ernest P.

    2004-01-01

    Boundary layer ingestion (BLI) is explored as means to improve overall system performance for Blended Wing Body configuration. The benefits of BLI for vehicle system performance benefit are assessed with a process derived from first principles suitable for highly-integrated propulsion systems. This performance evaluation process provides framework within which to assess the benefits of an integrated BLI inlet and lays the groundwork for higher-fidelity systems studies. The results of the system study show that BLI provides a significant improvement in vehicle performance if the inlet distortion can be controlled, thus encouraging the pursuit of active flow control (AFC) as a BLI enabling technology. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet distortion was assessed using a 6% scale model of a 30% BLI offset, diffusing inlet. The experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel with a model inlet designed specifically for this type of testing. High mass flow pulsing actuators provided the active flow control. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion was determined by 120 total pressure measurements located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum freestream Mach number of 0.15 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the pulsed actuation can reduce distortion from 29% to 4.6% as measured by the circumferential distortion descriptor DC60 using less than 1% of inlet mass flow. Closed loop control of the actuation was also demonstrated using a sidewall surface static pressure as the response sensor.

  3. Spatial distribution of HTO activity in unsaturated soil depth in the vicinity of long-term release source

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, A.; Golubeva, V.; Mavrin, S.

    2015-03-15

    Previous studies reported about a correlation between HTO activity distribution in unsaturated soil layer and atmospheric long-term releases of HTO in the vicinity of Savannah River Site. The Tritium Working Group of BIOMASS Programme has performed a model-model intercomparison study of HTO transport from atmosphere to unsaturated soil and has evaluated HTO activity distribution in the unsaturated soil layer in the vicinity of permanent atmospheric sources. The Tritium Working Group has also reported about such a correlation, however the conclusion was that experimental data sets are needed to confirm this conclusion and also to validate appropriate computer models. (authors)

  4. Combining energy and Laplacian regularization to accurately retrieve the depth of brain activity of diffuse optical tomographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarelli, Antonio M.; Maclin, Edward L.; Low, Kathy A.; Mathewson, Kyle E.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2016-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides data about brain function using surface recordings. Despite recent advancements, an unbiased method for estimating the depth of absorption changes and for providing an accurate three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction remains elusive. DOT involves solving an ill-posed inverse problem, requiring additional criteria for finding unique solutions. The most commonly used criterion is energy minimization (energy constraint). However, as measurements are taken from only one side of the medium (the scalp) and sensitivity is greater at shallow depths, the energy constraint leads to solutions that tend to be small and superficial. To correct for this bias, we combine the energy constraint with another criterion, minimization of spatial derivatives (Laplacian constraint, also used in low resolution electromagnetic tomography, LORETA). Used in isolation, the Laplacian constraint leads to solutions that tend to be large and deep. Using simulated, phantom, and actual brain activation data, we show that combining these two criteria results in accurate (error <2 mm) absorption depth estimates, while maintaining a two-point spatial resolution of <24 mm up to a depth of 30 mm. This indicates that accurate 3-D reconstruction of brain activity up to 30 mm from the scalp can be obtained with DOT.

  5. The role of local atmospheric forcing on the modulation of the ocean mixed layer depth in reanalyses and a coupled single column ocean model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pookkandy, Byju; Dommenget, Dietmar; Klingaman, Nicholas; Wales, Scott; Chung, Christine; Frauen, Claudia; Wolff, Holger

    2016-02-01

    The role of local atmospheric forcing on the ocean mixed layer depth (MLD) over the global oceans is studied using ocean reanalysis data products and a single-column ocean model coupled to an atmospheric general circulation model. The focus of this study is on how the annual mean and the seasonal cycle of the MLD relate to various forcing characteristics in different parts of the world's oceans, and how anomalous variations in the monthly mean MLD relate to anomalous atmospheric forcings. By analysing both ocean reanalysis data and the single-column ocean model, regions with different dominant forcings and different mean and variability characteristics of the MLD can be identified. Many of the global oceans' MLD characteristics appear to be directly linked to the different atmospheric forcing characteristics at different locations. Here, heating and wind-stress are identified as the main drivers; in some, mostly coastal, regions the atmospheric salinity forcing also contributes. The annual mean MLD is more closely related to the annual mean wind-stress and the MLD seasonality is more closely related to the seasonality in heating. The single-column ocean model, however, also points out that the MLD characteristics over most global ocean regions, and in particular in the tropics and subtropics, cannot be maintained by local atmospheric forcings only, but are also a result of ocean dynamics that are not simulated in a single-column ocean model. Thus, lateral ocean dynamics are essential in correctly simulating observed MLD.

  6. Glider and satellite high resolution monitoring of a mesoscale eddy in the algerian basin: Effects on the mixed layer depth and biochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotroneo, Yuri; Aulicino, Giuseppe; Ruiz, Simón; Pascual, Ananda; Budillon, Giorgio; Fusco, Giannetta; Tintoré, Joaqun

    2016-10-01

    Deepening of temperature, salinity and density isolines at the center of the eddy is associated with variations in Chl-a, oxygen concentration and turbidity patterns. In particular, at 50 m depth along the eddy borders, Chl-a values are higher (1.1-5.2 μg/l) in comparison with the eddy center (0.5-0.7 μg/l) with maximum values found in the southeastern sector of the eddy. Calculation of geostrophic velocities along transects and vertical quasi-geostrophic velocities (QG-w) over a regular 5 km grid from the glider data helped to describe the mechanisms and functioning of the eddy. QG-w presents an asymmetric pattern, with relatively strong downwelling in the western part of the eddy and upwelling in the southeastern part. This asymmetry in the vertical velocity pattern, which brings LIW into the euphotic layer as well as advection from the northeastern sector of the eddy, may explain the observed increases in Chl-a values.

  7. Sensitivity of water stress in a two-layered sandy grassland soil to variations in groundwater depth and soil hydraulic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, M.; Seuntjens, P.; Joris, I.; Boënne, W.; Van Hoey, S.; Campling, P.; Cornelis, W. M.

    2015-07-01

    Monitoring and modeling tools may improve irrigation strategies in precision agriculture. We used non-invasive soil moisture monitoring, a crop growth and a soil hydrological model to predict soil-water content fluctuations and crop yield in a heterogeneous sandy grassland soil under supplementary irrigation. The sensitivity of the model to hydraulic parameters, water stress, crop yield and lower boundary conditions was assessed. Free drainage and incremental constant head conditions was implemented in a lower boundary sensitivity analysis. A time-dependent sensitivity analysis showed that changes in soil water content are mainly affected by the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks and the Mualem-van Genuchten retention curve shape parameters n and α. Results further showed that different parameter optimization strategies (two-, three-, four- or six-parameter optimizations) did not affect the calculated water stress and water content as significantly as does the bottom boundary. For this case, a two-parameter scenario, where Ks was optimized for each layer under the condition of a constant groundwater depth at 135-140 cm, performed best. A larger yield reduction, and a larger number and longer duration of stress conditions occurred in the free drainage condition as compared to constant boundary conditions. Numerical results showed that optimal irrigation scheduling using the aforementioned water stress calculations can save up to 12-22 % irrigation water as compared to the current irrigation regime. This resulted in a yield increase of 4.5-6.5 %, simulated by crop growth model.

  8. Joint assimilation of Aquarius-derived sea surface salinity and AVHRR-derived sea surface temperature in an ocean general circulation model using SEEK filter: Implication for mixed layer depth and barrier layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhisek; Sharma, Rashmi; Kumar, Raj; Basu, Sujit

    2015-10-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) from Aquarius mission and sea surface temperature (SST) from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) for the years 2012-2014 are assimilated into the global Massachusetts Institute of Technology General Circulation Model (MITGCM). Investigation of the impact of assimilation of these two data sets on simulated mixed layer depth (MLD) and barrier layer thickness (BLT) forms the core of our study. The method of assimilation is the Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman (SEEK) filter. Several assimilation runs are performed. Single-parameter assimilation, as well as joint assimilation, is conducted. To begin with, the model simulated SST and SSS are compared with independent Argo observations of these two parameters. Use of latitudinally varying error variances, which is a novel feature of our study, gives rise to the significant improvement in the simulation of SSS and SST. The best result occurs when joint assimilation is performed. Afterward, simulated MLD and BLT are compared with the same parameters derived from Argo observations forming an independent validation data set. Comparisons are performed both in temporal and spatial domains. Significant positive impact of assimilation is found in all the cases studied, and joint assimilation is found to outperform single-parameter assimilation in each of the cases considered. It is found that simulations of MLD and BLT improve up to 24% and 29%, respectively, when a joint assimilation of SSS and SST is carried out.

  9. Glider and satellite high resolution monitoring of a mesoscale eddy in the Algerian basin: effects on the mixed layer depth and biochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotroneo, Yuri; Aulicino, Giuseppe; Ruiz, Simón; Pascual, Ananda; Budillon, Giorgio; Fusco, Giannetta; Tintoré, Joaquin

    2016-04-01

    Despite of the extensive bibliography about the circulation of the Mediterranean Sea and its sub-basins, the debate on mesoscale dynamics and its impacts on biochemical processes is still open because of their intrinsic time scales and of the difficulties in sampling. In order to clarify some of these processes, the "Algerian BAsin Circulation Unmanned Survey - ABACUS" project was proposed and realized through access to JERICO Trans National Access (TNA) infrastructures between September and December 2014. In this framework, a deep glider cruise was carried out in the area between Balearic Islands and Algerian coasts to establish an endurance line for monitoring the basin circulation. During the mission, a mesoscale eddy, identified on satellite altimetry maps, was sampled at high-spatial horizontal resolution (4 km) along its main axes and from surface to 1000 m depth. Data were collected by a Slocum glider equipped with a pumped CTD and biochemical sensors that collected about 100 complete casts inside the eddy. In order to describe the structure of the eddy, in situ data were merged with new generation remotely sensed data as daily synoptic sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll concentration (Chl-a) images from MODIS satellites as well as sea surface height and geostrophic velocities from AVISO. From its origin along the Algerian coast in the eastern part of the basin, the eddy propagated to north-west at a mean speed of about 4 km/day with a mean diameter of 112/130 km, a mean elevation of 15.7 cm and clearly distinguished by the surrounding waters thanks to its higher SST and Chl-a values. Temperature and salinity values along the water column confirm the origin of the eddy from the AC showing the presence of recent Atlantic water in the surface layer and Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW) in the deeper layer. Eddy footprint is clearly evident in the multiparametric vertical sections conducted along its main axes. Deepening of temperature, salinity and

  10. DS86 neutron dose: Monte Carlo analysis for depth profile of 152Eu activity in a large stone sample.

    PubMed

    Endo, S; Iwatani, K; Oka, T; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Imanaka, T; Takada, J; Fujita, S; Hasai, H

    1999-06-01

    The depth profile of 152Eu activity induced in a large granite stone pillar by Hiroshima atomic bomb neutrons was calculated by a Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). The pillar was on the Motoyasu Bridge, located at a distance of 132 m (WSW) from the hypocenter. It was a square column with a horizontal sectional size of 82.5 cm x 82.5 cm and height of 179 cm. Twenty-one cells from the north to south surface at the central height of the column were specified for the calculation and 152Eu activities for each cell were calculated. The incident neutron spectrum was assumed to be the angular fluence data of the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86). The angular dependence of the spectrum was taken into account by dividing the whole solid angle into twenty-six directions. The calculated depth profile of specific activity did not agree with the measured profile. A discrepancy was found in the absolute values at each depth with a mean multiplication factor of 0.58 and also in the shape of the relative profile. The results indicated that a reassessment of the neutron energy spectrum in DS86 is required for correct dose estimation.

  11. Fate and Transport of Methane Formed in the Active Layer of Alaskan Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, M. E.; Curtis, J. B.; Smith, L. J.; Bill, M.; Torn, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past 2 years a series of tracer tests designed to estimate rates of methane formation via acetoclastic methanogenesis in the active layer of permafrost soils were conducted at the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO) in northernmost Alaska. The tracer tests consisted of extracting 0.5 to 1.0 liters of soil water in gas-tight bags from different features of polygons at the BEO, followed by addition of a tracer cocktail including acetate with a 13C-labeled methyl group and D2O (as a conservative tracer) into the soil water and injection of the mixture back into the original extraction site. Samples were then taken at depths of 30 cm (just above the bottom of the active layer), 20 cm, 10 cm and surface flux to determine the fate of the 13C-labeled acetate. During 2014 (2015 results are pending) water, soil gas, and flux gas were sampled for 60 days following injection of the tracer solution. Those samples were analyzed for concentrations and isotopic compositions of CH4, DIC/CO2 and water. At one site (the trough of a low-centered polygon) the 13C acetate was completely converted to 13CH4 within the first 2 days. The signal persisted for throughout the entire monitoring period at the injection depth with little evidence of transport or oxidation in any of the other sampling depths. In the saturated center of the same polygon, the acetate was also rapidly converted to 13CH4, but water turnover caused the signal to rapidly dissipate. High δ13C CO2 in flux samples from the polygon center indicate oxidation of the 13CH4 in near-surface waters. Conversely, CH4 production in the center of an unsaturated, flat-centered polygon was relatively small 13CH4 and dissipated rapidly without any evidence of either 13CH4 transport to shallower levels or oxidation. At another site in the edge of that polygon no 13CH4 was produced, but significant 13CO2/DIC was observed indicating direct aerobic oxidation of the acetate was occurring at this site. These results suggest that

  12. Seasonal and interannual variability of pan-Arctic surface mixed layer properties from 1979 to 2012 from hydrographic data, and the dominance of stratification for multiyear mixed layer depth shoaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta-Ferriz, Cecilia; Woodgate, Rebecca A.

    2015-05-01

    Using 21,406 hydrographic profiles from 1979 to 2012, we present the first observational, pan-Arctic assessment of Mixed Layer (ML) properties, including quantification of seasonal and interannual variability, and identification of multiyear ML depth shoaling. Arctic Mixed Layer Depths (MLDs) vary strongly seasonally, being deeper (∼25 to >50 m) in winter than summer (∼5-30 m). Eastern Arctic MLDs (regional mean ∼20 m in summer, ∼70 to 100+ m in winter) are deeper than western Arctic MLDs (∼8 m in summer, 30 m in winter). Patchiness, likely related to small-scale sea ice cover variability, is large - standard deviations ∼40% of the regional mean. By binning data into 6 regions (i.e., Chukchi Sea, Southern Beaufort Sea, Canada Basin, Makarov Basin, Eurasian Basin and Barents Sea), we quantify regional seasonal climatologies and interannual variability of ML depth, temperature and salinity. In most regions, ML changes are consistent with seasonal ice melt (∼1-3 m) with a ∼1.5 times greater sea ice change required in the western Arctic than in the eastern Arctic. In the Southern Beaufort Sea and the Canada Basin, however, other freshwater sources contribute to observed seasonality. MLDs are significantly correlated with wind only during ice-free times, and even then the relationship only explains 1-20% of the MLD variance. The same wind is 2-3 times more effective at deepening the ML in the eastern Arctic than in the (more stratified) western Arctic. Changes in underlying stratification (Δρ) explain ∼60% of the MLD variance, with MLDs proportional to Δρ-0.45. Weak eastern Arctic stratification permits a wind-MLD coupling comparable to an Ekman model, while the stronger western Arctic stratifications reduce the wind's effectiveness by a factor of 6. Remarkably, record-length (up to 30-year) trends indicate almost ubiquitous ML shoaling, order 0.5-1 m/yr, both in winter and summer over all the high Arctic (Canada, Makarov and Eurasian basins) and

  13. Recognition of human activities using depth images of Kinect for biofied building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Ami; Mita, Akira

    2015-03-01

    These days, various functions in the living spaces are needed because of an aging society, promotion of energy conservation, and diversification of lifestyles. To meet this requirement, we propose "Biofied Building". The "Biofied Building" is the system learnt from living beings. The various information is accumulated in a database using small sensor agent robots as a key function of this system to control the living spaces. Among the various kinds of information about the living spaces, especially human activities can be triggers for lighting or air conditioning control. By doing so, customized space is possible. Human activities are divided into two groups, the activities consisting of single behavior and the activities consisting of multiple behaviors. For example, "standing up" or "sitting down" consists of a single behavior. These activities are accompanied by large motions. On the other hand "eating" consists of several behaviors, holding the chopsticks, catching the food, putting them in the mouth, and so on. These are continuous motions. Considering the characteristics of two types of human activities, we individually, use two methods, R transformation and variance. In this paper, we focus on the two different types of human activities, and propose the two methods of human activity recognition methods for construction of the database of living space for "Biofied Building". Finally, we compare the results of both methods.

  14. Sensitivity of water stress in a two-layered sandy grassland soil to variations in groundwater depth and soil hydraulic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, M.; Seuntjens, P.; Joris, I.; Boënne, W.; Van Hoey, S.; Campling, P.; Cornelis, W. M.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring and modelling tools may improve irrigation strategies in precision agriculture. We used non-invasive soil moisture monitoring, a crop growth and a soil hydrological model to predict soil water content fluctuations and crop yield in a heterogeneous sandy grassland soil under supplementary irrigation. The sensitivity of the soil hydrological model to hydraulic parameters, water stress, crop yield and lower boundary conditions was assessed after integrating models. Free drainage and incremental constant head conditions were implemented in a lower boundary sensitivity analysis. A time-dependent sensitivity analysis of the hydraulic parameters showed that changes in soil water content are mainly affected by the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity Ks and the Mualem-van Genuchten retention curve shape parameters n and α. Results further showed that different parameter optimization strategies (two-, three-, four- or six-parameter optimizations) did not affect the calculated water stress and water content as significantly as does the bottom boundary. In this case, a two-parameter scenario, where Ks was optimized for each layer under the condition of a constant groundwater depth at 135-140 cm, performed best. A larger yield reduction, and a larger number and longer duration of stress conditions occurred in the free drainage condition as compared to constant boundary conditions. Numerical results showed that optimal irrigation scheduling using the aforementioned water stress calculations can save up to 12-22 % irrigation water as compared to the current irrigation regime. This resulted in a yield increase of 4.5-6.5 %, simulated by the crop growth model.

  15. Towards NOAA Forecasts of Permafrost Active Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livezey, M. M.; Jonassen, R. G.; Horsfall, F. M. C.; Jafarov, E. E.; Schaefer, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA's implementation of its 2014 Arctic Action Plan (AAP) lacks services related to permafrost change yet the Interagency Working Group on Coordination of Domestic Energy Development and Permitting in Alaska noted that warming permafrost challenges land-based development and calls for agencies to provide focused information needed by decision-makers. To address this we propose to link NOAA's existing seasonal forecasts of temperature and precipitation with a high-resolution model of the thermal state of permafrost (Jafarov et al., 2012) to provide near-term (one year ahead) forecasts of active layer thickness (ALT). Such forecasts would be an official NOAA statement of the expected thermal state of permafrost ALT in Alaska and would require: (1) long-term climate outlooks, (2) a permafrost model, (3) detailed specification of local spatial and vertical controls upon soil thermal state, (4) high-resolution vertical measurements of that thermal state, and (5) demonstration of forecast skill in pilot studies. Pilot efforts should focus on oil pipelines where the cost can be justified. With skillful forecasts, engineers could reduce costs of monitoring and repair as well as ecosystem damage by positioning equipment to more rapidly respond to predicted disruptions.

  16. Active layer hydrology for Imnavait Creek, Toolik, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hinzman, L.D.; Kane, D.L.

    1987-04-01

    The hydrology of the active layer of a watershed is described. In the annual hydrologic cycle, snowmelt is the most significant event at Imnavait Creek located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Precipitation that has accumulated for more than 6 months on the surface melts in a relatively short period of 7 to 10 days once sustained melting occurs. Significant runoff events are few. Convective storms covering relatively small areas on the North Slope of Alaska can produce significant small-scale events in a small watershed scale,but these events are rapidly attenuated outside the basin. Data collection began in August 1984. We have continuously monitored the hydrologic, the meteorologic, and the soil`s physical conditions. Information was collected through implementation of four snowmelt runoff plots and measurements of essential microclimate parameters. Soil moisture and temperature profiles were measured adjacent to each snowmelt runoff plot, and heat flux is collected adjacent to one of these plots. Meteorological parameters were measured locally. The water content of the snowpack prior to snowmelt was measured throughout the watershed and measured daily adjacent to each plot during snowmelt. The stream draining the basin was measured regularly during the spring melt event to provide information on watershed runoff rates and the volume of snowmelt.

  17. Active layer hydrology for Imnavait Creek, Toolik, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hinzman, L.D.; Kane, D.L.

    1987-04-01

    The hydrology of the active layer of a watershed is described. In the annual hydrologic cycle, snowmelt is the most significant event at Imnavait Creek located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Precipitation that has accumulated for more than 6 months on the surface melts in a relatively short period of 7 to 10 days once sustained melting occurs. Significant runoff events are few. Convective storms covering relatively small areas on the North Slope of Alaska can produce significant small-scale events in a small watershed scale,but these events are rapidly attenuated outside the basin. Data collection began in August 1984. We have continuously monitored the hydrologic, the meteorologic, and the soil's physical conditions. Information was collected through implementation of four snowmelt runoff plots and measurements of essential microclimate parameters. Soil moisture and temperature profiles were measured adjacent to each snowmelt runoff plot, and heat flux is collected adjacent to one of these plots. Meteorological parameters were measured locally. The water content of the snowpack prior to snowmelt was measured throughout the watershed and measured daily adjacent to each plot during snowmelt. The stream draining the basin was measured regularly during the spring melt event to provide information on watershed runoff rates and the volume of snowmelt.

  18. Effects of Soil Property Uncertainty on Projected Active Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, D. R.; Atchley, A. L.; Coon, E.; Painter, S. L.; Wilson, C. J.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Liljedahl, A.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty in future climate is often assumed to contribute the largest uncertainty to active layer thickness (ALT) projections. However, the impact of soil property uncertainty on these projections may be significant. In this research, we evaluate the contribution of soil property uncertainty on ALT projections at the Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska. The effect of variations in porosity, thermal conductivity, saturation, and water retention properties of peat and mineral soil are evaluated. The micro-topography of ice wedge polygons present at the site is included in the analysis using three 1D column models to represent polygon center, rim and trough features. The Arctic Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) is used to model multiphase thermal and hydrological processes in the subsurface. We apply the Null-Space Monte Carlo (NSMC) algorithm to identify an ensemble of soil property combinations that produce simulated temperature profiles that are consistent with temperature measurements available from the site. ALT is simulated for the ensemble of soil property combinations for four climate scenarios. The uncertainty in ALT due to soil properties within and across climate scenarios is evaluated. This work was supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project LDRD201200068DR and by the The Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project. NGEE-Arctic is supported by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the DOE Office of Science.

  19. Active layer thermal monitoring at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Roberto; Schaefer, Carlos; Simas, Felipe; Pregesbauer, Michael; Bockheim, James

    2013-04-01

    International attention on the climate change phenomena has grown in the last decade, intense modelling of climate scenarios were carried out by scientific investigations searching the sources and trends of these changes. The cryosphere and its energy flux became the focus of many investigations, being recognised as a key element for the understanding of future trends. The active layer and permafrost are key components of the terrestrial cryosphere due to their role in energy flux regulation and high sensitivity to climate change (Kane et al., 2001; Smith and Brown, 2009). Compared with other regions of the globe, our understanding of Antarctic permafrost is poor, especially in relation to its thermal state and evolution, its physical properties, links to pedogenesis, hydrology, geomorphic dynamics and response to global change (Bockheim, 1995, Bockheim et al., 2008). The active layer monitoring site was installed in the summer of 2008, and consist of thermistors (accuracy ± 0.2 °C) arranged in a vertical array (Turbic Eutric Cryosol 600 m asl, 10.5 cm, 32.5 cm, 67.5 cm and 83.5 cm). King George Island experiences a cold moist maritime climate characterized by mean annual air temperatures of -2°C and mean summer air temperatures above 0°C for up to four months (Rakusa-Suszczewski et al., 1993, Wen et al., 1994). Ferron et al., (2004) found great variability when analysing data from 1947 to1995 and identified cycles of 5.3 years of colder conditions followed by 9.6 years of warmer conditions. All probes were connected to a Campbell Scientific CR 1000 data logger recording data at hourly intervals from March 1st 2008 until November 30th 2012. Meteorological data for Fildes was obtained from the near by stations. We calculated the thawing days, freezing days; thawing degree days and freezing degree days; all according to Guglielmin et al. (2008). The active lawyer thickness was calculated as the 0 °C depth by extrapolating the thermal gradient from the two

  20. Investigation of the spatio-temporal variability of atmospheric boundary layer depths over mountainous terrain observed with a suite of ground-based and airborne instruments during the MATERHORN field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, S.; De Wekker, S.; Emmitt, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    We present first results of the spatio-temporal variability of atmospheric boundary layer depths obtained with a suite of ground-based and airborne instruments deployed during the first field phase of The Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program (http://www3.nd.edu/~dynamics/materhorn/index.php) at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG, Utah, USA) in Fall 2012. We mainly use high-resolution data collected on selected intensive observation periods obtained by Doppler lidars, ceilometer, and in-situ measurements from an unmanned aerial vehicle for the measurements of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) depths. In particular, a Navy Twin Otter aircraft flew 6 missions of about 5 hours each during the daytime, collecting remotely sensed (Doppler lidar, TODWL) wind data in addition to in-situ turbulence measurements which allowed a detailed investigation of the spatial heterogeneity of the convective boundary layer turbulence features over a steep isolated mountain of a horizontal and vertical scale of about 10 km and 1 km, respectively. Additionally, we use data collected by (1) radiosonde systems at two sites of Granite Mountain area in DPG (Playa and Sagebrush), (2) sonic anemometers (CSAT-3D) for high resolution turbulence flux measurements near ground, (3) Pyranometer for incoming solar radiation, and (4) standard meteorological measurements (PTU) obtained near the surface. In this contribution, we discuss and address (1) composites obtained with lidar, ceilometer, micro-meteorological measurements, and radiosonde observations to determine the quasi-continuous regime of ABL depths, growth rates, maximum convective boundary layer (CBL) depths, etc., (2) the temporal variability in the ABL depths during entire diurnal cycle and the spatial heterogeneity in the daytime ABL depths triggered by the underlying orography in the experimental area to investigate the most possible mechanisms (e.g. combined effect of diurnal cycle and orographic trigger

  1. Monitoring depth of anesthesia: from consciousness to nociception. A window on subcortical brain activity.

    PubMed

    Constant, Isabelle; Sabourdin, Nada

    2015-01-01

    Anesthesia results from several inhibitor processes, which interact to lead to loss of consciousness, amnesia, immobility, and analgesia. The anesthetic agents act on the whole brain, the cortical and subcortical areas according to their receptor targets. The conscious processes are rather integrated at the level of the cortical neuronal network, while the nonconscious processes such as the nociception or implicit memory require subcortical processing. A reliable and meaningful monitoring of depth of anesthesia should provide assessment of these different processes. Besides the EEG monitoring which gives mainly information on cortical anesthetic effects, it would be relevant to have also a subcortical feedback allowing an assessment of nociception. Several devices have been proposed in this last decade, to give us an idea of the analgesia/nociception balance. Up to now, most of them are based on the assessment of the autonomic response to noxious stimulation. Among the emerging clinical devices, we can mention those which assess vascular sympathetic response (skin conductance), cardiac and vascular sympathetic response (surgical pleth index), parasympathetic cardiac response (analgesia nociception index), and finally the pupillometry which is based on the assessment of the pupillary reflex dilatation induced by nociceptive stimulations. Basically, the skin conductance might be the most adapted to assess the stress in the awake or sedated neonate, while the performances of this method appear disappointing under anesthesia. The surgical pleth index is still poorly investigated in children. The analgesia nociception index showed promising results in adults, which have to be confirmed, especially in children and in infants, and lastly pupillometry, which can be considered as reliable and reactive in children as in adults, but which is still sometimes complicated in its use. PMID:25410376

  2. Factors controlling the final depth of active and failed continental rift zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thybo, H.; Elesin, Y.; Artemieva, I. M.

    2012-12-01

    Rift zones are elongated, narrow tectonic depressions in the Earth's surface which with time become filled with sediments and volcanics. Rifting processes may lead to break-up of continental plates to form new oceanic lithosphere. Subsidence of rift basins is caused by thinning of the crust and lithospheric mantle, together with thermal relaxation and isostatic compensation for the extra load of sediments. It is generally believed that the final depth of rift basins is primarily controlled by the amount of stretching. However, we show that the relative rheological strength of faults inside and outside rift zones exerts substantial control on the volume of the final rift basin (by more than a factor of 3) even for the same amount of extension (total or inside the rift zone). This surprising result is mainly caused by irreversible deepening of the rift graben during stretching due to lower crustal flow when the faults in the rift zone are weak, whereas the effect is negligible for strong faults. Relatively strong faults inside the rift zone lead to substantial stretching of adjacent crust, and we find that long term stretching outside the main rift zone may explain the formation of wide continental margins, which are now below sea level. We also demonstrate that fast syn-rift erosion/sedimentation rates can increase the final volume of rift basins by up to a factor of 1.7 for weak crustal faults, whereas this effect is insignificant for strong faults inside the rift zone. These findings have significant implications for estimation of stretching factors, tectonic forces, and geodynamic evolution of sedimentary basins around failed rift zones.

  3. Examination of the Early Diagnostic Applicability of Active Dynamic Thermography for Burn Wound Depth Assessment and Concept Analysis.

    PubMed

    Prindeze, Nicholas J; Fathi, Payam; Mino, Matthew J; Mauskar, Neil A; Travis, Taryn E; Paul, Dereck W; Moffatt, Lauren T; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in perfusion imaging, burn wound imaging technology continues to lag behind that of other fields. Quantification of blood flow is able to predict time for healing, but clear assessment of burn depth is still questionable. Active dynamic thermography (ADT) is a noncontact imaging modality capable of distinguishing tissue of different thermal conductivities. Utilizing the abnormal heat transfer properties of the burn zones, we examined whether ADT was useful in the determination of burn depth in a model of early burn wound evaluation. Duroc pigs (castrated male; n = 3) were anesthetized, and two burns were created with an aluminum billet at 3 and 12 seconds. These contact times resulted in superficial partial and deep partial thickness burn wounds, respectively. ADT and laser Doppler imaging (LDI) imaging were performed every 30 minutes postburn for a total of five imaging sessions ending 150 minutes postburn. For ADT, imaging excitation was performed for 42-120 seconds with dual quartz-infrared lamps, and subsequent infrared image capture was performed for 300 seconds. MATLAB-assisted image analysis was performed to determine burn zone region of interest thermal relaxation and characteristic patterns. LDI was performed with a moorLDI system, and biopsies were captured for histology following the 150-minute imaging session. Both ADT and LDI imaging modalities are able to detect different physical properties at 30, 60, 90 120, and 150 minutes postburn with statistical significance (P < 0.05). Resultant ADT cooling curves characterize greater differences with greater stimulation and a potentially more identifiable differential cooling characteristic. Histological analysis confirmed burn depth. This preliminary work confirms that ADT can measure burn depth and is deserving of further research either as a stand-alone imaging technology or in combination with a device to assess perfusion. PMID:25412050

  4. Active diagenetic formation of metal-rich layers in N. E. Atlantic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, H. E.; Thomson, J.; Wilson, T. R. S.; Weaver, P. P. E.; Higgs, N. C.; Hydes, D. J.

    1988-06-01

    Sediment cores from the Porcupine Abyssal Plain exhibit an indurated layer 0.5-3 cm thick at depths of approximately 50 cm. This is some 15-20 cm below the glacial/Holocene transition as interpreted by radiocarbon dating and the palaeontological criteria of RUDDIMAN and MCINTYRE (1981). The layer is forming currently at the oxic/post-oxic boundary in the sediments, as revealed by pore water data: O 2 and NO -3 are present in solution above the layer, while Fe 2+, Mn 2+, PO 3-4 and NH +4 are present in solution below, and all these species show concentration gradients indicating fluxes into the layer. These data are consistent with the hypothesis for the initiation and sustained formation of such layers proposed by WILSONet al. (1986a,b). The elements Mn, Ni, Co, Fe, P, V, Cu, Zn and U are all enriched to varying degrees in the vicinity of the layer. Some differential stratification of these elements in the vertical, consistent with a redox control, is observed at one site with a 0.5 cm layer, with Mn, Ni and Co above, Fe, P, V and Cu in the layer, and U below. At another site the metal-rich layer has higher Fe and P concentrations and is more indurated. Here all enrichments except Co are contained within a single layer sample, 3 cm thick.

  5. Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, K. J.; Jeong, T. S.; Youn, C. J.

    2014-09-01

    The temperature-dependent photoresponse characteristics of MnAl2S4 layers have been investigated, for the first time, by use of photocurrent (PC) spectroscopy. Three peaks were observed at all temperatures. The electronic origin of these peaks was associated with band-to-band transitions from the valence-band states Γ4( z), Γ5( x), and Γ5( y) to the conduction-band state Γ1( s). On the basis of the relationship between PC-peak energy and temperature, the optical band gap could be well expressed by the expression E g( T) = E g(0) - 2.80 × 10-4 T 2/(287 + T), where E g(0) was estimated to be 3.7920 eV, 3.7955 eV, and 3.8354 eV for the valence-band states Γ4( z), Γ5( x), and Γ5( y), respectively. Results from PC spectroscopy revealed the crystal-field and spin-orbit splitting were 3.5 meV and 39.9 meV. The gradual decrease of PC intensity with decreasing temperature can be explained on the basis of trapping centers associated with native defects in the MnAl2S4 layers. Plots of log J ph, the PC current density, against 1/ T, revealed a dominant trap level in the high-temperature region. By comparing PC and the Hall effect results, we confirmed that this trap level is a shallow donor 18.9 meV below the conduction band.

  6. Advanced ultrasound activated lockin-thermography for defect selective depth-resolved imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleiter, A.; Riegert, G.; Zweschper, Th.; Degenhardt, R.; Busse, G.

    2006-04-01

    Ultrasound activated Lockin-Thermography ("ultrasound attenuation mapping") is a defect selective NDT-technique. Its main advantage is a high probability of defect detection ("POD") since only defects produce a signal while all other features are suppressed. The mechanism involved is local sound absorption which turns a variably loaded defect into a heat source. Thermographic monitoring of elastic wave attenuation in defects was reported for the first time in 1979 by Henneke and colleagues for continuous and pulsed ultrasound injection. Later, amplitude modulated ultrasound was used to derive frequency coded phase angle images combining defect-selectivity with robustness of measurement. With mono-frequent ultrasound excitation a standing wave pattern might hide defects. With additional modulation of the ultrasound frequency such a misleading pattern can be minimized. Applications related to quality maintenance (aerospace, automotive industry) will be presented in order to illustrate the potential of frequency modulated ultrasound excitation and its applications.

  7. Depth-of-processing effects on semantic activation deficits in schizophrenia: an electrophysiological investigation.

    PubMed

    Kiang, Michael; Christensen, Bruce K; Zipursky, Robert B

    2011-12-01

    N400, an event-related brain potential (ERP) waveform elicited by meaningful stimuli, is normally reduced (made less negative) by relatedness between the eliciting stimulus and preceding ones (N400 semantic priming). Schizophrenia patients' N400 semantic priming deficits suggest impairment in using meaningful context to activate related concepts in semantic memory. We aimed to examine the degree to which this impairment can be ameliorated by task instructions that more explicitly require processing of stimulus meaning. We recorded ERPs from 16 schizophrenia patients and 16 controls who viewed prime words each followed at 750-ms stimulus-onset asynchrony by an unrelated or related target word, or a nonword, in a non-semantic task (indicating whether a letter occurred in the target) compared to an explicit semantic task (judging prime-target relatedness). Consistent with previous work, controls exhibited greater N400 semantic priming (larger amplitude reductions for related versus unrelated targets) in the semantic task than in the orthographic task. Schizophrenia patients showed this same pattern, although their N400 semantic priming effects were smaller than controls' across tasks. Nevertheless, patients' priming effects increased as much as did controls' from the orthographic to the semantic task. Thus, connections among related concepts in schizophrenia patients' semantic memory appear grossly intact, such that, given a meaningful stimulus, they can make use of explicit cues to activate related concepts at a neurophysiological level, although their ability to do so remains less than normal. These data provide support for further research on semantic-cueing strategies for cognitive remediation of verbal memory in schizophrenia.

  8. Grain sorting in the morphological active layer of a braided river physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, P.; Ashmore, P.; Gardner, J. T.

    2015-07-01

    A physical scale model of a gravel-bed braided river was used to measure vertical grain size sorting in the morphological active layer aggregated over the width of the river. This vertical sorting is important for analyzing braided river sedimentology, for numerical modeling of braided river morpho-dynamics and for measuring and predicting bed load transport rate. We define the morphological active layer as the bed material between the maximum and minimum bed elevations at a point over extended time periods sufficient for braiding processes to re-work the river bed. The vertical extent of the active layer was measured using 40 hourly high-resolution DEMs of the model river bed. An image texture algorithm was used to map bed material grain size of each DEM. Analysis of the 40 DEMs and texture maps provides data on the geometry of the morphological active layer and variation in grain size in three-dimensions. Normalizing active layer thickness and dividing into 10 sub-layers we show that all grain sizes occur with almost equal frequency in all sub-layers. Occurrence of patches and strings of coarser (or finer) material relates to preservation of particular morpho-textural features within the active layer. For numerical modeling and bed load prediction a morphological active layer that is fully mixed with respect to grain size is a reliable approximation.

  9. Apparent Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nassar, Antonio B.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses a well-known optical refraction problem where the depth of an object in a liquid is determined. Proposes that many texts incorrectly solve the problem. Provides theory, equations, and diagrams. (MVL)

  10. Soil Active Layer Freeze/Thaw Detection Using Combined L- and P-Band Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Kimball, J. S.; Moghaddam, M.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring of soil active layer freeze-thaw (FT) dynamics is critical for studying high-latitude ecosystem and environmental changes. We evaluated the potential of inferring FT state dynamics within a tundra soil profile using combined L- and P-band radar remote sensing and forward radiative transfer modeling of backscatter characteristics. A first-order two-layer soil scattering model (FTSS) was developed in this study to analyze soil multi-layer scattering effects. The FTSS was evaluated against other sophisticated modeling approaches and showed comparable performance. The FTSS was then applied to analyzing L- and P-band microwave responses to layered soil. We find that soil volume scattering is rather weak for the two frequencies for frozen or dry soil with mean particle size below 10mm diameter. Dielectric contrast between adjacent soil layers can contribute to total backscatter at both L- and P-band with more significant impact on P-band than L-band signals depending on the depth of soil profile. Combined L- and P-band radar data are shown to have greater utility than single channel observations in detecting soil FT dynamics and dielectric profile inhomogeneity. Further analysis using available airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data and in-situ measurements also confirm that soil profile heterogeneity can be effectively detected using combined L- and P-band radar backscatter data. This study demonstrates the potential of lower frequency SARs from airborne missions, including UAV-SAR and AirMOSS, for Arctic and alpine assessment of soil active layer properties.

