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Sample records for active layer detachment

  1. Salix polaris growth responses to active layer detachment and solifluction processes in High Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siekacz, Liliana

    2015-04-01

    The work is dedicated to demonstrate the potential of Salix polaris grow properties in the dendrogemorphologic image, analyzing periglacially induced slope processes in the high Arctic.. Observed anatomical and morphological plants responses to solifluction and active layer detachment processes are presented qualitatively and quantitatively as a summary of presented features frequency. The results are discussed against the background of the other research results in this field. The investigations was performed in Ebba valley, in the vicinity of Petunia Bay, northernmost part of Billefjorden in central Spitsbergen (Svalbard). Environmental conditions are characterized by annual precipitation sum lower than 200 mm (Hagen et al.,1993) and average summer temperature of about 5°C, with maximum daily temperatures rarely exceeding 10°C (Rachlewicz, 2009). Collected shrub material was prepared according to the methods presented by Schweingruber and Poschlod (2005). Thin (approx. 15-20μm) sections of the whole cross-section were prepared with a sledge microtome, stained with Safranine and Astra blue and finally permanently fixed on microslides with Canada balsam and dried. Snapshots were taken partially for each cross-section with digital camera (ColorView III, Olympus) connected to a microscope (Olympus BX41) and merged into one, high resolution image. After all, ring widths were measured in 3-4 radii in every single cross-section using ImageJ software. Analyzed plants revealed extremely harsh environmental conditions of their growth. Buchwał et al. (2013) provided quantitative data concerning missing rings and partially missing rings in shrubs growing on Ebba valley floor. Mean ring width at the level of 79μm represents one of the smallest values of yearly growth ever noted. The share of missing rings and partially missing rings was 11,2% and 13,6% respectively. Plants growing on Ebba valley slope indicate almost twice smaller values of ring width (41μm), and higher

  2. The Detached Haze Layer in Titan's Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavvas, P.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.

    2008-12-01

    The Cassini observations reveal the presence of a detached haze layer in Titan's mesosphere at an altitude of 520 km, well above the stratosphere. Observations of scattered light made by the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) reveal a clearly defined layer encircling low and mid-latitude regions. The aerosol layer is also detected in stellar occultation measurements of UV extinction by the UltraViolet Imaging Spectrometer (UVIS). The haze is a global and permanent feature of Titan's atmosphere. Furthermore the location of the detached haze layer is coincident with and the likely cause of a local maximum in the temperature profile measured by the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument (HASI). This temperature inversion is also permanent and global, having been detected in ground-based stellar occultations. The correlation between the extinction profile and the temperature maximum imply that the detached haze cannot be due to condensation, as previously suggested. Previously, Voyager high phase angle images at 500 nm revealed a detached haze layer near 350 km, more than 150 km lower than the Cassini layer. Close examination of the Voyager images suggests that the Cassini detached layer at 520 km is a separate phenomenon rather than a change in the Voyager detached layer. Analysis of the observed optical properties suggests that the average size of particles in the Cassini detached layer is < 45 nm, with an imaginary index k < 0.3 at 187.5 nm, while Non-LTE calculations of the temperature perturbation induced by the detached haze show that the average particle size must be greater than 35 nm for reproducing the heating rate implied by the HASI temperature profile. Calculation of the sedimentation velocity of the particles, coupled with the derived number density, imply a mass flux of 1.9-3.2 × 10-14 g cm-2 s-1. This is approximately equal to the mass flux required to explain the main haze layer and suggests that the stratospheric haze is formed primarily by

  3. Drivers and Estimates of Terrain Suitability for Active Layer Detachment Slides and Retrogressive Thaw Slumps in the Brooks Range and Foothills of Northwest Alaska, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balser, A.; Jones, J.

    2015-12-01

    Active layer detachment sliding and retrogressive thaw slumping are important modes of upland permafrost degradation and disturbance in permafrost regions, and have been linked with climate warming trends, ecosystem impacts, and permafrost carbon release. In the Brooks Range and foothills of northwest Alaska, these features are widespread, with distribution linked to multiple landscape properties. Inter-related and co-varying terrain properties, including surficial geology, topography, geomorphology, vegetation and hydrology, are generally considered key drivers of permafrost landscape characteristics and responses to climate perturbation. However, these inter-relationships as collective drivers of terrain suitability for active layer detachment and retrogressive thaw slump processes are poorly understood in this region. We empirically tested and refined a hypothetical model of terrain factors driving active layer detachment and retrogressive thaw slump terrain suitability, and used final model results to generate synoptic terrain suitability estimates across the study region. Spatial data for terrain properties were examined against locations of 2,492 observed active layer detachments and 805 observed retrogressive thaw slumps using structural equation modelling and integrated terrain unit analysis. Factors significant to achieving model fit were found to substantially hone and constrain region-wide terrain suitability estimates, suggesting that omission of relevant factors leads to broad overestimation of terrain suitability. Resulting probabilistic maps of terrain suitability, and a threshold-delineated mask of suitable terrain, were used to quantify and describe landscape settings typical of these features. 51% of the study region is estimated suitable terrain for retrogressive thaw slumps, compared with 35% for active layer detachment slides, while 29% of the study region is estimated suitable for both. Results improve current understanding of arctic landscape

  4. Rocket dust storms and detached layers in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, A.; Faure, J.; Madeleine, J.; Maattanen, A. E.; Forget, F.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne dust is the main climatic agent in the Martian environment. Local dust storms play a key role in the dust cycle; yet their life cycle is poorly known. Here we use mesoscale modeling with radiatively-active transported dust to predict the evolution of a local dust storm monitored by OMEGA onboard Mars Express. We show that the evolution of this dust storm is governed by deep convective motions. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, in lieu of latent heating in moist convection on Earth. We propose to use the terminology "rocket dust storm", or conio-cumulonimbus, to describe those storms in which rapid and efficient vertical transport takes place, injecting dust particles at high altitudes in the Martian troposphere (30 to 50 km). Combined to horizontal transport by large-scale winds, rocket dust storms form detached layers of dust reminiscent of those observed with instruments onboard Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Detached layers are stable over several days owing to nighttime sedimentation being unable to counteract daytime convective transport, and to the resupply of convective energy at sunrise. The peak activity of rocket dust storms is expected in low-latitude regions at clear season, which accounts for the high-altitude tropical dust maximum unveiled by Mars Climate Sounder. Our findings on dust-driven deep convection have strong implications for the Martian dust cycle, thermal structure, atmospheric dynamics, cloud microphysics, chemistry, and robotic and human exploration.ensity-scaled dust optical depth at local times 1400 1600 and 1800 (lat 2.5°S, Ls 135°) hortwave heating rate at local time 1500 and latitude 2.5°S.

  5. Detached Dust Layers in Regional and Global Dust Events on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavens, Nicholas

    2014-11-01

    Throughout much of the year in Mars's tropics, the vertical distribution of dust has a local maximum in mass mixing ratio significantly above the inferred height of the planetary boundary layer: a feature known as a "detached dust layer." Detached dust layering also has been observed in the extratropics. Modeling shows that dust-heated convective plumes within dust storms can rapidly transport dust vertically to altitudes of 40 km or more. These "rocket dust storm" plumes minimally mix with the surrounding environment, resulting in detached dust layers. Visible image climatology of dust storm activity argue against the "rocket dust storm" mechanism being dominant in northern spring and summer, when detached dust layer formation is common but tropical dust storm activity is rare. Some detached dust layers undoubtedly form by the "rocket dust storm" mechanism, such as those during regional and global dust events, which reach altitudes of 45-75 km above the MOLA datum and have mass mixing ratios of 40-260 ppm, equivalent to well-mixed visible column opacities of 3.6-23. These layers are not just a phenomenological curiosity. The plumes that generate them could play a role in dust storm development analogous to convection in tropical cyclone activity on Earth: "the dusty hurricane" analogy.Here I report on detached dust layers from one global dust event and five regional dust events observed by the Mars Climate Sounder on board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. I examine the history of detached dust layer activity during the dust events in the context of possible limb observations of deep convection as well as visible imaging of dust lifting activity.Global dust events are associated with detached dust layers that are thicker and/or reach higher altitudes than in regional dust events. However, detached dust layers in these dust events do not originate from the tropics alone or have a simple relationship with dust lifting activity, arguing against strong analogy with

  6. Detached scrape-off layer tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kesner, J.

    1995-06-01

    The equilibrium and stability of scrape-off layer plasmas are considered using a one-dimensional treatment of coupled heat conduction and pressure balance equations. It is found that, for sufficiently low-temperature and high neutral density, a region of greatly reduced power flux to the endplate can be achieved. The plasma in the vicinity of the end wall is characterized by a sharp plasma pressure gradient and a relatively low temperature, 1{lt}{ital T}{sub 0}{lt}10 eV.

  7. The disappearance and reappearance of Titan's detached haze layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Robert; Rannou, Pascal; Lavvas, Panayotis; Seignovert, Benoit; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; Perry, Jason; Ovanessian, Aida; Roy, Mou

    2016-10-01

    Titan's extended haze is a prominent and long-lived feature of the atmosphere that encompasses a rich variety of chemical, dynamical and microphysical processes operating over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. The so-called 'detached' haze layer is easily seen in high-resolution short-wave (near-UV and blue wavelengths) images and is a consequence of a nearly global (outside of the winter polar hood region) layer depleted in aerosol content. It was first seen near 350 Km altitude in Voyager images (Rages and Pollack, 1983) and later observed by the Cassini ISS cameras (Porco et al., 2005; West et al., 2010) and UV stellar occultation profiles (Koskinen et al. 2011). A series of Cassini images from 2009 to 2010 revealed what appears to be a seasonally related altitude variation with remarkable regularity (comparing the Voyager and Cassini images). The drop in altitude is most rapid at equinox. Here we report on images of the upper haze layer over the period 2012 to early 2016. In the early part of this period the detached haze continued to drop in altitude and disappeared. There was no evidence for it beginning late in 2012 and extending to early 2016 when it was again detected with very low contrast at an altitude near 500 Km. We document this behavior and examine the evolution of the haze as functions of both latitude and time. These new details put additional constraints on models that attempt to account for the existence of the detached layer. Part of this work was done by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. References: Rages, K., and J. B. Pollack (1983), Vertical distribution of scattering hazes in Titan's upper atmosphere, Icarus, 55, 50-62, doi:10.1016/0019-1035 (83)90049-0; Porco, C. C. et al., Imaging Titan from the Cassini Spacecraft, Nature 434, 159-168 (2005); West, R. A. et al., The evolution of Titans detached haze layer near equinox in 2009", Geophys. Res. Lett. 38, L06204, doi:10.1029/2011GL046843, 2011

  8. Aerosols optical properties in Titan's Detached Haze Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seignovert, Benoit; Rannou, Pascal; Lavvas, Panayotis; West, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Titan's Detached Haze Layer (DHL) was first observed in 1983 by Rages and Pollack during the Voyager 2 is a consistent spherical haze feature surrounding Titan's upper atmosphere and detached from the main haze. Since 2005, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) instrument on board the Cassini mission performs a continuous survey of the Titan's atmosphere and confirmed its persistence at 500 km up to the equinox (2009) before its drop and disappearance in 2012 (West et al. 2011). Previous analyses showed, that this layer corresponds to the transition area between small spherical aerosols and large fractal aggregates and play a key role in the aerosols formation in Titan's atmosphere (Rannou et al. 2000, Lavvas et al. 2009, Cours et al. 2011).In this talk we will present the UV photometric analyses based on radiative transfer inversion to retrieve aerosols particles properties in the DHL (bulk and monomer radius and local density) performed on ISS observations taken from 2005 to 2007.References:- Rages and Pollach, Icarus 55 (1983)- West, et al., Icarus 38 (2011)- Rannou, et al., Icarus 147 (2000)- Lavvas, et al., Icarus 201 (2009)- Cours, et al., ApJ Lett. 741 (2015)

  9. DUAL ORIGIN OF AEROSOLS IN TITAN'S DETACHED HAZE LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Cours, T.; Burgalat, J.; Rannou, P.; Rodriguez, S.; Brahic, A.

    2011-11-10

    We have analyzed scattered light profiles from the Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem, taken at the limb and at several large phase angles. We also used results from an occultation observed by Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph in the ultraviolet. We found that particles responsible for the scattering in the detached haze have an effective radius around 0.15 {mu}m and the aerosol size distribution follows a power law (exponent about -4.5). We discuss these results along with microphysical constraints and thermal equilibrium of the detached haze, and we conclude that only a strong interaction with atmospheric dynamics can explain such a structure.

  10. Detachment of Liquid-Water Droplets from Gas-Diffusion Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prodip K.; Grippin, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-07-01

    A critical issue for optimal water management in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells at lower temperatures is the removal of liquid water from the cell. This pathway is intimately linked with the phenomena of liquid-water droplet removal from surface of the gas-diffusion layer and into the flow channel. Thus, a good understanding of liquid-water transport and droplet growth and detachment from the gas-diffusion layer is critical. In this study, liquid-water droplet growth and detachment on the gas-diffusion layer surfaces are investigated experimentally to improve the understating of water transport through and removal from gas-diffusion layers. An experiment using a sliding-angle measurement is designed and used to quantify and directly measure the adhesion force for liquid-water droplets, and to understand the droplets? growth and detachment from the gas-diffusion layers.

  11. Rocket dust storms and detached dust layers in the Martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Faure, Julien; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Määttänen, Anni; Forget, François

    2013-04-01

    Airborne dust is the main climatic agent in the Martian environment. Local dust storms play a key role in the dust cycle; yet their life cycle is poorly known. Here we use mesoscale modeling that includes the transport of radiatively active dust to predict the evolution of a local dust storm monitored by OMEGA on board Mars Express. We show that the evolution of this dust storm is governed by deep convective motions. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, rather than by latent heating as in moist convection on Earth. We propose to use the terminology "rocket dust storm," or conio-cumulonimbus, to describe those storms in which rapid and efficient vertical transport takes place, injecting dust particles at high altitudes in the Martian troposphere (30-50 km). Combined to horizontal transport by large-scale winds, rocket dust storms produce detached layers of dust reminiscent of those observed with Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Since nighttime sedimentation is less efficient than daytime convective transport, and the detached dust layers can convect during the daytime, these layers can be stable for several days. The peak activity of rocket dust storms is expected in low-latitude regions at clear seasons (late northern winter to late northern summer), which accounts for the high-altitude tropical dust maxima unveiled by Mars Climate Sounder. Dust-driven deep convection has strong implications for the Martian dust cycle, thermal structure, atmospheric dynamics, cloud microphysics, chemistry, and robotic and human exploration.

  12. Retrieving the aerosol particle distribution in Titan's detached layer from ISS limb observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seignovert, B.; Rannou, P.; Lavvas, P.; Cours, T.; West, R. A.

    2015-10-01

    The study of the detached haze layer above Titan's thick atmosphere is one of the key elements to understand the growth of the aerosols in the upper atmosphere of Titan. In this work we will present the results of a radiative transfer inversion of the vertical profile distribution of aerosols in the detached haze layer (from 300 to 600 km) by using the I/F ratio ob- served by Cassini ISS camera. The analyses will focus on the derivation of the particle size distribution.

  13. Detachment of solids and nitrifiers in integrated, fixed-film activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Maas, Carol L A; Parker, Wayne J; Legge, Raymond L

    2008-12-01

    Despite the importance of detachment to biofilm processes, detachment phenomena are not well understood. In this study, researchers investigated biofilm detachment from free-floating biofilm carriers that were established in an integrated, fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) installation in Mississauga, Ontario. A method for assessing detachment from biofilm carrier systems was devised, evaluated, and refined during this study. In the absence of substrate, superficial air velocity significantly affected the 24-hour detachment rates of total suspended solids from the carriers. Short-term growth conditions did not appear to significantly affect the rate of detachment of solids and nitrifiers. The measured solids-detachment rates were found to be described by a second order function of biofilm attached growth total solids with a detachment coefficient of 0.006 +/- 0.0008 (g/m x d)(-1).

  14. Delay of Turbulent Boundary Layer Detachment by Mechanical Excitation: Application to Rearward-facing Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinzie, Daniel J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A vane oscillating about a fixed point at the inlet to a two-dimensional 20 deg rearward-facing ramp proved effective in delaying the detachment of a turbulent boundary layer. Flow-field, surface static pressure, and smoke-wire flow visualization measurements were made. Surface pressure coefficient distributions revealed that two different effects occurred with axial distance along the ramp surface. The surface pressure coefficient varied as a complex function of the vane oscillation frequency and its trailing edge displacement amplitude; that is, it varied as a function of the vane oscillation frequency throughout the entire range of frequencies covered during the test, but it varied over only a limited range of the trailing edge displacement amplitudes covered.The complexity of these findings prompted a detailed investigation, the results of which revealed a combination of phenomena that explain qualitatively how the mechanically generated, periodic, sinusoidal perturbing signal produced by the oscillating vane reacts with the fluid flow to delay the detachment of a turbulent boundary layer experiencing transitory detachment.

  15. Secular period decreasing of 17 detached chromospherically active binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, C. Q.; Luo, Y. P.; Zhang, X. B.; Deng, L. C.; Luo, Z. Q.; Yang, S. Z.

    2008-10-01

    The long-term orbital period changes of detached chromospheric active binaries were surveyed. 17 of such systems are found to be undergoing secular period decreasing with the rates (dP/dt) of -3.05 × 10-9 to -3.77 × 10-5 days per year. The longer the orbital period, the more rapidly the period decreases. Following Stepien (1995), the period decreasing rate due to the angular momentum loss (AML) caused by magnetic wind is computed for each system. A comparison shows that the observed dP/dt's are obviously higher than that of the theoretical predictions by 1-3 orders of magnitude. It suggests that the magnetic wind is not likely the determinant mechanism driving the AML in close binaries.

  16. Secular period decreasing of detached chromospherically active binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chang Qing; Zhang, Xiao Bin; Deng, Li Cai; Luo, Yang Ping; Luo, Zhi Quan; Yang, Shu Zheng

    2010-05-01

    The long-term orbital period changes of a large sample of detached chromospherically active binaries (CABs) were studied. Eleven such systems were found to be undergoing secular period decreases with the rates of -6.3×10-9 to -1.1×10-6 days per year. The period decreasing rates are found to vary depending on the orbital period. The longer the orbital period is, the more rapidly the period decreases. Following Stepien (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 274:1019, 1995), the period decreasing rate predicted by angular momentum loss (AML) caused by magnetic wind is computed for each system. A comparison between the observed and calculated period decreasing rates shows that the former values are obviously larger than the latter by 1-3 orders of magnitude. It suggests that the magnetic wind is not likely the determinant mechanism driving the AML in these systems. Finally, the orbital angular momentum (AM) and the rate of AML, dot{J} , are computed for each system. It shows that the AM have a similar change with the orbital period like d P/d t does, but logdot{J}/J presents no strict changing with the kinematical ages.

  17. A rescaling method for correcting log-layer mismatch in detached eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ning

    2013-06-01

    In order to correct the unphysical log-layer mismatch commonly encountered in detached eddy simulation (DES) of flows with attached boundary layers, a function ℓM,ML, which has a multi-layer structure with scaling laws in each layer and a plateau related to the Kármán constant, is defined. The height of this plateau is found to be crucial for obtaining the correct log-layer. A target scaling function is designed which equals ℓM,ML in the near-wall region, but with the height of plateau determined analytically from the classical log-law. This scaling function is used as a target function according to which the resolved turbulent fluctuations are renormalized, in order to recover the height of plateau prescribed by the log-law. The renormalization procedure guarantees the height of ℓM,ML required by log-law, resulting in correct log layer slope. The method is also shown to maintain similar turbulent properties in the large eddy simulation (LES) region of DES method. Hence it predicts the turbulent intensity correctly. The results demonstrate the relationship between constant ℓM,ML and log-law profile of mean velocity, and relate the Kármán constant to turbulent fluctuations, implying a complete description of turbulent structural ensemble dynamics. The proposed method can be extended to more general flows with log layers since it uses only the log-law with Kármán constant as the input, while the intercept of log layer depends on the solution of Spalart-Allmaras (SA) model in the near-wall field, where Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solutions are accurate.

  18. Needle detachment in a slim and physically active child with insulin pump treatment.

    PubMed

    Moser, Christine; Maurer, Kathrin; Binder, Elisabeth; Meraner, Dagmar; Steichen, Elisabeth; Abt, Daniela; Freund-Unsinn, Karin; Hofer, Sabine E

    2016-08-01

    Insulin pump therapy (CSII) is well established in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. In childhood diabetes, insulin pump treatment shows considerable advantages such as fewer injections, increased flexibility, fewer hypoglycemic events and lower HbA1c levels. Side effects such as catheter obstruction, technical pump failure, and dermatological complications have been observed, but are rarely reported. The reported patient is a physically very active and slim 10-year-old boy with reduced subcutaneous fatty tissue. After strong muscular activity an accidental rupture of the infusion set and needle detachment occurred in October 2013. X-ray and ultrasound imaging localized the needle in the musculus rectus femoris dexter. The needle was kept in situ and oral antibiotic treatment to prevent inflammatory reaction was prescribed. Repeated ultrasound measurements documented that the needles position had remained unchanged. Steel needle catheters (Sure-T infusion set, 6 mm) positioned in a thin layer of subcutaneous fat tissue of the thigh, combined with intense sports activity can result in a needle rupture and penetration into the muscle. Careful monitoring provides an alternative to surgery and lowers the risk of muscular necrosis. Because of differences in the distribution of subcutaneous fat tissue, an individualized catheter selection is necessary in pump treatment for children and adolescents, requiring a variety of different catheter sets.

  19. Vitreous Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... of vision. Treatment How does vitreous detachment affect vision? Although a vitreous detachment does not threaten sight, ... hole or detached retina can lead to permanent vision loss in the affected eye. Those who experience ...

  20. Macrophage- and RIP3-dependent inflammasome activation exacerbates retinal detachment-induced photoreceptor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, K; Matsumoto, H; Kaneko, H; Notomi, S; Takeuchi, K; Sweigard, J H; Atik, A; Murakami, Y; Connor, K M; Terasaki, H; Miller, J W; Vavvas, D G

    2015-01-01

    Detachment of photoreceptors from the retinal pigment epithelium is seen in various retinal disorders, resulting in photoreceptor death and subsequent vision loss. Cell death results in the release of endogenous molecules that activate molecular platforms containing caspase-1, termed inflammasomes. Inflammasome activation in retinal diseases has been reported in some cases to be protective and in others to be detrimental, causing neuronal cell death. Moreover, the cellular source of inflammasomes in retinal disorders is not clear. Here, we demonstrate that patients with photoreceptor injury by retinal detachment (RD) have increased levels of cleaved IL-1β, an end product of inflammasome activation. In an animal model of RD, photoreceptor cell death led to activation of endogenous inflammasomes, and this activation was diminished by Rip3 deletion. The major source of Il1b expression was found to be infiltrating macrophages in the subretinal space, rather than dying photoreceptors. Inflammasome inhibition attenuated photoreceptor death after RD. Our data implicate the infiltrating macrophages as a source of damaging inflammasomes after photoreceptor detachment in a RIP3-dependent manner and suggest a novel therapeutic target for treatment of retinal diseases. PMID:25906154

  1. Retinal Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... men more than women and whites more than African Americans. A retinal detachment is also more likely to occur in people who Are extremely nearsighted Have had a retinal detachment in the other eye Have a family history of retinal detachment Have had cataract surgery Have ...

  2. Widespread active detachment faulting and core complex formation near 13 degrees N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Smith, Deborah K; Cann, Johnson R; Escartín, Javier

    2006-07-27

    Oceanic core complexes are massifs in which lower-crustal and upper-mantle rocks are exposed at the sea floor. They form at mid-ocean ridges through slip on detachment faults rooted below the spreading axis. To date, most studies of core complexes have been based on isolated inactive massifs that have spread away from ridge axes. Here we present a survey of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 13 degrees N containing a segment in which a number of linked detachment faults extend for 75 km along one flank of the spreading axis. The detachment faults are apparently all currently active and at various stages of development. A field of extinct core complexes extends away from the axis for at least 100 km. Our observations reveal the topographic characteristics of actively forming core complexes and their evolution from initiation within the axial valley floor to maturity and eventual inactivity. Within the surrounding region there is a strong correlation between detachment fault morphology at the ridge axis and high rates of hydroacoustically recorded earthquake seismicity. Preliminary examination of seismicity and seafloor morphology farther north along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggests that active detachment faulting is occurring in many segments and that detachment faulting is more important in the generation of ocean crust at this slow-spreading ridge than previously suspected.

  3. The control effect in a detached laminar boundary layer of an array of normal synthetic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela Calva, Fernando; Avila Rodriguez, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    In this work, 3D numerical simulations of an array of three normal circular synthetic jets embedded in an attached laminar boundary layer that separates under the influence of an inclined flap are performed for flow separation control. At the beginning of the present study, three cases are used to validate the numerical simulation with data obtained from experiments. The experimental data is chosen based on the cases which presented higher repeatability and reliability. Simulations showed reasonable agreement when compared with experiments. The simulations are undertaken at three synthetic jet operating conditions, i.e. Case A: L = 2, VR = 0.32; Case B: L = 4, VR = 0.64 and Case C: L = 6, VR = 0.96. The vortical structures produced for each synthetic jet operating condition are hairpin vortices for Case A and tilted vortices for Case B and C, respectively. By examining the spatial wall shear stress variations, the effect on the boundary layer prior to separation of the middle synthetic jet is evaluated. For effective flow control, produced at a relatively low the finding from this study suggests that hairpin vortical structures are more desirable structures. Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico.

  4. Divertor detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei

    2015-11-01

    The heat exhaust is one of the main conceptual issues of magnetic fusion reactor. In a standard operational regime the large heat flux onto divertor target reaches unacceptable level in any foreseeable reactor design. However, about two decades ago so-called ``detached divertor'' regimes were found. They are characterized by reduced power and plasma flux on divertor targets and look as a promising solution for heat exhaust in future reactors. In particular, it is envisioned that ITER will operate in a partly detached divertor regime. However, even though divertor detachment was studied extensively for two decades, still there are some issues requiring a new look. Among them is the compatibility of detached divertor regime with a good core confinement. For example, ELMy H-mode exhibits a very good core confinement, but large ELMs can ``burn through'' detached divertor and release large amounts of energy on the targets. In addition, detached divertor regimes can be subject to thermal instabilities resulting in the MARFE formation, which, potentially, can cause disruption of the discharge. Finally, often inner and outer divertors detach at different plasma conditions, which can lead to core confinement degradation. Here we discuss basic physics of divertor detachment including different mechanisms of power and momentum loss (ionization, impurity and hydrogen radiation loss, ion-neutral collisions, recombination, and their synergistic effects) and evaluate the roles of different plasma processes in the reduction of the plasma flux; detachment stability; and an impact of ELMs on detachment. We also evaluate an impact of different magnetic and divertor geometries on detachment onset, stability, in- out- asymmetry, and tolerance to the ELMs. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-DE-FG02-04ER54739 at UCSD.

  5. Loss of Tyrosine Phosphatase Dependent Inhibition Promotes Activation of Tyrosine Kinase c-Src in Detached Pancreatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, Sarah F.; Isley, Beth A.; Baker, Cheryl H.; Gallick, Gary E.; Summy, Justin M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite an intense focus on novel therapeutic strategies, pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains one of the deadliest human malignancies. The frequent and rapid mortality associated with pancreatic cancer may be attributed to several factors, including late diagnosis, rapid tumor invasion into surrounding tissues, and formation of distant metastases. Both local invasion and metastasis require disruption of tumor cell contacts with the extracellular matrix. Detachment of normal cells from the extracellular matrix leads to a form of programmed cell death termed anoikis. Pancreatic cancer cells avert anoikis by activation of signaling pathways that allow for adhesion-independent survival. In the present studies, cellular signaling pathways activated in detached pancreatic cancer cells were examined. We demonstrate a rapid and robust activation of Src kinase in detached pancreatic cancer cells, relative to adherent. Src autophosphorylation rapidly returned to baseline levels upon reattachment to tissue culture plastic, in the presence or absence of specific extracellular matrix proteins. Treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors increased steady-state Src autophosphorylation in adherent cells and abrogated the detachment-induced increase in Src autophosphorylation. Src was found to co-immunoprecipitate with the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2) in pancreatic cancer cells, suggesting that SHP-2 may participate in regulation of Src autophosphorylation in adherent cells. Src family kinase (SFK) dependent increases in Akt and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation were observed in detached cells, indicating the potential for Src-dependent activation of survival and stress pathways in pancreatic cancer cells that have detached from the extracellular matrix. PMID:20945416

  6. Effects of carbohydrate on the internal oxygen concentration, oxygen uptake, and nitrogenase activity in detached pea nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D. ); LaRue, T.A. )

    1989-10-01

    The interaction between carbon substrates and O{sub 2} and their effects on nitrogenase activity (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) were examined in detached nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Sparkle). The internal O{sub 2} concentration was estimated from the fractional oxygenation of leghemoglobin measured by reflectance spectroscopy. Lowering the endogenous carbohydrate content of nodules by excising the shoots 16 hours before nodule harvest or by incubating detached nodules at 100 kPa O{sub 2} for 2 hours resulted in a 2- to 10-fold increase in internal O{sub 2}, and a decline in nitrogenase activity. Conversely, when detached nodules were supplied with 100 millimolar succinate, the internal O{sub 2} was lowered. Nitrogenase activity was stimulated by succinate but only at high external O{sub 2}. Oxygen uptake increased linearly with external O{sub 2} but was affected only slightly by the carbon treatments. The apparent diffusion resistance in the nodule cortex was similar in all of the treatments. Carbon substrates can thus affect nitrogenase activity indirectly by affecting the O{sub 2} concentration within detached nodules.

  7. Retinal Detachment

    MedlinePlus

    ... immediately. Treatment How is retinal detachment treated? Small holes and tears are treated with laser surgery or ... laser surgery tiny burns are made around the hole to “weld” the retina back into place. Cryopexy ...

  8. Pluton pinning of an active Miocene detachment fault system, eastern Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Gregory A.; Fowler, T. Kenneth; Bishop, Kim M.; Brudos, Thomas C.; Julio Friedmann, S.; Burbank, Douglas W.; Parke, Mary A.; Burchfiel, B. C.

    1993-07-01

    The Miocene Kingston Range-Halloran Hills detachment fault system of the eastern Mojave Desert, California, delineates part of the eastern breakaway zone for a profoundly extended area between the Sierra Nevada and the Spring Mountains structural blocks. The shallow-dipping, west-rooting detachment fault cuts discordantly across Paleozoic and Precambrian units in the Mesozoic foreland fold-and-thrust belt, exhibits west- to southwest-trending corrugations with structural relief of up to 1.5 km, and underlies the terrestrial Shadow Valley basin. Middle Miocene fault displacement and syntectonic sedimentation in the northern basin were terminated at ˜12.4 Ma by intrusion of the large (˜130 km2), shallow-level (≥4 km depth) Kingston Peak pluton across the detachment fault soon after faulting began. Basin sedimentation and fault displacement southeast of the pluton were not, however, disrupted by its emplacement and continued to evolve. Northern "pluton-pinned" and southern "pluton-free" domains were separated by the Blacksmith Hills fault, a northeast-striking, right-slip lateral ramp that accommodated more than 3 km of postpluton differential extension between pinned and nonpinned domains. In more western regions, late phases of detachment-fault-related extension beneath formerly pinned areas (including western and central parts of the pluton itself) are believed to have led to the development of two generations of east-striking left-slip faults. Collectively, these dextral and sinistral transfer faults illustrate the complex patterns of differential extension and accommodation that can characterize detachment-fault systems as adjacent areal domains of extension are generated and die.

  9. Coherent and turbulent process analysis of the effects of a longitudinal vortex on boundary layer detachment on a NACA0015 foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prothin, Sebastien; Djeridi, Henda; Billard, Jean-Yves

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the influence of a single tip vortex on boundary layer detachment is studied. This study offers a preliminary approach in order to better understand the interaction between a propeller hub vortex and the rudder installed in its wake. This configuration belongs to the field of marine propulsion and encompasses such specific problem as cavitation inception, modification of propulsive performances and induced vibrations. To better understand the complex mechanisms due to propeller-rudder interactions it was decided to emphasize configurations where the hub vortex is generated by an elliptical 3-D foil and is located upstream of a 2-D NACA0015 foil at high incidences for a Reynolds number of 5×105. The physical mechanisms were studied using Time Resolved Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-SPIV) techniques. Particular attention was paid to the detachment at 25° incidence and a detailed cartography of the mean and turbulent properties of the wake is presented. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) analysis was applied in order to highlight the unsteady nature of the flow using phase averaging based on the first POD coefficients to characterize the turbulent and coherent process in the near wake of the rudder.

  10. Calpain-controlled detachment of major glycoproteins from the cytoskeleton regulates adhesive properties of activated phosphatidylserine-positive platelets.

    PubMed

    Artemenko, Elena O; Yakimenko, Alena O; Pichugin, Alexey V; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-02-15

    In resting platelets, adhesive membrane glycoproteins are attached to the cytoskeleton. On strong activation, phosphatidylserine(PS)-positive and -negative platelet subpopulations are formed. Platelet activation is accompanied by cytoskeletal rearrangement, although the glycoprotein attachment status in these two subpopulations is not clear. We developed a new, flow cytometry-based, single-cell approach to investigate attachment of membrane glycoproteins to the cytoskeleton in cell subpopulations. In PS-negative platelets, adhesive glycoproteins integrin αIIbβ3, glycoprotein Ib and, as shown for the first time, P-selectin were associated with the cytoskeleton. In contrast, this attachment was disrupted in PS-positive platelets; it was retained to some extent only in the small convex regions or 'caps'. It correlated with the degradation of talin and filamin observed only in PS-positive platelets. Calpain inhibitors essentially prevented the disruption of membrane glycoprotein attachment in PS-positive platelets, as well as talin and filamin degradation. With the suggestion that detachment of glycoproteins from the cytoskeleton may affect platelet adhesive properties, we investigated the ability of PS-positive platelets to resist shear-induced breakaway from the immobilized fibrinogen. Shear rates of 500/s caused PS-positive platelet breakaway, but their adhesion stability increased more than 10-fold after pretreatment of the platelets with calpain inhibitor. In contrast, the ability of PS-positive platelets to adhere to immobilized von Willebrand's factor at 100/s was low, but this was not affected by the preincubation of platelets with a calpain inhibitor. Our data suggest that calpain-controlled detachment of membrane glycoproteins is a new mechanism that is responsible for the loss of ability of the procoagulant platelets to resist detachment from thrombi by high shear stress.

  11. Experimental results from detached plasmas in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Boody, F.P.; Bush, C.E.; Cohen, S.A.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Mansfield, D.K.; Medley, S.S.

    1986-10-01

    Detached plasmas are formed in TFTR which have the principal property of the boundary to the high temperature plasma core being defined by a radiating layer. This paper documents the properties of TFTR ohmic-detached plasmas with a range of plasma densities at two different plasma currents.

  12. Catalase activity is modulated by calcium and calmodulin in detached mature leaves of sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Afiyanti, Mufidah; Chen, Hsien-Jung

    2014-01-15

    Catalase (CAT) functions as one of the key enzymes in the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and affects the H2O2 homeostasis in plants. In sweet potato, a major catalase isoform was detected, and total catalase activity showed the highest level in mature leaves (L3) compared to immature (L1) and completely yellow, senescent leaves (L5). The major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity were strongly suppressed by ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). This inhibition could be specifically and significantly mitigated in mature L3 leaves by exogenous CaCl2, but not MgCl2 or CoCl2. EGTA also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Furthermore, chlorpromazine (CPZ), a calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor, drastically suppressed the major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity, and this suppression was alleviated by exogenous sweet potato calmodulin (SPCAM) fusion protein in L3 leaves. CPZ also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Protein blot hybridization showed that both anti-catalase SPCAT1 and anti-calmodulin SPCAM antibodies detect a band at the same position, which corresponds to the activity of the major catalase isoform from unboiled, but not boiled crude protein extract of L3 leaves. An inverse correlation between the major catalase isoform/total enzymatic activity and the H2O2 level was also observed. These data suggest that sweet potato CAT activity is modulated by CaCl2 and SPCAM, and plays an important role in H2O2 homeostasis in mature leaves. Association of SPCAM with the major CAT isoform is required and regulates the in-gel CAT activity band.

  13. Zonal detached eddy simulation (ZDES) of a spatially developing flat plate turbulent boundary layer over the Reynolds number range 3 150 ⩽ Reθ ⩽ 14 000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deck, Sébastien; Renard, Nicolas; Laraufie, Romain; Sagaut, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    A Wall-Modeled Large Eddy Simulation (WMLES) of a spatially developing zero-pressure gradient smooth flat plate turbulent boundary layer is performed by means of the third mode of the Zonal Detached Eddy Simulation technique. The outer layer is resolved by a Large Eddy Simulation whereas the wall is modeled by a RANS simulation zone, with a RANS/LES interface prescribed at a fixed location. A revisited cost assessment of the Direct Numerical Simulation of high Reynolds numbers (Reθ ⩾ 10 000) wall-bounded flows emphasizes how moderate the cost of the WMLES approach is compared to methods resolving the near-wall dynamics. This makes possible the simulation over a wide Reynolds number range 3 150 ⩽ Reθ ⩽ 14 000, leaving quite enough space for very large scale motions to develop. For a better skin friction prediction, it is shown that the RANS/LES interface should be high enough in the boundary layer and at a location scaling in boundary layer thickness units (e.g., 0.1δ) rather than in wall units. Velocity spectra are compared to experimental data. The outer layer is well resolved, except near the RANS/LES interface where the very simple and robust passive boundary treatment might be improved by a more specific treatment. Besides, the inner RANS zone also contains large scale fluctuations down to the wall. It is shown that these fluctuations fit better to the experimental data for the same interface location that provides a better skin friction prediction. Numerical tests suggest that the observed very large scale motions may appear in an autonomous way, independently from the near-wall dynamics. It still has to be determined whether the observed structures have a physical or a numerical origin. In order to assess how the large scale motions contribute to skin friction, the Reynolds shear stress contribution is studied as suggested by the FIK identity [K. Fukagata, K. Iwamoto, and N. Kasagi, "Contribution of Reynolds stress distribution to the skin friction

  14. RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES FOR EXISTING DETACHED HOUSES - TECHNICAL GUIDANCE (THIRD EDITION) FOR ACTIVE SOIL DEPRESSURIZATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical guidance document is designed to aid in the selection, design, installation and operation of indoor radon reduction techniques using soil depressurization in existing houses. Its emphasis is on active soil depressurization; i.e., on systems that use a fan to depre...

  15. Chlorophyll composition and photochemical activity of photosystems detached from chloroplast grana and stroma lamellae.

    PubMed

    Gasanov, R A; French, C S

    1973-07-01

    A stroma fraction that has photosystem 1 activity and grana lamellae fractions that have activities for both photosystems were isolated by differential centrifugation of a needle valve homogenate. Subsequent fractions, corresponding to photosystems 1 (F-1D) and 2 (F-2D) were isolated by digitonin treatment of the grana lamellae (P-10K) and compared with respect to their chlorophyll composition and electron transport activities.Fraction F-2D from grana lamellae having photosystem 2 activity is primarily active in photosystem 2 and contains only the four major forms of chlorophyll a with a predominance of chlorophyll a 677 nm. This fraction differs from the original grana membranes in the absence of the longwavelength form of chlorophyll a and in the widening of the absorption band of chlorophyll a 682 nm from 10.9 to 15.6 nm.Photosystem 1 particles from grana and stroma both have high photosystem 1 activity but differ from each other in the proportions of the four major forms of chlorophyll a. The short-wavelength forms of chlorophyll a and also chlorophyll b 650 nm in particles from grana lamellae comprise relatively more total area than these same forms in the particles from stroma. In addition, the fraction corresponding to photosystem 1 from grana lamellae is not shifted to the long-wavelength side of the main absorption maximum, as compared to the photosystem 2 particles from grana and the original grana membrane fraction; this is usually observed in fractions that have photosystem 1 activity. Furthermore, the longest wavelength form of chlorophyll a in the photosystem 1 particles from grana is at 700 nm, while in the same fraction from stroma, it is at 706 nm.The half-width of the four main forms of chlorophyll a and both forms of chlorophyll b in the photosystem 1 fraction from grana is narrower than that of the corresponding forms in the same fraction from stroma. This may indicate a different packing of pigment molecules that are aggregated on the surface

  16. Hydrothermal regimes of the dry active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Mamoru; Zhang, Yinsheng; Kadota, Tsutomu; Ohata, Tetsuo

    2006-04-01

    Evaporation and condensation in the soil column clearly influence year-round nonconductive heat transfer dynamics in the dry active layer underlying semiarid permafrost regions. We deduced this from heat flux components quantified using state-of-the-art micrometeorological data sets obtained in dry and moist summers and in winters with various snow cover depths. Vapor moves easily through large pores, some of which connect to the atmosphere, allowing (1) considerable active layer warming driven by pipe-like snowmelt infiltration, and (2) direct vapor linkage between atmosphere and deeper soils. Because of strong adhesive forces, water in the dry active layer evaporates with great difficulty. The fraction of latent heat to total soil heat storage ranged from 26 to 45% in dry and moist summers, respectively. These values are not negligible, despite being smaller than those of arctic wet active layer, in which only freezing and thawing were considered.

  17. An insolation activated dust layer on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Beule, Caroline; Wurm, Gerhard; Kelling, Thorben; Koester, Marc; Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2015-11-01

    The illuminated dusty surface of Mars acts like a gas pump. It is driven by thermal creep at low pressure within the soil. In the top soil layer this gas flow has to be sustained by a pressure gradient. This is equivalent to a lifting force on the dust grains. The top layer is therefore under tension which reduces the threshold wind speed for saltation. We carried out laboratory experiments to quantify the thickness of this activated layer. We use basalt with an average particle size of 67 μm. We find a depth of the active layer of 100-200 μm. Scaled to Mars the activation will reduce threshold wind speeds for saltation by about 10%.

  18. The North Cycladic Detachment System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolivet, Laurent; Lecomte, Emmanuel; Huet, Benjamin; Denèle, Yoann; Lacombe, Olivier; Labrousse, Loïc; Le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Mehl, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Low-angle normal faults accommodate a large part of continental post-orogenic extension. Besides the intrinsic rheological characteristics of the continental crust that may lead to the formation of shallow-dipping shear zones at the brittle-ductile transition, the role of pre-existing low-angle structures such as large thrusts has been proposed by several authors. We explore this question with the example of the North Cycladic Detachment System (NCDS) that is composed of a series of distinct detachments cropping out on the islands of Andros, Tinos and Mykonos, separating the Cycladic Blueschists in the footwall from the Upper Cycladic Nappe in the hanging wall. We show that these extensional structures are part of a single large-scale structure (more than 200 km along strike) that reactivates the Vardar suture zone. It extends eastward on Ikaria and westward offshore Evia and Thessalia where it probably connects to recent shallow-dipping normal faults evidenced on published seismic reflection profiles. The NCDS started its activity in the Oligocene concommitantly with the Aegean extension, and was still active in the Late Miocene. It has exhumed a series of metamorphic domes from southern Evia to Mykonos below low-angle detachment systems, made of low-angle normal faults and low-angle ductile shear zones. The ductile shear zones and the faults were created with a low dip and they kept the same attitude throughout their exhumation. We identify three main detachments that are part of a continuum of extension on the NCDS : Tinos detachment, Livada detachment and Mykonos detachment. A fourth detachment (Vari detachment) is the reactivation of an Eocene exhumation-related structure. Deformation in the footwall is characterized by intense stretching and flattening. Using the spatial evolution observed along strike from Andros to Mykonos we construct a history of formation of the NCDS starting with the reactivation of former thrusts leading to the exhumation of high

  19. Dynamics of slab detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duretz, T.; Schmalholz, S. M.; Gerya, T. V.

    2012-04-01

    Our study investigates the dynamics of slab detachment and evaluates the amount of time necessary for slabs to detach. We combine both the results of two-dimensional numerical modeling with the prediction of a one-dimensional analytical solution for viscous necking under gravity. This tidy suggest that the dominant deformation mechanisms leading to slab detachment is viscous necking, independently of the depth of slab detachment. Localised simple shear may also occur when the slab dip is moderate, especially in the colder parts of the slab. Brittle fracturing, or breaking, plays a minor role during the slab detachment process. 2D thermo-mechanical simulations indicate that the duration of slab detachment is short (< 4 Ma) and can occur in less than 0.5 Ma. No simple correlation between the slab detachment depth and duration was found. Our results suggest that deep slab detachments (> 250 km) can also occur within a short time (< 1 Ma). On the other hand, slab detachments taking place between 35 and 250 km depth may last less than 2 Ma. This aspect has implications for geodynamic interpretations using slab detachment as explanation for processes such as melting, exhumation or surface uplift.

  20. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  1. Descemet membrane detachment.

    PubMed

    Mackool, R J; Holtz, S J

    1977-03-01

    Four eyes of three patients had extensive postoperative Descemet membrane (DM) detachment. Blood was present just anterior to the DM in three of the four eyes and later converted to and persisted as pigment. Haziness of the cornea at the level of the DM could be seen with reattachment. Detachments of the DM are classified as planar when there is 1 mm or less separation of the DM from its overlying stroma in all areas. Nonplanar DM detachments exceed 1 mm of separation. Planar detachments have a much better prognosis than nonplanar detachments do, with or without descemetopexy. Repair of DM detachments, when necessary, should include air injection, with the lease possible instrumentation of the DM.

  2. Late Miocene termination of tectonic activity on the detachment in the Alaşehir Rift, Western Anatolia: Depositional records of the Göbekli Formation and high-angle cross-cutting faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Fatih

    2016-04-01

    Western Anatolia is a well-known province of continental extension in the world. Most distinctive structural elements of the region are E-W trending grabens. The Alaşehir Rift/Graben is an asymmetric rift/graben trending E-W between Ahmetli and Turgutlu in its western part and continues eastwardly in a NW-SE direction to Alaşehir (Philadelphia in ancient Greek). The stratigraphy of the region consists of metamorphic rocks of the Menderes Massif (Paleozoic-lower Cenozoic) and the syn-extensional Salihli granitoid (middle Miocene) forming the basement unit and overlying sedimentary cover rocks of Neogene-Quaternary. These rocks are cut and deformed by the Karadut detachment fault and various low-angle normal faults (antithetic and synthetic faults of the Karadut detachment fault), which are also cut by various younger high-angle normal faults. It is possible to observe two continuous sequences of different time intervals in that Miocene deposits of the first rifting phase are covered by Plio-Quaternary sediments of second rifting phase with a "break-up" unconformity. In lower levels of a measured stratigraphic section (583 m) of the Göbekli formation which has lower age of late Miocene and upper age of early Pliocene, the presence of angular to sub-angular clasts of the blocks and conglomerates suggests alluvial-fun origin during an initial stage of deposition. Existence of normal-reverse graded, cross-bedding, pebble imbrications in layers of the pebbly sandstone demonstrates fluvial environment in following levels of the sequence. Existence of lenses and normal graded conglomerates in pebbly sandstones and fine grained sandstones strata evidences a low energy environment. Observed siltstone-claystone intercalations on the middle levels of the sequence indicate an environment with low dipping morphology to be formed as flat plains during this period. In the uppermost levels of the sequence, existence of the pebble imbrications inside pebbly sandstones overlying

  3. Retinal detachment repair

    MedlinePlus

    Scleral buckling; Vitrectomy; Pneumatic retinopexy; Laser retinopexy; Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment repair ... it meets the hole in the retina. Scleral buckling can be done using numbing medicine while you ...

  4. Modeling of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Popov, Dmitri

    1997-01-01

    Our long term goal is to develop techniques to achieve detached solidification reliably and reproducibly, in order to produce crystals with fewer defects. To achieve this goal it is necessary to understand thoroughly the physics of detached solidification. It was the primary objective of the current project to make progress toward this complete understanding. 'Me products of this grant are attached. These include 4 papers and a preliminary survey of the observations of detached solidification in space. We have successfully modeled steady state detached solidification, examined the stability of detachment, and determined the influence of buoyancy-driven convection under different conditions. Directional solidification in microgravity has often led to ingots that grew with little or no contact with the ampoule wall. When this occurred, crystallographic perfection was usually greatly improved -- often by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, under the Soviet microgravity program the major objective was to achieve detached solidification with its resulting improvement in perfection and properties. Unfortunately, until recently the true mechanisms underlying detached solidification were unknown. As a consequence, flight experiments yielded erratic results. Within the past three years, we have developed a new theoretical model that explains many of the flight results. This model gives rise to predictions of the conditions required to yield detached solidification.

  5. Folding of a detachment and fault - Modified detachment folding along a lateral ramp, southwestern Montana, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Christopher; Whisner, S. Christopher; Whisner, Jennifer B.

    2014-12-01

    The inversion of the Middle Proterozoic Belt sedimentary basin during Late Cretaceous thrusting in Montana produced a large eastwardly-convex salient, the southern boundary of which is a 200 km-long oblique to lateral ramp subtended by a detachment between the Belt rocks and Archean basement. A 10 km-long lateral ramp segment exposes the upper levels of the detachment where hanging wall Belt rocks have moved out over the Paleozoic and Mesozoic section. The hanging wall structure consists of a train of high amplitude, faulted, asymmetrical detachment folds. Initial west-east shortening produced layer parallel shortening fabrics and dominantly strike slip faulting followed by symmetrical detachment folding. 'Lock-up' of movement on the detachment surface produced regional simple shear and caused the detachment folds to become asymmetrical and faulted. Folding of the detachment surface after lock-up modified the easternmost detachment folds further into a southeast-verging, overturned fold pair with a ramp-related fault along the base of the stretched mutual limb.

  6. A simple analytical solution for slab detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalholz, Stefan M.

    2011-04-01

    An analytical solution is presented for the nonlinear dynamics of high amplitude necking in a free layer of power-law fluid extended in layer-parallel direction due to buoyancy stress. The solution is one-dimensional (1-D) and contains three dimensionless parameters: the thinning factor (i.e. ratio of current to initial layer thickness), the power-law stress exponent, n, and the ratio of time to the characteristic deformation time of a viscous layer under buoyancy stress, t/ tc. tc is the ratio of the layer's effective viscosity to the applied buoyancy stress. The value of tc/ n specifies the time for detachment, i.e. the time it takes until the layer thickness has thinned to zero. The first-order accuracy of the 1-D solution is confirmed with 2-D finite element simulations of buoyancy-driven necking in a layer of power-law fluid embedded in a linear or power-law viscous medium. The analytical solution is accurate within a factor about 2 if the effective viscosity ratio between the layer and the medium is larger than about 100 and if the medium is a power-law fluid. The analytical solution is applied to slab detachment using dislocation creep laws for dry and wet olivine. Results show that one of the most important parameters controlling the dynamics of slab detachment is the strength of the slab which strongly depends on temperature and rheological parameters. The fundamental conclusions concerning slab detachment resulting from both the analytical solution and from earlier published thermo-mechanical numerical simulations agree well, indicating the usefulness of the highly simplified analytical solution for better understanding slab detachment. Slab detachment resulting from viscous necking is a combination of inhomogeneous thinning due to varying buoyancy stress within the slab and a necking instability due to the power-law viscous rheology ( n > 1). Application of the analytical solution to the Hindu Kush slab provides no "order-of-magnitude argument" against

  7. Retinal detachment in pseudophakia.

    PubMed

    Galin, M A; Poole, T A; Obstbaum, S A

    1979-07-01

    In a series of cataract patients excluding myopic individuals, under age 60 years, and cases in which vitreous loss occurred, retinal detachment was no less frequent after intracapsular cataract extraction and Sputnik iris supported lenses than in controls. Both groups were followed up for a minimum of two years. The detachments predominantly occurred from retinal breaks in areas of the retina that looked normal preoperatively.

  8. Cemented mounds and hydrothermal sediments on the detachment surface at Kane Megamullion: A new manifestation of hydrothermal venting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucholke, Brian E.; Humphris, Susan E.; Dick, Henry J. B.

    2013-09-01

    Long-lived detachment faults are now known to be important in tectonic evolution of slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges, and there is increasing evidence that fluid flow plays a critical role in development of detachment systems. Here we document a new manifestation of low-temperature hydrothermal venting associated with the detachment fault that formed Kane Megamullion ˜3.3-2.1 m.y. ago in the western rift-valley wall of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Hydrothermal effects on the detachment surface include (1) cemented mounds of igneous rock and chalk debris containing hydrothermal Mn oxides and Fe oxyhydroxides, and (2) layered deposits of similar Fe-Mn minerals ± interbedded chalks. Mounds are roughly conical, ˜1-10 m high, and contain primarily basalts with lesser gabbro, serpentinite, and polymict breccia. The layered Fe-Mn-rich sediments are flat-bedded to contorted and locally are buckled into low-relief linear or polygonal ridges. We propose that the mounds formed where hydrothermal fluids discharged through the detachment hanging wall near the active fault trace. Hydrothermal precipitates cemented hanging-wall debris and welded it to the footwall, and this debris persisted as mounds as the footwall was exhumed and surrounding unconsolidated material sloughed off the sloping detachment surface. Some of the layered Fe-Mn-rich deposits may have precipitated from fluids discharging from the hanging-wall vents, but they also precipitated from low-temperature fluids venting from the exposed footwall through overlying chalks. Observed natural disturbance and abnormally thin hydrogenous Fe-Mn crusts on some contorted, hydrothermal Fe-Mn-rich chalks on ˜2.7 Ma crust suggest diffuse venting that is geologically recent. Results of this study imply that there are significant fluid pathways through all parts of detachment systems and that low-temperature venting through fractured detachment footwalls may continue for several million years off-axis.

  9. Pharmacotherapies for Retinal Detachment.

    PubMed

    Wubben, Thomas J; Besirli, Cagri G; Zacks, David N

    2016-07-01

    Retinal detachment is an important cause of visual loss. Currently, surgical techniques, including vitrectomy, scleral buckle, and pneumatic retinopexy, are the only means to repair retinal detachment and restore vision. However, surgical failure rates may be as high as 20%, and visual outcomes continue to vary secondary to multiple processes, including postoperative cystoid macular edema, epiretinal membrane formation, macular folds, and, ultimately, photoreceptor death. Therefore, pharmacotherapies are being sought to aid the success rates of modern surgical techniques and reduce or slow the degeneration of photoreceptors during retinal detachment. This review discusses potential therapeutic avenues that aid in retinal reattachment, reduce the rate of retinal redetachment by limiting proliferative vitreoretinopathy, and protect against photoreceptor cell death.

  10. Detached rock evaluation device

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A rock detachment evaluation device (10) having an energy transducer unit 1) for sensing vibrations imparted to a subject rock (172) for converting the sensed vibrations into electrical signals, a low band pass filter unit (12) for receiving the electrical signal and transmitting only a low frequency segment thereof, a high band pass filter unit (13) for receiving the electrical signals and for transmitting only a high frequency segment thereof, a comparison unit (14) for receiving the low frequency and high frequency signals and for determining the difference in power between the signals, and a display unit (16) for displaying indicia of the difference, which provides a quantitative measure of rock detachment.

  11. Development and evolution of detachment faulting along 50 km of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 16.5°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Deborah K.; Schouten, Hans; Dick, Henry J. B.; Cann, Johnson R.; Salters, Vincent; Marschall, Horst R.; Ji, Fuwu; Yoerger, Dana; Sanfilippo, Alessio; Parnell-Turner, Ross; Palmiotto, Camilla; Zheleznov, Alexei; Bai, Hailong; Junkin, Will; Urann, Ben; Dick, Spencer; Sulanowska, Margaret; Lemmond, Peter; Curry, Scott

    2014-12-01

    multifaceted study of the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 16.5°N provides new insights into detachment faulting and its evolution through time. The survey included regional multibeam bathymetry mapping, high-resolution mapping using AUV Sentry, seafloor imaging using the TowCam system, and an extensive rock-dredging program. At different times, detachment faulting was active along ˜50 km of the western flank of the study area, and may have dominated spreading on that flank for the last 5 Ma. Detachment morphologies vary and include a classic corrugated massif, noncorrugated massifs, and back-tilted ridges marking detachment breakaways. High-resolution Sentry data reveal a new detachment morphology; a low-angle, irregular surface in the regional bathymetry is shown to be a finely corrugated detachment surface (corrugation wavelength of only tens of meters and relief of just a few meters). Multiscale corrugations are observed 2-3 km from the detachment breakaway suggesting that they formed in the brittle layer, perhaps by anastomosing faults. The thin wedge of hanging wall lavas that covers a low-angle (6°) detachment footwall near its termination are intensely faulted and fissured; this deformation may be enhanced by the low angle of the emerging footwall. Active detachment faulting currently is limited to the western side of the rift valley. Nonetheless, detachment fault morphologies also are present over a large portion of the eastern flank on crust >2 Ma, indicating that within the last 5 Ma parts of the ridge axis have experienced periods of two-sided detachment faulting.

  12. Carbon dioxide fixation by detached cereal caryopses

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.A.; Duffus, C.M. )

    1988-06-01

    Immature detached cereal caryposes from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var distichum cv Midas) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Sicco) were shown to be capable of fixing externally supplied {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in the light or dark. Green cross cells and the testa contained the majority of the {sup 14}C-labeled material. Some {sup 14}C-labeled material was also found in the outer, or transparent, layer and in the endosperm/embryo fraction. More {sup 14}C was recovered from caryopses when they were incubated in {sup 14}CO{sub 2} without the transparent layer, thus suggesting that this layer is a barrier to the uptake of CO{sub 2}. In all cases, significant amounts of {sup 14}C-labeled material were found in caryopses after dark incubation with {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Interestingly, CO{sub 2} fixation in the chlorophyll-less mutant Albino lemma was significantly greater in the light than in the dark. The results indicate that intact caryopses have the ability to translocate {sup 14}C-labeled assimilate derived from external CO{sub 2} to the endosperm/embryo. Carboxylating activity in the transparent layer appears to be confined to phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity but that in the chloroplast-containing cross-cells may be accounted for by both ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity. Depending on a number of assumptions, the amount of CO{sub 2} fixed is sufficient to account for about 2% of the weight of starch found in the mature caryposis.