  11. Layer-by-layer engineered nanocapsules of curcumin with improved cell activity.

    PubMed

    Kittitheeranun, Paveenuch; Sajomsang, Warayuth; Phanpee, Sarunya; Treetong, Alongkot; Wutikhun, Tuksadon; Suktham, Kunat; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong

    2015-08-15

    Nanocarriers based on electrostatic Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of CaCO3 nanoparticles (CaCO3 NPs) was investigated. These inorganic nanoparticles was used as templates to construct nanocapsules made from films based on two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), and poly (sodium 4-styrene-sulfonate sodium salt), followed by core dissolution. The naked CaCO3 NPs, CaCO3 NPs coated with the polyelectrolytes and hollow nanocapsules were found with hexagonal shape with average sizes of 350-400 nm. A reversal of the surface charge between positive to negative zeta potential values was found, confirming the adsorption of polyelectrolytes. The loading efficiency and release of curcumin were controlled by the hydrophobic interactions between the drug and the polyelectrolyte matrix of the hollow nanocapsules. The quantity of curcumin released from hollow nanocapsules was found to increase under acidic environments, which is a desirable for anti-cancer drug delivery. The hollow nanocapsules were found to localize in the cytoplasm and nucleus compartment of Hela cancer cells after 24 h of incubation. Hollow nanocapsules were non-toxic to human fibroblast cells. Furthermore, curcumin loaded hollow nanocapsules exhibited higher in vitro cell inhibition against Hela cells than that of free curcumin, suggesting that polyelectrolyte based-hollow nanocapsules can be utilized as new carriers for drug delivery. PMID:26143232

  12. Silver ions/ovalbumin films layer-by-layer self-assembled polyacrylonitrile nanofibrous mats and their antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Rukun; Yan, Jinjiao; Xu, Shasha; Wang, Yuntao; Ye, Ting; Chang, Jing; Deng, Hongbing; Li, Bin

    2013-08-01

    The CN groups of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) can strongly adsorb silver ions. The possibility of using this attraction as a layer-by-layer (LBL) self-assembly driving force was investigated. Firstly, the surface of the PAN nanofibrous mats was modified by silver ions to make sure it was positively charged. Then oppositely charged ovalbumin (OVA) and silver ions in aqueous media were alternatively deposited onto the surface of the obtained composite mats by layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. The morphology of the LBL films coating mats was observed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The deposition of silver ions and OVA was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD). The thermal degradation properties were investigated by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Besides these, the cytotoxicity and antibacterial activity of the prepared mats were studied via flow cytometry (FCM) and inhibition zone test, respectively. The results showed that the composite mats after LBL self-assembly processing exhibited improved thermal stability, slightly decreased cytotoxicity, and excellent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coil and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:23563300

  13. Study on real-time wear measurement of piston-ring and cylinder-bore in an engine using thin layer activation method.

    PubMed

    Donghui, Huang; Pingsheng, Wang; Weizhi, Tian; Dequan, Zhao; Guangzhou, Cao; Bangfa, Ni; Xiuhua, Zhang; Lin, Li; Guiying, Zhang; Cunxiong, Liu; Dehong, Li

    2008-08-01

    The instantaneous wear rates for both the top compression piston-ring and the cylinder-bore, in a ZS1105 diesel engine, were measured in situ using the method of thin layer activation (TLA). The experimental arrangement and methods for calibrating the test specimens are described. During a 300 s counting interval, the minimum detectable wear depths for the cylinder-bore and piston-ring were 9 and 75 nm, respectively. These values reflect average recession depths and may not reflect localized differences in wear damage. Nevertheless, such in situ techniques can be usefully employed in engine development. PMID:18424051

  14. High temperature microbial activity in upper soil layers.

    PubMed

    Santana, M M; Gonzalez, J M

    2015-11-01

    Biomineralization at high temperatures in upper soil layers has been largely ignored, although desertification and global warming have led to increasing areas of soils exposed to high temperatures. Recent publications evidenced thermophilic bacteria ubiquity in soils as viable cells, and their role in nutrient cycling and seedling development. High temperature events, frequently observed at medium and low latitudes, locate temporal niches for thermophiles to grow in soils. There, at temperatures inhibitory for common mesophiles, thermophilic bacteria could perform biogeochemical reactions important to the soil food web. Nutrient cycling analyses in soils at medium and low latitudes would benefit from considering the potential role of thermophiles.

  15. Comparison of Atmospheric Column Optical Depth Measurements for Urban Reno, NV with Three Different Sun Photometers and In Situ Measurements Combined with Boundary Layer Height Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loria Salazar, S. M.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Sumlin, B.; Karr, D.

    2011-12-01

    Reno, Nevada, USA is located in a mountain valley often characterized by very dry conditions, clear sky and red sunsets during the summer season, with rare incursions of monsoonal moisture. This city is subject to moderately strong nocturnal inversions nearly every day in summer. Urban aerosols, wind blown dust, as well as occasional biomass burning smoke from natural and non-natural fires all contribute to the optical depth. Because of its geographical position, drastic changes in weather conditions and variations in aerosol optical properties make Reno an excellent location for evaluating measurements of aerosol optical depth in order to determine particulate air pollution concentration as well as to provide input for models of atmospheric radiation transfer and evaluation of satellite-based aerosol optical sensing measurements. Aerosol optical depth can be calculated by in situ photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption and reciprocal nephelometer scattering coefficients and estimation of aerosol mixing height. LED-based hand-held sun photometers are commonly used as inexpensive instruments for informal networks. However, the LED emission wavelength maximum and bandwidth are higher and narrower than the LED reception wavelength spectrum, necessitating empirical determination of an equivalent wavelength. The manually operated spectrometer and Cimel sun photometer measurements provide the most accurate and precise column aerosol optical depth. This paper makes a comparison between these four instruments for measurements obtained during the summer and fall seasons in order to study how the total and aerosol optical depth change during dry and moist conditions. Ångström exponents of extinction and absorption are also analyzed to provide insight on aerosol size distribution and composition, respectively.

  16. Grain sorting in the morphological active layer of a braided river physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, P.; Ashmore, P.; Gardner, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    A physical scale model of a gravel-bed braided river was used to measure vertical grain size sorting in the morphological active layer aggregated over the width of the river. This vertical sorting is important for analyzing braided river sedimentology, for numerical modeling of braided river morphodynamics, and for measuring and predicting bedload transport rate. We define the morphological active layer as the bed material between the maximum and minimum bed elevations at a point over extended time periods sufficient for braiding processes to rework the river bed. The vertical extent of the active layer was measured using 40 hourly high-resolution DEMs (digital elevation models) of the model river bed. An image texture algorithm was used to map bed material grain size of each DEM. Analysis of the 40 DEMs and texture maps provides data on the geometry of the morphological active layer and variation in grain size in three dimensions. By normalizing active layer thickness and dividing into 10 sublayers, we show that all grain sizes occur with almost equal frequency in all sublayers. Occurrence of patches and strings of coarser (or finer) material relates to preservation of particular morpho-textural features within the active layer. For numerical modeling and bedload prediction, a morphological active layer that is fully mixed with respect to grain size is a reliable approximation.

  17. Application of Satellite SAR Imagery in Mapping the Active Layer of Arctic Permafrost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ting-Jun; Li, Shu-Sun

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project is to map the spatial variation of the active layer over the arctic permafrost in terms of two parameters: (i) timing and duration of thaw period and (ii) differential frost heave and thaw settlement of the active layer. To achieve this goal, remote sensing, numerical modeling, and related field measurements are required. Tasks for the University of Colorado team are to: (i) determine the timing of snow disappearance in spring through changes in surface albedo (ii) simulate the freezing and thawing processes of the active layer and (iii) simulate the impact of snow cover on permafrost presence.

  18. Measuring the depth profiles of strain/composition in AlGaN-graded layer by high-resolution x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchuk, A. V.; Stanchu, H. V.; Kladko, V. P.; Belyaev, A. E.; Li, Chen; Ware, M. E.; Mazur, Yu. I.; Salamo, G. J.

    2014-12-14

    Here, we demonstrate X-ray fitting through kinematical simulations of the intensity profiles of symmetric reflections for epitaxial compositionally graded layers of AlGaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy pseudomorphically on [0001]-oriented GaN substrates. These detailed simulations depict obvious differences between changes in thickness, maximum concentration, and concentration profile of the graded layers. Through comparison of these simulations with as-grown samples, we can reliably determine these parameters, most important of which are the profiles of the concentration and strain which determine much of the electrical properties of the film. In addition to learning about these parameters for the characterization of thin film properties, these fitting techniques create opportunities to calibrate growth rates and control composition profiles of AlGaN layers with a single growth rather than multiple growths as has been done traditionally.

  19. Orexin-dependent activation of layer VIb enhances cortical network activity and integration of non-specific thalamocortical inputs.

    PubMed

    Hay, Y Audrey; Andjelic, Sofija; Badr, Sammy; Lambolez, Bertrand

    2015-11-01

    Neocortical layer VI is critically involved in thalamocortical activity changes during the sleep/wake cycle. It receives dense projections from thalamic nuclei sensitive to the wake-promoting neuropeptides orexins, and its deepest part, layer VIb, is the only cortical lamina reactive to orexins. This convergence of wake-promoting inputs prompted us to investigate how layer VIb can modulate cortical arousal, using patch-clamp recordings and optogenetics in rat brain slices. We found that the majority of layer VIb neurons were excited by nicotinic agonists and orexin through the activation of nicotinic receptors containing α4-α5-β2 subunits and OX2 receptor, respectively. Specific effects of orexin on layer VIb neurons were potentiated by low nicotine concentrations and we used this paradigm to explore their intracortical projections. Co-application of nicotine and orexin increased the frequency of excitatory post-synaptic currents in the ipsilateral cortex, with maximal effect in infragranular layers and minimal effect in layer IV, as well as in the contralateral cortex. The ability of layer VIb to relay thalamocortical inputs was tested using photostimulation of channelrhodopsin-expressing fibers from the orexin-sensitive rhomboid nucleus in the parietal cortex. Photostimulation induced robust excitatory currents in layer VIa neurons that were not pre-synaptically modulated by orexin, but exhibited a delayed, orexin-dependent, component. Activation of layer VIb by orexin enhanced the reliability and spike-timing precision of layer VIa responses to rhomboid inputs. These results indicate that layer VIb acts as an orexin-gated excitatory feedforward loop that potentiates thalamocortical arousal.

  20. Urban Geocryology: Mapping Urban-Rural Contrasts in Active-Layer Thickness, Barrow Penninsula, Northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klene, A. E.; Nelson, F. E.

    2014-12-01

    As development proceeds in the high latitudes, information about interactions between urban influences and the thickness of the active layer above permafrost becomes vital, particularly given the possibility of increasing temperatures accompanying climate change. Permafrost characteristics are often mapped at small geographical scales (i.e., over large areas), at low resolution, and without extensive field validation. Although maps of active-layer thickness (ALT) have been created for areas of relatively undisturbed terrain, this has rarely been done within urbanized areas, even though ALT is a critical factor in the design of roads, buildings, pipelines, and other elements of infrastructure. The need for detailed maps of ALT is emphasized in work on potential hazards in permafrost regions associated with global warming scenarios. Northern Alaska is a region considered to be at moderate to high risk for thaw-induced damage under climatic warming. The Native Village of Barrow (71°17'44"N; 156°45' 59"W), the economic, transportation, and administrative hub of the North Slope Borough, is the northernmost community in the USA, and the largest native settlement in the circum-Arctic. A winter urban heat island in Barrow, earlier snowmelt in the village, and dust deposition downwind of gravel pads and roads are all urban effects that could increase ALT. A recent empirical study documented a 17 to 41 cm difference in ALT between locations in the village of Barrow and surrounding undeveloped tundra, even in similar land-cover classes. We mapped ALT in the Barrow Peninsula, with particular attention to contrasts between the urbanized village and relatively undisturbed tundra in the nearby Barrow Environmental Observatory. The modified Berggren solution, an advanced analytic solution to the general Stefan problem of calculating frost and thaw depth, was used in a geographic context to map ALT over the 150 km² area investigated in the Barrow Urban Heat Island Study. The

  1. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; Vladimir Romanovsky; William Cable

    2014-11-06

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  2. The Role of Organic Capping Layers of Platinum Nanoparticles in Catalytic Activity of CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong Y.; Aliaga, Cesar; Renzas, J. Russell; Lee, Hyunjoo; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-12-17

    We report the catalytic activity of colloid platinum nanoparticles synthesized with different organic capping layers. On the molecular scale, the porous organic layers have open spaces that permit the reactant and product molecules to reach the metal surface. We carried out CO oxidation on several platinum nanoparticle systems capped with various organic molecules to investigate the role of the capping agent on catalytic activity. Platinum colloid nanoparticles with four types of capping layer have been used: TTAB (Tetradecyltrimethylammonium Bromide), HDA (hexadecylamine), HDT (hexadecylthiol), and PVP (poly(vinylpyrrolidone)). The reactivity of the Pt nanoparticles varied by 30%, with higher activity on TTAB coated nanoparticles and lower activity on HDT, while the activation energy remained between 27-28 kcal/mol. In separate experiments, the organic capping layers were partially removed using ultraviolet light-ozone generation techniques, which resulted in increased catalytic activity due to the removal of some of the organic layers. These results indicate that the nature of chemical bonding between organic capping layers and nanoparticle surfaces plays a role in determining the catalytic activity of platinum colloid nanoparticles for carbon monoxide oxidation.

  3. Application of Satellite SAR Imagery in Mapping the Active Layer of Arctic Permafrost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Shu-Sun; Romanovsky, V.; Lovick, Joe; Wang, Z.; Peterson, Rorik

    2003-01-01

    A method of mapping the active layer of Arctic permafrost using a combination of conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter and more sophisticated interferometric SAR (INSAR) techniques is proposed. The proposed research is based on the sensitivity of radar backscatter to the freeze and thaw status of the surface soil, and the sensitivity of INSAR techniques to centimeter- to sub-centimeter-level surface differential deformation. The former capability of SAR is investigated for deriving the timing and duration of the thaw period for surface soil of the active layer over permafrost. The latter is investigated for the feasibility of quantitative measurement of frost heaving and thaw settlement of the active layer during the freezing and thawing processes. The resulting knowledge contributes to remote sensing mapping of the active layer dynamics and Arctic land surface hydrology.

  4. Considerations for site-specific implementation of active downforce and seeding depth technologies on row-crop planters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Planter technology continues to rapidly advance including row-by-row control of parameters such as applied downforce and seeding depth that permit real-time adjustment to varying field conditions. The objective of this research was to investigate the relationship of seeding depth and applied downfo...

  5. Improving ice nucleation activity of zein film through layer-by-layer deposition of extracellular ice nucleators.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ke; Yu, Hailong; Lee, Tung-Ching; Huang, Qingrong

    2013-11-13

    Zein protein has been of scientific interest in the development of biodegradable functional food packaging. This study aimed at developing a novel zein-based biopolymer film with ice nucleation activity through layer-by-layer deposition of biogenic ice nucleators, that is, extracellular ice nucleators (ECINs) isolated from Erwinia herbicola , onto zein film surface. The adsorption behaviors and mechanisms were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). On unmodified zein surface, the highest ECINs adsorption occurred at pH 5.0; on UV/ozone treated zein surface followed by deposition of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) layer, the optimum condition for ECINs adsorption occurred at pH 7.0 and I 0.05 M, where the amount of ECINs adsorbed was also higher than that on unmodified zein surface. QCM-D analyses further revealed a two-step adsorption process on unmodified zein surfaces, compared to a one-step adsorption process on PDADMAC-modified zein surface. Also, significantly, in order to quantify the ice nucleation activity of ECINs-coated zein films, an empirical method was developed to correlate the number of ice nucleators with the ice nucleation temperature measured by differential scanning calorimetry. Calculated using this empirical method, the highest ice nucleation activity of ECINs on ECINs-modified zein film reached 64.1 units/mm(2), which was able to elevate the ice nucleation temperature of distilled water from -15.5 °C to -7.3 °C.

  6. Gender and Health Lifestyle: An In-Depth Exploration of Self-Care Activities in Later Life

    PubMed Central

    Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Stoller, Eleanor P.; Brewer-Lowry, A. Nichol; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evaluate similarities and differences in the self-care domain of health lifestyle among older, rural dwelling women and men. Method Qualitative analysis of in-depth interview data from 62 community-dwelling older (M = 74.3 years) African and European American women and men. Results Both older women and men rely heavily on over-the-counter (OTC) medications and home remedies self-care; professional health care is typically sought when self-care is not effective. However, relative to men, women were more knowledgeable about different approaches to self-care, especially home remedies, they used a wider range of self-care activities, and they placed greater priority on self-care over professional health care. Discussion The structure of older women’s and men’s self-care domain of health lifestyle is similar. However, there are subtle differences in health lifestyle that are likely embedded in gendered role behavior and may contribute to women’s greater health complaints. PMID:21632439

  7. Activity of lactoperoxidase when adsorbed on protein layers.

    PubMed

    Haberska, Karolina; Svensson, Olof; Shleev, Sergey; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2008-09-15

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is an enzyme, which is used as an antimicrobial agent in a number of applications, e.g., food technology. In the majority of applications LPO is added to a homogeneous product phase or immobilised on product surface. In the latter case, however, the measurements of LPO activity are seldom reported. In this paper we have assessed LPO enzymatic activity on bare and protein modified gold surfaces by means of electrochemistry. It was found that LPO rapidly adsorbs to bare gold surfaces resulting in an amount of LPO adsorbed of 2.9mg/m(2). A lower amount of adsorbed LPO is obtained if the gold surface is exposed to bovine serum albumin, bovine or human mucin prior to LPO adsorption. The enzymatic activity of the adsorbed enzyme is in general preserved at the experimental conditions and varies only moderately when comparing bare gold and gold surface pretreated with the selected proteins. The measurement of LPO specific activity, however, indicate that it is about 1.5 times higher if LPO is adsorbed on gold surfaces containing a small amount of preadsorbed mucin in comparison to the LPO directly adsorbed on bare gold.

  8. Crystallinity Modulation of Layered Carbon Nitride for Enhanced Photocatalytic Activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhai; Shen, Yanfei; Li, Ying; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2016-08-22

    As an emerging metal-free semiconductor, covalently bonded carbon nitride (CN) has attracted much attention in photocatalysis. However, drawbacks such as a high recombination rate of excited electrons and holes hinder its potential applications. Tailoring the crystallinity of semiconductors is an important way to suppress unwanted charge recombination, but has rarely been applied to CN so far. Herein, a simple method to synthesize CN of high crystallinity by protonation of specific intermediate species during conventional polymerization is reported. Interestingly, the as-obtained CN exhibited improved photocatalytic activities of up to seven times those of the conventional bulk CN. This approach, with only a slight change to the conventional method, provides a facile way to effectively regulate the crystallinity of bulk CN to improve its photocatalytic activities and sheds light on large-scale industrial applications of CN with high efficiency for sustainable energy. PMID:27436164

  9. Crystallinity Modulation of Layered Carbon Nitride for Enhanced Photocatalytic Activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhai; Shen, Yanfei; Li, Ying; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2016-08-22

    As an emerging metal-free semiconductor, covalently bonded carbon nitride (CN) has attracted much attention in photocatalysis. However, drawbacks such as a high recombination rate of excited electrons and holes hinder its potential applications. Tailoring the crystallinity of semiconductors is an important way to suppress unwanted charge recombination, but has rarely been applied to CN so far. Herein, a simple method to synthesize CN of high crystallinity by protonation of specific intermediate species during conventional polymerization is reported. Interestingly, the as-obtained CN exhibited improved photocatalytic activities of up to seven times those of the conventional bulk CN. This approach, with only a slight change to the conventional method, provides a facile way to effectively regulate the crystallinity of bulk CN to improve its photocatalytic activities and sheds light on large-scale industrial applications of CN with high efficiency for sustainable energy.

  10. The influence of vegetation and soil characteristics on active-layer thickness of permafrost soils in boreal forest.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James P; Estop-Aragonés, Cristian; Thierry, Aaron; Charman, Dan J; Wolfe, Stephen A; Hartley, Iain P; Murton, Julian B; Williams, Mathew; Phoenix, Gareth K

    2016-09-01

    Carbon release from thawing permafrost soils could significantly exacerbate global warming as the active-layer deepens, exposing more carbon to decay. Plant community and soil properties provide a major control on this by influencing the maximum depth of thaw each summer (active-layer thickness; ALT), but a quantitative understanding of the relative importance of plant and soil characteristics, and their interactions in determine ALTs, is currently lacking. To address this, we undertook an extensive survey of multiple vegetation and edaphic characteristics and ALTs across multiple plots in four field sites within boreal forest in the discontinuous permafrost zone (NWT, Canada). Our sites included mature black spruce, burned black spruce and paper birch, allowing us to determine vegetation and edaphic drivers that emerge as the most important and broadly applicable across these key vegetation and disturbance gradients, as well as providing insight into site-specific differences. Across sites, the most important vegetation characteristics limiting thaw (shallower ALTs) were tree leaf area index (LAI), moss layer thickness and understory LAI in that order. Thicker soil organic layers also reduced ALTs, though were less influential than moss thickness. Surface moisture (0-6 cm) promoted increased ALTs, whereas deeper soil moisture (11-16 cm) acted to modify the impact of the vegetation, in particular increasing the importance of understory or tree canopy shading in reducing thaw. These direct and indirect effects of moisture indicate that future changes in precipitation and evapotranspiration may have large influences on ALTs. Our work also suggests that forest fires cause greater ALTs by simultaneously decreasing multiple ecosystem characteristics which otherwise protect permafrost. Given that vegetation and edaphic characteristics have such clear and large influences on ALTs, our data provide a key benchmark against which to evaluate process models used to predict

  11. The influence of vegetation and soil characteristics on active-layer thickness of permafrost soils in boreal forest.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James P; Estop-Aragonés, Cristian; Thierry, Aaron; Charman, Dan J; Wolfe, Stephen A; Hartley, Iain P; Murton, Julian B; Williams, Mathew; Phoenix, Gareth K

    2016-09-01

    Carbon release from thawing permafrost soils could significantly exacerbate global warming as the active-layer deepens, exposing more carbon to decay. Plant community and soil properties provide a major control on this by influencing the maximum depth of thaw each summer (active-layer thickness; ALT), but a quantitative understanding of the relative importance of plant and soil characteristics, and their interactions in determine ALTs, is currently lacking. To address this, we undertook an extensive survey of multiple vegetation and edaphic characteristics and ALTs across multiple plots in four field sites within boreal forest in the discontinuous permafrost zone (NWT, Canada). Our sites included mature black spruce, burned black spruce and paper birch, allowing us to determine vegetation and edaphic drivers that emerge as the most important and broadly applicable across these key vegetation and disturbance gradients, as well as providing insight into site-specific differences. Across sites, the most important vegetation characteristics limiting thaw (shallower ALTs) were tree leaf area index (LAI), moss layer thickness and understory LAI in that order. Thicker soil organic layers also reduced ALTs, though were less influential than moss thickness. Surface moisture (0-6 cm) promoted increased ALTs, whereas deeper soil moisture (11-16 cm) acted to modify the impact of the vegetation, in particular increasing the importance of understory or tree canopy shading in reducing thaw. These direct and indirect effects of moisture indicate that future changes in precipitation and evapotranspiration may have large influences on ALTs. Our work also suggests that forest fires cause greater ALTs by simultaneously decreasing multiple ecosystem characteristics which otherwise protect permafrost. Given that vegetation and edaphic characteristics have such clear and large influences on ALTs, our data provide a key benchmark against which to evaluate process models used to predict

  12. Effect of in-water oxygen prebreathing at different depths on decompression-induced bubble formation and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Gerardo; Yang, Zhong-jin; Di Tano, Guglielmo; Camporesi, Enrico M; Faralli, Fabio; Savini, Fabio; Landolfi, Angelo; Doria, Christian; Fanò, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    Effect of in-water oxygen prebreathing at different depths on decompression-induced bubble formation and platelet activation in scuba divers was evaluated. Six volunteers participated in four diving protocols, with 2 wk of recovery between dives. On dive 1, before diving, all divers breathed normally for 20 min at the surface of the sea (Air). On dive 2, before diving, all divers breathed 100% oxygen for 20 min at the surface of the sea [normobaric oxygenation (NBO)]. On dive 3, before diving, all divers breathed 100% O2 for 20 min at 6 m of seawater [msw; hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) 1.6 atmospheres absolute (ATA)]. On dive 4, before diving, all divers breathed 100% O2 for 20 min at 12 msw (HBO 2.2 ATA). Then they dove to 30 msw (4 ATA) for 20 min breathing air from scuba. After each dive, blood samples were collected as soon as the divers surfaced. Bubbles were measured at 20 and 50 min after decompression and converted to bubble count estimate (BCE) and numeric bubble grade (NBG). BCE and NBG were significantly lower in NBO than in Air [0.142+/-0.034 vs. 0.191+/-0.066 (P<0.05) and 1.61+/-0.25 vs. 1.89+/-0.31 (P<0.05), respectively] at 20 min, but not at 50 min. HBO at 1.6 ATA and 2.2 ATA has a similar significant effect of reducing BCE and NBG. BCE was 0.067+/-0.026 and 0.040+/-0.018 at 20 min and 0.030+/-0.022 and 0.020+/-0.020 at 50 min. NBG was 1.11+/-0.17 and 0.92+/-0.16 at 20 min and 0.83+/-0.18 and 0.75+/-0.16 at 50 min. Prebreathing NBO and HBO significantly alleviated decompression-induced platelet activation. Activation of CD62p was 3.0+/-0.4, 13.5+/-1.3, 10.7+/-0.9, 4.5+/-0.7, and 7.6+/-0.8% for baseline, Air, NBO, HBO at 1.6 ATA, and HBO at 2.2 ATA, respectively. The data show that prebreathing oxygen, more effective with HBO than NBO, decreases air bubbles and platelet activation and, therefore, may be beneficial in reducing the development of decompression sickness.

  13. Contribution of S-Layer Proteins to the Mosquitocidal Activity of Lysinibacillus sphaericus

    PubMed Central

    Allievi, Mariana Claudia; Palomino, María Mercedes; Prado Acosta, Mariano; Lanati, Leonardo; Ruzal, Sandra Mónica; Sánchez-Rivas, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus strains belonging the antigenic group H5a5b produce spores with larvicidal activity against larvae of Culex mosquitoes. C7, a new isolated strain, which presents similar biochemical characteristics and Bin toxins in their spores as the reference strain 2362, was, however, more active against larvae of Culex mosquitoes. The contribution of the surface layer protein (S-layer) to this behaviour was envisaged since this envelope protein has been implicated in the pathogenicity of several bacilli, and we had previously reported its association to spores. Microscopic observation by immunofluorescence detection with anti S-layer antibody in the spores confirms their attachment. S-layers and BinA and BinB toxins formed high molecular weight multimers in spores as shown by SDS-PAGE and western blot detection. Purified S-layer from both L. sphaericus C7 and 2362 strain cultures was by itself toxic against Culex sp larvae, however, that from C7 strain was also toxic against Aedes aegypti. Synergistic effect between purified S-layer and spore-crystal preparations was observed against Culex sp. and Aedes aegypti larvae. This effect was more evident with the C7 strain. In silico analyses of the S-layer sequence suggest the presence of chitin-binding and hemolytic domains. Both biochemical characteristics were detected for both S-layers strains that must justify their contribution to pathogenicity. PMID:25354162

  14. The limited depth range of a metallic-Fe-bearing layer in the lower mantle and its implications for partial melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, J.; Karato, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Partial melting in (most of) the lower mantle occurs only by the presence of volatile elements such as hydrogen (and/or carbon). The experimental studies by [Kawamoto, 2004] showed that partial melting is possible even at temperature of 1673 K in the shallow lower mantle if there is sufficient water. However, if metallic Fe is present in the lower mantle as suggested by [Frost et al., 2004]). most of hydrogen will be dissolved in metallic Fe, and thus melting will be prevented, making it difficult to explain a seismic velocity drop in the shallow lower mantle [Schmandt et al., 2014]. In this study we conducted high pressure experiments using the Rotational Drickamer Apparatus (RDA), on bridgmanite (Mg,Fe)SiO3 + (Mg,Fe)O mixture at pressure up to 23-29 GPa and temperature of about 2000-2200K. Using the advantage of the new RDA cell design which provide a larger pressure gradient (~6 GPa across the sample), we report experimental observations showing that metallic Fe is formed only in the low pressure conditions, 24-26.5 GPa (corresponding to the depth range of 660-730 km), leaving the shallow lower mantle minerals "dry". Our results are also consistent with the published results by [Irifune et al., 2010; Sinmyo and Hirose, 2013] where they did not find any metallic Fe above 27 GPa. Therefore we conclude that metallic Fe is present only in the narrow depth range in the lower mantle. In such a case partial melt would be impossible and only occur at depth greater than 730 km. Our results explain why a velocity drop is observed at ~730 km not at 660 km [Schmandt et al., 2014]. The present results also have important implications for other geochemical issues including the behaviors of siderohpile elements during core formation. Frost, D. J., et al., (2004), Nature, 428, 409-412. Irifune, T., et al., (2010), Science, 327, 193-195. Kawamoto, T. (2004), Physics of Earth and Planetary Interiors, 143/144, 387-395. Schmandt, B., et al., (2014), Science, 344(6189), 1265

  15. Oxygen depth profiling with subnanometre depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmata, Marcel; Munnik, Frans; Hanf, Daniel; Grötzschel, Rainer; Crocoll, Sonja; Möller, Wolfhard

    2014-10-01

    A High-depth Resolution Elastic Recoil Detection (HR-ERD) set-up using a magnetic spectrometer has been taken into operation at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf for the first time. This instrument allows the investigation of light elements in ultra-thin layers and their interfaces with a depth resolution of less than 1 nm near the surface. As the depth resolution is highly influenced by the experimental measurement parameters, sophisticated optimisation procedures have been implemented. Effects of surface roughness and sample damage caused by high fluences need to be quantified for each kind of material. Also corrections are essential for non-equilibrium charge state distributions that exist very close to the surface. Using the example of a high-k multilayer SiO2/Si3N4Ox/SiO2/Si it is demonstrated that oxygen in ultra-thin films of a few nanometres thickness can be investigated by HR-ERD.

  16. Audio-visual interactions for motion perception in depth modulate activity in visual area V3A.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Akitoshi; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2013-05-01

    Multisensory signals can enhance the spatial perception of objects and events in the environment. Changes of visual size and auditory intensity provide us with the main cues about motion direction in depth. However, frequency changes in audition and binocular disparity in vision also contribute to the perception of motion in depth. Here, we presented subjects with several combinations of auditory and visual depth-cues to investigate multisensory interactions during processing of motion in depth. The task was to discriminate the direction of auditory motion in depth according to increasing or decreasing intensity. Rising or falling auditory frequency provided an additional within-audition cue that matched or did not match the intensity change (i.e. intensity-frequency (IF) "matched vs. unmatched" conditions). In two-thirds of the trials, a task-irrelevant visual stimulus moved either in the same or opposite direction of the auditory target, leading to audio-visual "congruent vs. incongruent" between-modalities depth-cues. Furthermore, these conditions were presented either with or without binocular disparity. Behavioral data showed that the best performance was observed in the audio-visual congruent condition with IF matched. Brain imaging results revealed maximal response in visual area V3A when all cues provided congruent and reliable depth information (i.e. audio-visual congruent, IF-matched condition including disparity cues). Analyses of effective connectivity revealed increased coupling from auditory cortex to V3A specifically in audio-visual congruent trials. We conclude that within- and between-modalities cues jointly contribute to the processing of motion direction in depth, and that they do so via dynamic changes of connectivity between visual and auditory cortices.

  17. Nanofibrous mats layer-by-layer assembled by HTCC/layered silicate composites with in vitro antitumor activity against SMMC-7721 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Zhou, Xue; Liu, Xinqin; Zhang, Qi; Jin, Huan'guang; Shi, Xiaowen; Luo, Wenjing; Deng, Hongbing

    2014-03-01

    Organic rectorite (OREC) was used to prepare the intercalated nanocomposites with N-(2-hydroxyl) propyl-3-trimethyl ammonium chitosan chloride (HTCC), and then the immobilization of the positively charged HTCC-OREC nanocomposites and the negatively charged sodium alginate (ALG) on cellulose nanofibrous mats was performed through layer-by-layer (LBL) technique. Fiber diameter distribution results from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) images showed that the average fiber diameter of (HTCC-OREC/ALG)(n) films coating obviously increased from 433 to 608 nm. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results further confirmed the interaction between HTCC and OREC and their successful immobilization on cellulose template. MTT assay indicated that the prepared nanofibrous mats exhibited strong inhibitory activity against human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (SMMC-7721) but a little cytotoxic effect on human Chang liver (CCL-13) cells. Furthermore, the experimental results from FE-SEM and Inverted Fluorescence Microscope of SMMC-7721 cells cultured on LBL structured nanofibrous mats demonstrated the significant antitumor activity of prepared samples. The developed approach to immobilize nanocomposites onto polymer nanofibers with controllable thickness may also be utilized to tumor therapy. PMID:24730244

  18. Permafrost and Active Layer Monitoring in the Maritime Antarctic: A Contribution to TSP and ANTPAS projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, G.; Ramos, M.; Batista, V.; Caselli, A.; Correia, A.; Fragoso, M.; Gruber, S.; Hauck, C.; Kenderova, R.; Lopez-Martinez, J.; Melo, R.; Mendes-Victor, L. A.; Miranda, P.; Mora, C.; Neves, M.; Pimpirev, C.; Rocha, M.; Santos, F.; Blanco, J. J.; Serrano, E.; Trigo, I.; Tome, D.; Trindade, A.

    2008-12-01

    Permafrost and active layer monitoring in the Maritime Antarctic (PERMANTAR) is a Portuguese funded International Project that, in cooperation with the Spanish project PERMAMODEL, will assure the installation and the maintenance of a network of boreholes and active layer monitoring sites, in order to characterize the spatial distribution of the physical and thermal properties of permafrost, as well as the periglacial processes in Livingston and Deception Islands (South Shetlands). The project is part of the International Permafrost Association IPY projects Thermal State of Permafrost (TSP) and Antarctic and Sub-Antarctic Permafrost, Soils and Periglacial Environments (ANTPAS). It contributes to GTN-P and CALM-S networks. The PERMANTAR-PERMAMODEL permafrost and active layer monitoring network includes several boreholes: Reina Sofia hill (since 2000, 1.1m), Incinerador (2000, 2.3m), Ohridski 1 (2008, 5m), Ohridski 2 (2008, 6m), Gulbenkian-Permamodel 1 (2008, 25m) and Gulbenkian- Permamodel 2 (2008, 15m). For active layer monitoring, several CALM-S sites have been installed: Crater Lake (2006), Collado Ramos (2007), Reina Sofia (2007) and Ohridski (2007). The monitoring activities are accompanied by detailed geomorphological mapping in order to identify and map the geomorphic processes related to permafrost or active layer dynamics. Sites will be installed in early 2009 for monitoring rates of geomorphological activity in relation to climate change (e.g. solifluction, rockglaciers, thermokarst). In order to analyse the spatial distribution of permafrost and its ice content, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and seismic refraction surveys have been performed and, in early 2009, continuous ERT surveying instrumentation will be installed for monitoring active layer evolution. The paper presents a synthesis of the activities, as well as the results obtained up to the present, mainly relating to ground temperature monitoring and from permafrost characteristics and

  19. Layer-by-layer carbon nanotube bio-templates for in situ monitoring of the metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Ho, Genevieve; Lynch, Jerome P.; Love, Nancy G.

    2009-03-01

    Despite the wide variety of effective disinfection and wastewater treatment techniques for removing organic and inorganic wastes, pollutants such as nitrogen remain in wastewater effluents. If left untreated, these nitrogenous wastes can adversely impact the environment by promoting the overgrowth of aquatic plants, depleting dissolved oxygen, and causing eutrophication. Although nitrification/denitrification processes are employed during advanced wastewater treatment, effective and efficient operation of these facilities require information of the pH, dissolved oxygen content, among many other parameters, of the wastewater effluent. In this preliminary study, a biocompatible CNT-based nanocomposite is proposed and validated for monitoring the biological metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria in wastewater effluent environments (i.e., to monitor the nitrification process). Using carbon nanotubes and a pH-sensitive conductive polymer (i.e., poly(aniline) emeraldine base), a layer-by-layer fabrication technique is employed to fabricate a novel thin film pH sensor that changes its electrical properties in response to variations in ambient pH environments. Laboratory studies are conducted to evaluate the proposed nanocomposite's biocompatibility with wastewater effluent environments and its pH sensing performance.

  20. Rapid electrostatics-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Askar, Khalid; Leo, Sin-Yen; Xu, Can; Liu, Danielle; Jiang, Peng

    2016-11-15

    Here we report a rapid and scalable bottom-up technique for layer-by-layer (LBL) assembling near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals consisting of large (⩾1μm) silica microspheres. By combining a new electrostatics-assisted colloidal transferring approach with spontaneous colloidal crystallization at an air/water interface, we have demonstrated that the crystal transfer speed of traditional Langmuir-Blodgett-based colloidal assembly technologies can be enhanced by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. Importantly, the crystalline quality of the resultant photonic crystals is not compromised by this rapid colloidal assembly approach. They exhibit thickness-dependent near-infrared stop bands and well-defined Fabry-Perot fringes in the specular transmission and reflection spectra, which match well with the theoretical calculations using a scalar-wave approximation model and Fabry-Perot analysis. This simple yet scalable bottom-up technology can significantly improve the throughput in assembling large-area, multilayer colloidal crystals, which are of great technological importance in a variety of optical and non-optical applications ranging from all-optical integrated circuits to tissue engineering. PMID:27494632

  1. Transfection activity of layer-by-layer plasmid DNA/poly(ethylenimine) films deposited on PLGA microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kakade, Sandeep; Manickam, Devika Soundara; Handa, Hitesh; Mao, Guangzhao; Oupický, David

    2009-01-01

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of DNA and polycations on the surface of colloidal templates can be used for gene delivery. Plasmid DNA encoding for secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) was used to deposit LbL films with poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) on the surface of polystyrene and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles. The formation of LBL films was confirmed by zeta potential analysis and fluorescence and atomic force microscopy techniques. The LbL particles were rapidly internalized in a dose-dependent manner by J774.1 murine macrophages. Transfection activity of the LbL particles was evaluated in J774.1 cells using three different doses (5, 10, 25 particle per cell). The levels of SEAP expression increased with increasing dose but were lower than transfection levels mediated by control PEI/DNA polyplexes at corresponding DNA doses. The LbL particles reported here present a promising platform for delivery of DNA to phagocytic cells. PMID:18786622

  2. Rapid electrostatics-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Askar, Khalid; Leo, Sin-Yen; Xu, Can; Liu, Danielle; Jiang, Peng

    2016-11-15

    Here we report a rapid and scalable bottom-up technique for layer-by-layer (LBL) assembling near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals consisting of large (⩾1μm) silica microspheres. By combining a new electrostatics-assisted colloidal transferring approach with spontaneous colloidal crystallization at an air/water interface, we have demonstrated that the crystal transfer speed of traditional Langmuir-Blodgett-based colloidal assembly technologies can be enhanced by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. Importantly, the crystalline quality of the resultant photonic crystals is not compromised by this rapid colloidal assembly approach. They exhibit thickness-dependent near-infrared stop bands and well-defined Fabry-Perot fringes in the specular transmission and reflection spectra, which match well with the theoretical calculations using a scalar-wave approximation model and Fabry-Perot analysis. This simple yet scalable bottom-up technology can significantly improve the throughput in assembling large-area, multilayer colloidal crystals, which are of great technological importance in a variety of optical and non-optical applications ranging from all-optical integrated circuits to tissue engineering.