  13. Plasma detachment in linear devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, N.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma detachment research in linear devices, sometimes called divertor plasma simulators, is reviewed. Pioneering works exploring the concept of plasma detachment were conducted in linear devices. Linear devices have contributed greatly to the basic understanding of plasma detachment such as volume plasma recombination processes, detached plasma structure associated with particle and energy transport, and other related issues including enhancement of convective plasma transport, dynamic response of plasma detachment, plasma flow reversal, and magnetic field effect. The importance of plasma detachment research using linear devices will be highlighted aimed at the design of future DEMO.

  14. The symbol detachment problem.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Castelfranchi, Cristiano

    2007-06-01

    In situated and embodied approaches it is commonly assumed that the dynamics of sensorimotor engagement between an adaptive agent and its environment are crucial in understanding natural cognition. This perspective permits to address the symbol grounding problem, since the aboutness of any mental state arising during agent-environment engagement is guaranteed by their continuous coupling. However, cognitive agents are also able to formulate representations that are detached from the current state of affairs, such as expectations and goals. Moreover, they can act on their representations before--or instead of--acting directly on the environment, for example building the plan of a bridge and not directly the bridge. On the basis of representations, actions such as planning, remembering or imagining are possible that are disengaged from the current sensorimotor cycle, and often functional to future-oriented conducts. A new problem thus has to be acknowledged, the symbol detachment problem: how and why do situated agents develop representations that are detached from their current sensorimotor interaction, but nevertheless preserve grounding and aboutness? How do cognitive agents progressively acquire a range of capabilities permitting them to deal not only with the current situation but also with alternative, in particular future states of affairs? How do they develop the capability of acting on their representations instead of acting directly on the world? In a theoretical and developmental perspective, we propose that anticipation plays a crucial role in the detachment process: anticipatory representations, originally detached from the sensorimotor cycle for the sake of action control, are successively exapted for bootstrapping increasingly complex cognitive capabilities.

  15. Melanin as an active layer in biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Piacenti da Silva, Marina Congiu, Mirko Oliveira Graeff, Carlos Frederico de; Fernandes, Jéssica Colnaghi Biziak de Figueiredo, Natália Mulato, Marcelo

    2014-03-15

    The development of pH sensors is of great interest due to its extensive application in several areas such as industrial processes, biochemistry and particularly medical diagnostics. In this study, the pH sensing properties of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET) based on melanin thin films as active layer are investigated and the physical mechanisms related to the device operation are discussed. Thin films were produced from different melanin precursors on indium tin oxide (ITO) and gold substrates and were investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in the pH range from 2 to 12. EGFETs with melanin deposited on ITO and on gold substrates showed sensitivities ranging from 31.3 mV/pH to 48.9 mV/pH, depending on the melanin precursor and the substrate used. The pH detection is associated with specific binding sites in its structure, hydroxyl groups and quinone imine.

  16. RhoA Signaling and Synaptic Damage Occur Within Hours in a Live Pig Model of CNS Injury, Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zarbin, Marco; Sugino, Ilene; Whitehead, Ian; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The RhoA pathway is activated after retinal injury. However, the time of onset and consequences of activation are unknown in vivo. Based on in vitro studies we focused on a period 2 hours after retinal detachment, in pig, an animal whose retina is holangiotic and contains cones. Methods Under anesthesia, retinal detachments were created by subretinal injection of a balanced salt solution. Two hours later, animals were sacrificed and enucleated for GTPase activity assays and quantitative Western blot and confocal microscopy analyses. Results RhoA activity with detachment was increased 1.5-fold compared to that in normal eyes or in eyes that had undergone vitrectomy only. Increased phosphorylation of myosin light chain, a RhoA effector, also occurred. By 2 hours, rod cells had retracted their terminals toward their cell bodies, disrupting the photoreceptor-to-bipolar synapse and producing significant numbers of spherules with SV2 immunolabel in the outer nuclear layer of the retina. In eyes with detachment, distant retina that remained attached also showed significant increases in RhoA activity and synaptic disjunction. Increases in RAC1 activity and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were not specific for detachment, and sprouting of bipolar dendrites, reported for longer detachments, was not seen. The RhoA kinase inhibitor Y27632 significantly reduced axonal retraction by rod cells. Conclusions Activation of the RhoA pathway occurs quickly after injury and promotes synaptic damage that can be controlled by RhoA kinase inhibition. We suggest that retinal detachment joins the list of central nervous system injuries, such as stroke and spinal cord injury, that should be considered for rapid therapeutic intervention. PMID:27472075

  17. Stability of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Croell, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bridgman crystal growth can be conducted in the so-called "detached" solidification regime, where the growing crystal is detached from the crucible wall. A small gap between the growing crystal and the crucible wall, of the order of 100 micrometers or less, can be maintained during the process. A meniscus is formed at the bottom of the melt between the crystal and crucible wall. Under proper conditions, growth can proceed without collapsing the meniscus. The meniscus shape plays a key role in stabilizing the process. Thermal and other process parameters can also affect the geometrical steady-state stability conditions of solidification. The dynamic stability theory of the shaped crystal growth process has been developed by Tatarchenko. It consists of finding a simplified autonomous set of differential equations for the radius, height, and possibly other process parameters. The problem then reduces to analyzing a system of first order linear differential equations for stability. Here we apply a modified version of this theory for a particular case of detached solidification. Approximate analytical formulas as well as accurate numerical values for the capillary stability coefficients are presented. They display an unexpected singularity as a function of pressure differential. A novel approach to study the thermal field effects on the crystal shape stability has been proposed. In essence, it rectifies the unphysical assumption of the model that utilizes a perturbation of the crystal radius along the axis as being instantaneous. It consists of introducing time delay effects into the mathematical description and leads, in general, to stability over a broader parameter range. We believe that this novel treatment can be advantageously implemented in stability analyses of other crystal growth techniques such as Czochralski and float zone methods.

  18. Model of detached plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, S.; Chance, M.

    1986-07-01

    Recently a tokamak plasma was observed in TFTR that was not limited by a limiter or a divertor. A model is proposed to explain this equilibrium, which is called a detached plasma. The model consists of (1) the core plasma where ohmic heating power is lost by anomalous heat conduction and (2) the shell plasma where the heat from the core plasma is radiated away by the atomic processes of impurity ions. A simple scaling law is proposed to test the validity of this model.

  19. Alanine or aspartic acid substitutions at serine23/24 of cardiac troponin I decrease thin filament activation, with no effect on crossbridge detachment kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Mamidi, Ranganath; Gollapudi, Sampath K.; Mallampalli, Sri Lakshmi; Chandra, Murali

    2012-01-01

    Ala/Asp substitutions at Ser23/24 have been employed to investigate the functional impact of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). Some limitations of previous studies include the use of heterologous proteins and confounding effects arising from phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein-C. Our goal was to probe the effects of cTnI phosphorylation using a homologous assay, so that altered function could be solely attributed to changes in cTnI. We reconstituted detergent-skinned rat cardiac papillary fibers with homologous rat cardiac troponin subunits to study the impact of Ala and Asp substitutions at Ser23/24 of rat cTnI (RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D). Both RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D showed a ~36% decrease in Ca2+-activated maximal tension. Both RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D showed a ~18% decrease in ATPase activity. Muscle fiber stiffness measurements suggested that the decrease in thin filament activation observed in RcTnI S23A/24A and RcTnI S23D/24D was due to a decrease in the number of strongly-bound crossbridges. Another major finding was that Ala and Asp substitutions in cTnI did not affect crossbridge detachment kinetics. PMID:22684024

  20. Three-dimensional seismic structure of a Mid-Atlantic Ridge segment characterized by active detachment faulting (TAG, 25°55’N-26°20’N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; Canales, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) (25°55'N-26°20'N) is characterized by massive active and relict high-temperature hydrothermal deposits. Previous geological and geophysical studies indicate that the active TAG hydrothermal mound sits on the hanging wall of an active detachment fault. The STAG microseismicity study revealed that seismicity associated to detachment faulting extends deep into the crust/uppermost mantle (>6 km), forming an arcuate band (in plan view) extending along ~25 km of the rift valley floor (deMartin et al., Geology, 35, 711-714, 2007). Two-dimensional analysis of the STAG seismic refraction data acquired with ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) showed that the eastern rift valley wall is associated with high P-wave velocities (>7 km/s) at shallow levels (>1 km depth), indicating uplift of lower crustal and/or upper mantle rocks along the detachment fault (Canales et al., Geochem., Geophys., Geosyst., 8, Q08004, doi:08010.01029/02007GC001629, 2008). Here we present a three-dimensional (3D) seismic tomography analysis of the complete STAG seismic refraction OBS dataset to illuminate the 3D crustal architecture of the TAG segment. Our new results provide, for the first time, a detailed picture of the complex, dome-shaped geometry and structure of a nascent oceanic core complex being exhumed by a detachment fault. Our results show a relatively low-velocity anomaly embedded within the high-velocity body forming the footwall of the detachment fault. The low velocity sits 2-3 km immediately beneath the active TAG hydrothermal mound. Although velocities within the low-velocity zone are too high (6 km/s) to represent partial melt, we speculate that this low velocity zone is intimately linked to hydrothermal processes taking place at TAG. We consider three possible scenarios for its origin: (1) a highly fissured zone produced by extensional stresses during footwall exhumation that may help localize fluid flow

  1. Active unjamming of confluent cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. Motivated by these observations, we have studied a model of dense tissues that combines self-propelled particle models and vertex models of confluent cell layers. In this model, referred to as self-propelled Voronoi (SPV), cells are described as polygons in a Voronoi tessellation with directed noisy cell motility and interactions governed by a shape energy that incorporates the effects of cell volume incompressibility, contractility and cell-cell adhesion. Using this model, we have demonstrated a new density-independent solid-liquid transition in confluent tissues controlled by cell motility and a cell-shape parameter measuring the interplay of cortical tension and cell-cell adhesion. An important insight of this work is that the rigidity and dynamics of cell layers depends sensitively on cell shape. We have also used the SPV model to test a new method developed by our group to determine cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces, hence providing the spatio-temporal distribution of stresses in motile dense tissues. This work was done with Dapeng Bi, Lisa Manning and Xingbo Yang. MCM was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184 and by the Simons Foundation.

  2. Active Boundary Layer Trip for Supersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schloegel, F.; Panigua, G.; Tirtey, S.

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has been full of excitement and success for the hypersonic community thanks to various Scramjet ground tests and launches. These studies have shown promising potentials but the viability to perform commercial flights at Mach 8 is still to be demonstrated. An ideal Scramjet is one which is capable of self- starting over a wide range of angles of attack and Mach number. The Scramjet designer has to ensure that the boundary layer over the inlet ramp is fully turbulent where shocks impact, hence reducing the risks of chocked flow conditions. Most studies have issued the efficiency of roughness trip to trigger the boundary layer transition. At hypersonic speed, heat transfer and drag dramatically increase resulting in skin friction averaging at 40% of the overall drag. This study investigates the possibility of triggering transition using perpendicular air jets on a flat plate place in a hypersonic cross-flow. Experiments were conducted in the von Karman Institute hypersonic blow down wind tunnel H3. This facility is mounted with a Mach 6 contoured nozzles and provides flows with Reynolds number in the range of 10x106/m to 30x106/m. The model consist of a flat plate manufactured with a built -in settling chamber, equipped with a pressure tap and a thermocouple to monitor the jet conditions. A first flat plate was manufactured with a black-coated Plexiglas top, for surface heat transfer measurement using an infrared camera. On the second model, a Upilex sheet equipped with 32 thin film gages was glued, time dependent heat transfer measurements up to 60kHz. The jet injection conditions have been varied and a Mach number of 5.5 kept constant. The flow topology was investigated using fast schlieren techniques and oil flow, in order to gain a better understanding.

  3. Vibration control through passive constrained layer damping and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Inman, Daniel J.; Saunders, William R.

    1997-05-01

    To add damping to systems, viscoelastic materials (VEM) are added to structures. In order to enhance the damping effects of the VEM, a constraining layer is attached. When this constraining layer is an active element, the treatment is called active constrained layer damping (ACLD). Recently, the investigation of ACLD treatments has shown it to be an effective method of vibration suppression. In this paper, the treatment of a beam with a separate active element and passive constrained layer (PCLD) element is investigated. A Ritz- Galerkin approach is used to obtain discretized equations of motion. The damping is modeled using the GHM method and the system is analyzed in the time domain. By optimizing on the performance and control effort for both the active and passive case, it is shown that this treatment is capable of lower control effort with more inherent damping, and is therefore a better approach to damp vibration.

  4. Mesoporous layer-by-layer ordered nanohybrids of layered double hydroxide and layered metal oxide: highly active visible light photocatalysts with improved chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Gunjakar, Jayavant L; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Hyo Na; Kim, In Young; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2011-09-28

    Mesoporous layer-by-layer ordered nanohybrids highly active for visible light-induced O(2) generation are synthesized by self-assembly between oppositely charged 2D nanosheets of Zn-Cr-layered double hydroxide (Zn-Cr-LDH) and layered titanium oxide. The layer-by-layer ordering of two kinds of 2D nanosheets is evidenced by powder X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional high resolution-transmission electron microscopy. Upon the interstratification process, the original in-plane atomic arrangements and electronic structures of the component nanosheets remain intact. The obtained heterolayered nanohybrids show a strong absorption of visible light and a remarkably depressed photoluminescence signal, indicating an effective electronic coupling between the two component nanosheets. The self-assembly between 2D inorganic nanosheets leads to the formation of highly porous stacking structure, whose porosity is controllable by changing the ratio of layered titanate/Zn-Cr-LDH. The resultant heterolayered nanohybrids are fairly active for visible light-induced O(2) generation with a rate of ∼1.18 mmol h(-1) g(-1), which is higher than the O(2) production rate (∼0.67 mmol h(-1) g(-1)) by the pristine Zn-Cr-LDH material, that is, one of the most effective visible light photocatalysts for O(2) production, under the same experimental condition. This result highlights an excellent functionality of the Zn-Cr-LDH-layered titanate nanohybrids as efficient visible light active photocatalysts. Of prime interest is that the chemical stability of the Zn-Cr-LDH is significantly improved upon the hybridization, a result of the protection of the LDH lattice by highly stable titanate layer. The present findings clearly demonstrate that the layer-by-layer-ordered assembly between inorganic 2D nanosheets is quite effective not only in improving the photocatalytic activity of the component semiconductors but also in synthesizing novel porous LDH-based hybrid materials with improved chemical

  5. Sporadic Layer es and Siesmic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, Obid; Blokhin, Alexandr; Kalashnikova, Tatyana

    2016-07-01

    To determine the influence of seismogenic disturbances on the calm state of the iono-sphere and assess the impact of turbulence development in sporadic-E during earthquake prepa-ration period we calculated the variation in the range of semitransparency ∆fES = f0ES - fbES. The study was based primarily on the ionograms obtained by vertical sounding of the ionosphere at Dushanbe at nighttime station from 15 to 29 August 1986. In this time period four successive earthquakes took place, which serves the purpose of this study of the impact of seis-mogenic processes on the intensity of the continuous generation of ionospheric turbulence. Analysis of the results obtained for seismic-ionospheric effects of 1986 earthquakes at station Dushanbe has shown that disturbance of ionospheric parameters during earthquake prepa-ration period displays a pronounced maximum with a duration of t = 1-6 hours. Ionospheric effects associated with the processes of earthquake preparation emerge quite predictably, which verifies seismogenic disturbances in the ionosphere. During the preparation of strong earthquakes, ionograms of vertical sounding produced at station Dushanbe - near the epicenter area - often shown the phenomenon of spreading traces of sporadic Es. It is assumed that the duration of manifestation of seismic ionospheric precursors in Du-shanbe τ = 1 - 6 hours may be associated with deformation processes in the Earth's crust and var-ious faults, as well as dissimilar properties of the environment of the epicentral area. It has been shown that for earthquakes with 4.5 ≤ M ≤ 5.5 1-2 days prior to the event iono-spheric perturbations in the parameters of the sporadic layer Es and an increase in the value of the range of semitransparency Es - ΔfEs were observed, which could lead to turbulence at altitudes of 100-130 km.

  6. Shock detachment process on cones in hypervelocity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, Ivett Alejandra

    1999-11-01

    The shock detachment process on cones in hypervelocity flows is one of the most sensitive flows to relaxation effects. The critical angle for shock detachment under frozen conditions can be very different from the critical angle under chemical and thermal equilibrium. The rate of increase of the detachment distance with cone angle is also affected by the relaxation rate. The purpose of this study is to explain the effects of nonequilibrium on the shock detachment distance and its growth rate on cones in hypervelocity flows. The study consists of an experimental and a computational program. The experimental part has been carried out at Caltech's hypervelocity reflected shock tunnel. Six free-stream conditions were chosen, using both N2 and CO2 as test gases. The experimental data obtained are holographic interferograms, surface temperature, and pressure measurements. The code employed for the numerical simulations is a Navier-Stokes solver that can account for thermal and chemical nonequilibrium in axisymmetric flows. The data obtained for the shock detachment distance confirms a previous theoretical model that predicts the detachment distance will grow more slowly for relaxing flows than for frozen or equilibrium flows. This difference is due to the behavior of the sonic line inside the shock layer. Different growth rates result when the detachment distance is controlled by the diameter of the cone (frozen and equilibrium cases) than when it is controlled by the relaxation length (nonequilibrium flows). The behavior of the detachment distance from the frozen to equilibrium limits for a given cone half-angle and free-stream condition has also been studied. It was confirmed that the ratio of the detachment distance to the cone diameter is constant in the two extremes and rapidly switches from one value to the other for cone diameters of about 2 cm to 16 cm. The experimental interferograms are also compared with numerical ones in terms of the detachment distance, the

  7. PIMASERTIB AND SEROUS RETINAL DETACHMENTS

    PubMed Central

    AlAli, Alaa; Bushehri, Ahmad; Park, Jonathan C.; Krema, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case of multifocal serous retinal detachments associated with pimasertib. Methods: The authors report a 26-year-old patient who developed bilateral multifocal serous retinal detachments appearing 2 days after starting pimasertib (as part of a clinical trial investigating its use in low-grade metastatic ovarian cancer) and rapidly resolving 3 days after stopping it. Conclusion: The mechanism of MEK inhibitor induced visual toxicity remains unclear. The pathophysiology of multifocal serous retinal detachments as a complication of pimasertib is still poorly understood. PMID:26444523

  8. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  9. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  10. Retinal detachment repair - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... scleral buckle is applied. This consists of a silicone patch wrapped around the eye, compressing the globe ... of the eye, and sealing the detachment. The silicone patch is usually left in place permanently, unless ...

  11. A Sensitivity Analysis of SOLPS Plasma Detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. L.; Canik, J. M.; Eldon, D.; Meneghini, O.; AToM SciDAC Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Predicting the scrape off layer plasma conditions required for the ITER plasma to achieve detachment is an important issue when considering divertor heat load management options that are compatible with desired core plasma operational scenarios. Given the complexity of the scrape off layer, such predictions often rely on an integrated model of plasma transport with many free parameters. However, the sensitivity of any given prediction to the choices made by the modeler is often overlooked due to the logistical difficulties in completing such a study. Here we utilize an OMFIT workflow to enable a sensitivity analysis of the midplane density at which detachment occurs within the SOLPS model. The workflow leverages the TaskFarmer technology developed at NERSC to launch many instances of the SOLPS integrated model in parallel to probe the high dimensional parameter space of SOLPS inputs. We examine both predictive and interpretive models where the plasma diffusion coefficients are chosen to match an empirical scaling for divertor heat flux width or experimental profiles respectively. This research used resources of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and is supported under Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231, DE-AC05-00OR22725 and DE-SC0012656.

  12. Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment treatment guidelines.

    PubMed

    García-Arumí, J; Martínez-Castillo, V; Boixadera, A; Blasco, H; Marticorena, J; Zapata, M Á; Macià, C; Badal, J; Distéfano, L; Rafart, J M; Berrocal, M; Zambrano, A; Ruíz-Moreno, J M; Figueroa, M S

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines general guidelines following the initial diagnosis of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. These include preoperative evaluation, treatment, possible intra- and post-operative complications, retinal re-detachment, and all therapeutic options available for each case. Treatment of the traumatic retinal detachment is also described, due to its importance and peculiarities. Treatment or prophylactic guidelines are suggested for the different types of retinal detachment described. These are based on both the experience of the ophthalmologists that have participated in preparing the guidelines, and also on evidence-based grading linked to bibliographical sources. However, these guidelines should not be interpreted as being mandatory. Given that there is a wide spectrum of options for treatment of retinal detachment, the surgeons' experience with one or other surgical technique will be of utmost importance in obtaining the best surgical result. As guidelines, they are intended as an additional aid to the surgeon during the decision-making process, with the expectation that the final choice will still be left to the surgeon's judgment and past experience.

  13. Plasma Detachment Study in VASIMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilin, A. V.; Díaz, F. R. Chang; Squire, J. P.; Breizman, B. N.; Novakovski, S. V.; Sagdeev, R. Z.

    2000-10-01

    We present kinetic and MHD simulations of plasma detachment in the exhaust of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR). The detachment is associated with a transition from subalfvenic to superalfvenic plasma flow in the magnetic nozzle. As a result, the kinetic energy of the outgoing plasma flow is greater than the magnetic field energy in the exhaust area, so that the plasma is no longer confined by the magnetic field. We model the outgoing plasma flow under the assumptions that the plasma is collisionless and has a constant electron temperature. Particle simulations show that the ion motion may become nonadiabatic in the exhaust area as the magnetic field decreases downstream. This effect should facilitate the detachment.

  14. Choroidal detachment and ocular hypotony: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Peyman, G.A.

    1984-12-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) findings in 20 patients with hemorrhagic choroidal detachment, serous choroidal detachment and/or ocular hypotony are described. Hemorrhagic choroidal detachment appeared as an area of high attenuation that was usually localized, uniformly hyperdense, and not position-dependent. Serous choroidal detachment appeared as a convex, thick line of increased density within the vitreous cavity. Inflammatory choroidal detachment produces a diffuse intrauveal and suprachoroidal accumulation of high-density, position-dependent fluid, and uveoscleral thickening and enhancement, which in cross section resembles a ring. CT has proved valuable in localizing and differentiating serous or hemorrhagic choroidal detachment and uveoscleral infolding.

  15. Local and Sustained Activity of Doxycycline Delivered with Layer-by-Layer Microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dong; Gould, David J; Sukhorukov, Gleb B

    2016-04-11

    Achieving localized delivery of small molecule drugs has the potential to increase efficacy and reduce off target and side effects associated with systemic distribution. Herein, we explore the potential use of layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled microcapsules for the delivery of doxycycline. Absorbance of doxycycline onto core dextran sulfate of preassembled microcapsules provides an efficient method to load both synthetic and biodegradable microcapsules with the drug. Application of an outer layer lipid coat enhances the sustained in vitro release of doxycycline from both microcapsule types. To monitor doxycycline delivery in a biological system, C2C12 mouse myoblasts are engineered to express EGFP under the control of the optimized components of the tetracycline regulated gene expression system. Microcapsules are not toxic to these cells, and upon delivery to the cells, EGFP is more efficiently induced in those cells that contain engulfed microcapsules and monitored EGFP expression clearly demonstrates that synthetic microcapsules with a DPPC coat are the most efficient for sustain intracellular delivery. Doxycycline released from microcapsules also displayed sustained activity in an antimicrobial growth inhibition assay compared with doxycycline solution. This study reveals the potential for LbL microcapsules in small molecule drug delivery and their feasible use for achieving prolonged doxycycline activity.

  16. Detachment folding, fold amplification, and diapirism in thrust wedge experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonini, Marco

    2003-12-01

    The relations between detachment folding, fold amplification, and salt diapirism in contractional settings have been investigated by means of scaled analogue models. The viscosity of the silicone layer simulating salt in nature and the shortening rates were combined in order to reproduce weak (type 1 models) and strong (type 2 models) décollements. Deformation patterns in the roof sequence exhibited two contrasting styles, (1) outward propagation of detachment folding along the décollement (OFP mode) and (2) passive roof duplex (PRD mode). In type 2 models, detachment folding propagated away from the most external thrust in the floor sequence, while in type 1 models, long-lived detachment folds almost invariably localized amplified above a floor thrust tip as a result of strain localization. A silicone wall intruded occasionally into the crestal graben of detachment folds in type 1 and OFP models. Best fitting of transition models data points indicates nonlinear relations with regression curves close to the equilateral hyperbola equation for both OFP-PRD and amplified detachment folds-box folds transitions. A quantitative comparison of model results with nature has been attempted by plotting salt-based fold-and-thrust belts data points on the scaled transition curves obtained from the modeling. Such a comparison relates shear stress products and ratios to the conditions favoring the amplification of detachment folds and the potential emplacement of ductile diapirs in their core. By reducing the roof sequence strength, pore fluid pressure λb is inferred to shift the equilibrium of fold-and-thrust belts toward the field of OFP and diapirism.

  17. Active layer hydrology for Imnavait Creek, Toolik, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    In the annual hydrologic cycle, snowmelt is the most significant event at Imnavait Creek located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Precipitation that has accumulated for more than 6 months on the surface melts in a relatively short period of 7 to 10 days once sustained melting occurs. During the ablation period, runoff dominates the hydrologic cycle. Some meltwater goes to rewetting the organic soils in the active layer. The remainder is lost primarily because of evaporation, since transpiration is not a very active process at this time. Following the snowmelt period, evapotranspiration becomes the dominate process, with base flow contributing the other watershed losses. It is important to note that the water initally lost by evapotranspiration entered the organic layer during melt. This water from the snowpack ensures that each year the various plant communities will have sufficient water to start a new summer of growth.

  18. HAMLET binding to α-actinin facilitates tumor cell detachment.

    PubMed

    Trulsson, Maria; Yu, Hao; Gisselsson, Lennart; Chao, Yinxia; Urbano, Alexander; Aits, Sonja; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina

    2011-03-08

    Cell adhesion is tightly regulated by specific molecular interactions and detachment from the extracellular matrix modifies proliferation and survival. HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex with tumoricidal activity that also triggers tumor cell detachment in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that molecular interactions defining detachment are perturbed in cancer cells. To identify such interactions, cell membrane extracts were used in Far-western blots and HAMLET was shown to bind α-actinins; major F-actin cross-linking proteins and focal adhesion constituents. Synthetic peptide mapping revealed that HAMLET binds to the N-terminal actin-binding domain as well as the integrin-binding domain of α-actinin-4. By co-immunoprecipitation of extracts from HAMLET-treated cancer cells, an interaction with α-actinin-1 and -4 was observed. Inhibition of α-actinin-1 and α-actinin-4 expression by siRNA transfection increased detachment, while α-actinin-4-GFP over-expression significantly delayed rounding up and detachment of tumor cells in response to HAMLET. In response to HAMLET, adherent tumor cells rounded up and detached, suggesting a loss of the actin cytoskeletal organization. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in β1 integrin staining and a decrease in FAK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, consistent with a disruption of integrin-dependent cell adhesion signaling. Detachment per se did not increase cell death during the 22 hour experimental period, regardless of α-actinin-4 and α-actinin-1 expression levels but adherent cells with low α-actinin levels showed increased death in response to HAMLET. The results suggest that the interaction between HAMLET and α-actinins promotes tumor cell detachment. As α-actinins also associate with signaling molecules, cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane receptors and ion channels, additional α-actinin-dependent mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Layered shielding design for an active neutron interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    The use of source and detector shields in active neutron interrogation can improve detector signal. In simulations, a shielded detector with a source rotated π/3 rad relative to the opening decreased neutron flux roughly three orders of magnitude. Several realistic source and detector shield configurations were simulated. A layered design reduced neutron and secondary photon flux in the detector by approximately one order of magnitude for a deuterium-tritium source. The shield arrangement can be adapted for a portable, modular design.

  20. Spatio-temporal modeling of Active Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touyz, J.; Apanasovich, T. V.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Shiklomanov, N. I.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic Regions are experiencing an unprecedented rate of environmental and climate change. The active layer (the uppermost layer of soil between the atmosphere and permafrost that freezes in winter and thaws in summer) is sensitive to both climate and environmental changes and plays an important role in the functioning of Arctic ecosystems, planning, and economic activities. Knowledge about spatio-temporal variability of ALT is crucial for environmental and engineering applications. The objective of this study is to provide the methodology to model and estimate spatio-temporal variation in the active layer thickness (ALT) at several sites located in the Circumpolar region spanning the Alaska North Slope, and to demonstrate its use in spatio-temporal interpolation as well as time-forward prediction. In our data analysis we estimate a parametric trend and examine residuals for the presence of spatial and temporal dependence. We propose models that provide a description of residual space-time variability in ALT. Formulations that take into account interaction among spatial and temporal components are also developed. Moreover, we compare our models to naive models in which residual spatio-temporal and temporal correlations are not considered. The predicted root mean squared and absolute errors are significantly reduced when our approach is employed. While the methodology is developed in the context of ALT, it can also be applied to model and predict other environmental variables which use similar spatio-temporal sampling designs.

  1. Vibration control of cylindrical shells using active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Manas C.; Chen, Tung-Huei; Baz, Amr M.

    1997-05-01

    The fundamentals of controlling the structural vibration of cylindrical shells treated with active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments are presented. The effectiveness of the ACLD treatments in enhancing the damping characteristics of thin cylindrical shells is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to describe the dynamic interaction between the shells and the ACLD treatments. The FEM is used to predict the natural frequencies and the modal loss factors of shells which are partially treated with patches of the ACLD treatments. The predictions of the FEM are validated experimentally using stainless steel cylinders which are 20.32 cm in diameter, 30.4 cm in length and 0.05 cm in thickness. The cylinders are treated with ACLD patches of different configurations in order to target single or multi-modes of lobar vibrations. The ACLD patches used are made of DYAD 606 visco-elastic layer which is sandwiched between two layers of PVDF piezo-electric films. Vibration attenuations of 85% are obtained with maximum control voltage of 40 volts. Such attenuations are attributed to the effectiveness of the ACLD treatment in increasing the modal damping ratios by about a factor of four over those of conventional passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) treatments. The obtained results suggest the potential of the ACLD treatments in controlling the vibration of cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  2. Typology of nonlinear activity waves in a layered neural continuum.

    PubMed

    Koch, Paul; Leisman, Gerry

    2006-04-01

    Neural tissue, a medium containing electro-chemical energy, can amplify small increments in cellular activity. The growing disturbance, measured as the fraction of active cells, manifests as propagating waves. In a layered geometry with a time delay in synaptic signals between the layers, the delay is instrumental in determining the amplified wavelengths. The growth of the waves is limited by the finite number of neural cells in a given region of the continuum. As wave growth saturates, the resulting activity patterns in space and time show a variety of forms, ranging from regular monochromatic waves to highly irregular mixtures of different spatial frequencies. The type of wave configuration is determined by a number of parameters, including alertness and synaptic conditioning as well as delay. For all cases studied, using numerical solution of the nonlinear Wilson-Cowan (1973) equations, there is an interval in delay in which the wave mixing occurs. As delay increases through this interval, during a series of consecutive waves propagating through a continuum region, the activity within that region changes from a single-frequency to a multiple-frequency pattern and back again. The diverse spatio-temporal patterns give a more concrete form to several metaphors advanced over the years to attempt an explanation of cognitive phenomena: Activity waves embody the "holographic memory" (Pribram, 1991); wave mixing provides a plausible cause of the competition called "neural Darwinism" (Edelman, 1988); finally the consecutive generation of growing neural waves can explain the discontinuousness of "psychological time" (Stroud, 1955).

  3. Fluid flow in extensional detachments determined from stable isotope analyses: Application to Kettle dome detachment, Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilichini, A.; Teyssier, C.; Mulch, A.; Nachlas, W.

    2009-04-01

    In detachment systems that border metamorphic core complexes fluids convect from the surface to the detachment along faults and fractures in the brittle crust that serve as zones of recharge and discharge. This buoyancy-driven fluid flow is controlled by a high heat flow at the base of the system, beneath the detachment, where heat is advected by crustal thinning and magma intrusions. This hydrothermal convective flow is focused in the detachment for the duration of activity of the detachment and at relatively high temperature (300-500°C), resulting in very significant fluid-rock interaction and isotopic exchange. Studies of detachments in the North American Cordilleran core complexes suggest that meteoric fluids permeate detachment zones, as recorded by the deuterium composition of hydrous phases such as white mica, biotite, and amphibole. Quantifying fluid flux in detachments is a challenge because permeability of ductilely deforming rocks is poorly understood. The approach we are using focuses on oxygen and hydrogen isotopes in quartzite (+ minor mica) sections of detachments, complemented by high-precision chemical analyses of mica to understand their growth history and recrystallization process. The initial fluid isotopic composition is approximated using the deuterium composition of mica at a particular temperature that is given by oxygen isotopes in quartz-mica pairs. The more fluid interact with the quartzite, the larger the expected shift in oxygen isotope value. The Eocene Kettle Dome detachment in the North American Cordillera provides a continuous section of ~200 m thick quartzite mylonite where this methodology is applied. High-resolution sampling (up to 5 m) complements the initial sampling that was performed every 10 m in this section (Mulch et al., 2006, Tectonics, TC4001). Based on mica deuterium values, the fluid that participated in mica crystallization was meteoric in origin (~110 per mil). Interaction of this fluid with the quartz mylonite

  4. Detached Growth of Germanium by Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    The conditions of detached solidification under controlled pressure differential across the meniscus were investigated. Uncoated and graphite- or BN-coated silica and pBN crucibles were used. Detached and partly detached growth was achieved in pBN and BN-coated crucibles, respectively. The results of the experiments are discussed based on the theory of Duffar et al.

  5. Shock detachment process on cones in hypervelocity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, Ivett A.

    1999-11-01

    The shock detachment process on cones in hypervelocity flows is one of the most sensitive flows to relaxation effects. The critical angle for shock detachment under frozen conditions can be very different from the critical angle under chemical and thermal equilibrium. The rate of increase of the detachment distance with cone angle is also affected by the relaxation rate. The purpose of this study is to explain the effects of nonequilibrium on the shock detachment distance and its growth rate on cones in hypervelocity flows. The study consists of an experimental and a computational program. The experimental part has been carried out at Caltech's hypervelocity reflected shock tunnel (T5). Six different free-stream conditions have been chosen, four using N2 as the test gas and two using CO2. About 170 shots were performed on 24 cones. The cones range in diameter from 2 cm to 16 cm with half-angles varying from 55° to 75°. The experimental data obtained are holographic interferograms of every shot, and surface temperature and pressure measurements for the bigger cones. Extensive numerical simulations were made for the N2 flows and some were also made for the CO2 flows. The code employed is a Navier-Stokes solver that can account for thermal and chemical nonequilibrium in axisymmetric flows. The experimental and computational data obtained for the shock detachment distance confirms a previous theoretical model that predicts the detachment distance will grow more slowly for relaxing flows than for frozen or equilibrium flows. This difference is explained in terms of the behavior of the sonic line inside the shock layer. Different growth rates result when the detachment distance is controlled by the diameter of the cone (frozen and equilibrium cases) than when it is controlled by the extent of the relaxation zone inside the shock layer (nonequilibrium flows). The experimental data are also complemented with computational data to observe the behavior of the detachment

  6. Catalytically active single-atom niobium in graphitic layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Guo, Junjie; Guan, Pengfei; Liu, Chunjing; Huang, Hao; Xue, Fanghong; Dong, Xinglong; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2013-05-01

    Carbides of groups IV through VI (Ti, V and Cr groups) have long been proposed as substitutes for noble metal-based electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. However, their catalytic activity has been extremely limited because of the low density and stability of catalytically active sites. Here we report the excellent performance of a niobium-carbon structure for catalysing the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. A large number of single niobium atoms and ultra small clusters trapped in graphitic layers are directly identified using state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. This structure not only enhances the overall conductivity for accelerating the exchange of ions and electrons, but it suppresses the chemical/thermal coarsening of the active particles. Experimental results coupled with theory calculations reveal that the single niobium atoms incorporated within the graphitic layers produce a redistribution of d-band electrons and become surprisingly active for O2 adsorption and dissociation, and also exhibit high stability.

  7. Kinematic Fitting of Detached Vertices

    SciTech Connect

    Mattione, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The eg3 experiment at the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector aims to determine the existence of the $\\Xi_{5}$ pentaquarks and investigate the excited $\\Xi$ states. Specifically, the exotic $\\Xi_{5}^{--}$ pentaquark will be sought by first reconstructing the $\\Xi^{-}$ particle through its weak decays, $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda\\to\\pi^{-}$. A kinematic fitting routine was developed to reconstruct the detached vertices of these decays, where confidence level cuts on the fits are used to remove background events. Prior to fitting these decays, the exclusive reaction $\\gamma D\\rightarrow pp\\pi^{-}$ was studied in order to correct the track measurements and covariance matrices of the charged particles. The $\\Lambda\\rightarrow p\\pi^{-}$ and $\\Xi^{-}\\to\\pi^{-}\\Lambda$ decays were then investigated to demonstrate that the kinematic fitting routine reconstructs the decaying particles and their detached vertices correctly.

  8. Active Constrained Layer Damping of Thin Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RAY, M. C.; OH, J.; BAZ, A.

    2001-03-01

    The effectiveness of the active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments in enhancing the damping characteristics of thin cylindrical shells is presented. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to describe the dynamic interaction between the shells and the ACLD treatments. Experiments are performed to verify the numerical predictions. The obtained results suggest the potential of the ACLD treatments in controlling the vibration of cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  9. Turbulence structures in a strongly decelerated boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gungor, Ayse G.; Maciel, Yvan; Simens, Mark P.

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of three-dimensional intense Reynolds shear stress structures (Qs) are presented from a direct numerical simulation of an adverse pressure gradient boundary layer at Reθ = 1500 -2175. The intense Q2 (ejections) and Q4 (sweeps) structures separate into two groups: wall-attached and wall-detached structures. In the region where turbulent activity is maximal, between 0 . 2 δ and 0 . 6 δ , 94 % of the structures are detached structures. In comparison to canonical wall flows, the large velocity defect turbulent boundary layers are less efficient in extracting turbulent energy from the mean flow. There is, furthermore, much less turbulence activity and less velocity coherence near the wall. Additionally, the wall-detached structures are more frequent and carry a much larger amount of Reynolds shear stress. Funded in part by ITU, NSERC of Canada, and Multiflow program of the ERC.

  10. Optical activity of transparent polymer layers characterized by spectral means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosutchi, Andreea Irina; Dimitriu, Dan Gheorghe; Zelinschi, Carmen Beatrice; Breaban, Iuliana; Dorohoi, Dana Ortansa

    2015-06-01

    The method based on the channeled spectrum, validated for inorganic optical active layers, is used now to determine the optical activity of some transparent polymer solutions in different solvents. The circular birefringence, the dispersion parameter and the specific rotation were estimated in the visible range by using the measurements of wavelengths in the channeled spectra of Hydroxypropyl cellulose in water, methanol and acetic acid. The experiments showed the specific rotation dependence on the polymer concentration and also on the solvent nature. The decrease of the specific rotation in the visible range with the increase in wavelength was evidenced. The method has some advantages as the rapidity of the experiments and the large spectral range in which it can be applied. One disadvantage is the fact that the channeled spectrum does not allow to establish the rotation sense of the electric field intensity.

  11. Role of pulsed winds on detachment of low salinity water from the Pearl River Plume: Upwelling and mixing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaoyun; Pan, Jiayi; Jiang, Yuwu

    2016-04-01

    The detachment of low salinity water (LSW) from the Pearl River plume occurs frequently as revealed by in situ observations and satellite images, and plays an important role in cross-shore transport of the nutrient-rich plume water. In this study, the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) is used to simulate the LSW detachment process forced by realistic and idealized winds, and to explore its dynamical mechanisms. Modeling results show that the LSW detachment appears under a pulsed southwesterly wind, while tidal mixing modifies the size and salinity of the detached LSW. Strong pulsed wind causes the LSW to separate from the plume and move offshore quickly after the detachment. Under a pulsed northeasterly wind, however, the plume without separation of the LSW moves shoreward, indicating that the LSW detachment is sensitive to wind direction. In the plume region, upwelling develops under the forcing of the pulsed southwesterly wind, which transports high salinity bottom water to the surface layer, while the shear mixing in the upper layer further enhances the surface buoyancy flux, leading to appearance of high salinity water in the surface layer off the Pearl River estuary mouth, cutting off the eastward-spreading plume water, and resulting in the plume LSW detachment. Further analysis shows that the pulsed southwesterly wind induces positive local salinity change rate in the LSW detachment area. The pulsed upwelling-favorable wind with duration of 2-5 days is responsible for the detachment process.

  12. Active Flow Control on a Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Susan Althoff; Owens, Lewis R.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Allan, Brian G.; Schuster, Ernest P.

    2004-01-01

    Boundary layer ingestion (BLI) is explored as means to improve overall system performance for Blended Wing Body configuration. The benefits of BLI for vehicle system performance benefit are assessed with a process derived from first principles suitable for highly-integrated propulsion systems. This performance evaluation process provides framework within which to assess the benefits of an integrated BLI inlet and lays the groundwork for higher-fidelity systems studies. The results of the system study show that BLI provides a significant improvement in vehicle performance if the inlet distortion can be controlled, thus encouraging the pursuit of active flow control (AFC) as a BLI enabling technology. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet distortion was assessed using a 6% scale model of a 30% BLI offset, diffusing inlet. The experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel with a model inlet designed specifically for this type of testing. High mass flow pulsing actuators provided the active flow control. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion was determined by 120 total pressure measurements located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum freestream Mach number of 0.15 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the pulsed actuation can reduce distortion from 29% to 4.6% as measured by the circumferential distortion descriptor DC60 using less than 1% of inlet mass flow. Closed loop control of the actuation was also demonstrated using a sidewall surface static pressure as the response sensor.

  13. Quaternary low-angle slip on detachment faults in Death Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayman, N.W.; Knott, J.R.; Cowan, D.S.; Nemser, E.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Detachment faults on the west flank of the Black Mountains (Nevada and California) dip 29??-36?? and cut subhorizontal layers of the 0.77 Ma Bishop ash. Steeply dipping normal faults confined to the hanging walls of the detachments offset layers of the 0.64 Ma Lava Creek B tephra and the base of 0.12-0.18 Ma Lake Manly gravel. These faults sole into and do not cut the low-angle detachments. Therefore the detachments accrued any measurable slip across the kinematically linked hanging-wall faults. An analysis of the orientations of hundreds of the hanging-wall faults shows that extension occurred at modest slip rates (<1 mm/yr) under a steep to vertically oriented maximum principal stress. The Black Mountain detachments are appropriately described as the basal detachments of near-critical Coulomb wedges. We infer that the formation of late Pleistocene and Holocene range-front fault scarps accompanied seismogenic slip on the detachments.

  14. Characterization of cathode keeper wear by surface layer activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the erosion rates of the discharge cathode keeper in a 30 cm NSTAR configuration ion thruster were measured using a technique known as Surface Layer Activation (SLA). This diagnostic technique involves producing a radioactive tracer in a given surface by bombardment with high energy ions. The decrease in activity of the tracer material may be monitored as the surface is subjected to wear processes and correlated to a depth calibration curve, yielding the eroded depth. Analysis of the activities was achieved through a gamma spectroscopy system. The primary objectives of this investigation were to reproduce erosion data observed in previous wear studies in order to validate the technique, and to determine the effect of different engine operating parameters on erosion rate. The erosion profile at the TH 15 (23 kw) setting observed during the 8200 hour Life Demonstration Test (LDT) was reproduced. The maximum keeper erosion rate at this setting was determined to be 0.085 pm/hr. Testing at the TH 8 (1.4 kw) setting demonstrated lower erosion rates than TH 15, along with a different wear profile. Varying the keeper voltage was shown to have a significant effect on the erosion, with a positive bias with respect to cathode potential decreasing the erosion rate significantly. Accurate measurements were achieved after operating times of only 40 to 70 hours, a significant improvement over other erosion diagnostic methods.

  15. Slab detachment under the Eastern Alps seen by seismic anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Qorbani, Ehsan; Bianchi, Irene; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-01-01

    We analyze seismic anisotropy for the Eastern Alpine region by inspecting shear-wave splitting from SKS and SKKS phases. The Eastern Alpine region is characterized by a breakdown of the clear mountain-chain-parallel fast orientation pattern that has been previously documented for the Western Alps and for the western part of the Eastern Alps. The main interest of this paper is a more detailed analysis of the anisotropic character of the Eastern Alps, and the transition to the Carpathian–Pannonian region. SK(K)S splitting measurements reveal a rather remarkable lateral change in the anisotropy pattern from the west to the east of the Eastern Alps with a transition area at about 12°E. We also model the backazimuthal variation of the measurements by a vertical change of anisotropy. We find that the eastern part of the study area is characterized by the presence of two layers of anisotropy, where the deeper layer has characteristics similar to those of the Central Alps, in particular SW–NE fast orientations of anisotropic axes. We attribute the deeper layer to a detached slab from the European plate. Comparison with tomographic studies of the area indicates that the detached slab might possibly connect with the lithosphere that is still in place to the west of our study area, and may also connect with the slab graveyard to the East, at the depth of the upper mantle transition zone. On the other hand, the upper layer has NW–SE fast orientations coinciding with a low-velocity layer which is found above a more-or-less eastward dipping high-velocity body. The anisotropy of the upper layer shows large-scale NW–SE fast orientation, which is consistent with the presence of asthenospheric flow above the detached slab foundering into the deeper mantle. PMID:25843968

  16. Slab detachment under the Eastern Alps seen by seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qorbani, Ehsan; Bianchi, Irene; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-01-01

    We analyze seismic anisotropy for the Eastern Alpine region by inspecting shear-wave splitting from SKS and SKKS phases. The Eastern Alpine region is characterized by a breakdown of the clear mountain-chain-parallel fast orientation pattern that has been previously documented for the Western Alps and for the western part of the Eastern Alps. The main interest of this paper is a more detailed analysis of the anisotropic character of the Eastern Alps, and the transition to the Carpathian-Pannonian region. SK(K)S splitting measurements reveal a rather remarkable lateral change in the anisotropy pattern from the west to the east of the Eastern Alps with a transition area at about 12°E. We also model the backazimuthal variation of the measurements by a vertical change of anisotropy. We find that the eastern part of the study area is characterized by the presence of two layers of anisotropy, where the deeper layer has characteristics similar to those of the Central Alps, in particular SW-NE fast orientations of anisotropic axes. We attribute the deeper layer to a detached slab from the European plate. Comparison with tomographic studies of the area indicates that the detached slab might possibly connect with the lithosphere that is still in place to the west of our study area, and may also connect with the slab graveyard to the East, at the depth of the upper mantle transition zone. On the other hand, the upper layer has NW-SE fast orientations coinciding with a low-velocity layer which is found above a more-or-less eastward dipping high-velocity body. The anisotropy of the upper layer shows large-scale NW-SE fast orientation, which is consistent with the presence of asthenospheric flow above the detached slab foundering into the deeper mantle.

  17. Slab Detachment Under the Eastern Alps Seen By Seismic Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qorbani, E.; Bianchi, I.; Bokelmann, G.

    2014-12-01

    We analyze seismic anisotropy for the Eastern Alpine region by inspecting shear-wave splitting from SKS and SKKS phases. The Eastern Alpine region is characterized by a breakdown of the clear mountain-chain-parallel fast orientation pattern that has been previously documented for the Western Alps and for the western part of the Eastern Alps. The main interest of this paper is a more detailed analysis of the anisotropic character of the Eastern Alps, and the transition to the Carpathian-Pannonian region. SK(K)S splitting measurements reveal a rather remarkable lateral change in the anisotropy pattern from the west to the east of the Eastern Alps with a transition area at about 12°E. We also model the backazimuthal variation of the measurements by a vertical change of anisotropy. We find that the eastern part of the study area is characterized by the presence of two layers of anisotropy, where the deeper layer has characteristics similar to those of the Central Alps, in particular SW-NE fast orientations of anisotropic axes. We attribute the deeper layer to a detached slab from the European plate. Comparison with tomographic studies of the area indicates that the detached slab might possibly connect with the lithosphere that is still in place to the west of our study area, and may also connect with the slab graveyard to the East, at the depth of the upper mantle transition zone. On the other hand, the upper layer has NW-SE fast orientations coinciding with a low-velocity layer which is found above a more-or-less eastward dipping high-velocity body. The anisotropy of the upper layer shows large-scale NW-SE fast orientation, which is consistent with the presence of asthenospheric flow above the detached slab foundering into the deeper mantle.

  18. Slab detachment under the Eastern Alps seen by seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qorbani, Ehsan; Bianchi, Irene; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-04-01

    We analyze seismic anisotropy for the Eastern Alpine region by inspecting shear-wave splitting from SKS and SKKS phases. The Eastern Alpine region is characterized by a breakdown of the clear mountain-chain-parallel fast orientation pattern that has been previously documented for the Western Alps and for the western part of the Eastern Alps. The main interest of this paper is a more detailed analysis of the anisotropic character of the Eastern Alps, and the transition to the Carpathian-Pannonian region. SK(K)S splitting measurements reveal a rather remarkable lateral change in the anisotropy pattern from the west to the east of the Eastern Alps with a transition area at about 12°E. We also model the backazimuthal variation of the measurements by a vertical change of anisotropy. We find that the eastern part of the study area is characterized by the presence of two layers of anisotropy, where the deeper layer has characteristics similar to those of the Central Alps, in particular SW-NE fast orientations of anisotropic axes. We attribute the deeper layer to a detached slab from the European plate. Comparison with tomographic studies of the area indicates that the detached slab might possibly connect with the lithosphere that is still in place to the west of our study area, and may also connect with the slab graveyard to the East, at the depth of the upper mantle transition zone. On the other hand, the upper layer has NW-SE fast orientations coinciding with a low-velocity layer which is found above a more-or-less eastward dipping high-velocity body. The anisotropy of the upper layer shows large-scale NW-SE fast orientation, which is consistent with the presence of asthenospheric flow above the detached slab foundering into the deeper mantle.

  19. Slab detachment under the Eastern Alps seen by seismic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Qorbani, Ehsan; Bianchi, Irene; Bokelmann, Götz

    2015-01-01

    We analyze seismic anisotropy for the Eastern Alpine region by inspecting shear-wave splitting from SKS and SKKS phases. The Eastern Alpine region is characterized by a breakdown of the clear mountain-chain-parallel fast orientation pattern that has been previously documented for the Western Alps and for the western part of the Eastern Alps. The main interest of this paper is a more detailed analysis of the anisotropic character of the Eastern Alps, and the transition to the Carpathian-Pannonian region. SK(K)S splitting measurements reveal a rather remarkable lateral change in the anisotropy pattern from the west to the east of the Eastern Alps with a transition area at about 12°E. We also model the backazimuthal variation of the measurements by a vertical change of anisotropy. We find that the eastern part of the study area is characterized by the presence of two layers of anisotropy, where the deeper layer has characteristics similar to those of the Central Alps, in particular SW-NE fast orientations of anisotropic axes. We attribute the deeper layer to a detached slab from the European plate. Comparison with tomographic studies of the area indicates that the detached slab might possibly connect with the lithosphere that is still in place to the west of our study area, and may also connect with the slab graveyard to the East, at the depth of the upper mantle transition zone. On the other hand, the upper layer has NW-SE fast orientations coinciding with a low-velocity layer which is found above a more-or-less eastward dipping high-velocity body. The anisotropy of the upper layer shows large-scale NW-SE fast orientation, which is consistent with the presence of asthenospheric flow above the detached slab foundering into the deeper mantle.

  20. Effect of CW YAG and argon green lasers on experimentally detached retinas.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Conway, M D; House, B J

    1984-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of argon-green (514.5 nm) and CW neodymium YAG (1060 nm) wavelengths on experimentally detached retinas of primates. Neither laser produced damage to the sensory retina of the fovea. The argon green wavelength, which was absorbed by haemoglobin in the vessel or by extravasated red blood cells, created vasospasm and nerve fiber layer damage. The beam of the CW YAG was not absorbed by haemoglobin; therefore, no vasospasm could be produced on experimentally detached retinas.

  1. Dynamic stability of detached solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic stability analysis model is developed for meniscus-defined crystal growth processes. The Young-Laplace equation is used to analyze the response of a growing crystal to perturbations to its radius and a thermal transport model is used to analyze the effect of perturbations on the evolution of the crystal-melt interface. A linearized differential equation is used to analyze radius perturbations but a linear integro-differential equation is required for the height perturbations. The stability model is applied to detached solidification under zero-gravity and terrestrial conditions. A numerical analysis is supplemented with an approximate analytical analysis, valid in the limit of small Bond numbers. For terrestrial conditions, a singularity is found to exist in the capillary stability coefficients where, at a critical value of the pressure differential across the meniscus, there is a transition from stability to instability. For the zero-gravity condition, exact formulas for the capillary stability coefficients are derived.

  2. Activity and lifetime of urease immobilized using layer-by-layer nano self-assembly on silicon microchannels.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Scott R; Elmore, Bill B; Palmer, James D

    2005-01-01

    Urease has been immobilized and layered onto the walls of manufactured silicon microchannels. Enzyme immobilization was performed using layer-by-layer nano self-assembly. Alternating layers of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, with enzyme layers "encased" between them, were deposited onto the walls of the silicon microchannels. The polycations used were polyethylenimine (PEI), polydiallyldimethylammonium (PDDA), and polyallylamine (PAH). The polyanions used were polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) and polyvinylsulfate (PVS). The activity of the immobilized enzyme was tested by pumping a 1 g/L urea solution through the microchannels at various flow rates. Effluent concentration was measured using an ultraviolet/visible spectrometer by monitoring the absorbance of a pH sensitive dye. The architecture of PEI/PSS/PEI/urease/PEI with single and multiple layers of enzyme demonstrated superior performance over the PDDA and PAH architectures. The precursor layer of PEI/PSS demonstrably improved the performance of the reactor. Conversion rates of 70% were achieved at a residence time of 26 s, on d 1 of operation, and >50% at 51 s, on d 15 with a six-layer PEI/urease architecture.

  3. ERK-mediated activation of Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (Faim2) prevents apoptosis of 661W cells in a model of detachment-induced photoreceptor cell death.

    PubMed

    Besirli, Cagri G; Zheng, Qiong-Duon; Reed, David M; Zacks, David N

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined the role of Fas apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (Faim2), an inhibitor of the Fas signaling pathway, and its regulation by stress kinase signaling during Fas-mediated apoptosis of 661W cells, an immortalized photoreceptor-like cell line Treatment of 661W cells with a Fas-activating antibody led to increased levels of Faim2. Both ERK and JNK stress kinase pathways were activated in Fas-treated 661W cells, but only the inhibition of the ERK pathway reduced the levels of Faim2. Blocking the ERK pathway using a pharmacological inhibitor increased the susceptibility of 661W cells to Fas-induced caspase activation and apoptosis. When the levels of Faim2 were reduced in 661W cells by siRNA knockdown, Fas activating antibody treatment resulted in earlier and more robust caspase activation, and increased cell death. These results demonstrate that Faim2 acts as a neuroprotectant during Fas-mediated apoptosis of 661W cells. The expression of Faim2 is triggered, at least in part, by Fas-receptor activation and subsequent ERK signaling. Our findings identify a novel protective pathway that auto-regulates Fas-induced photoreceptor apoptosis in vitro. Modulation of this pathway to increase Faim2 expression may be a potential therapeutic option to prevent photoreceptor death.

  4. Synkinematic skarns and fluid drainage along detachments: The West Cycladic Detachment System on Serifos Island (Cyclades, Greece) and its related mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducoux, M.; Branquet, Y.; Jolivet, L.; Arbaret, L.; Grasemann, B.; Rabillard, A.; Gumiaux, C.; Drufin, S.