  3. Carbon nanotubes supported cerium dioxide and platinum nanohybrids: Layer-by-layer synthesis and enhanced electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xinyuan; Chen, Jiayi; Wang, Mengdi; Gu, Jialei; Wu, Ping; Sun, Dongmei; Tang, Yawen

    2015-08-01

    We successfully synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported cerium dioxide and platinum (Pt/CeO2/CNTs) nanohybrids via layer-by-layer assembly. The composition, morphology and structure of the as-prepared Pt/CeO2/CNTs nanohybrids are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). By comparison of the electrocatalytic properties of the Pt/CeO2/CNTs with the Pt/CNTs, we systematically investigate the promotion effect of CeO2 on the Pt/CeO2/CNTs catalysts towards methanol oxidation. It is found that the introduction of CeO2 not only enhances the electrocatalytic activity and stability of the Pt/CeO2/CNTs catalyst for methanol oxidation but also minimizes the CO poisoning, probably accounting for the good oxygen carrying capacity of CeO2 and its high stability in acidic solution.

  4. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Rosikhin, Ahmad Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2015-12-29

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO{sub 2} in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO{sub 2} layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  5. Active depth-locking handheld micro-injector based on common-path swept source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Gyeong-Woo; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a handheld micro-injector system using common-path swept source optical coherence tomography (CP-SSOCT) as a distal sensor with highly accurate injection-depth-locking. To achieve real-time, highly precise, and intuitive freehand control, the system used graphics processing unit (GPU) to process the oversampled OCT signal with high throughput and a smart customized motion monitoring control algorithm. A performance evaluation was conducted with 60-insertions and fluorescein dye injection tests to show how accurately the system can guide the needle and lock to the target depth. The evaluation tests show our system can guide the injection needle into the desired depth with 4.12μm average deviation error while injecting 50nƖ of fluorescein dye.

  6. Permafrost distribution and active layer thickness in the Aksu catchment, Central Tian Shan (P.R. China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbery, S.; Gao, Q.; Sun, Z.; Duishonakunov, M.; King, L.

    2012-04-01

    Climate change actually leads to an accelerated ablation and retreat of high mountain glaciers in most parts of the world, and to a runoff increase of the related rivers in the short to middle term. Whereas this is a well-known fact, the additional runoff supplied by slowly melting ground-ice and perennial snow fields is almost unknown. However, this periglacial contribution is significant in extremely arid mountain areas as e.g. the Central Tian Shan. Here, the rivers form the vital source for the development of the Taklamakan basin, rich in natural resources, and strongly suffering from water shortage. Main scientific tasks in our subproject hence include an improvement of knowledge on permafrost distribution and active layer thickness, and their role for water discharge in the Aksu catchment. A dense network of 46 high resolution thermistor strings and mini data loggers were installed in the Gukur catchment (130 km2), a tributary of the Aksu river. Hourly temperatures are recorded at the ground surface and at various depths of up to 150 cm. First results indicate that the depth of the active layer and the propagation of the diurnal temperature signal depend - besides altitude, slope and aspect - largely on snow thickness/-distribution and substratum. The detailed identification of parameters determining the active layer thickness and thaw dynamics is fundamental for the large scale modelling of the state of the permafrost in the Central Tian Shan. The field studies will contribute to a better understanding of the thermal effects of substantial debris cover of subsurface ice-rich material or ground-ice, and of the temperature regime of rock glaciers and ice-cored moraines. These features store large amounts of ice in a permafrost environment over long time periods. In addition to the generally ice-rich top of the permafrost in the fine grained silty sediments in valleys and lee positions, they might have considerable influence on the amount and annual

  7. Impact of active layer detachments on carbon exchange in a high-Arctic ecosystem, Cape Bounty, Nunavut, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, N. A.; Beamish, A.; Neil, A.; Wagner, I.

    2011-12-01

    High Arctic ecosystems are experiencing some of the earliest and most extreme changes in climate, including increases in both temperature and precipitation leading to a deepening and destabilization of the active layer. This destabilization of shallow slopes can lead to disturbances such as active layer detachments (ALD), which could further alter soil temperature and moisture regimes, potentially releasing carbon (C) and nutrients previously unavailable to soil microbes. We explored the impact of ALD's on carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange at the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory on Melville Island, Canada over two growing seasons. CO2 exchange under light and dark conditions was measured approximately every five to nine days across both growing seasons for a total of five sampling day in 2009 and nine sampling days in 2010. Sampling was stratified to include highly disturbed, moderately disturbed, and undisturbed areas. Transparent static chambers were equipped with a Vaisala GMP343 CO2 sensor to measure changes in CO2 concentration over time. Based on static chamber C flux measurements during the growing seasons of 2009 and 2010, we found that the moderately disturbed sites were net sinks of CO2 (-6.44gC m-2 season-1, -8.21gC m-2 season-1, respectively). The highly disturbed sites however were net sources of CO2 in both seasons (3.01gC m-2 season-1, 30.01gC m-2 season-1, respectively). Control sites in 2009 were a net C sink (-6.48gC m-2 season-1) while in 2010 they represented a net C source (16.75gC m-2 season-1). Overall, the formation of ALD's led to highly disturbed areas (roughly 40% of the area of an ALD) becoming C sources, but appeared to enhance C uptake in moderately disturbed areas. Active layer depth explained little of the variation in any of the C fluxes, while combinations of soil moisture, temperature, and air temperature explained up to roughly 40% of the variation in C fluxes. These findings have important implications if temperature and

  8. Modeling the effect of active layer deepening on stocks of soil organic carbon in the Pechora River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, P.; Hugelius, G.; Marchenko, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    This study investigates how much of the estimated mass of surface permafrost (1 m deep) soil organic carbon stored in soils of the northern Pechora River Basin (Russian Arctic) could be affected due to active layer deepening for the time period 1980 to 2099. The study estimates how much of the upper permafrost soil organic carbon (1-100 cm depth range) will be affected by active layer deepening due to climate warming, on what timescale the deepening will take place and if the estimated changes differ depending on the extent of permafrost in the region. A model developed in a Geographic Information System combines datasets from The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (Hugelius, in press), field data of soil organic carbon content (SOCC) in different permafrost soil horizons in the Usa basin (Hugelius et al., 2011) and data of recent (observed) and future (projected) active layer depth from a spatially distributed permafrost dynamics model in the Pechora River Basin (GIPL2 model; Marchenko et al., 2008). For the simulation of permafrost dynamics we used output from the regional climate model HIRHAM5 with the physical parameterization of ECHAM5 with a doubling gradual increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration by the end of the current century (Stendel et al., 2010). According to this specific climate scenario, projections of future changes in permafrost suggest that by the end of the 21st century, permafrost in the Russian North may be actively thawing at many locations of the Pechora River watershed. The results show that in 1980, 75% of the available 0-100 cm Gelisol SOCC is affected by seasonal thawing (Figure 1). In 2050 the proportion is increased to 86% and by 2090 almost the whole study area has an active layer deeper than 1 meter (98%). This indicates an increase from approximately 0.64% to 0.84% of the total 1-100 cm soil organic carbon mass in the northern permafrost region. The change is more gradual in the isolated and the sporadic permafrost zones

  9. Discrete-Layer Piezoelectric Plate and Shell Models for Active Tip-Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyliger, P. R.; Ramirez, G.; Pei, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop computational tools for the analysis of active-sensory composite structures with added or embedded piezoelectric layers. The targeted application for this class of smart composite laminates and the analytical development is the accomplishment of active tip-clearance control in turbomachinery components. Two distinct theories and analytical models were developed and explored under this contract: (1) a discrete-layer plate theory and corresponding computational models, and (2) a three dimensional general discrete-layer element generated in curvilinear coordinates for modeling laminated composite piezoelectric shells. Both models were developed from the complete electromechanical constitutive relations of piezoelectric materials, and incorporate both displacements and potentials as state variables. This report describes the development and results of these models. The discrete-layer theories imply that the displacement field and electrostatic potential through-the-thickness of the laminate are described over an individual layer rather than as a smeared function over the thickness of the entire plate or shell thickness. This is especially crucial for composites with embedded piezoelectric layers, as the actuating and sensing elements within these layers are poorly represented by effective or smeared properties. Linear Lagrange interpolation polynomials were used to describe the through-thickness laminate behavior. Both analytic and finite element approximations were used in the plane or surface of the structure. In this context, theoretical developments are presented for the discrete-layer plate theory, the discrete-layer shell theory, and the formulation of an exact solution for simply-supported piezoelectric plates. Finally, evaluations and results from a number of separate examples are presented for the static and dynamic analysis of the plate geometry. Comparisons between the different approaches are provided when

  10. DC resistivity tomography applied to monitoring active layer environments below patterned ground in Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tatsuya; Juliussen, Hâvard; Matsuoka, Norikazu; Christiansen, Hanne H.

    2010-05-01

    Patterned ground is one of the most characteristic features in arctic periglacial landscapes that originated from various periglacial processes. On flat tundra surfaces composed of fine-grained soils, ice-wedge polygons are dominant, but mud boils and hummocks are also developed. Their distribution is constrained by local ground material, hydrology, snow cover, vegetation and freeze/thaw regimes. Whereas there have been a large number of studies on patterned ground phenomena, environmental factors distinguishing the types of patterned ground are not well understood. We applied DC resistivity tomography to understanding hydrological characteristics and freeze/thaw dynamics at adjoining ice-wedge and mud-boil sites in Adventdalen, Svalbard, where comprehensive periglacial process monitoring has been undertaken. Electrode arrays consisting of 81 nails spaced at 20 cm intervals were fixed at each site early in June 2009 immediately after the snow cover disappeared. The nails were stuck within the top 5 cm to resolve the top layer of the ground. Measurements were carried out repeatedly at approximately two week intervals. Spring results from both sites are characterized by an increase in resistivity near surface due to drying up. This tendency is prominent in the ice-wedge polygon centre where standing water remains until late spring. Time-lapse analyses indicate a distinct decrease in resistivity in seasonal frozen layer at both sites probably due to an increase in unfrozen water content by downward heat transfer. Summer profiles from both sites display a distinct resistivity boundary propagating downward with time, corresponding well with the thaw depth measured by mechanical probing. These data also show near-surface high resistivity spots indicating the location of desiccation cracks. Profiles from the mud-boil site show higher resistivity in the thaw layer than those of ice-wedge site, implying different drainage condition between them. After seasonal freezing

  11. Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels using Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid passive/active noise control system utilizing constrained layer damping and model predictive feedback control is presented. This system is used to control the sound radiation of panels due to broadband disturbances. To facilitate the hybrid system design, a methodology for placement of constrained layer damping which targets selected modes based on their relative radiated sound power is developed. The placement methodology is utilized to determine two constrained layer damping configurations for experimental evaluation of a hybrid system. The first configuration targets the (4,1) panel mode which is not controllable by the piezoelectric control actuator, and the (2,3) and (5,2) panel modes. The second configuration targets the (1,1) and (3,1) modes. The experimental results demonstrate the improved reduction of radiated sound power using the hybrid passive/active control system as compared to the active control system alone.

  12. Gender and Health Lifestyle: An In-Depth Exploration of Self-Care Activities in Later Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Stoller, Eleanor Palo; Brewer-Lowry, A. Nichol; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate similarities and differences in the self-care domain of health lifestyle among older, rural-dwelling women and men. Method: Qualitative analysis of in-depth interview data from 62 community-dwelling older (M = 74.3 years) African and European American women and men. Results: Both older women and men rely heavily on…

  13. Activation Layer Stabilization of High Polarization Photocathodes in Sub-Optimal RF Gun Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory A. Mulhollan

    2010-11-16

    Specific activation recipes for bulk, 100 nm thick MBE grown and high polarization III-V photocathode material have been developed which mitigate the effects of exposure to background gasses. Lifetime data using four representative gasses were acquired for bulk GaAs, 100 nm unstrained GaAs and strained superlattice GaAs/GaAsP, all activated both with Cs and then Cs and Li (bi-alkali). Each photoemitter showed marked resilience improvement when activated using the bi-alkali recipe compared to the standard single alkali recipe. A dual alkali activation system at SLAC was constructed, baked and commissioned with the purpose of performing spin-polarization measurements on electrons emitted from the bi-alkali activated surfaces. An end station at SSRL was configured with the required sources for energy resolved photoemission measurements on the bi-alkali activated and CO2 dosed surfaces. The bi-alkali recipes were successfully implemented at SLAC/SSRL. Measurements at SLAC of the photoelectron spin-polarization from the modified activation surface showed no sign of a change in value compared to the standard activated material, i.e., no ill effects. Analysis of photoemission data indicates that the addition of Li to the activation layer results in a multi-layer structure. The presence of Li in the activation layer also acts as an inhibitor to CO2 absorption, hence better lifetimes in worse vacuum were achieved. The bi-alkali activation has been tested on O2 activated GaAs for comparison with NF3 activated surfaces. Comparable resilience to CO2 exposure was achieved for the O2 activated surface. An RF PECVD amorphous silicon growth system was modified to allow high temperature heat cleaning of GaAs substrates prior to film deposition. Growth versus thickness data were collected. Very thin amorphous silicon germanium layers were optimized to exhibit good behavior as an electron emitter. Growth of the amorphous silicon germanium films on the above substrates was fine tuned

  14. MAPLE prepared heterostructures with arylene based polymer active layer for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanculescu, F.; Rasoga, O.; Catargiu, A. M.; Vacareanu, L.; Socol, M.; Breazu, C.; Preda, N.; Socol, G.; Stanculescu, A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents some studies about the preparation by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique of heterostructures with single layer of arylene based polymer, poly[N-(2-ethylhexyl)2.7-carbazolyl vinylene]/AMC16 and poly[N-(2-ethylhexyl)2.7-carbazolyl 1.4-phenylene ethynylene]/AMC22, and with layers of these polymers mixed with Buckminsterfullerene/C60 in the weight ratio of 1:2 (AMC16:C60) and 1:3 (AMC22:C60). The deposited layers have been characterized by spectroscopic (UV-Vis-NIR, PL, FTIR) and microscopic (SEM, AFM) methods. The effect of the polymer particularities on the optical and electrical properties of the structures based on polymer and polymer:C60 mixed layer has been analyzed. The study of the electrical properties has revealed typical solar cell behavior for the heterostructure prepared by MAPLE on glass/ITO/PEDOT-PSS with AMC16, AMC22 and AMC22:C60 layer, confirming that this method is adequate for the preparation of polymeric and mixed active layers for solar cells applications. The highest photovoltaic effect was shown by the solar cell structure realized with single layer of AMC16 polymer: glass/ITO/PEDOT-PSS/AMC16/Al.

  15. Efficacy of different final irrigant activation protocols on smear layer removal by EDTA and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Daniel R; Santos, Zarina T; Tay, Lidia Y; Silva, Emmanuel J; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Gomes, Brenda P F A

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different activation protocols for chelating agents used after chemo-mechanical preparation (CMP), for smear layer (SL) removal. Forty-five single-rooted human premolars with straight canals and fully formed apex were selected. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups depending on the chelating agent used for smear layer removal: distilled water (DW, control group); 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); and 10% citric acid (CA). Each group was further divided into three subgroups according to the activation protocol used: no-activation (NA), manual dynamic activation (MDA), or sonic activation (SA). After CMP, all specimens were sectioned and processed for observation of the apical thirds by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two calibrated evaluators attributed scores to each specimen. The differences between activation protocols were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used for comparison between each root canal third. When chelating agents were activated, either by MDA or SA, it was obtained the best cleaning results with no significant difference between EDTA and CA (P > 0.05). Sonic activation showed the best results when root canal thirds were analyzed, in comparison to MDA and NA groups (P < 0.05). The activation of chelating agents, independent of the protocol used, benefits smear layer removal from root canals.

  16. Antimicrobial Activity Evaluation on Silver Doped Hydroxyapatite/Polydimethylsiloxane Composite Layer

    PubMed Central

    Ciobanu, C. S.; Groza, A.; Iconaru, S. L.; Popa, C. L.; Chapon, P.; Chifiriuc, M. C.; Hristu, R.; Stanciu, G. A.; Negrila, C. C.; Ghita, R. V.; Ganciu, M.; Predoi, D.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was the preparation, physicochemical characterization, and microbiological evaluation of novel hydroxyapatite doped with silver/polydimethylsiloxane (Ag:HAp-PDMS) composite layers. In the first stage, the deposition of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer layer on commercially pure Si disks has been produced in atmospheric pressure corona discharges. Finally, the new silver doped hydroxyapatite/polydimethylsiloxane composite layer has been obtained by the thermal evaporation technique. The Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layers were characterized by various techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The antimicrobial activity of the Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layer was assessed against Candida albicans ATCC 10231 (ATCC—American Type Culture Collection) by culture based and confirmed by SEM and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) methods. This is the first study reporting the antimicrobial effect of the Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layer, which proved to be active against Candida albicans biofilm embedded cells. PMID:26504849

  17. Antimicrobial Activity Evaluation on Silver Doped Hydroxyapatite/Polydimethylsiloxane Composite Layer.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, C S; Groza, A; Iconaru, S L; Popa, C L; Chapon, P; Chifiriuc, M C; Hristu, R; Stanciu, G A; Negrila, C C; Ghita, R V; Ganciu, M; Predoi, D

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was the preparation, physicochemical characterization, and microbiological evaluation of novel hydroxyapatite doped with silver/polydimethylsiloxane (Ag:HAp-PDMS) composite layers. In the first stage, the deposition of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer layer on commercially pure Si disks has been produced in atmospheric pressure corona discharges. Finally, the new silver doped hydroxyapatite/polydimethylsiloxane composite layer has been obtained by the thermal evaporation technique. The Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layers were characterized by various techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The antimicrobial activity of the Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layer was assessed against Candida albicans ATCC 10231 (ATCC-American Type Culture Collection) by culture based and confirmed by SEM and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) methods. This is the first study reporting the antimicrobial effect of the Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layer, which proved to be active against Candida albicans biofilm embedded cells. PMID:26504849

  18. Modeling the gain and bandwidth of submicron active layer n+-i-p+ avalanche photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Kanishka; Das, N. R.

    2012-10-01

    The electron initiated avalanche gain and bandwidth are calculated for thin submicron GaAs n+-i-p+ avalanche photodiode. A model is used to estimate the avalanche build-up of carriers in the active multiplication layer considering the dead-space effect. In the model, the carriers are identified both by their energy and position in the multiplication region. The excess energy of the carriers above threshold is assumed to be equally distributed among the carriers generated after impact ionization. The gain versus bias and bandwidth versus gain characteristics of the device are also demonstrated for different active layer thicknesses of the APD.

  19. Europium-152 depth profile of a stone bridge pillar exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb: 152Eu activities for analysis of the neutron spectrum.

    PubMed

    Hasai, H; Iwatani, K; Shizuma, K; Hoshi, M; Yokoro, K; Sawada, S; Kosako, T; Morishima, H

    1987-09-01

    The 152Eu activity depth profile of a granite pillar of the Motoyasu bridge located 132 m from the Hiroshima atomic bomb hypocenter was assessed. The pillars each measured 82 cm in depth, 82 cm in width and 193 cm in height. One of the pillars was bored and 6.8-cm-diameter core samples were removed and cut into 2-cm-thick disks. Two gamma rays of 152Eu, 122 keV and 344 keV, in each disk were measured using a low background, gamma-ray spectrometer, and the activity distribution was determined as a function of depth in the granite. A concentration of stable Eu in the granite was determined by activation analysis. The specific radioactivity of 152Eu and 154Eu at the pillar surface was determined to have been 117 and 24 Bq per mg Eu, respectively, at the time of detonation. The value of 152Eu agrees within 20% of that calculated by Loewe. The depth profile of 152Eu in granite demonstrates a distinct difference from the estimates made only by thermal neutrons. Present data provide valuable information for the analysis of the neutron spectrum of the Hiroshima atomic bomb and its intensity.

  20. Characterization of a multi-user indoor positioning system based on low cost depth vision (Kinect) for monitoring human activity in a smart home.

    PubMed

    Sevrin, Loïc; Noury, Norbert; Abouchi, Nacer; Jumel, Fabrice; Massot, Bertrand; Saraydaryan, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of systems use indoor positioning for many scenarios such as asset tracking, health care, games, manufacturing, logistics, shopping, and security. Many technologies are available and the use of depth cameras is becoming more and more attractive as this kind of device becomes affordable and easy to handle. This paper contributes to the effort of creating an indoor positioning system based on low cost depth cameras (Kinect). A method is proposed to optimize the calibration of the depth cameras, to describe the multi-camera data fusion and to specify a global positioning projection to maintain the compatibility with outdoor positioning systems. The monitoring of the people trajectories at home is intended for the early detection of a shift in daily activities which highlights disabilities and loss of autonomy. This system is meant to improve homecare health management at home for a better end of life at a sustainable cost for the community.

  1. Characterization of a multi-user indoor positioning system based on low cost depth vision (Kinect) for monitoring human activity in a smart home.

    PubMed

    Sevrin, Loïc; Noury, Norbert; Abouchi, Nacer; Jumel, Fabrice; Massot, Bertrand; Saraydaryan, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of systems use indoor positioning for many scenarios such as asset tracking, health care, games, manufacturing, logistics, shopping, and security. Many technologies are available and the use of depth cameras is becoming more and more attractive as this kind of device becomes affordable and easy to handle. This paper contributes to the effort of creating an indoor positioning system based on low cost depth cameras (Kinect). A method is proposed to optimize the calibration of the depth cameras, to describe the multi-camera data fusion and to specify a global positioning projection to maintain the compatibility with outdoor positioning systems. The monitoring of the people trajectories at home is intended for the early detection of a shift in daily activities which highlights disabilities and loss of autonomy. This system is meant to improve homecare health management at home for a better end of life at a sustainable cost for the community. PMID:26737415

  2. Microbial diversity of active layer and permafrost in an acidic wetland from the Canadian High Arctic.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Roland C; Niederberger, Thomas D; Greer, Charles; Whyte, Lyle G

    2011-04-01

    The abundance and structure of archaeal and bacterial communities from the active layer and the associated permafrost of a moderately acidic (pH < 5.0) High Arctic wetland (Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada) were investigated using culture- and molecular-based methods. Aerobic viable cell counts from the active layer were ∼100-fold greater than those from the permafrost (2.5 × 10(5) CFU·(g soil dry mass)(-1)); however, a greater diversity of isolates were cultured from permafrost, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Isolates from both layers demonstrated growth characteristics of a psychrotolerant, halotolerant, and acidotolerant community. Archaea constituted 0.1% of the total 16S rRNA gene copy number and, in the 16S rRNA gene clone library, predominantly (71% and 95%) consisted of Crenarchaeota related to Group I. 1b. In contrast, bacterial communities were diverse (Shannon's diversity index, H = ∼4), with Acidobacteria constituting the largest division of active layer clones (30%) and Actinobacteria most abundant in permafrost (28%). Direct comparisons of 16S rRNA gene sequence data highlighted significant differences between the bacterial communities of each layer, with the greatest differences occurring within Actinobacteria. Comparisons of 16S rRNA gene sequences with those from other Arctic permafrost and cold-temperature wetlands revealed commonly occurring taxa within the phyla Chloroflexi, Acidobacteria, and Actinobacteria (families Intrasporangiaceae and Rubrobacteraceae). PMID:21491982

  3. Study of dopant activation in biaxially compressively strained SiGe layers using excimer laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, G. V.; Wirths, S.; Stefanov, S.; Holländer, B.; Schubert, J.; Conde, J. C.; Stoica, T.; Breuer, U.; Chiussi, S.; Goryll, M.; Buca, D.; Mantl, S.

    2013-05-01

    Excimer Laser Annealing (ELA) with a wavelength of 248 nm is used to study doping of biaxialy compressively strained Si1-xGex/Si heterostructures. The challenge is to achieve a high activation of As in SiGe, while conserving the elastic strain and suppressing dopant diffusion. Doping of 20 nm Si0.64Ge0.36 layers by ion implantation of 1 × 1015 As+/cm2 and subsequent laser annealing using single 20 ns pulse with an energy density of 0.6 J/cm2 leads to an As activation of about 20% and a sheet resistance of 650 Ω/sq. At this laser energy density, the entire SiGe layer melts and the subsequent fast recrystallization on a nanosecond time scale allows high As incorporation into the lattice. Moreover, using these annealing parameters, the SiGe layer exhibits epitaxial regrowth with negligible strain relaxation. ELA at energy densities greater than 0.6 J/cm2 resembles Pulsed Lased Induced Epitaxy, leading to an intermixing of the SiGe layer with the Si substrate, thus to thicker single-crystalline strained SiGe layers with sheet resistance down to 62 Ω/sq. Effects of energy densities on composition, crystal quality, activation of As and co-doping with B are discussed and related to the spatial and temporal evolution of the temperature in the irradiated zone, as simulated by Finite Element Methods.

  4. Electrospun nanofiber layers with incorporated photoluminescence indicator for chromatography and detection of ultraviolet-active compounds.

    PubMed

    Kampalanonwat, Pimolpun; Supaphol, Pitt; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2013-07-19

    For the first time, electrospun nanofiber phases were fabricated with manganese-activated zinc silicate as photoluminescent indicator (UV254) to transfer and enlarge its application to the field of UV-active compounds. By integration of such an indicator, UV-active compounds got visible on the chromatogram. The separation of 7 preservatives and a beverage sample were studied on the novel luminescent polyacrylonitrile layers. The mat thickness and mean fiber diameters were calculated for additions of different UV254 indicator concentrations. The separation efficiency on the photoluminescent layers was characterized by comparison to HPTLC layers and calculation of the plate numbers and resolutions. Some benefits were the reduction in migration distance (3cm), migration time (12min), analyte (10-nL volumes) and mobile phase volumes (1mL). As ultrathin stationary phase, such layers are suited for their integration into the Office Chromatography concept. For the first time, electrospun nanofiber layers were hyphenated with mass spectrometry and the confirmation of compounds was successfully performed using the elution-head based TLC-MS Interface.

  5. Photocatalytic activity of layered perovskite-like oxides in practically valuable chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, I. A.; Zvereva, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    The photocatalytic properties of layered perovskite-like oxides corresponding to the Ruddlesen–Popper, Dion–Jacobson and Aurivillius phases are considered. Of the photocatalytic reactions, the focus is on the reactions of water splitting, hydrogen evolution from aqueous solutions of organic substances and degradation of model organic pollutants. Possibilities to conduct these reactions under UV and visible light in the presence of layered perovskite-like oxides and composite photocatalysts based on them are shown. The specific surface area, band gap energy, particle morphology, cation and anion doping and surface modification are considered as factors that affect the photocatalytic activity. Special attention is paid to the possibilities to enhance the photocatalytic activity by intercalation, ion exchange and exfoliation, which are inherent in this class of compounds. Conclusions are made about the prospects for the use of layered perovskite-like oxides in photocatalysis. The bibliography includes 253 references.

  6. Photocatalytic activity of layered perovskite-like oxides in practically valuable chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, I. A.; Zvereva, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    The photocatalytic properties of layered perovskite-like oxides corresponding to the Ruddlesen-Popper, Dion-Jacobson and Aurivillius phases are considered. Of the photocatalytic reactions, the focus is on the reactions of water splitting, hydrogen evolution from aqueous solutions of organic substances and degradation of model organic pollutants. Possibilities to conduct these reactions under UV and visible light in the presence of layered perovskite-like oxides and composite photocatalysts based on them are shown. The specific surface area, band gap energy, particle morphology, cation and anion doping and surface modification are considered as factors that affect the photocatalytic activity. Special attention is paid to the possibilities to enhance the photocatalytic activity by intercalation, ion exchange and exfoliation, which are inherent in this class of compounds. Conclusions are made about the prospects for the use of layered perovskite-like oxides in photocatalysis. The bibliography includes 253 references.

  7. Activity induces traveling waves, vortices and spatiotemporal chaos in a model actomyosin layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Inspired by the actomyosin cortex in biological cells, we investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a model describing a contractile active polar fluid sandwiched between two external media. The external media impose frictional forces at the interface with the active fluid. The fluid is driven by a spatially-homogeneous activity measuring the strength of the active stress that is generated by processes consuming a chemical fuel. We observe that as the activity is increased over two orders of magnitude the active polar fluid first shows spontaneous flow transition followed by transition to oscillatory dynamics with traveling waves and traveling vortices in the flow field. In the flow-tumbling regime, the active polar fluid also shows transition to spatiotemporal chaos at sufficiently large activities. These results demonstrate that level of activity alone can be used to tune the operating point of actomyosin layers with qualitatively different spatiotemporal dynamics.

  8. Activity induces traveling waves, vortices and spatiotemporal chaos in a model actomyosin layer

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the actomyosin cortex in biological cells, we investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a model describing a contractile active polar fluid sandwiched between two external media. The external media impose frictional forces at the interface with the active fluid. The fluid is driven by a spatially-homogeneous activity measuring the strength of the active stress that is generated by processes consuming a chemical fuel. We observe that as the activity is increased over two orders of magnitude the active polar fluid first shows spontaneous flow transition followed by transition to oscillatory dynamics with traveling waves and traveling vortices in the flow field. In the flow-tumbling regime, the active polar fluid also shows transition to spatiotemporal chaos at sufficiently large activities. These results demonstrate that level of activity alone can be used to tune the operating point of actomyosin layers with qualitatively different spatiotemporal dynamics. PMID:26877263

  9. Determination of depth, permeability, and fluid pressure of hydraulically active fractures in the COSC-1 borehole and their correlation with chemical and geophysical logging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Doughty, Christine; Rosberg, Jan-Erik; Berthet, Theo; Juhlin, Christopher; Niemi, Auli

    2016-04-01

    The Flowing Fluid Electricity Conductivity (FFEC) logging method has been applied to the 2.5-km fully-cored COSC-1 borehole in Sweden, both during and after the drilling period. The method is based on the fact that the drilling fluid has a lower electric conductivity (EC) value (about 200 μS/cm) compared to the formation water. Thus, by scanning several times along the borehole while it is being pumped at a low rate, Q, the locations of inflow zones can be identified as EC peaks at these depths. An analysis of the shape of the EC peaks will yield the local inflow rates and the formation water EC at each of the inflow zones. Further, by conducting the logging more than once with two values of Q, the initial or inherent fluid pressure at each inflow zone can be calculated. In the case of the COSC-1 borehole, the method has identified nine discrete inflow zones between 250 m depth and the borehole bottom of 2500 m depth. The permeability values are small and spread over more than one order of magnitude. The fluid pressures in the inflow zones show two groups of similar values with the shallow inflow zones having a higher pressure than those in the deeper part of the borehole. Correlation of the FFEC logging results with other information and data from the COSC-1 borehole are underway. First, rock cores were carefully examined at the depths of the inflow zones identified by FFEC logging. We were able to identify the fractures which may be responsible for the flow. It appears that each inflow zone can be correlated with one single fracture. The cores with these hydraulically active fractures have been transferred to the laboratory for detailed study. Second, COSC-1 fracture logs were reviewed. The majority of the fractures in the borehole are not hydraulically active and the active ones represent only about 1-2 % of the total number of fractures, consistent with previous statistical studies of fractures in crystalline rocks. Breakout logs were also studied and it

  10. [Effects of human engineering activities on permafrost active layer and its environment in northern Qinghai-Tibetan plateau].

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenggang; Wu, Qingbo; Niu, Fujun

    2006-11-01

    With disturbed and undisturbed belts during the construction of Qinghai-Tibet highway as test objectives, this paper studied the effects of human engineering activities on the permafrost ecosystem in northern Qinghai-Tibetan plateau. The results showed that the thickness of permafrost active layer was smaller in disturbed than in undisturbed belt, and decreased with increasing altitude in undisturbed belt while no definite pattern was observed in disturbed belt. Different vegetation types had different effects on the thickness of permafrost active layer, being decreased in the order of steppe > shrub > meadow. In the two belts, altitude was the main factor affecting the vertical distribution of soil moisture, but vegetation type was also an important affecting factor if the altitude was similar. Due to the human engineering activities, soil temperature in summer was lower in disturbed than in undisturbed belt.

  11. Toward Efficient Thick Active PTB7 Photovoltaic Layers Using Diphenyl Ether as a Solvent Additive.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yifan; Goh, Tenghooi; Fan, Pu; Shi, Wei; Yu, Junsheng; Taylor, André D

    2016-06-22

    The development of thick organic photovoltaics (OPV) could increase absorption in the active layer and ease manufacturing constraints in large-scale solar panel production. However, the efficiencies of most low-bandgap OPVs decrease substantially when the active layers exceed ∼100 nm in thickness (because of low crystallinity and a short exciton diffusion length). Herein, we report the use of solvent additive diphenyl ether (DPE) that facilitates the fabrication of thick (180 nm) active layers and triples the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of conventional thienothiophene-co-benzodithiophene polymer (PTB7)-based OPVs from 1.75 to 6.19%. These results demonstrate a PCE 20% higher than those of conventional (PTB7)-based OPV devices using 1,8-diiodooctane. Morphology studies reveal that DPE promotes the formation of nanofibrillar networks and ordered packing of PTB7 in the active layer that facilitate charge transport over longer distances. We further demonstrate that DPE improves the fill factor and photocurrent collection by enhancing the overall optical absorption, reducing the series resistance, and suppressing bimolecular recombination.

  12. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  13. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  14. Groundwater hydrochemistry in the active layer of the proglacial zone, Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, R.J.; Wadham, J.L.; Tranter, M.; Hodgkins, R.; Peters, N.E.

    2002-01-01

    Glacial bulk meltwaters and active-layer groundwaters were sampled from the proglacial zone of Finsterwalderbreen during a single melt season in 1999, in order to determine the geochemical processes that maintain high chemical weathering rates in the proglacial zone of this glacier. Results demonstrate that the principle means of solute acquisition is the weathering of highly reactive moraine and fluvial active-layer sediments by supra-permafrost groundwaters. Active-layer groundwater derives from the thaw of the proglacial snowpack, buried ice and glacial bulk meltwaters. Groundwater evolves by sulphide oxidation and carbonate dissolution. Evaporation- and freeze-concentration of groundwater in summer and winter, respectively produce Mg-Ca-sulphate salts on the proglacial surface. Re-dissolution of these salts in early summer produces groundwaters that are supersaturated with respect to calcite. There is a pronounced spatial pattern to the geochemical evolution of groundwater. Close to the main proglacial channel, active layer sediments are flushed diurnally by bulk meltwaters. Here, Mg-Ca-sulphate deposits become exhausted in the early season and geochemical evolution proceeds by a combination of sulphide oxidation and carbonate dissolution. At greater distances from the channel, the dissolution of Mg-Ca-sulphate salts is a major influence and dilution by the bulk meltwaters is relatively minor. The influence of sulphate salt dissolution decreases during the sampling season, as these salts are exhausted and waters become increasingly routed by subsurface flowpaths. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Toward Efficient Thick Active PTB7 Photovoltaic Layers Using Diphenyl Ether as a Solvent Additive.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yifan; Goh, Tenghooi; Fan, Pu; Shi, Wei; Yu, Junsheng; Taylor, André D

    2016-06-22

    The development of thick organic photovoltaics (OPV) could increase absorption in the active layer and ease manufacturing constraints in large-scale solar panel production. However, the efficiencies of most low-bandgap OPVs decrease substantially when the active layers exceed ∼100 nm in thickness (because of low crystallinity and a short exciton diffusion length). Herein, we report the use of solvent additive diphenyl ether (DPE) that facilitates the fabrication of thick (180 nm) active layers and triples the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of conventional thienothiophene-co-benzodithiophene polymer (PTB7)-based OPVs from 1.75 to 6.19%. These results demonstrate a PCE 20% higher than those of conventional (PTB7)-based OPV devices using 1,8-diiodooctane. Morphology studies reveal that DPE promotes the formation of nanofibrillar networks and ordered packing of PTB7 in the active layer that facilitate charge transport over longer distances. We further demonstrate that DPE improves the fill factor and photocurrent collection by enhancing the overall optical absorption, reducing the series resistance, and suppressing bimolecular recombination. PMID:27253271

  16. Activation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid by a 940 nm diode laser for enhanced removal of smear layer.

    PubMed

    Lagemann, Manfred; George, Roy; Chai, Lei; Walsh, Laurence J

    2014-08-01

    Laser enhancement of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid with cetrimide (EDTAC) has previously been shown to increase removal of smear layer, for middle-infrared erbium lasers. This study evaluated the efficiency of EDTAC activation using a near-infrared-pulsed 940 nm laser delivered by plain fibre tips into 15% EDTAC or 3% hydrogen peroxide. Root canals in 4 groups of 10 single roots were prepared using rotary files, with controls for the presence and absence of smear layer. After laser treatment (80 mJ pulse(-1) , 50 Hz, 6 cycles of 10 s), roots were split and the apical, middle and coronal thirds of the canal were examined using scanning electron microscopy, with the area of dentine tubules determined by a validated quantitative image analysis method. Lasing EDTAC considerably improved smear layer removal, while lasing into peroxide gave minimal smear layer removal. The laser protocol used was more effective for smear layer removal than the 'gold standard' protocol using EDTAC with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). In addition, lasers may also provide a benefit through photothermal disinfection. Further research is needed to optimise irrigant activation protocols using near-infrared diode lasers of other wavelengths.

  17. A Novel Surface Structure Consisting of Contact-active Antibacterial Upper-layer and Antifouling Sub-layer Derived from Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Salt Polyurethanes

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiehua; Gao, Yunlong; Luo, Feng; Tan, Hong; Wang, Kunjie; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Contact-active antibacterial surfaces play a vital role in preventing bacterial contamination of artificial surfaces. In the past, numerous researches have been focused on antibacterial surfaces comprising of antifouling upper-layer and antibacterial sub-layer. In this work, we demonstrate a reversed surface structure which integrate antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer. These surfaces are prepared by simply casting gemini quaternary ammonium salt waterborne polyurethanes (GWPU) and their blends. Due to the high interfacial energy of gemini quaternary ammonium salt (GQAS), chain segments containing GQAS can accumulate at polymer/air interface to form an antibacterial upper-layer spontaneously during the film formation. Meanwhile, the soft segments composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) formed the antifouling sub-layer. Our findings indicate that the combination of antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer endow these surfaces strong, long-lasting antifouling and contact-active antibacterial properties, with a more than 99.99% killing efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria attached to them. PMID:27561546

  18. A Novel Surface Structure Consisting of Contact-active Antibacterial Upper-layer and Antifouling Sub-layer Derived from Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Salt Polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiehua; Gao, Yunlong; Luo, Feng; Tan, Hong; Wang, Kunjie; Fu, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Contact-active antibacterial surfaces play a vital role in preventing bacterial contamination of artificial surfaces. In the past, numerous researches have been focused on antibacterial surfaces comprising of antifouling upper-layer and antibacterial sub-layer. In this work, we demonstrate a reversed surface structure which integrate antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer. These surfaces are prepared by simply casting gemini quaternary ammonium salt waterborne polyurethanes (GWPU) and their blends. Due to the high interfacial energy of gemini quaternary ammonium salt (GQAS), chain segments containing GQAS can accumulate at polymer/air interface to form an antibacterial upper-layer spontaneously during the film formation. Meanwhile, the soft segments composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) formed the antifouling sub-layer. Our findings indicate that the combination of antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer endow these surfaces strong, long-lasting antifouling and contact-active antibacterial properties, with a more than 99.99% killing efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria attached to them.

  19. A Novel Surface Structure Consisting of Contact-active Antibacterial Upper-layer and Antifouling Sub-layer Derived from Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Salt Polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiehua; Gao, Yunlong; Luo, Feng; Tan, Hong; Wang, Kunjie; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Contact-active antibacterial surfaces play a vital role in preventing bacterial contamination of artificial surfaces. In the past, numerous researches have been focused on antibacterial surfaces comprising of antifouling upper-layer and antibacterial sub-layer. In this work, we demonstrate a reversed surface structure which integrate antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer. These surfaces are prepared by simply casting gemini quaternary ammonium salt waterborne polyurethanes (GWPU) and their blends. Due to the high interfacial energy of gemini quaternary ammonium salt (GQAS), chain segments containing GQAS can accumulate at polymer/air interface to form an antibacterial upper-layer spontaneously during the film formation. Meanwhile, the soft segments composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) formed the antifouling sub-layer. Our findings indicate that the combination of antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer endow these surfaces strong, long-lasting antifouling and contact-active antibacterial properties, with a more than 99.99% killing efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria attached to them. PMID:27561546

  20. Survival, growth and immune activity of scallop Chlamys farreri cultured at different depths in Haizhou Bay (Yellow Sea, China) during hot season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zonghe; Yang, Hongsheng; Liu, Baozhong; Xing, Kun; Zhang, Libin; Xu, Qiang

    2010-05-01

    Survival, growth and immune response of the scallop, Chlamys farreri, cultured in lantern nets at five different depths (2, 5, 10, 15, and 20 m below the sea surface) were studied in Haizhou Bay during the hot season (summer and autumn) of 2007. Survival and growth rates were quantified bimonthly. Immune activities in hemolymph (superoxide dismutase (SOD) and acid phosphatase (ACP)) were measured to evaluate the health of scallops at the end of the study. Environmental parameters at the five depths were also monitored during the experiment. Mortalities mainly occurred during summer. Survival of scallops suspended at 15 m (78.0%) and 20 m (86.7%) was significantly higher than at 2 m (62.9%), 5 m (60.8%) or 10 m (66.8%) at the end of the study. Mean shell height grew significantly faster at 10 m (205.0 μm/d) and 20 m (236.9 μm/d) than at 2, 5 or 15 m in summer (July 9 to September 1); however, shell growth rate at 20 m was significantly lower than at the other four depths in autumn (September 2 to November 6). In contrast to summer, scallops at 5 m grew faster (262.9 μm/d) during autumn. The growth of soft tissue at different depths showed a similar trend to the shell. Growth rates of shell height and soft tissue were faster in autumn than in summer, with the exception of shell height at 20 m. SOD activity of scallops increased with depth, and ACP activity was significantly higher at 15 and 20 m than at other depths, which suggests that scallops were healthier near the bottom. Factors explaining the depth-related mortality and growth of scallops are also discussed. We conclude that the mass mortality of scallop, C. farreri, during summer can be prevented by moving the culture area to deeper water and yield can be maximized by suspending the scallops in deep water during summer and then transferring them to shallow water in autumn.

  1. Impact of fire, landscape position, aspect, and soil depth on microbial extracellular enzyme activities in the Jemez River Basin Critical Zone Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbanks, D.; Murphy, M. A.; Frost, G.; Chorover, J.; Gallery, R. E.; Rich, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    Fire frequency and severity are increasing across the western US, and post-fire recovery and effects on critical zone structure are not fully understood. Resident microbiota (bacteria and fungi) transform the majority of carbon in ecosystems, and the structure of these communities influence seedling establishment and the trajectory of vegetative recovery as well as biogeochemical cycling. We surveyed changes in microbial composition and activity after wildfire to better understand soil microbial resilience and fire ecology. Specifically, we assessed potential extracellular enzyme activities in response to fire severity across landscape position and aspect. We sampled 18 days after containment of the June 2013 Thompson Ridge Fire in the Jemez River Basin Critical Zone Observatory, across a gradient of burn severities in a mixed-conifer zero order basin. We subsampled six depths through the surface soil profile and measured potential activities of seven hydrolytic enzymes using established fluorometric techniques. Four of these enzymes hydrolyze C-rich substrates (β-glucosidase [BG], β-D-cellubiosidase [CB], xylosidase [XYL], and α-glucosidase [AG], two hydrolyze N-rich substrates N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase [NAG] and leucine aminopeptidase [LAP]), and one hydrolyzes a P-rich substrate (acid phosphatase [PHOS]). Results showed decreased activities with depth for BG, CB, and LAP. Significantly higher potential enzyme activity was observed for convergent sites relative to planar or divergent sites across all depths sampled. Additionally, we looked at shifts in enzyme nutrient acquisition ratios that correspond with resource limitations relative to microbial stoichiometric demands. Higher acquisition potential is interpreted as greater resource allocation towards nutrient acquisition. Results showed a variance in resource acquisition potential with depth for C relative to N, with greater resources being allocated towards acquiring C at shallower depth. Conversely

  2. Electrical and mechanical characterization of nanoscale-layered cellulose-based electro-active paper.

    PubMed

    Yun, Gyu-Young; Yun, Ki-Ju; Kim, Joo-Hyung; Kim, Jaehwan

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the electro-mechanical behavior of piezoelectric electro active paper (EAPap), the converse and direct piezoelectric characterization of cellulose EAPap was studied and compared. A delay between the electrical field and the induced strain of EAPap was observed due to the inner nano-voids or the localized amorphous regions in layer-by-layered structure to capture or hold the electrical charges and remnant ions. The linear relation between electric field and induced strain is also observed. The electro-mechanical performance of EAPap is discussed in detail in this paper.

  3. Active layer thermal monitoring of a Dry Valley of the Ellsworth Mountains, Continental Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto; Michel, Roberto; Souza, Karoline; Senra, Eduardo; Bremer, Ulisses

    2015-04-01

    The Ellsworth Mountains occur along the southern edge of the Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf and are subdivided by the Minnesota Glacier into the Heritage Range to the east and the Sentinel Range to the West. The climate of the Ellsworth Mountains is strongly controlled by proximity to the Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf and elevation. The mean annual air temperature at the 1,000 m level is estimated to be -25°C, and the average annual accumulation of water-equivalent precipitation likely ranges from 150 to 175 mm yr-1 (Weyant, 1966). The entire area is underlain by continuous permafrost of unknown thickness. Based on data collected from 22 pits, 41% of the sites contained dry permafrost below 70 cm, 27% had ice-cemented permafrost within 70 cm of the surface, 27% had bedrock within 70 cm, and 5% contained an ice-core (Bockheim, unpublished; Schaefer et al., 2015). Dry-frozen permafrost, which may be unique to Antarctica, appears to form from sublimation of moisture in ice-cemented permafrost over time. Active-layer depths in drift sheets of the Ellsworth Mountains range from 15 to 50 cm (Bockheim, unpublished); our understanding of Antarctic permafrost is poor, especially at the continent. The active layer monitoring sites were installed at Edson Hills, Ellsworth_Mountains, in the summer of 2012, and consist of thermistors (accuracy ± 0.2 °C) installed at 1 m above ground for air temperature measurements at two soil profiles on quartzite drift deposits, arranged in a vertical array (Lithic Haplorthel 886 m asl, 5 cm, 10 cm, 30 cm and Lithic Anyorthel 850 m asl, 5 cm, 10 cm, 30 cm). All probes were connected to a Campbell Scientific CR 1000 data logger recording data at hourly intervals from January 2nd 2012 until December 29th 2013. We calculated the thawing days (TD), freezing days (FD); isothermal days (ID), freeze thaw days (FTD), thawing degree days (TDD) and freezing degree days (FDD); all according to Guglielmin et al. (2008). Temperature at 5 cm reaches a maximum

  4. Last Decade of Changes in Ground Temperature and Active Layer Thickness in the High Canadian Arctic and in Barrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, V. E.; Cable, W.; Walker, D. A.; Yoshikawa, K.; Marchenko, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    -45 cm from the ground surface in 2005. Increase in the active layer beyond this depth triggered the melting of the upper part of the ice wedges and widespread ground settlement at this location. In our presentation we will report on the observed changes in local topography in relation to changes in ground temperature and ALT at all three mentioned sites. In 2001, a Permafrost Observatory was also established within the Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska under the auspices of the International Arctic Research Center of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Since 2001, permafrost temperature at this depth increased by 0.5°C. Most of this increase happened after 2005. A site-specific numerical model for the Barrow permafrost temperature regime was developed in the GI Permafrost Lab. The daily air temperatures and snow cover thickness during the entire period of measurements (1924-2013) at the Barrow meteorological station were used as input data. Analysis of the resulting time series will be used in this presentation to reveal the effect of changes in air temperature and in snow depth on permafrost temperature and on the active layer thickness. This will help to put our decade-long observations along NAAT into a longer time perspective.

  5. Gas flux dynamics in high arctic permafrost polygon and ice wedge active layer soil; microbial feedback implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykytczuk, N. C.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Bennett, P.; Lamarche-Gagnon, G.; Hettich, R. L.; Phelps, T. J.; Layton, A.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Allan, J.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chourey, K.; Whyte, L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2011-12-01

    Temperatures in the Arctic may increase 4-8°C over the next 100 years, thereby increasing the depth of the active layer (AL) and thawing the underlying permafrost, with ice wedges in particular acting as an early indicator, a bellwether, for changing permafrost. Although data on CO2 and CH4 fluxes have been studied along with microbial diversity of AL and permafrost environments, the relationship between methanogenic, methanotrophic and heterotrophic in situ activities within the AL and CO2 and CH4 fluxes as a function of temperature has not been delineated. Defining these relationships is critical for accurately modeling the extent and rate of + / - feedback in global climate models. Initial field investigations of diurnal CO2 and CH4 flux from permafrost and ice-wedge AL soils were conducted during July on Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian high arctic. The AL soils (68-69 cm depth) were completely thawed while ambient air temperatures were between 9 and 27°C. The AL soils above the ice wedges had a higher water content and finer texture than the polygon AL soils. Diurnal patterns using in situ flux chambers and a Picarro C-13 CO2 cavity ring-down spectrometer recorded net outward flux of CO2 (3.2 to 8.8 g/m2/day) and consumption of atmospheric CH4 (-2.2 mg/m2/day) from the AL surfaces. Gas flux from the ice wedge soil surface were in a similar range as the polygon soil surface, having slightly higher maximal flux of CO2 (10.4 g/m2/day) and net efflux of CH4 (-2.2 to 14 mg/m2/day). Using a vertical probe, gas flux below the surface measured higher amounts of CO2 with increasing depth ranging from 10.4 to 21.4 g/m2/day in the polygon soils vs. 10 to 28.5 g/m2/day in the ice wedge soils. Through the same profile, the CH4 concentration decreased from 0.59 ppmv to < 0.1 ppmv within 30 cm of the surface in the ice wedge and from 1.1 to 0.54 ppmv at the base of the polygon AL. The δ13C of the CO2 efflux from the surface were consistent with microbial activity

  6. Predicted variation of stress orientation with depth near an active fault: application to the Cajon Pass Scientific Drillhole, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wesson, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary measurements of the stress orientation at a depth of 2 km interpreted to indicate that the regional orientation of the maximum compression is normal to the fault, and taken as evidence for a very weak fault. The orientation expected from plate tectonic arguments is about 66?? NE from the strike of the fault. Geodetic data indicate that the orientation of maximum compressive strain rate is about 43?? NE from the strike of the fault, and show nearly pure right-lateral shear acting parallel to the fault. These apparent conflicts in the inferred orientation of the axis of maximum compression may be explained in part by a model in which the fault zone is locked over a depth interval in the range of 2-5 to 15 km, but is very weak above and below that interval. This solution does require, however, a few mm/yr of creep at the surface on the San Andreas or nearby sub-parallel faults (such as the San Jacinto), which has not yet been observed, or a shallow zone near the faults of distributed deformation. -from Author

  7. Seismicity, fault plane solutions, depth of faulting, and active tectonics of the Andes of Peru, Ecuador, and southern Colombia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, G.; Molnar, P.; Burchfiel, B. C.

    1983-01-01

    The long-period P waveforms observed for 17 earthquakes in the Peruvian Andes during 1963-1976 are compared with synthetic waveforms to obtain fault-plane solutions and focal depths. The morphological units of the Peruvian Andes are characterized: coastal plains, Cordillera Occidental, altiplano and central high plateau, Cordillera Oriental, and sub-Andes. The data base and analysis methodology are discussed, and the results are presented in tables, diagrams, graphs, maps, and photographs illustrating typical formations. Most of the earthquakes are shown to occur in the transition zone from the sub-Andes to the Cordillera Oriental under formations of about 1 km elevation at focal depths of 10-38 km. It is suggested that the sub-Andean earthquakes reflect hinterland deformation of a detached fold and thrust belt, perhaps like that which occurred in parts of the Canadian Rockies. From the total crustal shortening evident in Andean morphology and the shortening rate of the recent earthquakes it is estimated that the topography and crustal root of the Andes have been formed during the last 90-135 Myr.

  8. Realizing the full potential of Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT) Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Chen, A.; Liu, L.; Parsekian, A.; Jafarov, E. E.; Panda, S. K.; Zebker, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT) product uses the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique to measure ground subsidence, active layer thickness (ALT), and thermokarst activity in permafrost regions. ReSALT supports research for the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) field campaign in Alaska and northwest Canada and is a precursor for a potential Nasa-Isro Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) product. ALT is a critical parameter for monitoring the status of permafrost and thermokarst activity is one of the key drivers of change in permafrost regions. The ReSALT product currently includes 1) long-term subsidence trends resulting from the melting and subsequent drainage of excess ground ice in permafrost-affected soils, 2) seasonal subsidence resulting from the expansion of soil water into ice as the active layer freezes and thaws, and 3) ALT estimated from the seasonal subsidence assuming a vertical profile of water within the soil column. ReSALT includes uncertainties for all parameters and is validated against in situ measurements from the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) network, Ground Penetrating Radar and mechanical probe measurements. We present high resolution ReSALT products on the North Slope of Alaska: Prudhoe Bay, Barrow, Toolik Lake, Happy Valley, and the Anaktuvuk fire zone. We believe that the ReSALT product could be expanded to include maps of individual thermokarst features identified as spatial anomalies in the subsidence trends, with quantified expansion rates. We illustrate the technique with multiple examples of thermokarst features on the North Slope of Alaska. Knowing the locations and expansion rates for individual features allows us to evaluate risks to human infrastructure. Our results highlight the untapped potential of the InSAR technique to remotely sense ALT and thermokarst dynamics over large areas of the Arctic.

  9. Quantitative molecular biology and gas flux measurements demonstrate soil treatment and depth affects on the distribution and activity of denitrifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, M. M.; Jahangir, M.; Cardenas, L.; Khalil, M.; Richards, K. R.; O'Flaherty, V.

    2010-12-01

    The growing industrialisation of agriculture has led to a dramatic increase in organic and inorganic nitrogen (N) fertiliser inputs to agro-ecosystems. This increase has had negative effects on the quality of water ecosystems and greenhouse gas emissions.The study objective was to quantify denitrification and denitrifying microorganisms, using real-time PCR assays of the nitrite reductase(nir) and nitrous oxide reductase(nos) functional gene copy concentrations (GCC g[soil]-1) in Irish agricultural surface and subsoils. Soil cores from 3 soil horizons (A:0-10 cm; B:45-55 cm; C:120-130cm) were amended with 3 alternate N- and C-source amendments (NO3-; NO3-+glucose-C; NO3-+Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC). Real-time production of N2O and N2 was recorded by gas chromatography in a specialized He/O2 environment. N2O and Total Denitrification (TDN) (N2O+N2) production was generally greater in surface soil (2.052 mg/kg/d TDN) than in subsoils (0.120 mg/kg/d TDN). The abundance of denitrifying nirS, nirK (nir) and nos genes was higher in the surface soil, decreasing with soil depth, except in incubations amended with NO3- and DOC, where the carbon source directly positively affected gene copy numbers and fluxes of N2O and N2 production. C addition increased soil denitrification rates, and resulted in higher N2O/(N2O+N2) ratios in surface soil (0.39) than subsoils (0.005), indicating that the subsoil had higher potential for complete reduction of N2O to N2. In the subsoils, complete reduction of NO3- due to glucose-C and DOC addition was observed. Interestingly, at all 3 soil depths, lower nirK abundance (2.78 105 GCC) was recorded, compared to nirS (1.45 107 GCC), but the overall abundance of nir (S+K) i.e. (1.54 107GCC), corresponded with N2O emission fluxes (3.34 mg/kg/d) Statistical analysis indicates negative correlation between nirK GCC and N2O production, but a strong positive correlation was observed between nirS GCC and N2O. We therefore hypothesize that the

  10. Thermal impacts of engineering activities and vegetation layer on permafrost in different alpine ecosystems of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingbai; Zhang, Zhongqiong; Gao, Siru; Ma, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Climate warming and engineering activities have various impacts on the thermal regime of permafrost in alpine ecosystems of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Using recent observations of permafrost thermal regimes along the Qinghai-Tibet highway and railway, the changes of such regimes beneath embankments constructed in alpine meadows and steppes are studied. The results show that alpine meadows on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau can have a controlling role among engineering construction effects on permafrost beneath embankments. As before railway construction, the artificial permafrost table (APT) beneath embankments is not only affected by climate change and engineering activities but is also controlled by alpine ecosystems. However, the change rate of APT is not dependent on ecosystem type, which is predominantly affected by climate change and engineering activities. Instead, the rate is mainly related to cooling effects of railway ballast and heat absorption effects of asphalt pavement. No large difference between alpine and steppe can be identified regarding the variation of soil temperature beneath embankments, but this difference is readily identified in the variation of mean annual soil temperature with depth. The vegetation layer in alpine meadows has an insulation role among engineering activity effects on permafrost beneath embankments, but this insulation gradually disappears because the layer decays and compresses over time. On the whole, this layer is advantageous for alleviating permafrost temperature rise in the short term, but its effect gradually weakens in the long term.

  11. An In-Depth Examination of Perceptions of Physical Activity in Regularly Active and Insufficiently Active Older African American Women: A Participatory Approach

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable research and programmatic efforts to alleviate racial/ethnic disparities in physical activity (PA), disparities in PA among older minorities and major racial ethnic groups persist. This study explored perceptions of PA among regularly active (RA) and insufficiently active (IA) older African American women (AAW) and the factors that influence (positively and negatively) their physical participation in their socio-cultural environment. A total of 20 AAW aged 60 to 80 years participated in a cross-sectional mixed-methods study (i.e., qualitative and quantitative) employing participatory research approaches (i.e., photoelicitation) along with an objective assessment of PA. Nine women were considered RA and 11 IA according to current PA recommendations. RA and IA women held two major beliefs about the nature of PA (i.e., PA as a broadly defined construct that goes beyond traditional exercise routines; and PA and exercise are synonymous and can be used interchangeably) and had a good understanding of its benefits. Participants in both groups did not know about the importance of PA intensity for health benefits. Barriers and facilitator of PA were found to be similar among RA and IA participants. Special attention should be paid to providing access to no or low cost opportunities for PA participation in safe environments. PMID:26554842

  12. An In-Depth Examination of Perceptions of Physical Activity in Regularly Active and Insufficiently Active Older African American Women: A Participatory Approach.

    PubMed

    Sebastião, Emerson; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek; Schwingel, Andiara

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable research and programmatic efforts to alleviate racial/ethnic disparities in physical activity (PA), disparities in PA among older minorities and major racial ethnic groups persist. This study explored perceptions of PA among regularly active (RA) and insufficiently active (IA) older African American women (AAW) and the factors that influence (positively and negatively) their physical participation in their socio-cultural environment. A total of 20 AAW aged 60 to 80 years participated in a cross-sectional mixed-methods study (i.e., qualitative and quantitative) employing participatory research approaches (i.e., photoelicitation) along with an objective assessment of PA. Nine women were considered RA and 11 IA according to current PA recommendations. RA and IA women held two major beliefs about the nature of PA (i.e., PA as a broadly defined construct that goes beyond traditional exercise routines; and PA and exercise are synonymous and can be used interchangeably) and had a good understanding of its benefits. Participants in both groups did not know about the importance of PA intensity for health benefits. Barriers and facilitator of PA were found to be similar among RA and IA participants. Special attention should be paid to providing access to no or low cost opportunities for PA participation in safe environments.

  13. Air-coupled piezoelectric transducers with active polypropylene foam matching layers.

    PubMed

    Gómez Alvarez-Arenas, Tomás E

    2013-05-10

    This work presents the design, construction and characterization of air-coupled piezoelectric transducers using 1-3 connectivity piezocomposite disks with a stack of matching layers being the outer one an active quarter wavelength layer made of polypropylene foam ferroelectret film. This kind of material has shown a stable piezoelectric response together with a very low acoustic impedance (<0.1 MRayl). These features make them a suitable candidate for the dual use or function proposed here: impedance matching layer and active material for air-coupled transduction. The transducer centre frequency is determined by the l/4 resonance of the polypropylene foam ferroelectret film (0.35 MHz), then, the rest of the transducer components (piezocomposite disk and passive intermediate matching layers) are all tuned to this frequency. The transducer has been tested in several working modes including pulse-echo and pitch-catch as well as wide and narrow band excitation. The performance of the proposed novel transducer is compared with that of a conventional air-coupled transducers operating in a similar frequency range.

  14. Activation of Extrasynaptic NMDARs at Individual Parallel Fiber–Molecular Layer Interneuron Synapses in Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Nahir, Ben

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) expressed by cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) are not activated by single exocytotic events but can respond to glutamate spillover following coactivation of adjacent parallel fibers (PFs), indicating that NMDARs are perisynaptic. Several types of synaptic plasticity rely on these receptors but whether they are activated at isolated synapses is not known. Using a combination of electrophysiological and optical recording techniques in acute slices of rat cerebellum, along with modeling, we find that repetitive activation of single PF–MLI synapses can activate NMDARs in MLIs. High-frequency stimulation, multivesicular release (MVR), or asynchronous release can each activate NMDARs. Frequency facilitation was found at all PF–MLI synapses but, while some showed robust MVR with increased release probability, most were limited to univesicular release. Together, these results reveal a functional diversity of PF synapses, which use different mechanisms to activate NMDARs. PMID:24107963

  15. Influence of the Halogen Activation on the Ozone Layer in XXIst Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Igor; Aloyan, Artash; Yermakov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the work is to evaluate a possible effect of heterophase chemical reactions (HCR) with participation of reservoir gases (ClONO2, HCl) and sulfate particles of the Junge layer on the ozone layer at mid-latitudes in the XXI century, which could be relevant for more accurate predicting a recovery of the ozone layer, taking into account that just these processes were the main cause of the ozone depletion at the end of XXth century. Required for calculating the dynamics of GHR data on the specific volume/surface of the sulfate aerosols in the lower stratosphere were taken from the data of field experiments. Their physico-chemical properties (chemical composition, density, water activity and free protons activity et al.) have been obtained with help of thermodynamic calculations (Atmospheric Inorganic Model, AIM). Altitude concentration profiles of individual gas components, as well as temperature and relative humidity (RH) at a given geographic location and season have been calculated using a two-dimensional model SOCRATES. The calculations have been made for the conditions of June 1995, 2040 and 2080 at 15 km altitude and 50° N latitude. It has been shown that the rate of ozone depletion as a result of processes involving halogen activation for the given conditions in 2040, 2080 is about 35% lower than a corresponding value in 1995 (a year of maximum effect of halogen activation). From this we can conclude that in the XXI century, despite the natural decline of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons. processes of halogen activation of the ozone depletion with participation of sulfate aerosols should be taken into account in the calculations of the recovery of the ozone layer at mid-latitudes.

  16. Activity retention after nisin entrapment in a polyethylene oxide brush layer.

    PubMed

    Auxier, Julie A; Schilke, Karl F; McGuire, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    The cationic, amphiphilic peptide nisin is an effective inhibitor of gram-positive bacteria whose mode of action does not encourage pathogenic resistance, and its proper incorporation into food packaging could enhance food stability, safety, and quality in a number of circumstances. Sufficiently small peptides have been shown to integrate into otherwise nonfouling polyethylene oxide (PEO) brush layers in accordance with their amphiphilicity and ordered structure, including nisin, and we have recently shown that nisin entrapment within a PEO layer does not compromise the nonfouling character of that layer. In this work we test the hypothesis that surface-bound, pendant PEO chains will inhibit displacement of entrapped nisin by competing proteins and, in this way, prolong retention of nisin activity at the interface. For this purpose, the antimicrobial activity of nisinloaded, PEO-coated surfaces was evaluated against the gram-positive indicator strain, Pediococcus pentosaceous. The retained antimicrobial activity of nisin layers was evaluated on uncoated and PEO-coated surfaces after incubation in the presence of bovine serum albumin for contact periods up to 1 week. Nisin-loaded, uncoated and PEO-coated samples were withdrawn at selected times and were incubated on plates inoculated with P. pentosaceous to quantify nisin activity by determination of kill zone radii. Our results indicate that nisin activity is retained at a higher level for a longer period of time after entrapment within PEO than after direct adsorption in the absence of PEO, owing to inhibition of nisin exchange with dissolved protein afforded by the pendant PEO chains.

  17. Effects of food, water depth, and temperature on diving activity of larval Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto: evidence for diving to forage.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Conan; Roitberg, Bernard D

    2013-12-01

    Anopheles gambiae larvae have frequently been observed to dive, but the ecology of this behavior has not been extensively examined. We manipulated food level, water depth, and temperature for individually-reared larvae and observed diving activity. Larvae dived more often under low food, which suggests that they dive to forage. There was only weak evidence for effects of water depth or temperature on diving. Experimental results are discussed in the context of energy budgets. Understanding larval ecology of this species is important for predicting how it will respond to environmental change. Further study is needed to assess the role that larval diving plays in both feeding ecology and thermal regulation of this and other medically important species.

  18. Active layer hydrology for Imnavait Creek, Toolik, Alaska. Annual progress report, July 1984--January 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.L.

    1986-12-31

    In the annual hydrologic cycle, snowmelt is the most significant event at Imnavait Creek located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Precipitation that has accumulated for more than 6 months on the surface melts in a relatively short period of 7 to 10 days once sustained melting occurs. During the ablation period, runoff dominates the hydrologic cycle. Some meltwater goes to rewetting the organic soils in the active layer. The remainder is lost primarily because of evaporation, since transpiration is not a very active process at this time. Following the snowmelt period, evapotranspiration becomes the dominate process, with base flow contributing the other watershed losses. It is important to note that the water initally lost by evapotranspiration entered the organic layer during melt. This water from the snowpack ensures that each year the various plant communities will have sufficient water to start a new summer of growth.

  19. Dual Gate Thin Film Transistors Based on Indium Oxide Active Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Kekuda, Dhananjaya; Rao, K. Mohan; Tolpadi, Amita; Chu, C. W.

    2011-07-15

    Polycrystalline Indium Oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films were employed as an active channel layer for the fabrication of bottom and top gate thin film transistors. While conventional SiO{sub 2} served as a bottom gate dielectric, cross-linked poly-4-vinylphenol (PVP) was used a top gate dielectric. These nano-crystalline TFTs exhibited n-channel behavior with their transport behavior highly dependent on the thickness of the channel. The correlation between the thickness of the active layer and TFT parameters such as on/off ratio, field-effect mobility, threshold voltage were carried out. The optical spectra revealed a high transmittance in the entire visible region, thus making them promising candidates for the display technology.

  20. Influence of active layer and support layer surface structures on organic fouling propensity of thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinglin; Arias Chavez, Laura H; Romero-Vargas Castrillón, Santiago; Ma, Jun; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the influence of surface structure on the fouling propensity of thin-film composite (TFC) forward osmosis (FO) membranes. Specifically, we compare membranes fabricated through identical procedures except for the use of different solvents (dimethylformamide, DMF and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone, NMP) during phase separation. FO fouling experiments were carried out with a feed solution containing a model organic foulant. The TFC membranes fabricated using NMP (NMP-TFC) had significantly less flux decline (7.47 ± 0.15%) when compared to the membranes fabricated using DMF (DMF-TFC, 12.70 ± 2.62% flux decline). Water flux was also more easily recovered through physical cleaning for the NMP-TFC membrane. To determine the fundamental cause of these differences in fouling propensity, the active and support layers of the membranes were extensively characterized for physical and chemical characteristics relevant to fouling behavior. Polyamide surface roughness was found to dominate all other investigated factors in determining the fouling propensities of our membranes relative to each other. The high roughness polyamide surface of the DMF-TFC membrane was also rich in larger leaf-like structures, whereas the lower roughness NMP-TFC membrane polyamide layer contained more nodular and smaller features. The support layers of the two membrane types were also characterized for their morphological properties, and the relation between support layer surface structure and polyamide active layer formation was discussed. Taken together, our findings indicate that support layer structure has a significant impact on the fouling propensity of the active layer, and this impact should be considered in the design of support layer structures for TFC membranes.

  1. Influence of active layer and support layer surface structures on organic fouling propensity of thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinglin; Arias Chavez, Laura H; Romero-Vargas Castrillón, Santiago; Ma, Jun; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we investigate the influence of surface structure on the fouling propensity of thin-film composite (TFC) forward osmosis (FO) membranes. Specifically, we compare membranes fabricated through identical procedures except for the use of different solvents (dimethylformamide, DMF and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone, NMP) during phase separation. FO fouling experiments were carried out with a feed solution containing a model organic foulant. The TFC membranes fabricated using NMP (NMP-TFC) had significantly less flux decline (7.47 ± 0.15%) when compared to the membranes fabricated using DMF (DMF-TFC, 12.70 ± 2.62% flux decline). Water flux was also more easily recovered through physical cleaning for the NMP-TFC membrane. To determine the fundamental cause of these differences in fouling propensity, the active and support layers of the membranes were extensively characterized for physical and chemical characteristics relevant to fouling behavior. Polyamide surface roughness was found to dominate all other investigated factors in determining the fouling propensities of our membranes relative to each other. The high roughness polyamide surface of the DMF-TFC membrane was also rich in larger leaf-like structures, whereas the lower roughness NMP-TFC membrane polyamide layer contained more nodular and smaller features. The support layers of the two membrane types were also characterized for their morphological properties, and the relation between support layer surface structure and polyamide active layer formation was discussed. Taken together, our findings indicate that support layer structure has a significant impact on the fouling propensity of the active layer, and this impact should be considered in the design of support layer structures for TFC membranes. PMID:25564877

  2. Assessing Metacognitive Activities: The In-Depth Comparison of a Task-Specific Questionnaire with Think-Aloud Protocols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellings, Gonny L.; van Hout-Wolters, Bernadette H. A .M.; Veenman, Marcel V. J.; Meijer, Joost

    2013-01-01

    Teaching and assessing metacognitive activities are important educational objectives, and teachers are calling for efficient instruments. The advantages of questionnaires in measuring metacognitive activities are obvious, but serious validity issues appear. For example, correlations of questionnaire data with think-aloud measures are generally…

  3. A Comparison of Active and Passive Methods for Control of Hypersonic Boundary Layers on Airbreathing Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Active and passive methods for control of hypersonic boundary layers have been experimentally examined in NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels on a Hyper-X model. Several configurations for forcing transition using passive discrete roughness elements and active mass addition, or blowing, methods were compared in two hypersonic facilities, the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air and the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air tunnels. Heat transfer distributions, obtained via phosphor thermography, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. The comparisons between the active and passive methods for boundary layer control were conducted at test conditions that nearly match the nominal Mach 7 flight trajectory of an angle-of-attack of 2-deg and length Reynolds number of 5.6 million. For the passive roughness examination, the primary parametric variation was a range of trip heights within the calculated boundary layer thickness for several trip concepts. The prior passive roughness study resulted in a swept ramp configuration being selected for the Mach 7 flight vehicle that was scaled to be roughly 0.6 of the calculated boundary layer thickness. For the active jet blowing study, the blowing manifold pressure was systematically varied for each configuration, while monitoring the mass flow, to determine the jet penetration height with schlieren and transition movement with the phosphor system for comparison to the passive results. All the blowing concepts tested were adequate for providing transition onset near the trip location with manifold stagnation pressures on the order of 40 times the model static pressure or higher.

  4. Acoustic radiation from the submerged circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li-Yun; Xiang, Yu; Lu, Jing; Jiang, Hong-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Based on the transfer matrix method of exploring the circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping (i.e., ACLD), combined with the analytical solution of the Helmholtz equation for a point source, a multi-point multipole virtual source simulation method is for the first time proposed for solving the acoustic radiation problem of a submerged ACLD shell. This approach, wherein some virtual point sources are assumed to be evenly distributed on the axial line of the cylindrical shell, and the sound pressure could be written in the form of the sum of the wave functions series with the undetermined coefficients, is demonstrated to be accurate to achieve the radiation acoustic pressure of the pulsating and oscillating spheres respectively. Meanwhile, this approach is proved to be accurate to obtain the radiation acoustic pressure for a stiffened cylindrical shell. Then, the chosen number of the virtual distributed point sources and truncated number of the wave functions series are discussed to achieve the approximate radiation acoustic pressure of an ACLD cylindrical shell. Applying this method, different radiation acoustic pressures of a submerged ACLD cylindrical shell with different boundary conditions, different thickness values of viscoelastic and piezoelectric layer, different feedback gains for the piezoelectric layer and coverage of ACLD are discussed in detail. Results show that a thicker thickness and larger velocity gain for the piezoelectric layer and larger coverage of the ACLD layer can obtain a better damping effect for the whole structure in general. Whereas, laying a thicker viscoelastic layer is not always a better treatment to achieve a better acoustic characteristic. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11162001, 11502056, and 51105083), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (Grant No. 2012GXNSFAA053207), the Doctor Foundation of Guangxi

  5. Depth-resolved fluorescence of human ectocervical tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yicong; Xi, Peng; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Yim, So Fan; Yu, Mei-Yung; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2005-04-01

    The depth-resolved autofluorescence of normal and dysplastic human ectocervical tissue within 120um depth were investigated utilizing a portable confocal fluorescence spectroscopy with the excitations at 355nm and 457nm. From the topmost keratinizing layer of all ectocervical tissue samples, strong keratin fluorescence with the spectral characteristics similar to collagen was observed, which created serious interference in seeking the correlation between tissue fluorescence and tissue pathology. While from the underlying non-keratinizing epithelial layer, the measured NADH fluorescence induced by 355nm excitation and FAD fluorescence induced by 457nm excitation were strongly correlated to the tissue pathology. The ratios between NADH over FAD fluorescence increased statistically in the CIN epithelial relative to the normal and HPV epithelia, which indicated increased metabolic activity in precancerous tissue. This study demonstrates that the depth-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy can reveal fine structural information on epithelial tissue and potentially provide more accurate diagnostic information for determining tissue pathology.

  6. Self-assembly Columnar Structure in Active Layer of Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Cheng; Segui, Jennifer; Yu, Yingjie; Li, Hongfei; Akgun, Bulent; Satijia, Sushil. K.; Gersappe, Dilip; Nam, Chang-Yong; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2012-02-01

    Bulk Heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells are an area of intense interest due to their flexibility and relatively low cost. However, due to the disordered inner structure in active layer, the power conversion efficiency of BHJ solar cell is relatively low. Our research provides the method to produce ordered self-assembly columnar structure within active layer of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell by introducing polystyrene (PS) into the active layer. The blend thin film of polystyrene, poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) at different ratio are spin coated on substrate and annealed in vacuum oven for certain time. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images show uniform phase segregation on the surface of polymer blend thin film and highly ordered columnar structure is then proven by etching the film with ion sputtering. TEM cross-section technology is also used to investigate the column structure. Neutron reflectometry was taken to establish the confinement of PCBM at the interface of PS and P3HT. The different morphological structures formed via phase segregation will be correlated with the performance of the PEV cells to be fabricated at the BNL-CFN.

  7. Origin of photogenerated carrier recombination at the metal-active layer interface in polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Dubey, Ashish; Reza, Khan Mamun; Adhikari, Nirmal; Qiao, Qiquan; Bommisetty, Venkat

    2015-11-01

    The role of the metal-active layer interface in photogenerated recombination has been investigated using nanoscale current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) and intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) in as-deposited, pre-annealed and post-annealed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Aluminum (Al) confined post-annealed BHJ solar cells exhibited a significantly improved device efficiency compared to pre-annealed BHJ solar cells having similar photocarrier harvesting ability in the active layer. The nanoscale topography and CS-AFM results indicate a uniform PCBM rich phase at the metal-active layer interface in the post-annealed cells, but PCBM segregation in the pre-annealed cells. These two different annealing processes showed different carrier dynamics revealed using IMPS under various light intensities. The IMPS results suggest reduced photo generated carrier recombination in uniform PCBM rich post-annealed BHJ solar cells. This study reveals the importance of the metal-bend interface in BHJ solar cells in order to obtain efficient charge carrier extraction for high efficiency. PMID:26431263

  8. Bioavailable Carbon and the Relative Degradation State of Organic Matter in Active Layer and Permafrost Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastrow, J. D.; Burke, V. J.; Vugteveen, T. W.; Fan, Z.; Hofmann, S. M.; Lederhouse, J. S.; Matamala, R.; Michaelson, G. J.; Mishra, U.; Ping, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    The decomposability of soil organic carbon (SOC) in permafrost regions is a key uncertainty in efforts to predict carbon release from thawing permafrost and its impacts. The cold and often wet environment is the dominant factor limiting decomposer activity, and soil organic matter is often preserved in a relatively undecomposed and uncomplexed state. Thus, the impacts of soil warming and permafrost thaw are likely to depend at least initially on the genesis and past history of organic matter degradation before its stabilization in permafrost. We compared the bioavailability and relative degradation state of SOC in active layer and permafrost soils from Arctic tundra in Alaska. To assess readily bioavailable SOC, we quantified salt (0.5 M K2SO4) extractable organic matter (SEOM), which correlates well with carbon mineralization rates in short-term soil incubations. To assess the relative degradation state of SOC, we used particle size fractionation to isolate fibric (coarse) from more degraded (fine) particulate organic matter (POM) and separated mineral-associated organic matter into silt- and clay-sized fractions. On average, bulk SOC concentrations in permafrost were lower than in comparable active layer horizons. Although SEOM represented a very small proportion of the bulk SOC, this proportion was greater in permafrost than in comparable active layer soils. A large proportion of bulk SOC was found in POM for all horizons. Even for mineral soils, about 40% of bulk SOC was in POM pools, indicating that organic matter in both active layer and permafrost mineral soils was relatively undecomposed compared to typical temperate soils. Not surprisingly, organic soils had a greater proportion of POM and mineral soils had greater silt- and clay-sized carbon pools, while cryoturbated soils were intermediate. For organic horizons, permafrost organic matter was generally more degraded than in comparable active layer horizons. However, in mineral and cryoturbated horizons

  9. Real-time monitoring of enzyme activity in a mesoporous silicon double layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosco, Manuel M.; Pacholski, Claudia; Sailor, Michael J.

    2009-04-01

    The activity of certain proteolytic enzymes is often an indicator of disease states such as cancer, stroke and neurodegeneracy, so there is a need for rapid assays that can characterize the kinetics and substrate specificity of enzymatic reactions. Nanostructured membranes can efficiently separate biomolecules, but coupling a sensitive detection method to such a membrane remains difficult. Here, we demonstrate a single mesoporous nanoreactor that can isolate and quantify in real time the reaction products of proteases. The reactor consists of two layers of porous films electrochemically prepared from crystalline silicon. The upper layer, with large pore sizes (~100 nm in diameter), traps the protease and acts as the reactor. The lower layer, with smaller pore sizes (~6 nm), excludes the proteases and other large proteins and captures the reaction products. Infiltration of the digested fragments into the lower layer produces a measurable change in optical reflectivity, and this allows label-free quantification of enzyme kinetics in real time within a volume of ~5 nl.