    2017-01-01

    Back-arc extension in the Aegean Sea has been accommodated by several large-scale detachments such as the West Cycladic Detachment System (WCDS) in the Oligocene and Miocene. The WCDS especially crops out on Serifos Island (Cyclades) with a synkinematic granodioritic intrusion. As skarns represent metasomatic reactions near the contact between intrusions and the host rocks, they sign the position of the main drains used by fluids. While the mineralogy of the Serifos skarns is well known, geometrical and kinematic relations between the detachments and ore bodies remains poorly studied. This study allows us to distinguish different types of skarn. High Temperature skarns correspond to (1) massive garnet endoskarns, (2) ribbon and ;bubble; garnet-pyroxene endoskarns, (3) garnet-pyroxene cracks exoskarns, whereas medium-temperature pyroxene ± ilvaite bearing skarn breccias within the Meghàlo Livadhi and Kàvos Kiklopas detachments belonging to the WCDS. Our observations show that skarn formation is associated with the activity of detachments and the syntectonic pluton emplacement. Endo and exoskarn deposits formed coeval with the ductile and brittle structures resulting from the activity of the WCDS, such as echelon veins, veins with antithetic shear and boudinaged veins wrapped within sheath folds, with a top-to-the SSW or SW shear senses compatible with the regional kinematics. Some skarn breccias formed within detachment planes far from the contact of the main granodioritic body, attesting for the intense flow of magmatic fluids along these discontinuities. These over-pressurized fluids play a major role in the mechanical behaviour of the detachments and strain localization. The two detachments acting as preferential crustal-scale drains, the pattern of magmatic fluid flows is not centred on the intrusion. In this context, iron-rich skarns and associated primary magnetite deposits have been remobilized during late brittle increments of motion along the detachments

  5. Microbial diversity in European alpine permafrost and active layers.

    PubMed

    Frey, Beat; Rime, Thomas; Phillips, Marcia; Stierli, Beat; Hajdas, Irka; Widmer, Franco; Hartmann, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Permafrost represents a largely understudied genetic resource. Thawing of permafrost with global warming will not only promote microbial carbon turnover with direct feedback on greenhouse gases, but also unlock an unknown microbial diversity. Pioneering metagenomic efforts have shed light on the permafrost microbiome in polar regions, but temperate mountain permafrost is largely understudied. We applied a unique experimental design coupled to high-throughput sequencing of ribosomal markers to characterize the microbiota at the long-term alpine permafrost study site 'Muot-da-Barba-Peider' in eastern Switzerland with an approximate radiocarbon age of 12 000 years. Compared to the active layers, the permafrost community was more diverse and enriched with members of the superphylum Patescibacteria (OD1, TM7, GN02 and OP11). These understudied phyla with no cultured representatives proposedly feature small streamlined genomes with reduced metabolic capabilities, adaptations to anaerobic fermentative metabolisms and potential ectosymbiotic lifestyles. The permafrost microbiota was also enriched with yeasts and lichenized fungi known to harbour various structural and functional adaptation mechanisms to survive under extreme sub-zero conditions. These data yield an unprecedented view on microbial life in temperate mountain permafrost, which is increasingly important for understanding the biological dynamics of permafrost in order to anticipate potential ecological trajectories in a warming world.

  6. Active Layer Soil Carbon and Nutrient Mineralization, Barrow, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stan D. Wullschleger; Holly M. Vander Stel; Colleen Iversen; Victoria L. Sloan; Richard J. Norby; Mallory P. Ladd; Jason K. Keller; Ariane Jong; Joanne Childs; Deanne J. Brice

    2015-10-29

    This data set consists of bulk soil characteristics as well as carbon and nutrient mineralization rates of active layer soils manually collected from the field in August, 2012, frozen, and then thawed and incubated across a range of temperatures in the laboratory for 28 day periods in 2013-2015. The soils were collected from four replicate polygons in each of the four Areas (A, B, C, and D) of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Soil samples were coincident with the established Vegetation Plots that are located in center, edge, and trough microtopography in each polygon. Data included are 1) bulk soil characteristics including carbon, nitrogen, gravimetric water content, bulk density, and pH in 5-cm depth increments and also by soil horizon, 2) carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus mineralization rates for soil horizons incubated aerobically (and in one case both aerobically and anaerobically) for 28 days at temperatures that included 2, 4, 8, and 12 degrees C. Additional soil and incubation data are forthcoming. They will be available when published as part of another paper that includes additional replicate analyses.

  7. Active layer hydrology for Imnavait Creek, Toolik, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hinzman, L.D.; Kane, D.L.

    1987-04-01

    The hydrology of the active layer of a watershed is described. In the annual hydrologic cycle, snowmelt is the most significant event at Imnavait Creek located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Precipitation that has accumulated for more than 6 months on the surface melts in a relatively short period of 7 to 10 days once sustained melting occurs. Significant runoff events are few. Convective storms covering relatively small areas on the North Slope of Alaska can produce significant small-scale events in a small watershed scale,but these events are rapidly attenuated outside the basin. Data collection began in August 1984. We have continuously monitored the hydrologic, the meteorologic, and the soil`s physical conditions. Information was collected through implementation of four snowmelt runoff plots and measurements of essential microclimate parameters. Soil moisture and temperature profiles were measured adjacent to each snowmelt runoff plot, and heat flux is collected adjacent to one of these plots. Meteorological parameters were measured locally. The water content of the snowpack prior to snowmelt was measured throughout the watershed and measured daily adjacent to each plot during snowmelt. The stream draining the basin was measured regularly during the spring melt event to provide information on watershed runoff rates and the volume of snowmelt.

  8. Active layer hydrology for Imnavait Creek, Toolik, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hinzman, L.D.; Kane, D.L.

    1987-04-01

    The hydrology of the active layer of a watershed is described. In the annual hydrologic cycle, snowmelt is the most significant event at Imnavait Creek located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Precipitation that has accumulated for more than 6 months on the surface melts in a relatively short period of 7 to 10 days once sustained melting occurs. Significant runoff events are few. Convective storms covering relatively small areas on the North Slope of Alaska can produce significant small-scale events in a small watershed scale,but these events are rapidly attenuated outside the basin. Data collection began in August 1984. We have continuously monitored the hydrologic, the meteorologic, and the soil's physical conditions. Information was collected through implementation of four snowmelt runoff plots and measurements of essential microclimate parameters. Soil moisture and temperature profiles were measured adjacent to each snowmelt runoff plot, and heat flux is collected adjacent to one of these plots. Meteorological parameters were measured locally. The water content of the snowpack prior to snowmelt was measured throughout the watershed and measured daily adjacent to each plot during snowmelt. The stream draining the basin was measured regularly during the spring melt event to provide information on watershed runoff rates and the volume of snowmelt.

  9. Detachment faults:Evidence for a low-angle origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Robert J.; Lister, Gordon S.

    1992-09-01

    The origin of low-angle normal faults or detachment faults mantling metamorphic core complexes in the southwestern United States remains controversial. If σ1 is vertical during extension, the formation of, or even slip along, such low-angle normal faults is mechanically implausible. No records exist of earthquakes on low-angle normal faults in areas currently undergoing continental extension, except from an area of actively forming core complexes in the Solomon Sea, Papua New Guinea. In light of such geophysical and mechanical arguments, W. R. Buck and B. Wernicke and G. J. Axen proposed models in which detachment faults originate as high-angle normal faults, but rotate to low angles and become inactive as extension proceeds. These models are inconsistent with critical field relations in several core complexes. The Rawhide fault, an areally extensive detachment fault in western Arizona, propagated at close to its present subhorizontal orientation late in the Tertiary extension of the region. Neither the Wernicke and Axen nor Buck models predict such behavior; in fact, both models preclude the operation of low-angle normal faults. We must seek alternative explanations or modify existing models to explain the evidence that detachment faults form and operate with gentle dips.

  10. Detachment faults: Evidence for a low-angle origin

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, R.J.; Lister, G.S. )

    1992-09-01

    The origin of low-angle normal faults or detachment faults mantling metamorphic core complexes in the southwestern United States remains controversial. If [sigma][sub 1] is vertical during extension, the formation of, or even slip along, such low-angle normal faults is mechanically implausible. No records exist of earthquakes on low-angle normal faults in areas currently undergoing continental extension, except from an area of actively forming core complexes in the Solomon Sea, Papua New Guinea. In light of such geophysical and mechanical arguments, W.R. Buck and B. Wernicke and G.J. Axen proposed models in which detachment faults originate as high-angle normal faults, but rotate to low angles and become inactive as extension proceeds. These models are inconsistent with critical field relations in several core complexes. The Rawhide fault, an areally extensive detachment fault in western Arizona, propagated at close to its present subhorizontal orientation late in the Tertiary extension of the region. Neither the Wernicke and Axen nor Buck models predict such behavior; in fact, both models preclude the operation of low-angle normal faults. The authors recommend that alternative explanations or modifications of existing models are needed to explain the evidence that detachment faults form and operate with gentle dips.

  11. Stability of Detached Grown Germanium Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweizer, M.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S. D.; Vujisic, L.; Szofran, F. R.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Detachment of the melt meniscus from the crucible during semiconductor Bridgman growth experiments has been observed in recent years, especially under microgravity experiments. Under earth conditions, the hydrostatic pressure counteracts the mechanism, whereby it is more difficult to achieve detached Bridgman growth. Attempts to get stable detached growth under terrestrial conditions have been discussed in the literature and have been the subject of recent experiments in our own group. The advantage of crystals grown without wall contact is obvious: In general, they possess a higher crystal quality than conventional Bridgman grown crystals with wall contact. However, due to the interaction of different parameters such as the wetting behavior of the melt with the crucible, and the dependence of the growth angle with the shape of the melt meniscus, the mechanism leading to detachment is very complicated and not completely understood. We have grown several doped and undoped Germanium crystals with the detached Bridgman and the normal Bridgman growth technique. Pyrolytic boron nitride containers were used for all growth experiments. In the detached grown crystals the typical gap thickness between the pBN crucible and the crystal is in the range of 10 to 100 micrometers, which was determined by performing profilometer measurements. Etch pit density measurements were also performed and a comparison between detached and attached grown crystals will be given. An interesting feature was detected on the surface of a detached grown crystal. Strong surface striations with an average axial distance of 0.5 mm were observed around the whole circumference. The maximum fluctuation of the gap thickness is in the range of 5-10 micrometers. These variations of the detached gap along the crystal axis can be explained by a kind of stiction of the melt/crucible interface and thus by a variation of the meniscus shape. This phenomenon leading to the fluctuation of the gap thickness will be

  12. Stability of Detached Grown Germanium Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweizer, M.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S. D.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Detachment of the melt meniscus from the crucible during semiconductor Bridgman growth experiments has been observed in recent years especially, under microgravity experiments. Under earth conditions, the hydrostatic pressure counteracts the mechanism, whereby it is more difficult to achieve detached Bridgman growth. Attempts to get stable detached growth under terrestrial conditions have been discussed in the literature and have been the subject of recent experiments in our own group. The advantage of crystals grown without wall contact is obvious: In general, they possess a higher crystal quality than conventional Bridgman grown crystals with wall contact. However, due to the interaction of different parameters such as the wetting behavior of the melt with the crucible, and the dependence of the growth angle with the shape of the melt meniscus, the mechanism leading to detachment is very complicated and not completely understood. We have grown several doped and undoped Germanium crystals with the detached Bridgman and the normal Bridgman growth technique. Pyrolytic boron nitride containers were used for all growth experiments. In the detached grown crystals the typical gap thickness between the pBN crucible and the crystal is in the range of 10 to 100 microns, which was determined by performing profilometer measurements. Etch pit density measurements were also performed and a comparison between detached and attached grown crystals will be given. An interesting feature was detected on the surface of a detached grown crystal. Strong surface striations with an average axial distance of 0.5mm were observed around the whole circumference. The maximum fluctuation of the gap thickness is in the range of 5-10 microns. These variations of the detached gap along the crystal axis can be explained by a kind of stiction of the melt/crucible interface and thus by a variation of the meniscus shape. This phenomenon leading to the fluctuation of the gap thickness will be

  13. Modeling active constrained-layer damping using Golla-Hughes-McTavish approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Saunders, William R.; Inman, Daniel J.

    1995-05-01

    Viscoelastic material (VEM) adds damping to structures. In order to enhance the damping effects of the viscoelastic material, a constraining layer is attached. If this constraining layer is a piezoelectric patch, the system is said to have active constrained layer damping (ACLD). In this paper, the damping effects due to viscoelastic material which has an active constraining layer is modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) damping method. The piezoelectric patch and structure are modeled using a Galerkin approach in order to account for the effect of the constraining layer on the beam.

  14. Particle Simulations of Plasma Detachment in VASIMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, A. V.; ChangDiaz, F. R.; Squire, J. P.; Breizman, B. N.; Carter, M. D.; Novakovski, S. V.

    1999-01-01

    The particle simulations in a Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) currently include self-consistent calculation of. 1) stationary magnetic field in plasma, 2) ion density and velocity, 3) ion-cyclotron radio-frequency heating, 4) ambipolar electric field. The assumptions of quasineutral and collissionless plasma are based on the range of operating VASIMR parameters. The main motivation for the particle simulation in VASIMR is plasma detachment from the magnetic field in the exhaust area. The plasma detachment is caused mainly by the Larmor radius increase. The plasma beta effect on detachment is observed and investigated as well. The results of particle simulations are compared with those from MHD simulations.

  15. [Development of all-silicone detachable balloons].

    PubMed

    Machida, T; Aoki, S; Sasaki, Y; Sasaki, Y; Iio, M; Matsuno, A; Yoshida, S; Basugi, N

    1990-11-25

    Treatment of cerebral vascular lesions such as carotid cavernous sinus fistulas and giant aneurysms is now being performed with intravascular detachable balloon embolization techniques. We have developed several types of all-silicone detachable balloons. Our balloons have self-sealing valves (with or without collars) and detach with simple traction. The self-sealing valve is smaller than 0.6 mm and the balloon can easily be placed through a 7-F catheter. We started clinical trials and a representative case was reported.

  16. Bacterial detachment from salivary conditioning films by dentifrice supernates.

    PubMed

    van der Mei, Henny C; White, Donald J; Cox, Ed R; Geertsema-Doornbusch, Gesinda I; Busscher, Henk J

    2002-01-01

    This study compared the detachment by supernates of nine different dentifrices of four oral bacterial strains adhering to a salivary pellicle in a parallel plate flow chamber. Ultra-thin bovine enamel slabs were coated for 1.5 h with human whole saliva. Following buffer rinsing, a bacterial suspension of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mutans or Actinomyces naeslundii was perfused through the flow chamber at a shear rate of 30 s-1 for four hours, and the number of adhering bacteria n4h was enumerated by image analysis after buffer rinsing at the same shear rate. Then, a 25 wt%-dentifrice/water supernate was perfused through the flow chamber for four minutes, followed by eight minutes of buffer rinsing and another enumeration of the number of bacteria that had remained adhering nad. Finally, an air-bubble was passed through the flow chamber to mimic the occasionally high detachment forces occurring in the oral cavity, and the adhering bacteria nab were counted again. On average, S. sanguis was the easiest to detach (73% averaged over all dentifrice supernates), while A. naeslundii was the most difficult (22% on average). The combined detachment of bacteria by dentifrice supernates and air-bubble ranged from a low of 16% to a high of 80%. Dentifrices containing pyrophosphate and polymeric polyphosphate (hexametaphosphate) surface active ingredients appeared to produce the most consistent and strongest desorption effects on plaque bacteria. Factors apparently important to bacterial detachment from pellicle-covered tooth surfaces by dentifrice formulations include the nature of adhesion of bacterial strains and chemical composition of the dentifrice formulations, including pH, surfactant system and the effect of added ingredients (dispersants, metal ions, peroxides, baking soda).

  17. [Ocular hypertension after surgery for retinal detachment].

    PubMed

    Muşat, O; Cristescu, R; Coman, Corina; Asandi, R

    2012-01-01

    This papers presents a case of a patient with retinal detachement, 3 days ago operated (posterior vitrectomy internal tamponament with silicon oil 1000) who develop increased ocular pressure following silicon oil output in the anterior chamber.

  18. Detached plasma in Saturn's front side magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goertz, C. K.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma observations in the outer front side Saturnian magnetosphere are discussed which indicate the existence of dense flux tubes outside the plasma sheets. It is suggested that flux tubes are detached from the plasma sheet by a centifugally driven flute instability. The same instability leads to a dispersal of Titan-injected plasma. It is shown that the detached flux tubes will probably break open as they convect into the nightside magnetotail and lose their content in the form of a planetary wind.

  19. The Missing Magnetic WDs in Detached Close Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovmassian, G.; Gonzalez-Buitrago, D.; Zharikov, S.

    2017-03-01

    A substantial fraction of isolated white dwarfs (WDs) are strongly magnetic. An even higher number of magnetic WDs are reported in cataclysmic variables (CVs). However, we have been struggling to find them in detached, close binaries. Recently, we identified a pair of such systems with K star companions. We suggest that we could not recognize them because they replicate CV behavior by fueling accretion onto the WD through the coupled magnetic fields of the WD and chromospherically active K star.

  20. Effects of spatial variation of skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers on optical mapping of brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuping; Shibahara, Nanae; Kuramashi, Daishi; Okawa, Shinpei; Kakuta, Naoto; Okada, Eiji; Maki, Atsushi; Yamada, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the effects of anatomical variation in human heads on the optical mapping of brain activity, we perform simulations of optical mapping by solving the photon diffusion equation for layered-models simulating human heads using the finite element method (FEM). Particularly, the effects of the spatial variations in the thicknesses of the skull and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layers on mapping images are investigated. Mapping images of single active regions in the gray matter layer are affected by the spatial variations in the skull and CSF layer thicknesses, although the effects are smaller than those of the positions of the active region relative to the data points. The increase in the skull thickness decreases the sensitivity of the images to active regions, while the increase in the CSF layer thickness increases the sensitivity in general. The images of multiple active regions are also influenced by their positions relative to the data points and by their depths from the skin surface.

  1. Inhibition of retinal detachment-induced apoptosis in photoreceptors by a small peptide inhibitor of the fas receptor.

    PubMed

    Besirli, Cagri G; Chinskey, Nicholas D; Zheng, Qiong-Duan; Zacks, David N

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. To test the effect of a small peptide inhibitor (Met12) of the Fas receptor on the activation of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways after retinal detachment. Methods. Retinal-RPE separation was created in Brown Norway rats by subretinal injection of 1% hyaluronic acid. Met12, derived from the Fas-binding extracellular domain of the oncoprotein Met, was injected into the subretinal space at the time of separation. A mutant peptide and vehicle administered in a similar fashion acted as inactive controls. The extrinsic apoptotic pathway was induced in 661W cells using a Fas-activating antibody in the presence or absence of Met12. Caspase 3, caspase 8, and caspase 9 activities were measured with calorimetric and luminescent assays in retinal extracts and cell lysates. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) was performed in retinal sections 3 days after separation. Histology was performed in retinal sections 2 months after retinal detachment. Results. Met12 inhibited Fas-induced caspase 8 activation in 661W cells. Similarly, administration of Met12 into the subretinal space inhibited the activation of caspase 3, caspase 8, and caspase 9 after retinal detachment. This corresponded to a decreased level of TUNEL-positive staining of photoreceptors after retinal-RPE separation in animals that received Met12, but not inactive mutant, peptide treatment. After 2 months, the outer nuclear layer was significantly thicker, and the photoreceptor count was higher in animals treated with subretinal Met12. Conclusions. The small peptide Met12 may serve as a photoreceptor-protective agent in the setting of retinal-RPE separation.

  2. Keratinocyte detachment-differentiation connection revisited, or anoikis-pityriasi nexus redux.

    PubMed

    Banno, Tomohiro; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Epidermis, a continuously self-renewing and differentiating organ, produces a protective stratum corneum that shields us from external chemical, physical and microbial threats. Epidermal differentiation is a multi-step process regulated by influences, some unknown, others insufficiently explored. Detachment of keratinocytes from the basement membrane is one such pro-differentiation stimulus. Here, we define the transcriptional changes during differentiation, especially those caused by detachment from the substratum. Using comprehensive transcriptional profiling, we revisited the effects of detachment as a differentiation signal to keratinocytes. We identified the genes regulated by detachment, the corresponding ontological categories and, using metaanalysis, compared the genes and categories to those regulated by other pro-differentiating stimuli. We identified 762 genes overexpressed in suspended keratinocyte, including known and novel differentiation markers, and 1427 in attached cells, including basal layer markers. Detachment induced epidermis development, cornification and desmosomal genes, but also innate immunity, proliferation inhibitors, transcription regulators and MAPKs; conversely the attached cells overexpressed cell cycle, anchoring, motility, splicing and mitochondrial genes, and both positive and negative regulators of apoptosis. Metaanalysis identified which detachment-regulated categories overlap with those induced by suprabasal location in vivo, by reaching confluency in vitro, and by inhibition of JUN kinases. Attached and in vivo basal cells shared overexpression of mitochondrial components. Interestingly, melanosome trafficking components were also overexpressed in the attached and in vivo basal keratinocytes. These results suggest that specific pro-differentiation signals induce specific features of the keratinization process, which are in vivo orchestrated into harmonious epidermal homeostasis.

  3. Carbonate pseudotachylite? from a Miocene extensional detachment, W. Cyclades, Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A. Hugh N.; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Most pseudotachylites, both impact- and fault-related, occur in silicate-rich rocks, typically with 'granitoid' compositions. Examples of melting in carbonate rocks, excluding magmatic sources, are restricted to impact-events, except for a carbonate pseudotachylite in the Canalone Fault, S. Italy (Viganò et al. 2011). Another potential example of carbonate pseudotachylite, shown here, comes from the Miocene-aged W. Cycladic Detachment System, in Greece. Top-SSE ductile to brittle movement on this detachment, with a maximum displacement estimated at tens of kilometers, exhumed of HP-rocks. The carbonate pseudotachylite occurs within an <200 mm thick zone of cataclasites developed between footwall carbonate ultramylonites, containing thin layers and cm-scale boudins of quartzite, and hanging wall breccias; no contacts with the footwall ultramylonites or hanging wall breccias has been found (yet). The cataclasite zone, which can be traced along-strike for at least 90 m, over ~20 m elevation, comprises several distinct layers. In the sample described, five layers occur. The lowest (A; >43 mm thick), consists of dark (hematitic) red, ultra-fine grained unlayered carbonate with up to 40x10 mm rather rounded clasts of earlier generations of cataclasite, many with a quartzite composition. These clasts are fractured and partially separated, with a fine red carbonate matrix. No layering of the matrix or clasts is apparent. The clasts become finer and more abundant towards the boundary with Layer B. Layers B and D (~57 & ~20 mm thick) dominantly comprises protocataclasite with greyish quartz fragments separated by a carbonate matrix along narrow fractures. Zone C and E (~23 m & >15 mm thick) comprise pale pink carbonate-dominated rocks with abundant <30x5 mm-sized red carbonate clasts (+/- quartz fragments) of earlier cataclasite generations. These elongate clasts lie parallel to the overall banding, which is parallel to the ultramylonitic foliation (detachment surface

  4. Observation of mutual neutralization in detached plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akira, Tonegawa; Isao, Shirota; Ken'ichi, Yoshida; Masataka, Ono; Kazutaka, Kawamura; Tuguhiro, Watanabe; Nobuyoshi, Ohyabu; Hajime, Suzuki; Kazuo, Takayama

    2001-10-01

    Mutual neutralization in collisions between negative ions and positive ions in molecular activated recombination (MAR) has been observed in a high density magnetized sheet plasma source TPDSHEET-IV(Test Plasma produced by Directed current for SHEET plasma) device. Measurements of the negative ion density of hydrogen atom, the electron density, electron temperature, and the heat load to the target plate were carried out in hydrogen high density plasma with hydrogen gas puff. A cylindrical probe made of tungsten ( 0.4 x 2 cm) was used to measure the spatial profiles of H- by a probe-assisted laser photodetachment The Balmer spectra of visible light emission from hydrogen or helium atoms were detected in front of the target plate. A small amount of secondary hydrogen gas puffing into a hydrogen plasma reduced strongly the heat flux to the target and increased rapidly the density of negative ions of hydrogen atom in the circumference of the plasma, while the conventional radiative and three-body recombination processes were disappeared. These results can be well explained by taking the charge exchange recombination of MAR in the detached plasma into account.

  5. Advancing Detached-Eddy Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    predicted using LES. While DES is now relatively well understood in massively separated flows characterized by thin boundary layers prior to separation...version has been tested on the flow over the Aerospatiale A-airfoil. To ensure that the new version does not degrade predictions in massively separated...flows characterised by massive separation using RANS approaches (49). A number of different RANS models have been considered in the past with no

  6. Detachment folds versus thrust-folds: numerical modelling and applications to the Swiss Jura Mountains and the Canadian Foothills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humair, Florian; Bauville, Arthur; Epard, Jean-Luc; Schmalholz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Jura Mountains and the Foothills of the Canadian Rockies fold-and-thrust belts are classical examples of thin-skinned belts where folds develop over weak detachment horizons. They offer the possibility to observe and measure strain in folds. In these two belts, a large spectrum of fold geometries is expressed, from symmetric box-fold or pop-up structures to asymmetric thrust-related folds. In this study, we focus on the quantification and prediction of the brittle strain distribution in folds as a function of the fold geometry. Fold geometry is considered as a continuum between two end-member structural styles: symmetric detachment folds and asymmetric foreland-vergent thrust-folds. We performed two-dimensional numerical simulations of visco-plastic detachment folding. The models are used (1) to systematically examine the influence of different initial parameters on the resulting geometry and style of folding and (2) to quantify the local strain pattern through time. The different parameters tested are the following: presence and size of initial geometrical perturbation at the detachment-sediment interface, rheology of the detachment (frictional vs. viscous), additional detachment layer within the series and overbunden thickness. Results of single detachment layer models show that the asymmetry of folds is primarily controlled by the height of the initial geometrical perturbation, regardless to the rheology of the detachment (frictional vs. viscous). Additional detachment interlayer within the series decreases the brittle strain within the stiff layers and favours more rounded anticlines geometry. The models were then adapted to the Swiss Jura and the Canadian Foothills settings. Compared to field observations and cross-sections of existing fault-related anticlines, the proposed simulations agree with the first order geometry and the development of associated localized zones of brittle deformation.

  7. A Meta-Analysis on Antecedents and Outcomes of Detachment from Work

    PubMed Central

    Wendsche, Johannes; Lohmann-Haislah, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Detachment from work has been proposed as an important non-work experience helping employees to recover from work demands. This meta-analysis (86 publications, k = 91 independent study samples, N = 38,124 employees) examined core antecedents and outcomes of detachment in employee samples. With regard to outcomes, results indicated average positive correlations between detachment and self-reported mental (i.e., less exhaustion, higher life satisfaction, more well-being, better sleep) and physical (i.e., lower physical discomfort) health, state well-being (i.e., less fatigue, higher positive affect, more intensive state of recovery), and task performance (small to medium sized effects). However, average relationships between detachment and physiological stress indicators and work motivation were not significant while associations with contextual performance and creativity were significant, but negative. Concerning work characteristics, as expected, job demands were negatively related and job resources were positively related to detachment (small sized effects). Further, analyses revealed that person characteristics such as negative affectivity/neuroticism (small sized effect) and heavy work investment (medium sized effect) were negatively related to detachment whereas detachment and demographic variables (i.e., age and gender) were not related. Moreover, we found a medium sized average negative relationship between engagement in work-related activities during non-work time and detachment. For most of the examined relationships heterogeneity of effect sizes was moderate to high. We identified study design, samples' gender distribution, and affective valence of work-related thoughts as moderators for some of these aforementioned relationships. The results of this meta-analysis point to detachment as a non-work (recovery) experience that is influenced by work-related and personal characteristics which in turn is relevant for a range of employee outcomes. PMID:28133454

  8. A Meta-Analysis on Antecedents and Outcomes of Detachment from Work.

    PubMed

    Wendsche, Johannes; Lohmann-Haislah, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Detachment from work has been proposed as an important non-work experience helping employees to recover from work demands. This meta-analysis (86 publications, k = 91 independent study samples, N = 38,124 employees) examined core antecedents and outcomes of detachment in employee samples. With regard to outcomes, results indicated average positive correlations between detachment and self-reported mental (i.e., less exhaustion, higher life satisfaction, more well-being, better sleep) and physical (i.e., lower physical discomfort) health, state well-being (i.e., less fatigue, higher positive affect, more intensive state of recovery), and task performance (small to medium sized effects). However, average relationships between detachment and physiological stress indicators and work motivation were not significant while associations with contextual performance and creativity were significant, but negative. Concerning work characteristics, as expected, job demands were negatively related and job resources were positively related to detachment (small sized effects). Further, analyses revealed that person characteristics such as negative affectivity/neuroticism (small sized effect) and heavy work investment (medium sized effect) were negatively related to detachment whereas detachment and demographic variables (i.e., age and gender) were not related. Moreover, we found a medium sized average negative relationship between engagement in work-related activities during non-work time and detachment. For most of the examined relationships heterogeneity of effect sizes was moderate to high. We identified study design, samples' gender distribution, and affective valence of work-related thoughts as moderators for some of these aforementioned relationships. The results of this meta-analysis point to detachment as a non-work (recovery) experience that is influenced by work-related and personal characteristics which in turn is relevant for a range of employee outcomes.

  9. Layer-by-layer structured polysaccharides-based multilayers on cellulose acetate membrane: Towards better hemocompatibility, antibacterial and antioxidant activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lincai; Li, Hui; Meng, Yahong

    2017-04-01

    The development of multifunctional cellulose acetate (CA) membranes with enhanced hemocompatibility and antibacterial and antioxidant activities is extremely important for biomedical applications. In this work, significant improvements in hemocompatibility and antibacterial and antioxidant activities of cellulose acetate (CA) membranes were achieved via layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition of chitosan (CS) and water-soluble heparin-mimicking polysaccharides (i.e., sulfated Cantharellus cibarius polysaccharides, SCP) onto their surface. The surface chemical compositions, growth manner, surface morphologies, and wetting ability of CS/SCP multilayer-modified CA membranes were characterized, respectively. The systematical evaluation of hemocompatibility revealed that CS/SCP multilayer-modified CA membranes significantly improved blood compatibility including resistance to non-specific protein adsorption, suppression of platelet adhesion and activation, prolongation of coagulation times, inhibition of complement activation, as well as reduction in blood hemolysis. Meanwhile, CS/SCP multilayer-modified CA membranes exhibited strong growth inhibition against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, as well as high scavenging abilities against superoxide and hydroxyl radicals. In summary, the CS/SCP multilayers could confer CA membranes with integrated hemocompatibility and antibacterial and antioxidant activities, which might have great potential application in the biomedical field.

  10. Application of Satellite SAR Imagery in Mapping the Active Layer of Arctic Permafrost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ting-Jun; Li, Shu-Sun

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project is to map the spatial variation of the active layer over the arctic permafrost in terms of two parameters: (i) timing and duration of thaw period and (ii) differential frost heave and thaw settlement of the active layer. To achieve this goal, remote sensing, numerical modeling, and related field measurements are required. Tasks for the University of Colorado team are to: (i) determine the timing of snow disappearance in spring through changes in surface albedo (ii) simulate the freezing and thawing processes of the active layer and (iii) simulate the impact of snow cover on permafrost presence.

  11. Orexin-dependent activation of layer VIb enhances cortical network activity and integration of non-specific thalamocortical inputs.

    PubMed

    Hay, Y Audrey; Andjelic, Sofija; Badr, Sammy; Lambolez, Bertrand

    2015-11-01

    Neocortical layer VI is critically involved in thalamocortical activity changes during the sleep/wake cycle. It receives dense projections from thalamic nuclei sensitive to the wake-promoting neuropeptides orexins, and its deepest part, layer VIb, is the only cortical lamina reactive to orexins. This convergence of wake-promoting inputs prompted us to investigate how layer VIb can modulate cortical arousal, using patch-clamp recordings and optogenetics in rat brain slices. We found that the majority of layer VIb neurons were excited by nicotinic agonists and orexin through the activation of nicotinic receptors containing α4-α5-β2 subunits and OX2 receptor, respectively. Specific effects of orexin on layer VIb neurons were potentiated by low nicotine concentrations and we used this paradigm to explore their intracortical projections. Co-application of nicotine and orexin increased the frequency of excitatory post-synaptic currents in the ipsilateral cortex, with maximal effect in infragranular layers and minimal effect in layer IV, as well as in the contralateral cortex. The ability of layer VIb to relay thalamocortical inputs was tested using photostimulation of channelrhodopsin-expressing fibers from the orexin-sensitive rhomboid nucleus in the parietal cortex. Photostimulation induced robust excitatory currents in layer VIa neurons that were not pre-synaptically modulated by orexin, but exhibited a delayed, orexin-dependent, component. Activation of layer VIb by orexin enhanced the reliability and spike-timing precision of layer VIa responses to rhomboid inputs. These results indicate that layer VIb acts as an orexin-gated excitatory feedforward loop that potentiates thalamocortical arousal.

  12. Farnesol induces cell detachment from established S. epidermidis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Cerca, Nuno; Gomes, Fernanda; Bento, Joana C; França, Angela; Rolo, Joana; Miragaia, Maria; Teixeira, Pilar; Oliveira, Rosário

    2013-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem in Staphylococcus epidermidis infections as many clinical isolates of this organism are resistant to up to eight different antibiotics. The increased resistance to conventional antibiotic therapy has lead to the search for new antimicrobial therapeutic agents. Farnesol, an essential oil found in many plants, has been shown to be active against S. epidermidis. Using a type control strain we recently described that although farnesol was not efficient at killing biofilm bacteria, a strong reduction on biofilm biomass was detected, and we hypothesize that farnesol could, somehow, induce biofilm detachment. In this report, to test our hypothesis we used 36 representative clinical strains of S. epidermidis from different geographic locations and characterized them in terms of genetic variability by multilocus sequence typing and staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec. Strains were tested for biofilm formation, and the presence of ica, bhp and aap genes was determined. Stronger biofilms had always the presence of ica operon but often co-harbored bhp and aap genes. Farnesol was then used in biofilm-forming strains, and biofilm detachment was detected in half of the strains tested. Furthermore, we also showed that farnesol inability to kill biofilm bacteria was not the result of the biofilm structure but was related to high cell density. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that the biomass reduction previously found by us, and many other groups, is the result not of cell killing but instead is the result of biofilm detachment.

  13. Quantitative Collection and Enzymatic Activity of Glucose Oxidase Nanotubes Fabricated by Templated Layer-by-Layer Assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shouwei; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie; Jonas, Alain M

    2015-08-10

    We report on the fabrication of enzyme nanotubes in nanoporous polycarbonate membranes via the layer-by-layer (LbL) alternate assembly of polyethylenimine (PEI) and glucose oxidase (GOX), followed by dissolution of the sacrificial template in CH2Cl2, collection, and final dispersion in water. An adjuvant-assisted filtration methodology is exploited to extract quantitatively the nanotubes without loss of activity and morphology. Different water-soluble CH2Cl2-insoluble adjuvants are tested for maximal enzyme activity and nanotube stability; whereas NaCl disrupts the tubes by screening electrostatic interactions, the high osmotic pressure created by fructose also contributes to loosening the nanotubular structures. These issues are solved when using neutral, high molar mass dextran. The enzymatic activity of intact free nanotubes in water is then quantitatively compared to membrane-embedded nanotubes, showing that the liberated nanotubes have a higher catalytic activity in proportion to their larger exposed surface. Our study thus discloses a robust and general methodology for the fabrication and quantitative collection of enzymatic nanotubes and shows that LbL assembly provides access to efficient enzyme carriers for use as catalytic swarming agents.

  14. [Binocular vision after treatment of retinal detachment].

    PubMed

    Maksymowicz, Małgorzata; Raczyńska, Krystyna; Maksymowicz, Jarosław

    2003-01-01

    The study covered 79 patients after treatment of retinal detachment. Double vision, strabismus and disturbances of eyeballs motility were found. Up to 12 months after intervention, the deterioration of binocular vision was observed in 48.28 to 89.66% of patients, depending on the method used. The majority of disturbances were observed during the first 3 months with tendency to gradual subsidence during consecutive 9 months. A patient, after treatment of retinal detachment, can be qualified to return to work where stereopsis is needed under condition that ophthalmologic examination is done every three months during the first year after operation and than once a year.

  15. The Role of Organic Capping Layers of Platinum Nanoparticles in Catalytic Activity of CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong Y.; Aliaga, Cesar; Renzas, J. Russell; Lee, Hyunjoo; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-12-17

    We report the catalytic activity of colloid platinum nanoparticles synthesized with different organic capping layers. On the molecular scale, the porous organic layers have open spaces that permit the reactant and product molecules to reach the metal surface. We carried out CO oxidation on several platinum nanoparticle systems capped with various organic molecules to investigate the role of the capping agent on catalytic activity. Platinum colloid nanoparticles with four types of capping layer have been used: TTAB (Tetradecyltrimethylammonium Bromide), HDA (hexadecylamine), HDT (hexadecylthiol), and PVP (poly(vinylpyrrolidone)). The reactivity of the Pt nanoparticles varied by 30%, with higher activity on TTAB coated nanoparticles and lower activity on HDT, while the activation energy remained between 27-28 kcal/mol. In separate experiments, the organic capping layers were partially removed using ultraviolet light-ozone generation techniques, which resulted in increased catalytic activity due to the removal of some of the organic layers. These results indicate that the nature of chemical bonding between organic capping layers and nanoparticle surfaces plays a role in determining the catalytic activity of platinum colloid nanoparticles for carbon monoxide oxidation.

  16. Pervaporation dehydration of ethanol by hyaluronic acid/sodium alginate two-active-layer composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chengyun; Zhang, Minhua; Ding, Jianwu; Pan, Fusheng; Jiang, Zhongyi; Li, Yifan; Zhao, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The composite membranes with two-active-layer (a capping layer and an inner layer) were prepared by sequential spin-coatings of hyaluronic acid (HA) and sodium alginate (NaAlg) on the polyacrylonitrile (PAN) support layer. The SEM showed a mutilayer structure and a distinct interface between the HA layer and the NaAlg layer. The coating sequence of two-active-layer had an obvious influence on the pervaporation dehydration performance of membranes. When the operation temperature was 80 °C and water concentration in feed was 10 wt.%, the permeate fluxes of HA/Alg/PAN membrane and Alg/HA/PAN membrane were similar, whereas the separation factor were 1130 and 527, respectively. It was found that the capping layer with higher hydrophilicity and water retention capacity, and the inner layer with higher permselectivity could increase the separation performance of the composite membranes. Meanwhile, effects of operation temperature and water concentration in feed on pervaporation performance as well as membrane properties were studied.

  17. Application of Satellite SAR Imagery in Mapping the Active Layer of Arctic Permafrost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Shu-Sun; Romanovsky, V.; Lovick, Joe; Wang, Z.; Peterson, Rorik

    2003-01-01

    A method of mapping the active layer of Arctic permafrost using a combination of conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter and more sophisticated interferometric SAR (INSAR) techniques is proposed. The proposed research is based on the sensitivity of radar backscatter to the freeze and thaw status of the surface soil, and the sensitivity of INSAR techniques to centimeter- to sub-centimeter-level surface differential deformation. The former capability of SAR is investigated for deriving the timing and duration of the thaw period for surface soil of the active layer over permafrost. The latter is investigated for the feasibility of quantitative measurement of frost heaving and thaw settlement of the active layer during the freezing and thawing processes. The resulting knowledge contributes to remote sensing mapping of the active layer dynamics and Arctic land surface hydrology.

  18. Detachment of esophageal carcinoma cells from extracellular matrix causes relocalization of death receptor 5 and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guang-Chao; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Shi-Gui; Gao, Rong; Long, Zhang-Fu; Tao, Ke; Ma, Yuan-Fang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of detachment of esophageal cancer cells from extracellular matrix on the localization of death receptor 5 (DR5) and apoptosis. METHODS: Anchorage-dependent EC9706 cells of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma were pretreated or not treated with brefeldin A. Detached cells were harvested by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid digestion. Expression and localization of DR5 in these cells were determined by immunocytochemical and immunofluorescence assays, as well as flow cytometry analysis. Apoptosis of EC9706 cells was detected by flow cytometry after stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled annexin V/propidium iodide. Activation of caspase 8 was detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Immunocytochemical assay indicated that DR5 was predominantly perinuclear in adherent cells but was mainly localized in cell membrane in detached cells. In addition, immunofluorescence assay also confirmed the above-mentioned results, and further demonstrated that DR5 was present in the form of coarse granules in detached cells, but in the form of fine granules in adherent cells. Cytometry analysis revealed higher levels of DR5 expression on the surfaces of brefeldin-A-untreated cells than on the surfaces of brefeldin-A-treated cells, but brefeldin A treatment did not affect the total DR5 expression levels. Moreover, nocodazole did not influence the extracelluar DR5 expression levels in EC9706 cells. Apoptosis assay revealed that detached cells were more sensitive to DR5 antibody-induced apoptosis than adherent cells. Western blotting showed that caspase 8 was activated in temporarily detached cells 4 h earlier than in adherent cells. CONCLUSION: Progress from adhesion to detachment of EC9706 cells causes DR5 relocalization, and promotes cytoplasmic translocation of DR5 to cell surfaces via a Golgi-dependent pathway. Moreover, it might also result in DR5 aggregation to render apoptosis of detached cells. PMID:19230044

  19. Depth heterogeneity of fully aromatic polyamide active layers in reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Coronell, Orlando; Mariñas, Benito J; Cahill, David G

    2011-05-15

    We studied the depth heterogeneity of fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layers in commercial reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes by quantifying near-surface (i.e., top 6 nm) and volume-averaged properties of the active layers using X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), respectively. Some membranes (e.g., ESPA3 RO) had active layers that were depth homogeneous with respect to the concentration and pK(a) distribution of carboxylic groups, degree of polymer cross-linking, concentration of barium ion probe that associated with ionized carboxylic groups, and steric effects experienced by barium ion. Other membranes (e.g., NF90 NF) had active layers that were depth heterogeneous with respect to the same properties. Our results therefore support the existence of both depth-homogeneous and depth-heterogeneous active layers. It remains to be assessed whether the depth heterogeneity consists of gradually changing properties throughout the active layer depth or of distinct sublayers with different properties.

  20. [Retinal detachment in various myopic refractions].

    PubMed

    Alimanović-Halilović, Emina

    2009-01-01

    The basic aim of this study was to find the group of "critical" myopic refraction with the highest occurrence of retinal detachment. In the study, 180 myopic eyes were analyzed. Upon the targeted ophthalmological anamnesis, definition of the objective refraction, and indirect binocular ophthalmoscopy, we analyzed the distribution of retinal detachment and the area affected in relation to refraction. All the eyes were divided into groups according to the refraction height. Average age of our patients ranged from 48.43 to 51.60 years with SD from 13.88 to 18.45. We did not find a statistically significant difference for a certain age. The study covered 102 (56.6%) male and 78 (43.3%) female patients. The highest occurrence of retinal detachment was found in Refraction Group from 3.5 to 7.49 dsph, total 21 (11.6%). The retinal detachments usually affected 2/4 or 3/4 of the eye fundus surface respectively.

  1. Electron-impact detachment from B-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, L. H.; Jensen, M. J.; Pedersen, H. B.; Vejby-Christensen, L.; Djurić, N.

    1998-10-01

    Cross sections for electron-impact single and double detachment from B- have been measured from 0 to 200 eV. The single-detachment cross section peaks at 4-5 eV with a cross-section maximum of about 10-14 cm2. A (2p3) 4S state has recently been predicted to give rise to a resonance state in the H2- dianion [T. Sommerfeld et al., Phys. Rev. A 55 1903 (1997)]. We observe no resonances in the detachment cross section of B- and hence no sign of an equivalent shortlived B2-(2p3) state. The ratio of the double- to single-detachment cross section reaches a constant value of 3% at energies above 50 eV. A simple model relates this number to a shake-off probability of about 90%. The ratio between double and single ionization of neutral atomic targets at high energy is also discussed, and the model relates this ratio to the shake-off probability in the sudden approximation.

  2. [Retinal detachment with retinoschisis--case report].

    PubMed

    Cristescu, R; Muşat, O; Toma, Oana; Coma, Corina; Gabej, Ioana; Burcea, M

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 43 year old patient diagnosed with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and retinoschizis, a rare case of disease association. Surgery is recommended and we practice 23 gauge vitrectomy, laser retinopexy, criopexy in the periphery and internal heavy oil tamponade. Postoperatory evolution was favorable.

  3. Low-frequency absorption using a two-layer system with active control of input impedance.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Pedro; Fernández, Alejandro; Doutres, Olivier

    2003-12-01

    Broadband noise absorption, including low frequencies, may be obtained by a hybrid passive-active two-layer system. A porous layer in front of an air layer provides passive absorption, at medium and high frequencies. Active control of the input impedance of the two-layer system yields absorption at low frequencies. The active control system can implement either pressure-release or impedance-matching conditions. A simple analytical model based upon plane waves propagating in a tube permits the comparison of both control strategies. The results of this simple model show that the pressure-release condition affords higher absorption than the impedance-matching condition for some combinations of geometrical and material parameters. Experimental results corroborate the good performance of the pressure-release condition under the prescribed geometrical setup.

  4. Activated Transport in the Separate Layers that Form the νT=1 Exciton Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, R. D.; Lok, J. G.; Kraus, S.; Dietsche, W.; von Klitzing, K.; Schuh, D.; Bichler, M.; Tranitz, H.-P.; Wegscheider, W.

    2004-12-01

    We observe the total filling factor νT=1 quantum Hall state in a bilayer two-dimensional electron system with virtually no tunneling. We find thermally activated transport in the balanced system with a monotonic increase of the activation energy with decreasing d/ℓB below 1.65. In the imbalanced system we find activated transport in each of the layers separately, yet the activation energies show a striking asymmetry around the balance point, implying a different excitation spectrum for the separate layers forming the condensed state.

  5. Crystallinity Modulation of Layered Carbon Nitride for Enhanced Photocatalytic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianhai; Shen, Yanfei; Li, Ying; Liu, Songqin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As an emerging metal‐free semiconductor, covalently bonded carbon nitride (CN) has attracted much attention in photocatalysis. However, drawbacks such as a high recombination rate of excited electrons and holes hinder its potential applications. Tailoring the crystallinity of semiconductors is an important way to suppress unwanted charge recombination, but has rarely been applied to CN so far. Herein, a simple method to synthesize CN of high crystallinity by protonation of specific intermediate species during conventional polymerization is reported. Interestingly, the as‐obtained CN exhibited improved photocatalytic activities of up to seven times those of the conventional bulk CN. This approach, with only a slight change to the conventional method, provides a facile way to effectively regulate the crystallinity of bulk CN to improve its photocatalytic activities and sheds light on large‐scale industrial applications of CN with high efficiency for sustainable energy. PMID:27436164

  6. Contribution of S-Layer Proteins to the Mosquitocidal Activity of Lysinibacillus sphaericus

    PubMed Central

    Allievi, Mariana Claudia; Palomino, María Mercedes; Prado Acosta, Mariano; Lanati, Leonardo; Ruzal, Sandra Mónica; Sánchez-Rivas, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus strains belonging the antigenic group H5a5b produce spores with larvicidal activity against larvae of Culex mosquitoes. C7, a new isolated strain, which presents similar biochemical characteristics and Bin toxins in their spores as the reference strain 2362, was, however, more active against larvae of Culex mosquitoes. The contribution of the surface layer protein (S-layer) to this behaviour was envisaged since this envelope protein has been implicated in the pathogenicity of several bacilli, and we had previously reported its association to spores. Microscopic observation by immunofluorescence detection with anti S-layer antibody in the spores confirms their attachment. S-layers and BinA and BinB toxins formed high molecular weight multimers in spores as shown by SDS-PAGE and western blot detection. Purified S-layer from both L. sphaericus C7 and 2362 strain cultures was by itself toxic against Culex sp larvae, however, that from C7 strain was also toxic against Aedes aegypti. Synergistic effect between purified S-layer and spore-crystal preparations was observed against Culex sp. and Aedes aegypti larvae. This effect was more evident with the C7 strain. In silico analyses of the S-layer sequence suggest the presence of chitin-binding and hemolytic domains. Both biochemical characteristics were detected for both S-layers strains that must justify their contribution to pathogenicity. PMID:25354162

  7. Exploring active layer thaw depth and water content dynamics with multi-channel GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollschlaeger, U.; Gerhards, H.; Westermann, S.; Pan, X.; Boike, J.; Schiwek, P.; Yu, Q.; Roth, K.

    2011-12-01

    In permafrost landscapes, the active layer is the highly dynamic uppermost section of the ground where many important hydrological, biological and geomorphological processes take place. Active layer hydrological processes are controlled by many different factors like thaw depth, soil textural properties, vegetation, and snow cover. These may lead to complex runoff patterns that are difficult to estimate from point measurements in boreholes. New multi-channel GPR systems provide the opportunity to non-invasively estimate reflector depth and average volumetric water content of distinct soil layers over distances ranging from some ten meters up to a few kilometers. Due to the abrupt change in dielectric permittivity between frozen and unfrozen ground, multi-channel GPR is a valuable technique for mapping the depth of the frost table along with the volumetric water content of the active layer without the need of laborious drillings or frost probe measurements. Knowing both values, the total amount of water stored in the active layer can be determined which may be used as an estimate of its latent heat content. Time series of measurements allow spatial monitoring of the progression of the thawing front. Multi-channel GPR thus offers new opportunities for monitoring active layer hydrological processes. This presentation will provide a brief introduction of the multi-channel GPR evaluation technique and will present different applications from several permafrost sites.

  8. Regulation of proline accumulation in detached rice leaves exposed to excess copper.

    PubMed

    Chen, C T.; Chen, L -M.; Lin, C C.; Kao, C H.

    2001-01-05

    Accumulation of proline in response to excess Cu was studied in detached leaves of rice (Oryza sativa). CuSO(4) was effective in inducing proline accumulation in detached rice leaves under both light and dark conditions. CuSO(4) and CuCl(2) were equally effective in inducing proline accumulation, indicating that proline accumulation is induced by Cu. Sulfate salts of Mg, Mn, and Fe were ineffective in inducing proline accumulation in detached rice leaves. Excess Cu had no effect on relative water content of detached rice leaves, suggesting that Cu-induced proline accumulation is unlikely due to water deficit. Proline accumulation induced by excess Cu was related to proteolysis and an increase in Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase or ornithine-delta-aminotransferase activity and could not be explained by proline utilization or stress-induced modifications in proline dehydrogenase or Delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase. The content of glutamic acid decreased by excess Cu. The increase in arginine but not ornithine was found to be associated with the increase in proline content in Cu-stressed detached rice leaves. CuSO(4) treatment resulted in an increase in abscisic acid content in detached rice leaves. The possibility that proline accumulation induced by excess Cu is mediated through abscisic acid is discussed.

  9. Residual Gas Effects on Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Ramakrishnan, Suresh; Kota, Arun

    2003-01-01

    Many microgravity directional solidification experiments yielded ingots with portions that grew without contacting the ampoule wall, leading to greatly improved crystallographic perfection. Our long-term goal is to make such detached solidification reproducible, which requires a full understanding of the mechanisms underlying it. Our Moving Meniscus Model of steady-state detachment predicts that it depends strongly on the surface tension of the melt and the advancing contact angle with the ampoule wall. Detached solidification is more likely when the contact angle for the melt on the ampoule wall is high, i.e. non-wetting. It has been claimed that impurities increase the contact angle. The objective of the current project is to determine the influence of residual gases on the surface tension and contact angle of molten semiconductors on typical ampoule materials. We are focusing on determining the influence of oxygen on the contact angle of molten InSb on clean silica ('quartz'), including the advancing and retreating contact angles in addition to the usual equilibrium contact angle. We have created a gas flow system that allows us to control the oxygen partial pressure over a sessile drop of InSb on a horizontal quartz surface. The cell is slowly tilted while videotaping to reveal the contact angles on the two sides of the drop just prior to it rolling down the surface. Thus far, we have learned the following: (1) Molten InSb readily forms an oxide layer in the presence of the trace amounts of oxygen found in high purity argon; (2) This oxide contains a substantial amount of Ga, which presumably is a trace contaminant that is not detectable in the starting material; (3) The addition of 10% hydrogen to the argon gas is sufficient to reduce the oxide and produce a clean drop; (4) An infrared filter must precede the video camera in order to produce a sharp image of the drop for later image analysis; (5) Tilting the surface on which the drop rests causes the two sides

  10. Risk factors of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment associated with choroidal detachment in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yong-Hao; Ke, Gen-Jie; Wang, Lin; Gu, Qi-Hong; Zhou, En-Liang; Pan, Hong-Biao; Wang, Shi-Ying

    2016-01-01

    AIM To comprehensively analyze the risk factors of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) associated with choroidal detachment (CD). METHODS A total of 265 eyes of 265 consecutive cases of RRD were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had systemic and ophthalmologic examination. CD was diagnosed by indirect ophthalmoscopy, B-scan ultrasonography, and ultrasound biomicroscope (UBM). Each parameter was compared between patients of RRD and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment associated with choroidal detachment (RRDCD). Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent risk factors of CD. RESULTS There were 52 eyes (19.62%) with CD. Pseudophakia was more commonly seen in RRDCD (21.15% vs 6.10%, P=0.002). Intraocular pressure (IOP) was lower (8.60±3.62 vs 12.96±3.55, P<0.001), best-corrected visual acuity was worse [3.00 (2.00 to 3.00) vs 1.92 (1.22 to 3.00), P=0.001], and refractive error was more myopic [-4 (-9 to -2) vs -2 (-6 to 0), P=0.007] in RRDCD. Eyes with RRDCD had larger extent of retinal detachment (P=0.007). In RRDCD, 34.62% of eyes presented with multiple holes (P=0.044) and 25.00% with macular holes (P=0.012), compared with 20.66% and 14.08% in RRD. High myopia (P=0.039), low IOP (P=0.017), and larger extent of retinal detachment (P<0.001) were significant and independent risk factors for developing CD. CONCLUSION For CD in RRD, related factors include BCVA, IOP, lens status, refractive error, extent of retinal detachment, number of holes, and macular hole. Larger extent of retinal detachment, high myopia, and low IOP are significant and independent risk factors. PMID:27500106

  11. Interannual active layer thermal and dynamics evolution at the crater Lake CALM site, Deception Island (Antarctica).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Miguel; Vieira, Gonzalo; Ángel De Pablo, Miguel; Molina, Antonio; Abramov, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    Deception Island, is an active strato-volcano on South Shetland Archipelago of Antarctica (62° 55' 0″ S, 60° 37' 0″ W), is a cold region with harsh remote and hostile environmental conditions. The permafrost and active layer existence, and the cold climate conditions together with volcanic material with height water content inside made this region of the Earth a perfect site to study the active layer and permafrost evolution involved in the Circumpolar Active Layer South (CALM-S) program. The active layer is measured in late January or firs february (during the end of the thaw period) at the "Crater Lake" CALM site (62°58'06.7''; 60°40'44.8'') on Deception Island, Antarctica, at the period 2006 to 2014 we obtained a mean annual value of 29,7±2 cm. In this paper, we describe the spatial active layer thickness distribution and report the reduction on the mean thickness between February 2006 and 2014. Below the active layer, permafrost could be also reported (with a mean thickness of 4.5± 0.5 m.) based on the temperature data acquired by sensors installed at different depth inside the soil; three different shallow boreholes was drilled (1.0 m., 1.6 m., 4.5 m. in depth) and we have been registered its temperature gradient at the 2010 to 2013 period. Here we use all those data 1) to describe the thermal behavior of the permafrost at the CALM site, and 2) to describe its evolution (aggradation/degradation) along fourteen years of continuous measurements. We develop this study, to known the thermal behavior of the permafrost and the active layer related with the air/soil interaction being one of the most important factors the snow layer that was measured by the installation of termo-snowmeters with the complement of an automatic digital camera during the 2008 to 2014 period. On the other hand, the pyroclastics soil materials has a very high values of water content then the latent heat in the freezing/thawing process controls the active layer evolution and the

  12. Boosting oxygen reduction/evolution reaction activities with layered perovskite catalysts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengjie; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Zhenbao; Shao, Zongping; Ciucci, Francesco

    2016-08-25

    Layered PrBaMn2O5+δ (H-PBM) was simply prepared by annealing pristine Pr0.5Ba0.5MnO3-δ in H2. The oxygen reduction/evolution reaction activities are remarkably enhanced by employing H-PBM. The improvement can be ascribed to the introduction of additional oxygen vacancies, an optimized eg filling of Mn ions, and the facile incorporation of oxygen into layered H-PBM.

  13. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Rosikhin, Ahmad Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2015-12-29

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO{sub 2} in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO{sub 2} layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  14. Layer-by-layer carbon nanotube bio-templates for in situ monitoring of the metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Ho, Genevieve; Lynch, Jerome P.; Love, Nancy G.

    2009-03-01

    Despite the wide variety of effective disinfection and wastewater treatment techniques for removing organic and inorganic wastes, pollutants such as nitrogen remain in wastewater effluents. If left untreated, these nitrogenous wastes can adversely impact the environment by promoting the overgrowth of aquatic plants, depleting dissolved oxygen, and causing eutrophication. Although nitrification/denitrification processes are employed during advanced wastewater treatment, effective and efficient operation of these facilities require information of the pH, dissolved oxygen content, among many other parameters, of the wastewater effluent. In this preliminary study, a biocompatible CNT-based nanocomposite is proposed and validated for monitoring the biological metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria in wastewater effluent environments (i.e., to monitor the nitrification process). Using carbon nanotubes and a pH-sensitive conductive polymer (i.e., poly(aniline) emeraldine base), a layer-by-layer fabrication technique is employed to fabricate a novel thin film pH sensor that changes its electrical properties in response to variations in ambient pH environments. Laboratory studies are conducted to evaluate the proposed nanocomposite's biocompatibility with wastewater effluent environments and its pH sensing performance.

  15. Carbon nanotubes supported cerium dioxide and platinum nanohybrids: Layer-by-layer synthesis and enhanced electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xinyuan; Chen, Jiayi; Wang, Mengdi; Gu, Jialei; Wu, Ping; Sun, Dongmei; Tang, Yawen

    2015-08-01

    We successfully synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported cerium dioxide and platinum (Pt/CeO2/CNTs) nanohybrids via layer-by-layer assembly. The composition, morphology and structure of the as-prepared Pt/CeO2/CNTs nanohybrids are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). By comparison of the electrocatalytic properties of the Pt/CeO2/CNTs with the Pt/CNTs, we systematically investigate the promotion effect of CeO2 on the Pt/CeO2/CNTs catalysts towards methanol oxidation. It is found that the introduction of CeO2 not only enhances the electrocatalytic activity and stability of the Pt/CeO2/CNTs catalyst for methanol oxidation but also minimizes the CO poisoning, probably accounting for the good oxygen carrying capacity of CeO2 and its high stability in acidic solution.