  10. Active layer warming and deepening at Thule, Greenland during past decade: a comparison of a Polar Desert and a Polar Semi-desert site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sletten, R. S.; Hagedorn, B.; Hallet, B.; Burnham, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Microclimate and soil temperature/moisture monitoring at a Polar Desert and a Polar Semi-Desert site at Thule, Greenland reveals recent warming trends and distinct differences between these two sites. Approximately 5 C of warming occurred at the Polar Desert site from 2004 to 2009, while the Polar Semi-desert site warmed only about 3.5 C. Since 2009, the temperatures remain higher but stable. This warming trend is also reflected in the active layer, both in warming of the soil and in deepening of the active layer. Trends in soil temperatures and active layer depth are controlled substantially by the snow cover. For the Polar Semi-desert site, soil temperatures are measured both under natural snow accumulation conditions and under enhanced snow accumulation where a snow fence was installed. The insulating effect of the snow cover is effective and results in significantly warmer winter soils, as has been shown in other artificial snow cover studies. The warmer winter soils may allow greater respiration during the transition seasons thereby releasing more of the accumulated soil carbon in these sites than that we have previously documented. The trends in temperature and moisture may in part be controlled by the higher wind velocities at the Polar Desert site. These conditions are likely to be dominant controls on the ecosystem, along with differences in lithology which affects the cryoturbation of the soils. This in-depth microclimate study, along with our studies of the soils and soil water chemistry provides a detailed comparison of the adjacent ecosystems and may allow us to better predict how slight changes in climatic conditions may influence these systems and their subsequent feedback on carbon cycling.

  11. Active but inoperable thrombin is accumulated in a plasma protein layer surrounding Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Naudin, Clément; Hurley, Sinead M; Malmström, Erik; Plug, Tom; Shannon, Oonagh; Meijers, Joost C M; Mörgelin, Matthias; Björck, Lars; Herwald, Heiko

    2015-10-01

    Activation of thrombin is a critical determinant in many physiological and pathological processes including haemostasis and inflammation. Under physiological conditions many of these functions are involved in wound healing or eradication of an invading pathogen. However, when activated systemically, thrombin can contribute to severe and life-threatening conditions by causing complications such as multiple multi-organ failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. In the present study we investigated how the activity of thrombin is modulated when it is bound to the surface of Streptococcus pyogenes. Our data show that S. pyogenes bacteria become covered with a proteinaceous layer when incubated with human plasma, and that thrombin is a constituent of this layer. Though the coagulation factor is found attached to the bacteria with a functional active site, thrombin has lost its capacity to interact with its natural substrates and inhibitors. Thus, the interaction of bacteria with human plasma renders thrombin completely inoperable at the streptococcal surface. This could represent a host defense mechanism to avoid systemic activation of coagulation which could be otherwise induced when bacteria enter the circulation and cause systemic infection.

  12. Layer-by-layer assembly of TiO2 nanowire/carbon nanotube films and characterization of their photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darányi, Mária; Csesznok, Tamás; Kukovecz, Ákos; Kónya, Zoltán; Kiricsi, Imre; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Vajtai, Robert

    2011-05-01

    We report on the layer-by-layer (LbL) formation of TiO2-MWNT-TiO2 coatings on quartz with either trititanate derived TiO2 nanowires or Degussa P25 as the photocatalytically active material. The optimized deposition sequence is discussed in detail and the morphology of the prepared coatings is analyzed by SEM and XRD. The heterogeneous photocatalytic performance of the coatings was tested in the methyl orange oxidation reaction. The apparent first order rate constant fell in the 0.01-0.20 h - 1 range over a 2.5 × 2.5 cm2 film depending on the type and the thickness of the titanate coating. Building a multiwall carbon nanotube layer into the middle of the layer improved the photocatalytic activity for each material for all of the studied thicknesses. P25 based films performed 2-5 times better than TiO2 nanowire films; however, the pores in the P25 based films were largely blocked because the isotropic P25 nanoparticles form closely packed layers by themselves and even more so with the comparably sized multiwall carbon nanotubes. Therefore, films derived from titanate nanowires appear to be more suitable for use as multifunctional, photocatalytically active filtration media.

  13. Diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs along depth profiles of arctic and subarctic lake water column and sediments

    PubMed Central

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J; Pohlman, John W; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emitted from high-latitude lakes accounts for 2–6% of the global atmospheric CH4 budget. Methanotrophs in lake sediments and water columns mitigate the amount of CH4 that enters the atmosphere, yet their identity and activity in arctic and subarctic lakes are poorly understood. We used stable isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), pyrosequencing and enrichment cultures to determine the identity and diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs in the water columns and sediments (0–25 cm) from an arctic tundra lake (Lake Qalluuraq) on the north slope of Alaska and a subarctic taiga lake (Lake Killarney) in Alaska's interior. The water column CH4 oxidation potential for these shallow (∼2 m deep) lakes was greatest in hypoxic bottom water from the subarctic lake. The type II methanotroph, Methylocystis, was prevalent in enrichment cultures of planktonic methanotrophs from the water columns. In the sediments, type I methanotrophs (Methylobacter, Methylosoma and Methylomonas) at the sediment-water interface (0–1 cm) were most active in assimilating CH4, whereas the type I methanotroph Methylobacter and/or type II methanotroph Methylocystis contributed substantially to carbon acquisition in the deeper (15–20 cm) sediments. In addition to methanotrophs, an unexpectedly high abundance of methylotrophs also actively utilized CH4-derived carbon. This study provides new insight into the identity and activity of methanotrophs in the sediments and water from high-latitude lakes. PMID:22592821

  14. Diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs along depth profiles of arctic and subarctic lake water column and sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    He, Ruo; Wooller, Matthew J.; Pohlman, John W.; Quensen, John; Tiedje, James M.; Leigh, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emitted from high-latitude lakes accounts for 2–6% of the global atmospheric CH4 budget. Methanotrophs in lake sediments and water columns mitigate the amount of CH4 that enters the atmosphere, yet their identity and activity in arctic and subarctic lakes are poorly understood. We used stable isotope probing (SIP), quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), pyrosequencing and enrichment cultures to determine the identity and diversity of active aerobic methanotrophs in the water columns and sediments (0–25 cm) from an arctic tundra lake (Lake Qalluuraq) on the north slope of Alaska and a subarctic taiga lake (Lake Killarney) in Alaska's interior. The water column CH4 oxidation potential for these shallow (~2m deep) lakes was greatest in hypoxic bottom water from the subarctic lake. The type II methanotroph, Methylocystis, was prevalent in enrichment cultures of planktonic methanotrophs from the water columns. In the sediments, type I methanotrophs (Methylobacter, Methylosoma and Methylomonas) at the sediment-water interface (0–1 cm) were most active in assimilating CH4, whereas the type I methanotroph Methylobacter and/or type II methanotroph Methylocystis contributed substantially to carbon acquisition in the deeper (15–20 cm) sediments. In addition to methanotrophs, an unexpectedly high abundance of methylotrophs also actively utilized CH4-derived carbon. This study provides new insight into the identity and activity of methanotrophs in the sediments and water from high-latitude lakes.

  15. Superior Photostability and Photocatalytic Activity of ZnO Nanoparticles Coated with Ultrathin TiO2 Layers through Atomic-Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Kishore; Jang, Eunyong; Park, Young Min; Park, Tae Joo

    2015-12-21

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) is a thin-film growth technology that allows for conformal growth of thin films with atomic-level control over their thickness. Although ALD is successful in the semiconductor manufacturing industry, its feasibility for nanoparticle coating has been less explored. Herein, the ALD coating of TiO2 layers on ZnO nanoparticles by employing a specialized rotary reactor is demonstrated. The photocatalytic activity and photostability of ZnO nanoparticles coated with TiO2 layers by ALD and chemical methods were examined by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B dye under UV irradiation. Even though the photocatalytic activity of the presynthesized ZnO nanoparticles is higher than that of commercial P25 TiO2 nanoparticles, their activity tends to decline due to severe photocorrosion. The chemically synthesized TiO2 coating layer on ZnO resulted in severely declined photoactivity despite the improved photostability. However, ultrathin and conformal ALD TiO2 coatings (≈ 0.75-1.5 nm) on ZnO improved its photostability without degradation of photocatalytic activity. Surprisingly, the photostability is comparable to that of pure TiO2, and the photocatalytic activity to that of pure ZnO.

  16. Possible Future Changes in Permafrost and Active Layer Thickness in Northern Eurasia and their Relation to Permafrost Carbon Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, S. S.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Chapman, W. L.; Walsh, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Recent observations indicate a warming of permafrost in many northern regions with the resulting degradation of ice-rich and carbon-rich permafrost. Permafrost temperature has increased by 1 to 3 deg C in northern Eurasia during the last 30 years. To assess possible changes in the permafrost thermal state and the active layer thickness we implemented the GIPL2 (Geophysical Institute Permafrost Lab) transient model for the entire Northern Eurasia for the 1981-2100 time period. Input parameters to the model are spatial datasets of mean monthly air temperature, snow properties or SWE, prescribed vegetation and thermal properties of the multilayered soil column, and water content. The climate scenario was derived from an ensemble of five IPCC Global Circulation Models (GCM) ECHAM5, GFDL21, CCSM, HADcm and CCCMA. The outputs from these five models have been scaled down to 25 km spatial resolution with monthly temporal resolution, based on the composite (mean) output of the five models, using the IPCC SRES A1B CO2 emission scenario through the end of current century. Historic ground temperature measurements in shallow boreholes (3.2 m in depth) from more than 120 weather stations located within the continuous, discontinuous, and sporadic permafrost zones were available for the initial model validation and calibration. To prescribe the thermal properties we used the map of soil characteristics for whole of Russia (Stolbovoi & Savin, 2002) and the map of Soil Carbon Pools, CO2 and CH4 emissions (Tarnocai et al., 2009) and also the soil structure descriptions available for some locations. We estimated dynamics of the seasonally thawed volume of soils within the two upper meters for the entire North Eurasia. The model results indicate 1,200 km3 of seasonally unfrozen soils within the two upper meters within 10,800,000 km2 of northern Eurasian permafrost domain during the last two decades of the 20th century. Our projections have shown that unfrozen volume of soil within two

  17. Study on Na layer response to geomagnetic activities based on Odin/OSIRIS Na density data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Takuo; Nakamura, Takuji; Hedin, Jonas; Gumbel, Jorg; Hosokawa, Keisuke; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Nishiyama, Takanori; Takahashi, Toru

    2016-07-01

    The Na layer is normally distributed from 80 to 110 km, and the height range is corresponding to the ionospheric D and E region. In the polar region, the energetic particles precipitating from the magnetosphere can often penetrate into the E region and even into the D region. Thus, the influence of the energetic particles to the Na layer is one of interests in the aspect of the atmospheric composition change accompanied with the auroral activity. There are several previous studies in this issue. For example, recently, we have reported an initial result on a clear relationship between the electron density increase (due to the energetic particles) and the Na density decrease from observational data sets obtained by Na lidar, EISCAT VHF radar, and optical instruments at Tromsoe, Norway on 24-25 January 2012. However, all of the previous studies had been carried out based on case studies by ground-based lidar observations. In this study, we have performed, for the first time, statistical analysis using Na density data from 2004 to 2009 obtained with the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS) onboard Odin satellite. In the presentation, we will show relationship between the Na density and geomagnetic activities, and its latitudinal variation. Based on these results, the Na layer response to the energetic particles will be discussed.

  18. Enhancing the performance of nanofiltration membranes by modifying the active layer with aramide dendrimers.

    PubMed

    de Jubera, Ana M Saenz; Gao, Yuan; Moore, Jeffrey S; Cahill, David G; Mariñas, Benito J

    2012-09-01

    The fully aromatic polyamide active layer of a commercial nanofiltration membrane was modified with three generations (G1, G2, and G3) of aramide dendrimers, all with oligoethylene glycol chains on their peripheries. Permeation experiments revealed that the rejection of Rhodamine WT, used as a surrogate for organic contaminants, improved 1-2 orders of magnitude for membranes modified with G2 and G3 dendrimers at loadings of 0.7-3.5 μg/cm(2) (dendrimer layer thicknesses of ~1-6 nm) compared to the performance of unmodified membranes. In contrast, the corresponding water permeability of dendrimer-modified membranes decreased by only ~30%. Although an enhancement in the rejection of H(3)AsO(3), NaCl, and BaCl(2) was also observed for dendritic membranes, the effect was less pronounced than that for rhodamine WT. Characterization of membranes modified with 3.5 μg/cm(2) dendrimers G2 and G3 by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with the aid of heavy ion probes (Ag(+) and Ba(2+)) revealed that accessibility of the larger Ba(2+) probe to carboxylate groups on the active layer decreased for the membranes modified with dendrimers.

  19. Statistical analysis on Na layer response to geomagnetic activities using Odin/OSIRIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Takuo T.; Nakamura, Takuji; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.; Nishiyama, Takanori; Hosokawa, Keisuke; Takahashi, Toru; Gumbel, Jörg; Hedin, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    The Na layer is normally distributed from 80 to 110 km, and the height range is corresponding to the ionospheric D and E region. In the polar region, the energetic particles precipitating from the magnetosphere can often penetrate into the E region and even into the D region. Thus, the influence of the energetic particles to the Na layer is one of interests in the aspect of the atmospheric composition change accompanied with the auroral activity. There are several previous studies in this issue. For example, recently, we have reported an initial result on a clear relationship between the electron density increase (due to the energetic particles) and the Na density decrease from observational dataset obtained by Na lidar, EISCAT VHF radar, and optical instruments at Tromsoe, Norway on 24-25 January 2012. However, all of the previous studies had been carried out based on case studies by ground-based lidar observations. In this study, we have performed, for the first time, statistical analysis using Na density data from 2004 to 2009 obtained with the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS) onboard Odin satellite. In the presentation, we will show relationship between the Na density and geomagnetic activities, and its latitudinal variation. Based on these results, the Na layer response to the energetic particles will be discussed.

  20. Design method of the layered active magnetic regenerator (AMR) for hydrogen liquefaction by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Inmyong; Kim, Youngkwon; Park, Jiho; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2015-09-01

    The design procedure of an active magnetic regenerator (AMR) operating between liquid nitrogen temperature and liquid hydrogen temperature is discussed with the selected magnetic refrigerants. Selected magnetic refrigerants (GdNi2, Dy0.85Er0.15Al2, Dy0.5Er0.5Al2, and Gd0.1Dy0.9Ni2) that have different transition temperatures are layered in an AMR to widen the temperature span. The optimum volume fraction of the layered refrigerants for the maximum COP with minimum volume is designed in a two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) using one dimensional numerical simulation. The entropy generation in each stage of the AMR is calculated by the numerical simulation to optimize the proposed design. The main sources of the entropy generation in the AMR are pressure drop, convection and conduction heat transfers in the AMR. However, the entropy generation by the convective heat transfer is mostly dominant in the optimized cases. In this paper, the design parameters and the operating conditions such as the distribution of the selected refrigerants in the layered AMR, the intermediate temperature between two stages and the mass flow rate of heat transfer fluid are specifically determined to maximize the performance of the AMR. The proposed design method will facilitate the construction of AMR systems with various magnetic refrigerants and conditions such as AMR size, operating temperature range, and magnetic field variation.

  1. Layer V Perirhinal Cortical Ensemble Activity during Object Exploration: A Comparison between Young and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Burke, S.N.; Hartzell, A.L.; Lister, J.P.; Hoang, L.T.; Barnes, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Object recognition memory requires the perirhinal cortex (PRC) and this cognitive function declines during normal aging. Recent electrophysiological recordings from young rats have shown that neurons in layer V of the PRC are activated by 3-dimensional objects. Thus, it is possible that age-related object recognition deficits result from alterations in PRC neuron activity in older animals. To examine this, the present study used cellular compartment analysis of temporal activity by fluorescence in situ hybridization (catFISH) with confocal microscopy to monitor cellular distributions of activity-induced Arc RNA in layer V of the PRC. Activity was monitored during two distinct epochs of object exploration. In one group of rats (6 young/6 aged) animals were placed in a familiar testing arena and allowed to explore five different 3-dimensional objects for two 5-min sessions separated by a 20-min rest (AA). The second group of animals (6 young/6 aged) also explored the same objects for two 5-min sessions, but the environment was changed between the first and the second epoch (AB). Behavioral data showed that both age groups spent less time exploring objects during the second epoch, even when the environment changed, indicating successful recognition. Although the proportion of active neurons between epochs did not change in the AA group, in the AB group more neurons were active during epoch 2 of object exploration. This recruitment of neurons into the active neural ensemble could serve to signal that familiar stimuli are being encountered in a new context. When numbers of Arc positive neurons were compared between age groups, the old rats had significantly lower proportions of Arc-positive PRC neurons in both the AA and AB behavioral conditions. These data support the hypothesis that age-associated functional alterations in the PRC contribute to declines in stimulus recognition over the lifespan. PMID:22987683

  2. Layer V perirhinal cortical ensemble activity during object exploration: a comparison between young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Burke, S N; Hartzell, A L; Lister, J P; Hoang, L T; Barnes, C A

    2012-10-01

    Object recognition memory requires the perirhinal cortex (PRC) and this cognitive function declines during normal aging. Recent electrophysiological recordings from young rats have shown that neurons in Layer V of the PRC are activated by three-dimensional objects. Thus, it is possible that age-related object recognition deficits result from alterations in PRC neuron activity in older animals. To examine this, the present study used cellular compartment analysis of temporal activity by fluorescence in situ hybridization (catFISH) with confocal microscopy to monitor cellular distributions of activity-induced Arc RNA in layer V of the PRC. Activity was monitored during two distinct epochs of object exploration. In one group of rats (6 young/6 aged) animals were placed in a familiar testing arena and allowed to explore five different three-dimensional objects for two 5-min sessions separated by a 20-min rest (AA). The second group of animals (6 young/6 aged) also explored the same objects for two 5-min sessions, but the environment was changed between the first and the second epoch (AB). Behavioral data showed that both age groups spent less time exploring objects during the second epoch, even when the environment changed, indicating successful recognition. Although the proportion of active neurons between epochs did not change in the AA group, in the AB group more neurons were active during epoch 2 of object exploration. This recruitment of neurons into the active neural ensemble could serve to signal that familiar stimuli are being encountered in a new context. When numbers of Arc positive neurons were compared between age groups, the old rats had significantly lower proportions of Arc-positive PRC neurons in both the AA and AB behavioral conditions. These data support the hypothesis that age-associated functional alterations in the PRC contribute to declines in stimulus recognition over the lifespan.

  3. Sampling Depths, Depth Shifts, and Depth Resolutions for Bi(n)(+) Ion Analysis in Argon Gas Cluster Depth Profiles.

    PubMed

    Havelund, R; Seah, M P; Gilmore, I S

    2016-03-10

    Gas cluster sputter depth profiling is increasingly used for the spatially resolved chemical analysis and imaging of organic materials. Here, a study is reported of the sampling depth in secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. It is shown that effects of the sampling depth leads to apparent shifts in depth profiles of Irganox 3114 delta layers in Irganox 1010 sputtered, in the dual beam mode, using 5 keV Ar₂₀₀₀⁺ ions and analyzed with Bi(q+), Bi₃(q+) and Bi₅(q+) ions (q = 1 or 2) with energies between 13 and 50 keV. The profiles show sharp delta layers, broadened from their intrinsic 1 nm thickness to full widths at half-maxima (fwhm's) of 8-12 nm. For different secondary ions, the centroids of the measured delta layers are shifted deeper or shallower by up to 3 nm from the position measured for the large, 564.36 Da (C₃₃H₄₆N₃O₅⁻) characteristic ion for Irganox 3114 used to define a reference position. The shifts are linear with the Bi(n)(q+) beam energy and are greatest for Bi₃(q+), slightly less for Bi₅(q+) with its wider or less deep craters, and significantly less for Bi(q+) where the sputtering yield is very low and the primary ion penetrates more deeply. The shifts increase the fwhm’s of the delta layers in a manner consistent with a linearly falling generation and escape depth distribution function (GEDDF) for the emitted secondary ions, relevant for a paraboloid shaped crater. The total depth of this GEDDF is 3.7 times the delta layer shifts. The greatest effect is for the peaks with the greatest shifts, i.e. Bi₃(q+) at the highest energy, and for the smaller fragments. It is recommended that low energies be used for the analysis beam and that carefully selected, large, secondary ion fragments are used for measuring depth distributions, or that the analysis be made in the single beam mode using the sputtering Ar cluster ions also for analysis. PMID:26883085

  4. Low-noise encoding of active touch by layer 4 in the somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Hires, Samuel Andrew; Gutnisky, Diego A; Yu, Jianing; O'Connor, Daniel H; Svoboda, Karel

    2015-08-06

    Cortical spike trains often appear noisy, with the timing and number of spikes varying across repetitions of stimuli. Spiking variability can arise from internal (behavioral state, unreliable neurons, or chaotic dynamics in neural circuits) and external (uncontrolled behavior or sensory stimuli) sources. The amount of irreducible internal noise in spike trains, an important constraint on models of cortical networks, has been difficult to estimate, since behavior and brain state must be precisely controlled or tracked. We recorded from excitatory barrel cortex neurons in layer 4 during active behavior, where mice control tactile input through learned whisker movements. Touch was the dominant sensorimotor feature, with >70% spikes occurring in millisecond timescale epochs after touch onset. The variance of touch responses was smaller than expected from Poisson processes, often reaching the theoretical minimum. Layer 4 spike trains thus reflect the millisecond-timescale structure of tactile input with little noise.

  5. Atomic layer deposition encapsulated activated carbon electrodes for high voltage stable supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kijoo; Cho, Moonkyu; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-01-28

    Operating voltage enhancement is an effective route for high energy density supercapacitors. Unfortunately, widely used activated carbon electrode generally suffers from poor electrochemical stability over 2.5 V. Here we present atomic layer deposition (ALD) encapsulation of activated carbons for high voltage stable supercapacitors. Two-nanometer-thick Al2O3 dielectric layers are conformally coated at activated carbon surface by ALD, well-maintaining microporous morphology. Resultant electrodes exhibit excellent stability at 3 V operation with 39% energy density enhancement from 2.5 V operation. Because of the protection of surface functional groups and reduction of electrolyte degradation, 74% of initial voltage was maintained 50 h after full charge, and 88% of capacitance was retained after 5000 cycles at 70 °C accelerated test, which correspond to 31 and 17% improvements from bare activated carbon, respectively. This ALD-based surface modification offers a general method to enhance electrochemical stability of carbon materials for diverse energy and environmental applications.

  6. Teaching Depth of Field Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Frederick C.; Smith, Rodney J.

    1978-01-01

    This activity utilizes an overhead projector, a wax pencil, and a petri-dish to demonstrate the depth of field concept to students learning the use of the microscope. Illustrations and directions are included. (MA)

  7. Role of interfacial friction for flow instabilities in a thin polar-ordered active fluid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Niladri; Basu, Abhik

    2015-11-01

    We construct a generic coarse-grained dynamics of a thin inflexible planar layer of polar-ordered suspension of active particles that is frictionally coupled to an embedding isotropic passive fluid medium with a friction coefficient Γ . Being controlled by Γ , our model provides a unified framework to describe the long-wavelength behavior of a variety of thin polar-ordered systems, ranging from wet to dry active matter and free-standing active films. Investigations of the linear instabilities around a chosen orientationally ordered uniform reference state reveal generic moving and static instabilities in the system that can depend sensitively on Γ . Based on our results, we discuss estimation of bounds on Γ in experimentally accessible systems.

  8. Natural fracturing, by depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, John; Laubach, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Natural opening-mode fractures commonly fall upon a spectrum whose end-members are veins, which have wide ranges of sizes and are mostly or thoroughly cemented, and joints, which have little opening displacement and little or no cement. The vein end-member is common in metamorphic rocks, whose high temperature and pressure of formation place them outside typical reservoir settings; conversely, many uncemented joints likely form near the surface and so too have limited relevance to subsurface exploration. Sampling of cores retrieved from tight-gas sandstone reservoirs suggest that it is intermediate fractures, not true joints or veins, that provide natural porosity and permeability. Such fractures have abundant pore space among fracture-bridging cements, which may hold fractures open despite varying states of stress through time. Thus the more sophisticated our understanding of the processes that form veins and joints, i.e., how natural fracturing varies by depth, the better our ability to predict intermediate fractures. Systematic differences between veins and joints, in terms of size-scaling and lateral and stratigraphic spatial arrangement, have been explained in the literature by the mechanical effects of sedimentary layering, which likely exert more control over fracture patterns at shallower depths. Thus stratabound joints commonly have narrow size ranges and regular spacing; non-stratabound veins have a wide range of sizes and spacings. However, new fieldwork and careful literature review suggest that the effects of mechanical layering are only half the story. Although atypical, veins may be highly stratabound and yet spatially clustered; non-stratabound fractures may nonetheless feature narrow size ranges. These anomalous fracture arrangements are better explained by the presence of precipitating cements during fracture opening than by mechanical layering. Cement is thought to be highly important for fracture permeability, but potential effects of

  9. Aminosilane layers on the plasma activated thermoplastics: influence of solvent on its structure and morphology.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Vijaya; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2013-12-01

    The chemistry and the structure of aminosilane layer on the plasma activated thermoplastic substrates, e.g., polycarbonate (PC), polystyrene (PS), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and cyclic olefin co-polymer (COC) were investigated at the molecular level. The nature of the surface functional groups of the silane layers prepared by solution phase deposition in aqueous and anhydrous solvents were studied using various techniques including ellipsometry, goniometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). The XPS analyses revealed the presence of various oxygen functionalities on the plasma activated thermoplastics. Considerable differences were observed for the structure of aminosilane depending on the solvent used for the reaction. Deposition from aqueous solution resulted in relatively flat and smooth surfaces with consistent thickness compared to the anhydrous solution deposition. In the former case, 33% of the total nitrogen accounted for protonated amine and 16% for the free amino groups. In the latter, only 6% accounted for the protonated amine. The point of zero charge (pzc), on the aminosilane modified PC was found to be around 7, indicated that the surface is positively charged below pH 7 and negatively charged above pH 7. The surface analysis data suggested that various interactions are possible between the plasma activated thermoplastic surface and the aminosilane. In general, they are bound to the surface through covalent bond formation between the oxygen functionalities on the thermoplastic surface and the amino or the silanol groups of the aminosilane.

  10. Hot-Film and Hot-Wire Anemometry for a Boundary Layer Active Flow Control Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenahan, Keven C.; Schatzman, David M.; Wilson, Jacob Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Unsteady active flow control (AFC) has been used experimentally for many years to minimize bluff-body drag. This technology could significantly improve performance of rotorcraft by cleaning up flow separation. It is important, then, that new actuator technologies be studied for application to future vehicles. A boundary layer wind tunnel was constructed with a 1ft-x-3ft test section and unsteady measurement instrumentation to study how AFC manipulates the boundary layer to overcome adverse pressure gradients and flow separation. This unsteady flow control research requires unsteady measurement methods. In order to measure the boundary layer characteristics, both hot-wire and hot-film Constant Temperature Anemometry is used. A hot-wire probe is mounted in the flow to measure velocity while a hot-film array lays on the test surface to measure skin friction. Hot-film sensors are connected to an anemometer, a Wheatstone bridge circuit with an output that corresponds to the dynamic flow response. From this output, the time varying flow field, turbulence, and flow reversal can be characterized. Tuning the anemometers requires a fan test on the hot-film sensors to adjust each output. This is a delicate process as several variables drastically affect the data, including control resistance, signal input, trim, and gain settings.

  11. Evidence for reduced charge recombination in carbon nanotube/perovskite-based active layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A.; Jeong, Seung Pyo; Han, Xu; Cutting, Christie L.; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Venkataraman, D.

    2016-10-01

    Using impedance spectroscopy and computation, we show that incorporation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in the bulk of the active layer of perovskite-based solar cells reduces charge recombination and increases the open circuit voltage. An ∼87% reduction in recombination was achieved when MWCNTs were introduced in the planar-heterostructure perovskite solar cell containing mixed counterions. The open circuit voltage (Voc) of perovskite/MWCNTs devices was increased by 70 mV, while the short circuit current density (Jsc) and fill factor (FF) remained unchanged.

  12. Improved Power Conversion Efficiency of Inverted Organic Solar Cells by Incorporating Au Nanorods into Active Layer.

    PubMed

    He, Yeyuan; Liu, Chunyu; Li, Jinfeng; Zhang, Xinyuan; Li, Zhiqi; Shen, Liang; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2015-07-29

    This Research Article describes a cooperative plasmonic effect on improving the performance of organic solar cells. When Au nanorods(NRs) are incorporated into the active layers, the designed project shows superior enhanced light absorption behavior comparing with control devices, which leads to the realization of organic solar cell with power conversion efficiency of 6.83%, accounting for 18.9% improvement. Further investigations unravel the influence of plasmonic nanostructures on light trapping, exciton generation, dissociation, and charge recombination and transport inside the thin films devices. Moreover, the introduction of high-conductivity Au NRs improves electrical conductivity of the whole device, which contributes to the enhanced fill factor.

  13. Correlations between the Heterogeneity of Permafrost Thaw Depth and Vegetation in Boreal Forests and Arctic Tundra in Alaska.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uy, K. L. Q.; Natali, S.; Kholodov, A. L.; Loranty, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Global climate change induces rapid large scale changes in the far Northern regions of the globe, which include the thickening of the active layer of arctic and subarctic soils. Active layer depth, in turn, drives many changes to the hydrology and geochemistry of the soil, making an understanding of this layer essential to boreal forest and arctic tundra ecology. Because the structure of plant communities can affect the thermal attributes of the soil, they may drive variations in active layer depth. For instance, trees and tussocks create shade, which reduces temperatures, but also hold snow, which increases temperature through insulation; these aspects of vegetation can increase or decrease summer thaw. The goal of this project is to investigate correlations between the degree of heterogeneity of active layer depths, organic layer thickness, and aboveground vegetation to determine how these facets of Northern ecosystems interact at the ecosystem scale. Permafrost thaw and organic layer depths were measured along 20m transects in twenty-four boreal forest and tundra sites in Alaska. Aboveground vegetation along these transects was characterized by measuring tree diameter at breast height (DBH), tussock dimensions, and understory biomass. Using the coefficient of variation as a measure of heterogeneity, we found a positive correlation between thaw depth variability and tussock volume variability, but little correlation between the former and tree DBH variability. Soil organic layer depth variability was also positively correlated with thaw depth variability, but weakly correlated with tree and tussock heterogeneity. These data suggest that low vegetation and organic layer control the degree of variability in permafrost thaw at the ecosystem scale. Vegetation can thus affect the microtopography of permafrost and future changes in the plant community that affect vegetation heterogeneity will drive corresponding changes in the variability of the soil.

  14. Is visual short-term memory depthful?

    PubMed

    Reeves, Adam; Lei, Quan

    2014-03-01

    Does visual short-term memory (VSTM) depend on depth, as it might be if information was stored in more than one depth layer? Depth is critical in natural viewing and might be expected to affect retention, but whether this is so is currently unknown. Cued partial reports of letter arrays (Sperling, 1960) were measured up to 700 ms after display termination. Adding stereoscopic depth hardly affected VSTM capacity or decay inferred from total errors. The pattern of transposition errors (letters reported from an uncued row) was almost independent of depth and cue delay. We conclude that VSTM is effectively two-dimensional. PMID:24491386

  15. Noninvasive localization of electromagnetic epileptic activity. II. Demonstration of sublobar accuracy in patients with simultaneous surface and depth recordings.

    PubMed

    Lantz, G; Grave de Peralta Menendez, R; Gonzalez Andino, S; Michel, C M

    2001-01-01

    Seven patients with complex partial epileptic seizures undergoing invasive video/EEG-monitoring were investigated with a combination of 10 subdural strip electrode contacts (subtemporal + lateral temporal), and 22 extracranial recording sites. In each patient spikes with different intracranial distributions were identified, and for those with similar distributions the extracranial activity was averaged. A new inverse solution method called EPIFOCUS (Grave et al. 2001, this issue) was used to reconstruct the sources of both single and averaged spikes in a standard 3D-MRI, and a statistical analysis was performed in order to demonstrate location differences between spikes with different intracranial distributions. The results revealed significantly more anterior and ventral source locations for subtemporal compared to lateral temporal spikes. Within the subtemporal group, medial spikes had more mesial and dorsal locations compared to lateral ones. In the lateral temporal group, more anterior and ventral locations were obtained for anterior compared to posterior spikes. The results demonstrate the applicability of EPIFOCUS in the localization of sources in the temporal lobe with sublobar accuracy. This possibility may become important in the future, for instance in identifying cases where amygdalo-hippocampectomy or other limited temporal lobe resections may replace the standard en bloc resections.

  16. Carbonate-derived CO 2 purging magma at depth: Influence on the eruptive activity of Somma-Vesuvius, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallai, Luigi; Cioni, Raffaello; Boschi, Chiara; D'Oriano, Claudia

    2011-10-01

    Mafic phenocrysts from selected products of the last 4 ka volcanic activity at Mt. Vesuvius were investigated for their chemical and O-isotope composition, as a proxy for primary magmas feeding the system. 18O/ 16O ratios of studied Mg-rich olivines suggest that near-primary shoshonitic to tephritic melts experienced a flux of sedimentary carbonate-derived CO 2, representing the early process of magma contamination in the roots of the volcanic structure. Bulk carbonate assimilation (physical digestion) mainly occurred in the shallow crust, strongly influencing magma chamber evolution. On a petrological and geochemical basis the effects of bulk sedimentary carbonate digestion on the chemical composition of the near-primary melts are resolved from those of carbonate-released CO 2 fluxed into magma. An important outcome of this process lies in the effect of external CO 2 in changing the overall volatile solubility of the magma, enhancing the ability of Vesuvius mafic magmas to rapidly rise and explosively erupt at the surface.

  17. Layer-by-layer grown scalable redox-active ruthenium-based molecular multilayer thin films for electrochemical applications and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Kuzume, Akiyoshi; Maharajan, Sivarajakumar; Pobelov, Ilya V; Kwon, Nam Hee; Mohos, Miklos; Broekmann, Peter; Fromm, Katharina M; Haga, Masa-aki; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2015-11-14

    Here we report the first study on the electrochemical energy storage application of a surface-immobilized ruthenium complex multilayer thin film with anion storage capability. We employed a novel dinuclear ruthenium complex with tetrapodal anchoring groups to build well-ordered redox-active multilayer coatings on an indium tin oxide (ITO) surface using a layer-by-layer self-assembly process. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), UV-Visible (UV-Vis) and Raman spectroscopy showed a linear increase of peak current, absorbance and Raman intensities, respectively with the number of layers. These results indicate the formation of well-ordered multilayers of the ruthenium complex on ITO, which is further supported by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The thickness of the layers can be controlled with nanometer precision. In particular, the thickest layer studied (65 molecular layers and approx. 120 nm thick) demonstrated fast electrochemical oxidation/reduction, indicating a very low attenuation of the charge transfer within the multilayer. In situ-UV-Vis and resonance Raman spectroscopy results demonstrated the reversible electrochromic/redox behavior of the ruthenium complex multilayered films on ITO with respect to the electrode potential, which is an ideal prerequisite for e.g. smart electrochemical energy storage applications. Galvanostatic charge-discharge experiments demonstrated a pseudocapacitor behavior of the multilayer film with a good specific capacitance of 92.2 F g(-1) at a current density of 10 μA cm(-2) and an excellent cycling stability. As demonstrated in our prototypical experiments, the fine control of physicochemical properties at nanometer scale, relatively good stability of layers under ambient conditions makes the multilayer coatings of this type an excellent material for e.g. electrochemical energy storage, as interlayers in inverted bulk heterojunction solar cell applications and as functional components in molecular electronics applications

  18. Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case study.

    PubMed

    Paytan, Adina; Lecher, Alanna L; Dimova, Natasha; Sparrow, Katy J; Kodovska, Fenix Garcia-Tigreros; Murray, Joseph; Tulaczyk, Slawomir; Kessler, John D

    2015-03-24

    Methane emissions in the Arctic are important, and may be contributing to global warming. While methane emission rates from Arctic lakes are well documented, methods are needed to quantify the relative contribution of active layer groundwater to the overall lake methane budget. Here we report measurements of natural tracers of soil/groundwater, radon, and radium, along with methane concentration in Toolik Lake, Alaska, to evaluate the role active layer water plays as an exogenous source for lake methane. Average concentrations of methane, radium, and radon were all elevated in the active layer compared with lake water (1.6 × 10(4) nM, 61.6 dpm⋅m(-3), and 4.5 × 10(5) dpm⋅m(-3) compared with 1.3 × 10(2) nM, 5.7 dpm⋅m(-3), and 4.4 × 10(3) dpm⋅m(-3), respectively). Methane transport from the active layer to Toolik Lake based on the geochemical tracer radon (up to 2.9 g⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1)) can account for a large fraction of methane emissions from this lake. Strong but spatially and temporally variable correlations between radon activity and methane concentrations (r(2) > 0.69) in lake water suggest that the parameters that control methane discharge from the active layer also vary. Warming in the Arctic may expand the active layer and increase the discharge, thereby increasing the methane flux to lakes and from lakes to the atmosphere, exacerbating global warming. More work is needed to quantify and elucidate the processes that control methane fluxes from the active layer to predict how this flux might change in the future and to evaluate the regional and global contribution of active layer water associated methane inputs.

  19. Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Paytan, Adina; Lecher, Alanna L.; Dimova, Natasha; Sparrow, Katy J.; Kodovska, Fenix Garcia-Tigreros; Murray, Joseph; Tulaczyk, Slawomir; Kessler, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Methane emissions in the Arctic are important, and may be contributing to global warming. While methane emission rates from Arctic lakes are well documented, methods are needed to quantify the relative contribution of active layer groundwater to the overall lake methane budget. Here we report measurements of natural tracers of soil/groundwater, radon, and radium, along with methane concentration in Toolik Lake, Alaska, to evaluate the role active layer water plays as an exogenous source for lake methane. Average concentrations of methane, radium, and radon were all elevated in the active layer compared with lake water (1.6 × 104 nM, 61.6 dpm⋅m−3, and 4.5 × 105 dpm⋅m−3 compared with 1.3 × 102 nM, 5.7 dpm⋅m−3, and 4.4 × 103 dpm⋅m−3, respectively). Methane transport from the active layer to Toolik Lake based on the geochemical tracer radon (up to 2.9 g⋅m−2⋅y−1) can account for a large fraction of methane emissions from this lake. Strong but spatially and temporally variable correlations between radon activity and methane concentrations (r2 > 0.69) in lake water suggest that the parameters that control methane discharge from the active layer also vary. Warming in the Arctic may expand the active layer and increase the discharge, thereby increasing the methane flux to lakes and from lakes to the atmosphere, exacerbating global warming. More work is needed to quantify and elucidate the processes that control methane fluxes from the active layer to predict how this flux might change in the future and to evaluate the regional and global contribution of active layer water associated methane inputs. PMID:25775530

  20. Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case study.

    PubMed

    Paytan, Adina; Lecher, Alanna L; Dimova, Natasha; Sparrow, Katy J; Kodovska, Fenix Garcia-Tigreros; Murray, Joseph; Tulaczyk, Slawomir; Kessler, John D

    2015-03-24

    Methane emissions in the Arctic are important, and may be contributing to global warming. While methane emission rates from Arctic lakes are well documented, methods are needed to quantify the relative contribution of active layer groundwater to the overall lake methane budget. Here we report measurements of natural tracers of soil/groundwater, radon, and radium, along with methane concentration in Toolik Lake, Alaska, to evaluate the role active layer water plays as an exogenous source for lake methane. Average concentrations of methane, radium, and radon were all elevated in the active layer compared with lake water (1.6 × 10(4) nM, 61.6 dpm⋅m(-3), and 4.5 × 10(5) dpm⋅m(-3) compared with 1.3 × 10(2) nM, 5.7 dpm⋅m(-3), and 4.4 × 10(3) dpm⋅m(-3), respectively). Methane transport from the active layer to Toolik Lake based on the geochemical tracer radon (up to 2.9 g⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1)) can account for a large fraction of methane emissions from this lake. Strong but spatially and temporally variable correlations between radon activity and methane concentrations (r(2) > 0.69) in lake water suggest that the parameters that control methane discharge from the active layer also vary. Warming in the Arctic may expand the active layer and increase the discharge, thereby increasing the methane flux to lakes and from lakes to the atmosphere, exacerbating global warming. More work is needed to quantify and elucidate the processes that control methane fluxes from the active layer to predict how this flux might change in the future and to evaluate the regional and global contribution of active layer water associated methane inputs. PMID:25775530

  1. Ultrahigh Enzyme Activity Assembled in Layered Double Hydroxides via Mg(2+)-Allosteric Effector.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Huang, Shu-Wan; Xu, Dan; Bao, Wen-Jing; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2015-06-01

    It is well-known that some metal ions could be allosteric effectors of allosteric enzymes to activate/inhibit the catalytic activities of enzymes. In nanobiocatalytic systems constructed based on the positive metal ion-induced allosteric effect, the incorporated enzymes will be activated and thus exhibit excellent catalytic performance. Herein, we present an environmentally friendly strategy to construct a novel allosteric effect-based β-galactosidase/Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (β-gal/Mg-Al-LDH) nanobiocatalytic system via the delamination-reconstruction method. The intercalated β-gal in the LDH galleries changes its conformation significantly due to the Mg(2+)-induced allosteric interactions and other weak interactions, which causes the activation of enzymatic activity. The β-gal/Mg-Al-LDH nanobiocatalytic system shows much higher catalytic activity and affinity toward its substrate and about 30 times higher catalytic reaction velocity than the free β-gal, which suggests that Mg(2+)-induced allosteric effect plays a vital role in the improvement of enzymatic performance.

  2. Depth distribution of the strain in the GaN layer with low-temperature AlN interlayer on Si(111) substrate studied by Rutherford backscattering/channeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Y.; Cong, G.W.; Liu, X.L.; Lu, D.C.; Wang, Z.G.; Wu, M.F.

    2004-12-06

    The depth distribution of the strain-related tetragonal distortion e{sub T} in the GaN epilayer with low-temperature AlN interlayer (LT-AlN IL) on Si(111) substrate is investigated by Rutherford backscattering and channeling. The samples with the LT-AlN IL of 8 and 16 nm thickness are studied, which are also compared with the sample without the LT-AlN IL. For the sample with 16-nm-thick LT-AlN IL, it is found that there exists a step-down of e{sub T} of about 0.1% in the strain distribution. Meanwhile, the angular scan around the normal GaN <0001> axis shows a tilt difference about 0.01 deg. between the two parts of GaN separated by the LT-AlN IL, which means that these two GaN layers are partially decoupled by the AlN interlayer. However, for the sample with 8-nm-thick LT-AlN IL, neither step-down of e{sub T} nor the decoupling phenomenon is found. The 0.01 deg. decoupled angle in the sample with 16-nm-thick LT-AlN IL confirms the relaxation of the LT-AlN IL. Thus the step-down of e{sub T} should result from the compressive strain compensation brought by the relaxed AlN interlayer. It is concluded that the strain compensation effect will occur only when the thickness of the LT-AlN IL is beyond a critical thickness.

  3. Permafrost and active layer monitoring in the maritime Antarctic: Preliminary results from CALM sites on Livingston and Deception Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramos, M.; Vieira, G.; Blanco, J.J.; Hauck, C.; Hidalgo, M.A.; Tome, D.; Nevers, M.; Trindade, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained from scientific work and experiments performed on Livingston and Deception Islands. Located in the South Shetland Archipelago, these islands have been some of the most sensitive regions over the last 50 years with respect to climate change with a Mean Annual Air Temperature (MAAT) close to -2 ºC. Three Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) sites were installed to record the thermal regime and the behaviour of the active layer in different places with similar climate, but with different soil composition, porosity, and water content. The study’s ultimate aim is to document the influence of climate change on permafrost degradation. Preliminary results, obtained in 2006, on maximum active-layer thickness (around 40 cm in the CALM of Deception Island), active layer temperature evolution, snow thickness, and air temperatures permit early characterization of energy exchange mechanisms between the ground and the atmosphere in the CALM-S sites.

  4. Design of Bicontinuous Donor/Acceptor Morphologies for Use as Organic Solar Cell Active Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipp, Dylan; Mok, Jorge; Verduzco, Rafael; Ganesan, Venkat

    Two of the primary challenges limiting the marketability of organic solar cells are i) the smaller device efficiency of the organic solar cell relative to the conventional silicon-based solar cell and ii) the long term thermal instability of the device active layer. The achievement of equilibrium donor/acceptor morphologies with the characteristics believed to yield high device performance characteristics could address each of these two challenges. In this work, we present the results of a combined simulations and experiments-based approach to investigate if a conjugated BCP additive can be used to control the self-assembled morphologies taken on by conjugated polymer/PCBM mixtures. First, we use single chain in mean field Monte Carlo simulations to identify regions within the conjugated polymer/PCBM composition space in which addition of copolymers can lead to bicontinuous equilibrium morphologies with high interfacial areas and nanoscale dimensions. Second, we conduct experiments as directed by the simulations to achieve such morphologies in the PTB7 + PTB7- b-PNDI + PCBM model blend. We characterize the results of our experiments via a combination of transmission electron microscopy and X-ray scattering techniques and demonstrate that the morphologies from experiments agree with those predicted in simulations. Accordingly, these results indicate that the approach utilized represents a promising approach to intelligently design the morphologies taken on by organic solar cell active layers.

  5. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Germanium Active Layer for Top Cell of a Multi Junction Cell Structure.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaehyun; Iftiquar, S M; Kim, Minbum; Park, Jinjoo; Jung, Junhee; Kim, Jiwoong; Yi, Junsin

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium (a-SiGe:H) alloy is generally used in the bottom cell because of its low band gap. The a-SiGe:H has a higher photo conductivity in comparison to the a-Si:H; thus, it is expected that the a-SiGe:H can show better short circuit current density than that of the a-Si:H based solar cell. Therefore, we optimized a-SiGe:H active layer that can be a suitable choice for the front cell of a multi junction.solar cell. Furthermore, we carried out a comparative study of the solar cells that have a-SiGe:H and a-Si:H as respective active layers. The a-SiGe:H based solar cells show higher short circuit current density, while the a-Si:H based cells show higheropen circuit voltage. The current-voltage characteristics of these cells are as follows: (a) V(oc) = 770 mV, J(sc) = 15.0 mA/cm2, FF = 64.5%, and η = 7.47% for a-SiGe:H based cell; and (b) V(oc) = 826 mV, J(sc) = 13.63 mA/cm2, FF = 72.0%, and η = 8.1% for a-Si:H based cell.

  6. Cooperation between adsorbates accounts for the activation of atomic layer deposition reactions.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Mahdi; Elliott, Simon D

    2015-04-14

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a technique for producing conformal layers of nanometre-scale thickness, used commercially in non-planar electronics and increasingly in other high-tech industries. ALD depends on self-limiting surface chemistry but the mechanistic reasons for this are not understood in detail. Here we demonstrate, by first-principle calculations of growth of HfO2 from Hf(N(CH3)2)4-H2O and HfCl4-H2O and growth of Al2O3 from Al(CH3)3-H2O, that, for all these precursors, co-adsorption plays an important role in ALD. By this we mean that previously-inert adsorbed fragments can become reactive once sufficient numbers of molecules adsorb in their neighbourhood during either precursor pulse. Through the calculated activation energies, this 'cooperative' mechanism is shown to have a profound influence on proton transfer and ligand desorption, which are crucial steps in the ALD cycle. Depletion of reactive species and increasing coordination cause these reactions to self-limit during one precursor pulse, but to be re-activated via the cooperative effect in the next pulse. This explains the self-limiting nature of ALD.

  7. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-01-01

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2–C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2–C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2–C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment. PMID:27703168

  8. Topology optimization of magnetorheological fluid layers in sandwich plates for semi-active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Kang, Zhan

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates topology optimization of the magnetorheological (MR) fluid layer in a sandwich plate for improving the semi-active vibration control performance. Therein, a uniform magnetic field is applied across the MR fluid layer to provide a semi-active damping control effect. In the optimization model, the pseudo-densities describing the MR fluid material distribution are taken as design variables, and an artificial magneto-rheological fluid model (AMRF) with penalization is proposed to suppress intermediate density values. For reducing the vibration level under harmonic excitations, the dynamic compliance under a specific excitation frequency, or the frequency-aggregated dynamic compliance in a given frequency band, is taken as the objective function to be minimized. In this context, the adjoint-variable sensitivity analysis scheme is derived. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical examples, in which the structural dynamic performance can be remarkably improved through optimization. The influences of several key factors on the optimal designs are also explored. It is shown that the AMRF model is effective in yielding clear boundaries in the final optimal solutions without use of additional regularization techniques.

  9. Blended Wing Body Systems Studies: Boundary Layer Ingestion Inlets With Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiselhart, Karl A. (Technical Monitor); Daggett, David L.; Kawai, Ron; Friedman, Doug

    2003-01-01

    A CFD analysis was performed on a Blended Wing Body (BWB) aircraft with advanced, turbofan engines analyzing various inlet configurations atop the aft end of the aircraft. The results are presented showing that the optimal design for best aircraft fuel efficiency would be a configuration with a partially buried engine, short offset diffuser using active flow control, and a D-shaped inlet duct that partially ingests the boundary layer air in flight. The CFD models showed that if active flow control technology can be satisfactorily developed, it might be able to control the inlet flow distortion to the engine fan face and reduce the powerplant performance losses to an acceptable level. The weight and surface area drag benefits of a partially submerged engine shows that it might offset the penalties of ingesting the low energy boundary layer air. The combined airplane performance of such a design might deliver approximately 5.5% better aircraft fuel efficiency over a conventionally designed, pod-mounted engine.

  10. Interplay of solvent additive concentration and active layer thickness on the performance of small molecule solar cells.

    PubMed

    Love, John A; Collins, Samuel D; Nagao, Ikuhiro; Mukherjee, Subhrangsu; Ade, Harald; Bazan, Guillermo C; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen

    2014-11-19

    A relationship between solvent additive concentration and active layer thickness in small-molecule solar cells is investigated. Specifically, the additive concentration must scale with the amount of semiconductor material and not as absolute concentration in solution. Devices with a wide range of active layers with thickness up to 200 nm can readily achieve efficiencies close to 6% when the right concentration of additive is used.

  11. Threshold improvement in uniformly lying helix cholesteric liquid crystal laser using auxiliary π-conjugated polymer active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Shiozaki, Yusuke; Inoue, Yo; Takahashi, Masaya; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Fujii, Akihiko; Ozaki, Masanori

    2013-05-01

    We propose a device structure to lower the lasing threshold of a uniformly lying helix cholesteric liquid crystal (ChLC) laser. We place a π-conjugated polymer active layer beneath the ChLC layer to provide auxiliary gain, and demonstrate an improvement in the lasing threshold by a factor of 2.3. We also perform finite difference time domain calculations coupled with rate equations for a four-level system, and clarify the effect of the additional active layer on both the photonic density of states and the inversion population density. Although the addition of an extra layer lowers the photonic density of states, the gain provided by the auxiliary layer is sufficient to overcome the losses and decrease the lasing threshold. Our concept is useful for obtaining high-performance ChLC lasers.

  12. Layer-by-layer evolution of structure, strain, and activity for the oxygen evolution reaction in graphene-templated Pt monolayers.

    PubMed

    Abdelhafiz, Ali; Vitale, Adam; Joiner, Corey; Vogel, Eric; Alamgir, Faisal M

    2015-03-25

    In this study, we explore the dimensional aspect of structure-driven surface properties of metal monolayers grown on a graphene/Au template. Here, surface limited redox replacement (SLRR) is used to provide precise layer-by-layer growth of Pt monolayers on graphene. We find that after a few iterations of SLRR, fully wetted 4-5 monolayer Pt films can be grown on graphene. Incorporating graphene at the Pt-Au interface modifies the growth mechanism, charge transfers, equilibrium interatomic distances, and associated strain of the synthesized Pt monolayers. We find that a single layer of sandwiched graphene is able to induce a 3.5% compressive strain on the Pt adlayer grown on it, and as a result, catalytic activity is increased due to a greater areal density of the Pt layers beyond face-centered-cubic close packing. At the same time, the sandwiched graphene does not obstruct vicinity effects of near-surface electron exchange between the substrate Au and adlayers Pt. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques are used to examine charge mediation across the Pt-graphene-Au junction and the local atomic arrangement as a function of the Pt adlayer dimension. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are used as probes to examine the electrochemically active area of Pt monolayers and catalyst activity, respectively. Results show that the inserted graphene monolayer results in increased activity for the Pt due to a graphene-induced compressive strain, as well as a higher resistance against loss of the catalytically active Pt surface.

  13. Hypoxia Activates Calpains in the Nerve Fiber Layer of Monkey Retinal Explants

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Masayuki; Shearer, Thomas R.; Azuma, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The vascular ischemic hypothesis attributes nerve damage in the retina to decreased blood flow in the ophthalmic artery, reduced oxygenation, and impaired axonal transport. Activation of calpain enzymes contributes to retinal cell death during hypoxia. However, we still do not know in which specific retinal layers calpains are activated. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate where and when calpains are activated in an improved culture model of hypoxic monkey retina. Methods Monkey retinal explants were cultured on microporous membranes with the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) side facing up. Explants were incubated under hypoxic conditions, with or without additional reoxygenation. When it was used, the calpain inhibitor SNJ-1945 was maintained throughout the culture period. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting assays for α-spectrin, calpains 1 and 2, calpastatin, β-III tubulin, and γ-synuclein were performed with specific antibodies. Cell death was assessed by TUNEL staining. Results Under normoxic conditions, TUNEL-positive cells were minimal in our improved culture conditions. As early as 8 hours after hypoxia, the 150-kDa calpain-specific α-spectrin breakdown product appeared in the nerve fiber layer (NFL), where calpains 1 and 2 were localized. TUNEL-positive RGCs then increased at later time periods. The calpain inhibitor SNJ-1945 ameliorated changes induced by hypoxia or hypoxia/reoxygenation. Conclusions During hypoxia/reoxygenation in an improved, relevant monkey model, calpains were first activated in the NFL, followed by death of the parent RGCs. This observation suggest that calpain-induced degeneration of retinal nerve fibers may be an underlying mechanism for RGC death in hypoxic retinal neuropathies. PMID:26393472

  14. Actomyosin dynamics drive local membrane component organization in an in vitro active composite layer

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Kabir; Iljazi, Elda; Bhat, Abrar; Bieling, Peter; Mullins, R. Dyche; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2016-01-01

    The surface of a living cell provides a platform for receptor signaling, protein sorting, transport, and endocytosis, whose regulation requires the local control of membrane organization. Previous work has revealed a role for dynamic actomyosin in membrane protein and lipid organization, suggesting that the cell surface behaves as an active composite composed of a fluid bilayer and a thin film of active actomyosin. We reconstitute an analogous system in vitro that consists of a fluid lipid bilayer coupled via membrane-associated actin-binding proteins to dynamic actin filaments and myosin motors. Upon complete consumption of ATP, this system settles into distinct phases of actin organization, namely bundled filaments, linked apolar asters, and a lattice of polar asters. These depend on actin concentration, filament length, and actin/myosin ratio. During formation of the polar aster phase, advection of the self-organizing actomyosin network drives transient clustering of actin-associated membrane components. Regeneration of ATP supports a constitutively remodeling actomyosin state, which in turn drives active fluctuations of coupled membrane components, resembling those observed at the cell surface. In a multicomponent membrane bilayer, this remodeling actomyosin layer contributes to changes in the extent and dynamics of phase-segregating domains. These results show how local membrane composition can be driven by active processes arising from actomyosin, highlighting the fundamental basis of the active composite model of the cell surface, and indicate its relevance to the study of membrane organization. PMID:26929326

  15. Identifying active functionalities on few-layered graphene catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of isobutane.

    PubMed

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Tsai, Yu-Tung; Gierszal, Kamil; Xu, Ye; Liang, Chengdu; Rondinone, Adam J; Overbury, Steven H; Schwartz, Viviane

    2014-02-01

    The general consensus in the studies of nanostructured carbon catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of alkanes to olefins is that the oxygen functionalities generated during synthesis and reaction are responsible for the catalytic activity of these nanostructured carbons. Identification of the highly active oxygen functionalities would enable engineering of nanocarbons for ODH of alkanes. Few-layered graphenes were used as model catalysts in experiments to synthesize reduced graphene oxide samples with varying oxygen concentrations, to characterize oxygen functionalities, and to measure the activation energies for ODH of isobutane. Periodic density functional theory calculations were performed on graphene nanoribbon models with a variety of oxygen functionalities at the edges to calculate their thermal stability and to model reaction mechanisms for ODH of isobutane. Comparing measured and calculated thermal stability and activation energies leads to the conclusion that dicarbonyls at the zigzag edges and quinones at armchair edges are appropriately balanced for high activity, relative to other model functionalities considered herein. In the ODH of isobutane, both dehydrogenation and regeneration of catalytic sites are relevant at the dicarbonyls, whereas regeneration is facile compared with dehydrogenation at quinones. The catalytic mechanism involves weakly adsorbed isobutane reducing functional oxygen and leaving as isobutene, and O2 in the feed, weakly adsorbed on the hydrogenated functionality, reacting with that hydrogen and regenerating the catalytic sites.

  16. Polyethylene/organically-modified layered-silicate nanocomposites with antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songtipya, P.; Jimenez-Gasco, M. M.; Manias, E.

    2009-03-01

    Despite the very intensive research on polymer nanocomposites, the opportunities for new functionalities possible by nanofillers still remain largely untapped. Here, we present polyethylene/inorganic nanocomposites that exhibit strongly enhanced mechanical performance and, at the same time, also an antimicrobial activity originating from the organo-filler nature. Specifically, PE/organically-modified layered-silicate nanocomposites were prepared via melt-processing, and antimicrobial activity was designed by proper choice of their organic modification. Their antimicrobial activity was measured against three micotoxinogen fungal strains (Penicillium roqueforti and claviforme, and Fusarium graminearum) as model soil-borne plant and food contaminants. Montmorillonite-based organofillers, which only differ in their organic modification, were used to exemplify how these surfactants can be designed to render antifungal activity to the nanocomposites. The comparative discussion of the growth of fungi on unfilled PE and nanocomposite PE films is used to demonstrate how the antimicrobial efficacy is dictated by the surfactant chemistry and, further, how the nanocomposites' inhibitory activity compares to that of the organo-fillers and the surfactants.

  17. Ionization behavior, stoichiometry of association, and accessibility of functional groups in the active layers of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Coronell, Orlando; González, Mari I; Mariñas, Benito J; Cahill, David G

    2010-09-01

    We characterized the fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layers of six commercial reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes and found that in contrast to their similar elemental composition, total concentration of functional groups, and degree of polymerization, the ionization behavior and spatial distribution of carboxylic (R-COOH) groups within the active layers can be significantly different. We also studied the steric effects experienced by barium ion (Ba2+) in the active layers by determining the fraction of carboxylate (R-COO-) groups accessible to Ba2+; such fraction, referred to as the accessibility ratio (AR), was found to vary within the range AR=0.40-0.81, and to be generally independent of external solution pH. Additionally, we studied an NF membrane with a sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) active layer, and found that the concentration of sulfonate (R-SO3-) groups in the active layer was 1.67 M, independent of external solution pH and approximately three times higher than the maximum concentration (approximately 0.45+/-0.25 M) of R-COO- groups in PA active layers. The R-SO3- groups were found to be highly accessible to Ba2+ (AR=0.95+/-0.01).

  18. Contribution of Sp1 to Telomerase Expression and Activity in Skin Keratinocytes Cultured With a Feeder Layer.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Francis; Paquet, Claudie; Bourget, Jean-Michel; Zaniolo, Karine; Rochette, Patrick J; Landreville, Solange; Damour, Odile; Boudreau, François; Auger, François A; Guérin, Sylvain L; Germain, Lucie

    2015-02-01

    The growth of primary keratinocytes is improved by culturing them with a feeder layer. The aim of this study was to assess whether the feeder layer increases the lifespan of cultured epithelial cells by maintaining or improving telomerase activity and expression. The addition of an irradiated fibroblast feeder layer of either human or mouse origin (i3T3) helped maintain telomerase activity as well as expression of the transcription factor Sp1 in cultured keratinocytes. In contrast, senescence occurred earlier, together with a reduction of Sp1 expression and telomerase activity, in keratinocytes cultured without a feeder layer. Telomerase activity was consistently higher in keratinocytes grown on the three different feeder layers tested relative to cells grown without them. Suppression of Sp1 expression by RNA inhibition (RNAi) reduced both telomerase expression and activity in keratinocytes and also abolished their long-term growth capacity suggesting that Sp1 is a key regulator of both telomerase gene expression and cell cycle progression of primary cultured human skin keratinocytes. The results of the present study therefore suggest that the beneficial influence of the feeder layer relies on its ability to preserve telomerase activity in cultured human keratinocytes through the maintenance of stable levels of Sp1 expression.

  19. Contribution of Sp1 to Telomerase Expression and Activity in Skin Keratinocytes Cultured With a Feeder Layer.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Francis; Paquet, Claudie; Bourget, Jean-Michel; Zaniolo, Karine; Rochette, Patrick J; Landreville, Solange; Damour, Odile; Boudreau, François; Auger, François A; Guérin, Sylvain L; Germain, Lucie

    2015-02-01

    The growth of primary keratinocytes is improved by culturing them with a feeder layer. The aim of this study was to assess whether the feeder layer increases the lifespan of cultured epithelial cells by maintaining or improving telomerase activity and expression. The addition of an irradiated fibroblast feeder layer of either human or mouse origin (i3T3) helped maintain telomerase activity as well as expression of the transcription factor Sp1 in cultured keratinocytes. In contrast, senescence occurred earlier, together with a reduction of Sp1 expression and telomerase activity, in keratinocytes cultured without a feeder layer. Telomerase activity was consistently higher in keratinocytes grown on the three different feeder layers tested relative to cells grown without them. Suppression of Sp1 expression by RNA inhibition (RNAi) reduced both telomerase expression and activity in keratinocytes and also abolished their long-term growth capacity suggesting that Sp1 is a key regulator of both telomerase gene expression and cell cycle progression of primary cultured human skin keratinocytes. The results of the present study therefore suggest that the beneficial influence of the feeder layer relies on its ability to preserve telomerase activity in cultured human keratinocytes through the maintenance of stable levels of Sp1 expression. PMID:24962522

  20. A Melting Layer Model for Passive/Active Microwave Remote Sensing Applications. Part 1; Model Formulation and Comparison with Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, William S.; Bauer, Peter; Viltard, Nicolas F.; Johnson, Daniel E.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2000-01-01

    In this study, a 1-D steady-state microphysical model which describes the vertical distribution of melting precipitation particles is developed. The model is driven by the ice-phase precipitation distributions just above the freezing level at applicable gridpoints of "parent" 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations. It extends these simulations by providing the number density and meltwater fraction of each particle in finely separated size categories through the melting layer. The depth of the modeled melting layer is primarily determined by the initial material density of the ice-phase precipitation. The radiative properties of melting precipitation at microwave frequencies are calculated based upon different methods for describing the dielectric properties of mixed phase particles. Particle absorption and scattering efficiencies at the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager frequencies (10.65 to 85.5 GHz) are enhanced greatly for relatively small (approx. 0.1) meltwater fractions. The relatively large number of partially-melted particles just below the freezing level in stratiform regions leads to significant microwave absorption, well-exceeding the absorption by rain at the base of the melting layer. Calculated precipitation backscatter efficiencies at the Precipitation Radar frequency (13.8 GHz) increase in proportion to the particle meltwater fraction, leading to a "bright-band" of enhanced radar reflectivities in agreement with previous studies. The radiative properties of the melting layer are determined by the choice of dielectric models and the initial water contents and material densities of the "seeding" ice-phase precipitation particles. Simulated melting layer profiles based upon snow described by the Fabry-Szyrmer core-shell dielectric model and graupel described by the Maxwell-Garnett water matrix dielectric model lead to reasonable agreement with radar-derived melting layer optical depth distributions. Moreover, control profiles

  1. Layer-specific entrainment of gamma-band neural activity by the alpha rhythm in monkey visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Spaak, Eelke; Bonnefond, Mathilde; Maier, Alexander; Leopold, David A.; Jensen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Summary While the mammalian neocortex has a clear laminar organization, layer-specific neuronal computations remain to be uncovered. Several studies suggest that gamma band activity in primary visual cortex (V1) is produced in granular and superficial layers and is associated with the processing of visual input [1–3]. Oscillatory alpha band activity in deeper layers has been proposed to modulate neuronal excitability associated with changes in arousal and cognitive factors [4–7]. To investigate the layer-specific interplay between these two phenomena, we characterized the coupling between alpha and gamma band activity of the local field potential (LFP) in V1 of the awake macaque. Using multicontact laminar electrodes to measure spontaneous signals simultaneously from all layers of V1, we found a robust coupling between alpha phase in the deeper layers and gamma amplitude in granular and superficial layers. Moreover, the power in the two frequency bands was anticorrelated. Taken together, these findings demonstrate robust inter-laminar cross-frequency coupling in the visual cortex, supporting the view that neuronal activity in the alpha frequency range phasically modulates processing in the cortical microcircuit in a top-down manner [7]. PMID:23159599

  2. Induction and modulation of persistent activity in a layer V PFC microcircuit model

    PubMed Central

    Papoutsi, Athanasia; Sidiropoulou, Kyriaki; Cutsuridis, Vassilis; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2013-01-01

    Working memory refers to the temporary storage of information and is strongly associated with the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Persistent activity of cortical neurons, namely the activity that persists beyond the stimulus presentation, is considered the cellular correlate of working memory. Although past studies suggested that this type of activity is characteristic of large scale networks, recent experimental evidence imply that small, tightly interconnected clusters of neurons in the cortex may support similar functionalities. However, very little is known about the biophysical mechanisms giving rise to persistent activity in small-sized microcircuits in the PFC. Here, we present a detailed biophysically—yet morphologically simplified—microcircuit model of layer V PFC neurons that incorporates connectivity constraints and is validated against a multitude of experimental data. We show that (a) a small-sized network can exhibit persistent activity under realistic stimulus conditions. (b) Its emergence depends strongly on the interplay of dADP, NMDA, and GABAB currents. (c) Although increases in stimulus duration increase the probability of persistent activity induction, variability in the stimulus firing frequency does not consistently influence it. (d) Modulation of ionic conductances (Ih, ID, IsAHP, IcaL, IcaN, IcaR) differentially controls persistent activity properties in a location dependent manner. These findings suggest that modulation of the microcircuit's firing characteristics is achieved primarily through changes in its intrinsic mechanism makeup, supporting the hypothesis of multiple bi-stable units in the PFC. Overall, the model generates a number of experimentally testable predictions that may lead to a better understanding of the biophysical mechanisms of persistent activity induction and modulation in the PFC. PMID:24130519

  3. Atomic Layer-by-Layer Deposition of Pt on Pd Nanocubes for Catalysts with Enhanced Activity and Durability toward Oxygen Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shuifen; Choi, Sang; Lu, Ning; Roling, Luke T.; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Zhang, Lei; Park, Jinho; Wang, Jinguo; Kim, Moon J.; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2014-06-11

    An effective strategy for reducing the Pt content while retaining the activity of a Pt-based catalyst is to deposit the Pt atoms as ultrathin skins of only a few atomic layers thick on nanoscale substrates made of another metal. During deposition, however, the Pt atoms often take an island growth mode because of a strong bonding between Pt atoms. Here we report a versatile route to the conformal deposition of Pt as uniform, ultrathin shells on Pd nanocubes in a solution phase. The introduction of the Pt precursor at a relatively slow rate and high temperature allowed the deposited Pt atoms to spread across the entire surface of a Pd nanocube to generate a uniform shell. The thickness of the Pt shell could be controlled from one to six atomic layers by varying the amount of Pt precursor added into the system. Compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pd@PnL (n = 1-6) core-shell nanocubes showed enhancements in specific activity and durability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model (100) surfaces suggest that the enhancement in specific activity can be attributed to the weakening of OH binding through ligand and strain effects, which, in turn, increases the rate of OH hydrogenation. A volcano-type relationship between the ORR specific activity and the number of Pt atomic layers was derived, in good agreement with the experimental results. Both theoretical and experimental studies indicate that the ORR specific activity was maximized for the catalysts based on Pd@Pt2-3L nanocubes. Because of the reduction in Pt content used and the enhancement in specific activity, the Pd@Pt1L nanocubes showed a Pt mass activity with almost three-fold enhancement relative to the Pt/C catalyst.

  4. Transformation of organic-inorganic hybrid films obtained by molecular layer deposition to photocatalytic layers with enhanced activity.

    PubMed

    Ishchuk, Sergey; Taffa, Dereje Hailu; Hazut, Ori; Kaynan, Niv; Yerushalmi, Roie

    2012-08-28

    We present the transformation of organic-inorganic hybrid titanicone films formed by TiCl(4) as metal precursor and ethylene glycol (EG) using solvent-free MLD to highly active photocatalytic films. The photocatalytic activities of the films were investigated using hydroxyl-functionalized porphyrin as a spectroscopic marker. TEM imaging and electron diffraction, XPS, UV-vis spectroscopy, and spectroscsopic ellipsometry were employed for structural and composition analyses of the films. The photocatalytic activity of Ti-EG films was investigated for different anneal temperatures and compared to TiO(2) films prepared by ALD using TiCl(4) as metal precursor and H(2)O (TiO(2) films). Overall, our results indicate that the photocatalytic activity of the thermally annealed Ti-EG film is about 5-fold increased compared to that of the TiO(2) film prepared by ALD for optimal process conditions. The combined results indicate that the structural and photocatalytic properties can be assigned to three states: (I) amorphous state, intermediate dye loading, low photocatalytic activity, (II) intermediate film state with both crystalline and amorphous regions, high dye loading, high catalytic activity, and (III) highly crystalline film with low dye loading and low photocatalytic activity. The formation of photocatalytic nanotubes (NTs) is demonstrated using sacrificial Ge nanowires (NWs) scaffolds to yield Ti-EG NT structures with controllable wall thickness structures and enhanced dye loading capacity. Our results demonstrate the feasibility and high potential of MLD to form metal oxides with high photocatalytic activity. PMID:22768917

  5. Absorption of the selenite anion from aqueous solutions by thermally activated layered double hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Frost, Ray L; Martens, Wayde N

    2009-03-01

    The presence of selenite or selenate in potable water is a health hazard especially when consumed over a long period of time. Its removal from potable water is of importance. This paper reports technology for the removal of selenite from water through the use of thermally activated layered double hydroxides. Mg/Al hydrotalcites with selenite in the interlayer were prepared at different times from 0.5 to 20 h through ion exchange. X-ray diffraction of the MgAlSeO3 hydrotalcites indicates that the selenite anion entered the interlayer spacing of Mg/Al hydrotalcite and MgAlSeO3 hydrotalcite was formed. Raman spectra proved the presence of selenite anion in the hydrotalcite interlayer as the counter anion. The band intensity and width of MgAlSeO3 hydrotalcite in the region of 3800-3000 cm(-1) increase with the adsorption of selenite by the Mg/Al hydrotalcite. The characteristic bands of free selenite anions in the MgAlSeO3 hydrotalcites are located between the region between 850 and 800 cm(-1). The Raman spectra of the lower wave number region of 550-500 cm(-1) show a shift toward higher wave numbers with adsorption of the selenite. An estimation of the amount of selenite anion removed by the thermally activated layered double hydroxide was obtained through the measurement of the intensity of the selenite Raman bands at 814 and 835 cm(-1) resulting from the amount of selenite anion remaining in solution. Thermally activated LDHs provide a mechanism for removing selenite anions from aqueous solutions.

  6. Magma storage depths beneath an active rift volcano in Afar (Dabbahu), constrained by melt inclusion analyses, seismicity and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (INSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, L.; Blundy, J.; Wright, T. J.; Yirgu, G.; Afar Consortium

    2010-12-01

    Dabbahu volcano is located at the northern end of the active Manda Hararo rift segment in western Afar, Ethiopia. In 2005 a major rifting episode began in the segment, which has been modelled as basalt dyke injections (1). Seismic activity, inflation and deflation have been recorded at the volcano. The aim of this research is to provide an insight into the history and evolution of a silicic magmatic centre in the rift, and to contribute to the wider aims of the NERC Afar Consortium to track the creation, migration, evolution and emplacement of magma from the asthenosphere to the crust. The volatile contents of rare melt inclusions trapped within phenocrysts of alkali feldspar, clinopyroxene and olivine from Dabbahu have been studied using secondary ion mass spectrometry. The host lavas are mildly peralkaline obsidians, which, based on field evidence and preliminary results from 40Ar-39Ar dating, represent the youngest samples on the volcano (<4 ka). Whilst the obsidian and pumice groundmass glasses are largely degassed, the H2O contents of the analysed inclusions are up to 5.8 wt%. CO2 contents are generally low; <462 ppm in the alkali feldspar-hosted inclusions, but higher values (up to 1457 ppm) have been found in the clinopyroxene-hosted inclusions. The pressure (and depth) of pre-eruptive magma storage beneath Dabbahu has been constrained using H2O and CO2 data, which suggest shallow magma storage at depths of ~1 - 5 km below the surface. These depths are consistent with observations from recorded seismicity and InSAR at Dabbahu. Seismicity has been recorded from deformation caused by deflation of the magma chamber following the 2005 dyke emplacement event (Oct 2005 - Apr 2006)(2) and InSAR has monitored deflation and subsequent steady inflation after this event. We show that melt inclusions accurately record a stable, shallow magma chamber as corroborated by remote sensing and geophysical observations at Dabbahu volcano. 1 Ayele et al. 2009 ‘September 2005

  7. PEMFC catalyst layers: the role of micropores and mesopores on water sorption and fuel cell activity.

    PubMed

    Soboleva, Tatyana; Malek, Kourosh; Xie, Zhong; Navessin, Titichai; Holdcroft, Steven

    2011-06-01

    The effects of carbon microstructure and ionomer loading on water vapor sorption and retention in catalyst layers (CLs) of PEM fuel cells are investigated using dynamic vapor sorption. Catalyst layers based on Ketjen Black and Vulcan XC-72 carbon blacks, which possess distinctly different surface areas, pore volumes, and microporosities, are studied. It is found that pores <20 nm diameter facilitate water uptake by capillary condensation in the intermediate range of relative humidities. A broad pore size distribution (PSD) is found to enhance water retention in Ketjen Black-based CLs whereas the narrower mesoporous PSD of Vulcan CLs is shown to have an enhanced water repelling action. Water vapor sorption and retention properties of CLs are correlated to electrochemical properties and fuel cell performance. Water sorption enhances electrochemical properties such as the electrochemically active surface area (ESA), double layer capacitance and proton conductivity, particularly when the ionomer content is very low. The hydrophilic properties of a CL on the anode and the cathode are adjusted by choosing the PSD of carbon and the ionomer content. It is shown that a reduction of ionomer content on either cathode or anode of an MEA does not necessarily have a significant detrimental effect on the MEA performance compared to the standard 30 wt % ionomer MEA. Under operation in air and high relative humidity, a cathode with a narrow pore size distribution and low ionomer content is shown to be beneficial due to its low water retention properties. In dry operating conditions, adequate ionomer content on the cathode is crucial, whereas it can be reduced on the anode without a significant impact on fuel cell performance.

  8. Multi-omics of permafrost, active layer and thermokarst bog soil microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Jenni; Waldrop, Mark P; Mackelprang, Rachel; David, Maude M; McFarland, Jack; Blazewicz, Steven J; Harden, Jennifer; Turetsky, Merritt R; McGuire, A David; Shah, Manesh B; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Lee, Lang Ho; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Jansson, Janet K

    2015-05-14

    Over 20% of Earth's terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost with vast stores of carbon that, once thawed, may represent the largest future transfer of carbon from the biosphere to the atmosphere. This process is largely dependent on microbial responses, but we know little about microbial activity in intact, let alone in thawing, permafrost. Molecular approaches have recently revealed the identities and functional gene composition of microorganisms in some permafrost soils and a rapid shift in functional gene composition during short-term thaw experiments. However, the fate of permafrost carbon depends on climatic, hydrological and microbial responses to thaw at decadal scales. Here we use the combination of several molecular 'omics' approaches to determine the phylogenetic composition of the microbial communities, including several draft genomes of novel species, their functional potential and activity in soils representing different states of thaw: intact permafrost, seasonally thawed active layer and thermokarst bog. The multi-omics strategy reveals a good correlation of process rates to omics data for dominant processes, such as methanogenesis in the bog, as well as novel survival strategies for potentially active microbes in permafrost. PMID:25739499

  9. Multi-omics of permafrost, active layer and thermokarst bog soil microbiomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultman, Jenni; Waldrop, Mark P.; Mackelprang, Rachel; David, Maude M.; McFarland, Jack; Blazewicz, Steven J.; Harden, Jennifer; Turetsky, Merritt R.; McGuire, A. David; Shah, Manesh B.; Verberkmoes, Nathan C.; Lee, Lang Ho; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Jansson, Janet K.

    2015-05-01

    Over 20% of Earth's terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost with vast stores of carbon that, once thawed, may represent the largest future transfer of carbon from the biosphere to the atmosphere. This process is largely dependent on microbial responses, but we know little about microbial activity in intact, let alone in thawing, permafrost. Molecular approaches have recently revealed the identities and functional gene composition of microorganisms in some permafrost soils and a rapid shift in functional gene composition during short-term thaw experiments. However, the fate of permafrost carbon depends on climatic, hydrological and microbial responses to thaw at decadal scales. Here we use the combination of several molecular `omics' approaches to determine the phylogenetic composition of the microbial communities, including several draft genomes of novel species, their functional potential and activity in soils representing different states of thaw: intact permafrost, seasonally thawed active layer and thermokarst bog. The multi-omics strategy reveals a good correlation of process rates to omics data for dominant processes, such as methanogenesis in the bog, as well as novel survival strategies for potentially active microbes in permafrost.

  10. Multi-omics of Permafrost, Active Layer and Thermokarst Bog Soil Microbiomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hultman, Jenni; Waldrop, Mark P.; Mackelprang, Rachel; David, Maude; McFarland, Jack; Blazewicz, Steven J.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Turetsky, Merritt; McGuire, A. David; Shah, Manesh B.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Lee, Lang Ho; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Jansson, Janet K.

    2015-03-04

    Over 20% of Earth’s terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost with vast stores of carbon that, if thawed may represent the largest future transfer of C from the biosphere to the atmosphere 1. This process is largely dependent on microbial responses, but we know little about microbial activity in intact, let alone in thawing permafrost. Molecular approaches have recently revealed the identities and functional gene composition of microorganisms in some permafrost soils 2-4 and a rapid shift in functional gene composition during short-term thaw experiments 3. However, the fate of permafrost C depends on climatic, hydrologic, and microbial responses to thaw at decadal scales 5, 6. Here the combination of several molecular “omics” approaches enabled us to determine the phylogenetic composition of the microbial community, including several draft genomes of novel species, their functional potential and activity in soils representing different states of thaw: intact permafrost, seasonally thawed active layer and thermokarst bog. The multi-omics strategy revealed a good correlation of process rates to omics data for dominant processes, such as methanogenesis in the bog, as well as novel survival strategies for potentially active microbes in permafrost.