  16. Macular Hole Formation in Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment after Scleral Buckling

    PubMed Central

    Byon, Ik Soo; Kwon, Han Jo; Park, Gun Hyung; Park, Sung Who

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe early macular hole (MH) development in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) after scleral buckling (SB) based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings. Methods The medical records and spectral domain OCT images of patients in whom MH developed after RRD repair were evaluated retrospectively. Results A postoperative MH was detected in five eyes that underwent SB during a 6-year period. All had fovea-off RRD without MH at the time of surgery. OCT showed partial loss of the inner retina with a preserved photoreceptor layer in early postoperative days. On average, 7 days (range,5 to 8 days) after surgery, outer retinal tissues disappeared, resulting in the full-thickness MH. Conclusions Serial OCT findings revealed that partial-thickness lamellar holes progressed to full-thickness MHs, which were formed by the degeneration of the outer retina in eyes with preceding loss of the glial cone in the fovea. PMID:25276077

  17. Asbestos fibre length-dependent detachment injury to alveolar epithelial cells in vitro: role of a fibronectin-binding receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, K.; Miller, B. G.; Sara, E.; Slight, J.; Brown, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    A short and a long fibre sample of amosite asbestos were tested for their effects on cells of the human Type 2 alveolar epithelial cell-line A549 in vitro. The long amosite sample was found to cause a rapid detachment of the epithelial cells live from their substratum. At the highest dose, on average 28% of the cells present were detached in this way. Studies on the mechanism of the detachment injury showed that it did not involve oxidants since it was not ameliorated by scavengers of active oxygen species. Neither was the effect reduced by treatment of the fibres with the iron chelator Desferal. Treatments reported to increase the interaction between fibres and cells, serum and poly-L-lysine, did not influence the detachment injury, nor did lung lining fluid. Conversely, the fibronectin tripeptide RGD alone could cause detachment which suggested that a fibronectin-binding integrin was involved. This receptor could be reduced in activity by long fibre exposure, leading to detachment. The detaching effect of fibre could be mimicked by the protein kinase C activator PMA, and so the second messenger system of the cell could also be involved. This type of injury could be important in the pathology associated with exposure to long fibres. PMID:8392859

  18. Discrete-Layer Piezoelectric Plate and Shell Models for Active Tip-Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyliger, P. R.; Ramirez, G.; Pei, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop computational tools for the analysis of active-sensory composite structures with added or embedded piezoelectric layers. The targeted application for this class of smart composite laminates and the analytical development is the accomplishment of active tip-clearance control in turbomachinery components. Two distinct theories and analytical models were developed and explored under this contract: (1) a discrete-layer plate theory and corresponding computational models, and (2) a three dimensional general discrete-layer element generated in curvilinear coordinates for modeling laminated composite piezoelectric shells. Both models were developed from the complete electromechanical constitutive relations of piezoelectric materials, and incorporate both displacements and potentials as state variables. This report describes the development and results of these models. The discrete-layer theories imply that the displacement field and electrostatic potential through-the-thickness of the laminate are described over an individual layer rather than as a smeared function over the thickness of the entire plate or shell thickness. This is especially crucial for composites with embedded piezoelectric layers, as the actuating and sensing elements within these layers are poorly represented by effective or smeared properties. Linear Lagrange interpolation polynomials were used to describe the through-thickness laminate behavior. Both analytic and finite element approximations were used in the plane or surface of the structure. In this context, theoretical developments are presented for the discrete-layer plate theory, the discrete-layer shell theory, and the formulation of an exact solution for simply-supported piezoelectric plates. Finally, evaluations and results from a number of separate examples are presented for the static and dynamic analysis of the plate geometry. Comparisons between the different approaches are provided when

  19. Detached Growth of Germanium by Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Volz, M.; Cobb, S.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    Detached crystal growth technique (dewetting) offers improvement in the quality of the grown crystals by preventing sticking to the walls of the crucible and thus reducing the possibility of parasitic nucleation and formation of lattice defects upon cooling. One of the factors relevant for the phenomena is the pressure differential across the meniscus at the crystal-melt interface. We investigated this effect experimentally. The growth took place in closed ampoules under the pressure of an inert gas (forming gas: 96% Ar + 4% H2). The pressure above the melt was adjustable and allowed for a control of the pressure difference between the top and bottom menisci. The crystals were characterized, particularly by taking profilometer measurements along the grown crystals surface. The effects of the experimental conditions on the detachment were compared with those predicted based on the theory of Duffar et al.

  20. Controlled Detachment of Chemically Glued Cells.

    PubMed

    Koo, Heebeom; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-11-16

    We demonstrate a chemically detachable cell-glue system based on linkers containing disulfide bonds as well as functional groups for metabolic glycoengineering and bioorthogonal click chemistry. Azide groups are generated on the cell surface by metabolic glycoengineering, and they are further modified into tetrazine (Tz) or trans-cyclooctene (TCO) using rationally designed cross-linkers. When the Tz-modified and TCO-modified cells are mixed together, cell gluing between these two cell groups is established by Tz-TCO click chemistry. This artificial cell-cell adhesion can be broken by the administration of glutathione (5 mM), which triggers the degradation of disulfide bonds. Both the gluing and detachment processes are rapid (<10 min) and minimally cytotoxic.

  1. Responsive systems for cell sheet detachment.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nikul G; Zhang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Cell sheet engineering has been progressing rapidly during the past few years and has emerged as a novel approach for cell based therapy. Cell sheet harvest technology enables fabrication of viable, transplantable cell sheets for various tissue engineering applications. Currently, the majority of cell sheet studies use thermo-responsive systems for cell sheet detachment. However, other responsive systems began showing their potentials for cell sheet harvest. This review provides an overview of current techniques in creating cell sheets using different types of responsive systems including thermo-responsive, electro-responsive, photo-responsive, pH-responsive and magnetic systems. Their mechanism, approach, as well as applications for cell detachment have been introduced. Further development of these responsive systems will allow efficient cell sheet harvesting and patterning of cells to reconstruct complex tissue for broad clinical applications.

  2. Fluid flow along North American Cordillera detachments determined from stable isotope and high resolution chemical analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilichini, A.; Teyssier, C.; Mulch, A.; Nachlas, W.

    2009-12-01

    Fluid flow is likely a major parameter controlling the dynamics of extensional detachment zones. Buoyancy-driven fluid flow is generated by high heat flow beneath the detachment zone, where heat is advected by crustal thinning and magma intrusions. This hydrothermal convective flow is focused in the detachment zone for the duration of activity of the detachment at relatively high temperature (300-500°C), resulting in very significant fluid-rock interaction and isotopic exchange. Quantifying sources and fluid flux in detachments is a challenge because permeability of ductilely deforming rocks is poorly understood. In order to solve these problems, we studied two different Eocene extensional systems in the North American Cordillera: the quartzitic detachment which borders the Kettle dome metamorphic core complex (WA), and the quartzo-feldspathic Bitterroot shear zone along the Idaho batholith (MT). The Kettle Dome detachment provides a continuous section of ~200 m thick quartzite mylonite where high-resolution sampling (~5 m) indicates that Deuterium isotopic ratios that are obtained from synkinematic muscovite grains are consistent with a meteoric fluid source (-130 per mil). In the Bitterroot shear zone, Coyner (2003) reported similar Deuterium isotopic ratios (down to -140 per mil) in muscovite from mylonites and ultramylonites. Microprobe analyses were obtained for white mica porphyroclasts by performing transects perpendicular to the basal (001) cleavage in order to determine intragrain chemical zoning. Preliminary results for the Kettle dome indicate increasing phengite composition with depth, suggesting enhanced activity of the Tschermak exchange. The variations of the phengitic signature in muscovite indicates that temperature diminuish downsection, which is contradictory with the results obtained by the Qz-Ms oxygen isotope thermometer along the Kettle section. Our recent work provides geologic data for numerical models that address the permeability of

  3. Detachments in Shale: Controlling Characteristics on Fold-Thrust Belt Style

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansberry, Rowan; King, Ros; Collins, Alan; Morley, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Fold-thrust belts occur across multiple tectonic settings where thin-skinned deformation is accommodated by one or more detachment zones, both basal and within the fold-thrust belt. These fold-thrust belts exhibit considerable variation in structural style and vergence depending on the characteristics (e.g. strength, thickness, and lithology) and number of detachment zones. Shale as a detachment lithology is intrinsically weaker than more competent silts and sands; however, it can be further weakened by high pore pressures, reducing resistance to sliding and; high temperatures, altering the rheology of the detachment. Despite the implications for petroleum exploration and natural hazard assessment the precise nature by which detachments in shale control and are involved in deformation in fold-thrust belts is poorly understood. Present-day active basal detachment zones are usually located in inaccessible submarine regions. Therefore, this project employs field observations and sample analysis of ancient, exhumed analogues to document the nature of shale detachments (e.g. thickness, lithology, dip and dip direction, deformational temperature and thrust propagation rates) at field sites in Thailand, Norway and New Zealand. X-ray diffraction analysis of illite crystallinity and oxygen stable isotopes analysis are used as a proxy for deformational temperature whilst electron-backscatter diffraction analysis is used to constrain microstructural deformational patterns. K-Ar dating of synkinematic clay fault gouges is being applied to date the final stages of activity on individual faults with a view to constraining thrust activation sequences. It is not possible to directly measure palaeo-data for some key detachment parameters, such as pore pressure and coefficients of friction. However, the use of critical taper wedge theory has been used to successfully infer internal and basal coefficients of friction and depth-normalized pore pressure within a wedge and at its base

  4. Effect of layered composite meta-structures on the optical activity and ellipticity of structural biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, E. H.; Hor, Y. Li; Leong, Eunice S. P.; Liu, Y. J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we design layered composite meta-structures to investigate its' effect on the optical activity and circular dichroism (CD). The layered composite meta-structures consist of thin gammadion nanostructure with thickness λ/10, where λ is the incident wavelength. The layered meta-structures are alternate between a dielectric and gold (AU) material. Each layered composite meta-gammadion is arranged together in an array of pitch 700 nm. In the first case, 3 layers of meta-gammadion, with metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and insulator-metal-insulator (IMI) configuration are simulated with material properties from optical hand book. There are 3 modes in the CD spectrum, which can be characterized into Bloch CD mode and hybrid CD modes. Compared with the CD spectrum of whole structure of gammadion in gold with same total height, the CD of the MIM layered composite are larger. When the number layer increase to 5, it is observed that the CD is reduced by 30% and there is a red shift in the Bloch CD mode and a slight blue shift in the hybrid CD modes. By further increasing the number of layers to 7, we observed further CD increment and larger wavelength shift in the CD modes. The layered composite meta-gammadion is fabricated using template stripping method. Experimental results also show excellent agreement with the simulation results for CD and wavelength shift. We submerge the layered meta-gammadion into a solution of chiral molecules. The CD spectrum of the meta-gammadion shows a larger wavelength shift compared to pure metal structures. This indicate a more sensitive and robust detection of chiral molecules.

  5. Plasma Detachment Mechanisms in Propulsive Magnetic Nozzles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-07

    a marginal fraction of the beam flows back and the divergence angle of the 95%-mass tube measures the effectiveness of detachment, allowing...propellants1,15; and high throttlability, based on the capability of actuating, at constant power, on both the gas flow and the magnetic nozzle16. However...unlimited. Thus, central to our model will be to include the 2D depletion of the injected gas flow , which is governed by the competition between plasma

  6. Retinal detachment: is reparative surgery always mandatory?

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, W H

    1988-01-01

    The author reports 16 cases of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment in which, for a variety of reasons, immediate reparative surgery was not carried out. To date, one-half of these cases have not been operated, and four have been followed for 6 years or longer. No case suffered visual loss because of the delay in surgery, nor has chronic inflammation, glaucoma, or rubeosis been a problem. The clinical characteristics of this group of cases is defined. PMID:2979020

  7. Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels using Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid passive/active noise control system utilizing constrained layer damping and model predictive feedback control is presented. This system is used to control the sound radiation of panels due to broadband disturbances. To facilitate the hybrid system design, a methodology for placement of constrained layer damping which targets selected modes based on their relative radiated sound power is developed. The placement methodology is utilized to determine two constrained layer damping configurations for experimental evaluation of a hybrid system. The first configuration targets the (4,1) panel mode which is not controllable by the piezoelectric control actuator, and the (2,3) and (5,2) panel modes. The second configuration targets the (1,1) and (3,1) modes. The experimental results demonstrate the improved reduction of radiated sound power using the hybrid passive/active control system as compared to the active control system alone.

  8. Axial eye length after retinal detachment surgery.

    PubMed

    Vukojević, Nenad; Sikić, Jakov; Curković, Tihomir; Juratovac, Zlatko; Katusić, Damir; Sarić, Borna; Jukić, Tomislav

    2005-01-01

    Changes in the eye axial diameter were studied to assess the eye globe impact of conventional operation for retinal detachment. The study included 69 eyes in 69 patients operated on for rhegmatogenous retinal detachment. There were 46.4% of men and 53.6% of women, mean age 52.7 (+/- 15.21) years. Results of preoperative and postoperative ultrasonographic measurement of axial diameter are presented. The mean preoperative and postoperative eye axial diameter was 23.69 (+/- 1.84) mm and 24.43 (+/- 1.91) mm, respectively. Postoperative results showed the axial eye length to increase by a mean of 0.74 (+/- 0.44) mm, yielding a statistically significant difference from the preoperative measurement (p < 0.001). The mean myopia induced by this eyeball elongation was 1.77 D. The encircling band with and without segmental buckling used in surgical repair of retinal detachment creates circular and segmental indentation of the eyeball, thus increasing its axial length. The myopia induced by elongation of the eyeball results in considerable myopia, which requires appropriate correction in the early postoperative period to achieve favorable vision rehabilitation.

  9. Extinguishing ELMs in detached radiative divertor plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigarov, Alexander; Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Rognlien, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    In order to avoid deleterious effects of ELMs on PFCs in next-step fusion devices it has been suggested to operate with small-sized ELMs naturally extinguishing in the divertor. Our modeling effort is focusing at extinguishing type-I ELMs: conditions for expelled plasma dissipation; efficiency of ELM power handling by detached radiative divertors; and the ELM impact on detachment state. Here time-dependent modeling of a sequence of many ELMs was performed with 2-D edge plasma transport code UEDGE-MB-W which incorporates the Macro-Blob (MB) approach to simulate non-diffusive filamentary transport and various ``Wall'' (W) models for time-dependent hydrogen wall inventory and recycling. Three cases were modeled, in which extinguishing ELMs are achieved due to: (i) intrinsic impurities via graphite sputtering, (ii) extrinsic impurity gas puff (Ne), and (iii) =(i) +(ii). For each case, we performed a series of UEDGE-MB-W runs scanning the deuterium and impurity inventories, pedestal losses and ELM frequency. Temporal variations of the degree of detachment, ionization front shape, recombination sink strength, radiated fraction, peak power loads, OSP, impurity charge states, and in/out asymmetries were analyzed. We discuss the onset of extinguishing ELMs, conditions for not burning through and enhanced plasma recombination as functions of scanned parameters. Efficiencies of intrinsic and extrinsic impurities in ELM extinguishing are compared.

  10. Detached Growth of Germanium and Germaniumsilicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dold, P.; Schweizer, M.; Szofran, F.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Up to now, detached growth was observed mainly under microgravity, i.e. under the absence of hydrostatic pressure that hinders the formation of a free melt meniscus. the detached growth of germanium doped with gallium was obtained under 1 g conditions, the growth was performed in quartz-glass ampoule. Part of the crystal grew without wall contact, the detached growth was observed in-situ with a CCD-camera as well as after the growth process in form of growth lines and the formation of <111> facets on the crystal surface. GeSi crystal (oriientation: <111>, maximum silicon content: 4 at%, seed material: Ge) was grown in a pBN crucible (excluding the possibility of in-situ monitoring of the growth process). The grown crystal exhibits three growth facets, indicating also wall free growth. Surface analysis of the crystals (NDIC, SEM) and characterization of crystal segregation (EDAX, resistivity measurement) and defect structure (EPD, x-ray diffraction measurements) will be presented.

  11. Activation Layer Stabilization of High Polarization Photocathodes in Sub-Optimal RF Gun Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory A. Mulhollan

    2010-11-16

    Specific activation recipes for bulk, 100 nm thick MBE grown and high polarization III-V photocathode material have been developed which mitigate the effects of exposure to background gasses. Lifetime data using four representative gasses were acquired for bulk GaAs, 100 nm unstrained GaAs and strained superlattice GaAs/GaAsP, all activated both with Cs and then Cs and Li (bi-alkali). Each photoemitter showed marked resilience improvement when activated using the bi-alkali recipe compared to the standard single alkali recipe. A dual alkali activation system at SLAC was constructed, baked and commissioned with the purpose of performing spin-polarization measurements on electrons emitted from the bi-alkali activated surfaces. An end station at SSRL was configured with the required sources for energy resolved photoemission measurements on the bi-alkali activated and CO2 dosed surfaces. The bi-alkali recipes were successfully implemented at SLAC/SSRL. Measurements at SLAC of the photoelectron spin-polarization from the modified activation surface showed no sign of a change in value compared to the standard activated material, i.e., no ill effects. Analysis of photoemission data indicates that the addition of Li to the activation layer results in a multi-layer structure. The presence of Li in the activation layer also acts as an inhibitor to CO2 absorption, hence better lifetimes in worse vacuum were achieved. The bi-alkali activation has been tested on O2 activated GaAs for comparison with NF3 activated surfaces. Comparable resilience to CO2 exposure was achieved for the O2 activated surface. An RF PECVD amorphous silicon growth system was modified to allow high temperature heat cleaning of GaAs substrates prior to film deposition. Growth versus thickness data were collected. Very thin amorphous silicon germanium layers were optimized to exhibit good behavior as an electron emitter. Growth of the amorphous silicon germanium films on the above substrates was fine tuned

  12. Antimicrobial Activity Evaluation on Silver Doped Hydroxyapatite/Polydimethylsiloxane Composite Layer

    PubMed Central

    Ciobanu, C. S.; Groza, A.; Iconaru, S. L.; Popa, C. L.; Chapon, P.; Chifiriuc, M. C.; Hristu, R.; Stanciu, G. A.; Negrila, C. C.; Ghita, R. V.; Ganciu, M.; Predoi, D.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was the preparation, physicochemical characterization, and microbiological evaluation of novel hydroxyapatite doped with silver/polydimethylsiloxane (Ag:HAp-PDMS) composite layers. In the first stage, the deposition of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer layer on commercially pure Si disks has been produced in atmospheric pressure corona discharges. Finally, the new silver doped hydroxyapatite/polydimethylsiloxane composite layer has been obtained by the thermal evaporation technique. The Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layers were characterized by various techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The antimicrobial activity of the Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layer was assessed against Candida albicans ATCC 10231 (ATCC—American Type Culture Collection) by culture based and confirmed by SEM and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) methods. This is the first study reporting the antimicrobial effect of the Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layer, which proved to be active against Candida albicans biofilm embedded cells. PMID:26504849

  13. Antimicrobial Activity Evaluation on Silver Doped Hydroxyapatite/Polydimethylsiloxane Composite Layer.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, C S; Groza, A; Iconaru, S L; Popa, C L; Chapon, P; Chifiriuc, M C; Hristu, R; Stanciu, G A; Negrila, C C; Ghita, R V; Ganciu, M; Predoi, D

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was the preparation, physicochemical characterization, and microbiological evaluation of novel hydroxyapatite doped with silver/polydimethylsiloxane (Ag:HAp-PDMS) composite layers. In the first stage, the deposition of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer layer on commercially pure Si disks has been produced in atmospheric pressure corona discharges. Finally, the new silver doped hydroxyapatite/polydimethylsiloxane composite layer has been obtained by the thermal evaporation technique. The Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layers were characterized by various techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The antimicrobial activity of the Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layer was assessed against Candida albicans ATCC 10231 (ATCC-American Type Culture Collection) by culture based and confirmed by SEM and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) methods. This is the first study reporting the antimicrobial effect of the Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layer, which proved to be active against Candida albicans biofilm embedded cells.

  14. Thermal conductivity tensors of the cladding and active layers of interband cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanle; Cui, Boya; Vurgaftman, I.; Canedy, C. L.; Kim, C. S.; Kim, M.; Bewley, W. W.; Merritt, C. D.; Abell, J.; Meyer, J. R.; Grayson, M.

    2014-12-01

    The cross-plane and in-plane thermal conductivities of the W-active stages and InAs/AlSb superlattice optical cladding layer of an interband cascade laser (ICL) were characterized for temperatures ranging from 15 K to 324 K. The in-plane thermal conductivity of the active layer is somewhat larger than the cross-plane value at temperatures above about 30 K, while the thermal conductivity tensor becomes nearly isotropic at the lowest temperatures studied. These results will improve ICL performance simulations and guide the optimization of thermal management.

  15. New photocathode using ZnSe substrates with GaAs active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xiuguang; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Fuchi, Shingo

    2017-03-01

    GaAs active layers were successfully fabricated on ZnSe substrates using a metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy system. As a photocathode, a GaAs active layer shows a high quantum efficiency (QE) of 9% at 532 nm laser light illumination, which is comparable to a QE of 11% from GaAs bulk. In addition, a photoemission current of 10 µA was obtained from this photocathode. One more important point is that this photocathode could realize back-side illumination of 532 nm laser light, and thus its widespread applications are expected in microscopy and accelerator fields.

  16. Microbial Activity in Active and Upper Permafrost Layers in Axel Heiberg Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Allan, J.; Cheng, K.; Chourey, K.; Hettich, R. L.; Layton, A.; Liu, X.; Murphy, J.; Mykytczuk, N. C.; Phelps, T. J.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Saarunya, G.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Whyte, L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2011-12-01

    Data on microbial communities and their metabolic activity in Arctic wetlands and underlying permafrost sediments is lacking. Samples were collected from different depths of a cryosol (D1, D2) and upper permafrost (D3) at the Axel Heiberg Island in July 2009. Upper cryosol has lower H2O but higher C and N content when compared to deeper horizons including upper permafrost layer. Deep cryosol and upper permafrost contained SO42- (155 and 132 ppm) and NO3- (0.12 and 0.10 ppm), respectively. The phylogenetic analyses of the environmental 16S rRNA genes showed the putative SRB were more abundant in permafrost (8%) than in cryosols, D1 (0.2%) and D2 (1.1%). Putative denitrifying bacteria varied along depth with near 0.1% in D1 and a significant increase in D2 (2.7%) and D3 (2.2%). Methanogens were not detected; methanotrophs were present at low levels in D3 (1%). Two sets of microcosms were set up. Firstly, anaerobic microcosms, amended with 10 mM glucose, sulfate or nitrate, were cultivated at varying temperatures (15o, 6o, and 0o C) for 10 months. Metabolic activity was monitored by measuring CO2 and CH4 every 3 months. A total of 89.5% of the D3-originated microcosms showed higher activity in comparison to cryosols in first 3 months. CH4 was not detected in these microcosms, whereas CO2 production was higher at 15o C or with glucose. Metaproteomics analyses of microcosms with higher levels of CO2 production indicated the presence of stress responsive proteins (e.g. DnaK, GroEL) and proteins essential for energy production and survival under carbon starvation (e.g. F0F1 ATP synthase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase). These proteins have been previously shown to be up-regulated at low temperatures by permafrost bacteria. Metaproteomics data based on the draft sequences indicated the presence of proteins from the genera Bradyrhizobium, Sphingomonas, Lysinibacillus and Methylophilaceae and these bacteria were also detected by pyrosequencing. Secondly, a duplicate set of anaerobic

  17. Photocatalytic activity of layered perovskite-like oxides in practically valuable chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, I. A.; Zvereva, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    The photocatalytic properties of layered perovskite-like oxides corresponding to the Ruddlesen-Popper, Dion-Jacobson and Aurivillius phases are considered. Of the photocatalytic reactions, the focus is on the reactions of water splitting, hydrogen evolution from aqueous solutions of organic substances and degradation of model organic pollutants. Possibilities to conduct these reactions under UV and visible light in the presence of layered perovskite-like oxides and composite photocatalysts based on them are shown. The specific surface area, band gap energy, particle morphology, cation and anion doping and surface modification are considered as factors that affect the photocatalytic activity. Special attention is paid to the possibilities to enhance the photocatalytic activity by intercalation, ion exchange and exfoliation, which are inherent in this class of compounds. Conclusions are made about the prospects for the use of layered perovskite-like oxides in photocatalysis. The bibliography includes 253 references.

  18. Activation energy of thermal desorption of silicon oxide layers on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enta, Yoshiharu; Osanai, Shodai; Ogasawara, Takahito

    2017-02-01

    Thermal desorption rates of silicon oxide layers, from 20 to 120 nm in thickness, on silicon substrates in vacuum have been accurately obtained from intervals between ring structures formed inside voids on the oxide layers. From the temperature dependence of the desorption rate, the activation energy and frequency factor of the desorption reaction have been derived as a function of the oxide thickness. The obtained values are compared with the previous studies, and as a result, the activation energy is found to be almost constant ( 4 eV) in a wide range of the oxide thickness. The frequency factor decreases as the inverse square of the oxide thickness. The decomposition kinetics of the oxide layer is also discussed from the obtained results.

  19. Activity induces traveling waves, vortices and spatiotemporal chaos in a model actomyosin layer

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the actomyosin cortex in biological cells, we investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a model describing a contractile active polar fluid sandwiched between two external media. The external media impose frictional forces at the interface with the active fluid. The fluid is driven by a spatially-homogeneous activity measuring the strength of the active stress that is generated by processes consuming a chemical fuel. We observe that as the activity is increased over two orders of magnitude the active polar fluid first shows spontaneous flow transition followed by transition to oscillatory dynamics with traveling waves and traveling vortices in the flow field. In the flow-tumbling regime, the active polar fluid also shows transition to spatiotemporal chaos at sufficiently large activities. These results demonstrate that level of activity alone can be used to tune the operating point of actomyosin layers with qualitatively different spatiotemporal dynamics. PMID:26877263

  20. Epigenetic Salt Accumulation and Water Movement in the Active Layer of Central Yakutia in Eastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Caceres, M.; Brouchkov, A.; Nakayama, H.; Takakai, F.; Fedorov, A.; Fukuda, M.

    2005-12-01

    Observations of soil moisture and salt content were conducted from May to August at Neleger station in Eastern Siberia. Seasonal changes of salt and soil moisture distribution in the active layer of larch forest (undisturbed) and a thermokarst depression known as alas (disturbed) were studied. Electric conductivity (ECe) of the intact forest revealed higher concentrations that increased with depth from the soil surface into the active layer and the underlying permafrost, 1 mS cm-1 at 1.1m to 2.6 mS cm-1 at 160 cm depth in the permafrost. However, maximum value of 5.4 mS cm-1 at 0.6 m depth was found in the dry area of alas. The concentration of ions, especially Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, SO42-as well as HCO3- in the upper layers of this long-term disturbed site indicates the upward movement of ions together with water. Higher concentration of solutes was found in profiles with deeper seasonal thawing. The accumulation of salts in alas occurs from spring through the growing season. The low concentration of salt in the surface soil layers appears to be linked to leaching of salts by rainfall. There are substantial differences between water content and electric conductivity of soil in forest and alas. Modern salinization of the active layer in alas is epigenetic, and it happens in summer as a result of spring water collection and high summer evaporation; the gradual salt accumulation in alas in comparison to forest is controlled by annual balance of water and salts in the active layer. Present climatic trends point to continuous permafrost degradation in eastern Siberia increasing the risk of surface salinization which has already contributed to change the landscape by hindering the growth of forests.

  1. Epigenetic salt accumulation and water movement in the active layer of central Yakutia in eastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, C. M. Larry; Brouchkov, A.; Nakayama, H.; Takakai, F.; Fedorov, A. N.; Fukuda, M.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of soil moisture and salt content were conducted from May to August at Neleger station in eastern Siberia. Seasonal changes of salt and soil moisture distribution in the active layer of larch forest (undisturbed) and a thermokarst depression known as an alas (disturbed) were studied. Electric conductivity ECe of the intact forest revealed higher concentrations that increased with depth from the soil surface into the active layer and the underlying permafrost: 1 mS cm-1 at 1.1 m, to 2.6 mS cm-1 at 160 cm depth in the permafrost. However, a maximum value of 5.4 mS cm-1 at 0.6 m depth was found in the dry area of the alas. The concentration of ions, especially Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, SO42- and HCO3- in the upper layers of this long-term disturbed site, indicates the upward movement of ions together with water. A higher concentration of solutes was found in profiles with deeper seasonal thawing. The accumulation of salts in the alas occurs from spring through into the growing season. The low concentration of salt in the surface soil layers appears to be linked to leaching of salts by rainfall. There are substantial differences between water content and electric conductivity of soil in the forest and alas. Modern salinization of the active layer in the alas is epigenetic, and it happens in summer as a result of spring water collection and high summer evaporation; the gradual salt accumulation in the alas in comparison with the forest is controlled by the annual balance of water and salts in the active layer. Present climatic trends point to continuous permafrost degradation in eastern Siberia increasing the risk of surface salinization, which has already contributed to changing the landscape by hindering the growth of forest. Copyright

  2. Toward Efficient Thick Active PTB7 Photovoltaic Layers Using Diphenyl Ether as a Solvent Additive.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yifan; Goh, Tenghooi; Fan, Pu; Shi, Wei; Yu, Junsheng; Taylor, André D

    2016-06-22

    The development of thick organic photovoltaics (OPV) could increase absorption in the active layer and ease manufacturing constraints in large-scale solar panel production. However, the efficiencies of most low-bandgap OPVs decrease substantially when the active layers exceed ∼100 nm in thickness (because of low crystallinity and a short exciton diffusion length). Herein, we report the use of solvent additive diphenyl ether (DPE) that facilitates the fabrication of thick (180 nm) active layers and triples the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of conventional thienothiophene-co-benzodithiophene polymer (PTB7)-based OPVs from 1.75 to 6.19%. These results demonstrate a PCE 20% higher than those of conventional (PTB7)-based OPV devices using 1,8-diiodooctane. Morphology studies reveal that DPE promotes the formation of nanofibrillar networks and ordered packing of PTB7 in the active layer that facilitate charge transport over longer distances. We further demonstrate that DPE improves the fill factor and photocurrent collection by enhancing the overall optical absorption, reducing the series resistance, and suppressing bimolecular recombination.

  3. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  4. Groundwater hydrochemistry in the active layer of the proglacial zone, Finsterwalderbreen, Svalbard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, R.J.; Wadham, J.L.; Tranter, M.; Hodgkins, R.; Peters, N.E.

    2002-01-01

    Glacial bulk meltwaters and active-layer groundwaters were sampled from the proglacial zone of Finsterwalderbreen during a single melt season in 1999, in order to determine the geochemical processes that maintain high chemical weathering rates in the proglacial zone of this glacier. Results demonstrate that the principle means of solute acquisition is the weathering of highly reactive moraine and fluvial active-layer sediments by supra-permafrost groundwaters. Active-layer groundwater derives from the thaw of the proglacial snowpack, buried ice and glacial bulk meltwaters. Groundwater evolves by sulphide oxidation and carbonate dissolution. Evaporation- and freeze-concentration of groundwater in summer and winter, respectively produce Mg-Ca-sulphate salts on the proglacial surface. Re-dissolution of these salts in early summer produces groundwaters that are supersaturated with respect to calcite. There is a pronounced spatial pattern to the geochemical evolution of groundwater. Close to the main proglacial channel, active layer sediments are flushed diurnally by bulk meltwaters. Here, Mg-Ca-sulphate deposits become exhausted in the early season and geochemical evolution proceeds by a combination of sulphide oxidation and carbonate dissolution. At greater distances from the channel, the dissolution of Mg-Ca-sulphate salts is a major influence and dilution by the bulk meltwaters is relatively minor. The influence of sulphate salt dissolution decreases during the sampling season, as these salts are exhausted and waters become increasingly routed by subsurface flowpaths. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  6. New First Order Raman-active Modes in Few Layered Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Terrones, H.; Corro, E. Del; Feng, S.; Poumirol, J. M.; Rhodes, D.; Smirnov, D.; Pradhan, N. R.; Lin, Z.; Nguyen, M. A. T.; Elías, A. L.; Mallouk, T. E.; Balicas, L.; Pimenta, M. A.; Terrones, M.

    2014-01-01

    Although the main Raman features of semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides are well known for the monolayer and bulk, there are important differences exhibited by few layered systems which have not been fully addressed. WSe2 samples were synthesized and ab-initio calculations carried out. We calculated phonon dispersions and Raman-active modes in layered systems: WSe2, MoSe2, WS2 and MoS2 ranging from monolayers to five-layers and the bulk. First, we confirmed that as the number of layers increase, the E′, E″ and E2g modes shift to lower frequencies, and the A′1 and A1g modes shift to higher frequencies. Second, new high frequency first order A′1 and A1g modes appear, explaining recently reported experimental data for WSe2, MoSe2 and MoS2. Third, splitting of modes around A′1 and A1g is found which explains those observed in MoSe2. Finally, exterior and interior layers possess different vibrational frequencies. Therefore, it is now possible to precisely identify few-layered STMD. PMID:24572993

  7. A Novel Surface Structure Consisting of Contact-active Antibacterial Upper-layer and Antifouling Sub-layer Derived from Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Salt Polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiehua; Gao, Yunlong; Luo, Feng; Tan, Hong; Wang, Kunjie; Fu, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Contact-active antibacterial surfaces play a vital role in preventing bacterial contamination of artificial surfaces. In the past, numerous researches have been focused on antibacterial surfaces comprising of antifouling upper-layer and antibacterial sub-layer. In this work, we demonstrate a reversed surface structure which integrate antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer. These surfaces are prepared by simply casting gemini quaternary ammonium salt waterborne polyurethanes (GWPU) and their blends. Due to the high interfacial energy of gemini quaternary ammonium salt (GQAS), chain segments containing GQAS can accumulate at polymer/air interface to form an antibacterial upper-layer spontaneously during the film formation. Meanwhile, the soft segments composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) formed the antifouling sub-layer. Our findings indicate that the combination of antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer endow these surfaces strong, long-lasting antifouling and contact-active antibacterial properties, with a more than 99.99% killing efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria attached to them.

  8. A Novel Surface Structure Consisting of Contact-active Antibacterial Upper-layer and Antifouling Sub-layer Derived from Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Salt Polyurethanes

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiehua; Gao, Yunlong; Luo, Feng; Tan, Hong; Wang, Kunjie; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Contact-active antibacterial surfaces play a vital role in preventing bacterial contamination of artificial surfaces. In the past, numerous researches have been focused on antibacterial surfaces comprising of antifouling upper-layer and antibacterial sub-layer. In this work, we demonstrate a reversed surface structure which integrate antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer. These surfaces are prepared by simply casting gemini quaternary ammonium salt waterborne polyurethanes (GWPU) and their blends. Due to the high interfacial energy of gemini quaternary ammonium salt (GQAS), chain segments containing GQAS can accumulate at polymer/air interface to form an antibacterial upper-layer spontaneously during the film formation. Meanwhile, the soft segments composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) formed the antifouling sub-layer. Our findings indicate that the combination of antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer endow these surfaces strong, long-lasting antifouling and contact-active antibacterial properties, with a more than 99.99% killing efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria attached to them. PMID:27561546

  9. The North American Arctic Transect: Baseline Vegetation and Active Layer Maps for the IPY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munger, C.; Walker, D.; Raynolds, M.; Kade, A.; Vonlanthen, C.; Kuss, P.; Daanen, R.

    2006-12-01

    Maps of vegetation and active layer were made at 21 10x10-m grids at 11 localities along an 1800-km bioclimate North American Arctic Transect (NAAT). Locations were chosen in each of the five Arctic bioclimate subzones (Subzones A (cold) to E (warm)) and the northern boreal forest. The primary purpose of the maps was to analyze the relationship of the patchy mosaics of plant communities to patterns of plant biomass, microhabitats, active-layer depth, and snow-accumulation along an arctic bioclimate gradient. Vegetation maps show small patterned-ground features (non-sorted circles, earth hummocks, turf hummocks, and small non-sorted circles). The scale of vegetation patterning decreases with latitude; in subzone A, landscape heterogeneity is best visible at small (decimeter) scales, with major differences in plant communities and biomass associated with the cracks vs. the centers of small non-sorted polygons. Toward the southern end of the gradient (Subzone E), the vegetation within the grids is homogenous tussock tundra with minor variations in plant communities mainly associated with earth hummocks and small non-sorted circles that occur between cottongrass tussocks. Patterns of plant communities in the grids are clearly reflected in maps of active-layer thickness and snow depth. In subzones C and D, well-developed non-sorted circles develop wherever there are peaty soils, creating significant micro-scale gradients in soil temperature and soil moisture, which contribute to large differences in active-layer thickness and to frost heave. Thaw depths, therefore, have the most micro-scale variability in the middle part of the climate gradient where there is maximum contrast in plant cover and biomass between circles and inter-circle areas. This contrast is greatest towards the beginning of summer and decreases as the season progresses. The local topography associated with differential winter heave in the patterned ground features was also reflected in the snow

  10. Sensitive monitoring of photocarrier densities in the active layer of a photovoltaic device with time-resolved terahertz reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Genki; Matsubara, Eiichi; Nagai, Masaya; Kim, Changsu; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Ashida, Masaaki

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate the sensitive measurement of photocarriers in an active layer of a GaAs-based photovoltaic device using time-resolved terahertz reflection spectroscopy. We found that the reflection dip caused by Fabry-Pérot interference is strongly affected by the carrier profile in the active layer of the p-i-n structure. The experimental results show that this method is suitable for quantitative evaluation of carrier dynamics in active layers of solar cells under operating conditions.

  11. Hexuronic acid stereochemistry determination in chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan oligosaccharides by electron detachment dissociation.

    PubMed

    Leach, Franklin E; Ly, Mellisa; Laremore, Tatiana N; Wolff, Jeremy J; Perlow, Jacob; Linhardt, Robert J; Amster, I Jonathan

    2012-09-01

    Electron detachment dissociation (EDD) has previously provided stereo-specific product ions that allow for the assignment of the acidic C-5stereochemistry in heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), but application of the same methodology to an epimer pair in the chondroitin sulfate glycoform class does not provide the same result. A series of experiments have been conducted in which glycosaminoglycan precursor ions are independently activated by electron detachment dissociation (EDD), electron induced dissociation (EID), and negative electron transfer dissociation (NETD) to assign the stereochemistry in chondroitin sulfate (CS) epimers and investigate the mechanisms for product ion formation during EDD in CS glycoforms. This approach allows for the assignment of electronic excitation products formed by EID and detachment products to radical pathways in NETD, both of which occur simultaneously during EDD. The uronic acid stereochemistry in electron detachment spectra produces intensity differences when assigned glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages are compared. The variations in the intensities of the doubly deprotonated (0,2)X(3) and Y(3) ions have been shown to be indicative of CS-A/DS composition during the CID of binary mixtures. These ions can provide insight into the uronic acid composition of binary mixtures in EDD, but the relative abundances, although reproducible, are low compared with those in a CID spectrum acquired on an ion trap. The application of principal component analysis (PCA) presents a multivariate approach to determining the uronic acid stereochemistry spectra of these GAGs by taking advantage of the reproducible peak distributions produced by electron detachment.

  12. Oncogenic Ras differentially regulates metabolism and anoikis in extracellular matrix-detached cells.

    PubMed

    Mason, J A; Davison-Versagli, C A; Leliaert, A K; Pape, D J; McCallister, C; Zuo, J; Durbin, S M; Buchheit, C L; Zhang, S; Schafer, Z T

    2016-08-01

    In order for cancer cells to survive during metastasis, they must overcome anoikis, a caspase-dependent cell death process triggered by extracellular matrix (ECM) detachment, and rectify detachment-induced metabolic defects that compromise cell survival. However, the precise signals used by cancer cells to facilitate their survival during metastasis remain poorly understood. We have discovered that oncogenic Ras facilitates the survival of ECM-detached cancer cells by using distinct effector pathways to regulate metabolism and block anoikis. Surprisingly, we find that while Ras-mediated phosphatidylinositol (3)-kinase signaling is critical for rectifying ECM-detachment-induced metabolic deficiencies, the critical downstream effector is serum and glucocorticoid-regulated kinase-1 (SGK-1) rather than Akt. Our data also indicate that oncogenic Ras blocks anoikis by diminishing expression of the phosphatase PHLPP1 (PH Domain and Leucine-Rich Repeat Protein Phosphatase 1), which promotes anoikis through the activation of p38 MAPK. Thus, our study represents a novel paradigm whereby oncogene-initiated signal transduction can promote the survival of ECM-detached cells through divergent downstream effectors.

  13. Large-scale geometry and timing of the detachment systems in the Cyclades (Greece). Insight from Makronisos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, Benjamin; Loisl, Johannes; Lindner, Karoline; Grasemann, Bernhard; Rice, A. Hugh N.; Soukis, Konstantinos; Schneider, David

    2013-04-01

    Characterizing the large-scale geometry of detachment zones and the timing of their movement is crucial to our overall understanding of the dynamics of metamorphic core complexes (MCCs). The Cyclades presents a world-class example of middle and lower crust that was exhumed below low angle detachments in such MCCs. They formed during Oligo-Miocene times in the stretched back-arc of the Hellenic subduction zone. Recently, regional correlations have emphasized the role of two large-scale detachment systems: the North Cycladic Detachment System (NCDS), running from Evia to Mykonos (at least) and the Western Cyclades Detachment System (WCDS) running from Serifos to Kea. Both detachment systems exhumed the Cycladic Blueschist unit and the basement unit below the Pelagonian. However, they are antithetic, with the NCDS having a top-NNE and the WCDS a top-SSW movement, and their timings are, in detail, different. Lithological and structural observations, together with radiochronologic and metamorphic constraints from the island of Makronisos allow us to bridge the gap between the Western Cyclades and Attica and prolongate the WCDS towards the NW, giving it an overall length of 90 km. Depending on the tectonostratigraphic position of Makronisos, which remains unclear, we propose two alternative scenarios for the large-scale geometry and dynamics of the WCDS. We also integrate our data within a model at the scale of the whole Cycladic realm and propose a mechanical explanation for the activity, location and timing of the major detachment systems.

  14. Temporal Variation in Splash Detachment at the Forest Floor of Japanese Cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) plantations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakiyama, Y.; Onda, Y.; Nanko, K.; Mizugaki, S.; Kitahara, H.; Ono, H.

    2008-12-01

    suggested that splash detachment was enhanced by simultaneous surface water layer due to the decline of infiltration rate triggered by raindrop with high energy. Consequently, a piezoelectric sensor will be a promising method for the evaluation of soil erosion processes in the fields under natural rainfall conditions.

  15. ``Detached'' deep earthquakes: are they really?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okal, Emile A.

    2001-12-01

    We use primarily the generation of acoustic T waves into the ocean by deep seismic sources to investigate the propagation of high-frequency seismic energy from the bottom of subduction zones to the shoreline at the earth's surface. Conversion from shear waves to oceanic acoustic waves can be used as a proxy for the existence of a continuous slab featuring low anelastic attenuation. With the help of other techniques, such as the estimation of Q from S-to- P spectral amplitude ratios, we examine systematically a number of regions where earthquakes have been described as "detached". We establish the mechanical continuity of the slab to the hypocenters of the 1990 Sakhalin and 1982 Bonin events, which occurred several hundred kilometers in front of the mainstream seismic zone. The study of the 1989 Paraguay shock is inconclusive, probably due to its much smaller size. The vertical continuity of the South American slab through its aseismic depth range is verified, and a similar situation probably exists in Java. Attenuation data suggests that the deep Spanish earthquakes occur within a vertically large segment of colder material, and a similar situation may exist in Colombia. The only clearly detached deep events with no mechanical connection to the surface make up the Vityaz cluster, under the North Fiji Basin. Based on a variety of geophysical evidence, the small deep earthquakes under New Zealand are likely to take place in a detached blob at least 350 km below the termination of mainstream seismicity. These results support a model integrating buoyancy forces over a long continuous slab as the source of the down-dip compressional stresses observed in large earthquakes at the bottom of the transition zone.

  16. The low-mode approximation for modeling of stellar activity in single-layer and two-layer media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukhina, Nadezhda; Popova, Helen; Potemina, Ksenia

    The cycles of solar magnetic activity are connected with a solar dynamo that operates in the convective zone. Solar dynamo mechanism is based on the combined action of the differential rotation and the alpha-effect. Application of these concepts allows us to get an oscillating solution as a wave of the toroidal field propagating from middle latitudes to the equator. We investigated the dynamo model with the meridional circulation by the low-mode approach. This approach is based on an assumption that the solar magnetic field can be described by non-linear dynamical systems with a relatively small number of parameters. Such non-linear dynamical systems are based on the equations of dynamo models. With this method dynamical systems have been built for single and double layer media and contain the meridional flow and thickness of the convection zone of the star. It was shown the possibility of coexistence of quiasi-biennial and 22-year cycle and existence of the triple cycle (quasi-biennial, 22- and hundred-year cycles). We obtained the different regimes (oscillations, vacillations, dynamo-bursts) depending on the value of the dynamo-number, the meridional circulation, and thickness of the convection zone. We discuss the features of these regimes and compare them with the observed features of evolution of the solar and geo magnetic fields. We built batterfly-diagrams for the helicity, the toroidal and poloidal magnetic field for different regimes.

  17. Radiative transfer theory for active remote sensing of a layer of small ellipsoidal scatterers. [of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, L.; Kubacsi, M. C.; Kong, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied within the Rayleigh approximation to calculate the backscattering cross section of a layer of randomly positioned and oriented small ellipsoids. The orientation of the ellipsoids is characterized by a probability density function of the Eulerian angles of rotation. The radiative transfer equations are solved by an iterative approach to first order in albedo. In the half space limit the results are identical to those obtained via the approach of Foldy's and distorted Born approximation. Numerical results of the theory are illustrated using parameters encountered in active remote sensing of vegetation layers. A distinctive characteristic is the strong depolarization shown by vertically aligned leaves.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Layered Double Hydroxides Containing Optically Active Transition Metal Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, S. B.; Kharkwal, Aneeta; Nitu; Kharkwal, Mamta; Sharma, Raghunandan

    2017-01-01

    The acetate intercalated layered double hydroxides of Zn and Mn, have been synthesized by chimie douce method. The materials were characterized by XRD, TGA, CHN, IR, XPS, SEM-EDX and UV-visible spectroscopy. The photoluminescence properties was also studied. The optical properties of layered hydroxides are active transition metal ion dependent, particularly d1-10 system plays an important role. Simultaneously the role of host - guest orientation has been considered the basis of photoluminescence. Acetate ion can be exchanged with iodide and sulphate ions. The decomposed product resulted the pure phase Mn doped zinc oxide are also reported.

  19. Thermal regime of active layer at two lithologically contrasting sites on James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrbáček, Filip; Nývlt, Daniel; Láska, Kamil

    2016-04-01

    Antarctic Peninsula region (AP) represents one of the most rapidly warming parts of our planet in the last 50 years. Despite increasing research activities along both western and eastern sides of AP in last decades, there is still a lot of gaps in our knowledge relating to permafrost, active layer and its thermal and physical properties. This study brings new results of active layer monitoring on James Ross Island, which is the largest island in northern AP. Its northern part, Ulu Peninsula, is the largest ice-free area (more than 200 km2) in the region. Due its large area, we focused this study on sites located in different lithologies, which would affect local thermal regime of active layer. Study site (1) at Abernethy Flats area (41 m a.s.l.) lies ~7 km from northern coast. Lithologically is formed by disintegrated Cretaceous calcareous sandstones and siltstones of the Santa Marta Formation. Study site (2) is located at the northern slopes of Berry Hill (56 m a.s.l.), about 0.4 km from northern coastline. Lithology is composed of muddy to intermediate diamictites, tuffaceous siltstones to fine grained sandstones of the Mendel Formation. Data of air temperature at 2 meters above ground and the active layer temperatures at 75 cm deep profiles were obtained from both sites in period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014. Small differences were found when comparing mean air temperatures and active temperatures at 5 and 75 cm depth in the period 2012-2014. While the mean air temperatures varied between -7.7 °C and -7.0 °C, the mean ground temperatures fluctuated between -6.6 °C and -6.1 °C at 5 cm and -6.9 °C and -6.0 °C at 75 cm at Abernethy Flats and Berry Hill slopes respectively. Even though ground temperature differences along the profiles weren't pronounced during thawing seasons, the maximum active layer thickness was significantly larger at Berry Hill slopes (80 to 82 cm) than at Abernethy Flats (52 to 64 cm). We assume this differences are affected by

  20. Farallon slab detachment and deformation of the Magdalena Shelf, southern Baja California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Daniel S.; Harding, Alistair J.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Antonio; Holbrook, W.S. Steven; Kent, Graham M.; Driscoll, Neal W.; Fletcher, John M.; Lizarralde, Daniel; Umhoefer, Paul J.; Axen, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Subduction of the Farallon plate beneath northwestern Mexico stalled by ~12 Ma when the Pacific-Farallon spreading-ridge approached the subduction zone. Coupling between remnant slab and the overriding North American plate played an important role in the capture of the Baja California (BC) microplate by the Pacific Plate. Active-source seismic reflection and wide-angle seismic refraction profiles across southwestern BC (~24.5°N) are used to image the extent of remnant slab and study its impact on the overriding plate. We infer that the hot, buoyant slab detached ~40 km landward of the fossil trench. Isostatic rebound following slab detachment uplifted the margin and exposed the Magdalena Shelf to wave-base erosion. Subsequent cooling, subsidence and transtensional opening along the shelf (starting ~8 Ma) starved the fossil trench of terrigenous sediment input. Slab detachment and the resultant rebound of the margin provide a mechanism for rapid uplift and exhumation of forearc subduction complexes.

  1. Timing and conditions of clay fault gouge formation on the Naxos detachment (Cyclades, Greece)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancktelow, N.; Zwingmann, H.; Mulch, A.

    2016-10-01

    Clay fault gouge from the Naxos detachment (locally up to 1.0-1.5 m thick) is reported and dated for the first time. K-Ar ages on eight clay size fractions from the detachment and a minor fault in the immediate footwall have a narrow range, from 10.3 to 9.0 Ma, with an average of 9.7 ± 0.5 Ma (±1σ). These results are in excellent accord with regional and local age constraints, independently demonstrating the reliability of the method. Hydrogen δD values fall in the range -89 to -95‰, indicating interaction with infiltrating meteoric water during gouge formation, which is consistent with deposition of freshwater sediments in the hanging wall at the same time. Clay mineralogy in the detachment gouge is predominantly mixed layer illite-smectite with subordinate 1 M illite and kaolinite but without higher-temperature 2 M1 illite/mica. Clay fault gouge predominantly formed over a limited time and temperature range, potentially acting as a weak lubricant promoting movement on the Naxos detachment, with correspondingly rapid exhumation and cooling of the underlying footwall.

  2. Measurement of cell adhesion force by vertical forcible detachment using an arrowhead nanoneedle and atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Seunghwan; Hashizume, Yui; Mishima, Mari; Kawamura, Ryuzo; Tamura, Masato; Matsui, Hirofumi; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Chikashi

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We developed a method to measure cell adhesion force by detaching cell using an arrowhead nanoneedle and AFM. • A nanofilm consisting of fibronectin and gelatin was formed on cell surface to reinforce the cell cortex. • By the nanofilm lamination, detachment efficiencies of strongly adherent cell lines were improved markedly. - Abstract: The properties of substrates and extracellular matrices (ECM) are important factors governing the functions and fates of mammalian adherent cells. For example, substrate stiffness often affects cell differentiation. At focal adhesions, clustered–integrin bindings link cells mechanically to the ECM. In order to quantitate the affinity between cell and substrate, the cell adhesion force must be measured for single cells. In this study, forcible detachment of a single cell in the vertical direction using AFM was carried out, allowing breakage of the integrin–substrate bindings. An AFM tip was fabricated into an arrowhead shape to detach the cell from the substrate. Peak force observed in the recorded force curve during probe retraction was defined as the adhesion force, and was analyzed for various types of cells. Some of the cell types adhered so strongly that they could not be picked up because of plasma membrane breakage by the arrowhead probe. To address this problem, a technique to reinforce the cellular membrane with layer-by-layer nanofilms composed of fibronectin and gelatin helped to improve insertion efficiency and to prevent cell membrane rupture during the detachment process, allowing successful detachment of the cells. This method for detaching cells, involving cellular membrane reinforcement, may be beneficial for evaluating true cell adhesion forces in various cell types.

  3. Structural insights into the early stages of exhumation along an orogen-scale detachment: The South Tibetan Detachment System, Dzakaa Chu section, Eastern Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottle, John M.; Jessup, Micah J.; Newell, Dennis L.; Searle, Michael P.; Law, Richard D.; Horstwood, Matthew S. A.

    2007-11-01

    Structural transects through the South Tibetan Detachment system (STDS) in the Dzakaa Chu valley, Tibet reveal a ˜1000-m thick, low-angle (<35°) zone of distributed ductile shear that displaces Paleozoic sediments over amphibolite facies gneisses, calc-mylonites and leucogranites of the Greater Himalayan Series (GHS). Within the shear zone, grain-size reduction with dynamic recrystallisation of quartz and growth of secondary phyllosilicates accommodated ductile deformation at elevated temperatures. Small-scale brittle normal faults and extensional shear veins overprint ductile features recording deformation at lower temperatures. Our structural data indicate that the Dzakaa Chu STDS records a progression from ductile- to brittle-deformation without development of a discrete detachment fault(s) that is common to many STDS sections. U(-Th)-Pb dating of post-kinematic leucogranites suggest that, in the lower part of the shear zone, mylonitic fabric development occurred prior to ˜20 Ma. By integrating structural and geochronological evidences we propose that the Dzakaa Chu STDS represents a deeper structural position than elsewhere in the Himalaya and provides important insight into the early ductile exhumation of the GHS that was dominated by movement along a 1-km wide shear zone without discrete brittle detachments. These findings are an important step towards understanding the development of low-angle detachment fault systems active during continental collision.

  4. Active layer temperature in two Cryosols from King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Roberto F. M.; Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto G. R.; Poelking, Everton L.; Simas, Felipe N. B.; Fernandes Filho, Elpidio I.; Bockheim, James G.

    2012-06-01

    This study presents soil temperature and moisture regimes from March 2008 to January 2009 for two active layer monitoring (CALM-S) sites at King George Island, Maritime Antarctica. The monitoring sites were installed during the summer of 2008 and consist of thermistors (accuracy of ± 0.2 °C), arranged vertically with probes at different depths and one soil moisture probe placed at the bottommost layer at each site (accuracy of ± 2.5%), recording data at hourly intervals in a high capacity datalogger. The active layer thermal regime in the studied period for both soils was typical of periglacial environments, with extreme variation in surface temperature during summer resulting in frequent freeze and thaw cycles. The great majority of the soil temperature readings during the eleven month period was close to 0 °C, resulting in low values of freezing and thawing degree days. Both soils have poor thermal apparent diffusivity but values were higher for the soil from Fildes Peninsula. The different moisture regimes for the studied soils were attributed to soil texture, with the coarser soil presenting much lower water content during all seasons. Differences in water and ice contents may explain the contrasting patterns of freezing of the studied soils, being two-sided for the coarser soil and one-sided for the loamy soil. The temperature profile of the studied soils during the eleven month period indicates that the active layer reached a maximum depth of approximately 92 cm at Potter and 89 cm at Fildes. Longer data sets are needed for more conclusive analysis on active layer behaviour in this part of Antarctica.

  5. Active layer dynamics in three sites with contrasted topography in the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva, Marc; Ruiz-Fernández, Jesús; Vieira, Gonçalo

    2015-04-01

    Topography exerts a key role on permafrost distribution in areas where mean annual temperatures are slightly negative. This is the case of low-altitude environments in Maritime Antarctica, namely in the South Shetland Islands, where permafrost is marginal to discontinuous until elevations of 20-40 m asl turning to continuous at higher areas. Consequently, the active layer dynamics is also strongly conditioned by the geomorphological setting. In January 2014 we installed three sites for monitoring the active layer dynamics across the Byers Peninsula (Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands) in different geomorphological environments at elevations between 60 and 100 m. The purpose was to examine the role of the topography and microclimatic conditions on the active layer dynamics. At each site a set of loggers was set up to monitor: air temperatures, snow thickness, ground temperatures until 80 cm together with the coupling atmosphere-ground temperatures. During the first year of monitoring the mean annual air temperatures show similar values in the three sites, in all cases slightly below freezing. The snowy conditions during this year in this archipelago have resulted in a late melting of snow, which has also conditioned the duration of frozen conditions in the uppermost soil layers. Topography has a strong influence on snow cover duration, which in turn affects frozen ground conditions. The Domo site is located in a higher position with respect to the central plateau of Byers; here, the wind is stronger and snow cover thinner, which has conditioned a longer thawing season than in the other two sites (Cerro Negro, Escondido). These two sites are located in topographically protected areas favouring snow accumulation. The longer persistence of snow conditions a longer duration of negative temperatures in the active layer of the permafrost. This research was financially supported by the HOLOANTAR project (Portuguese Science Foundation) and the AXA Research Fund.

  6. Layer-specific optogenetic activation of pyramidal neurons causes beta–gamma entrainment of neonatal networks

    PubMed Central

    Bitzenhofer, Sebastian H; Ahlbeck, Joachim; Wolff, Amy; Wiegert, J. Simon; Gee, Christine E.; Oertner, Thomas G.; Hanganu-Opatz, Ileana L.