  11. Multi-omics of permafrost, active layer and thermokarst bog soil microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Jenni; Waldrop, Mark P; Mackelprang, Rachel; David, Maude M; McFarland, Jack; Blazewicz, Steven J; Harden, Jennifer; Turetsky, Merritt R; McGuire, A David; Shah, Manesh B; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Lee, Lang Ho; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Jansson, Janet K

    2015-05-14

    Over 20% of Earth's terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost with vast stores of carbon that, once thawed, may represent the largest future transfer of carbon from the biosphere to the atmosphere. This process is largely dependent on microbial responses, but we know little about microbial activity in intact, let alone in thawing, permafrost. Molecular approaches have recently revealed the identities and functional gene composition of microorganisms in some permafrost soils and a rapid shift in functional gene composition during short-term thaw experiments. However, the fate of permafrost carbon depends on climatic, hydrological and microbial responses to thaw at decadal scales. Here we use the combination of several molecular 'omics' approaches to determine the phylogenetic composition of the microbial communities, including several draft genomes of novel species, their functional potential and activity in soils representing different states of thaw: intact permafrost, seasonally thawed active layer and thermokarst bog. The multi-omics strategy reveals a good correlation of process rates to omics data for dominant processes, such as methanogenesis in the bog, as well as novel survival strategies for potentially active microbes in permafrost.

  12. Novel biohybrids of layered double hydroxide and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Braiek, Mohamed; Hidouri, Slah; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem

    2016-02-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biomolecule such as enzyme to produce bioinorganic system. Lactate dehydrogenase (Lac Deh) has been chosen as a model enzyme, being immobilized onto MgAl and ZnAl LDH materials via direct ion-exchange (adsorption) and co-precipitation methods. The immobilization efficiency was largely dependent upon the immobilization methods. A comparative study shows that the co-precipitation method favors the immobilization of great and tunable amount of enzyme. The structural behavior, chemical bonding composition and morphology of the resulting biohybrids were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The free and immobilized enzyme activity and kinetic parameters were also reported using UV-Visible spectroscopy. However, the modified LDH materials showed a decrease in crystallinity as compared to the unmodified LDH. The change in activity of the immobilized lactate dehydrogenase was considered to be due, to the reduced accessibility of substrate molecules to the active sites of the enzyme and the partial conformational change of the Lac Deh molecules as a result of the immobilization way. Finally, it was proven that there is a correlation between structure/microstructure and enzyme activity dependent on the immobilization process.

  13. Low-noise encoding of active touch by layer 4 in the somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Andrew Hires, Samuel; Gutnisky, Diego A; Yu, Jianing; O'Connor, Daniel H; Svoboda, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Cortical spike trains often appear noisy, with the timing and number of spikes varying across repetitions of stimuli. Spiking variability can arise from internal (behavioral state, unreliable neurons, or chaotic dynamics in neural circuits) and external (uncontrolled behavior or sensory stimuli) sources. The amount of irreducible internal noise in spike trains, an important constraint on models of cortical networks, has been difficult to estimate, since behavior and brain state must be precisely controlled or tracked. We recorded from excitatory barrel cortex neurons in layer 4 during active behavior, where mice control tactile input through learned whisker movements. Touch was the dominant sensorimotor feature, with >70% spikes occurring in millisecond timescale epochs after touch onset. The variance of touch responses was smaller than expected from Poisson processes, often reaching the theoretical minimum. Layer 4 spike trains thus reflect the millisecond-timescale structure of tactile input with little noise. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06619.001 PMID:26245232

  14. Vibration and damping characteristics of cylindrical shells with active constrained layer damping treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ling; Zhang, Dongdong; Wang, Yi

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the application of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments is extended to the vibration control of cylindrical shells. The governing equation of motion of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments is derived on the basis of the constitutive equations of elastic, piezoelectric and visco-elastic materials and an energy approach. The damping of a visco-elastic layer is modeled by the complex modulus formula. A finite element model is developed to describe and predict the vibration characteristics of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments. A closed-loop control system based on proportional and derivative feedback of the sensor voltage generated by the piezo-sensor of the ACLD patches is established. The dynamic behaviors of cylindrical shells with ACLD treatments such as natural frequencies, loss factors and responses in the frequency domain are further investigated. The effects of several key parameters such as control gains, location and coverage of ACLD treatments on vibration suppression of cylindrical shells are also discussed. The numerical results indicate the validity of the finite element model and the control strategy approach. The potential of ACLD treatments in controlling vibration and sound radiation of cylindrical shells used as major critical structures such as cabins of aircraft, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles is thus demonstrated.

  15. Influence of quaternization of ammonium on antibacterial activity and cytocompatibility of thin copolymer layers on titanium.

    PubMed

    Waßmann, Marco; Winkel, Andreas; Haak, Katharina; Dempwolf, Wibke; Stiesch, Meike; Menzel, Henning

    2016-10-01

    Antimicrobial coatings are able to improve the osseointegration of dental implants. Copolymers are promising materials for such applications due to their combined properties of two different monomers. To investigate the influence of different monomer mixtures, we have been synthesized copolymers of dimethyl (methacryloxyethyl) phosphonate (DMMEP) and dipicolyl aminoethyl methacrylate in different compositions and have them characterized to obtain the r-parameters. Some of the copolymers with different compositions have also been alkylated with 1-bromohexane, resulting in quaternized ammonium groups. The copolymers have been deposited onto titanium surfaces resulting in ultrathin, covalently bound layers. These layers have been characterized by water contact angle measurements and ellipsometry. The influence of quaternary ammonium groups on antibacterial properties and cytocompatibility was studied: Activity against bacteria was tested with a gram positive Staphylococcus aureus strain. Cytocompatibility was tested with a modified LDH assay after 24 and 72 h to investigate adhesion and proliferation of human fibroblast cells on modified surfaces. The copolymer with the highest content of DMMEP showed a good reduction of S. aureus and in the alkylated version a very good reduction of about 95%. On the other hand, poor cytocompatibility is observed. However, our results show that this trend cannot be generalized for this copolymer system.

  16. Nanocomposites of polymers with layered inorganic nanofillers: Antimicrobial activity, thermo-mechanical properties, morphology, and dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songtipya, Ponusa

    In the first part of the thesis, polyethylene/layered silicate nanocomposites that exhibit an antimicrobial activity were synthesized and studied. Their antimicrobial activity was designed to originate from non-leaching, novel cationic modifiers---amine-based surfactants---used as the organic-modification of the fillers. Specifically, PE/organically-modified montmorillonite ( mmt) nanocomposites were prepared via melt-processing, and simultaneous dispersion and antimicrobial activity was designed by proper choice of the fillers' organic modification. The antimicrobial activity was measured against three micotoxinogen fungal strains (Penicillium roqueforti and claviforme, and Fusarium graminearum ). Various mmt-based organofillers, which only differ in the type or amount of their organic modification, were used to exemplify how these surfactants can be designed to render antifungal activity to the fillers themselves and the respective nanocomposites. A comparative discussion of the growth of fungi on unfilled PE and nanocomposite PE films is used to demonstrate how the antimicrobial efficacy is dictated by the surfactant chemistry and, further, how the nanocomposites' inhibitory activity compares to that of the organo-fillers and the surfactants. An attempt to improve the thermomechanical reinforcement of PE/mmt nanocomposites while maintaining their antimicrobial activity, was also carried out by combining two different organically modified montmorillonites. However, a uniform microscopic dispersion could not be achieved through this approach. In the second part of this thesis, a number of fundamental studies relating to structure-property relations in nanocomposites were carried out, towards unveiling strategies that can concurrently optimize selected properties of polymers by the addition of nanofillers. Specifically, the dispersion-crystallinity-reinforcement relations in HDPE/mmt nanocomposites was investigated. The influence of a functional HDPE compatibilizer

  17. Comparison of Plasma Activation of Thin Water Layers by Direct and Remote Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Plasma activation of liquids is now being investigated for a variety of biomedical applications. The plasma sources used for this activation can be generally classified as direct (the plasma is in contact with the surface of the liquid) or remote (the plasma does not directly touch the liquid). The direct plasma source may be a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) where the surface of the liquid is a floating electrode or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave forming the plasma plume reaches the liquid. The remote plasma source may be a DBD with electrodes electrically isolated from the liquid or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave in the plume does not reach the liquid. In this paper, a comparison of activation of thin water layers on top of tissue, as might be encountered in wound healing, will be discussed using results from numerical investigations. We used the modeling platform nonPDPSIM to simulate direct plasma activation of thin water layers using DBDs and remote activation using plasma jets using up to hundreds of pulses. The DBDs are sustained in humid air while the plasma jets consist of He/O2 mixtures flowed into humid air. For similar number of pulses and energy deposition, the direct DBD plasma sources produce more acidification and higher production of nitrates/nitrites in the liquid. This is due to the accumulation of NxOy plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with newly produced reactive species. in the gas phase. In the plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with

  18. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoclusters: Aqueous, Concentrated, Stable, and Catalytically Active Colloids toward Green Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tarutani, Naoki; Vaz, Pedro D; Nunes, Carla D; Prevot, Vanessa; Stenning, Gavin B G; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-05-24

    Increasing attention has been dedicated to the development of nanomaterials rendering green and sustainable processes, which occur in benign aqueous reaction media. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of another family of green nanomaterials, layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoclusters, which are concentrated (98.7 g/L in aqueous solvent), stably dispersed (transparent sol for >2 weeks), and catalytically active colloids of nano LDHs (isotropic shape with the size of 7.8 nm as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering). LDH nanoclusters are available as colloidal building blocks to give access to meso- and macroporous LDH materials. Proof-of-concept applications revealed that the LDH nanocluster works as a solid basic catalyst and is separable from solvents of catalytic reactions, confirming the nature of nanocatalysts. The present work closely investigates the unique physical and chemical features of this colloid, the formation mechanism, and the ability to act as basic nanocatalysts in benign aqueous reaction systems. PMID:27124717

  19. Some enzyme activities associated with the chlorophyll containing layers of the immature barley pericarp.

    PubMed

    Duffus, C M; Rosie, R

    1973-09-01

    Some photosynthetic and biochemical properties of the chlorophyl containing layers of the pericarp of developing barley have been investigated. The tissue changes from pale green to bright green early in development, chlorophyll disappearing only at the later stages of maturity. It contains chloroplasts and probably amyloplasts and starch bearing chloroplasts. It is capable of high rates of light dependent oxygen evolution. It has been shown that the enzyme phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.31) is present in the pericarp and is 100 times as active in carbon dioxide fixation as ribulose diphosphate carboxylase (EC 4.1.1.39). Other enzymes present in the pericarp are phosphoenol pyruvate synthetase, pyrophosphatase (EC 3.6.1.1), malate NAD and NADP dehydrogenases (EC 1.1.1.37), malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40), and fructose 1,6 diphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). PMID:24458756

  20. Energetic basis of catalytic activity of layered nanophase calcium manganese oxides for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Birkner, Nancy; Nayeri, Sara; Pashaei, Babak; Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Casey, William H; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2013-05-28

    Previous measurements show that calcium manganese oxide nanoparticles are better water oxidation catalysts than binary manganese oxides (Mn3O4, Mn2O3, and MnO2). The probable reasons for such enhancement involve a combination of factors: The calcium manganese oxide materials have a layered structure with considerable thermodynamic stability and a high surface area, their low surface energy suggests relatively loose binding of H2O on the internal and external surfaces, and they possess mixed-valent manganese with internal oxidation enthalpy independent of the Mn(3+)/Mn(4+) ratio and much smaller in magnitude than the Mn2O3-MnO2 couple. These factors enhance catalytic ability by providing easy access for solutes and water to active sites and facile electron transfer between manganese in different oxidation states.

  1. Modeling of the polymer solar cell with a P3HT:PCBM active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelić, Ž.; Petrović, J.; Matavulj, P.; Melancon, J.; Sharma, A.; Zellhofer, C.; Živanović, S.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical model for simulating the behavior of a polymer solar cell with a poly(3-hexylthiophene):1-(3-methoxycarbonyl) propyl-1-phenyl-[6, 6]-methanofullerene (P3HT:PCBM) active layer. Two different types of boundary conditions were considered, Dirichlet’s and mixed. For Dirichlet’s boundary conditions we have achieved an excellent agreement with the experiment. The influence of boundary conditions on the appearance of the s-shaped current-voltage characteristic (sometimes observed in experiments) has been investigated. When mixed boundary conditions are applied, calculated current-voltage characteristics are inevitably s-shaped. By altering the boundary carrier concentration, an s-shaped deformation in current-voltage characteristics is numerically simulated by using Dirichlet’s boundary conditions.

  2. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoclusters: Aqueous, Concentrated, Stable, and Catalytically Active Colloids toward Green Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tarutani, Naoki; Vaz, Pedro D; Nunes, Carla D; Prevot, Vanessa; Stenning, Gavin B G; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-05-24

    Increasing attention has been dedicated to the development of nanomaterials rendering green and sustainable processes, which occur in benign aqueous reaction media. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of another family of green nanomaterials, layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoclusters, which are concentrated (98.7 g/L in aqueous solvent), stably dispersed (transparent sol for >2 weeks), and catalytically active colloids of nano LDHs (isotropic shape with the size of 7.8 nm as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering). LDH nanoclusters are available as colloidal building blocks to give access to meso- and macroporous LDH materials. Proof-of-concept applications revealed that the LDH nanocluster works as a solid basic catalyst and is separable from solvents of catalytic reactions, confirming the nature of nanocatalysts. The present work closely investigates the unique physical and chemical features of this colloid, the formation mechanism, and the ability to act as basic nanocatalysts in benign aqueous reaction systems.

  3. Materials for the active layer of organic photovoltaics: ternary solar cell approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Yu; Lin, Ryan Yeh-Yung; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Lin, Jiann T

    2013-01-01

    Power conversion efficiencies in excess of 7% have been achieved with bulk heterojunction (BHJ)-type organic solar cells using two components: p- and n-doped materials. The energy level and absorption profile of the active layer can be tuned by introduction of an additional component. Careful design of the additional component is required to achieve optimal panchromatic absorption, suitable energy-level offset, balanced electron and hole mobility, and good light-harvesting efficiency. This article reviews the recent progress on ternary organic photovoltaic systems, including polymer/small molecule/functional fullerene, polymer/polymer/functional fullerene, small molecule/small molecule/functional fullerene, polymer/functional fullerene I/functional fullerene II, and polymer/quantum dot or metal/functional fullerene systems.

  4. Reduction of Free Edge Peeling Stress of Laminated Composites Using Active Piezoelectric Layers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Kim, Heung Soo

    2014-01-01

    An analytical approach is proposed in the reduction of free edge peeling stresses of laminated composites using active piezoelectric layers. The approach is the extended Kantorovich method which is an iterative method. Multiterms of trial function are employed and governing equations are derived by taking the principle of complementary virtual work. The solutions are obtained by solving a generalized eigenvalue problem. By this approach, the stresses automatically satisfy not only the traction-free boundary conditions, but also the free edge boundary conditions. Through the iteration processes, the free edge stresses converge very quickly. It is found that the peeling stresses generated by mechanical loadings are significantly reduced by applying a proper electric field to the piezoelectric actuators. PMID:25025088

  5. Performance of scalable coding in depth domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöström, Mårten; Karlsson, Linda S.

    2010-02-01

    Common autostereoscopic 3D displays are based on multi-view projection. The diversity of resolutions and number of views of such displays implies a necessary flexibility of 3D content formats in order to make broadcasting efficient. Furthermore, distribution of content over a heterogeneous network should adapt to an available network capacity. Present scalable video coding provides the ability to adapt to network conditions; it allows for quality, temporal and spatial scaling of 2D video. Scalability for 3D data extends this list to the depth and the view domains. We have introduced scalability with respect to depth information. Our proposed scheme is based on the multi-view-plus-depth format where the center view data are preserved, and side views are extracted in enhancement layers depending on depth values. We investigate the performance of various layer assignment strategies: number of layers, and distribution of layers in depth, either based on equal number of pixels or histogram characteristics. We further consider the consequences to variable distortion due to encoder parameters. The results are evaluated considering their overall distortion verses bit rate, distortion per enhancement layer, as well as visual quality appearance. Scalability with respect to depth (and views) allows for an increased number of quality steps; the cost is a slight increase of required capacity for the whole sequence. The main advantage is, however, an improved quality for objects close to the viewer, even if overall quality is worse.

  6. Many-body microhydrodynamics of colloidal particles with active boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rajesh; Ghose, Somdeb; Adhikari, R.

    2015-06-01

    Colloidal particles with active boundary layers—regions surrounding the particles where non-equilibrium processes produce large velocity gradients—are common in many physical, chemical and biological contexts. The velocity or stress at the edge of the boundary layer determines the exterior fluid flow and, hence, the many-body interparticle hydrodynamic interaction. Here, we present a method to compute the many-body hydrodynamic interaction between N spherical active particles induced by their exterior microhydrodynamic flow. First, we use a boundary integral representation of the Stokes equation to eliminate bulk fluid degrees of freedom. Then, we expand the boundary velocities and tractions of the integral representation in an infinite-dimensional basis of tensorial spherical harmonics and, on enforcing boundary conditions in a weak sense on the surface of each particle, obtain a system of linear algebraic equations for the unknown expansion coefficients. The truncation of the infinite series, fixed by the degree of accuracy required, yields a finite linear system that can be solved accurately and efficiently by iterative methods. The solution linearly relates the unknown rigid body motion to the known values of the expansion coefficients, motivating the introduction of propulsion matrices. These matrices completely characterize hydrodynamic interactions in active suspensions just as mobility matrices completely characterize hydrodynamic interactions in passive suspensions. The reduction in the dimensionality of the problem, from a three-dimensional partial differential equation to a two-dimensional integral equation, allows for dynamic simulations of hundreds of thousands of active particles on multi-core computational architectures. In our simulation of 104 active colloidal particle in a harmonic trap, we find that the necessary and sufficient ingredients to obtain steady-state convective currents, the so-called ‘self-assembled pump’, are (a) one

  7. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of thermally activated magnetization reversal in dual-layer Exchange Coupled Composite recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumer, M. L.; Almudallal, A. M.; Mercer, J. I.; Whitehead, J. P.; Fal, T. J.

    The kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method developed for thermally activated magnetic reversal processes in single-layer recording media has been extended to study dual-layer Exchange Coupled Composition (ECC) media used in current and next generations of disc drives. The attempt frequency is derived from the Langer formalism with the saddle point determined using a variant of Bellman Ford algorithm. Complication (such as stagnation) arising from coupled grains having metastable states are addressed. MH-hysteresis loops are calculated over a wide range of anisotropy ratios, sweep rates and inter-layer coupling parameter. Results are compared with standard micromagnetics at fast sweep rates and experimental results at slow sweep rates.

  8. An in-depth understanding of the bimetallic effects and coked carbon species on an active bimetallic Ni(Co)/Al2O3 dry reforming catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xin; Gerdts, Rihards; Parker, Stewart F; Chi, Lina; Zhao, Yongxiang; Hill, Martyn; Guo, Junqiu; Jones, Martin O; Jiang, Zheng

    2016-06-29

    Ni/Al2O3, Co/Al2O3 and bimetallic Ni(Co)/Al2O3 catalysts were prepared using an impregnation method and employed in CO2 dry reforming of methane under coking-favored conditions. The spent catalysts were carefully characterized using typical characterization technologies and inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy. The bimetallic catalyst exhibited a superior activity and anti-coking performance compared to Ni/Al2O3, while the most resistant to coking behavior was Co/Al2O3. The enhanced activity of the Ni(Co)/Al2O3 bimetallic catalyst is attributed to the reduced particle size of metallic species and resistance to forming stable filamentous carbon. The overall carbon deposition on the spent bimetallic catalyst is comparable to that of the spent Ni/Al2O3 catalyst, whereas the carbon deposited on the bimetallic catalyst is mainly less-stable carbonaceous species as confirmed by SEM, TPO, Raman and INS characterization. This study provides an in depth understanding of alloy effects in catalysts, the chemical nature of coked carbon on spent Ni-based catalysts and, hopefully, inspires the creative design of a new bimetallic catalyst for dry reforming reactions. PMID:27326792

  9. An in-depth understanding of the bimetallic effects and coked carbon species on an active bimetallic Ni(Co)/Al2O3 dry reforming catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xin; Gerdts, Rihards; Parker, Stewart F; Chi, Lina; Zhao, Yongxiang; Hill, Martyn; Guo, Junqiu; Jones, Martin O; Jiang, Zheng

    2016-06-29

    Ni/Al2O3, Co/Al2O3 and bimetallic Ni(Co)/Al2O3 catalysts were prepared using an impregnation method and employed in CO2 dry reforming of methane under coking-favored conditions. The spent catalysts were carefully characterized using typical characterization technologies and inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy. The bimetallic catalyst exhibited a superior activity and anti-coking performance compared to Ni/Al2O3, while the most resistant to coking behavior was Co/Al2O3. The enhanced activity of the Ni(Co)/Al2O3 bimetallic catalyst is attributed to the reduced particle size of metallic species and resistance to forming stable filamentous carbon. The overall carbon deposition on the spent bimetallic catalyst is comparable to that of the spent Ni/Al2O3 catalyst, whereas the carbon deposited on the bimetallic catalyst is mainly less-stable carbonaceous species as confirmed by SEM, TPO, Raman and INS characterization. This study provides an in depth understanding of alloy effects in catalysts, the chemical nature of coked carbon on spent Ni-based catalysts and, hopefully, inspires the creative design of a new bimetallic catalyst for dry reforming reactions.

  10. Surface modification of polypropylene non-woven fibers with TiO2 nanoparticles via layer-by-layer self assembly method: Preparation and photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Pavasupree, Suttipan; Dubas, Stephan T; Rangkupan, Ratthapol

    2015-11-01

    Polypropylene (PP) meltblown fibers were coated with titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles using layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition technique. The fibers were first modified with 3 layers of poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS) and poly(diallyl-dimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) to improve the anchoring of the TiO2 nanoparticle clusters. PDADMAC, which is positively charged, was then used as counter polyelectrolyte in tandem with anionic TiO2 nanoparticles to construct TiO2/PDADMAC bilayer in the LbL fashion. The number of deposited TiO2/PDADMAC layers was varied from 1 to 7 bilayer, and could be used to adjust TiO2 loading. The LbL technique showed higher TiO2 loading efficiency than the impregnation approach. The modified fibers were tested for their photocatalytic activity against a model dye, Methylene Blue (MB). Results showed that the TiO2 modified fibers exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity efficiency similar to that of TiO2 powder dispersed in solution. The deposition of TiO2 3 bilayer on the PP substrate was sufficient to produce nanocomposite fibers that could bleach the MB solution in less than 4hr. TiO2-LbL constructions also preserved TiO2 adhesion on substrate surface after 1cycle of photocatalytic test. Successive photocatalytic test showed decline in MB reduction rate with loss of TiO2 particles from the substrate outer surface. However, even in the third cycle, the TiO2 modified fibers are still moderately effective as it could remove more than 95% of MB after 8hr of treatment. PMID:26574088

  11. Geodynamics and underlying bedrock of the magnetically active crust layer of the Lut block, Eastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi-Rozveh, T.; Khatib, M. M.; Yassaghi, A.; Gholami, E.

    2016-05-01

    The Curie point depth map of Eastern Iran was constituted from spectral analysis of the aeromagnetic data. The reduction to pole (RTP) was applied to the magnetic anomaly data. The Curie point depth values from 165 overlapping blocks, 100 × 100 km in size, have been estimated. The Curie point depth method provides a relationship between the 2-D FFT power spectrum of the magnetic anomalies and the depth of magnetic sources by transforming the spatial data into the frequency domain. The centroid and top depth of the magnetic sources (respectively Z 0 and Z t ) is calculated from radially averaged log power spectrum for each block. Finally, the Curie point depth of Eastern Iran is obtained by Z b = 2 Z 0- Z t . The highest value of 24 km is located in eastern and western boundaries of the Lut block, and the lowest value of 12 km is located at north of study area. The shallow depths in the Curie-point depth map are well correlated with the young volcanic areas and geothermal potential fields. Geothermal gradient ranging from 24 to 45°C/km. The deduced thermal structure in eastern Iran has a relationship with orogenic collapse associated with delamination of thickened lithospheric root between the Lut and Afghan continental blocks.

  12. Unpinning the Open-Circuit Voltage in Organic Solar Cells through Tuning Ternary Blend Active Layer Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlyabich, Petr; Thompson, Barry; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2015-03-01

    The use of ternary, as opposed to binary, blends having complementary absorption in active layers of organic bulk heterojunction solar cells is a simple approach to increase overall light absorption. While the open-circuit voltage (Voc) of such solar cells have generally been shown to be pinned by the smallest energy level difference between the donor and acceptor constituents, there have been materials systems, that when incorporated into active layers of solar cells, exhibit composition dependent and tunable Voc. Herein, we demonstrate that this Voc tunability in ternary blend solar cells is correlated with the morphology of the active layer. Chemical compatibility between the constituents in the blend, as probed by grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) measurements, affords Voc tuning. The constituents need not ``co-crystallize'' limited miscibility between the constituents in the active layers of solar cells affords Voc tunability. Poor physical interactions between the constituent domains within the active layers, on the other hand, result in devices that exhibit an invariant Voc that is pinned by the smallest energy level difference between the donor(s) and the acceptor(s). Our morphological studies thus support the proposed alloying model that was put forth originally.

  13. Efficient solar photocatalytic activity of TiO2 coated nano-porous silicon by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, Sridhar; Maydannik, Philipp; Ivanova, Tatiana; Shestakova, Marina; Homola, Tomáš; Bryukvin, Anton; Sillanpää, Mika; Nagumothu, Rameshbabu; Alagan, Viswanathan

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, TiO2 coated nano-porous silicon (TiO2/PS) was prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) whereas porous silicon was prepared by stain etching method for efficient solar photocatalytic activity. TiO2/PS was characterized by FESEM, AFM, XRD, XPS and DRS UV-vis spectrophotometer. Absorbance spectrum revealed that TiO2/PS absorbs complete solar light with wave length range of 300 nm-800 nm and most importantly, it absorbs stronger visible light than UV light. The reason for efficient solar light absorption of TiO2/PS is that nanostructured TiO2 layer absorbs UV light and nano-porous silicon layer absorbs visible light which is transparent to TiO2 layer. The amount of visible light absorption of TiO2/PS directly increases with increase of silicon etching time. The effect of silicon etching time of TiO2/PS on solar photocatalytic activity was investigated towards methylene blue dye degradation. Layer by layer solar absorption mechanism was used to explain the enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO2/PS solar absorber. According to this, the photo-generated electrons of porous silicon will be effectively injected into TiO2 via hetero junction interface which leads to efficient charge separation even though porous silicon is not participating in any redox reactions in direct.

  14. Transforming a Traditional Hands-On Activity into an Enquiry Activity to Foster More In-Depth Understanding of the Concept of Density

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yeung Chung; Kwok, Ping Wai

    2010-01-01

    Traditional methods used to teach the concept of density that employ solid objects of different masses and volumes can be supplemented by enquiry activities in which students vary the mass-to-volume ratio of the same object to test ideas about density and flotation. A simple substance, Blu-Tack, is an ideal material to use in this case. The…

  15. Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells with active layers from 300 to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Momblona, C.; Malinkiewicz, O.; Soriano, A.; Gil-Escrig, L.; Bandiello, E.; Scheepers, M.; Bolink, H. J.; Edri, E.

    2014-08-01

    Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite-based solar cells have been prepared in which the perovskite layer is sandwiched in between two organic charge transporting layers that block holes and electrons, respectively. This configuration leads to stable and reproducible devices that do not suffer from strong hysteresis effects and when optimized lead to efficiencies close to 15%. The perovskite layer is formed by using a dual-source thermal evaporation method, whereas the organic layers are processed from solution. The dual-source thermal evaporation method leads to smooth films and allows for high precision thickness variations. Devices were prepared with perovskite layer thicknesses ranging from 160 to 900 nm. The short-circuit current observed for these devices increased with increasing perovskite layer thickness. The main parameter that decreases with increasing perovskite layer thickness is the fill factor and as a result optimum device performance is obtained for perovskite layer thickness around 300 nm. However, here we demonstrate that with a slightly oxidized electron blocking layer the fill factor for the solar cells with a perovskite layer thickness of 900 nm increases to the same values as for the devices with thin perovskite layers. As a result the power conversion efficiencies for the cells with 300 and 900 nm are very similar, 12.7% and 12%, respectively.

  16. Extending airborne electromagnetic surveys for regional active layer and permafrost mapping with remote sensing and ancillary data, Yukon Flats ecoregion, central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pastick, Neal J.; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Wylie, Bruce K.; Minsley, Burke J.; Ji, Lei; Walvoord, Michelle A.; Smith, Bruce D.; Abraham, Jared D.; Rose, Joshua R.

    2013-01-01

    Machine-learning regression tree models were used to extrapolate airborne electromagnetic resistivity data collected along flight lines in the Yukon Flats Ecoregion, central Alaska, for regional mapping of permafrost. This method of extrapolation (r = 0.86) used subsurface resistivity, Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) at-sensor reflectance, thermal, TM-derived spectral indices, digital elevation models and other relevant spatial data to estimate near-surface (0–2.6-m depth) resistivity at 30-m resolution. A piecewise regression model (r = 0.82) and a presence/absence decision tree classification (accuracy of 87%) were used to estimate active-layer thickness (ALT) (< 101 cm) and the probability of near-surface (up to 123-cm depth) permafrost occurrence from field data, modelled near-surface (0–2.6 m) resistivity, and other relevant remote sensing and map data. At site scale, the predicted ALTs were similar to those previously observed for different vegetation types. At the landscape scale, the predicted ALTs tended to be thinner on higher-elevation loess deposits than on low-lying alluvial and sand sheet deposits of the Yukon Flats. The ALT and permafrost maps provide a baseline for future permafrost monitoring, serve as inputs for modelling hydrological and carbon cycles at local to regional scales, and offer insight into the ALT response to fire and thaw processes.

  17. Active control of turbulent boundary layer sound transmission into a vehicle interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, A.; Alujević, N.; Pluymers, B.; Desmet, W.

    2016-09-01

    In high speed automotive, aerospace, and railway transportation, the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is one of the most important sources of interior noise. The stochastic pressure distribution associated with the turbulence is able to excite significantly structural vibration of vehicle exterior panels. They radiate sound into the vehicle through the interior panels. Therefore, the air flow noise becomes very influential when it comes to the noise vibration and harshness assessment of a vehicle, in particular at low frequencies. Normally, passive solutions, such as sound absorbing materials, are used for reducing the TBL-induced noise transmission into a vehicle interior, which generally improve the structure sound isolation performance. These can achieve excellent isolation performance at higher frequencies, but are unable to deal with the low-frequency interior noise components. In this paper, active control of TBL noise transmission through an acoustically coupled double panel system into a rectangular cavity is examined theoretically. The Corcos model of the TBL pressure distribution is used to model the disturbance. The disturbance is rejected by an active vibration isolation unit reacting between the exterior and the interior panels. Significant reductions of the low-frequency vibrations of the interior panel and the sound pressure in the cavity are observed.

  18. Active Control of Turbulent Boundary Layer Induced Sound Radiation from Multiple Aircraft Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to experimentally investigate active structural acoustic control of turbulent boundary layer (TBL) induced sound radiation from multiple panels on an aircraft sidewall. One possible approach for controlling sound radiation from multiple panels is a multi-input/multi-output scheme which considers dynamic coupling between the panels. Unfortunately, this is difficult for more than a few panels, and is impractical for a typical aircraft which contains several hundred such panels. An alternative is to implement a large number of independent control systems. Results from the current work demonstrate the feasibility of reducing broadband radiation from multiple panels utilizing a single-input/single-output (SISO) controller per bay, and is the first known demonstration of active control of TBL induced sound radiation on more than two bays simultaneously. The paper compares sound reduction for fully coupled control of six panels versus independent control on each panel. An online adaptive control scheme for independent control is also demonstrated. This scheme will adjust for slow time varying dynamic systems such as fuselage response changes due to aircraft pressurization, etc.

  19. An electrochemical double layer capacitor using an activated carbon electrode with gel electrolyte binder

    SciTech Connect

    Osaka, Tetsuya, Liu, X.; Nojima, Masashi; Momma, Toshiyuki

    1999-05-01

    An electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) was prepared with an activated carbon powder electrode with poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) based gel electrolyte. Ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) were used as plasticizer and tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF{sub 4}) was used as the supporting electrolyte. An optimized gel electrolyte of PVdF-HFP/PC/EC/TEABF{sub 4} - 23/31/35/11 mass ratio exhibited high ionic conductivity of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm, high electrode capacitance, and good mechanical strength. An electrode consisting of activated carbon (AC) with the gel electrolyte as the binder (AC/PVdF-HFP based gel, 7/3 mass ratio) showed a higher specific capacitance and a lower ion diffusion resistance within the electrode than a carbon electrode, prepared with PVdF-HFP binder without plasticizer. This suggests that an electrode mixed with the gel electrolyte has a lower ion diffusion resistance inside the electrode. The highest specific capacitance of 123 F/g was achieved with an electrode containing AC with a specific surface area of 2500 m{sup 2}/g. A coin-type EDLC cell with optimized components showed excellent cycleability exceeding 10{sup 4} cycles with ca. 100% coulombic efficiency achieved when charging and discharging was repeated between 1.0 and 2.5 V at 1.66 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  20. [Aluminum coordination and active sites on aluminas, Y-zeolites and pillared layered silicates]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Fripiat, J.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report is organized in four sections. In the first the authors will outline structural features which are common to all fine grained alumina, as well as to non-framework alumina in zeolites. This section will be followed by a study of the surface vs. bulk coordination of aluminum. The third section will deal with measurement of the number of acid sites and the scaling of their strength. The fourth and last section will describe three model reactions: the isomerization of 1-butene and of 2 cis-butene; the isomerization and disproportionation of oxtho-xylene; and the transformation of trichloroethane into vinyl chloride followed by the polymerization of the vinyl chloride. The relationship between chemical activity and selectivity and what is known of the local structure of the active catalytic sites will be underlined. Other kinds of zeolites besides Y zeolite have been studied. Instead of the aluminum pillared silicates they found it more interesting to study the substitution of silicon by aluminum in a layered structure containing a permanent porosity (aluminated sepiolite).

  1. [Effect of the atmospheric ozone layer on the biologically active ultraviolet radiation on the earth's surface].

    PubMed

    Schulze, R; Kasten, F

    1975-08-01

    Based on measurements of the spectral irradiation intensity of UV-B global radiation by Bener (1960) and on the curve of spectral skin erythema effects newly measured by Urbach and Berger (1972), the biologically active UV-radiation at earth's surface has been calculated as a function of sun's altitude and atmospheric ozone content in so-called "Biological Units": BE = mWh cm-2 times erythema efficacy. On the basis of these data, the total daily, monthly, and yearly amounts of biologically active UV-radiation have been determined for the different geographical latitudes and various ozone contents. Approximately two thirds of BU hit the equatorial zone from 35 degrees south to 35 degrees north. Provided that the stratospheric ozone layer would be reduced by ten per cent from the exhaust gases of supersonic planes flying at high-altitude, an increase of BU would result amounting to 18% at the equator, to 19% in middle latitudes, and to 22% at the poles.

  2. Biophysical parameters analysis over the Valencia Anchor Station in the framework of SMOS Vegetation Optical Depth Validation Activities (2010-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado Hernanz, Paula Maria; Fernandez Moran, Roberto; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Lopez Baeza, Ernesto

    2014-05-01

    The SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) Mission was successfully launched on 2nd November 2009 as the second ESA Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission within the framework of ESA's Living Planet Programme. Referring to continental surfaces, one of the main objectives of SMOS is to improve the knowledge of the Earth's Water Cycle through the global observation of soil moisture and the study of the effect of vegetation. The Valencia Anchor Station (VAS) is a relatively homogeneous area of 50 x 50 km2 composed mainly by vineyards (65%) and other Mediterranean vegetation cover types (30%). It is placed in the natural region of the Utiel - Requena Plateau, about 80 km west of the city of Valencia. The VAS was selected by ESA and the SMOS Science Group in October 2006 as one of the core validation sites for SMOS land data and products, and it is currently a long term validation site of SMOS level 2 and 3 products. In addition, it is being considered in the framework of the forthcoming NASA SMAP (Soil Moisture Active and Passive) and ESA SENTINEL-3 OLCI (Ocean & Land Colour Instrument) validation activities. The study establishes an analysis of the biophysical parameter vegetation optical depth (TAU) taken from the SMOS satellite level 3 products and from the microwave L-band ESA radiometer ELBARA-II situated at the MELBEX-III site (Mediterranean Ecosystem L-Band Characterization Experiment) at the Valencia Anchor Station. The vegetation optical depth parameter depends on vegetation water content (VWC), biomass, vegetation dynamics and transmissivity of the plant. Consequently, the objective of this study is to assess, in the Valencia Anchor Station area, the relationship of TAU SMOS and TAU ELBARA-II with other vegetation indices related with different vegetation characteristics. On the one hand, TAU is correlated with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) obtained from MODIS and, on the other hand, with the Leaf Area

  3. Enhanced Electrocatalytic Performance for Oxygen Reduction via Active Interfaces of Layer-By-Layered Titanium Nitride/Titanium Carbonitride Structures

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhaoyu; Li, Panpan; Xiao, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Cathode materials always limit the performance of fuel cells while the commercial platinum-based catalysts hardly meet the requirements of low cost, durable and stable. Here a non-precious metal oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electocatalyst based on titanium nitride/titanium carbonitride hierarchical structures (TNTCNHS) is demonstrated as high activity as Pt/C. In alkaline condition, tuning interface/mass ratio of TiN/TiCN, we observed the onset potential of ~0.93 V vs. RHE and a limit diffusion current density of ~5.1 mA cm−2 (at a rotating speed of 1600 rpm) on TNTCNHS with a relative low catalyst loading of ~0.1 mg cm−2. The kinetic current, durability and tolerance to crossover effect studies reveal even more efficient than carbon-supported platinum. The architecture fabrication for such electrocatalyst is easy to realize in industrial-scale facilities, for the use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique could support a huge area production (more than 10000 cm2 for one pot) to satisfy the enormous market requirements in the future. PMID:25335930

  4. Enhanced electrocatalytic performance for oxygen reduction via active interfaces of layer-by-layered titanium nitride/titanium carbonitride structures.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhaoyu; Li, Panpan; Xiao, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Cathode materials always limit the performance of fuel cells while the commercial platinum-based catalysts hardly meet the requirements of low cost, durable and stable. Here a non-precious metal oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electocatalyst based on titanium nitride/titanium carbonitride hierarchical structures (TNTCNHS) is demonstrated as high activity as Pt/C. In alkaline condition, tuning interface/mass ratio of TiN/TiCN, we observed the onset potential of ~0.93 V vs. RHE and a limit diffusion current density of ~5.1 mA cm(-2) (at a rotating speed of 1600 rpm) on TNTCNHS with a relative low catalyst loading of ~0.1 mg cm(-2). The kinetic current, durability and tolerance to crossover effect studies reveal even more efficient than carbon-supported platinum. The architecture fabrication for such electrocatalyst is easy to realize in industrial-scale facilities, for the use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique could support a huge area production (more than 10000 cm(2) for one pot) to satisfy the enormous market requirements in the future. PMID:25335930

  5. p-GaAs(Cs,O)-photocathodes: Demarcation of domains of validity for practical models of the activation layer

    SciTech Connect

    Bakin, V. V.; Toropetsky, K. V.; Scheibler, H. E.; Terekhov, A. S.; Jones, L. B.; Militsyn, B. L.; Noakes, T. C. Q.