    2017-01-01

    Coordinated activity patterns in the developing brain may contribute to the wiring of neuronal circuits underlying future behavioural requirements. However, causal evidence for this hypothesis has been difficult to obtain owing to the absence of tools for selective manipulation of oscillations during early development. We established a protocol that combines optogenetics with electrophysiological recordings from neonatal mice in vivo to elucidate the substrate of early network oscillations in the prefrontal cortex. We show that light-induced activation of layer II/III pyramidal neurons that are transfected by in utero electroporation with a high-efficiency channelrhodopsin drives frequency-specific spiking and boosts network oscillations within beta–gamma frequency range. By contrast, activation of layer V/VI pyramidal neurons causes nonspecific network activation. Thus, entrainment of neonatal prefrontal networks in fast rhythms relies on the activation of layer II/III pyramidal neurons. This approach used here may be useful for further interrogation of developing circuits, and their behavioural readout. PMID:28216627

  7. Influences and interactions of inundation, peat, and snow on active layer thickness

    DOE PAGES

    Atchley, Adam L.; Coon, Ethan T.; Painter, Scott L.; ...

    2016-05-18

    The effect of three environmental conditions: 1) thickness of organic soil, 2) snow depth, and 3) soil moisture content or water table height above and below the soil surface, on active layer thickness (ALT) are investigated using an ensemble of 1D thermal hydrology models. Sensitivity analyses of the ensemble exposed the isolated influence of each environmental condition on ALT and their multivariate interactions. The primary and interactive influences are illustrated in the form of color maps of ALT change. Results show that organic layer acts as a strong insulator, and its thickness is the dominant control of ALT, but themore » strength of the effect of organic layer thickness is dependent on the saturation state. Snow depth, subsurface saturation, and ponded water depth are strongly codependent and positively correlated to ALT.« less

  8. Influences and interactions of inundation, peat, and snow on active layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Atchley, Adam L.; Coon, Ethan T.; Painter, Scott L.; Harp, Dylan R.; Wilson, Cathy J.

    2016-05-18

    The effect of three environmental conditions: 1) thickness of organic soil, 2) snow depth, and 3) soil moisture content or water table height above and below the soil surface, on active layer thickness (ALT) are investigated using an ensemble of 1D thermal hydrology models. Sensitivity analyses of the ensemble exposed the isolated influence of each environmental condition on ALT and their multivariate interactions. The primary and interactive influences are illustrated in the form of color maps of ALT change. Results show that organic layer acts as a strong insulator, and its thickness is the dominant control of ALT, but the strength of the effect of organic layer thickness is dependent on the saturation state. Snow depth, subsurface saturation, and ponded water depth are strongly codependent and positively correlated to ALT.

  9. Ultrathin platinum nanowires grown on single-layered nickel hydroxide with high hydrogen evolution activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Huajie; Zhao, Shenlong; Zhao, Kun; Muqsit, Abdul; Tang, Hongjie; Chang, Lin; Zhao, Huijun; Gao, Yan; Tang, Zhiyong

    2015-03-01

    Design and synthesis of effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline environments is critical to reduce energy losses in alkaline water electrolysis. Here we report a hybrid nanomaterial comprising of one-dimensional ultrathin platinum nanowires grown on two-dimensional single-layered nickel hydroxide. Judicious surface chemistry to generate the fully exfoliated nickel hydroxide single layers is explored to be the key for controllable growth of ultrathin platinum nanowires with diameters of about 1.8 nm. Impressively, this hybrid nanomaterial exhibits superior electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline solution, which outperforms currently reported catalysts, and the obviously improved catalytic stability. We believe that this work may lead towards the development of single-layered metal hydroxide-based hybrid materials for applications in catalysis and energy conversion.

  10. Activation of Al2O3 passivation layers on silicon by microwave annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Johannes; Otto, Martin; Sprafke, Alexander N.; Wehrspohn, Ralf B.

    2013-11-01

    Thin aluminum oxide layers deposited on silicon by thermal atomic layer deposition can be used to reduce the electronic recombination losses by passivating the silicon surfaces. To activate the full passivation ability of such layers, a post-deposition annealing step at moderate temperatures (≈400 ∘C, duration≈30 min) is required. Such an annealing step is commonly done in an oven in air, nitrogen, or forming gas atmosphere. In this work, we investigate the ability to reduce the duration of the annealing step by heating the silicon wafer with a microwave source. The annealing time is significantly reduced to durations below 1 min while achieving effective minority carrier lifetimes similar or higher to that of conventionally oven-annealed samples.

  11. Simulating Divertor Detachment of Ohmic Discharges in ASDEX Upgrade Using SOLPS: the Role of Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Wischmeier, M; Coster, D; Chankin, A; Fuchs, C; Groth, M; Harhausen, J; Kallenbach, A; Muller, H; Tsalas, M; Wolfrum, E

    2007-06-27

    With divertor detachment being a prerequisite for burning plasma operation in ITER, numerical codes such as SOLPS [1] have been developed for predicting and interpreting the divertor performance at all operational regimes in current tokamaks and ITER. In ITER complete detachment from the outer divertor target is not permitted as this might result in an X-point MARFE, imposing an upper limit for the upstream separatrix density, n{sub e}{sup sep}. Despite the knowledge of the basic mechanisms required for achieving detachment, such as radiative power exhaust, volumetric momentum and charge removal [1], a quantitative evaluation of experimentally observed detached regimes proves to be particularly difficult for several tokamaks. In particular the strong asymmetry of the ion flux density between the inner, {Lambda}{sub it}, and the outer target {Lambda}{sub ot} with increasing line averaged density, {bar n}{sub e}, and in particular ''vanishing'' of the ion flux, defined as full/complete detachment, at the inner target cannot be reproduced. It is unclear how this is related to divertor target plates or other plasma facing components containing carbon. As part of a combined effort at various experimental devices this paper contributes to the validation of the SOLPS code against experimental data from ASDEX Upgrade, AUG, at the onset of divertor detachment. In the framework established under the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) Divertor and SOL working group a series of ohmic discharges have been performed in AUG, which had as similar as possible plasma parameters as companion discharges undertaken in DIII-D [2]. The effect of activating drift terms, the influence of the chemical sputtering yield at the inner target and in addition to [3] the role of impurity influx from the inner heat shield are analyzed.

  12. Physiological properties of Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm-detached cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Ling, Jun-Qi; Zhang, Kai; Wu, Christine D

    2013-03-01

    Biofilm detachment is a physiologically regulated process that facilitates the release of cells to colonize new sites and cause infections. Streptococcus mutans is one of the major inhabitants of cariogenic dental plaque biofilm. This study tested the hypothesis that S. mutans biofilm-detached cells exhibit distinct physiological properties compared with their sessile and planktonic counterparts. Biofilm-detached cells showed a longer generation time of 2.85 h compared with planktonic cells (2.06 h), but had higher phosphotransferase activity for sucrose and mannose (P < 0.05). Compared with planktonic cells, they showed higher chlorhexidine (CHX) resistance and fourfold more adherent (P < 0.05). Increased mutacin IV production in biofilm-detached cells was noted by a larger inhibition zone against Streptococcus gordonii (31.07 ± 1.62 mm vs. 25.2 ± 1.74 mm by planktonic cells; P < 0.05). The expressions of genes associated with biofilm formation (gtfC and comDE) and mutacin (nlmA) were higher compared with planktonic cells (P < 0.05). In many properties, biofilm-detached cells shared similarity with sessile cells except for a higher phosphotransferase activity for sucrose, glucose, and mannose, increased resistance to CHX, and elevated expression of gtfC-, comDE-, and acidurity-related gene aptD (P < 0.05). Based on data obtained, the S. mutans biofilm-detached cells are partially distinct in various physiological properties compared with their planktonic and sessile counterparts.

  13. Electron-impact detachment and dissociation of C4- ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Padellec, A.; Rabilloud, F.; Pegg, D.; Neau, A.; Hellberg, F.; Thomas, R.; Schmidt, H. T.; Larsson, M.; Danared, H.; Källberg, A.; Andersson, K.; Hanstorp, D.

    2001-12-01

    CRYRING was used to study collision processes between an electron and a negative ion cluster C4-. The total detachment cross sections for the production of the neutral 4C, 3C, 2C, and C fragments were measured. The cross sections for pure detachment, and for detachment plus dissociation leading to the production of C3+C, 2C2, and C2+2C were extracted using a grid. It was found that the pure detachment process overwhelmingly dominates all other fragmentation processes. The threshold location for the detachment channel is found to be around 6.0 eV. Although the doubly charged negative ion C42- has received little previous attention, a defined near-threshold resonance observed in the detachment cross section curve, has been associated with the short-lived state C42- (0.7 fs lifetime).

  14. Management of Giant Retinal Tear Detachments

    PubMed Central

    Berrocal, Maria H.; Chenworth, Megan L.; Acaba, Luis A.

    2017-01-01

    Giant retinal tears (GRTs) are full-thickness circumferential tears of more than 90 degrees of the retina that are associated with vitreous detachment. They are related to ocular trauma, high myopia, aphakia, pseudophakia, genetic mutations involving collagen and young age. GRTs comprise 1.5% of all rhegmatogenous retinal detachments and the average age of incidence is 42 years. GRTs are more common in males, as 72% of all cases occur in males. The incidence of GRTs in the general population is estimated to be 0.05 per 100,000 individuals. Common techniques used in the management of GRTs include fluid-air exchange, pneumatic retinopexy, scleral buckling, primary vitrectomy with gas or silicone oil tamponade, and combined scleral buckle-vitrectomies. However, management of GRTs poses a great challenge to physicians due to the high risk of intra- and post-operative complications and the many technical difficulties involved. The advent of perfluorocarbon liquids (PFCL) and the use of micro-incisional surgery for the treatment of GRTs has provided new opportunities for the management of GTRs. Today, retinal reattachment can be achieved in 94-100% of cases. PMID:28299011

  15. Meniscus Shapes in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K

    2010-01-01

    In detached Bridgman crystal growth, most of the melt is in contact with the ampoule wall, but the crystal is separated from the wall by a small gap, typically 1-100 micrometers. A liquid free surface, or meniscus, bridges across this gap at the position of the melt-crystal interface. Meniscus shapes have been calculated for the case of detached Bridgman growth in cylindrical ampoules by solving the Young-Laplace equation. Key parameters affecting meniscus shapes are the growth angle, contact angle of the meniscus to the ampoule wall, the pressure differential across the meniscus, and the Bond number, a measure of the ratio of gravitational to capillary forces. In general, for specified values of growth and contact angles, solutions exist only over a finite range of pressure differentials. For intermediate values of the Bond number, there are multiple solutions to the Young-Laplace equations. There are also cases where, as a function of pressure differential, existence intervals alternate with intervals where no solutions exist. The implications of the meniscus shape calculations on meniscus stability are discussed.

  16. Photometric orbits of seven detached eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popper, D. M.; Etzel, P. B.

    1981-01-01

    Photoelectric light curves of the detached eclipsing binaries V805 Aql, TV Cet, MY Cyg, V478 Cyg, V1143 Cyg, BS Dra, and BK Peg are analyzed. The systems are among those with good spectrographic orbits of both components that are in need of good photometric solutions in order to obtain the absolute properties of the components. The analyses are carried out with a computer program valid for detached systems of spherical or slightly oblate stars in orbits of arbitrary eccentricity. A range of solutions much greater than implied by the internal mean errors of the parameters, is found to give satisfactory fits to the observations. Some of the fits are displayed for a variety of solutions for each system. For the three systems with measurable light variation between eclipses - V478 Cyg, V805 Aql, and MY Cyg - the effect of reflection appears to be substantially less than predicted. Very small, but nonzero, orbital eccentricities are found for four of the systems. The variations of limb darkening with wavelength and with spectral type are found to be in reasonable agreement with predictions from atmospheric theory.

  17. Detection of detachments and inhomogeneities in frescos by Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, A.; Cesareo, R.; Buccolieri, G.; Donativi, M.; Palamà, F.; Quarta, S.; De Nunzio, G.; Brunetti, A.; Marabelli, M.; Santamaria, U.

    2005-07-01

    A mobile instrument has been developed for the detection and mapping of detachments in frescos by using Compton back scattered photons. The instrument is mainly composed of a high energy X-ray tube, an X-ray detection system and a translation table. The instrument was first applied to samples simulating various detachment situations, and then transferred to the Vatican Museum to detect detachments and inhomogeneities in the stanza di Eliodoro, one of the "Raphael's stanze".

  18. Detachments of the retinal pigment epithelium at the posterior pole.

    PubMed

    Noble, K G; Levitzky, M J; Carr, R E

    1976-08-01

    Multiple vitelliform cysts of the retina, a disorder of unknown cause in which there are multiple detachments of the retinal pigment epithelium at the posterior pole, occurred in five patients. In four patients all lesions were located outside the parafoveal area while one patient showed bilateral foveal elevations associated with more eccentric detachments. Several patients showed slow resolution of some of the detachments with mild disturbances of the pigment epithelium.

  19. Correlation between active layer thickness and ambient gas stability in IGZO thin-film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xu; Lin, Meng-Fang; Mao, Bao-Hua; Shimizu, Maki; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Kizu, Takio; Ou-Yang, Wei; Nabatame, Toshihide; Liu, Zhi; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Wang, Sui-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Decreasing the active layer thickness has been recently reported as an alternative way to achieve fully depleted oxide thin-film transistors for the realization of low-voltage operations. However, the correlation between the active layer thickness and device resistivity to environmental changes is still unclear, which is important for the optimized design of oxide thin-film transistors. In this work, the ambient gas stability of IGZO thin-film transistors is found to be strongly correlated to the IGZO thickness. The TFT with the thinnest IGZO layer shows the highest intrinsic electron mobility in a vacuum, which is greatly reduced after exposure to O2/air. The device with a thick IGZO layer shows similar electron mobility in O2/air, whereas the mobility variation measured in the vacuum is absent. The thickness dependent ambient gas stability is attributed to a high-mobility region in the IGZO surface vicinity with less sputtering-induced damage, which will become electron depleted in O2/air due to the electron transfer to adsorbed gas molecules. The O2 adsorption and deduced IGZO surface band bending is demonstrated by the ambient-pressure x-ray photoemission spectroscopy results.

  20. Influence of the Halogen Activation on the Ozone Layer in XXIst Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Igor; Aloyan, Artash; Yermakov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the work is to evaluate a possible effect of heterophase chemical reactions (HCR) with participation of reservoir gases (ClONO2, HCl) and sulfate particles of the Junge layer on the ozone layer at mid-latitudes in the XXI century, which could be relevant for more accurate predicting a recovery of the ozone layer, taking into account that just these processes were the main cause of the ozone depletion at the end of XXth century. Required for calculating the dynamics of GHR data on the specific volume/surface of the sulfate aerosols in the lower stratosphere were taken from the data of field experiments. Their physico-chemical properties (chemical composition, density, water activity and free protons activity et al.) have been obtained with help of thermodynamic calculations (Atmospheric Inorganic Model, AIM). Altitude concentration profiles of individual gas components, as well as temperature and relative humidity (RH) at a given geographic location and season have been calculated using a two-dimensional model SOCRATES. The calculations have been made for the conditions of June 1995, 2040 and 2080 at 15 km altitude and 50° N latitude. It has been shown that the rate of ozone depletion as a result of processes involving halogen activation for the given conditions in 2040, 2080 is about 35% lower than a corresponding value in 1995 (a year of maximum effect of halogen activation). From this we can conclude that in the XXI century, despite the natural decline of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons. processes of halogen activation of the ozone depletion with participation of sulfate aerosols should be taken into account in the calculations of the recovery of the ozone layer at mid-latitudes.

  1. Evolution of the combat and operational stress control detachment.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Jason I; Ijames, Victoria L

    2014-01-01

    Medical units designed to provide combat and operational stress control services have evolved since World War II into the current Combat and Operational Stress Control (COSC) detachments. Yet the structure of these COSC detachments differ greatly between what is authorized in the table of organization and equipment (TO&E) and what is doctrinally described in the current field manual guiding combat and operational stress control operations. We therefore explore the evolution of the COSC detachment, compare the organizations found in current doctrine with that currently authorized on the TO&E, and conclude with a proposed structure of a modern COSC detachment that is functionally modular with more clear chains of command.

  2. Influence of active layer and support layer surface structures on organic fouling propensity of thin-film composite forward osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinglin; Arias Chavez, Laura H; Romero-Vargas Castrillón, Santiago; Ma, Jun; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-02-03

    In this study, we investigate the influence of surface structure on the fouling propensity of thin-film composite (TFC) forward osmosis (FO) membranes. Specifically, we compare membranes fabricated through identical procedures except for the use of different solvents (dimethylformamide, DMF and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone, NMP) during phase separation. FO fouling experiments were carried out with a feed solution containing a model organic foulant. The TFC membranes fabricated using NMP (NMP-TFC) had significantly less flux decline (7.47 ± 0.15%) when compared to the membranes fabricated using DMF (DMF-TFC, 12.70 ± 2.62% flux decline). Water flux was also more easily recovered through physical cleaning for the NMP-TFC membrane. To determine the fundamental cause of these differences in fouling propensity, the active and support layers of the membranes were extensively characterized for physical and chemical characteristics relevant to fouling behavior. Polyamide surface roughness was found to dominate all other investigated factors in determining the fouling propensities of our membranes relative to each other. The high roughness polyamide surface of the DMF-TFC membrane was also rich in larger leaf-like structures, whereas the lower roughness NMP-TFC membrane polyamide layer contained more nodular and smaller features. The support layers of the two membrane types were also characterized for their morphological properties, and the relation between support layer surface structure and polyamide active layer formation was discussed. Taken together, our findings indicate that support layer structure has a significant impact on the fouling propensity of the active layer, and this impact should be considered in the design of support layer structures for TFC membranes.

  3. Electrokinetic microactuator arrays for active sublayer control of turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez-Garias, Francisco J.

    2002-09-01

    The present study has been the first to examine the electrokinetic principle as the basis for a new class of microscale actuator arrays for active sublayer control on full scale aeronautical and hydronautical vehicles under realistic operating conditions. The Helmholtz-Smoluchowski scalings that govern such electrokinetic actuator arrays show significant performance advantages from their miniaturization to the microscale. The electrokinetic microactuator arrays that are the subject of this study seek to interrupt the bursting process associated with naturally-occurring streamwise sublayer vortices in the turbulent boundary layer. Specific performance requirements for microactuator spacing, flow rate, and frequency response for active sublayer control have been determined from fundamental scaling laws for the streamwise vortical structures in the sublayer of turbulent boundary layers. In view of the inherently local nature of the sublayer dynamics, a general system architecture for microactuator arrays appropriate for active sublayer control has been developed based on the concept of relatively small and independent "unit cells", each with their own sensing, processing, and actuation capability, that greatly simplifies the sensing and processing requirements needed to achieve practical sublayer control. A fundamental three-layer design has been developed for such electrokinetic microactuator arrays, in which electrokinetic flow is induced by an impulsively applied electric field across a center layer, with a bottom layer containing an electrolyte reservoir and a common electrode, and a top layer that containing individual electrodes and lead-outs for each microactuator in the unit cell. Microfabrication techniques have been developed that permit mass production of large numbers of individual electrokinetic microactuators in unit cells on comparatively large-area tiles. Several generations of such electrokinetic microactuator arrays have been built leading to the

  4. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Brent D.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Graham, David E.; Gu, Baohua; Hubbard, Susan S.; Liang, Liyuan; Wu, Yuxin; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Wilson, Cathy; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-03-24

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) for analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.

  5. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-10-01

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2-C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2-C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2-C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment.

  6. Effect of a fluid layer on the sound radiation of a plate and its active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yao; Pan, Jie; Yang, Tiejun

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a baffled plate facing a layer of fluid is used to investigate the effects of the radiating environment on the plate's sound radiation and its active control. By varying the thickness of the fluid layer, different radiation environments are presented to the plate, resulting in a variation in the efficiencies and shapes of the radiation modes of the plate. As the design of feed-forward control of the radiated sound power and of feedback control of the vibration velocity or volume velocity is limited by the properties of the secondary control path (an open-loop frequency response function), the performance of the control system may be deteriorated if a controller optimally designed for one radiation environment is used for a different environment. The effects of radiation environment on the properties of the secondary control path and performance of active control are investigated.

  7. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-10-05

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2-C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2-C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2-C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment.

  8. Control of the boundary layer separation about an airfoil by active surface heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Badavi, Forooz F.; Noonan, Kevin W.

    1988-01-01

    Application of active control to separated flow on the RC(6)-08 airfoil at high angle of attack by localized surface heating is numerically simulated by integrating the compressible two-dimensional nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations solver. Active control is simulated by local modification of the temperature boundary condition over a narrow strip on the upper surface of the airfoil. Both mean and perturbed profiles are favorably altered when excited with the same natural frequency of the shear layer by moderate surface heating for both laminar and turbulent separation. The shear layer is found to be very sensitive to localized surface heating in the vicinity of the separation point. The excitation field at the surface sufficiently altered both the local as well as the global circulation to cause a significant increase in lift and reduction in drag.

  9. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, B. D.; Throckmorton, H. M.; Graham, D. E.; Gu, B.; Hubbard, S. S.; Liang, L.; Wu, Y.; Heikoop, J. M.; Herndon, E. M.; Phelps, T. J.; Wilson, C. J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) for analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.

  10. Active layer hydrology for Imnavait Creek, Toolik, Alaska. Annual progress report, July 1984--January 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.L.

    1986-12-31

    In the annual hydrologic cycle, snowmelt is the most significant event at Imnavait Creek located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Precipitation that has accumulated for more than 6 months on the surface melts in a relatively short period of 7 to 10 days once sustained melting occurs. During the ablation period, runoff dominates the hydrologic cycle. Some meltwater goes to rewetting the organic soils in the active layer. The remainder is lost primarily because of evaporation, since transpiration is not a very active process at this time. Following the snowmelt period, evapotranspiration becomes the dominate process, with base flow contributing the other watershed losses. It is important to note that the water initally lost by evapotranspiration entered the organic layer during melt. This water from the snowpack ensures that each year the various plant communities will have sufficient water to start a new summer of growth.

  11. The active layer morphology of organic solar cells probed with grazing incidence scattering techniques.

    PubMed

    Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2014-12-10

    Grazing incidence X-ray scattering (GIXS) provides unique insights into the morphology of active materials and thin film layers used in organic photovoltaic devices. With grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) the molecular arrangement of the material is probed. GIWAXS is sensitive to the crystalline parts and allows for the determination of the crystal structure and the orientation of the crystalline regions with respect to the electrodes. With grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) the nano-scale structure inside the films is probed. As GISAXS is sensitive to length scales from nanometers to several hundred nanometers, all relevant length scales of organic solar cells are detectable. After an introduction to GISAXS and GIWAXS, selected examples for application of both techniques to active layer materials are reviewed. The particular focus is on conjugated polymers, such as poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT).

  12. MMP Activity in the Hybrid Layer Detected with in situ Zymography

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, A.; Nascimento, F.D.; Carrilho, M.; Tersariol, I.; Papa, V.; Tjäderhane, L.; Di Lenarda, R.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Breschi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Dentinal proteases are believed to play an important role in the degradation of hybrid layers (HL). This study investigated the HL gelatinolytic activity by in situ zymography and functional enzyme activity assay. The hypotheses were that HLs created by an etch-and-rinse adhesive exhibit active gelatinolytic activity, and MMP-2 and -9 activities in dentin increase during adhesive procedures. Etched-dentin specimens were bonded with Adper Scotchbond 1XT and restored with composite. Adhesive/dentin interface slices were placed on microscope slides, covered with fluorescein-conjugated gelatin, and observed with a multi-photon confocal microscope after 24 hrs. Human dentin powder aliquots were prepared and assigned to the following treatments: A, untreated; B, etched with 10% phosphoric acid; or C, etched with 10% phosphoric acid and mixed with Scotchbond 1XT. The MMP-2 and -9 activities of extracts of dentin powder were measured with functional enzyme assays. Intense and continuous enzyme activity was detected at the bottom of the HL, while that activity was more irregular in the upper HL. Both acid-etching and subsequent adhesive application significantly increased MMP-2 and -9 activities (p < 0.05). The results demonstrate, for the first time, intrinsic MMP activity in the HL, and intense activation of matrix-bound MMP activity with both etching and adhesive application. PMID:22354448

  13. Dynamics of thin-skinned fold and thrust belts with a tilted detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Naiara; Kaus, Boris J. P.; Epard, Jean-Luc

    2014-05-01

    The formation of the Jura fold and thrust belt is linked to the Alpine orogeny. However, it is still a matter of debate why the Jura was formed tens of kilometres far away from the active deformation front while the Molasse basin that lies in between remained mostly undeformed. Progressive thickening of the Molasse basin due to its infill with sediments, and the existence of a tilted potential detachment level at the Triassic evaporitic units, have been pushed forward as the main causes for the detachment of the Molasse basin and the consequent jump of the deformation front from the Alpine front to the position of the Jura at around 22 Ma or later (e.g Willett and Schlunegger, 2010). In order to better understand the dynamics of a thin-skinned fold and thrust belt with a tilted detachment we have performed systematic forward numerical simulations with the 2D thermo-mechanical finite element code MILAMIN_VEP. The modelled setup consists of a tilted detachment, overlain by a sedimentary cover of constant thickness and a wedge shaped basin infill that makes the initial surface slope of the system to be zero. In this study we have tested the importance of the following factors in the dynamics of such a fold and thrust belt evolution: 1) the applied boundary conditions 2) the angle of a uniformly tilted detachment 3) the end displacement of a curved detachment with a flexural foreland basin profile. The implications of the studied factors are discussed for the case of the Jura-Molasse system. Acknowledgements Funding was provided by the European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework program (FP7/2007-2013) ERC Grant agreement #258830. References Willett, S.D. and Schlunegger, F. 2010, The last phase of deposition in the Swiss Molasse Basin: from foredeep to negative-alpha basin. Basin Research 22, 623-639, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2117.2009.00435.x

  14. A Comparison of Active and Passive Methods for Control of Hypersonic Boundary Layers on Airbreathing Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    Active and passive methods for control of hypersonic boundary layers have been experimentally examined in NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels on a Hyper-X model. Several configurations for forcing transition using passive discrete roughness elements and active mass addition, or blowing, methods were compared in two hypersonic facilities, the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air and the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air tunnels. Heat transfer distributions, obtained via phosphor thermography, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. The comparisons between the active and passive methods for boundary layer control were conducted at test conditions that nearly match the nominal Mach 7 flight trajectory of an angle-of-attack of 2-deg and length Reynolds number of 5.6 million. For the passive roughness examination, the primary parametric variation was a range of trip heights within the calculated boundary layer thickness for several trip concepts. The prior passive roughness study resulted in a swept ramp configuration being selected for the Mach 7 flight vehicle that was scaled to be roughly 0.6 of the calculated boundary layer thickness. For the active jet blowing study, the blowing manifold pressure was systematically varied for each configuration, while monitoring the mass flow, to determine the jet penetration height with schlieren and transition movement with the phosphor system for comparison to the passive results. All the blowing concepts tested were adequate for providing transition onset near the trip location with manifold stagnation pressures on the order of 40 times the model static pressure or higher.

  15. Acoustic radiation from the submerged circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li-Yun; Xiang, Yu; Lu, Jing; Jiang, Hong-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Based on the transfer matrix method of exploring the circular cylindrical shell treated with active constrained layer damping (i.e., ACLD), combined with the analytical solution of the Helmholtz equation for a point source, a multi-point multipole virtual source simulation method is for the first time proposed for solving the acoustic radiation problem of a submerged ACLD shell. This approach, wherein some virtual point sources are assumed to be evenly distributed on the axial line of the cylindrical shell, and the sound pressure could be written in the form of the sum of the wave functions series with the undetermined coefficients, is demonstrated to be accurate to achieve the radiation acoustic pressure of the pulsating and oscillating spheres respectively. Meanwhile, this approach is proved to be accurate to obtain the radiation acoustic pressure for a stiffened cylindrical shell. Then, the chosen number of the virtual distributed point sources and truncated number of the wave functions series are discussed to achieve the approximate radiation acoustic pressure of an ACLD cylindrical shell. Applying this method, different radiation acoustic pressures of a submerged ACLD cylindrical shell with different boundary conditions, different thickness values of viscoelastic and piezoelectric layer, different feedback gains for the piezoelectric layer and coverage of ACLD are discussed in detail. Results show that a thicker thickness and larger velocity gain for the piezoelectric layer and larger coverage of the ACLD layer can obtain a better damping effect for the whole structure in general. Whereas, laying a thicker viscoelastic layer is not always a better treatment to achieve a better acoustic characteristic. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11162001, 11502056, and 51105083), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (Grant No. 2012GXNSFAA053207), the Doctor Foundation of Guangxi

  16. Layer-specificity in the effects of attention and working memory on activity in primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    van Kerkoerle, Timo; Self, Matthew W.; Roelfsema, Pieter R.

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal activity in early visual cortex depends on attention shifts but the contribution to working memory has remained unclear. Here, we examine neuronal activity in the different layers of the primary visual cortex (V1) in an attention-demanding and a working memory task. A current-source density analysis reveales top-down inputs in the superficial layers and layer 5, and an increase in neuronal firing rates most pronounced in the superficial and deep layers and weaker in input layer 4. This increased activity is strongest in the attention task but it is also highly reliable during working memory delays. A visual mask erases the V1 memory activity, but it reappeares at a later point in time. These results provide new insights in the laminar circuits involved in the top-down modulation of activity in early visual cortex in the presence and absence of visual stimuli. PMID:28054544

  17. Impact of calcium-activated potassium channels on NMDA spikes in cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Active electrical events play an important role in shaping signal processing in dendrites. As these events are usually associated with an increase in intracellular calcium, they are likely to be under the control of calcium-activated potassium channels. Here, we investigate the impact of calcium-activated potassium channels on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent spikes, or NMDA spikes, evoked by glutamate iontophoresis onto basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We found that small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK channels) act to reduce NMDA spike amplitude but at the same time, also decrease the iontophoretic current required for their generation. This SK-mediated decrease in NMDA spike threshold was dependent on R-type voltage-gated calcium channels and indicates a counterintuitive, excitatory effect of SK channels on NMDA spike generation, whereas the capacity of SK channels to suppress NMDA spike amplitude is in line with the expected inhibitory action of potassium channels on dendritic excitability. Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels had no significant impact on NMDA spikes, indicating that these channels are either absent from basal dendrites or not activated by NMDA spikes. These experiments reveal complex and opposing interactions among NMDA receptors, SK channels, and voltage-gated calcium channels in basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons during NMDA spike generation, which are likely to play an important role in regulating the way these neurons integrate the thousands of synaptic inputs they receive. PMID:26936985

  18. Organic layer serves as a hotspot of microbial activity and abundance in Arctic tundra soils.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Jang, Inyoung; Chae, Namyi; Choi, Taejin; Kang, Hojeong

    2013-02-01

    Tundra ecosystem is of importance for its high accumulation of organic carbon and vulnerability to future climate change. Microorganisms play a key role in carbon dynamics of the tundra ecosystem by mineralizing organic carbon. We assessed both ecosystem process rates and community structure of Bacteria, Archaea, and Fungi in different soil layers (surface organic layer and subsurface mineral soil) in an Arctic soil ecosystem located at Spitsbergen, Svalbard during the summer of 2008 by using biochemical and molecular analyses, such as enzymatic assay, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and pyrosequencing. Activity of hydrolytic enzymes showed difference according to soil type. For all three microbial communities, the average gene copy number did not significantly differ between soil types. However, archaeal diversities appeared to differ according to soil type, whereas bacterial and fungal diversity indices did not show any variation. Correlation analysis between biogeochemical and microbial parameters exhibited a discriminating pattern according to microbial or soil types. Analysis of the microbial community structure showed that bacterial and archaeal communities have different profiles with unique phylotypes in terms of soil types. Water content and hydrolytic enzymes were found to be related with the structure of bacterial and archaeal communities, whereas soil organic matter (SOM) and total organic carbon (TOC) were related with bacterial communities. The overall results of this study indicate that microbial enzyme activity were generally higher in the organic layer than in mineral soils and that bacterial and archaeal communities differed between the organic layer and mineral soils in the Arctic region. Compared to mineral soil, peat-covered organic layer may represent a hotspot for secondary productivity and nutrient cycling in this ecosystem.

  19. Multiscale active layer morphologies for organic photovoltaics through self-assembly of nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Gehan, Timothy S; Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A; Shen, Xiaobo; Algaier, Dana D; Lahti, Paul M; Russell, Thomas P; Venkataraman, Dhandapani

    2014-09-10

    We address here the need for a general strategy to control molecular assembly over multiple length scales. Efficient organic photovoltaics require an active layer comprised of a mesoscale interconnected networks of nanoscale aggregates of semiconductors. We demonstrate a method, using principles of molecular self-assembly and geometric packing, for controlled assembly of semiconductors at the nanoscale and mesoscale. Nanoparticles of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) or [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) were fabricated with targeted sizes. Nanoparticles containing a blend of both P3HT and PCBM were also fabricated. The active layer morphology was tuned by the changing particle composition, particle radii, and the ratios of P3HT:PCBM particles. Photovoltaic devices were fabricated from these aqueous nanoparticle dispersions with comparable device performance to typical bulk-heterojunction devices. Our strategy opens a revolutionary pathway to study and tune the active layer morphology systematically while exercising control of the component assembly at multiple length scales.

  20. The cerebellar Golgi cell and spatiotemporal organization of granular layer activity

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Egidio; Solinas, Sergio; Mapelli, Jonathan; Gandolfi, Daniela; Mapelli, Lisa; Prestori, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellar granular layer has been suggested to perform a complex spatiotemporal reconfiguration of incoming mossy fiber signals. Central to this role is the inhibitory action exerted by Golgi cells over granule cells: Golgi cells inhibit granule cells through both feedforward and feedback inhibitory loops and generate a broad lateral inhibition that extends beyond the afferent synaptic field. This characteristic connectivity has recently been investigated in great detail and been correlated with specific functional properties of these neurons. These include theta-frequency pacemaking, network entrainment into coherent oscillations and phase resetting. Important advances have also been made in terms of determining the membrane and synaptic properties of the neuron, and clarifying the mechanisms of activation by input bursts. Moreover, voltage sensitive dye imaging and multi-electrode array (MEA) recordings, combined with mathematical simulations based on realistic computational models, have improved our understanding of the impact of Golgi cell activity on granular layer circuit computations. These investigations have highlighted the critical role of Golgi cells in: generating dense clusters of granule cell activity organized in center-surround structures, implementing combinatorial operations on multiple mossy fiber inputs, regulating transmission gain, and cut-off frequency, controlling spike timing and burst transmission, and determining the sign, intensity and duration of long-term synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber-granule cell relay. This review considers recent advances in the field, highlighting the functional implications of Golgi cells for granular layer network computation and indicating new challenges for cerebellar research. PMID:23730271

  1. Origin of photogenerated carrier recombination at the metal-active layer interface in polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Dubey, Ashish; Reza, Khan Mamun; Adhikari, Nirmal; Qiao, Qiquan; Bommisetty, Venkat

    2015-11-07

    The role of the metal-active layer interface in photogenerated recombination has been investigated using nanoscale current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) and intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) in as-deposited, pre-annealed and post-annealed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Aluminum (Al) confined post-annealed BHJ solar cells exhibited a significantly improved device efficiency compared to pre-annealed BHJ solar cells having similar photocarrier harvesting ability in the active layer. The nanoscale topography and CS-AFM results indicate a uniform PCBM rich phase at the metal-active layer interface in the post-annealed cells, but PCBM segregation in the pre-annealed cells. These two different annealing processes showed different carrier dynamics revealed using IMPS under various light intensities. The IMPS results suggest reduced photo generated carrier recombination in uniform PCBM rich post-annealed BHJ solar cells. This study reveals the importance of the metal-bend interface in BHJ solar cells in order to obtain efficient charge carrier extraction for high efficiency.

  2. Bioavailable Carbon and the Relative Degradation State of Organic Matter in Active Layer and Permafrost Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastrow, J. D.; Burke, V. J.; Vugteveen, T. W.; Fan, Z.; Hofmann, S. M.; Lederhouse, J. S.; Matamala, R.; Michaelson, G. J.; Mishra, U.; Ping, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    The decomposability of soil organic carbon (SOC) in permafrost regions is a key uncertainty in efforts to predict carbon release from thawing permafrost and its impacts. The cold and often wet environment is the dominant factor limiting decomposer activity, and soil organic matter is often preserved in a relatively undecomposed and uncomplexed state. Thus, the impacts of soil warming and permafrost thaw are likely to depend at least initially on the genesis and past history of organic matter degradation before its stabilization in permafrost. We compared the bioavailability and relative degradation state of SOC in active layer and permafrost soils from Arctic tundra in Alaska. To assess readily bioavailable SOC, we quantified salt (0.5 M K2SO4) extractable organic matter (SEOM), which correlates well with carbon mineralization rates in short-term soil incubations. To assess the relative degradation state of SOC, we used particle size fractionation to isolate fibric (coarse) from more degraded (fine) particulate organic matter (POM) and separated mineral-associated organic matter into silt- and clay-sized fractions. On average, bulk SOC concentrations in permafrost were lower than in comparable active layer horizons. Although SEOM represented a very small proportion of the bulk SOC, this proportion was greater in permafrost than in comparable active layer soils. A large proportion of bulk SOC was found in POM for all horizons. Even for mineral soils, about 40% of bulk SOC was in POM pools, indicating that organic matter in both active layer and permafrost mineral soils was relatively undecomposed compared to typical temperate soils. Not surprisingly, organic soils had a greater proportion of POM and mineral soils had greater silt- and clay-sized carbon pools, while cryoturbated soils were intermediate. For organic horizons, permafrost organic matter was generally more degraded than in comparable active layer horizons. However, in mineral and cryoturbated horizons

  3. Changes in spectral properties of detached leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.

    1984-01-01

    If leaf senescence can be delayed for several days without significant changes in spectral properties, then samples of leaves at remote test sites could be prepared and shipped to laboratories to measure spectral properties. The changes in spectral properties of detached leaves were determined. Leaves from red birch and red pine were immersed in water or 0.001 M benzylaminopurine (BAP) and stored in plastic bags in the dark at either 5 or 25 C. Total directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance of the adaxial surface of birch leaves were measured over the 400 to 1100 nm wavelength region with a spectroradiometer and integrating sphere. Pine needles were taped together and reflectance of the mat of needles was measured. Spectral properties changed less than 5% of initial values during the first week when leaves were stored at 5 C. Storage at 25 C promoted rapid senescence and large changes in spectral properties. BAP delayed, but did not stop, senescence at 25 C.

  4. Crystal Shape Evolution in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2013-01-01

    Detached (or dewetted) Bridgman crystal growth defines that process in which a gap exists between a growing crystal and the crucible wall. Existence of the gap provides several advantages, including no sticking of the crystal to the crucible wall, reduced thermal and mechanical stresses, reduced dislocations, and no heterogeneous nucleation by the crucible. Numerical calculations are used to determine the conditions in which a gap can exist. According to crystal shape stability theory, only some of these gap widths will be dynamically stable. Beginning with a crystal diameter that differs from stable conditions, the transient crystal growth process is analyzed. In microgravity, dynamic stability depends only on capillary effects and is decoupled from heat transfer. Depending on the initial conditions and growth parameters, the crystal shape will evolve towards the crucible wall, towards a stable gap width, or towards the center of the crucible, collapsing the meniscus. The effect of a tapered crucible on dynamic stability is also described

  5. Crystal Shape Evolution in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2013-01-01

    Detached (or dewetted) Bridgman crystal growth defines that process in which a gap exists between a growing crystal and the crucible wall. Existence of the gap provides several advantages, including no sticking of the crystal to the crucible wall, reduced thermal and mechanical stresses, reduced dislocations, and no heterogeneous nucleation by the crucible. Numerical calculations are used to determine the conditions in which a gap can exist. According to crystal shape stability theory, only some of these gap widths will be dynamically stable. Beginning with a crystal diameter that differs from stable conditions, the transient crystal growth process is analyzed. In microgravity, dynamic stability depends only on capillary effects and is decoupled from heat transfer. Depending on the initial conditions and growth parameters, the crystal shape will evolve towards the crucible wall, towards a stable gap width, or towards the center of the crucible, collapsing the meniscus. The effect of a tapered crucible on dynamic stability is also described.

  6. A detached binary system BK Pegasi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demircan, Osman; Kaya, Yalcin; Tufekcioglu, Zeki

    1994-12-01

    The UBV photometry of the detached F-type eclipsing binary BK Pegasi is presented. The light curve solution by a simple spherical model assumption suggests that a slightly hotter, larger and more luminous primary was eclipsed during the primary minimum. Combined with the radial velocity curves in Popper (1983), it was used to determine anew the system's parameters. The age and the metal abundance of the system were estimated as (3.3 +/- 0.2) x 109 yr and z = 0.028 +/- 0.003 from a comparison with the new grids of stellar models and the isochrones by Schaller et al. (1993). The distance of the system was estimated as 290 pc.

  7. Missed retinal breaks in rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Takkar, Brijesh; Azad, Shorya; Shashni, Adarsh; Pujari, Amar; Bhatia, Indrish; Azad, Rajvardhan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the causes and associations of missed retinal breaks (MRBs) and posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) in patients with rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). METHODS Case sheets of patients undergoing vitreo retinal surgery for RRD at a tertiary eye care centre were evaluated retrospectively. Out of the 378 records screened, 253 were included for analysis of MRBs and 191 patients were included for analysis of PVD, depending on the inclusion criteria. Features of RRD and retinal breaks noted on examination were compared to the status of MRBs and PVD detected during surgery for possible associations. RESULTS Overall, 27% patients had MRBs. Retinal holes were commonly missed in patients with lattice degeneration while missed retinal tears were associated with presence of complete PVD. Patients operated for cataract surgery were significantly associated with MRBs (P=0.033) with the odds of missing a retinal break being 1.91 as compared to patients with natural lens. Advanced proliferative vitreo retinopathy (PVR) and retinal bullae were the most common reasons for missing a retinal break during examination. PVD was present in 52% of the cases and was wrongly assessed in 16%. Retinal bullae, pseudophakia/aphakia, myopia, and horse shoe retinal tears were strongly associated with presence of PVD. Traumatic RRDs were rarely associated with PVD. CONCLUSION Pseudophakic patients, and patients with retinal bullae or advanced PVR should be carefully screened for MRBs. Though Weiss ring is a good indicator of PVD, it may still be over diagnosed in some cases. PVD is associated with retinal bullae and pseudophakia, and inversely with traumatic RRD. PMID:27990367

  8. Entropy generation in a parallel-plate active magnetic regenerator with insulator layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugica Guerrero, Ibai; Poncet, Sébastien; Bouchard, Jonathan

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes a feasible solution to diminish conduction losses in active magnetic regenerators. Higher performances of these machines are linked to a lower thermal conductivity of the Magneto-Caloric Material (MCM) in the streamwise direction. The concept presented here involves the insertion of insulator layers along the length of a parallel-plate magnetic regenerator in order to reduce the heat conduction within the MCM. This idea is investigated by means of a 1D numerical model. This model solves not only the energy equations for the fluid and solid domains but also the magnetic circuit that conforms the experimental setup of reference. In conclusion, the addition of insulator layers within the MCM increases the temperature span, cooling load, and coefficient of performance by a combination of lower heat conduction losses and an increment of the global Magneto-Caloric Effect. The generated entropy by solid conduction, fluid convection, and conduction and viscous losses are calculated to help understand the implications of introducing insulator layers in magnetic regenerators. Finally, the optimal number of insulator layers is studied.

  9. Active flow control insight gained from a modified integral boundary layer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Avraham

    2016-11-01

    Active Flow Control (AFC) can alter the development of boundary layers with applications (e.g., reducing drag by separation delay or separating the boundary layers and enhancing vortex shedding to increase drag). Historically, significant effects of steady AFC methods were observed. Unsteady actuation is significantly more efficient than steady. Full-scale AFC tests were conducted with varying levels of success. While clearly relevant to industry, AFC implementation relies on expert knowledge with proven intuition and or costly and lengthy computational efforts. This situation hinders the use of AFC while simple, quick and reliable design method is absent. An updated form of the unsteady integral boundary layer (UIBL) equations, that include AFC terms (unsteady wall transpiration and body forces) can be used to assist in AFC analysis and design. With these equations and given a family of suitable velocity profiles, the momentum thickness can be calculated and matched with an outer, potential flow solution in 2D and 3D manner to create an AFC design tool, parallel to proven tools for airfoil design. Limiting cases of the UIBL equation can be used to analyze candidate AFC concepts in terms of their capability to modify the boundary layers development and system performance.

  10. Hypoxia inducible factor 1α contributes to regulation of autophagy in retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Shelby, Shameka J; Angadi, Pavan S; Zheng, Qiong-Duon; Yao, Jingyu; Jia, Lin; Zacks, David N

    2015-08-01

    Photoreceptor (PR) cells receive oxygen and nutritional support from the underlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Retinal detachment results in PR hypoxia and their time-dependent death. Detachment also activates autophagy within the PR, which serves to reduce the rate of PR apoptosis. In this study, we test the hypothesis that autophagy activation in the PR results, at least in part, from the detachment-induced activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF). Retina-RPE separation was created in Brown-Norway rats and C57BL/6J mice by injection of 1% hyaluronic acid into the subretinal space. Retinas were harvested and assayed for HIF protein levels. Cultured 661W photoreceptor cells were subjected to hypoxic conditions and assayed for induction of HIF and autophagy. The requirement of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in regulating photoreceptor autophagy was tested using siRNA in vitro and in vivo. We observed increased levels of HIF-1α and HIF-2α within 1 day post-detachment, as well as increased levels of BNIP3, a downstream target of HIF-1α that contributes to autophagy activation. Exposing 661W cells to hypoxia resulted in increased HIF-1α and HIF-2α levels and increase in conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II. Silencing of HIF-1α, but not HIF-2α, reduced the hypoxia-induced increase in LC3-II formation and increased cell death in 661W cells. Silencing of HIF-1α in rat retinas prevented the detachment-induced increase in BNIP3 and LC3-II, resulting in increased PR cell death. Our data support the hypothesis that HIF-1α, but not HIF-2α, serves as an early response signal to induce autophagy and reduce photoreceptor cell death.

  11. Layer-by-layer assembly of TiO2 nanowire/carbon nanotube films and characterization of their photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darányi, Mária; Csesznok, Tamás; Kukovecz, Ákos; Kónya, Zoltán; Kiricsi, Imre; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Vajtai, Robert

    2011-05-01

    We report on the layer-by-layer (LbL) formation of TiO2-MWNT-TiO2 coatings on quartz with either trititanate derived TiO2 nanowires or Degussa P25 as the photocatalytically active material. The optimized deposition sequence is discussed in detail and the morphology of the prepared coatings is analyzed by SEM and XRD. The heterogeneous photocatalytic performance of the coatings was tested in the methyl orange oxidation reaction. The apparent first order rate constant fell in the 0.01-0.20 h - 1 range over a 2.5 × 2.5 cm2 film depending on the type and the thickness of the titanate coating. Building a multiwall carbon nanotube layer into the middle of the layer improved the photocatalytic activity for each material for all of the studied thicknesses. P25 based films performed 2-5 times better than TiO2 nanowire films; however, the pores in the P25 based films were largely blocked because the isotropic P25 nanoparticles form closely packed layers by themselves and even more so with the comparably sized multiwall carbon nanotubes. Therefore, films derived from titanate nanowires appear to be more suitable for use as multifunctional, photocatalytically active filtration media.

  12. Layer-by-layer assembly of TiO2 nanowire/carbon nanotube films and characterization of their photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Darányi, Mária; Csesznok, Tamás; Kukovecz, Akos; Kónya, Zoltán; Kiricsi, Imre; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Vajtai, Robert

    2011-05-13

    We report on the layer-by-layer (LbL) formation of TiO(2)-MWNT-TiO(2) coatings on quartz with either trititanate derived TiO(2) nanowires or Degussa P25 as the photocatalytically active material. The optimized deposition sequence is discussed in detail and the morphology of the prepared coatings is analyzed by SEM and XRD. The heterogeneous photocatalytic performance of the coatings was tested in the methyl orange oxidation reaction. The apparent first order rate constant fell in the 0.01-0.20 h(-1) range over a 2.5 × 2.5 cm(2) film depending on the type and the thickness of the titanate coating. Building a multiwall carbon nanotube layer into the middle of the layer improved the photocatalytic activity for each material for all of the studied thicknesses. P25 based films performed 2-5 times better than TiO(2) nanowire films; however, the pores in the P25 based films were largely blocked because the isotropic P25 nanoparticles form closely packed layers by themselves and even more so with the comparably sized multiwall carbon nanotubes. Therefore, films derived from titanate nanowires appear to be more suitable for use as multifunctional, photocatalytically active filtration media.

  13. Superior Photostability and Photocatalytic Activity of ZnO Nanoparticles Coated with Ultrathin TiO2 Layers through Atomic-Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Kishore; Jang, Eunyong; Park, Young Min; Park, Tae Joo

    2015-12-21

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) is a thin-film growth technology that allows for conformal growth of thin films with atomic-level control over their thickness. Although ALD is successful in the semiconductor manufacturing industry, its feasibility for nanoparticle coating has been less explored. Herein, the ALD coating of TiO2 layers on ZnO nanoparticles by employing a specialized rotary reactor is demonstrated. The photocatalytic activity and photostability of ZnO nanoparticles coated with TiO2 layers by ALD and chemical methods were examined by the photodegradation of Rhodamine B dye under UV irradiation. Even though the photocatalytic activity of the presynthesized ZnO nanoparticles is higher than that of commercial P25 TiO2 nanoparticles, their activity tends to decline due to severe photocorrosion. The chemically synthesized TiO2 coating layer on ZnO resulted in severely declined photoactivity despite the improved photostability. However, ultrathin and conformal ALD TiO2 coatings (≈ 0.75-1.5 nm) on ZnO improved its photostability without degradation of photocatalytic activity. Surprisingly, the photostability is comparable to that of pure TiO2, and the photocatalytic activity to that of pure ZnO.

  14. Seasonal and solar activity variations of F3 layer and quadruple stratification (StF-4) near the equatorial region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardelli, A.; Fagundes, P. R.; Pezzopane, M.; Venkatesh, K.; Pillat, V. G.

    2016-12-01

    The study of multiple stratification of the F layer has the initial records in the midtwentieth century. Since then, many studies were focused on F3 layer. The diurnal, seasonal, and solar activity variations of the F3 layer characteristics have been investigated by several researchers. Recently, investigations on multiple stratifications of F layer received an important boost after the quadruple stratification (StF-4) was observed at Palmas (10.3°S, 48.3°W; dip latitude 6.6°S—near-equatorial region), Brazil. The present study reports the latest findings related with the seasonal and solar activity characteristics of the F3 layer and StF-4 near the equatorial region during the period from 2002 to 2006. A significant connection between StF-4 and F3 layer has been noticed, since the StF-4 is always preceded and followed by a F3 layer appearance. However, the F3 layer and the StF-4 present different seasonal and solar cycle variations. At a near-equatorial station Palmas, the F3 layer shows the maximum and minimum occurrences during summer and winter seasons, respectively. On the contrary, the StF-4 presents the maximum and minimum occurrences during winter and summer seasons, respectively. While the F3 layer occurrence is not affected by solar cycle, the StF-4 appearance is instead more frequent during high solar activity.

  15. Enhancing the performance of nanofiltration membranes by modifying the active layer with aramide dendrimers.

    PubMed

    de Jubera, Ana M Saenz; Gao, Yuan; Moore, Jeffrey S; Cahill, David G; Mariñas, Benito J

    2012-09-04

    The fully aromatic polyamide active layer of a commercial nanofiltration membrane was modified with three generations (G1, G2, and G3) of aramide dendrimers, all with oligoethylene glycol chains on their peripheries. Permeation experiments revealed that the rejection of Rhodamine WT, used as a surrogate for organic contaminants, improved 1-2 orders of magnitude for membranes modified with G2 and G3 dendrimers at loadings of 0.7-3.5 μg/cm(2) (dendrimer layer thicknesses of ~1-6 nm) compared to the performance of unmodified membranes. In contrast, the corresponding water permeability of dendrimer-modified membranes decreased by only ~30%. Although an enhancement in the rejection of H(3)AsO(3), NaCl, and BaCl(2) was also observed for dendritic membranes, the effect was less pronounced than that for rhodamine WT. Characterization of membranes modified with 3.5 μg/cm(2) dendrimers G2 and G3 by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry with the aid of heavy ion probes (Ag(+) and Ba(2+)) revealed that accessibility of the larger Ba(2+) probe to carboxylate groups on the active layer decreased for the membranes modified with dendrimers.

  16. Active control of acoustic radiation from laminated cylindrical shells integrated with a piezoelectric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiongtao; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Xusheng; Jiang, Guohe

    2013-06-01

    Active control of sound radiation from piezoelectric laminated cylindrical shells is theoretically investigated in the wavenumber domain. The governing equations of the smart cylindrical shells are derived by using first-order shear deformation theory. The smart layer is divided into lots of actuator patches, each of which is coated with two very thin electrodes at its inner and outer surfaces. Proportional derivative negative feedback control is applied to the actuator patches and the stiffness of the controlled layer is derived in the wavenumber domain. The equivalent driving forces and moments generated by the piezoelectric layer can produce distinct sound radiation. Large actuator patches cause strong wavenumber conversion and fluctuation of the far-field sound pressure, and do not make any contribution to sound reduction. Nevertheless, suitable small actuator patches induce weak wavenumber conversion and play an important role in the suppression of vibration and acoustic power. The derivative gain of the active control can effectively suppress sound radiation from smart cylindrical shells. The effects of small proportional gain on the sound field can be neglected, but large proportional gain has a great impact on the acoustic radiation of cylindrical shells. The influence of different piezoelectric materials on the acoustic power is described in the numerical results.

  17. Spontaneous Solitaire™ AB Thrombectomy Stent Detachment During Stroke Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Akpinar, Suha Yilmaz, Guliz

    2015-04-15

    Spontaneous Solitaire™ stent retriever detachment is a rarely defined entity seen during stroke treatment, which can result in a disastrous clinical outcome if it cannot be solved within a critical stroke treatment time window. Two solutions to this problem are presented in the literature. The first is to leave the stent in place and apply angioplasty to the detached stent, while the second involves surgically removing the stent from the location at which it detached. Here, we present a case of inadvertent stent detachment during stroke treatment for a middle cerebral artery M1 occlusion resulting in progressive thrombosis. The detached stent was removed endovascularly by another Solitaire stent, resulting in the recanalization of the occluded middle cerebral artery.

  18. Layer V perirhinal cortical ensemble activity during object exploration: a comparison between young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Burke, S N; Hartzell, A L; Lister, J P; Hoang, L T; Barnes, C A

    2012-10-01

    Object recognition memory requires the perirhinal cortex (PRC) and this cognitive function declines during normal aging. Recent electrophysiological recordings from young rats have shown that neurons in Layer V of the PRC are activated by three-dimensional objects. Thus, it is possible that age-related object recognition deficits result from alterations in PRC neuron activity in older animals. To examine this, the present study used cellular compartment analysis of temporal activity by fluorescence in situ hybridization (catFISH) with confocal microscopy to monitor cellular distributions of activity-induced Arc RNA in layer V of the PRC. Activity was monitored during two distinct epochs of object exploration. In one group of rats (6 young/6 aged) animals were placed in a familiar testing arena and allowed to explore five different three-dimensional objects for two 5-min sessions separated by a 20-min rest (AA). The second group of animals (6 young/6 aged) also explored the same objects for two 5-min sessions, but the environment was changed between the first and the second epoch (AB). Behavioral data showed that both age groups spent less time exploring objects during the second epoch, even when the environment changed, indicating successful recognition. Although the proportion of active neurons between epochs did not change in the AA group, in the AB group more neurons were active during epoch 2 of object exploration. This recruitment of neurons into the active neural ensemble could serve to signal that familiar stimuli are being encountered in a new context. When numbers of Arc positive neurons were compared between age groups, the old rats had significantly lower proportions of Arc-positive PRC neurons in both the AA and AB behavioral conditions. These data support the hypothesis that age-associated functional alterations in the PRC contribute to declines in stimulus recognition over the lifespan.

  19. Permian magmatism, Permian detachment faulting, and Alpine thrusting in the Orobic Anticline, southern Alps, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Florian; Froitzheim, Niko; Geisler-Wierwille, Thorsten; Schlöder, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    The Grassi Detachment Fault is located in the Orobic Alps east of Lake Como and was described by Froitzheim et al. (2008) as an Early Permian extensional structure. Many issues still remained unclear, like the exact timing of faulting and the extension from the well-exposed part of the detachment towards west. The Grassi Detachment Fault separates the Variscan Basement in its footwall from the volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Early Permian Collio Formation within its hanging wall, marked by a mylonitic and cataclastic layer whose textures indicate top-to-the-southeast displacement. The footwall basement is formed by the Variscan Morbegno Gneiss and two granitic intrusions, the Val Biandino Quarz Diorite (VBQD) and the Valle Biagio Granite (VBG). The former is syntectonic with respect to the detachment, whereas for the latter, the relation to the detachment is unknown. The age of the VBQD is poorly defined as 312 Ma ± 48 Ma (Thöni et al. 1992); the VBG has not been dated. Volcanic rocks of the Collio Formation in the hanging wall may represent the extrusive part of the magmatic system. In our study area west of Val Biandino, several faults and shear zones are exposed: (1) The Grassi Detachment Fault is represented by mylonites and cataclasites with top-SE shear sense, between basement rocks and the Collio Volcanics. Towards NW, it is truncated by the unconformably overlying Late Permian Verrucano Lombardo. This may reflect the eroded culmination of a Permian metamorphic core complex. (2) A steeply NW-dipping, brittle normal fault is found further west in the footwall between VBQD and VBG. It is sealed by the basal unconformity of the Verrucano Lombardo and therefore should also be of Early Permian age (Sciunnach, 2001). It may represent an antithetic fault with respect to the detachment, accommodating the uplift of the magmatically inflated core complex. (3) The Biandino Fault is a steeply SE-dipping reverse fault, affecting also the Late Permian Verrucano

  20. Large-scale Quaternary detachments in Ventura Basin, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeats, Robert S.

    1983-01-01

    The Ventura basin is an east-north-east trending trough in the California Transverse Ranges which records major Quaternary detachment faulting at three levels. The earliest thrusting occurred along weak siltstone interbeds in a sequence dominated by competent basin-plain turbidite sandstone. Because sedimentation continued during thrusting, the age, rate, and direction of thrusting can be worked out. Faulting began 1.3 m.y. ago and ceased 0.65 m.y. ago, with a maximum slip rate of 2.8 mm/yr to the southeast. The fault set moved up a 45° ramp and ended as a blind thrust. The ramp had topographic expression on the seafloor, diverting turbidites around the ramp and preserving ash beds along with other hemipelagic sediments on its crest. Following the end of deposition 0.2 m.y. ago, the competent basin-plain turbidites underwent flexural slip folding over an incompetent Miocene sequence dominated by shale; underlying competent Paleogene strata were not folded. The south flank of the Ventura Avenue anticline tilted at 3.4 μrad/yr, the anticlinal crest rose at a rate of 15-16 mm/yr decelerating to 4.3-5.2 mm/yr, and the anticline and an adjacent syncline shortened at a rate of 20 mm/yr. The high rate of folding in the Ventura Avenue oil field resulted in overpressured sandstone reservoirs and oil-water interfaces which have not had time to reach gravity equilibrium. The Red Mountain, San Cayetano, and Santa Susana faults mark the surface expression of a seismically active midcrustal detachment which produced convergence across the Ventura basin at rates as high as 23 mm/yr. Total convergence across the eastern San Cayetano fault near Fillmore is 11,600±2000 m in the last million years.

  1. On Active Layer Environments and Processes in Western Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. D.; Meiklejohn, I.; Nel, W.

    2012-12-01

    The current understanding of Antarctic permafrost is poor, particularly regarding its evolution, the current thermal characteristics, and relationships with pedogenesis, hydrology, geomorphic, dynamics, biotic activity and response to global changes. Results from borehole temperature measurements over a four-year period in Western Dronning Maud Land suggest that the active layer depth is dependent on the substrate, latitude, altitude and the volume of ground exposed; the latter alludes to the potential impact of surrounding ice on the ground thermal regime. The active layer depths at the monitoring sites, varied between 16 cm at Vesleskarvet, a small nunatak at 850 masl to 28 cm in granitic till at Jutulsessen (1 270 masl). The mean near surface (1.5 cm depth) ground temperatures from 2009 to 2012 in the region have a narrow range from -16.4°C at 850m to -17.5°C at 1270 masl. Permafrost temperatures for the same locations vary between -16.3°C and -18.3°C. While little variability exists between the mean temperatures at the study locations, each site is distinct and seasonal and shorter-term frost cycles have produced landforms that are characteristic of both permafrost and diurnal frost environments. One of the key aspects of investigation is the control that the active layer has on autochthonous blockfield development in the region. The, thus far, exploratory research is being used to understand controls on the landscape and the relationship between distribution and abundance of biota. Given the rapidly changing climates in the region, improving knowledge of what drives patterns of biodiversity at a local and regional scale is vital to assess consequences of environmental change.

  2. Detachment of helium plasmas in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briesemeister, A. R.; Canik, J. M.; Isler, R. C.; Hillis, D. L.; Shafer, M. W.; McLean, A. G.; Makowski, M. A.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Meyer, W. H.; Moser, A. L.; Wang, H.; Watkins, J. G.

    2016-10-01

    In low power, Ohmic plasmas, the high recycling regime typically seen as core density is increased in deuterium plasmas, was not observed in helium plasmas. When neutral helium beam heating was added, the high recycling regime returned as predicted using the SOLPS code. Modeling shows that increasing input power reduces neutral penetration across the separatrix, reducing radiation from the confined plasma and allowing a larger fraction of the input power to be carried into the scrape off layer. Detailed measurements including divertor ion and electron temperatures and densities and radiation emission patterns are presented at a variety of heating levels including both H and L-mode plasmas. An understanding of the differences between detachment in the helium and deuterium plasmas will be important for understanding how divertor conditions in the helium startup phase of ITER will differ from those in deuterium operation. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-AC05-00OR22725, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Active-passive hybrid vibration control study in plates using enhanced smart constrained layer damping (ESCLD) treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamurugan, V.; Narayanan, S.

    2003-10-01

    In the present paper, the active-passive hybrid vibration control performance due to Enhanced Smart Constrained Layer Damping (ESCLD) treatment as proposed by Liao and Wang on plate like structures has been considered. This treatment consists of a viscoelastic layer constrained between a smart piezoelectric layer and the base structure being controlled. Also, the smart constraining layer is clamped to the base structure. This type of damping treatment has got both active and passive component of damping. The passive damping is through cyclic shearing of viscoelastic constrained layer which is further enhanced by activating the smart piezoelectric constraining layer and the active component of the damping is through the transfer of control moments from the piezoelectric layer to the base structure through the viscoelastic layer and also bypassed through the clamps. A plate finite element has been formulated using first order shear deformation theory, including the effect of transverse shear and rotary inertia. The effect of the viscoelastic shear layer and piezoelectric constraining layer on the mass and stiffness has been included in the model. The viscoelastic shear layer is modeled usig Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method, which is a time domain approach. The clamps (edge elements) are modeled as equivalent springs connecting the smart piezoelectric constraining layer with the structure to be controlled. LQR optimal control strategy is used to obtain optimal control gains. The effect of the viscoelastic material properties (shear modulus and loss factor) on the hybrid vibration control performance is studied for both SCLD (without edge elements) and ESCLD systems.

  4. Active layer thermal monitoring at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Roberto; Schaefer, Carlos; Simas, Felipe; Pregesbauer, Michael; Bockheim, James

    2013-04-01

    International attention on the climate change phenomena has grown in the last decade, intense modelling of climate scenarios were carried out by scientific investigations searching the sources and trends of these changes. The cryosphere and its energy flux became the focus of many investigations, being recognised as a key element for the understanding of future trends. The active layer and permafrost are key components of the terrestrial cryosphere due to their role in energy flux regulation and high sensitivity to climate change (Kane et al., 2001; Smith and Brown, 2009). Compared with other regions of the globe, our understanding of Antarctic permafrost is poor, especially in relation to its thermal state and evolution, its physical properties, links to pedogenesis, hydrology, geomorphic dynamics and response to global change (Bockheim, 1995, Bockheim et al., 2008). The active layer monitoring site was installed in the summer of 2008, and consist of thermistors (accuracy ± 0.2 °C) arranged in a vertical array (Turbic Eutric Cryosol 600 m asl, 10.5 cm, 32.5 cm, 67.5 cm and 83.5 cm). King George Island experiences a cold moist maritime climate characterized by mean annual air temperatures of -2°C and mean summer air temperatures above 0°C for up to four months (Rakusa-Suszczewski et al., 1993, Wen et al., 1994). Ferron et al., (2004) found great variability when analysing data from 1947 to1995 and identified cycles of 5.3 years of colder conditions followed by 9.6 years of warmer conditions. All probes were connected to a Campbell Scientific CR 1000 data logger recording data at hourly intervals from March 1st 2008 until November 30th 2012. Meteorological data for Fildes was obtained from the near by stations. We calculated the thawing days, freezing days; thawing degree days and freezing degree days; all according to Guglielmin et al. (2008). The active lawyer thickness was calculated as the 0 °C depth by extrapolating the thermal gradient from the two

  5. Active layer hydrology in an arctic tundra ecosystem: quantifying water sources and cycling using water stable isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Throckmorton, Heather M.; Newman, Brent D.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Perkins, George B.; Feng, Xiahong; Graham, David E.; O'Malley, Daniel; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Young, Jessica; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Wilson, Cathy J.

    2016-04-16

    Climate change and thawing permafrost in the Arctic will significantly alter landscape hydro-geomorphology and the distribution of soil moisture, which will have cascading effects on climate feedbacks (CO2 and CH4) and plant and microbial communities. Fundamental processes critical to predicting active layer hydrology are not well understood. This study applied water stable isotope techniques (δ2H and δ18O) to infer sources and mixing of active layer waters in a polygonal tundra landscape in Barrow, Alaska (USA), in August and September of 2012. Results suggested that winter precipitation did not contribute substantially to surface waters or subsurface active layer pore waters measured in August and September. Summer rain was the main source of water to the active layer, with seasonal ice melt contributing to deeper pore waters later in the season. Surface water evaporation was evident in August from a characteristic isotopic fractionation slope (δ2H vs δ18O). Freeze-out isotopic fractionation effects in frozen active layer samples and textural permafrost were indistinguishable from evaporation fractionation, emphasizing the importance of considering the most likely processes in water isotope studies, in systems where both evaporation and freeze-out occur in close proximity. The fractionation observed in frozen active layer ice was not observed in liquid active layer pore waters. Such a discrepancy between frozen and liquid active layer samples suggests mixing of meltwater, likely due to slow melting of seasonal ice. In conclusion, this research provides insight into fundamental processes relating to sources and mixing of active layer waters, which should be considered in process-based fine-scale and intermediate-scale hydrologic models.

  6. Influence Of Clear-cutting On Thermal and hydrological Regime In The Active Layer Near Yakutsk, Eastern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahana, G.; Kobayashi, Y.; Machimura, T.; Fedorov, A. N.; Fukuda, M.

    2004-12-01

    Thermal and hydrological conditions in the active layer were investigated simultaneously at a mature larch forest (control site) and a cutover, which experienced clear-cutting in November 2000 during the thawing periods from 2001 to 2003, near Yakutsk, Eastern Siberia. The two sites were located about 100m apart and the cutover was formerly a part of the control larch forest site. The aims were to clarify the characteristics of heat and water budget in the active layer, and to assess the influence of clear-cutting on permafrost and active layer conditions, based on field observations at both intact and clear-cut forest. Clear-cutting enhanced ground thawing and the difference in the active layer thickness between the forest and the cutover (1-year) was 14cm. The soil water content drastically decreased at the forest, while that at the cutover was retained in during the first thawing season after clear-cutting. Marked changes in the active layer conditions were limited only to the first thawing season. The difference in the maximum thaw depth did not expand significantly in the second thawing season despite the increased ground heat flux at the cutover site. Thermal and hydrological analyses of the active layer revealed that the storage of latent heat was a predominant component in the energy balance in the active layer. Thus, the soil moisture condition, especially spring ice content in the active layer, plays an important role in controlling the energy balance of the active layer. Further increases in the maximum thaw depth at the cutover site were inhibited by the thermal inertial effect of the larger amount of ice in the second spring after disturbance.

  7. Active layer hydrology in an arctic tundra ecosystem: quantifying water sources and cycling using water stable isotopes

    DOE PAGES

    Throckmorton, Heather M.; Newman, Brent D.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; ...

    2016-04-16

    Climate change and thawing permafrost in the Arctic will significantly alter landscape hydro-geomorphology and the distribution of soil moisture, which will have cascading effects on climate feedbacks (CO2 and CH4) and plant and microbial communities. Fundamental processes critical to predicting active layer hydrology are not well understood. This study applied water stable isotope techniques (δ2H and δ18O) to infer sources and mixing of active layer waters in a polygonal tundra landscape in Barrow, Alaska (USA), in August and September of 2012. Results suggested that winter precipitation did not contribute substantially to surface waters or subsurface active layer pore waters measuredmore » in August and September. Summer rain was the main source of water to the active layer, with seasonal ice melt contributing to deeper pore waters later in the season. Surface water evaporation was evident in August from a characteristic isotopic fractionation slope (δ2H vs δ18O). Freeze-out isotopic fractionation effects in frozen active layer samples and textural permafrost were indistinguishable from evaporation fractionation, emphasizing the importance of considering the most likely processes in water isotope studies, in systems where both evaporation and freeze-out occur in close proximity. The fractionation observed in frozen active layer ice was not observed in liquid active layer pore waters. Such a discrepancy between frozen and liquid active layer samples suggests mixing of meltwater, likely due to slow melting of seasonal ice. In conclusion, this research provides insight into fundamental processes relating to sources and mixing of active layer waters, which should be considered in process-based fine-scale and intermediate-scale hydrologic models.« less

  8. Observation of Plasma Recombination with the Negative Ions in Detached Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonegawa, Akira; Shirota, Isao; Yoshida, Kenichi; Sugimoto, Tatunori; Kawamura, Kazutaka; Watanabe, Tsuguhiro; Ohyabu, Nobuyoshi; Takayama, Kazuo

    2000-10-01

    Detached divertors regimes are characterized by a low temperature (few eV) and high density plasma near the divertor plates. Recently, a new recombination process associated with excited hydrogen molecule, that is, molecular activated recombination (MAR), is expected to lead to an enhancement of the reduction of ion particle flux, and to modify the structure of detached recombining plasmas. In particular, negative ions play a key role in detached divertors regimes in charge exchange recombination of MAR. We present the experimental investigation of effects of the negative ions on detached plasma with MAR in the linear divertor plasma simulator, TPDSHEET-IV (Test Plasma produced by Directed current for SHEET plasma) device. The hydrogen plasma were generated with the hydrogen gas flow of 100 sccm at the discharge current of 50 A and the magnetic field of 0.7 kG. The negative ion density of hydrogen atom was measure by a probe-assisted laser photodetachment method. The reduction of the heat load to the target plate was clearly observed in hydrogen plasma with the hydrogen gas puff. At the same time, negative ions of hydrogen atom are localized in the region of cold electrons (2 eV) of the circumference of the sheet plasma. The charge exchange recombination rate of MAR is about 4 times of magnitude larger than three body recombination rate coefficients at this temperature. These experimental results suggest that the plasma recombination process comes from the negative ion of hydrogen atom.

  9. Murein hydrolase activity of surface layer proteins from Lactobacillus acidophilus against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jun; Gao, Shu-Ming; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Lu, Rong-Rong

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the murein hydrolase activities of the surface layer proteins (SLPs) from two strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus using zymography. The influence of these hydrolase activities on Escherichia coli ATCC 43893 was also evaluated by analysing their growth curve, cell morphology and physiological state. After the incubation of E. coli with SLPs, growth was inhibited, the number of viable cells was significantly reduced, examination by transmission electron microscopy showed that the cell wall was damaged and flow cytometry results indicated that the majority of the cells were sublethally injured. All of these results suggested that the SLPs of both L. acidophilus strains possessed murein hydrolase activities that were sublethal to E. coli cells.

  10. Different determinants of soil carbon decomposition between active and permafrost layers: evidence from alpine permafrost on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Chen, L.; Qin, S.; Ding, J.; Yang, G.; Li, F.

    2015-12-01

    The fate of permafrost carbon is of great concern among global change community due to its potential positive feedback to climate warming. However, the determinants of soil carbon decomposition between active layer and permafrost layers remain poorly understood. This incubation study was designed to test the following two hypotheses: 1) low carbon quantity and microbial abundances in permafrost soils limit decomposition rates compared with active layer soils; 2) carbon losses from active layer are more controlled by environmental factors, whereas those from permafrost depth are primarily determined by the microbial condition. We collected five active layer and permafrost soils from alpine grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau and compared the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at -5 and 5 °C in a 80-days aerobic incubation. The availability of organic carbon and microbial abundances (fungi, bacteria, and actinomycete) within permafrost soils were significantly lower than active layer soils, which, together with the environmental data supports the reduced cumulative CO2 emissions in permafrost depth. However, the decomposability of SOC from permafrost was similar or even higher than surface soils. The carbon loss not only depended on SOC quantity and microbial abundance, but also nitrogen availability and soil pH. Nevertheless, the controls on carbon emissions between active and permafrost layers were significantly different. Cumulative CO2 emission from active layers was best predicted by soil moisture, and carbon emission from permafrost depths was highly associated with fungal-PLFAs. Taken together, these results demonstrate that different controls on carbon emission between active layer and permafrost soils. These differences highlight the importance of distinguishing permafrost depth in Earth System Models when predicting the responses of deep soil carbon to environmental change.

  11. Vertical profiles of trapped greenhouse gases in Alaskan permafrost active layers before the spring thaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Eunji; Yang, Ji-woong; Kim, Yongwon; Ahn, Jinho

    2015-04-01

    Seasonally frozen ground over permafrost is important in controlling annual greenhouse gas exchange between permafrost and atmosphere. Soil microbes decompose soil carbon and generate carbon dioxide and methane when they become activated. However, the actual greenhouse gas emission follows various efflux pathways. For example, seasonal freezing of the top soil layers can either restrain or press the gas emission from deeper layers. It has been reported that abrupt release of methane during spring is attributable to the emission of trapped gases that had failed to be released instantly after formation (1, 2). In order to examine the seasonally trapped greenhouse gases, we drilled five Alaskan permafrost cores before spring thaw; one from coastal tundra, two from typical boreal forests, one from area where fire occurred, and one from peat accumulated sites. Vertical profiles of carbon dioxide and methane concentrations were obtained with 5-10 cm depth intervals. We found methane peaks from two cores, indicating inhibition of methane efflux. We also analyzed organic carbon, nitrogen and water contents and compared them with the greenhouse gas profiles. We are continuing analysis for the soil temperature profiles of the sampling boreholes because the detailed temperature information might be related to microbial activity, and can be used as indirect indicators of soil water freezing and latent heat influences at some active layer depth (zero curtain effects). All the high-resolution analyses for subsurface environments may help to improve understanding greenhouse gas emission from permafrost regions. 1. Mastepanov M, et al. (2008) Large tundra methane burst during onset of freezing. Nature 456(7222):628-630. 2. Song C, et al. (2012) Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region. Environmental Research Letters 7(3):034009.

  12. Potassium channels control the interaction between active dendritic integration compartments in layer 5 cortical pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, Mark T.; Xu, Ning-Long; Magee, Jeffrey C.; Williams, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Active dendritic synaptic integration enhances the computational power of neurons. Such nonlinear processing generates an object-localization signal in the apical dendritic tuft of layer 5B cortical pyramidal neurons during sensory-motor behaviour. Here we employ electrophysiological and optical approaches in brain-slices and behaving animals to investigate how excitatory synaptic input to this distal dendritic compartment influences neuronal output. We find that active dendritic integration throughout the apical dendritic tuft is highly compartmentalized by voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels. A high-density of both transient and sustained KV channels was observed in all apical dendritic compartments. These channels potently regulated the interaction between apical dendritic tuft, trunk, and axo-somatic integration zones to control neuronal output in vitro as well as the engagement of dendritic nonlinear processing in vivo during sensory-motor behaviour. Thus, KV channels dynamically tune the interaction between active dendritic integration compartments in layer 5B pyramidal neurons to shape behaviourally relevant neuronal computations. PMID:23931999

  13. Aminosilane layers on the plasma activated thermoplastics: influence of solvent on its structure and morphology.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Vijaya; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2013-12-01

    The chemistry and the structure of aminosilane layer on the plasma activated thermoplastic substrates, e.g., polycarbonate (PC), polystyrene (PS), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and cyclic olefin co-polymer (COC) were investigated at the molecular level. The nature of the surface functional groups of the silane layers prepared by solution phase deposition in aqueous and anhydrous solvents were studied using various techniques including ellipsometry, goniometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). The XPS analyses revealed the presence of various oxygen functionalities on the plasma activated thermoplastics. Considerable differences were observed for the structure of aminosilane depending on the solvent used for the reaction. Deposition from aqueous solution resulted in relatively flat and smooth surfaces with consistent thickness compared to the anhydrous solution deposition. In the former case, 33% of the total nitrogen accounted for protonated amine and 16% for the free amino groups. In the latter, only 6% accounted for the protonated amine. The point of zero charge (pzc), on the aminosilane modified PC was found to be around 7, indicated that the surface is positively charged below pH 7 and negatively charged above pH 7. The surface analysis data suggested that various interactions are possible between the plasma activated thermoplastic surface and the aminosilane. In general, they are bound to the surface through covalent bond formation between the oxygen functionalities on the thermoplastic surface and the amino or the silanol groups of the aminosilane.

  14. Hot-Film and Hot-Wire Anemometry for a Boundary Layer Active Flow Control Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenahan, Keven C.; Schatzman, David M.; Wilson, Jacob Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Unsteady active flow control (AFC) has been used experimentally for many years to minimize bluff-body drag. This technology could significantly improve performance of rotorcraft by cleaning up flow separation. It is important, then, that new actuator technologies be studied for application to future vehicles. A boundary layer wind tunnel was constructed with a 1ft-x-3ft test section and unsteady measurement instrumentation to study how AFC manipulates the boundary layer to overcome adverse pressure gradients and flow separation. This unsteady flow control research requires unsteady measurement methods. In order to measure the boundary layer characteristics, both hot-wire and hot-film Constant Temperature Anemometry is used. A hot-wire probe is mounted in the flow to measure velocity while a hot-film array lays on the test surface to measure skin friction. Hot-film sensors are connected to an anemometer, a Wheatstone bridge circuit with an output that corresponds to the dynamic flow response. From this output, the time varying flow field, turbulence, and flow reversal can be characterized. Tuning the anemometers requires a fan test on the hot-film sensors to adjust each output. This is a delicate process as several variables drastically affect the data, including control resistance, signal input, trim, and gain settings.

  15. Single active-layer structured dual-function devices using hybrid polymer-quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Son, Dong-Ick; Park, Dong-Hee; Ie, Sang-Yub; Choi, Won-Kook; Choi, Ji-Won; Li, Fushan; Kim, Tae-Whan

    2008-10-01

    We demonstrate hybrid polymer-quantum dot dual-function devices with a single active-layer structure consisting of CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dots dispersed with poly N-vinylcarbazole (PVK) and 1,3,5-tirs-(N-phenylbenzimidazol-2-yl) benzene (TPBi) fabricated on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/glass substrate by using a simple spin-coating technique. The dual-function devices are composed of light-emitting diodes (LED) on the top side and nonvolatile organic bistable memory devices (OBD) on the bottom side and can show electroluminescence (EL) along with electrical bistability concurrently. Both the functionality of LEDs and OBDs can be successfully achieved by adding an electron transport layer (ETL) TPBi to the OBD to attain an LED in which the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level of TPBi is positioned at the energy level between the conduction band of CdSe/ZnS and the LiF/Al electrode. Through transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study, it is revealed that CdSe/ZnS QDs distributed on the interface of the hole transport layer (HTL) and ETL significantly take part in the electroluminescence process rather than those existing at the outer surface of the ETL.

  16. Evidence for reduced charge recombination in carbon nanotube/perovskite-based active layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A.; Jeong, Seung Pyo; Han, Xu; Cutting, Christie L.; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Venkataraman, D.

    2016-10-01

    Using impedance spectroscopy and computation, we show that incorporation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in the bulk of the active layer of perovskite-based solar cells reduces charge recombination and increases the open circuit voltage. An ∼87% reduction in recombination was achieved when MWCNTs were introduced in the planar-heterostructure perovskite solar cell containing mixed counterions. The open circuit voltage (Voc) of perovskite/MWCNTs devices was increased by 70 mV, while the short circuit current density (Jsc) and fill factor (FF) remained unchanged.

  17. Improved Power Conversion Efficiency of Inverted Organic Solar Cells by Incorporating Au Nanorods into Active Layer.

    PubMed

    He, Yeyuan; Liu, Chunyu; Li, Jinfeng; Zhang, Xinyuan; Li, Zhiqi; Shen, Liang; Guo, Wenbin; Ruan, Shengping

    2015-07-29

    This Research Article describes a cooperative plasmonic effect on improving the performance of organic solar cells. When Au nanorods(NRs) are incorporated into the active layers, the designed project shows superior enhanced light absorption behavior comparing with control devices, which leads to the realization of organic solar cell with power conversion efficiency of 6.83%, accounting for 18.9% improvement. Further investigations unravel the influence of plasmonic nanostructures on light trapping, exciton generation, dissociation, and charge recombination and transport inside the thin films devices. Moreover, the introduction of high-conductivity Au NRs improves electrical conductivity of the whole device, which contributes to the enhanced fill factor.

  18. Surface and Active Layer Pore Water Chemistry from Ice Wedge Polygons, Barrow, Alaska, 2013-2014

    DOE Data Explorer

    David E. Graham; Baohua Gu; Elizabeth M. Herndon; Stan D. Wullschleger; Ziming Yang; Liyuan Liang

    2016-11-10

    This data set reports the results of spatial surveys of aqueous geochemistry conducted at Intensive Site 1 of the Barrow Environmental Observatory in 2013 and 2014 (Herndon et al., 2015). Surface water and soil pore water samples were collected from multiple depths within the tundra active layer of different microtopographic features (troughs, ridges, center) of a low-centered polygon (area A), high-centered polygon (area B), flat-centered polygon (area C), and transitional polygon (area D). Reported analytes include dissolved organic and inorganic carbon, dissolved carbon dioxide and methane, major inorganic anions, and major and minor cations.

  19. Effect of sodium fluoride, ampicillin, and chlorhexidine on Streptococcus mutans biofilm detachment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Ling, Jun-Qi; Zhang, Kai; Huo, Li-Jun; Ning, Yang

    2012-08-01

    We examined the effect of three clinically used antimicrobials on Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilm detachment under flow conditions. Sodium fluoride (NaF) and chlorhexidine at MIC levels promoted biofilm detachment and inhibited detachment when concentrations were higher than the MIC and reduced detached-cell viability only at high concentrations. Ampicillin at all concentrations tested inhibited detachment and reduced the percentage of viable biofilm-detached cells. All the three antimicrobial treatments reduced biofilm live/dead cell ratios.

  20. Magnetic Nozzle and Plasma Detachment Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Gregory; Dobson, Chris; Jones, Jonathan; Martin, Adam; Bengtson, Roger D.; Briezman, Boris; Arefiev, Alexey; Cassibry, Jason; Shuttpelz, Branwen; Deline, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    High power plasma propulsion can move large payloads for orbit transfer (such as the ISS), lunar missions, and beyond with large savings in fuel consumption owing to the high specific impulse. At high power, lifetime of the thruster becomes an issue. Electrodeless devices with magnetically guided plasma offer the advantage of long life since magnetic fields confine the plasma radially and keep it from impacting the material surfaces. For decades, concerns have been raised about the plasma remaining attached to the magnetic field and returning to the vehicle along the closed magnetic field lines. Recent analysis suggests that this may not be an issue of the magnetic field is properly shaped in the nozzle region and the plasma has sufficient energy density to stretch the magnetic field downstream. An experiment was performed to test the theory regarding the Magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) detachment scenario. Data from this experiment will be presented. The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) being developed by the Ad Astra Rocket Company uses a magnetic nozzle as described above. The VASIMR is also a leading candidate for exploiting an electric propulsion test platform being considered for the ISS.

  1. Bubble Growth and Detachment from a Needle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shusser, Michael; Rambod, Edmond; Gharib, Morteza

    1999-11-01

    The release of bubbles from an underwater nozzle or orifice occurs in large number of applications, such as perforated plate columns, blood oxygenators and various methods of water treatment. It is also a widely used method in laboratory research on multiphase flow and acoustics for generating small bubbles in a controlled fashion. We studied experimentally the growth and pinch-off of air bubbles released from a submerged needle into a quiescent liquid or a liquid flowing parallel to the needle. Micron-sized bubbles were generated by an air-liquid dispenser. High-speed imaging was performed to study the formation and detachment of bubbles from the tip of the needle. The impact of the needle diameter was investigated and the size and number of produced bubbles were assessed for different flow rates of air and for different velocities of the imposed upward liquid flow. The results were compared with available theoretical models and numerical computations. The existence of a critical gas flow rate and two regimes of bubble growth were verified.

  2. Stability of Menisci in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Volz, Martin P.

    2013-01-01

    Detached growth, also referred to as dewetted growth, is a Bridgman crystal growth process in which the melt is in contact with the crucible wall but the crystal is not. A meniscus bridges the gap between the top of the crystal and the crucible wall. The meniscus shape depends on the contact angle of the melt with the crucible wall, the growth angle of the melt with respect to the solidifying crystal, the gas pressure differential, the Weber number describing the rotation rate of the crucible, and the Bond number. Only some of the meniscus shapes are stable and the stability criterion is the sign of the second variation of the potential energy upon admissible meniscus shape perturbations. The effects of confined gas volumes above and below the melt and crucible rotation are evaluated. The analysis is applicable to the non-stationary case where the crystal radius changes during growth. Static stability maps (crystal radius versus pressure differential) are obtained for a series of Bond numbers, growth angles and Weber numbers. Also, the specific cases of Ge and InSb, in both terrestrial and microgravity conditions, are analyzed. Stability was found to depend significantly on whether the interior surface was considered to be microscopically rough or smooth, corresponding to pinned or unpinned states. It was also found that all meniscus shapes are statically stable in a microgravity environment.

  3. Descemet's Membrane Detachment Management Following Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sharifipour, Farideh; Nassiri, Saman; Idan, Aida

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To present a case of total Descemet's membrane detachment (DMD) after trabeculectomy and its surgical management. Case Report: A 68-year-old woman presented with large DMD and corneal edema one day after trabeculectomy. Intracameral air injection on day 3 was not effective. Choroidal effusion complicated the clinical picture with Descemet's membrane (DM) touching the lens. Choroidal tap with air injection on day 6 resulted in DM attachment and totally clear cornea on the next day. However, on day 12 the same scenario was repeated with choroidal effusion, shallow anterior chamber (AC), and DM touching the lens. The third surgery included transconjunctival closure of the scleral flap with 10/0 nylon sutures, choroidal tap, and intracameral injection of 20% sulfur hexafluoride. After the third surgery, DM remained attached with clear cornea. Suture removal and needling bleb revision preserved bleb function. Lens opacity progressed, and the patient underwent uneventful cataract surgery 4 months later. Conclusion: Scleral flap closure using transconjunctival sutures can be used for DMD after trabeculectomy to make the eye a closed system. Surgical drainage of choroidal effusions should be considered to increase the AC depth. PMID:27621793

  4. Improved color rendering of phosphor-converted white light-emitting diodes with dual-blue active layers and n-type AlGaN layer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Qi-Rong; Zhang, Yong; Li, Shu-Ti; Yan, Qi-Ang; Shi, Pei-Pei; Niu, Qiao-Li; He, Miao; Li, Guo-Ping; Li, Jun-Rui

    2012-05-01

    An InGaN/GaN blue light-emitting diode (LED) structure and an InGaN/GaN blue-violet LED structure were grown sequentially on the same sapphire substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. It was found that the insertion of an n-type AlGaN layer below the dual blue-emitting active layers showed better spectral stability at the different driving current relative to the traditional p-type AlGaN electron-blocking layer. In addition, color rendering index of a Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ phosphor-converted white LED based on a dual blue-emitting chip with n-type AlGaN reached 91 at 20 mA, and Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates almost remained at the same point from 5 to 60 mA.

  5. Finite Element Formulation and Active Vibration Control Study on Beams Using Smart Constrained Layer Damping (scld) Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BALAMURUGAN, V.; NARAYANAN, S.

    2002-01-01

    This work deals with the active vibration control of beams with smart constrained layer damping (SCLD) treatment. SCLD design consists of viscoelastic shear layer sandwiched between two layers of piezoelectric sensors and actuator. This composite SCLD when bonded to a vibrating structure acts as a smart treatment. The sensor piezoelectric layer measures the vibration response of the structure and a feedback controller is provided which regulates the axial deformation of the piezoelectric actuator (constraining layer), thereby providing adjustable and significant damping in the structure. The damping offered by SCLD treatment has two components, active action and passive action. The active action is transmitted from the piezoelectric actuator to the host structure through the viscoelastic layer. The passive action is through the shear deformation in the viscoelastic layer. The active action apart from providing direct active control also adjusts the passive action by regulating the shear deformation in the structure. The passive damping component of this design eliminates spillover, reduces power consumption, improves robustness and reliability of the system, and reduces vibration response at high-frequency ranges where active damping is difficult to implement. A beam finite element model has been developed based on Timoshenko's beam theory with partially covered SCLD. The Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method has been used to model the viscoelastic layer. The dissipation co-ordinates, defined using GHM approach, describe the frequency-dependent viscoelastic material properties. Models of PCLD and purely active systems could be obtained as a special case of SCLD. Using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control, the effects of the SCLD on vibration suppression performance and control effort requirements are investigated. The effects of the viscoelastic layer thickness and material properties on the vibration control performance are investigated.

  6. Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case study.

    PubMed

    Paytan, Adina; Lecher, Alanna L; Dimova, Natasha; Sparrow, Katy J; Kodovska, Fenix Garcia-Tigreros; Murray, Joseph; Tulaczyk, Slawomir; Kessler, John D

    2015-03-24

    Methane emissions in the Arctic are important, and may be contributing to global warming. While methane emission rates from Arctic lakes are well documented, methods are needed to quantify the relative contribution of active layer groundwater to the overall lake methane budget. Here we report measurements of natural tracers of soil/groundwater, radon, and radium, along with methane concentration in Toolik Lake, Alaska, to evaluate the role active layer water plays as an exogenous source for lake methane. Average concentrations of methane, radium, and radon were all elevated in the active layer compared with lake water (1.6 × 10(4) nM, 61.6 dpm⋅m(-3), and 4.5 × 10(5) dpm⋅m(-3) compared with 1.3 × 10(2) nM, 5.7 dpm⋅m(-3), and 4.4 × 10(3) dpm⋅m(-3), respectively). Methane transport from the active layer to Toolik Lake based on the geochemical tracer radon (up to 2.9 g⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1)) can account for a large fraction of methane emissions from this lake. Strong but spatially and temporally variable correlations between radon activity and methane concentrations (r(2) > 0.69) in lake water suggest that the parameters that control methane discharge from the active layer also vary. Warming in the Arctic may expand the active layer and increase the discharge, thereby increasing the methane flux to lakes and from lakes to the atmosphere, exacerbating global warming. More work is needed to quantify and elucidate the processes that control methane fluxes from the active layer to predict how this flux might change in the future and to evaluate the regional and global contribution of active layer water associated methane inputs.

  7. Methane transport from the active layer to lakes in the Arctic using Toolik Lake, Alaska, as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Paytan, Adina; Lecher, Alanna L.; Dimova, Natasha; Sparrow, Katy J.; Kodovska, Fenix Garcia-Tigreros; Murray, Joseph; Tulaczyk, Slawomir; Kessler, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Methane emissions in the Arctic are important, and may be contributing to global warming. While methane emission rates from Arctic lakes are well documented, methods are needed to quantify the relative contribution of active layer groundwater to the overall lake methane budget. Here we report measurements of natural tracers of soil/groundwater, radon, and radium, along with methane concentration in Toolik Lake, Alaska, to evaluate the role active layer water plays as an exogenous source for lake methane. Average concentrations of methane, radium, and radon were all elevated in the active layer compared with lake water (1.6 × 104 nM, 61.6 dpm⋅m−3, and 4.5 × 105 dpm⋅m−3 compared with 1.3 × 102 nM, 5.7 dpm⋅m−3, and 4.4 × 103 dpm⋅m−3, respectively). Methane transport from the active layer to Toolik Lake based on the geochemical tracer radon (up to 2.9 g⋅m−2⋅y−1) can account for a large fraction of methane emissions from this lake. Strong but spatially and temporally variable correlations between radon activity and methane concentrations (r2 > 0.69) in lake water suggest that the parameters that control methane discharge from the active layer also vary. Warming in the Arctic may expand the active layer and increase the discharge, thereby increasing the methane flux to lakes and from lakes to the atmosphere, exacerbating global warming. More work is needed to quantify and elucidate the processes that control methane fluxes from the active layer to predict how this flux might change in the future and to evaluate the regional and global contribution of active layer water associated methane inputs. PMID:25775530

  8. Multi-layered control of peroxisomal activity upon salt stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Manzanares-Estreder, Sara; Espí-Bardisa, Joan; Alarcón, Benito; Pascual-Ahuir, Amparo; Proft, Markus

    2017-03-21

    Peroxisomes are dynamic organelles and the sole location for fatty acid β-oxidation in yeast cells. Here we report that peroxisomal function is crucial for the adaptation to salt stress, especially upon sugar limitation. Upon stress, multiple layers of control regulate the activity and the number of peroxisomes. Activated Hog1 MAP kinase triggers the induction of genes encoding enzymes for fatty acid activation, peroxisomal import and β-oxidation through the Adr1 transcriptional activator, which transiently associates with genes encoding fatty acid metabolic enzymes in a stress- and Hog1-dependent manner. Moreover, Na(+) and Li(+) stress increases the number of peroxisomes per cell in a Hog1-independent manner, which depends instead of the retrograde pathway and the dynamin related GTPases Dnm1 and Vps1. The strong activation of the Faa1 fatty acyl-CoA synthetase, which specifically localizes to lipid particles and peroxisomes, indicates that adaptation to salt stress requires the enhanced mobilization of fatty acids from internal lipid stores. Furthermore, the activation of mitochondrial respiration during stress depends on peroxisomes, mitochondrial acetyl-carnitine uptake is essential for salt resistance, and the number of peroxisomes attached to the mitochondrial network increases during salt adaptation, which altogether indicates that stress-induced peroxisomal β-oxidation triggers enhanced respiration upon salt shock. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrahigh Enzyme Activity Assembled in Layered Double Hydroxides via Mg(2+)-Allosteric Effector.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Huang, Shu-Wan; Xu, Dan; Bao, Wen-Jing; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2015-06-02

    It is well-known that some metal ions could be allosteric effectors of allosteric enzymes to activate/inhibit the catalytic activities of enzymes. In nanobiocatalytic systems constructed based on the positive metal ion-induced allosteric effect, the incorporated enzymes will be activated and thus exhibit excellent catalytic performance. Herein, we present an environmentally friendly strategy to construct a novel allosteric effect-based β-galactosidase/Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (β-gal/Mg-Al-LDH) nanobiocatalytic system via the delamination-reconstruction method. The intercalated β-gal in the LDH galleries changes its conformation significantly due to the Mg(2+)-induced allosteric interactions and other weak interactions, which causes the activation of enzymatic activity. The β-gal/Mg-Al-LDH nanobiocatalytic system shows much higher catalytic activity and affinity toward its substrate and about 30 times higher catalytic reaction velocity than the free β-gal, which suggests that Mg(2+)-induced allosteric effect plays a vital role in the improvement of enzymatic performance.

  10. Shape Evolution of Detached Bridgman Crystals Grown in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2015-01-01

    A theory describing the shape evolution of detached Bridgman crystals in microgravity has been developed. A starting crystal of initial radius r0 will evolve to one of the following states: Stable detached gap; Attachment to the crucible wall; Meniscus collapse. Only crystals where alpha plus omega is great than 180 degrees will achieve stable detached growth in microgravity. Results of the crystal shape evolution theory are consistent with predictions of the dynamic stability of crystallization (Tatarchenko, Shaped Crystal Growth, Kluwer, 1993). Tests of transient crystal evolution are planned for ICESAGE, a series of Ge and GeSi crystal growth experiments planned to be conducted on the International Space Station (ISS).

  11. Improved Crystal Quality by Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Directional solidification in microgravity has often led to ingots that grew with little or no contact with the ampoule wall. When this occurred, crystallographic perfection was usually greatly improved -- often by several orders of magnitude. Unfortunately, until recently the true mechanisms underlying detached solidification were unknown. As a consequence, flight experiments yielded erratic results. Within the past four years, we have developed a new theoretical model that explains many of the flight results. This model gives rise to predictions of the conditions required to yield detached solidification, both in microgravity and on earth. A discussion of models of detachment, the meniscus models and results of theoretical modeling, and future plans are presented.

  12. Permafrost and active layer monitoring in the maritime Antarctic: Preliminary results from CALM sites on Livingston and Deception Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramos, M.; Vieira, G.; Blanco, J.J.; Hauck, C.; Hidalgo, M.A.; Tome, D.; Nevers, M.; Trindade, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained from scientific work and experiments performed on Livingston and Deception Islands. Located in the South Shetland Archipelago, these islands have been some of the most sensitive regions over the last 50 years with respect to climate change with a Mean Annual Air Temperature (MAAT) close to -2 ºC. Three Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) sites were installed to record the thermal regime and the behaviour of the active layer in different places with similar climate, but with different soil composition, porosity, and water content. The study’s ultimate aim is to document the influence of climate change on permafrost degradation. Preliminary results, obtained in 2006, on maximum active-layer thickness (around 40 cm in the CALM of Deception Island), active layer temperature evolution, snow thickness, and air temperatures permit early characterization of energy exchange mechanisms between the ground and the atmosphere in the CALM-S sites.

  13. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis Of Microbial Communities From Active Layer And Permafrost After Short-Term Thaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Chauhan, A.; Saarunya, G.; Murphy, J.; Williams, D.; Layton, A. C.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Sanders, R.; Lau, C. M.; myneni, S.; Phelps, T. J.; Fountain, A. G.; Onstott, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    .Permafrost areas occupy 20-25% of the Earth and extend of 1 km depths. The total number of prokaryotes and their biomass in cold regions are estimated to be 1 x 1030 cells and 140 x1015 g of C, respectively. Thus these environments serve as a reservoir of microbial and biogeochemical activity, which is likely to increase upon thawing. We are currently performing long-term thawing experiments at 4o C on 18, geochemically well-characterized, 1 meter long, intact cores consisting of active-layer (0-70 cm depth) and permafrost, collected from a 7 meter diameter ice-wedge polygon located at the McGill Arctic Research Station on Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada. The organic carbon content of these cores averages ~1% at depth but increases to 5.4% in the top 10 cm. The cores were subdivided into four treatment groups: saturated cores (thawed while receiving artificial rain), drained cores (being thawed under natural hydrological conditions), dark cores (thawed under natural hydrological conditions with no light input) and control cores (maintain permafrost table at 70 cm depth). Over the course of 10 weeks the cores were progressively thawed from -4oC to 4oC from the top down to simulate spring thaw conditions in the Arctic. The temperatures at 5 cm, 35 cm, 65 cm, and below the permafrost table in the core were recorded continuously. Pore water and gas samples from 4 depths in each core were collected every two weeks and analyzed for pH, anions, cations, H2, CH4, CO, O2, N2, CO2 and δ13C of CO2. Headspace gas samples were collected weekly and analyzed for the same gases as the pore gases. Sediment sub-samples from the 4 depths were collected and total community genomic DNA (gDNA) was isolated using FastDNA SPIN kit followed by Qiagen column purification. The average yield of gDNA was ~3.5 μg/g of soil for the upper 5 cm active layers and decreased to ~1.5 μg/g of soil in the permafrost. The bacterial 16S copy numbers estimated by real-time quantitative PCR

  14. Electron pressure balance in the SOL through the transition to detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, A. G.; Leonard, A. W.; Makowski, M. A.; Groth, M.; Allen, S. L.; Boedo, J. A.; Bray, B. D.; Briesemeister, A. R.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hill, D. N.; Lasnier, C. J.; Liu, C.; Osborne, T. H.; Petrie, T. W.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Stangeby, P. C.; Tsui, C.; Unterberg, E. A.; Watkins, J. G.

    2015-08-01

    Upgrades to core and divertor Thomson scattering (DTS) diagnostics at DIII-D have provided measurements of electron pressure profiles in the lower divertor from attached- to fully-detached divertor plasma conditions. Detailed, multistep sequences of discharges with increasing line-averaged density were run at several levels of Pinj. Strike point sweeping allowed 2D divertor characterization using DTS optimized to measure Te down to 0.5 eV. The ionization front at the onset of detachment is found to move upwards in a controlled manner consistent with the indication that scrape-off layer parallel power flux is converted from conducted to convective heat transport. Measurements of ne, Te and pe in the divertor versus Lparallel demonstrate a rapid transition from Te ⩾ 15 eV to ⩽3 eV occurring both at the outer strike point and upstream of the X-point. These observations provide a strong benchmark for ongoing modeling of divertor detachment for existing and future tokamak devices.

  15. Selective reactivity of monochloramine with extracellular matrix components affects the disinfection of biofilm and detached clusters.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zheng; Lee, Woo Hyoung; Coburn, Kimberly M; Seo, Youngwoo

    2014-04-01

    The efficiency of monochloramine disinfection was dependent on the quantity and composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in biofilms, as monochloramine has a selective reactivity with proteins over polysaccharides. Biofilms with protein-based (Pseudomonas putida) and polysaccharide based EPS (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), as well as biofilms with varied amount of polysaccharide EPS (wild-type and mutant P. aeruginosa), were compared. The different reactivity of EPS components with monochloramine influenced disinfectant penetration, biofilm inactivation, as well as the viability of detached clusters. Monochloramine transport profiling measured by a chloramine-sensitive microelectrode revealed a broader diffusion boundary layer between bulk and biofilm surface in the P. putida biofilm compared to those of P. aeruginosa biofilms. The reaction with proteins in P. putida EPS multiplied both the time and the monochloramine mass required to achieve a full biofilm penetration. Cell viability in biofilms was also spatially influenced by monochloramine diffusion and reaction within biofilms, showing a lower survival in the surface section and a higher persistence in the middle section of the P. putida biofilm compared to the P. aeruginosa biofilms. While polysaccharide EPS promoted biofilm cell viability by obstructing monochloramine reactive sites on bacterial cells, protein EPS hindered monochloramine penetration by reacting with monochloramine and reduced its concentration within biofilms. Furthermore, the persistence of bacterial cells detached from biofilm (over 70% for P. putida and ∼40% for polysaccharide producing P. aeruginosa) suggested that currently recommended monochloramine residual levels may underestimate the risk of water quality deterioration caused by biofilm detachment.

  16. Electron pressure balance in the SOL through the transition to detachment

    DOE PAGES

    McLean, A. G.; Leonard, A. W.; Makowski, M. A.; ...

    2015-02-07

    Upgrades to core and divertor Thomson scattering (DTS) diagnostics at DIII-D have provided measurements of electron pressure profiles in the lower divertor from attached- to fully-detached divertor plasma conditions. Detailed, multistep sequences of discharges with increasing line-averaged density were run at several levels of Pinj. Strike point sweeping allowed 2D divertor characterization using DTS optimized to measure Te down to 0.5 eV. The ionization front at the onset of detachment is found to move upwards in a controlled manner consistent with the indication that scrape-off layer parallel power flux is converted from conducted to convective heat transport. Measurements of ne,more » Te and pe in the divertor versus Lparallel demonstrate a rapid transition from Te ≥ 15 eV to ≤3 eV occurring both at the outer strike point and upstream of the X-point. Furthermore, these observations provide a strong benchmark for ongoing modeling of divertor detachment for existing and future tokamak devices.« less

  17. Electron pressure balance in the SOL through the transition to detachment

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, A. G.; Leonard, A. W.; Makowski, M. A.; Groth, M.; Allen, S. L.; Boedo, J. A.; Bray, B. D.; Briesemeister, A. R.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Hill, D. N.; Lasnier, C. J.; Liu, C.; Osborne, T. H.; Petrie, T. W.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Stangeby, P. C.; Tsui, C.; Unterberg, E. A.; Watkins, J. G.

    2015-02-07

    Upgrades to core and divertor Thomson scattering (DTS) diagnostics at DIII-D have provided measurements of electron pressure profiles in the lower divertor from attached- to fully-detached divertor plasma conditions. Detailed, multistep sequences of discharges with increasing line-averaged density were run at several levels of Pinj. Strike point sweeping allowed 2D divertor characterization using DTS optimized to measure Te down to 0.5 eV. The ionization front at the onset of detachment is found to move upwards in a controlled manner consistent with the indication that scrape-off layer parallel power flux is converted from conducted to convective heat transport. Measurements of ne, Te and pe in the divertor versus Lparallel demonstrate a rapid transition from Te ≥ 15 eV to ≤3 eV occurring both at the outer strike point and upstream of the X-point. Furthermore, these observations provide a strong benchmark for ongoing modeling of divertor detachment for existing and future tokamak devices.

  18. Subduction Initiation at Oceanic Detachment Faults and the Origin of Supra-subduction Ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffione, M.; Thieulot, C.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Morris, A.; Spakman, W.; Plümper, O.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction initiation is a critical link in the plate tectonic cycle. Intra-oceanic subduction zones can form along transform faults and fracture zones, but how subduction nucleates parallel to mid-ocean ridges, as in e.g. the Neotethys Ocean during the Jurassic, remains a matter of debate. In recent years, extensional detachment faults have been widely documented adjacent to slow- and ultraslow-spreading ridges where they cut across the oceanic lithosphere. These structures are extremely weak due to widespread occurrence of serpentine and talc resulting from hydrothermal alteration, and can therefore effectively localize deformation. Here, we show geochemical, tectonic, and paleomagnetic evidence from the Jurassic ophiolites of Albania and Greece for a subduction zone formed in the western Neotethys parallel to a spreading ridge along an oceanic detachment fault. With 2-D numerical modeling exploring the evolution of a detachment-ridge system experiencing compression, we show that serpentinized detachments are always weaker than spreading ridges. We conclude that, owing to their extreme weakness, oceanic detachments can effectively localize deformation under perpendicular far-field forcing, providing ideal conditions to nucleate new subduction zones parallel and close to (or at) spreading ridges. Direct implication of this, is that resumed magmatic activity in the forearc during subduction initiation can yield widespread accretion of supra-subduction zone ophiolites at or close to the paleoridge. Our new model casts the enigmatic origin of regionally extensive ophiolite belts in a novel geodynamic context, and calls for future research on three-dimensional modeling of subduction initiation and how upper plate extension is associated with that.

  19. Blended Wing Body Systems Studies: Boundary Layer Ingestion Inlets With Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiselhart, Karl A. (Technical Monitor); Daggett, David L.; Kawai, Ron; Friedman, Doug

    2003-01-01

    A CFD analysis was performed on a Blended Wing Body (BWB) aircraft with advanced, turbofan engines analyzing various inlet configurations atop the aft end of the aircraft. The results are presented showing that the optimal design for best aircraft fuel efficiency would be a configuration with a partially buried engine, short offset diffuser using active flow control, and a D-shaped inlet duct that partially ingests the boundary layer air in flight. The CFD models showed that if active flow control technology can be satisfactorily developed, it might be able to control the inlet flow distortion to the engine fan face and reduce the powerplant performance losses to an acceptable level. The weight and surface area drag benefits of a partially submerged engine shows that it might offset the penalties of ingesting the low energy boundary layer air. The combined airplane performance of such a design might deliver approximately 5.5% better aircraft fuel efficiency over a conventionally designed, pod-mounted engine.

  20. Microtopographic and depth controls on active layer chemistry in Arctic polygonal ground

    DOE PAGES

    Newman, Brent D.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Graham, David E.; ...

    2015-03-24

    Polygonal ground is a signature characteristic of Arctic lowlands, and carbon release from permafrost thaw can alter feedbacks to Arctic ecosystems and climate. This study describes the first comprehensive spatial examination of active layer biogeochemistry that extends across high- and low-centered, ice wedge polygons, their features, and with depth. Water chemistry measurements of 54 analytes were made on surface and active layer pore waters collected near Barrow, Alaska, USA. Significant differences were observed between high- and low-centered polygons suggesting that polygon types may be useful for landscape-scale geochemical classification. However, differences were found for polygon features (centers and troughs) formore » analytes that were not significant for polygon type, suggesting that finer-scale features affect biogeochemistry differently from polygon types. Depth variations were also significant, demonstrating important multidimensional aspects of polygonal ground biogeochemistry. These results have major implications for understanding how polygonal ground ecosystems function, and how they may respond to future change.« less

  1. Photovoltaic performance of block copolymer devices is independent of the crystalline texture in the active layer

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Changhe; Lee, Youngmin; Lin, Yen -Hao; ...

    2016-06-15

    The electronic properties of organic semiconductors are strongly influenced by intermolecular packing. When cast as thin films, crystalline π-conjugated molecules are strongly textured, potentially leading to anisotropic charge transport. Consequently, it is hypothesized that the orientation of crystallites in the active layer plays an important role in charge extraction and organic photovoltaic device performance. Here we demonstrate orientation control of molecular packing from mostly face-on to edge-on configurations in the active layer of P3HT-b-PFTBT block copolymer photovoltaics using 1-chloronaphthalene as a solvent additive. The effect of molecular orientations in P3HT crystals on charge transport and solar cell performance is examined.more » We find that optimized photovoltaic device performance is independent of the crystalline texture of P3HT. Our observations provide further insights into the molecular organization required for efficient charge transport and overall device efficiencies. That is, the dominant crystal orientation, whether face-on or edge-on, is not critical to organic solar cells. Furthermore, a broad distribution of crystallite orientations ensures pathways for charge transport in any direction and enables efficient charge extraction in photovoltaic devices.« less

  2. Photovoltaic performance of block copolymer devices is independent of the crystalline texture in the active layer

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Changhe; Lee, Youngmin; Lin, Yen -Hao; Strzalka, Joseph; Wang, Cheng; Hexemer, Alexander; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Verduzco, Rafael; Wang, Qing; Gomez, Enrique D.

    2016-06-15

    The electronic properties of organic semiconductors are strongly influenced by intermolecular packing. When cast as thin films, crystalline π-conjugated molecules are strongly textured, potentially leading to anisotropic charge transport. Consequently, it is hypothesized that the orientation of crystallites in the active layer plays an important role in charge extraction and organic photovoltaic device performance. Here we demonstrate orientation control of molecular packing from mostly face-on to edge-on configurations in the active layer of P3HT-b-PFTBT block copolymer photovoltaics using 1-chloronaphthalene as a solvent additive. The effect of molecular orientations in P3HT crystals on charge transport and solar cell performance is examined. We find that optimized photovoltaic device performance is independent of the crystalline texture of P3HT. Our observations provide further insights into the molecular organization required for efficient charge transport and overall device efficiencies. That is, the dominant crystal orientation, whether face-on or edge-on, is not critical to organic solar cells. Furthermore, a broad distribution of crystallite orientations ensures pathways for charge transport in any direction and enables efficient charge extraction in photovoltaic devices.

  3. Toward bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells with thermally stable active layer morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinaletti, Ilaria; Kesters, Jurgen; Bertho, Sabine; Conings, Bert; Piersimoni, Fortunato; D'Haen, Jan; Lutsen, Laurence; Nesladek, Milos; Van Mele, Bruno; Van Assche, Guy; Vandewal, Koen; Salleo, Alberto; Vanderzande, Dirk; Maes, Wouter; Manca, Jean V.

    2014-01-01

    When state-of-the-art bulk heterojunction organic solar cells with ideal morphology are exposed to prolonged storage or operation at elevated temperatures, a thermally induced disruption of the active layer blend can occur, in the form of a separation of donor and acceptor domains, leading to diminished photovoltaic performance. Toward the long-term use of organic solar cells in real-life conditions, an important challenge is, therefore, the development of devices with a thermally stable active layer morphology. Several routes are being explored, ranging from the use of high glass transition temperature, cross-linkable and/or side-chain functionalized donor and acceptor materials, to light-induced dimerization of the fullerene acceptor. A better fundamental understanding of the nature and underlying mechanisms of the phase separation and stabilization effects has been obtained through a variety of analytical, thermal analysis, and electro-optical techniques. Accelerated aging systems have been used to study the degradation kinetics of bulk heterojunction solar cells in situ at various temperatures to obtain aging models predicting solar cell lifetime. The following contribution gives an overview of the current insights regarding the intrinsic thermally induced aging effects and the proposed solutions, illustrated by examples of our own research groups.

  4. Design of Bicontinuous Donor/Acceptor Morphologies for Use as Organic Solar Cell Active Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipp, Dylan; Mok, Jorge; Verduzco, Rafael; Ganesan, Venkat

    Two of the primary challenges limiting the marketability of organic solar cells are i) the smaller device efficiency of the organic solar cell relative to the conventional silicon-based solar cell and ii) the long term thermal instability of the device active layer. The achievement of equilibrium donor/acceptor morphologies with the characteristics believed to yield high device performance characteristics could address each of these two challenges. In this work, we present the results of a combined simulations and experiments-based approach to investigate if a conjugated BCP additive can be used to control the self-assembled morphologies taken on by conjugated polymer/PCBM mixtures. First, we use single chain in mean field Monte Carlo simulations to identify regions within the conjugated polymer/PCBM composition space in which addition of copolymers can lead to bicontinuous equilibrium morphologies with high interfacial areas and nanoscale dimensions. Second, we conduct experiments as directed by the simulations to achieve such morphologies in the PTB7 + PTB7- b-PNDI + PCBM model blend. We characterize the results of our experiments via a combination of transmission electron microscopy and X-ray scattering techniques and demonstrate that the morphologies from experiments agree with those predicted in simulations. Accordingly, these results indicate that the approach utilized represents a promising approach to intelligently design the morphologies taken on by organic solar cell active layers.