    2015-05-04

    The (Cs,O)-activation procedure for p-GaAs(Cs,O)-photocathodes was studied with the aim of demarcating the domains of validity for the two practical models of the (Cs,O)-activation layer: The dipole layer (DL) model and the heterojunction (HJ) model. To do this, the photocathode was activated far beyond the normal maximum of quantum efficiency, and several photocathode parameters were measured periodically during this process. In doing so, the data obtained enabled us to determine the domains of validity for the DL- and HJ-models, to define more precisely the characteristic parameters of the photocathode within both of these domains and thus to reveal the peculiarities of the influence of the (Cs,O)-layer on the photoelectron escape probability.

  6. Impact of active layer thickness in thin-film transistors based on Zinc Oxide by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Miguel A.; Flores, Francisco; Luna, Adan; Martinez, Javier; Luna-Lopez, Jose A.; Alcantara, Salvador; Rosales, Pedro; Reyes, Claudia; Orduña, Abdu

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the preparation of Zinc Oxide (ZnO) films by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis at low-temperature and its application in thin-film transistors (TFTs) are presented, as well, the impact of the active layer thickness and gate dielectric thickness in the electrical performance of the ZnO TFTs. A thinner active layer resulted in better transfer characteristics such as higher on/off-current ratio, while a thicker active layer resulted in better output characteristics. The ZnO films were deposited from 0.2 M precursor solution of Zinc acetate in methanol, using air as carrier gas on a hotplate at 200 °C. The ZnO films obtained at 200 °C were characterized by optical transmittance, Photoluminescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction.

  7. Estimating 1992-2000 average active layer thickness on the Alaskan North Slope from remotely sensed surface subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Schaefer, Kevin; Zhang, Tingjun; Wahr, John

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of temporal changes in active layer thickness (ALT) is crucial to monitoring permafrost degradation in the Arctic. We develop a retrieval algorithm to estimate long-term average ALT using thaw-season surface subsidence derived from spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) measurements. Our algorithm uses a model of vertical distribution of water content within the active layer accounting for soil texture, organic matter, and moisture. We determine the 1992-2000 average ALT for an 80 × 100 km study area of continuous permafrost on the North Slope of Alaska near Prudhoe Bay. We obtain an ALT of 30-50 cm over moist tundra areas, and a larger ALT of 50-80 cm over wet tundra areas. Our estimated ALT values match in situ measurements at Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) sites within uncertainties. Our results demonstrate that InSAR can provide ALT estimates over large areas at high spatial resolution.

  8. Wrinkled substrate and Indium Tin Oxide-free transparent electrode making organic solar cells thinner in active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kong; Lu, Shudi; Yue, Shizhong; Ren, Kuankuan; Azam, Muhammad; Tan, Furui; Wang, Zhijie; Qu, Shengchun; Wang, Zhanguo

    2016-11-01

    To enable organic solar cells with a competent charge transport efficiency, reducing the thickness of active layer without sacrificing light absorption efficiency turns out to be of high feasibility. Herein, organic solar cells on wrinkled metal surface are designed. The purposely wrinkled Al/Au film with a smooth surface provides a unique scaffold for constructing thin organic photovoltaic devices by avoiding pinholes and defects around sharp edges in conventional nanostructures. The corresponding surface light trapping effect enables the thin active layer (PTB7-Th:PC71BM) with a high absorption efficiency. With the innovative MoO3/Ag/ZnS film as the top transparent electrode, the resulting Indium Tin Oxide-free wrinkled devices show a power conversion efficiency as 7.57% (50 nm active layer), higher than the planner counterparts. Thus, this paper provides a new methodology to improve the performance of organic solar cells by balancing the mutual restraint factors to a high level.

  9. Layer by layer assembly of catalase and amine-terminated ionic liquid onto titanium nitride nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode: study of direct voltammetry and bioelectrocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Saadati, Shagayegh; Salimi, Abdollah; Hallaj, Rahman; Rostami, Amin

    2012-11-13

    A novel, simple and facile layer by layer (LBL) approach is used for modification of glassy carbon (GC) electrode with multilayer of catalase and nanocomposite containing 1-(3-Aminopropyl)-3-methylimidazolium bromide (amine terminated ionic liquid (NH(2)-IL)) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (TiNnp). First a thin layer of NH(2)-IL is covalently attached to GC/TiNnp electrode using electro-oxidation method. Then, with alternative self assemble positively charged NH(2)-IL and negatively charged catalase a sensitive H(2)O(2) biosensor is constructed, whose response is directly correlated to the number of bilayers. The surface coverage of active catalase per bilayer, heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k(s)) and Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M)) of immobilized catalase were 3.32×10(-12) mol cm(-2), 5.28s(-1) and 1.1 mM, respectively. The biosensor shows good stability, high reproducibility, long life-time, and fast amperometric response with the high sensitivity of 380 μA mM(-1)cm(-2) and low detection limit of 100 nM at concentration range up to 2.1 mM.

  10. High reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memory with a poly(4-vinyl phenol) charge trapping layer based on a pn-heterojunction active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Lanyi; Ying, Jun; Han, Jinhua; Zhang, Letian; Wang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate a high reliable and stable organic field-effect transistor (OFET) based nonvolatile memory (NVM) with a polymer poly(4-vinyl phenol) (PVP) as the charge trapping layer. In the unipolar OFETs, the inreversible shifts of the turn-on voltage (Von) and severe degradation of the memory window (ΔVon) at programming (P) and erasing (E) voltages, respectively, block their application in NVMs. The obstacle is overcome by using a pn-heterojunction as the active layer in the OFET memory, which supplied a holes and electrons accumulating channel at the supplied P and E voltages, respectively. Both holes and electrons transferring from the channels to PVP layer and overwriting the trapped charges with an opposite polarity result in the reliable bidirectional shifts of Von at P and E voltages, respectively. The heterojunction OFET exhibits excellent nonvolatile memory characteristics, with a large ΔVon of 8.5 V, desired reading (R) voltage at 0 V, reliable P/R/E/R dynamic endurance over 100 cycles and a long retention time over 10 years.

  11. Salix polaris growth responses to active layer detachment and solifluction processes in High Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siekacz, Liliana

    2015-04-01

    The work is dedicated to demonstrate the potential of Salix polaris grow properties in the dendrogemorphologic image, analyzing periglacially induced slope processes in the high Arctic.. Observed anatomical and morphological plants responses to solifluction and active layer detachment processes are presented qualitatively and quantitatively as a summary of presented features frequency. The results are discussed against the background of the other research results in this field. The investigations was performed in Ebba valley, in the vicinity of Petunia Bay, northernmost part of Billefjorden in central Spitsbergen (Svalbard). Environmental conditions are characterized by annual precipitation sum lower than 200 mm (Hagen et al.,1993) and average summer temperature of about 5°C, with maximum daily temperatures rarely exceeding 10°C (Rachlewicz, 2009). Collected shrub material was prepared according to the methods presented by Schweingruber and Poschlod (2005). Thin (approx. 15-20μm) sections of the whole cross-section were prepared with a sledge microtome, stained with Safranine and Astra blue and finally permanently fixed on microslides with Canada balsam and dried. Snapshots were taken partially for each cross-section with digital camera (ColorView III, Olympus) connected to a microscope (Olympus BX41) and merged into one, high resolution image. After all, ring widths were measured in 3-4 radii in every single cross-section using ImageJ software. Analyzed plants revealed extremely harsh environmental conditions of their growth. Buchwał et al. (2013) provided quantitative data concerning missing rings and partially missing rings in shrubs growing on Ebba valley floor. Mean ring width at the level of 79μm represents one of the smallest values of yearly growth ever noted. The share of missing rings and partially missing rings was 11,2% and 13,6% respectively. Plants growing on Ebba valley slope indicate almost twice smaller values of ring width (41μm), and higher

  12. Active Control of Panel Vibrations Induced by a Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, active and passive control of sound and vibration in aeroelastic structures have received a great deal of attention due to many potential applications to aerospace and other industries. There exists a great deal of research work done in this area. Recent advances in the control of sound and vibration can be found in the several conference proceedings. In this report we will summarize our research findings supported by the NASA grant NAG-1-1175. The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to study the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. The vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings will be presented in the next three sections. In Section II we shall describe our results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Section III is concerned with active control of the vibration and sound radiation from a nonlinear elastic panel. A detailed description of our work on the parametric vibrational control of nonlinear elastic panel will be presented in Section IV. This paper will be submitted to the Journal

  13. Effects of Calcium Spikes in the Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron on Coincidence Detection and Activity Propagation.

    PubMed

    Chua, Yansong; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon, in which action potentials triggered by stimuli near the soma above a certain frequency trigger a calcium spike at distal dendrites, leading to further somatic depolarization, is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network (FFN) embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be

  14. Effects of Calcium Spikes in the Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron on Coincidence Detection and Activity Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Yansong; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon, in which action potentials triggered by stimuli near the soma above a certain frequency trigger a calcium spike at distal dendrites, leading to further somatic depolarization, is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network (FFN) embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be

  15. Effect of Plasma-Polymerized Layer Formed on a Surface of Titanium Dioxide Particle on Its Photocatalytic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Kenji; Iwasawa, Naoko; Sonoda, Tatsuhiko; Yamane, Hirokazu; Matsushima, Shigenori; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    If TiO2 particles are used as components of paint without any surface modification, binding resin of the paint will be easily decomposed by the photocatalytic activity of the particles. In this work, plasma polymerization of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane as a siloxane monomer is tried to form thin layer stable to the photocatalytic activity on the surface of TiO2 particles. The plasma-polymerized layer containing Si-O and Si-C bonds is formed on the surface of the particles and shows stability to the photocatalytic activity of TiO2. The particles surface-modified with the plasma polymerization exhibit visible-light activity. The visible-light activity is originated from carbon doping which brings about in the particles during the plasma polymerization, and is thermally stable to be maintained after annealing at 673 K.

  16. Efficiency enhancement of solution-processed inverted organic solar cells with a carbon-nanotube-doped active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wen-Kai; Su, Shui-Hsiang; Yeh, Meng-Cheng; Huang, Yang-Chan; Yokoyama, Meiso

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed titanium-doped ZnO (TZO) is synthesized by the sol-gel method to be the electron-transporting layer (ETL) in an inverted organic solar cell (IOSC). Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are doped into an active layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl C 61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM). The addition of CNTs in the P3HT:PCBM composite increases the conjugation length of P3HT:PCBM:CNTs, which simultaneously enhances the capacity of the composite to absorb solar energy radiation. Vanadium oxide (V2O5) was spin-coated onto the active layer to be a hole-transporting layer (HTL). The power conversion efficiency (PCE) results indicate that the V2O5 nanobelt structure possesses better phase separation and provides a more efficient surface area for the P3HT:PCBM:CNT active layer to increase photocurrent. The optimized IOSCs exhibited an open circuit voltage (Voc), a short-circuit current density (Jsc), a fill factor (FF), and a PCE of 0.55 V, 6.50 mA/cm2, 58.34%, and 2.20%, respectively, under simulated AM1.5G illumination of 100 mW/cm2.

  17. High-capacity electric double-layer capacitor with high-density-activated carbon fiber electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Shudo, Atsushi; Miura, Kouichi

    2000-01-01

    Recently the authors have presented a method to prepare activated carbon fiber with high bulk density (HD-ACF) without using any binders. The possibility of using the HD-ACF as an electrode for electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) was examined in this paper. The capacitance of the EDLC with the HD-ACF electrode increased with the increase of bulk density of the HD-ACF, indicating that individual fibers are highly packed without losing their capacitance. The capacitance also increased in proportion to the size of the HD-ACF electrode. The initial discharge current of the EDLC showed little dependency on either the bulk density or the size of the HD-ACF electrode. These results clarified that the HD-ACF electrode is suitable for constructing a high-power EDLC. The initial discharge current was directly proportional to the conductivity of aqueous KCI used as the electrolyte, indicating that the resistance of the electrolyte is much higher than that of the HD-ACF electrode. This result showed that the efficiency of the HD-ACF was well above the efficiency of the electrolyte used in this study and that the improvement of the ionic conductivity of electrolyte is also necessary for developing a high-power EDLC.

  18. Ionophore-Based Voltammetric Ion Activity Sensing with Thin Layer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Cuartero, Maria; Crespo, Gaston A; Bakker, Eric

    2016-02-01

    As shown in recent work, thin layer ion-selective multi-ionophore membranes can be interrogated by cyclic voltammetry to detect the ion activity of multiple species simultaneously and selectively. Additional fundamental evidence is put forward on ion discrimination with thin multi-ionophore-based membranes with thicknesses of 200 ± 25 nm and backside contacted with poly-3-octylthiophene (POT). An anodic potential scan partially oxidizes the POT film (to POT(+)), thereby initiating the release of hydrophilic cations from the membrane phase to the sample solution at a characteristic potential. Varying concentration of added cation-exchanger demonstrates that it limits the ion transfer charge and not the deposited POT film. Voltammograms with multiple peaks are observed with each associated with the transfer of one type of ion (lithium, potassium, and sodium). Experimental conditions (thickness and composition of the membrane and concentration of the sample) are chosen that allow one to describe the system by a thermodynamic rather than kinetic model. As a consequence, apparent stability constants for sodium, potassium, and lithium (assuming 1:1 stoichiometry) with their respective ionophores are calculated and agree well with the values obtained by the potentiometric sandwich membrane technique. As an analytical application, a membrane containing three ionophores was used to determine lithium, sodium, and potassium in artificial samples at the same location and within a single voltammetric scan. Lithium and potassium were also determined in undiluted human plasma in the therapeutic concentration range. PMID:26712342

  19. Electrical activity of the Hartmann layers relative to surface viscous shearing in an annular magnetohydrodynamic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacroix, Jules; Davoust, Laurent

    2014-03-01

    As a first step towards two-phase magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), this paper addresses an original analytical coupling between surface rheology, e.g., a gradually oxidizing liquid metal surface, ruled by the Boussinesq number Bo, and a supporting annular MHD flow, ruled by the Hartmann number Ha, in the general layout of a classical annular deep-channel viscometer, as developed by Mannheimer and Schechter [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 32, 195-211 (1970)]. Using a matched asymptotic expansion based on the small parameter 1/Ha, we can express the surface velocity as a coupling variable in the jump momentum balance at the liquid surface. By solving the latter through the determination of the Green's function, the whole flow can be analytically calculated. A modified Boussinesq number, tilde{B_o}, is produced as a new non-dimensional parameter that provides the balance between surface viscous shearing and the Lorentz force. It is shown that the tilde{B_o} number drives the electrical activation of the Hartmann layers, heavily modifying the MHD flow topology and leading to the emergence of the Lorentz force, for which interaction with the flow is not classical. Finally, the evolution laws given in this study allow the determination of scaling laws for an original experimental protocol, which would make it possible to accurately determine the surface shear viscosity of a liquid metal with respect to the quality of the ambient atmosphere.

  20. Active control of panel vibrations induced by a boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1995-01-01

    The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to consider the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. Although the sound radiation has not been included, the vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings are presented in three sections. In section two we describe results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Sections three and four are concerned with some analytical and numerical results in the optimal control of the linear and nonlinear panel vibrations, respectively, excited by the flow pressure fluctuations. Finally, in section five, we draw some conclusions from research findings.

  1. Development of carbon free diffusion layer for activated carbon air cathode of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wulin; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-12-01

    The fabrication of activated carbon air cathodes for larger-scale microbial fuel cells requires a diffusion layer (DL) that is highly resistant to water leakage, oxygen permeable, and made using inexpensive materials. A hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane synthesized using a simple phase inversion process was examined as a low cost ($0.9/m(2)), carbon-free DL that prevented water leakage at high pressure heads compared to a polytetrafluoroethylene/carbon black DL ($11/m(2)). The power density produced with a PVDF (20%, w/v) DL membrane of 1400±7mW/m(2) was similar to that obtained using a wipe DL [cloth coated with poly(dimethylsiloxane)]. Water head tolerance reached 1.9m (∼19kPa) with no mesh supporter, and 2.1m (∼21kPa, maximum testing pressure) with a mesh supporter, compared to 0.2±0.05m for the wipe DL. The elimination of carbon black from the DL greatly simplified the fabrication procedure and further reduced overall cathode costs. PMID:26342345

  2. Occurrence of Sporadic -E layer during the Low Solar Activity over the Anomaly Crest Region Bhopal, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhawre, Purushottam

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric anomaly crest regions are most challenging for scientific community to understand its mechanism and investigation, for this purpose we are investigating some inospheric result for this region. The study is based on the ionogram data recorded by IPS-71 Digital Ionosonde installed over anomaly crust region Bhopal (Geo.Lat.23.2° N, Geo. Long77.4° E, Dip latitude18.4°) over a four year period from January 2007 to December 2010, covering the ending phase of 23rd Solar Cycle and starting phase of 24th solar cycle. This particular period is felt to be very suitable for examining the sunspot number and it encompasses periods of low solar activities. Quarterly ionograms are analyzed for 24 hours during these study years and have been carefully examined to note down the presence of sporadic- E. We also note down the space weather activities along with the study. The studies are divided in mainly four parts with space and geomagnetic activities during these periods. The occurrence probability of this layer is highest in summer solstice, moderate during equinox and low during winter solstice. Remarkable occurrence peaks appear from June to July in summer and from December to January in winter. The layer occurrence showed a double peak variation with distinct layer groups, in the morning (0200 LT) and the other during evening (1800 LT).The morning layer descent was associated with layer density increase indicating the strengthening of the layer while it decreased during the evening layer descent. The result indicates the presence of semi-diurnal tide over the location while the higher descent velocities could be due to the modulation of the ionization by gravity waves along with the tides. The irregularities associated with the gradient-drift instability disappear during the counter electrojet and the current flow is reversed in westward.

  3. Active control of Boundary Layer Separation & Flow Distortion in Adverse Pressure Gradient Flows via Supersonic Microjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvi, Farrukh S.; Gorton, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Inlets to aircraft propulsion systems must supply flow to the compressor with minimal pressure loss, flow distortion or unsteadiness. Flow separation in internal flows such as inlets and ducts in aircraft propulsion systems and external flows such as over aircraft wings, is undesirable as it reduces the overall system performance. The aim of this research has been to understand the nature of separation and more importantly, to explore techniques to actively control this flow separation. In particular, the use of supersonic microjets as a means of controlling boundary layer separation was explored. The geometry used for the early part of this study was a simple diverging Stratford ramp, equipped with arrays of supersonic microjets. Initial results, based on the mean surface pressure distribution, surface flow visualization and Planar Laser Scattering (PLS) indicated a reverse flow region. We implemented supersonic microjets to control this separation and flow visualization results appeared to suggest that microjets have a favorable effect, at least to a certain extent. However, the details of the separated flow field were difficult to determine based on surface pressure distribution, surface flow patterns and PLS alone. It was also difficult to clearly determine the exact influence of the supersonic microjets on this flow. In the latter part of this study, the properties of this flow-field and the effect of supersonic microjets on its behavior were investigated in further detail using 2-component (planar) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The results clearly show that the activation of microjets eliminated flow separation and resulted in a significant increase in the momentum of the fluid near the ramp surface. Also notable is the fact that the gain in momentum due to the elimination of flow separation is at least an order of magnitude larger (two orders of magnitude larger in most cases) than the momentum injected by the microjets and is accomplished with very

  4. Investigating the effect of solvent boiling temperature on the active layer morphology of diffusive bilayer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohra, Varun; Dörling, Bernhard; Higashimine, Koichi; Murata, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Using chlorobenzene as a base solvent for the deposition of the poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) layer in P3HT:phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester diffusive bilayer solar cells, we investigate the effect of adding of small amounts of high-boiling-point solvents with similar chemical structures on the resulting active layer morphologies. The results demonstrate that the crystallinity of the P3HT films as well as the vertical donor-acceptor gradient in the active layer can be tuned by this approach. The use of high-boiling-point solvents improved all photovoltaic parameters and resulted in a 32% increase in power conversion efficiency.

  5. Seismic depth conversion vs. structural validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totake, Yukitsugu; Butler, Rob; Bond, Clare

    2016-04-01

    Interpretation based on seismic reflection data is inherently an uncertain product based on imperfect datasets, with limits in data resolution and spatial extent. This has boosted geologists to use structural validation techniques to verify their seismic interpretations for many years. Structural validation of seismic interpretations should be ideally completed on depth sections, which are converted from time domain using velocities derived from well checkshot survey, seismic velocity analysis, or even estimates. Choices of velocity model critically control the final depth image and hence structural geometry of interpretations that are used as initial datasets for structural validations. However, the depth conversion is never perfectly accurate because of absence of depth constraint. Now, how robust are structural validation techniques to depth conversion uncertainty? Here we explore how structural validation techniques respond to different versions of depth interpretations converted by different velocities. We use a seismic time-based image of a fold-thrust structure in the deepwater Niger Delta to interpret, and convert to depth using three different velocity models: constant velocity (VM1); a single layer having initial velocity v0 at layer top with vertical velocity gradient k (VM2); and three layers having each v0-k set (VM3) below seabed. Forward modelling, automated trishear modelling algorithm called 'inverse trishear modelling' and Groshong's area-depth-strain (ADS) methods are applied to test the structural geometry of the depth-converted interpretations. We find forward modelling and inverse trishear modelling reasonably 'fit' all versions of interpretation, regardless of the velocity model used for depth conversion, with multiple sets of model parameters. On the other hand, only velocity model VM3 'passes' the ADS validation method, with the detachment level interpreted concordant with the depth estimated from excess area analysis, based on interpreted

  6. Aqueous Solution Processed Photoconductive Cathode Interlayer for High Performance Polymer Solar Cells with Thick Interlayer and Thick Active Layer.

    PubMed

    Nian, Li; Chen, Zhenhui; Herbst, Stefanie; Li, Qingyuan; Yu, Chengzhuo; Jiang, Xiaofang; Dong, Huanli; Li, Fenghong; Liu, Linlin; Würthner, Frank; Chen, Junwu; Xie, Zengqi; Ma, Yuguang

    2016-09-01

    An aqueous-solution-processed photoconductive cathode interlayer is developed, in which the photoinduced charge transfer brings multiple advantages such as increased conductivity and electron mobility, as well as reduced work function. Average power conversion efficiency over 10% is achieved even when the thickness of the cathode interlayer and active layer is up to 100 and 300 nm, respectively.

  7. Effects of stratified active layers on high-altitude permafrost warming: a case study on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xicai; Li, Yanping; Yu, Qihao; Shi, Xiaogang; Yang, Daqing; Roth, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    Seasonally variable thermal conductivity in active layers is one important factor that controls the thermal state of permafrost. The common assumption is that this conductivity is considerably lower in the thawed than in the frozen state, λt/λf < 1. Using a 9-year dataset from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) in conjunction with the GEOtop model, we demonstrate that the ratio λt/λf may approach or even exceed 1. This can happen in thick (> 1.5 m) active layers with strong seasonal total water content changes in the regions with summer-monsoon-dominated precipitation pattern. The conductivity ratio can be further increased by typical soil architectures that may lead to a dry interlayer. The unique pattern of soil hydraulic and thermal dynamics in the active layer can be one important contributor for the rapid permafrost warming at the study site. These findings suggest that, given the increase in air temperature and precipitation, soil hydraulic properties, particularly soil architecture in those thick active layers must be properly taken into account in permafrost models.

  8. Photocatalytic decolouration of Orange II by ZnO active layers screen-printed on ceramic tiles.

    PubMed

    Marto, J; São Marcos, P; Trindade, T; Labrincha, J A

    2009-04-15

    In this work ZnO layers have been deposited by screen-printing in common ceramic tiles. These layers were characterized and tested for the photocatalytic degradation of the organic dye Orange II in aqueous solutions, using a batch photoreactor either under visible light provided by a Philips ML-160 W lamp or under direct exposure to sunlight. For sake of comparison, ZnO suspensions have also been evaluated for similar reacting conditions. The influence of experimental parameters such as (i) firing temperature of the printed layer; (ii) layer thickness; and (iii) operation time have been investigated. Screen-printed ZnO layers obtained in optimal processing conditions showed photocatalytic activity comparable to aqueous ZnO suspensions. The maximal attenuation degree is over 70% and decolourisation rate, assuming that reaction kinetics follows a pseudo-first order rate law, is over 0.015 min(-1). Thus these ZnO-layered ceramic tiles can be regarded as an alternative to photocatalytic suspensions of the same material with the advantage of avoiding the removal of the photocatalyst.

  9. Activity-based protein profiling of hydrolytic enzymes induced by gibberellic acid in isolated aleurone layers of malting barley.

    PubMed

    Daneri-Castro, Sergio N; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Grosse-Holz, Friederike M; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Roberts, Thomas H

    2016-09-01

    During barley germination, the aleurone layer secretes most of the enzymes required to degrade the endosperm, many of which are yet to be characterized. We used activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) to detect a range of active enzymes extracted from aleurone layers isolated from grains of a commercial malting barley variety incubated with or without gibberellic acid (GA). Enzymes found to be induced by GA were putative aleurains, cathepsin-B-like proteases and serine hydrolases. By using an inhibitory sugar panel, a specific active retaining β-glycosidase in the barley aleurone was identified as a putative xylanase. Our results show that ABPP can be used rapidly to identify a variety of active enzyme isoforms in cereal aleurone without the need for enzyme purification.

  10. Microglia in mouse retina contralateral to experimental glaucoma exhibit multiple signs of activation in all retinal layers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glaucomatous optic neuropathy, a leading cause of blindness, can progress despite control of intraocular pressure - currently the main risk factor and target for treatment. Glaucoma progression shares mechanisms with neurodegenerative disease, including microglia activation. In the present model of ocular hypertension (OHT), we have recently described morphological signs of retinal microglia activation and MHC-II upregulation in both the untreated contralateral eyes and OHT eyes. By using immunostaining, we sought to analyze and quantify additional signs of microglia activation and differences depending on the retinal layer. Methods Two groups of adult Swiss mice were used: age-matched control (naïve, n = 12), and lasered (n = 12). In the lasered animals, both OHT eyes and contralateral eyes were analyzed. Retinal whole-mounts were immunostained with antibodies against Iba-1, MHC-II, CD68, CD86, and Ym1. The Iba-1+ cell number in the plexiform layers (PL) and the photoreceptor outer segment (OS), Iba-1+ arbor area in the PL, and area of the retina occupied by Iba-1+ cells in the nerve fiber layer-ganglion cell layer (NFL-GCL) were quantified. Results The main findings in contralateral eyes and OHT eyes were: i) ameboid microglia in the NFL-GCL and OS; ii) the retraction of processes in all retinal layers; iii) a higher level of branching in PL and in the OS; iv) soma displacement to the nearest cell layers in the PL and OS; v) the reorientation of processes in the OS; vi) MHC-II upregulation in all retinal layers; vii) increased CD68 immunostaining; and viii) CD86 immunolabeling in ameboid cells. In comparison with the control group, a significant increase in the microglial number in the PL, OS, and in the area occupied by Iba-1+ cells in the NFL-GCL, and significant reduction of the arbor area in the PL. In addition, rounded Iba-1+ CD86+ cells in the NFL-GCL, OS and Ym1+ cells, and rod-like microglia in the NFL-GCL were restricted to OHT eyes

  11. Double-layered collagen gel hemisphere for cell invasion assay: successful visualization and quantification of cell invasion activity.

    PubMed

    Takata, Masahiko; Maniwa, Yoshimasa; Doi, Takefumi; Tanaka, Yugo; Okada, Kenji; Nishio, Wataru; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Okita, Yutaka

    2007-10-01

    Although various methods for collagen gel-based cell invasion assays have been described, there continues to be a need for a simpler and more objective assay. Here, we describe an easy-to-prepare double-layered collagen gel hemisphere (DL-CGH) system that satisfies these requirements, and we demonstrate the advantages of this new system for visualizing cell movements during invasion. DL-CGH consists of a central core collagen layer surrounded by an outer cover collagen layer. A droplet of collagen I solution (containing cells to be examined) naturally forms a small hemisphere on the bottom of the culture dish. After this central core layer gels, a second droplet is placed atop the first gel, encapsulating it completely. The hemisphere is submerged in the medium and cultured. The invasive activity of cells that infiltrate from the inner to the outer layer can be evaluated optically. Using this in vitro system, we measured the inhibitory effect of E-cadherin expression on cancer cell invasion. DL-CGH also allowed visualization of interactions between invading cancer cells and the stroma. Cancer cells, which lack the proteases required for direct entrance into the three-dimensional collagen matrix, were seen to slip like amoebas through matrix gaps generated by the pericellular proteolytic activity of fibroblasts. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Cell Communication and Adhesion for the following free supplemental resources: Movies 1-3; 4a and b]. PMID:17957531

  12. ϒ-secretase and LARG mediate distinct RGMa activities to control appropriate layer targeting within the optic tectum

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, P; Harada, H; Tassew, N G; Charish, J; Goldschneider, D; Wallace, V A; Sugita, S; Mehlen, P; Monnier, P P

    2016-01-01

    While a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate retino-tectal mapping, the determinants that target retinal projections to specific layers of the optic tectum remain elusive. Here we show that two independent RGMa-peptides, C- and N-RGMa, activate two distinct intracellular pathways to regulate axonal growth. C-RGMa utilizes a Leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG)/Rho/Rock pathway to inhibit axonal growth. N-RGMa on the other hand relies on ϒ-secretase cleavage of the intracellular portion of Neogenin to generate an intracellular domain (NeICD) that uses LIM-only protein 4 (LMO4) to block growth. In the developing tectum (E18), overexpression of C-RGMa and dominant-negative LARG (LARG-PDZ) induced overshoots in the superficial tectal layer but not in deeper tectal layers. In younger embryos (E12), C-RGMa and LARG-PDZ prevented ectopic projections toward deeper tectal layers, indicating that C-RGMa may act as a barrier to descending axons. In contrast both N-RGMa and NeICD overexpression resulted in aberrant axonal-paths, all of which suggests that it is a repulsive guidance molecule. Thus, two RGMa fragments activate distinct pathways resulting in different axonal responses. These data reveal how retinal projections are targeted to the appropriate layer in their target tissue. PMID:26292756

  13. Mineralogical and petrological investigations of rocks cored from depths higher than 440m during the CFDDP drilling activities at the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mormone, Angela; Piochi, Monica; Balassone, Giuseppina; Carlino, Stefano; Somma, Renato; Troise, Claudia; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The Campi Flegrei caldera is one of the highest-risk volcanic areas on the Earth and the drilling exploiting activities carried by the Azienda Geologica Italiana Petroli (AGIP) and the Società Anonima Forze Endogene Napoletane (SAFEN) since the '40 have produced the main constrains to the definition of the subsurface structure of the caldera. The eastern part of the caldera represents among the least known in the area in terms of both volcanic and geothermal evolution. Recently, in the 2012, the Campi Flegrei Deep Drilling Project (CFDDP) allowed performing a 506m hole in this sector of the caldera, i.e. in the Bagnoli Plain, where the western districts of the Neapolitan city developed. Here, we present the preliminary results from mineralogical, geochemical and petrological investigations of drilling core samples collected at -443 m and -506 m of depths. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), microanalysis by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) together with investigations by back-scattered electron mode (SEM-BSE), and powder X-Ray diffraction (XRD) allowed: 1) defining the primary sample lithology; 2) examining the features of both primary and secondary minerals; 3) describing the relationships among texture and secondary mineralization. Sr isotope analyses were furthermore performed on separated feldspars. Density measurements were also carried out on the bottom core. The investigated samples are representative of strongly altered, massive pyroclastic tuffs, which made of a chaotic ashy to sandy matrix including low crystalline juvenile scoria and pumice fragments. Textural features of secondary mineralization are consistent with circulation of hydrothermal fluids as the results of a wide geothermal resource in the caldera. Comparing the paleo-temperature inferred by authigenic minerals occurrence and the temperature measured at the bottom hole (~60°C) during geophysical logs, we suggest the cooling of the hydrothermal system in the eastern sector of the caldera.

  14. Monitoring the Depth of Anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Musizza, Bojan; Ribaric, Samo

    2010-01-01

    One of the current challenges in medicine is monitoring the patients’ depth of general anaesthesia (DGA). Accurate assessment of the depth of anaesthesia contributes to tailoring drug administration to the individual patient, thus preventing awareness or excessive anaesthetic depth and improving patients’ outcomes. In the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of studies on the development, comparison and validation of commercial devices that estimate the DGA by analyzing electrical activity of the brain (i.e., evoked potentials or brain waves). In this paper we review the most frequently used sensors and mathematical methods for monitoring the DGA, their validation in clinical practice and discuss the central question of whether these approaches can, compared to other conventional methods, reduce the risk of patient awareness during surgical procedures. PMID:22163504

  15. Hydrothermal fluid-mineral interactions within volcanic sediment layer revealed by shallow drilling in active seafloor hydrothermal fields in the mid-Okinawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, J.; Miyoshi, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Omori, E.; Takahashi, Y.; Furuzawa, Y.; Yamanaka, T.; Kawagucci, S.; Yoshizumi, R.; Urabe, T.

    2012-12-01

    TAIGA11 Expedition of R/V Hakurei-maru No.2 was conducted in June, 2011 to study subseafloor environment below active hydrothermal fields using a shallow drilling system (called as Benthic Multi-coring System, BMS). Three active hydrothermal fields at Iheya North Knoll (27 47'N, 126 54'E), at Izena Hole Jade site (27 16'N, 127 05'E) and at Izena Hole Hakurei site (27 15'N, 127 04'E) were selected as exploration targets, to focus on a hydrothermal fluid circulation system that develops in sediment consists of volcaniclastic and hemipelagic materials. In this presentation, we will report mineralogy of hydrothermal precipitates and altered clay minerals together with geochemistry of pore fluids, to discuss hydrothermal interactions beneath an active hydrothermal field. In the Iheya North Knoll hydrothermal field, the BMS drilling successfully attained to 453 cmbsf at the station 200 meters apart from the central mound area. The obtained core consisted almost entirely of grayish white altered mud that was identified as kaolinite by XRD. Pore fluid from the corresponding depth showed enrichment in major cations (Na, K, Ca and Mg) and Cl, which may be explained as a result of involvement of water into the kaolinite. Since kaolinite is considered as stable in rather acidic environment, its abundant occurrence beneath the seafloor would be attributed to a unique hydrothermal interaction. A possible scenario is intrusion of the vapor-rich hydrothermal component that has experienced phase separation. In the Jade hydrothermal fields in the Izena Hole, the BMS drilling successfully attained to 529 cmbsf at the marginal part of a hydrothermal field. The obtained core comprised grayish white hydrothermal altered mud below 370 cmbsf. Occurrence of native sulphur is also identified. Unfortunately, pore fluid could not be extracted from the intense alteration layer. In the Hakurei hydrothermal fields in the Izena Hole, the BMS drilling successfully attained to 610 cmbsf near one of

  16. Parallel Evolution of Quasi-separatrix Layers and Active Region Upflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrini, C. H.; Baker, D.; Démoulin, P.; Cristiani, G. D.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Vargas Domínguez, S.; Nuevo, F. A.; Vásquez, A. M.; Pick, M.

    2015-08-01

    Persistent plasma upflows were observed with Hinode’s EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) at the edges of active region (AR) 10978 as it crossed the solar disk. We analyze the evolution of the photospheric magnetic and velocity fields of the AR, model its coronal magnetic field, and compute the location of magnetic null-points and quasi-sepratrix layers (QSLs) searching for the origin of EIS upflows. Magnetic reconnection at the computed null points cannot explain all of the observed EIS upflow regions. However, EIS upflows and QSLs are found to evolve in parallel, both temporarily and spatially. Sections of two sets of QSLs, called outer and inner, are found associated to EIS upflow streams having different characteristics. The reconnection process in the outer QSLs is forced by a large-scale photospheric flow pattern, which is present in the AR for several days. We propose a scenario in which upflows are observed, provided that a large enough asymmetry in plasma pressure exists between the pre-reconnection loops and lasts as long as a photospheric forcing is at work. A similar mechanism operates in the inner QSLs; in this case, it is forced by the emergence and evolution of the bipoles between the two main AR polarities. Our findings provide strong support for the results from previous individual case studies investigating the role of magnetic reconnection at QSLs as the origin of the upflowing plasma. Furthermore, we propose that persistent reconnection along QSLs does not only drive the EIS upflows, but is also responsible for the continuous metric radio noise-storm observed in AR 10978 along its disk transit by the Nançay Radio Heliograph.

  17. PARALLEL EVOLUTION OF QUASI-SEPARATRIX LAYERS AND ACTIVE REGION UPFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Mandrini, C. H.; Cristiani, G. D.; Nuevo, F. A.; Vásquez, A. M.; Baker, D.; Driel-Gesztelyi, L. van; Démoulin, P.; Pick, M.; Vargas Domínguez, S.

    2015-08-10

    Persistent plasma upflows were observed with Hinode’s EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) at the edges of active region (AR) 10978 as it crossed the solar disk. We analyze the evolution of the photospheric magnetic and velocity fields of the AR, model its coronal magnetic field, and compute the location of magnetic null-points and quasi-sepratrix layers (QSLs) searching for the origin of EIS upflows. Magnetic reconnection at the computed null points cannot explain all of the observed EIS upflow regions. However, EIS upflows and QSLs are found to evolve in parallel, both temporarily and spatially. Sections of two sets of QSLs, called outer and inner, are found associated to EIS upflow streams having different characteristics. The reconnection process in the outer QSLs is forced by a large-scale photospheric flow pattern, which is present in the AR for several days. We propose a scenario in which upflows are observed, provided that a large enough asymmetry in plasma pressure exists between the pre-reconnection loops and lasts as long as a photospheric forcing is at work. A similar mechanism operates in the inner QSLs; in this case, it is forced by the emergence and evolution of the bipoles between the two main AR polarities. Our findings provide strong support for the results from previous individual case studies investigating the role of magnetic reconnection at QSLs as the origin of the upflowing plasma. Furthermore, we propose that persistent reconnection along QSLs does not only drive the EIS upflows, but is also responsible for the continuous metric radio noise-storm observed in AR 10978 along its disk transit by the Nançay Radio Heliograph.

  18. Thermally activated decomposition of (Ga,Mn)As thin layer at medium temperature post growth annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikhov, Y.; Konstantynov, P.; Domagala, J.; Sadowski, J.; Chernyshova, M.; Wojciechowski, T.; Syryanyy, Y.; Demchenko, I. N.

    2016-05-01

    The redistribution of Mn atoms in Ga1-xMnxAs layer during medium-temperature annealing, 250-450 oC, by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) recorded at ALBA facility, was studied. For this purpose Ga1-xMnxAs thin layer with x=0.01 was grown on AlAs buffer layer deposited on GaAs(100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) followed by annealing. The examined layer was detached from the substrate using a “lift-off” procedure in order to eliminate elastic scattering in XAFS spectra. Fourier transform analysis of experimentally obtained EXAFS spectra allowed to propose a model which describes a redistribution/diffusion of Mn atoms in the host matrix. Theoretical XANES spectra, simulated using multiple scattering formalism (FEFF code) with the support of density functional theory (WIEN2k code), qualitatively describe the features observed in the experimental fine structure.

  19. Cobalt on rhenium(0001) an example of thermally activated layer intermixing and surface alloying