  5. Seismic Spatial Autocorrelation as a Technique to Track Changes in the Permafrost Active Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    We present preliminary results from an effort to continuously track freezing and thawing of the permafrost active layer using a small-aperture seismic array. The 7-element array of three-component posthole seismometers is installed on permafrost at Poker Flat Research Range, near Fairbanks, Alaska. The array is configured in two three-station circles with 75 and 25 meter radii that share a common center station. This configuration is designed to resolve omnidirectional, high-frequency seismic microtremor (i.e. ambient noise). Microtremor is continuously monitored and the data are processed using the spatial autocorrelation (SPAC) method. The resulting SPAC coefficients are then inverted for shear-wave velocity structure versus depth. Thawed active-layer soils have a much slower seismic velocity than frozen soils, allowing us to track the depth and intensity of thawing. Persistent monitoring on a permanent array would allow for a way to investigate year-to-year changes without costly site visits. Results from the seismic array will compared to, and correlated with, other measurement techniques, such as physical probing and remote sensing methods. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Determinants of carbon release from the active layer and permafrost deposits on the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Leiyi; Liang, Junyi; Qin, Shuqi; Liu, Li; Fang, Kai; Xu, Yunping; Ding, Jinzhi; Li, Fei; Luo, Yiqi; Yang, Yuanhe

    2016-01-01

    The sign and magnitude of permafrost carbon (C)-climate feedback are highly uncertain due to the limited understanding of the decomposability of thawing permafrost and relevant mechanistic controls over C release. Here, by combining aerobic incubation with biomarker analysis and a three-pool model, we reveal that C quality (represented by a higher amount of fast cycling C but a lower amount of recalcitrant C compounds) and normalized CO2–C release in permafrost deposits were similar or even higher than those in the active layer, demonstrating a high vulnerability of C in Tibetan upland permafrost. We also illustrate that C quality exerts the most control over CO2–C release from the active layer, whereas soil microbial abundance is more directly associated with CO2–C release after permafrost thaw. Taken together, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating microbial properties into Earth System Models when predicting permafrost C dynamics under a changing environment. PMID:27703168

  7. Numerical Modeling of Active Flow Control in a Boundary Layer Ingesting Offset Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allan, Brian G.; Owens, Lewis R.; Berrier, Bobby L.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation evaluates the numerical prediction of flow distortion and pressure recovery for a boundary layer ingesting offset inlet with active flow control devices. The numerical simulations are computed using a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes code developed at NASA. The numerical results are validated by comparison to experimental wind tunnel tests conducted at NASA Langley Research Center at both low and high Mach numbers. Baseline comparisons showed good agreement between numerical and experimental results. Numerical simulations for the inlet with passive and active flow control also showed good agreement at low Mach numbers where experimental data has already been acquired. Numerical simulations of the inlet at high Mach numbers with flow control jets showed an improvement of the flow distortion. Studies on the location of the jet actuators, for the high Mach number case, were conducted to provide guidance for the design of a future experimental wind tunnel test.

  8. Contribution of Sp1 to Telomerase Expression and Activity in Skin Keratinocytes Cultured With a Feeder Layer.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Francis; Paquet, Claudie; Bourget, Jean-Michel; Zaniolo, Karine; Rochette, Patrick J; Landreville, Solange; Damour, Odile; Boudreau, François; Auger, François A; Guérin, Sylvain L; Germain, Lucie

    2015-02-01

    The growth of primary keratinocytes is improved by culturing them with a feeder layer. The aim of this study was to assess whether the feeder layer increases the lifespan of cultured epithelial cells by maintaining or improving telomerase activity and expression. The addition of an irradiated fibroblast feeder layer of either human or mouse origin (i3T3) helped maintain telomerase activity as well as expression of the transcription factor Sp1 in cultured keratinocytes. In contrast, senescence occurred earlier, together with a reduction of Sp1 expression and telomerase activity, in keratinocytes cultured without a feeder layer. Telomerase activity was consistently higher in keratinocytes grown on the three different feeder layers tested relative to cells grown without them. Suppression of Sp1 expression by RNA inhibition (RNAi) reduced both telomerase expression and activity in keratinocytes and also abolished their long-term growth capacity suggesting that Sp1 is a key regulator of both telomerase gene expression and cell cycle progression of primary cultured human skin keratinocytes. The results of the present study therefore suggest that the beneficial influence of the feeder layer relies on its ability to preserve telomerase activity in cultured human keratinocytes through the maintenance of stable levels of Sp1 expression.

  9. Ionization behavior, stoichiometry of association, and accessibility of functional groups in the active layers of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Coronell, Orlando; González, Mari I; Mariñas, Benito J; Cahill, David G

    2010-09-01

    We characterized the fully aromatic polyamide (PA) active layers of six commercial reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes and found that in contrast to their similar elemental composition, total concentration of functional groups, and degree of polymerization, the ionization behavior and spatial distribution of carboxylic (R-COOH) groups within the active layers can be significantly different. We also studied the steric effects experienced by barium ion (Ba2+) in the active layers by determining the fraction of carboxylate (R-COO-) groups accessible to Ba2+; such fraction, referred to as the accessibility ratio (AR), was found to vary within the range AR=0.40-0.81, and to be generally independent of external solution pH. Additionally, we studied an NF membrane with a sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) active layer, and found that the concentration of sulfonate (R-SO3-) groups in the active layer was 1.67 M, independent of external solution pH and approximately three times higher than the maximum concentration (approximately 0.45+/-0.25 M) of R-COO- groups in PA active layers. The R-SO3- groups were found to be highly accessible to Ba2+ (AR=0.95+/-0.01).

  10. Layer-specific entrainment of γ-band neural activity by the α rhythm in monkey visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Spaak, Eelke; Bonnefond, Mathilde; Maier, Alexander; Leopold, David A; Jensen, Ole

    2012-12-18

    Although the mammalian neocortex has a clear laminar organization, layer-specific neuronal computations remain to be uncovered. Several studies suggest that gamma band activity in primary visual cortex (V1) is produced in granular and superficial layers and is associated with the processing of visual input. Oscillatory alpha band activity in deeper layers has been proposed to modulate neuronal excitability associated with changes in arousal and cognitive factors. To investigate the layer-specific interplay between these two phenomena, we characterized the coupling between alpha and gamma band activity of the local field potential in V1 of the awake macaque. Using multicontact laminar electrodes to measure spontaneous signals simultaneously from all layers of V1, we found a robust coupling between alpha phase in the deeper layers and gamma amplitude in granular and superficial layers. Moreover, the power in the two frequency bands was anticorrelated. Taken together, these findings demonstrate robust interlaminar cross-frequency coupling in the visual cortex, supporting the view that neuronal activity in the alpha frequency range phasically modulates processing in the cortical microcircuit in a top-down manner.

  11. Actomyosin dynamics drive local membrane component organization in an in vitro active composite layer

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Kabir; Iljazi, Elda; Bhat, Abrar; Bieling, Peter; Mullins, R. Dyche; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2016-01-01

    The surface of a living cell provides a platform for receptor signaling, protein sorting, transport, and endocytosis, whose regulation requires the local control of membrane organization. Previous work has revealed a role for dynamic actomyosin in membrane protein and lipid organization, suggesting that the cell surface behaves as an active composite composed of a fluid bilayer and a thin film of active actomyosin. We reconstitute an analogous system in vitro that consists of a fluid lipid bilayer coupled via membrane-associated actin-binding proteins to dynamic actin filaments and myosin motors. Upon complete consumption of ATP, this system settles into distinct phases of actin organization, namely bundled filaments, linked apolar asters, and a lattice of polar asters. These depend on actin concentration, filament length, and actin/myosin ratio. During formation of the polar aster phase, advection of the self-organizing actomyosin network drives transient clustering of actin-associated membrane components. Regeneration of ATP supports a constitutively remodeling actomyosin state, which in turn drives active fluctuations of coupled membrane components, resembling those observed at the cell surface. In a multicomponent membrane bilayer, this remodeling actomyosin layer contributes to changes in the extent and dynamics of phase-segregating domains. These results show how local membrane composition can be driven by active processes arising from actomyosin, highlighting the fundamental basis of the active composite model of the cell surface, and indicate its relevance to the study of membrane organization. PMID:26929326

  12. Dynamics of the Ligand Binding Domain Layer during AMPA Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Baranovic, Jelena; Chebli, Miriam; Salazar, Hector; Carbone, Anna L.; Faelber, Katja; Lau, Albert Y.; Daumke, Oliver; Plested, Andrew J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are postsynaptic tetrameric ligand-gated channels whose activity mediates fast excitatory transmission. Glutamate binding to clamshell-shaped ligand binding domains (LBDs) triggers opening of the integral ion channel, but how the four LBDs orchestrate receptor activation is unknown. Here, we present a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure displaying two tetrameric LBD arrangements fully bound to glutamate. Using a series of engineered metal ion trapping mutants, we showed that the more compact of the two assemblies corresponds to an arrangement populated during activation of full-length receptors. State-dependent cross-linking of the mutants identified zinc bridges between the canonical active LBD dimers that formed when the tetramer was either fully or partially bound by glutamate. These bridges also stabilized the resting state, consistent with the recently published full-length apo structure. Our results provide insight into the activation mechanism of glutamate receptors and the complex conformational space that the LBD layer can sample. PMID:26910426

  13. Polyethylene/organically-modified layered-silicate nanocomposites with antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songtipya, P.; Jimenez-Gasco, M. M.; Manias, E.

    2009-03-01

    Despite the very intensive research on polymer nanocomposites, the opportunities for new functionalities possible by nanofillers still remain largely untapped. Here, we present polyethylene/inorganic nanocomposites that exhibit strongly enhanced mechanical performance and, at the same time, also an antimicrobial activity originating from the organo-filler nature. Specifically, PE/organically-modified layered-silicate nanocomposites were prepared via melt-processing, and antimicrobial activity was designed by proper choice of their organic modification. Their antimicrobial activity was measured against three micotoxinogen fungal strains (Penicillium roqueforti and claviforme, and Fusarium graminearum) as model soil-borne plant and food contaminants. Montmorillonite-based organofillers, which only differ in their organic modification, were used to exemplify how these surfactants can be designed to render antifungal activity to the nanocomposites. The comparative discussion of the growth of fungi on unfilled PE and nanocomposite PE films is used to demonstrate how the antimicrobial efficacy is dictated by the surfactant chemistry and, further, how the nanocomposites' inhibitory activity compares to that of the organo-fillers and the surfactants.

  14. Low-salinity plume detachment under non-uniform summer wind off the Changjiang Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jianzhong; Ding, Pingxing; Chen, Changsheng

    2015-04-01

    In the past, two physical mechanisms, baroclinic instability (BI) and strong asymmetric tidal mixing (SATM) during the spring tidal period, were proposed for the offshore detachment of the low-salinity plume over the inner shelf of the East China Sea (ECS). These two mechanisms were re-examined using both observations and a fully three-dimensional (3-D), high-resolution, unstructured-grid, free-surface, primitive-equation, Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). The observed currents and salinities showed that the plume was characterized by a two-layer system, in which the upper layer is mainly driven by the river discharge-induced buoyancy flow and the lower layer is predominantly controlled by tidal mixing and rectification. The SATM mechanism was based on the model run without calibration against observed currents and salinity around the plume region, so that it should be applied with caution to a realistic condition observed on the inner shelf of the ECS. The BI mechanism was derived under a condition without consideration of tidal mixing. Although BI could still occur along the frontal zone when tides were included, it was unable to produce a single, large, detached low-salinity lens observed on the inner shelf of the ECS. The process-oriented model experiment results suggest that for a given river discharge and realistic tidal flow, the spatially non-uniform southwesterly surface wind during the southeast monsoon-dominant summer could increase frontal spatial variability and thus produce a significant offshore detachment of low-salinity water on the inner shelf of East China Sea.

  15. Advantages of diabetic tractional retinal detachment repair

    PubMed Central

    Sternfeld, Amir; Axer-Siegel, Ruth; Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Weinberger, Dov; Ehrlich, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes and complications of patients with diabetic tractional retinal detachment (TRD) treated with pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). Patients and methods We retrospectively studied a case series of 24 eyes of 21 patients at a single tertiary, university-affiliated medical center. A review was carried out on patients who underwent PPV for the management of TRD due to proliferative diabetic retinopathy from October 2011 to November 2013. Preoperative and final visual outcomes, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and medical background were evaluated. Results A 23 G instrumentation was used in 23 eyes (95.8%), and a 25 G instrumentation in one (4.2%). Mean postoperative follow-up time was 13.3 months (4–30 months). Visual acuity significantly improved from logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (LogMAR) 1.48 to LogMAR 1.05 (P<0.05). Visual acuity improved by ≥3 lines in 75% of patients. Intraoperative complications included iatrogenic retinal breaks in seven eyes (22.9%) and vitreal hemorrhage in nine eyes (37.5%). In two eyes, one sclerotomy was enlarged to 20 G (8.3%). Postoperative complications included reoperation in five eyes (20.8%) due to persistent subretinal fluid (n=3), vitreous hemorrhage (n=1), and dislocated intraocular lens (n=1). Thirteen patients (54.2%) had postoperative vitreous hemorrhage that cleared spontaneously, five patients (20.8%) required antiglaucoma medications for increased intraocular pressure, seven patients (29.2%) developed an epiretinal membrane, and two patients (8.3%) developed a macular hole. Conclusion Patients with diabetic TRD can benefit from PPV surgery. Intraoperative and postoperative complications can be attributed to the complexity of this disease. PMID:26604667

  16. A detachable mobile and adjustable telemetry system

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Tommy S; Persons, William E; Bradley, Joseph G; Gregg, Margaret; Gonzales, Shinelle K; Helton, Jesse S

    2013-01-01

    Many traditional mobile telemetry systems require permanently mounting a rod through the cabin of a vehicle to serve as the mast for a directional antenna. In this article we present an alternative to this configuration by providing a platform that can be placed atop the vehicle in which the antenna mast can be mounted and controlled from the cabin of the vehicle. Thereby making this design a viable option for researchers who share vehicles with others that may not approve of permanent vehicle modifications such as placing a hole in the roof of the vehicle as required by traditional mobile configurations. We tested the precision and accuracy of detachable mobile and adjustable telemetry system (DMATS) in an urban park with varying terrain, tree stands, overhead wires, and other structures that can contribute to signal deflection. We placed three radiocollars 50 m apart and 1.2 m above the ground then established three testing stations ∼280 m from the location of the radiocollars. The DMATS platform required 12 h for completion and cost $1059 USD. Four technicians were randomly assigned radio collars to triangulate using DMATS and a handheld telemetry system. We used a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a Scheffe post hoc test to compare error ellipses between azimuths taken using DMATS and the hand held system. Average error ellipses for all testers was 1.96 ± 1.22 ha. No significant differences were found between error ellipses of testers (P = 0.292). Our design, the DMATS, does not require any vehicle modification; thereby, making this a viable option for researchers sharing vehicles with others that may not approve of permanent vehicle alterations. PMID:23919133

  17. Effects of Pin Detached Space on Heat Transfer and Pin-Fin Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Siw, Sin Chien; Chyu, Minking K.; Shih, Tom I. -P.; Alvin, Mary Anne

    2012-01-01

    Heat transfer and pressure characteristics in a rectangular channel with pin-fin arrays of partial detachment from one of the endwalls have been experimentally studied. The overall channel geometry (W=76.2 mm, E=25.4 mm) simulates an internal cooling passage of wide aspect ratio (3:1) in a gas turbine airfoil. With a given pin diameter, D=6.35 mm=¼E, three different pin-fin height-to-diameter ratios, H/D=4, 3, and 2, were examined. Each of these three cases corresponds to a specific pin array geometry of detachment spacing (C) between the pin tip and one of the endwalls, i.e., C/D=0, 1, 2, respectively. The Reynolds number, based on the hydraulic diameter of the unobstructed cross-section and the mean bulk velocity, ranges from 10,000 to 25,000. The experiment employs a hybrid technique based on transient liquid crystal imaging to obtain the distributions of the local heat transfer coefficient over all of the participating surfaces, including the endwalls and all the pin elements. Experimental results reveal that the presence of a detached space between the pin tip and the endwall has a significant effect on the convective heat transfer and pressure loss in the channel. The presence of pin-to-endwall spacing promotes wall-flow interaction, generates additional separated shear layers, and augments turbulent transport. In general, an increase in detached spacing, or C/D, leads to lower heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop. However, C/D=1, i.e., H/D=3, of a staggered array configuration exhibits the highest heat transfer enhancement, followed by the cases of C/D=0 and C/D=2, i.e., H/D=4 or 2, respectively.

  18. Atomic Layer-by-Layer Deposition of Pt on Pd Nanocubes for Catalysts with Enhanced Activity and Durability toward Oxygen Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shuifen; Choi, Sang; Lu, Ning; Roling, Luke T.; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Zhang, Lei; Park, Jinho; Wang, Jinguo; Kim, Moon J.; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2014-06-11

    An effective strategy for reducing the Pt content while retaining the activity of a Pt-based catalyst is to deposit the Pt atoms as ultrathin skins of only a few atomic layers thick on nanoscale substrates made of another metal. During deposition, however, the Pt atoms often take an island growth mode because of a strong bonding between Pt atoms. Here we report a versatile route to the conformal deposition of Pt as uniform, ultrathin shells on Pd nanocubes in a solution phase. The introduction of the Pt precursor at a relatively slow rate and high temperature allowed the deposited Pt atoms to spread across the entire surface of a Pd nanocube to generate a uniform shell. The thickness of the Pt shell could be controlled from one to six atomic layers by varying the amount of Pt precursor added into the system. Compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pd@PnL (n = 1-6) core-shell nanocubes showed enhancements in specific activity and durability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model (100) surfaces suggest that the enhancement in specific activity can be attributed to the weakening of OH binding through ligand and strain effects, which, in turn, increases the rate of OH hydrogenation. A volcano-type relationship between the ORR specific activity and the number of Pt atomic layers was derived, in good agreement with the experimental results. Both theoretical and experimental studies indicate that the ORR specific activity was maximized for the catalysts based on Pd@Pt2-3L nanocubes. Because of the reduction in Pt content used and the enhancement in specific activity, the Pd@Pt1L nanocubes showed a Pt mass activity with almost three-fold enhancement relative to the Pt/C catalyst.

  19. One- and two-photon detachment of O-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génévriez, Matthieu; Urbain, Xavier; Dochain, Arnaud; Cyr, Alain; Dunseath, Kevin M.; Terao-Dunseath, Mariko

    2016-08-01

    Cross sections for one- and two-photon detachment of O-(1 s22 s22 p5P2o) have been determined in a joint experimental and theoretical study. The absolute measurement is based on the animated-crossed-beam technique, which is extended to the case of pulsed lasers, pulsed ion beams, and multiphoton detachment. The ab initio calculations employ R -matrix Floquet theory, with simple descriptions of the initial bound state and the residual oxygen atom which reproduce well the electron affinity and ground-state polarizability. For one-photon detachment, the measured and computed cross sections are in good mutual agreement, departing significantly from previous reference experiments and calculations. The generalized two-photon detachment cross section, measured at the Nd:YAG laser wavelength, is in good agreement with the R -matrix Floquet calculations. Long-standing discrepancies between theory and experiment are thus resolved.

  20. 4. VIEW OF COTTAGE NO. 8, SHOWING ORIGINAL SINGLECAR, DETACHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF COTTAGE NO. 8, SHOWING ORIGINAL SINGLE-CAR, DETACHED GARAGE, LOOKING NORTH - Nine Mile Hydroelectric Development, Cottage No. 8, State Highway 291 along Spokane River, Nine Mile Falls, Spokane County, WA

  1. Bimatoprost Induced Serous Macular Detachment after Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kaliaperumal, Subashini; Deb, Amit Kumar; Babu, K. Ramesh; Srinivasan, Renuka

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of bimatoprost induced serous macular detachment and choroidal folds following uneventful cataract surgery. A 66-year-old male using topical bimatoprost in both eyes for open angle glaucoma underwent uneventful cataract surgery in the right eye. Postoperatively, he was restarted on topical bimatoprost and antibiotic-steroids combination drops. One week after surgery, he presented with conjunctival hyperemia, serous macular detachment, and choroidal folds at the posterior pole. Fundus fluorescein angiography showed perifoveal leaks in early stage with pooling of dye in late stage. Discontinuation of bimatoprost led to resolution of serous detachment and choroidal folds within 3 weeks with significant improvement in visual acuity. Occurrence of serous macular detachment and choroidal folds in this case could be probably related to the proinflammatory property of bimatoprost. Hence, it should be used with caution in the immediate postoperative period after cataract surgery. PMID:27957367

  2. On Favorable Thermal Fields for Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelian, Carmen; Volz, Martin P.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal fields of two Bridgman-like configurations, representative of real systems used in prior experiments for the detached growth of CdTe and Ge crystals, are studied. These detailed heat transfer computations are performed using the CrysMAS code and expand upon our previous analyses [14] that posited a new mechanism involving the thermal field and meniscus position to explain stable conditions for dewetted Bridgman growth. Computational results indicate that heat transfer conditions that led to successful detached growth in both of these systems are in accordance with our prior assertion, namely that the prevention of crystal reattachment to the crucible wall requires the avoidance of any undercooling of the melt meniscus during the growth run. Significantly, relatively simple process modifications that promote favorable thermal conditions for detached growth may overcome detrimental factors associated with meniscus shape and crucible wetting. Thus, these ideas may be important to advance the practice of detached growth for many materials.

  3. Methyl jasmonate binds to and detaches mitochondria-bound hexokinase.

    PubMed

    Goldin, N; Arzoine, L; Heyfets, A; Israelson, A; Zaslavsky, Z; Bravman, T; Bronner, V; Notcovich, A; Shoshan-Barmatz, V; Flescher, E

    2008-08-07

    Cellular bio-energetic metabolism and mitochondria are recognized as potential targets for anticancer agents, due to the numerous relevant peculiarities cancer cells exhibit. Jasmonates are anticancer agents that interact directly with mitochondria. The aim of this study was to identify mitochondrial molecular targets of jasmonates. We report that jasmonates bind to hexokinase and detach it from the mitochondria and its mitochondrial anchor-the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), as judged by hexokinase immunochemical and activity determinations, surface plasmon resonance analysis and planar lipid bilayer VDAC-activity analysis. Furthermore, the susceptibility of cancer cells and mitochondria to jasmonates is dependent on the expression of hexokinase, evaluated using hexokinase-overexpressing transfectants and its mitochondrial association. Many types of cancer cells exhibit overexpression of the key glycolytic enzyme, hexokinase, and its excessive binding to mitochondria. These characteristics are considered to play a pivotal role in cancer cell growth rate and survival. Thus, our findings provide an explanation for the selective effects of jasmonates on cancer cells. Most importantly, this is the first demonstration of a cytotoxic mechanism based on direct interaction between an anticancer agent and hexokinase. The proposed mechanism can serve to guide development of a new selective approach for cancer therapy.

  4. Retinal Detachment due to CrossFit Training Injury

    PubMed Central

    Joondeph, Stephanie A.; Joondeph, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a traumatic retinal detachment occurring as a result of CrossFit training using an elastic exercise band. The patient sustained an ocular injury from an elastic band during CrossFit training, resulting in a giant retinal dialysis and retinal detachment, which were successfully repaired. Trainers and athletes need to be aware of the potential for ocular injury from elastic exercise bands and take appropriate precautions. PMID:24106626

  5. Retinal Detachment due to CrossFit Training Injury.

    PubMed

    Joondeph, Stephanie A; Joondeph, Brian C

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a traumatic retinal detachment occurring as a result of CrossFit training using an elastic exercise band. The patient sustained an ocular injury from an elastic band during CrossFit training, resulting in a giant retinal dialysis and retinal detachment, which were successfully repaired. Trainers and athletes need to be aware of the potential for ocular injury from elastic exercise bands and take appropriate precautions.

  6. PEMFC catalyst layers: the role of micropores and mesopores on water sorption and fuel cell activity.

    PubMed

    Soboleva, Tatyana; Malek, Kourosh; Xie, Zhong; Navessin, Titichai; Holdcroft, Steven

    2011-06-01

    The effects of carbon microstructure and ionomer loading on water vapor sorption and retention in catalyst layers (CLs) of PEM fuel cells are investigated using dynamic vapor sorption. Catalyst layers based on Ketjen Black and Vulcan XC-72 carbon blacks, which possess distinctly different surface areas, pore volumes, and microporosities, are studied. It is found that pores <20 nm diameter facilitate water uptake by capillary condensation in the intermediate range of relative humidities. A broad pore size distribution (PSD) is found to enhance water retention in Ketjen Black-based CLs whereas the narrower mesoporous PSD of Vulcan CLs is shown to have an enhanced water repelling action. Water vapor sorption and retention properties of CLs are correlated to electrochemical properties and fuel cell performance. Water sorption enhances electrochemical properties such as the electrochemically active surface area (ESA), double layer capacitance and proton conductivity, particularly when the ionomer content is very low. The hydrophilic properties of a CL on the anode and the cathode are adjusted by choosing the PSD of carbon and the ionomer content. It is shown that a reduction of ionomer content on either cathode or anode of an MEA does not necessarily have a significant detrimental effect on the MEA performance compared to the standard 30 wt % ionomer MEA. Under operation in air and high relative humidity, a cathode with a narrow pore size distribution and low ionomer content is shown to be beneficial due to its low water retention properties. In dry operating conditions, adequate ionomer content on the cathode is crucial, whereas it can be reduced on the anode without a significant impact on fuel cell performance.

  7. An Integrated Observational and Model Synthesis Approach to Examine Dominant Environmental Controls on Active Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atchley, A. L.; Coon, E.; Painter, S. L.; Harp, D. R.; Wilson, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The active layer thickness (ALT) - the annual maximum depth of soil with above 0°C temperatures - in part determines the volume of carbon-rich stores available for decomposition and therefore potential greenhouse gas release into the atmosphere from Arctic tundra. However, understanding and predicting ALT in polygonal tundra landscapes is difficult due to the complex nature of hydrothermal atmospheric-surface-subsurface interactions in freezing/thawing soil. Simply deconvolving effects of single environmental controls on ALT is not possible with measurements alone as processes act in concert to drive thaw depth formation. Process-rich models of thermal hydrological dynamics, conversely, are a valuable tool for understanding the dominant controls and uncertainties in predicting permafrost conditions. By integrating observational data with known physical relationships to form process-rich models, synthetic experiments can then be used to explore a breadth of environmental conditions encountered and the effect of each environmental attribute may be assessed. Here a process rich thermal hydrology model, The Advanced Terrestrial Simulator, has been created and calibrated using observed data from Barrow, AK. An ensemble of 1D thermal hydrologic models were simulated that span a range of three environmental factors 1) thickness of organic rich soil, 2) snow depth, and 3) soil moisture content, to investigate the role of each factor on ALT. Results show that organic layer thickness acts as a strong insulator and is the dominant control of ALT, but the strength of the effect of organic layer thickness is also dependent on the saturation state. Using the ensemble results, the effect of peat thickness on ALT was then examined on a 2D domain. This work was supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project LDRD201200068DR and by the The Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project. NGEE-Arctic is supported by the Office of Biological and

  8. Multi-omics of Permafrost, Active Layer and Thermokarst Bog Soil Microbiomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hultman, Jenni; Waldrop, Mark P.; Mackelprang, Rachel; David, Maude; McFarland, Jack; Blazewicz, Steven J.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Turetsky, Merritt; McGuire, A. David; Shah, Manesh B.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Lee, Lang Ho; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Jansson, Janet K.

    2015-03-04

    Over 20% of Earth’s terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost with vast stores of carbon that, if thawed may represent the largest future transfer of C from the biosphere to the atmosphere 1. This process is largely dependent on microbial responses, but we know little about microbial activity in intact, let alone in thawing permafrost. Molecular approaches have recently revealed the identities and functional gene composition of microorganisms in some permafrost soils 2-4 and a rapid shift in functional gene composition during short-term thaw experiments 3. However, the fate of permafrost C depends on climatic, hydrologic, and microbial responses to thaw at decadal scales 5, 6. Here the combination of several molecular “omics” approaches enabled us to determine the phylogenetic composition of the microbial community, including several draft genomes of novel species, their functional potential and activity in soils representing different states of thaw: intact permafrost, seasonally thawed active layer and thermokarst bog. The multi-omics strategy revealed a good correlation of process rates to omics data for dominant processes, such as methanogenesis in the bog, as well as novel survival strategies for potentially active microbes in permafrost.

  9. Novel biohybrids of layered double hydroxide and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Braiek, Mohamed; Hidouri, Slah; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem

    2016-02-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biomolecule such as enzyme to produce bioinorganic system. Lactate dehydrogenase (Lac Deh) has been chosen as a model enzyme, being immobilized onto MgAl and ZnAl LDH materials via direct ion-exchange (adsorption) and co-precipitation methods. The immobilization efficiency was largely dependent upon the immobilization methods. A comparative study shows that the co-precipitation method favors the immobilization of great and tunable amount of enzyme. The structural behavior, chemical bonding composition and morphology of the resulting biohybrids were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The free and immobilized enzyme activity and kinetic parameters were also reported using UV-Visible spectroscopy. However, the modified LDH materials showed a decrease in crystallinity as compared to the unmodified LDH. The change in activity of the immobilized lactate dehydrogenase was considered to be due, to the reduced accessibility of substrate molecules to the active sites of the enzyme and the partial conformational change of the Lac Deh molecules as a result of the immobilization way. Finally, it was proven that there is a correlation between structure/microstructure and enzyme activity dependent on the immobilization process.

  10. Multi-omics of permafrost, active layer and thermokarst bog soil microbiomes.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Jenni; Waldrop, Mark P; Mackelprang, Rachel; David, Maude M; McFarland, Jack; Blazewicz, Steven J; Harden, Jennifer; Turetsky, Merritt R; McGuire, A David; Shah, Manesh B; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Lee, Lang Ho; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Jansson, Janet K

    2015-05-14

    Over 20% of Earth's terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost with vast stores of carbon that, once thawed, may represent the largest future transfer of carbon from the biosphere to the atmosphere. This process is largely dependent on microbial responses, but we know little about microbial activity in intact, let alone in thawing, permafrost. Molecular approaches have recently revealed the identities and functional gene composition of microorganisms in some permafrost soils and a rapid shift in functional gene composition during short-term thaw experiments. However, the fate of permafrost carbon depends on climatic, hydrological and microbial responses to thaw at decadal scales. Here we use the combination of several molecular 'omics' approaches to determine the phylogenetic composition of the microbial communities, including several draft genomes of novel species, their functional potential and activity in soils representing different states of thaw: intact permafrost, seasonally thawed active layer and thermokarst bog. The multi-omics strategy reveals a good correlation of process rates to omics data for dominant processes, such as methanogenesis in the bog, as well as novel survival strategies for potentially active microbes in permafrost.

  11. Multi-omics of permafrost, active layer and thermokarst bog soil microbiomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hultman, Jenni; Waldrop, Mark P.; Mackelprang, Rachel; David, Maude M.; McFarland, Jack; Blazewicz, Steven J.; Harden, Jennifer; Turetsky, Merritt R.; McGuire, A. David; Shah, Manesh B.; Verberkmoes, Nathan C.; Lee, Lang Ho; Mavrommatis, Kostas; Jansson, Janet K.

    2015-05-01

    Over 20% of Earth's terrestrial surface is underlain by permafrost with vast stores of carbon that, once thawed, may represent the largest future transfer of carbon from the biosphere to the atmosphere. This process is largely dependent on microbial responses, but we know little about microbial activity in intact, let alone in thawing, permafrost. Molecular approaches have recently revealed the identities and functional gene composition of microorganisms in some permafrost soils and a rapid shift in functional gene composition during short-term thaw experiments. However, the fate of permafrost carbon depends on climatic, hydrological and microbial responses to thaw at decadal scales. Here we use the combination of several molecular `omics' approaches to determine the phylogenetic composition of the microbial communities, including several draft genomes of novel species, their functional potential and activity in soils representing different states of thaw: intact permafrost, seasonally thawed active layer and thermokarst bog. The multi-omics strategy reveals a good correlation of process rates to omics data for dominant processes, such as methanogenesis in the bog, as well as novel survival strategies for potentially active microbes in permafrost.

  12. Effects of Nanoscale Surface Roughness on Colloid Detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmuson, J. A.; Johnson, W. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in colloid transport science have demonstrated the importance of surface roughness on colloid attachment; however, few studies have investigated the influence of nano-scale roughness on colloid detachment. This study explores the effects of flow perturbations on a variety of mineral surfaces, as well as NaOH treated (i.e. rough, Figure 1a) and untreated (i.e. smooth, Figure 1b) surfaces for colloids of various sizes attached in an impinging jet system under flowing and stagnant conditions. These experiments showed minimal detachment from the roughened surfaces (treated glass) and significant detachment from the smooth surfaces (untreated glass and mica). A correlation between residence time and attachment irreversibility was also revealed, indicating that the particles that spent the longest time attached to the surface developed the strongest adhesion. The representative surface-heterogeneity model developed by Pazmino et al. (2014) was used to conduct detachment simulations under similar geochemical and flow conditions. While simulated results show qualitative agreement with experimental results, they tend to over-predict detachment, highlighting differences among simulated versus real surfaces, which may be related to surface roughness. These results suggest that more sophisticated models that incorporate surface roughness and time-based adhesion are needed to accurately predict colloid detachment in environmental systems.

  13. Defect Density Characterization of Detached-Grown Germanium Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweizer, M.; Cobb, S. D.; Volz, M. P.; Szoke, J.; Szofran, F. R.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several (111)-oriented, Ga-doped germanium crystals were grown in pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN) containers by the Bridgman and the detached Bridgman growth techniques. Growth experiments in closed-bottom pBN containers resulted in nearly completely detached-grown crystals, because the gas pressure below the melt can build up to a higher pressure than above the melt. With open-bottom tubes the gas pressure above and below the melt is balanced during the experiment, and thus no additional force supports the detachment. In this case the crystals grew attached to the wall. Etch pit density (EPD) measurements along the axial growth direction indicated a strong improvement of the crystal quality of the detached-grown samples compared to the attached samples. Starting in the seed with an EPD of 6-8 x 10(exp 3)/square cm it decreased in the detached-grown crystals continuously to about 200-500/square cm . No significant radial difference between the EPD on the edge and the middle of the crystal exists. In the attached grown samples the EPD increases up to a value of about 2-4 x 10(exp 4)/square cm (near the edge) and up to 1 x 10(exp 4)/square cm in the middle of the sample. Thus the difference between the detached- and the attached-grown crystals with respect to the EPD is approximately two orders of magnitude.

  14. Improved Crystal Quality By Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Wang, Yaz-Hen; Wang, Jian-Bin

    2003-01-01

    Many microgravity directional solidification experiments yielded ingots with portions that grew without contacting the ampoule wall, leading to greatly improved crystallographic perfection. Our long term goals have been: (1) To develop a complete understanding of all of the phenomena of detached solidification.; (2) To make it possible to achieve detached solidification reproducibly; (3) To increase crystallographic perfection through detached solidification. We have three major achievements to report here: (1) We obtained a new material balance solution for the Moving Meniscus Model of detached solidification. This solution greatly clarifies the physics as well as the roles of the parameters in the system; (2) We achieved detached solidification of InSb growing on earth in BN-coated ampoules; (3) We performed an extensive series of experiments on freezing water that showed how to form multiple gas bubbles or tubes on the ampoule wall. However, these did not propagate around the wall and lead to fully detached solidification unless the ampoule wall was extremely rough and non-wetted.

  15. Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials as Active Layer Components in Thin-Film Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shastry, Tejas Attreya

    Thin-film photovoltaics offer the promise of cost-effective and scalable solar energy conversion, particularly for applications of semi-transparent solar cells where the poor absorption of commercially-available silicon is inadequate. Applications ranging from roof coatings that capture solar energy to semi-transparent windows that harvest the immense amount of incident sunlight on buildings could be realized with efficient and stable thin-film solar cells. However, the lifetime and efficiency of thin-film solar cells continue to trail their inorganic silicon counterparts. Low-dimensional nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes and two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides, have recently been explored as materials in thin-film solar cells due to their exceptional optoelectronic properties, solution-processability, and chemical inertness. Thus far, issues with the processing of these materials has held back their implementation in efficient photovoltaics. This dissertation reports processing advances that enable demonstrations of low-dimensional nanomaterials in thin-film solar cells. These low-dimensional photovoltaics show enhanced photovoltaic efficiency and environmental stability in comparison to previous devices, with a focus on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes as an active layer component. The introduction summarizes recent advances in the processing of carbon nanotubes and their implementation through the thin-film photovoltaic architecture, as well as the use of two-dimensional metal dichalcogenides in photovoltaic applications and potential future directions for all-nanomaterial solar cells. The following chapter reports a study of the interaction between carbon nanotubes and surfactants that enables them to be sorted by electronic type via density gradient ultracentrifugation. These insights are utilized to construct of a broad distribution of carbon nanotubes that absorb throughout the solar spectrum. This polychiral distribution is then shown

  16. Aeromechanical stability augmentation of helicopters using enhanced active constrained layer damping treatment on rotor flex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badre Alam, Askari

    This thesis presents a study conducted to explore the feasibility of employing Enhanced Active Constrained Layer (EACL) damping treatment in helicopter rotor systems to alleviate aeromechanical instability. The central idea is to apply the EACL treatment on the flexbeams of soft in-plane bearingless main rotors (BMRs) and increase the damping of the first lag mode. In this research, it is explored whether EACL damping treatment can provide sufficient damping in rotor system without exceeding the physical design limits of actuators. To study the feasibility of the EACL damping treatment, a finite element based mathematical model of a rotor with EACL damping treatment on flexbeam is developed. A bench top experiment is conducted to verify the mathematical model. It is shown that the experimental results correlate well with the analytical results. A derivative controller, with control voltage based on the flexbeam tip transverse velocity, is used in this investigation. A filter is developed to remove 1/rev component of the feedback signal. An optimization study is conducted to understand the influence of EACL design parameters on the performance of the damping treatment. A study is conducted to analyze delamination of EACL damping treatment. In this study, a new finite element model is developed that is capable of accurately predicting both, the performance and interlaminar stresses in EACL damping treatment. A new configuration of PCL damping treatment is developed by tapering the constraining layer at the free ends. As compared to a conventional PCL, this configuration has significantly lower interlaminar stresses and similar damping performance. A study is conducted to compare ACL with purely active configuration. It was shown that in ACL configuration, the interlaminar stresses are an-order-of-magnitude lower than the purely active configuration for similar damping levels. A new ACL configuration is designed by changing the poling direction of the PZT constraining

  17. Low-noise encoding of active touch by layer 4 in the somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Andrew Hires, Samuel; Gutnisky, Diego A; Yu, Jianing; O'Connor, Daniel H; Svoboda, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Cortical spike trains often appear noisy, with the timing and number of spikes varying across repetitions of stimuli. Spiking variability can arise from internal (behavioral state, unreliable neurons, or chaotic dynamics in neural circuits) and external (uncontrolled behavior or sensory stimuli) sources. The amount of irreducible internal noise in spike trains, an important constraint on models of cortical networks, has been difficult to estimate, since behavior and brain state must be precisely controlled or tracked. We recorded from excitatory barrel cortex neurons in layer 4 during active behavior, where mice control tactile input through learned whisker movements. Touch was the dominant sensorimotor feature, with >70% spikes occurring in millisecond timescale epochs after touch onset. The variance of touch responses was smaller than expected from Poisson processes, often reaching the theoretical minimum. Layer 4 spike trains thus reflect the millisecond-timescale structure of tactile input with little noise. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06619.001 PMID:26245232

  18. Vibration and damping characteristics of cylindrical shells with active constrained layer damping treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ling; Zhang, Dongdong; Wang, Yi

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the application of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments is extended to the vibration control of cylindrical shells. The governing equation of motion of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments is derived on the basis of the constitutive equations of elastic, piezoelectric and visco-elastic materials and an energy approach. The damping of a visco-elastic layer is modeled by the complex modulus formula. A finite element model is developed to describe and predict the vibration characteristics of cylindrical shells partially treated with ACLD treatments. A closed-loop control system based on proportional and derivative feedback of the sensor voltage generated by the piezo-sensor of the ACLD patches is established. The dynamic behaviors of cylindrical shells with ACLD treatments such as natural frequencies, loss factors and responses in the frequency domain are further investigated. The effects of several key parameters such as control gains, location and coverage of ACLD treatments on vibration suppression of cylindrical shells are also discussed. The numerical results indicate the validity of the finite element model and the control strategy approach. The potential of ACLD treatments in controlling vibration and sound radiation of cylindrical shells used as major critical structures such as cabins of aircraft, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles is thus demonstrated.

  19. Removing Boundary Layer by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1927-01-01

    Through the utilization of the "Magnus effect" on the Flettner rotor ship, the attention of the public has been directed to the underlying physical principle. It has been found that the Prandtl boundary-layer theory furnishes a satisfactory explanation of the observed phenomena. The present article deals with the prevention of this separation or detachment of the flow by drawing the boundary layer into the inside of a body through a slot or slots in its surface.

  20. Tyrosinase and Layer-by-Layer supported tyrosinases in the synthesis of lipophilic catechols with antiinfluenza activity.

    PubMed

    Bozzini, Tiziana; Botta, Giorgia; Delfino, Michela; Onofri, Silvano; Saladino, Raffaele; Amatore, Donatella; Sgarbanti, Rossella; Nencioni, Lucia; Palamara, Anna Teresa

    2013-12-15

    Catechol derivatives with lipophilic properties have been selectively synthesized by tyrosinase in high yield avoiding long and tedious protection/deprotection steps usually required in traditional procedures. The synthesis was effective also with immobilized tyrosinase able to perform for more runs. The novel catechols were evaluated against influenza A virus, that continue to represent a severe threat worldwide. A significant antiviral activity was observed in derivatives characterized by antioxidant activity and long carbon alkyl side-chains, suggesting the possibility of a new inhibition mechanism based on both redox and lipophilic properties.

  1. Nanocomposites of polymers with layered inorganic nanofillers: Antimicrobial activity, thermo-mechanical properties, morphology, and dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songtipya, Ponusa

    In the first part of the thesis, polyethylene/layered silicate nanocomposites that exhibit an antimicrobial activity were synthesized and studied. Their antimicrobial activity was designed to originate from non-leaching, novel cationic modifiers---amine-based surfactants---used as the organic-modification of the fillers. Specifically, PE/organically-modified montmorillonite ( mmt) nanocomposites were prepared via melt-processing, and simultaneous dispersion and antimicrobial activity was designed by proper choice of the fillers' organic modification. The antimicrobial activity was measured against three micotoxinogen fungal strains (Penicillium roqueforti and claviforme, and Fusarium graminearum ). Various mmt-based organofillers, which only differ in the type or amount of their organic modification, were used to exemplify how these surfactants can be designed to render antifungal activity to the fillers themselves and the respective nanocomposites. A comparative discussion of the growth of fungi on unfilled PE and nanocomposite PE films is used to demonstrate how the antimicrobial efficacy is dictated by the surfactant chemistry and, further, how the nanocomposites' inhibitory activity compares to that of the organo-fillers and the surfactants. An attempt to improve the thermomechanical reinforcement of PE/mmt nanocomposites while maintaining their antimicrobial activity, was also carried out by combining two different organically modified montmorillonites. However, a uniform microscopic dispersion could not be achieved through this approach. In the second part of this thesis, a number of fundamental studies relating to structure-property relations in nanocomposites were carried out, towards unveiling strategies that can concurrently optimize selected properties of polymers by the addition of nanofillers. Specifically, the dispersion-crystallinity-reinforcement relations in HDPE/mmt nanocomposites was investigated. The influence of a functional HDPE compatibilizer

  2. Comparison of Plasma Activation of Thin Water Layers by Direct and Remote Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Plasma activation of liquids is now being investigated for a variety of biomedical applications. The plasma sources used for this activation can be generally classified as direct (the plasma is in contact with the surface of the liquid) or remote (the plasma does not directly touch the liquid). The direct plasma source may be a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) where the surface of the liquid is a floating electrode or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave forming the plasma plume reaches the liquid. The remote plasma source may be a DBD with electrodes electrically isolated from the liquid or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave in the plume does not reach the liquid. In this paper, a comparison of activation of thin water layers on top of tissue, as might be encountered in wound healing, will be discussed using results from numerical investigations. We used the modeling platform nonPDPSIM to simulate direct plasma activation of thin water layers using DBDs and remote activation using plasma jets using up to hundreds of pulses. The DBDs are sustained in humid air while the plasma jets consist of He/O2 mixtures flowed into humid air. For similar number of pulses and energy deposition, the direct DBD plasma sources produce more acidification and higher production of nitrates/nitrites in the liquid. This is due to the accumulation of NxOy plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with newly produced reactive species. in the gas phase. In the plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with

  3. Energetic basis of catalytic activity of layered nanophase calcium manganese oxides for water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Birkner, Nancy; Nayeri, Sara; Pashaei, Babak; Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Casey, William H.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Previous measurements show that calcium manganese oxide nanoparticles are better water oxidation catalysts than binary manganese oxides (Mn3O4, Mn2O3, and MnO2). The probable reasons for such enhancement involve a combination of factors: The calcium manganese oxide materials have a layered structure with considerable thermodynamic stability and a high surface area, their low surface energy suggests relatively loose binding of H2O on the internal and external surfaces, and they possess mixed-valent manganese with internal oxidation enthalpy independent of the Mn3+/Mn4+ ratio and much smaller in magnitude than the Mn2O3-MnO2 couple. These factors enhance catalytic ability by providing easy access for solutes and water to active sites and facile electron transfer between manganese in different oxidation states. PMID:23667149

  4. Reduction of Free Edge Peeling Stress of Laminated Composites Using Active Piezoelectric Layers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Kim, Heung Soo

    2014-01-01

    An analytical approach is proposed in the reduction of free edge peeling stresses of laminated composites using active piezoelectric layers. The approach is the extended Kantorovich method which is an iterative method. Multiterms of trial function are employed and governing equations are derived by taking the principle of complementary virtual work. The solutions are obtained by solving a generalized eigenvalue problem. By this approach, the stresses automatically satisfy not only the traction-free boundary conditions, but also the free edge boundary conditions. Through the iteration processes, the free edge stresses converge very quickly. It is found that the peeling stresses generated by mechanical loadings are significantly reduced by applying a proper electric field to the piezoelectric actuators. PMID:25025088

  5. Radiative transfer theory for active remote sensing of a layer of nonspherical particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, L.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    The radiative transfer theory is applied to calculate the scattering by a layer of randomly positioned and oriented nonspherical particles. The scattering amplitude functions of each individual particle are calculated with Waterman's T matrix method, which utilizes vector spherical wave functions for expansion of incident, scattered, and surface fields. The orientation of the particles is described by a probability density function of the Eulerian angles of rotation. A rotation matrix is used to relate the T matrix of the principal frame to that of the natural frame of the particle. The extinction matrix and phase matrix of the radiative transfer equations are expressed in terms of the T matrix elements. The extinction matrix for nonspherical particles is generally nondiagonal. There are only two attenuation rates in a specified direction of propagation. The radiative transfer equations are solved by an iterative method to first order in albedo. Numerical results are illustrated as functions of incidence angle and frequency with applications to active remote sensing.

  6. Giant Electron-Hole Interactions in Confined Layered Structures for Molecular Oxygen Activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Shichuan; Yong, Dingyu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Shuang; Shao, Wei; Sun, Xianshun; Pan, Bicai; Xie, Yi

    2017-04-05

    Numerous efforts have been devoted to understanding the excitation processes of photocatalysts, whereas the potential Coulomb interactions between photogenerated electrons and holes have been long ignored. Once these interactions are considered, excitonic effects will arise that undoubtedly influence the sunlight-driven catalytic processes. Herein, by taking bismuth oxyhalide as examples, we proposed that giant electron-hole interactions would be expected in confined layered structures, and excitons would be the dominating photoexcited species. Photocatalytic molecular oxygen activation tests were performed as a proof of concept, where singlet oxygen generation via energy transfer process was brightened. Further experiments verify that structural confinement is curial to the giant excitonic effects, where the involved catalytic process could be readily regulated via facet-engineering, thus enabling diverse reactive oxygen species generation. This study not only provides an excitonic prospective on photocatalytic processes, but also paves a new approach for pursuing systems with giant electron-hole interactions.

  7. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoclusters: Aqueous, Concentrated, Stable, and Catalytically Active Colloids toward Green Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Yasuaki; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tarutani, Naoki; Vaz, Pedro D; Nunes, Carla D; Prevot, Vanessa; Stenning, Gavin B G; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-05-24

    Increasing attention has been dedicated to the development of nanomaterials rendering green and sustainable processes, which occur in benign aqueous reaction media. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of another family of green nanomaterials, layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoclusters, which are concentrated (98.7 g/L in aqueous solvent), stably dispersed (transparent sol for >2 weeks), and catalytically active colloids of nano LDHs (isotropic shape with the size of 7.8 nm as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering). LDH nanoclusters are available as colloidal building blocks to give access to meso- and macroporous LDH materials. Proof-of-concept applications revealed that the LDH nanocluster works as a solid basic catalyst and is separable from solvents of catalytic reactions, confirming the nature of nanocatalysts. The present work closely investigates the unique physical and chemical features of this colloid, the formation mechanism, and the ability to act as basic nanocatalysts in benign aqueous reaction systems.

  8. Integrated structures/controls optimization of a smart composite plate with segmented active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beri, Rajan; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Nam, Changho

    2000-06-01

    A rigorous multi-objective optimization procedure, is developed to address the integrated structures/control design of composite plates with surface bonded segmented active constrained layer (ACL) damping treatment. The Kresselmeier- Steinhauser function approach is used to formulate this multidisciplinary problem. The goal is to control vibration without incorporating a weight penalty. Objective functions and constraints include damping ratios, structural weight and natural frequencies. Design variables include the ply stacking sequence, dimensions and placement of segmented ACL. The optimal designs show improved plate vibratory characteristics and reduced structural weight. The results of the multi- objective optimization problem are compared to those of a single objective optimization with vibration control as the objective. Results establish the necessity for developing the integrated structures/controls optimization procedure.

  9. Influences and interactions of inundation, peat, and snow on active layer thickness: Modeling Archive

    DOE Data Explorer

    Scott Painter; Ethan Coon; Cathy Wilson; Dylan Harp; Adam Atchley

    2016-04-21

    This Modeling Archive is in support of an NGEE Arctic publication currently in review [4/2016]. The Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) was used to simulate thermal hydrological conditions across varied environmental conditions for an ensemble of 1D models of Arctic permafrost. The thickness of organic soil is varied from 2 to 40cm, snow depth is varied from approximately 0 to 1.2 meters, water table depth was varied from -51cm below the soil surface to 31 cm above the soil surface. A total of 15,960 ensemble members are included. Data produced includes the third and fourth simulation year: active layer thickness, time of deepest thaw depth, temperature of the unfrozen soil, and unfrozen liquid saturation, for each ensemble member. Input files used to run the ensemble are also included.

  10. Active-layer thickness estimation from X-band SAR backscatter intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widhalm, Barbara; Bartsch, Annett; Leibman, Marina; Khomutov, Artem

    2017-02-01

    The active layer above the permafrost, which seasonally thaws during summer, is an important parameter for monitoring the state of permafrost. Its thickness is typically measured locally, but a range of methods which utilize information from satellite data exist. Mostly, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) obtained from optical satellite data is used as a proxy. The applicability has been demonstrated mostly for shallow depths of active-layer thickness (ALT) below approximately 70 cm. Some permafrost areas including central Yamal are, however, characterized by larger ALT. Surface properties including vegetation structure are also represented by microwave backscatter intensity. So far, the potential of such data for estimating ALT has not been explored. We therefore investigated the relationship between ALT and X-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter of TerraSAR-X (averages for 10 × 10 m window) in order to examine the possibility of delineating ALT with continuous and larger spatial coverage in this area and compare it to the already-established method of using NDVI from Landsat (30 m). Our results show that the mutual dependency of ALT and TerraSAR-X backscatter on land cover types suggests a connection of both parameters. A range of 5 dB can be observed for an ALT range of 100 cm (40-140 cm), and an R2 of 0.66 has been determined over the calibration sites. An increase of ALT with increasing backscatter can be determined. The root mean square error (RMSE) over a comparably heterogeneous validation site with maximum ALT of > 150 cm is 20 cm. Deviations are larger for measurement locations with mixed vegetation types (especially partial coverage by cryptogam crust) with respect to the spatial resolution of the satellite data.

  11. Temperature and moisture effects on greenhouse gas emissions from deep active-layer boreal soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Smith, Ashly P.; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2016-12-21

    Rapid climatic changes, rising air temperatures, and increased fires are expected to drive permafrost degradation and alter soil carbon (C) cycling in many high-latitude ecosystems. How these soils will respond to changes in their temperature, moisture, and overlying vegetation is highly uncertain, but critical to understand given the large soil C stocks in these regions. We used a laboratory experiment to examine how temperature and moisture control CO2 and CH4 emissions from mineral soils sampled from the bottom of the annual active layer, i.e. directly above permafrost, in an Alaskan boreal forest. Gas emissions from thirty cores, subjected to two temperatures and either field moisture conditions or experimental drought, were tracked over a 100-day incubation; we also measured a variety of physical and chemical characteristics of the cores. Gravimetric water content was 0.31 ± 0.12 (unitless) at the beginning of the incubation; cores at field moisture were unchanged at the end, but drought cores had declined to 0.06 ± 0.04. Carbon dioxide fluxes were strongly influenced by incubation chamber temperature, core water content, and percent soil nitrogen, and had a temperature sensitivity (i.e. Q10) of 1.3 and 1.9 for the field moisture and drought treatments, respectively. Methane emissions were most strongly correlated with percent nitrogen, but neither temperature nor water content was a significant first-order predictor of CH4 fluxes. The cumulative production of C from CO2 was over six orders of magnitudes higher than that from CH4. These results suggest that deep active-layer soils may be much more sensitive to changes in moisture than to temperature, a critical factor as discontinuous permafrost melts in interior Alaska. Deep but unfrozen high-latitude soils have been shown to be strongly affected by long-term experimental warming, and these results provide insight into their future dynamics and feedback potential with future climate change.

  12. Influence of Plant Communities on Active Layer Depth in Boreal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, James; Estop Aragones, Cristian; Thierry, Aaron; Hartley, Iain; Murton, Julian; Charman, Dan; Williams, Mathew; Phoenix, Gareth

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation plays a crucial role in determining active layer depth (ALD) and hence the extent to which permafrost may thaw under climate change. Such influences are multifaceted and include, for example, promotion of shallow ALD by insulation from moss or shading by plant canopies in summer, or trapping of snow in evergreen tree canopies that reduces snow insulation of soil in winter. However, while the role of different vegetation components are understood at a conceptual level, quantitative understanding of the relative importance of different vegetation components and how they interact to determine active layer depth is lacking. In addition, major abiotic factors such as fire and soil hydrological properties will considerably influence the role of vegetation in mediating ALD, though again this is not well understood. To address this we surveyed 60 plots across 4 sites of contrasting vegetation and fire status, encompassing a range of soil moisture and organic matter thickness, in the discontinuous permafrost zone near Yellowknife, NT, Canada. In each plot we measured ALD and a range of vegetation and soil parameters to understand how key characteristics of the understory and canopy vegetation, and soil properties influence ALD. Measurements included moss depth, tree canopy LAI, understory LAI, understory height, vegetation composition, soil organic matter depth, slope and soil moisture. By undertaking these surveys in sites with contrasting hydrological conditions in both burned and unburned areas we have also been able to determine which characteristics of the vegetation and soil are important for protecting permafrost, which characteristics emerge as the most important factors across sites (i.e. irrespective of site conditions) and which factors have site (ecosystem) specific influences. This work provides a major insight into how ecosystem properties influence ALD and therefore also how changes in ecosystems properties arising from climate change may influence

  13. Influence of Plant Communities on Active Layer Depth in Boreal Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoenix, G. K.; Fisher, J. P.; Estop-Aragones, C.; Thierry, A.; Hartley, I. P.; Murton, J.; Charman, D.; Williams, M.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation plays a crucial role in determining active layer depth (ALD) and hence also the extent that permafrost may thaw under climate change. Such influences are multifaceted and include, for example, promotion of shallow ALD by insulation from moss or shading by plant canopies in summer, or trapping of snow in evergreen tree canopies that reduces snow insulation of soil in winter. However, while the role of different vegetation components are understood at a conceptual level, quantitative understanding of the relative importance of different vegetation components and how they interact to determine active layer depth is lacking. In addition, major abiotic factors such as fire and soil hydrological properties will considerably influence the role of vegetation in mediating ALD, though again this is not well understood. To address this we surveyed multiple plots across 4 sites of contrasting vegetation and fire status, including a range of soil moisture and organic matter thickness, in the discontinuous permafrost zone near Yellowknife, NT, Canada. In each plot we measured ALD and a range of vegetation and soil parameters to understand how key characteristics of the understory and canopy vegetation, and soil properties influence ALD. Measurements included moss depth, tree canopy LAI, understory LAI, understory height, vegetation composition, soil organic matter depth, slope and soil moisture. By undertaking these surveys in sites with contrasting hydrological conditions in both burned and unburned areas we have also been able to determine which characteristics of the vegetation and soil are important for protecting permafrost, which characteristics emerge as the most important factors across sites (i.e. irrespective of site conditions) and which factors have site (ecosystem) specific influences. This work provides a major insight into how ecosystem properties influence ALD and therefore also how changes in ecosystems properties arising from climate change may

  14. Photoreceptor cell death and rescue in retinal detachment and degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yusuke; Notomi, Shoji; Hisatomi, Toshio; Nakazawa, Toru; Ishibashi, Tatsuro; Miller, Joan W.; Vavvas, Demetrios G.

    2013-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell death is the ultimate cause of vision loss in various retinal disorders, including retinal detachment (RD). Photoreceptor cell death has been thought to occur mainly through apoptosis, which is the most characterized form of programmed cell death. The caspase family of cysteine proteases plays a central role for inducing apoptosis, and in experimental models of RD, dying photoreceptor cells exhibit caspase activation; however, there is a paradox that caspase inhibition alone does not provide a sufficient protection against photoreceptor cell loss, suggesting that other mechanisms of cell death are involved. Recent accumulating evidence demonstrates that non-apoptotic forms of cell death, such as autophagy and necrosis, are also regulated by specific molecular machinery, such as those mediated by autophagy-related proteins and receptor-interacting protein kinases, respectively. Here we summarize the current knowledge of cell death signaling and its roles in photoreceptor cell death after RD and other retinal degenerative diseases. A body of studies indicate that not only apoptotic but also autophagic and necrotic signaling are involved in photoreceptor cell death, and that combined targeting of these pathways may be an effective neuroprotective strategy for retinal diseases associated with photoreceptor cell loss. PMID:23994436

  15. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of thermally activated magnetization reversal in dual-layer Exchange Coupled Composite recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumer, M. L.; Almudallal, A. M.; Mercer, J. I.; Whitehead, J. P.; Fal, T. J.

    The kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method developed for thermally activated magnetic reversal processes in single-layer recording media has been extended to study dual-layer Exchange Coupled Composition (ECC) media used in current and next generations of disc drives. The attempt frequency is derived from the Langer formalism with the saddle point determined using a variant of Bellman Ford algorithm. Complication (such as stagnation) arising from coupled grains having metastable states are addressed. MH-hysteresis loops are calculated over a wide range of anisotropy ratios, sweep rates and inter-layer coupling parameter. Results are compared with standard micromagnetics at fast sweep rates and experimental results at slow sweep rates.

  16. Small Molecule Thin Film Solar Cells With Active Layers Composed Of Copper Phthalocyanine (CuPc) And Fullerene (C70)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekuda, Dhananjaya; Rao, K. Mohan; Tolpadi, Amita; Rajendra, B. V.; Chu, C. W.

    2011-07-01

    We have grown organic solar cells through bilayer structure using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) as the donor material and fullerene (C70) as the acceptor. In this article, we demonstrate power conversion efficiency of 1.47% for the bilayered solar cells composed of CuPc and C70. Successful tuning of the thickness of the individual layers was carried out to obtain the optimum solar cell parameters. It has been found that efficiency of the bilayer devices depends primarily on the individual layer thickness and thermal annealing of the devices. Overall, bilayer structure is suitable when the active layers are insoluble in most of the commonly available solvents.

  17. Lithospheric detachment of India and Tibet inferred from thickening of the mantle transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Yaohui; Tian, Xiaobo; Liu, Zhen; Zhu, Gaohua; Nie, Shitan

    2016-07-01

    To spatially and temporally interpret eruptive volcanic activity and plateau uplift, the dynamic model of the Himalayan-Tibetan orogen requires several scenarios in which the deep part of the lithosphere is removed. The removed cold, dense material sank deeply and may rest in the mantle transition zone, which is considered as the graveyard for descending mantle lithosphere. Beneath the Himalayas and southern Tibet, stacking teleseismic P-wave receiver functions reveal thickening of the mantle transition zone (MTZ), which is caused by decreasing temperatures. We interpret the MTZ thickening beneath southern Tibet as being a result of a remnant of detached thickened Tibet mantle lithosphere, whereas the other thickening is most likely caused by a lithospheric slab that detached from the Indian plate and is sinking into the MTZ beneath the Himalayas.

  18. Controlled assembly of layer-by-layer stacking continuous graphene oxide films and their application for actively modulated field electron emission cathodes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan; She, Juncong; Yang, Wenjie; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2014-04-21

    A featured "vapor transportation" assembly technique was developed to attain layer-by-layer stacking continuous graphene oxide (GO) films on both flat and concavo-concave surfaces. Few-layer (layer number < 10) GO sheets were "evaporated" (carried by water vapor) from the water-dispersed GO suspension and smoothly/uniformly tiled on the substrate surface. We have found evidence of the influence of the deposition time and substrate-liquid separation on the film thickness. A model was proposed for interpreting the assembly process. It was found that a current conditioning would induce a reduction of the GO surface and form an Ohmic contact between the GO-metal interfaces. Accordingly, an actively modulated GO cold cathode was fabricated by locally depositing continuous GO sheets on the drain electrode of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET). The field emission current of the GO cathode can be precisely controlled by the MOSFET gate voltage (VGS). A current modulation range from 1 × 10(-10) A to 6.9 × 10(-6) A (4 orders of magnitude) was achieved by tuning the VGS from 0.812 V to 1.728 V. Due to the self-acting positive feedback of the MOSFET, the emission current fluctuation was dramatically reduced from 57.4% (non-control) to 3.4% (controlled). Furthermore, the integrated GO cathode was employed for a lab-prototype display pixel application demonstrating the active modulation of the phosphor luminance, i.e. from 0.01 cd m(-2) to 34.18 cd m(-2).

  19. Controlled assembly of layer-by-layer stacking continuous graphene oxide films and their application for actively modulated field electron emission cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan; She, Juncong; Yang, Wenjie; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2014-03-01

    A featured ``vapor transportation'' assembly technique was developed to attain layer-by-layer stacking continuous graphene oxide (GO) films on both flat and concavo-concave surfaces. Few-layer (layer number < 10) GO sheets were ``evaporated'' (carried by water vapor) from the water-dispersed GO suspension and smoothly/uniformly tiled on the substrate surface. We have found evidence of the influence of the deposition time and substrate-liquid separation on the film thickness. A model was proposed for interpreting the assembly process. It was found that a current conditioning would induce a reduction of the GO surface and form an Ohmic contact between the GO-metal interfaces. Accordingly, an actively modulated GO cold cathode was fabricated by locally depositing continuous GO sheets on the drain electrode of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET). The field emission current of the GO cathode can be precisely controlled by the MOSFET gate voltage (VGS). A current modulation range from 1 × 10-10 A to 6.9 × 10-6 A (4 orders of magnitude) was achieved by tuning the VGS from 0.812 V to 1.728 V. Due to the self-acting positive feedback of the MOSFET, the emission current fluctuation was dramatically reduced from 57.4% (non-control) to 3.4% (controlled). Furthermore, the integrated GO cathode was employed for a lab-prototype display pixel application demonstrating the active modulation of the phosphor luminance, i.e. from 0.01 cd m-2 to 34.18 cd m-2.

  20. Surface modification of polypropylene non-woven fibers with TiO2 nanoparticles via layer-by-layer self assembly method: Preparation and photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Pavasupree, Suttipan; Dubas, Stephan T; Rangkupan, Ratthapol

    2015-11-01

    Polypropylene (PP) meltblown fibers were coated with titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles using layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition technique. The fibers were first modified with 3 layers of poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS) and poly(diallyl-dimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) to improve the anchoring of the TiO2 nanoparticle clusters. PDADMAC, which is positively charged, was then used as counter polyelectrolyte in tandem with anionic TiO2 nanoparticles to construct TiO2/PDADMAC bilayer in the LbL fashion. The number of deposited TiO2/PDADMAC layers was varied from 1 to 7 bilayer, and could be used to adjust TiO2 loading. The LbL technique showed higher TiO2 loading efficiency than the impregnation approach. The modified fibers were tested for their photocatalytic activity against a model dye, Methylene Blue (MB). Results showed that the TiO2 modified fibers exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity efficiency similar to that of TiO2 powder dispersed in solution. The deposition of TiO2 3 bilayer on the PP substrate was sufficient to produce nanocomposite fibers that could bleach the MB solution in less than 4hr. TiO2-LbL constructions also preserved TiO2 adhesion on substrate surface after 1cycle of photocatalytic test. Successive photocatalytic test showed decline in MB reduction rate with loss of TiO2 particles from the substrate outer surface. However, even in the third cycle, the TiO2 modified fibers are still moderately effective as it could remove more than 95% of MB after 8hr of treatment.

  1. Partitioning of Alkali Metal Salts and Boric Acid from Aqueous Phase into the Polyamide Active Layers of Reverse Osmosis Membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingbo; Kingsbury, Ryan S; Perry, Lamar A; Coronell, Orlando

    2017-02-21

    The partition coefficient of solutes into the polyamide active layer of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes is one of the three membrane properties (together with solute diffusion coefficient and active layer thickness) that determine solute permeation. However, no well-established method exists to measure solute partition coefficients into polyamide active layers. Further, the few studies that measured partition coefficients for inorganic salts report values significantly higher than one (∼3-8), which is contrary to expectations from Donnan theory and the observed high rejection of salts. As such, we developed a benchtop method to determine solute partition coefficients into the polyamide active layers of RO membranes. The method uses a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to measure the change in the mass of the active layer caused by the uptake of the partitioned solutes. The method was evaluated using several inorganic salts (alkali metal salts of chloride) and a weak acid of common concern in water desalination (boric acid). All partition coefficients were found to be lower than 1, in general agreement with expectations from Donnan theory. Results reported in this study advance the fundamental understanding of contaminant transport through RO membranes, and can be used in future studies to decouple the contributions of contaminant partitioning and diffusion to contaminant permeation.

  2. Efficient solar photocatalytic activity of TiO2 coated nano-porous silicon by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, Sridhar; Maydannik, Philipp; Ivanova, Tatiana; Shestakova, Marina; Homola, Tomáš; Bryukvin, Anton; Sillanpää, Mika; Nagumothu, Rameshbabu; Alagan, Viswanathan

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, TiO2 coated nano-porous silicon (TiO2/PS) was prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) whereas porous silicon was prepared by stain etching method for efficient solar photocatalytic activity. TiO2/PS was characterized by FESEM, AFM, XRD, XPS and DRS UV-vis spectrophotometer. Absorbance spectrum revealed that TiO2/PS absorbs complete solar light with wave length range of 300 nm-800 nm and most importantly, it absorbs stronger visible light than UV light. The reason for efficient solar light absorption of TiO2/PS is that nanostructured TiO2 layer absorbs UV light and nano-porous silicon layer absorbs visible light which is transparent to TiO2 layer. The amount of visible light absorption of TiO2/PS directly increases with increase of silicon etching time. The effect of silicon etching time of TiO2/PS on solar photocatalytic activity was investigated towards methylene blue dye degradation. Layer by layer solar absorption mechanism was used to explain the enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO2/PS solar absorber. According to this, the photo-generated electrons of porous silicon will be effectively injected into TiO2 via hetero junction interface which leads to efficient charge separation even though porous silicon is not participating in any redox reactions in direct.

  3. Activation patterns in superficial layers of neocortex change between experiences independent of behavior, environment, or the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Takehara-Nishiuchi, Kaori; Insel, Nathan; Hoang, Lan T; Wagner, Zachary; Olson, Kathy; Chawla, Monica K; Burke, Sara N; Barnes, Carol A

    2013-09-01

    Previous work suggests that activation patterns of neurons in superficial layers of the neocortex are more sensitive to spatial context than activation patterns in deep cortical layers. A possible source of this laminar difference is the distribution of contextual information to the superficial cortical layers carried by hippocampal efferents that travel through the entorhinal cortex and subiculum. To evaluate the role that the hippocampus plays in determining context sensitivity in superficial cortical layers, behavior-induced expression of the immediate early gene Arc was examined in hippocampus-lesioned and control rats after exposing them to 2 distinct contexts. Contrary to expectations, hippocampal lesions had no observable effect on Arc expression in any neocortical layer relative to controls. Furthermore, another group of intact animals was exposed to the same environment twice, to determine the reliability of Arc-expression patterns across identical contextual and behavioral episodes. Although this condition included no difference in external input between 2 epochs, the significant layer differences in Arc expression still remained. Thus, laminar differences in activation or plasticity patterns are not likely to arise from hippocampal sources or differences in external inputs, but are more likely to be an intrinsic property of the neocortex.

  4. Central role of detachment faults in accretion of slow-spreading oceanic lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Escartín, J; Smith, D K; Cann, J; Schouten, H; Langmuir, C H; Escrig, S

    2008-10-09

    The formation of oceanic detachment faults is well established from inactive, corrugated fault planes exposed on sea floor formed along ridges spreading at less than 80 km Myr(-1) (refs 1-4). These faults can accommodate extension for up to 1-3 Myr (ref. 5), and are associated with one of the two contrasting modes of accretion operating along the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The first mode is asymmetrical accretion involving an active detachment fault along one ridge flank. The second mode is the well-known symmetrical accretion, dominated by magmatic processes with subsidiary high-angle faulting and the formation of abyssal hills on both flanks. Here we present an examination of approximately 2,500 km of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 12.5 and 35 degrees N, which reveals asymmetrical accretion along almost half of the ridge. Hydrothermal activity identified so far in the study region is closely associated with asymmetrical accretion, which also shows high levels of near-continuous hydroacoustically and teleseismically recorded seismicity. Increased seismicity is probably generated along detachment faults that accommodate a sizeable proportion of the total plate separation. In contrast, symmetrical segments have lower levels of seismicity, which occurs primarily at segment ends. Basalts erupted along asymmetrical segments have compositions that are consistent with crystallization at higher pressures than basalts from symmetrical segments, and with lower extents of partial melting of the mantle. Both seismic evidence and geochemical evidence indicate that the axial lithosphere is thicker and colder at asymmetrical sections of the ridge, either because associated hydrothermal circulation efficiently penetrates to greater depths or because the rising mantle is cooler. We suggest that much of the variability in sea-floor morphology, seismicity and basalt chemistry found along slow-spreading ridges can be thus attributed to the frequent involvement of detachment faults

  5. The Mormon Peak and Tule Springs Detachments of Southern Nevada and Their Role in Interpreting the Subsurface Structure of the Sevier Desert Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernicke, B.; Axen, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    The eastern Sevier front is commonly overprinted by west-dipping normal faults that have been active through much of Cenozoic time. Although examples of disparate age and geometry abound, the Sevier Desert detachment stands out as being: (1) a very large, low-angle structure, (2) probably still active, and (3) at drillable depth, and hence is a prime target for scientific drilling. Among the closest surface-exposed analogs of the detachment are the Miocene Mormon Peak and Tule Springs detachments in southern Nevada, about 250 km SSW of the Sevier Desert. In both areas, the detachments developed within a few km of the basal Sevier thrust. The few traces of the southern Nevada detachments that were identified by reconnaissance mapping in the 1950s were first interpreted as underlying "rootless" gravity-slide masses. Detailed stratigraphic and structural mapping in the 1980s revealed the full extent of these detachments and their close relationship to the basal Sevier thrust. Construction and retrodeformation of cross sections through the two detachments demonstrated that neither fault could represent the base of a surficial slide mass. The key field relationship is the structural contiguity of the hanging walls of the detachments with large mountain range blocks in their down-dip directions. "Rootless" gravity-driven masses of equivalent or larger scale are widely documented, and in contrast to the southern Nevada detachments show clear evidence along their down-dip portions of either riding over the earth's surface (e.g. Heart Mountain, WY; Shadow Valley, CA) or having been internally shortened (e.g. Bearpaw Mountains, MT; Louisiana shelf). A rootless slide origin for the Mormon Peak detachment has been revived based on meso- and microstructural analysis of the fault surface (refs. 1, 2, and 3), but the hypothesis still fails the retrodeformation test at macroscopic scale. The retrodefomed sections indicate that the footwalls of the southern Nevada detachments

  6. Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells with active layers from 300 to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Momblona, C.; Malinkiewicz, O.; Soriano, A.; Gil-Escrig, L.; Bandiello, E.; Scheepers, M.; Bolink, H. J.; Edri, E.

    2014-08-01

    Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite-based solar cells have been prepared in which the perovskite layer is sandwiched in between two organic charge transporting layers that block holes and electrons, respectively. This configuration leads to stable and reproducible devices that do not suffer from strong hysteresis effects and when optimized lead to efficiencies close to 15%. The perovskite layer is formed by using a dual-source thermal evaporation method, whereas the organic layers are processed from solution. The dual-source thermal evaporation method leads to smooth films and allows for high precision thickness variations. Devices were prepared with perovskite layer thicknesses ranging from 160 to 900 nm. The short-circuit current observed for these devices increased with increasing perovskite layer thickness. The main parameter that decreases with increasing perovskite layer thickness is the fill factor and as a result optimum device performance is obtained for perovskite layer thickness around 300 nm. However, here we demonstrate that with a slightly oxidized electron blocking layer the fill factor for the solar cells with a perovskite layer thickness of 900 nm increases to the same values as for the devices with thin perovskite layers. As a result the power conversion efficiencies for the cells with 300 and 900 nm are very similar, 12.7% and 12%, respectively.

  7. Mesospheric electron detachment and LORE recovery times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Vazquez, Francisco J.; Haldoupis, Christos; Luque, Alejandro

    2015-04-01

    We present new results concerning the recovery times (> 10 minutes) of LOng Recovery Early VLF events (LORE) in the upper mesosphere connected to electromagnetic pulses (EMP) of large (> 250 kA km) charge moment change (CMC) ± CG (cloud to ground) lightning capable of producing elves or elve-sprite pairs (in the case of +CG parent lightning) [1], [2]. We have modeled two possible scenarios considering first the relaxation of slightly perturbed ambient electron densities (ne0 + Δne) without an impulsive ionization source and another scenario where the ambient electron density is considerably enhanced due to an impulsive ionization source (the lightning EMP). The full non-equilibrium kinetic and 2D EMP modelling of the perturbed mesosphere in the 76 km - 92 km range during LORE occurring conditions indicates that the electron density relaxation time (defined as the time the perturbed electron density, Δne, takes to decay a factor 1/e of the way to the ambient electron density (ne0)) is critically controlled at each altitude by the relative importance of associative detachment (of O- by, respectively, O and CO and of O2- by O) with respect to electron loss mechanisms (mainly 3-body, 2-body attachment and electron-ion recombination at the highest altitudes). We found that the maximum electron density relaxation time (> 15000 s) occur between 80 km and 82 km while it decreases with increasing altitudes to 12000 s (at 85 km) and about 2000 s (at 92 km). However, LORES are presumably due to VLF scattering from electron density enhancements caused by lightning-induced EMPs in the uppermost D region ionosphere (85 - 92 km). Thus the observed VLF signal recoveries (LORE recovery times) should associate with the relaxation of the maximum enhanced electron densities produced by elves between 85 km and 92 km [3]. Finally, our results for the lowest altitudes considered (76 km and 77 km) are in good agreement with the recovery times (between 20 s and 120 s) of the typical

  8. Active Control of Turbulent Boundary Layer Induced Sound Radiation from Multiple Aircraft Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to experimentally investigate active structural acoustic control of turbulent boundary layer (TBL) induced sound radiation from multiple panels on an aircraft sidewall. One possible approach for controlling sound radiation from multiple panels is a multi-input/multi-output scheme which considers dynamic coupling between the panels. Unfortunately, this is difficult for more than a few panels, and is impractical for a typical aircraft which contains several hundred such panels. An alternative is to implement a large number of independent control systems. Results from the current work demonstrate the feasibility of reducing broadband radiation from multiple panels utilizing a single-input/single-output (SISO) controller per bay, and is the first known demonstration of active control of TBL induced sound radiation on more than two bays simultaneously. The paper compares sound reduction for fully coupled control of six panels versus independent control on each panel. An online adaptive control scheme for independent control is also demonstrated. This scheme will adjust for slow time varying dynamic systems such as fuselage response changes due to aircraft pressurization, etc.

  9. Synthesis of nanoporous activated iridium oxide films by anodized aluminum oxide templated atomic layer deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, D. J.; Christensen, S. T.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. J.; Hersam, M. C.

    2010-08-01

    Iridium oxide (IrOx) has been widely studied due to its applications in electrochromic devices, pH sensing, and neural stimulation. Previous work has demonstrated that both Ir and IrOx films with porous morphologies prepared by sputtering exhibit significantly enhanced charge storage capacities. However, sputtering provides only limited control over film porosity. In this work, we demonstrate an alternative scheme for synthesizing nanoporous Ir and activated IrOx films (AIROFs). This scheme utilizes atomic layer deposition to deposit a thin conformal Ir film within a nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide template. The Ir film is then activated by potential cycling in 0.1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to form a nanoporous AIROF. The morphologies and electrochemical properties of the films are characterized by scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry, respectively. The resulting nanoporous AIROFs exhibit a nanoporous morphology and enhanced cathodal charge storage capacities as large as 311 mC/cm{sup 2}.

  10. Active control of turbulent boundary layer sound transmission into a vehicle interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, A.; Alujević, N.; Pluymers, B.; Desmet, W.

    2016-09-01

    In high speed automotive, aerospace, and railway transportation, the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is one of the most important sources of interior noise. The stochastic pressure distribution associated with the turbulence is able to excite significantly structural vibration of vehicle exterior panels. They radiate sound into the vehicle through the interior panels. Therefore, the air flow noise becomes very influential when it comes to the noise vibration and harshness assessment of a vehicle, in particular at low frequencies. Normally, passive solutions, such as sound absorbing materials, are used for reducing the TBL-induced noise transmission into a vehicle interior, which generally improve the structure sound isolation performance. These can achieve excellent isolation performance at higher frequencies, but are unable to deal with the low-frequency interior noise components. In this paper, active control of TBL noise transmission through an acoustically coupled double panel system into a rectangular cavity is examined theoretically. The Corcos model of the TBL pressure distribution is used to model the disturbance. The disturbance is rejected by an active vibration isolation unit reacting between the exterior and the interior panels. Significant reductions of the low-frequency vibrations of the interior panel and the sound pressure in the cavity are observed.

  11. [Aluminum coordination and active sites on aluminas, Y-zeolites and pillared layered silicates]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Fripiat, J.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report is organized in four sections. In the first the authors will outline structural features which are common to all fine grained alumina, as well as to non-framework alumina in zeolites. This section will be followed by a study of the surface vs. bulk coordination of aluminum. The third section will deal with measurement of the number of acid sites and the scaling of their strength. The fourth and last section will describe three model reactions: the isomerization of 1-butene and of 2 cis-butene; the isomerization and disproportionation of oxtho-xylene; and the transformation of trichloroethane into vinyl chloride followed by the polymerization of the vinyl chloride. The relationship between chemical activity and selectivity and what is known of the local structure of the active catalytic sites will be underlined. Other kinds of zeolites besides Y zeolite have been studied. Instead of the aluminum pillared silicates they found it more interesting to study the substitution of silicon by aluminum in a layered structure containing a permanent porosity (aluminated sepiolite).

  12. Cross-layer active predictive congestion control protocol for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiangwen; Xu, Xiaofeng; Feng, Renjian; Wu, Yinfeng

    2009-01-01

    In wireless sensor networks (WSNs), there are numerous factors that may cause network congestion problems, such as the many-to-one communication modes, mutual interference of wireless links, dynamic changes of network topology and the memory-restrained characteristics of nodes. All these factors result in a network being more vulnerable to congestion. In this paper, a cross-layer active predictive congestion control scheme (CL-APCC) for improving the performance of networks is proposed. Queuing theory is applied in the CL-APCC to analyze data flows of a single-node according to its memory status, combined with the analysis of the average occupied memory size of local networks. It also analyzes the current data change trends of local networks to forecast and actively adjust the sending rate of the node in the next period. In order to ensure the fairness and timeliness of the network, the IEEE 802.11 protocol is revised based on waiting time, the number of the node's neighbors and the original priority of data packets, which dynamically adjusts the sending priority of the node. The performance of CL-APCC, which is evaluated by extensive simulation experiments. is more efficient in solving the congestion in WSNs. Furthermore, it is clear that the proposed scheme has an outstanding advantage in terms of improving the fairness and lifetime of networks.

  13. Dual-frequency plasmon lasing modes in active three-layered bimetallic Ag/Au nanoshells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, DaJian; Wu, XueWei; Cheng, Ying; Jin, BiaoBing; Liu, XiaoJun

    2015-11-01

    The optical properties of three-layered silver-gold-silica (SGS) nanoshells with gain have been investigated theoretically by using Mie theory. Surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (spaser) phenomena can be observed at two plasmon modes of the active SGS nanoshell in the visible region. It is found with the decrease in the radius of the inner Ag core that the critical value of ɛg″(ωg ) for the super-resonance of the low-energy mode increases first and then decreases while that for the high-energy mode decreases. An interesting overlap between the two curves for the critical value of ɛg″(ωg ) can be found at a special core radius. At this point, two super-resonances can be achieved concurrently at the low- and high-energy modes of the active SGS nanoshell with the same gain coefficient. This dual-frequency spaser based on the bimetallic Ag/Au nanoshell may be an efficient candidate for designing the nanolaser.

  14. An electrochemical double layer capacitor using an activated carbon electrode with gel electrolyte binder

    SciTech Connect

    Osaka, Tetsuya, Liu, X.; Nojima, Masashi; Momma, Toshiyuki

    1999-05-01

    An electric double layer capacitor (EDLC) was prepared with an activated carbon powder electrode with poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) based gel electrolyte. Ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) were used as plasticizer and tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF{sub 4}) was used as the supporting electrolyte. An optimized gel electrolyte of PVdF-HFP/PC/EC/TEABF{sub 4} - 23/31/35/11 mass ratio exhibited high ionic conductivity of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} S/cm, high electrode capacitance, and good mechanical strength. An electrode consisting of activated carbon (AC) with the gel electrolyte as the binder (AC/PVdF-HFP based gel, 7/3 mass ratio) showed a higher specific capacitance and a lower ion diffusion resistance within the electrode than a carbon electrode, prepared with PVdF-HFP binder without plasticizer. This suggests that an electrode mixed with the gel electrolyte has a lower ion diffusion resistance inside the electrode. The highest specific capacitance of 123 F/g was achieved with an electrode containing AC with a specific surface area of 2500 m{sup 2}/g. A coin-type EDLC cell with optimized components showed excellent cycleability exceeding 10{sup 4} cycles with ca. 100% coulombic efficiency achieved when charging and discharging was repeated between 1.0 and 2.5 V at 1.66 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  15. CdS-pillared CoAl-layered double hydroxide nanosheets with superior photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Yanqiang; Lin, Bizhou Jia, Fangcao; Chen, Yilin; Gao, Bifen; Liu, Peide

    2015-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CdS nanocrystals were intercalated into CoAl-LDH interlayer. • The nanohybrid display superior visible-light photocatalytic activity. • A photoexcitation model for the pillared heterostructured system was proposed. - Abstract: A new nanohybrid was synthesized by mixing the positively charged 2D nanosheets of CoAl-layered double hydroxide (CoAl-LDH) and the negatively charged CdS nanosol suspensions. It was revealed that the CdS nanoparticles were intercalated into the interlayer region of CoAl-LDH with a spacing of 2.62 nm. The obtained nanohybrid exhibited a mesoporous texture with an expanded specific surface area of 62 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and a superior photocatalytic activity in the degradation of acid red with a reaction constant of 1.26 × 10{sup −2} min{sup −1} under visible-light radiation, which is more than 2 times those of his parents CoAl-LDH and CdS.

  16. Miocene detachment faulting predating EPR propagation: Southern Baja California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bot, Anna; Geoffroy, Laurent; Authemayou, Christine; Bellon, Hervé; Graindorge, David; Pik, Raphaël.

    2016-05-01

    At the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula, we characterize the onshore structures and kinematics associated with crustal necking leading up to the Pliocene breakup and early East Pacific Rise seafloor spreading. From a combination of tectonic field investigations, K-Ar and cosmogenic isotope dating and geomorphology, we propose that the Los Cabos block represents the exhumed footwall of a major detachment fault. This north trending detachment fault is marked by a conspicuous low-dipping brittle-ductile shear zone showing a finite displacement with top to the SE ending to the ESE. This major feature is associated with fluid circulations which led to rejuvenation of the deformed Cretaceous magmatic rocks at a maximum of 17.5 Ma. The detachment footwall displays kilometer-scale corrugations controlling the present-day drainage pattern. This major detachment is synchronous with the development of the San José del Cabo Basin where syntectonic sedimentation took place from the middle Miocene to probably the early Pliocene. We propose that this seaward dipping detachment fault accommodates the proximal crustal necking of the Baja California passive margin, which predates the onset of formation of the East Pacific Rise spreading axis in the Cabo-Puerto Vallarta segment. Our data illustrate an apparent anticlockwise rotation of the stretching direction in Baja California Sur from ~17 Ma to the Pliocene.

  17. Wrinkled substrate and Indium Tin Oxide-free transparent electrode making organic solar cells thinner in active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kong; Lu, Shudi; Yue, Shizhong; Ren, Kuankuan; Azam, Muhammad; Tan, Furui; Wang, Zhijie; Qu, Shengchun; Wang, Zhanguo

    2016-11-01

    To enable organic solar cells with a competent charge transport efficiency, reducing the thickness of active layer without sacrificing light absorption efficiency turns out to be of high feasibility. Herein, organic solar cells on wrinkled metal surface are designed. The purposely wrinkled Al/Au film with a smooth surface provides a unique scaffold for constructing thin organic photovoltaic devices by avoiding pinholes and defects around sharp edges in conventional nanostructures. The corresponding surface light trapping effect enables the thin active layer (PTB7-Th:PC71BM) with a high absorption efficiency. With the innovative MoO3/Ag/ZnS film as the top transparent electrode, the resulting Indium Tin Oxide-free wrinkled devices show a power conversion efficiency as 7.57% (50 nm active layer), higher than the planner counterparts. Thus, this paper provides a new methodology to improve the performance of organic solar cells by balancing the mutual restraint factors to a high level.

  18. Selective Activation of the Deep Layers of the Human Primary Visual Cortex by Top-Down Feedback.

    PubMed

    Kok, Peter; Bains, Lauren J; van Mourik, Tim; Norris, David G; de Lange, Floris P

    2016-02-08

    In addition to bottom-up input, the visual cortex receives large amounts of feedback from other cortical areas [1-3]. One compelling example of feedback activation of early visual neurons in the absence of bottom-up input occurs during the famous Kanizsa illusion, where a triangular shape is perceived, even in regions of the image where there is no bottom-up visual evidence for it. This illusion increases the firing activity of neurons in the primary visual cortex with a receptive field on the illusory contour [4]. Feedback signals are largely segregated from feedforward signals within each cortical area, with feedforward signals arriving in the middle layer, while top-down feedback avoids the middle layers and predominantly targets deep and superficial layers [1, 2, 5, 6]. Therefore, the feedback-mediated activity increase in V1 during the perception of illusory shapes should lead to a specific laminar activity profile that is distinct from the activity elicited by bottom-up stimulation. Here, we used fMRI at high field (7 T) to empirically test this hypothesis, by probing the cortical response to illusory figures in human V1 at different cortical depths [7-14]. We found that, whereas bottom-up stimulation activated all cortical layers, feedback activity induced by illusory figures led to a selective activation of the deep layers of V1. These results demonstrate the potential for non-invasive recordings of neural activity with laminar specificity in humans and elucidate the role of top-down signals during perceptual processing.

  19. Layer-by-layer grown scalable redox-active ruthenium-based molecular multilayer thin films for electrochemical applications and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Kuzume, Akiyoshi; Maharajan, Sivarajakumar; Pobelov, Ilya V.; Kwon, Nam Hee; Mohos, Miklos; Broekmann, Peter; Fromm, Katharina M.; Haga, Masa-Aki; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    Here we report the first study on the electrochemical energy storage application of a surface-immobilized ruthenium complex multilayer thin film with anion storage capability. We employed a novel dinuclear ruthenium complex with tetrapodal anchoring groups to build well-ordered redox-active multilayer coatings on an indium tin oxide (ITO) surface using a layer-by-layer self-assembly process. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), UV-Visible (UV-Vis) and Raman spectroscopy showed a linear increase of peak current, absorbance and Raman intensities, respectively with the number of layers. These results indicate the formation of well-ordered multilayers of the ruthenium complex on ITO, which is further supported by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The thickness of the layers can be controlled with nanometer precision. In particular, the thickest layer studied (65 molecular layers and approx. 120 nm thick) demonstrated fast electrochemical oxidation/reduction, indicating a very low attenuation of the charge transfer within the multilayer. In situ-UV-Vis and resonance Raman spectroscopy results demonstrated the reversible electrochromic/redox behavior of the ruthenium complex multilayered films on ITO with respect to the electrode potential, which is an ideal prerequisite for e.g. smart electrochemical energy storage applications. Galvanostatic charge-discharge experiments demonstrated a pseudocapacitor behavior of the multilayer film with a good specific capacitance of 92.2 F g-1 at a current density of 10 μA cm-2 and an excellent cycling stability. As demonstrated in our prototypical experiments, the fine control of physicochemical properties at nanometer scale, relatively good stability of layers under ambient conditions makes the multilayer coatings of this type an excellent material for e.g. electrochemical energy storage, as interlayers in inverted bulk heterojunction solar cell applications and as functional components in molecular electronics applications

  20. Enhanced Electrocatalytic Performance for Oxygen Reduction via Active Interfaces of Layer-By-Layered Titanium Nitride/Titanium Carbonitride Structures

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhaoyu; Li, Panpan; Xiao, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Cathode materials always limit the performance of fuel cells while the commercial platinum-based catalysts hardly meet the requirements of low cost, durable and stable. Here a non-precious metal oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electocatalyst based on titanium nitride/titanium carbonitride hierarchical structures (TNTCNHS) is demonstrated as high activity as Pt/C. In alkaline condition, tuning interface/mass ratio of TiN/TiCN, we observed the onset potential of ~0.93 V vs. RHE and a limit diffusion current density of ~5.1 mA cm−2 (at a rotating speed of 1600 rpm) on TNTCNHS with a relative low catalyst loading of ~0.1 mg cm−2. The kinetic current, durability and tolerance to crossover effect studies reveal even more efficient than carbon-supported platinum. The architecture fabrication for such electrocatalyst is easy to realize in industrial-scale facilities, for the use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique could support a huge area production (more than 10000 cm2 for one pot) to satisfy the enormous market requirements in the future. PMID:25335930

  1. Active diagenetic formation of metal-rich layers in N. E. Atlantic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, H. E.; Thomson, J.; Wilson, T. R. S.; Weaver, P. P. E.; Higgs, N. C.; Hydes, D. J.

    1988-06-01

    Sediment cores from the Porcupine Abyssal Plain exhibit an indurated layer 0.5-3 cm thick at depths of approximately 50 cm. This is some 15-20 cm below the glacial/Holocene transition as interpreted by radiocarbon dating and the palaeontological criteria of RUDDIMAN and MCINTYRE (1981). The layer is forming currently at the oxic/post-oxic boundary in the sediments, as revealed by pore water data: O 2 and NO -3 are present in solution above the layer, while Fe 2+, Mn 2+, PO 3-4 and NH +4 are present in solution below, and all these species show concentration gradients indicating fluxes into the layer. These data are consistent with the hypothesis for the initiation and sustained formation of such layers proposed by WILSONet al. (1986a,b). The elements Mn, Ni, Co, Fe, P, V, Cu, Zn and U are all enriched to varying degrees in the vicinity of the layer. Some differential stratification of these elements in the vertical, consistent with a redox control, is observed at one site with a 0.5 cm layer, with Mn, Ni and Co above, Fe, P, V and Cu in the layer, and U below. At another site the metal-rich layer has higher Fe and P concentrations and is more indurated. Here all enrichments except Co are contained within a single layer sample, 3 cm thick.

  2. Folate receptor targeted three-layered micelles and hydrogels for gene delivery to activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mariam; Li, Ying; Abebe, Daniel G; Xie, Yuran; Kandil, Rima; Kraus, Teresa; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; Fujiwara, Tomoko; Merkel, Olivia M

    2016-12-28

    New folic acid (FA) coupled three layered micelles (3LM) were designed to encapsulate DNA, and their application as delivery system that specifically targets activated macrophages was investigated for new treatment options in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). FA coupled poly(l-lactide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (FA-PEG-PLLA) was synthesized via the NHS-ester activated/amine coupling method. Fluorescein labeled folic acid was used for flow cytometric detection of the expression of functional folic receptor β in LPS-activated and resting macrophages. FA coupled 3LM were formulated in a two-step procedure and characterized regarding hydrodynamic diameters and zeta potentials. The presence of the targeting ligand was shown not to increase the size of the 3LM compared to their non-targeted counterparts. Targeted and non-targeted 3LM were used in vitro to optimize uptake conditions in the RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line. The amount of FA coupled polymer in the final formulation was found to be optimal at 75% FA-PEG-PLLA and 25% PLLA-PEG-PLLA. Subsequently, transgene expression in vitro in RAW 264.7 cells and ex vivo in primary activated and resting mouse macrophages was determined as a function of FR-mediated internalization of 3LM encapsulating GFP expressing plasmid. FR-overexpressing activated cells, as successfully identified by internalization of FA-fluorescein, showed significantly higher GFP expression in vitro and ex vivo than resting macrophages with only a basal level of FR expression. Lastly, injectable hydrogels as depot formulation were formed by stereocomplexation, and their degradation, DNA release profiles, and dissociation into intact 3LM were found to be beneficial for potential in vivo application. Our findings confirm that FA-3LM are taken up by activated macrophages via folate receptor mediated endocytosis and that their hydrogels release intact 3LM for efficient transfection of primary macrophages. Therefore, FA-3LM could become a promising delivery system

  3. Impact of different detachment topographies on pull-apart basin evolution - analog modelling and computer visualisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoprich, M.; Decker, K.; Grasemann, B.; Sokoutis, D.; Willingshofer, E.

    2009-04-01

    Former analog modeling on pull-apart basins dealt with different sidestep geometries, the symmetry and ratio between velocities of moving blocks, the ratio between ductile base and model thickness, the ratio between fault stepover and model thickness and their influence on basin evolution. In all these models the pull-apart basin is deformed over an even detachment. The Vienna basin, however, is considered a classical thin-skinned pull-apart with a rather peculiar basement structure. Deformation and basin evolution are believed to be limited to the brittle upper crust above the Alpine-Carpathian floor thrust. The latter is not a planar detachment surface, but has a ramp-shaped topography draping the underlying former passive continental margin. In order to estimate the effects of this special geometry, nine experiments were accomplished and the resulting structures were compared with the Vienna basin. The key parameters for the models (fault and basin geometry, detachment depth and topography) were inferred from a 3D GoCad model of the natural Vienna basin, which was compiled from seismic, wells and geological cross sections. The experiments were scaled 1:100.000 ("Ramberg-scaling" for brittle rheology) and built of quartz sand (300 µm grain size). An average depth of 6 km (6 cm) was calculated for the basal detachment, distances between the bounding strike-slip faults of 40 km (40 cm) and a finite length of the natural basin of 200 km were estimated (initial model length: 100 cm). The following parameters were changed through the experimental process: (1) syntectonic sedimentation; (2) the stepover angle between bounding strike slip faults and basal velocity discontinuity; (3) moving of one or both fault blocks (producing an asymmetrical or symmetrical basin); (4) inclination of the basal detachment surface by 5°; (6) installation of 2 and 3 ramp systems at the detachment; (7) simulation of a ductile detachment through a 0.4 cm thick PDMS layer at the basin

  4. Photocatalytic activity and reusability of ZnO layer synthesised by electrolysis, hydrogen peroxide and heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Akhmal Saadon, Syaiful; Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Mohd Yusoff, Abdull Rahim; Hakim Wirzal, Mohd Dzul; Rahmalan, Muhammad Taufiq; Nur, Hadi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the zinc oxide (ZnO) layer was synthesised on the surface of Zn plates by three different techniques, i.e. electrolysis, hydrogen peroxide and heat treatment. The synthesised ZnO layers were characterised using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-visible diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the ZnO layer was further assessed against methylene blue (MB) degradation under UV irradiation. The photocatalytic degradation of MB was achieved up to 84%, 79% and 65% within 1 h for ZnO layers synthesised by electrolysis, heat and hydrogen peroxide treatment, respectively. The reusability results show that electrolysis and heat-treated ZnO layers have considerable photocatalytic stability. Furthermore, the results confirmed that the photocatalytic efficiency of ZnO was directly associated with the thickness and enlarged surface area of the layer. Finally, this study proved that the ZnO layers synthesised by electrolysis and heat treatment had shown better operational stability and reusability.

  5. Active Control of Panel Vibrations Induced by a Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, active and passive control of sound and vibration in aeroelastic structures have received a great deal of attention due to many potential applications to aerospace and other industries. There exists a great deal of research work done in this area. Recent advances in the control of sound and vibration can be found in the several conference proceedings. In this report we will summarize our research findings supported by the NASA grant NAG-1-1175. The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to study the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. The vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings will be presented in the next three sections. In Section II we shall describe our results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Section III is concerned with active control of the vibration and sound radiation from a nonlinear elastic panel. A detailed description of our work on the parametric vibrational control of nonlinear elastic panel will be presented in Section IV. This paper will be submitted to the Journal

  6. Cobalt-containing oxide layers on titanium, their composition, morphology, and catalytic activity in CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyeva, M. S.; Rudnev, V. S.; Ustinov, A. Yu.; Korotenko, I. A.; Modin, E. B.; Voitenko, O. V.

    2010-12-01

    In this study possibility to form the layered compositions CoO x + SiO 2/TiO 2/Ti by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method was shown. Compositions have been obtained by both one-stage PEO method (Method I) with addition of Co(CH 3COO) 2 into silicate electrolyte and impregnation of preliminary obtained by the PEO method SiO 2/TiO 2/Ti systems in aqueous solutions containing cobalt salts with their following annealing (Method II). XRD, XPS and SEM/EDX were used to investigate the phase and element composition, microstructure of the coatings prepared by the two various methods. Catalytic activity of the cobalt-containing composites was investigated in the CO oxidation reaction. Under experimental conditions, the structures obtained by impregnation and annealing method were more active, than those obtained by one-stage PEO method. The surface structures of cobalt-containing coatings obtained by the PEO method and by impregnation and annealing differ in both quantitative and qualitative relation. The cobalt content on the surface of impregnating coatings is three times as much as that for those formed by one-stage PEO method. It is found that coatings obtained by the Method II have a more developed surface. The surface of CoO x + SiO 2/TiO 2/Ti compositions obtained by the PEO method contains, presumably Co(OH) 2 and Co 3O 4. The surface of the similar compositions obtained by the Method II, possibly contains CoO, either Co 2O 3, or CoOOH. The combination of these factors, perhaps, also provides a higher activity of the compositions formed by the Method II.

  7. Interfacial diffusion behavior in Ni-BaTiO 3 MLCCs with ultra-thin active layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Huiling; Wang, Xiaohui; Tian, Zhibin; Zhang, Hui; Li, Longtu

    2014-03-01

    The interfacial structure and diffusion behavior between the dielectric layers (BaTiO3) and internal electrode layers (Ni) in X5R-type multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs, from -55°C to 85°C, at a temperature capacitance coefficient within ±15%) with ultra-thin active layers ( T = 1-3 µm) have been investigated by several microstructural techniques (SEM/TEM/HRTEM) with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). In the MLCC samples with different active layer thicknesses (1-3 µm), weak interfacial diffusion was observed between BaTiO3 and Ni. It was also found that the diffusion capability of Ni into the BaTiO3 layer was stronger than that of BaTiO3 to the Ni electrode, which indicated that the diffusion of Ni was the dominant factor for the interfacial diffusion behavior in the ultra-thin layered MLCCs. The mechanism of Ni diffusion is discussed in this study as well.

  8. Temperature and moisture effects on greenhouse gas emissions from deep active-layer boreal soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Smith, A. Peyton; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-12-01

    Rapid climatic changes, rising air temperatures, and increased fires are expected to drive permafrost degradation and alter soil carbon (C) cycling in many high-latitude ecosystems. How these soils will respond to changes in their temperature, moisture, and overlying vegetation is uncertain but critical to understand given the large soil C stocks in these regions. We used a laboratory experiment to examine how temperature and moisture control CO2 and CH4 emissions from mineral soils sampled from the bottom of the annual active layer, i.e., directly above permafrost, in an Alaskan boreal forest. Gas emissions from 30 cores, subjected to two temperatures and either field moisture conditions or experimental drought, were tracked over a 100-day incubation; we also measured a variety of physical and chemical characteristics of the cores. Gravimetric water content was 0.31 ± 0.12 (unitless) at the beginning of the incubation; cores at field moisture were unchanged at the end, but drought cores had declined to 0.06 ± 0.04. Daily CO2 fluxes were positively correlated with incubation chamber temperature, core water content, and percent soil nitrogen. They also had a temperature sensitivity (Q10) of 1.3 and 1.9 for the field moisture and drought treatments, respectively. Daily CH4 emissions were most strongly correlated with percent nitrogen, but neither temperature nor water content was a significant first-order predictor of CH4 fluxes. The cumulative production of C from CO2 was over 6 orders of magnitude higher than that from CH4; cumulative CO2 was correlated with incubation temperature and moisture treatment, with drought cores producing 52-73 % lower C. Cumulative CH4 production was unaffected by any treatment. These results suggest that deep active-layer soils may be sensitive to changes in soil moisture under aerobic conditions, a critical factor as discontinuous permafrost thaws in interior Alaska. Deep but unfrozen high-latitude soils have been shown to be

  9. Urban Geocryology: Mapping Urban-Rural Contrasts in Active-Layer Thickness, Barrow Penninsula, Northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klene, A. E.; Nelson, F. E.

    2014-12-01

    As development proceeds in the high latitudes, information about interactions between urban influences and the thickness of the active layer above permafrost becomes vital, particularly given the possibility of increasing temperatures accompanying climate change. Permafrost characteristics are often mapped at small geographical scales (i.e., over large areas), at low resolution, and without extensive field validation. Although maps of active-layer thickness (ALT) have been created for areas of relatively undisturbed terrain, this has rarely been done within urbanized areas, even though ALT is a critical factor in the design of roads, buildings, pipelines, and other elements of infrastructure. The need for detailed maps of ALT is emphasized in work on potential hazards in permafrost regions associated with global warming scenarios. Northern Alaska is a region considered to be at moderate to high risk for thaw-induced damage under climatic warming. The Native Village of Barrow (71°17'44"N; 156°45' 59"W), the economic, transportation, and administrative hub of the North Slope Borough, is the northernmost community in the USA, and the largest native settlement in the circum-Arctic. A winter urban heat island in Barrow, earlier snowmelt in the village, and dust deposition downwind of gravel pads and roads are all urban effects that could increase ALT. A recent empirical study documented a 17 to 41 cm difference in ALT between locations in the village of Barrow and surrounding undeveloped tundra, even in similar land-cover classes. We mapped ALT in the Barrow Peninsula, with particular attention to contrasts between the urbanized village and relatively undisturbed tundra in the nearby Barrow Environmental Observatory. The modified Berggren solution, an advanced analytic solution to the general Stefan problem of calculating frost and thaw depth, was used in a geographic context to map ALT over the 150 km² area investigated in the Barrow Urban Heat Island Study. The

  10. Fate and Transport of Methane Formed in the Active Layer of Alaskan Permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, M. E.; Curtis, J. B.; Smith, L. J.; Bill, M.; Torn, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past 2 years a series of tracer tests designed to estimate rates of methane formation via acetoclastic methanogenesis in the active layer of permafrost soils were conducted at the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO) in northernmost Alaska. The tracer tests consisted of extracting 0.5 to 1.0 liters of soil water in gas-tight bags from different features of polygons at the BEO, followed by addition of a tracer cocktail including acetate with a 13C-labeled methyl group and D2O (as a conservative tracer) into the soil water and injection of the mixture back into the original extraction site. Samples were then taken at depths of 30 cm (just above the bottom of the active layer), 20 cm, 10 cm and surface flux to determine the fate of the 13C-labeled acetate. During 2014 (2015 results are pending) water, soil gas, and flux gas were sampled for 60 days following injection of the tracer solution. Those samples were analyzed for concentrations and isotopic compositions of CH4, DIC/CO2 and water. At one site (the trough of a low-centered polygon) the 13C acetate was completely converted to 13CH4 within the first 2 days. The signal persisted for throughout the entire monitoring period at the injection depth with little evidence of transport or oxidation in any of the other sampling depths. In the saturated center of the same polygon, the acetate was also rapidly converted to 13CH4, but water turnover caused the signal to rapidly dissipate. High δ13C CO2 in flux samples from the polygon center indicate oxidation of the 13CH4 in near-surface waters. Conversely, CH4 production in the center of an unsaturated, flat-centered polygon was relatively small 13CH4 and dissipated rapidly without any evidence of either 13CH4 transport to shallower levels or oxidation. At another site in the edge of that polygon no 13CH4 was produced, but significant 13CO2/DIC was observed indicating direct aerobic oxidation of the acetate was occurring at this site. These results suggest that

  11. Temperature and moisture effects on greenhouse gas emissions from deep active-layer boreal soils

    DOE PAGES

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Smith, A. Peyton; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-12-21

    Rapid climatic changes, rising air temperatures, and increased fires are expected to drive permafrost degradation and alter soil carbon (C) cycling in many high-latitude ecosystems. How these soils will respond to changes in their temperature, moisture, and overlying vegetation is uncertain but critical to understand given the large soil C stocks in these regions. We used a laboratory experiment to examine how temperature and moisture control CO2 and CH4 emissions from mineral soils sampled from the bottom of the annual active layer, i.e., directly above permafrost, in an Alaskan boreal forest. Gas emissions from 30 cores, subjected to two temperaturesmore » and either field moisture conditions or experimental drought, were tracked over a 100-day incubation; we also measured a variety of physical and chemical characteristics of the cores. Gravimetric water content was 0.31 ± 0.12 (unitless) at the beginning of the incubation; cores at field moisture were unchanged at the end, but drought cores had declined to 0.06 ± 0.04. Daily CO2 fluxes were positively correlated with incubation chamber temperature, core water content, and percent soil nitrogen. They also had a temperature sensitivity (Q10) of 1.3 and 1.9 for the field moisture and drought treatments, respectively. Daily CH4 emissions were most strongly correlated with percent nitrogen, but neither temperature nor water content was a significant first-order predictor of CH4 fluxes. The cumulative production of C from CO2 was over 6 orders of magnitude higher than that from CH4; cumulative CO2 was correlated with incubation temperature and moisture treatment, with drought cores producing 52–73 % lower C. Cumulative CH4 production was unaffected by any treatment. These results suggest that deep active-layer soils may be sensitive to changes in soil moisture under aerobic conditions, a critical factor as discontinuous permafrost thaws in interior Alaska. Deep but unfrozen high-latitude soils have

  12. The Interior Structure Constants as an Age Diagnostic for Low-mass, Pre-main-sequence Detached Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiden, Gregory A.; Dotter, Aaron

    2013-03-01

    We propose a novel method for determining the ages of low-mass, pre-main-sequence stellar systems using the apsidal motion of low-mass detached eclipsing binaries. The apsidal motion of a binary system with an eccentric orbit provides information regarding the interior structure constants of the individual stars. These constants are related to the normalized stellar interior density distribution and can be extracted from the predictions of stellar evolution models. We demonstrate that low-mass, pre-main-sequence stars undergoing radiative core contraction display rapidly changing interior structure constants (greater than 5% per 10 Myr) that, when combined with observational determinations of the interior structure constants (with 5%-10% precision), allow for a robust age estimate. This age estimate, unlike those based on surface quantities, is largely insensitive to the surface layer where effects of magnetic activity are likely to be most pronounced. On the main sequence, where age sensitivity is minimal, the interior structure constants provide a valuable test of the physics used in stellar structure models of low-mass stars. There are currently no known systems where this technique is applicable. Nevertheless, the emphasis on time domain astronomy with current missions, such as Kepler, and future missions, such as LSST, has the potential to discover systems where the proposed method will be observationally feasible.

  13. Paleostress analyses in the uppermost footwalls of the Whipple detachment and the West Salton detachment faults, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, A. L.; Axen, G. J.; Selverstone, J.; Michelsen, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    Low-angle normal faults (LANFs) slip while nearly perpendicular to the regional S1, presenting a mechanical paradox that may be explained by rotation of S1 toward the fault as it is approached, weak materials reducing friction and/or high pore-fluid pressure. Well-exposed LANF footwalls provide opportunities for detailed studies of weak faults. Paleostress inversions of fault-slip data coupled with structural and chemical analyses of footwall rocks are in progress on the Whipple detachment fault (WDF; >40 km Miocene slip; evolved from ductile shear zone to brittle fault) and the West Salton detachment fault (WSDF; ~10 km slip during dextral-wrench tectonism coeval with San Andreas Fault slip). Both were folding during detachment slip. Paleostress analyses indicate that both faults slipped mainly in extensional stress fields (sub-vertical S1) and in axial compression (S2 ≈ S3). Over 40% of extensional stress fields yield S1 plunging >70° relative to the detachment, but ~30% yield plunges of 40° to 60° relative to the detachment. Thus, the stress field may have been locally and/or temporarily rotated away from sub-vertical during detachment slip. About 15% of the inversions yield shortening stress fields (S1 ~horizontal) consistent with folding and/or dextral-wrench deformation. Mutually cross-cutting relationships between fracture sets suggest that the stress fields may have alternated through time. “Mini-detachments” (MDs) are small, detachment-parallel faults that are structurally analogous to the main faults. Inversions yield S1 ~45° from the MDs and a larger magnitude of S2 relative to S3. Damage zones subjacent to MD fault cores commonly yield more moderately plunging S1 than do MD fault cores or deeper rocks. Petrological evidence suggests that the MDs formed early in the detachment history (Selverstone et al., GSA Abstract, 2009). If their damage zones also formed early, then S1 may have been shallower early in detachment history and(or) at greater

  14. Characterizing the Outer Divertor Leg Transition to Full Detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, A. G.; Allen, S. L.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Lasnier, C. J.; Meyer, W. H.; Porter, G. D.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Bray, B. D.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Leonard, A. W.; Liu, C.; Eldon, D.; Groth, M.; Stangeby, P. C.; Tsui, C. K.

    2013-10-01

    Experiments at DIII-D have explored the transition from an attached to fully detached divertor condition in L- and H-mode with an unprecedented level of detail. Improved divertor Thomson scattering capturing Te <= 1 eV, coupled with high resolution spectroscopic studies of molecular and neutral emissions, and Stark broadening of the deuterium Paschen series provide essential data for modeling the transition to detachment. 2D Te and ne profiles of the outer leg reveal movement of the ionization front away from the plate not replicated in modeling. Measured Paschen and molecular emissions suggest the onset of recombination occurs prior to, and to a greater extent than modeled. These data help guide and expose any missing physics in predictions for detached operation in future devices. This work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC52-07NA27344 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  15. Detachment energies of spheroidal particles from fluid-fluid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Gary B.; Krüger, Timm; Coveney, Peter V.; Harting, Jens

    2014-10-01

    The energy required to detach a single particle from a fluid-fluid interface is an important parameter for designing certain soft materials, for example, emulsions stabilised by colloidal particles, colloidosomes designed for targeted drug delivery, and bio-sensors composed of magnetic particles adsorbed at interfaces. For a fixed particle volume, prolate and oblate spheroids attach more strongly to interfaces because they have larger particle-interface areas. Calculating the detachment energy of spheroids necessitates the difficult measurement of particle-liquid surface tensions, in contrast with spheres, where the contact angle suffices. We develop a simplified detachment energy model for spheroids which depends only on the particle aspect ratio and the height of the particle centre of mass above the fluid-fluid interface. We use lattice Boltzmann simulations to validate the model and provide quantitative evidence that the approach can be applied to simulate particle-stabilized emulsions, and highlight the experimental implications of this validation.

  16. Streetscape showing north sides of five of eight Medical Detachment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Streetscape showing north sides of five of eight Medical Detachment Barracks on Ramp No. 5. Note that Building No. 9966-B on right has a wooden frame sun porch. This Standard Ward construction is different than most of the other Medical Detachment Barracks, which are all- brick. On the opposite side of this building, the construction is all-brick (Building No. 9966-A, not shown). Buildings No. 9967-B and 9968-B (not shown) also have wooden frame sun porches. Other buildings in photo are, on right, the north B-sides of Buildings Nos. 9965, 9964, 9963 and 9962. On left is Building No. 9971-A on Ramp No. 6. Corridor A is visible in far distance. - Madigan Hospital, Medical Detachment Barracks, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  17. In-Situ Pressure Measurements During the Detached Growth of Germanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Palosz, W.; Szofran, F. R.

    2003-01-01

    Crystal growth by the vertical Bridgman method in which there is little or no contact between the wall and the crystal has been termed detached solidification. Detachment has been observed frequently in previous microgravity experiments, and has been reported under some terrestrial conditions as well. It is expected that detachment can be conditioned by establishing an appropriate pressure difference below and above the melt. To test this hypothesis, an experimental technique has been developed to measure this pressure difference during the growth of germanium by the vertical Bridgman method. The apparatus allows for both monitoring the pressures and actively controlling them during growth. For a given melt height, there is a maximum pressure difference attainable before gas bubbles up through the melt. This maximum pressure increases with increasing melt height. As the melt height approaches zero, the maximum pressure difference, about 20 mbar in these experiments, is determined by the surface tension and gap width of the meniscus at the bottom of the melt.

  18. Concept of relativity and empirical observation of the detachment of mental imagery.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovich, Simon

    1997-04-01

    The work presents experimentation with afterimages - activities in the brain after a stimulation impact of the eye, visual or endogenous. It has been observed that afterimages do not follow certain relocations of the head with closed eyes, namely, those which are non-complanar with respect to the incidence plane of the afterimages, like turning or nodding. The detachment of mental imagery from the brain circuitry undermines the common photo camera analogy for the organization of the visual system and confronts the concept of relativity in the sense that it allows an absolute relocation (not acceleration!) of an isolated system to be detected. The observed effect is very robust, it persists for relocations of the body as a whole in a rotating and inclining chair, in a moving vehicle, and in a vibrating chamber. It might be quite possible that the detachment effect can be confirmed objectively with positron emission tomography (PET). In this context, it is worthwhile to reexamine the famous Penfield experiments on recall of past events by electrical stimulations of specific locations of the brain from which he came to a supposition that "the mind seems to act independently of the brain". The detachment effect actually relates the influx of the mental information to an outlying frame of reference.

  19. Effects of Calcium Spikes in the Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron on Coincidence Detection and Activity Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Yansong; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon, in which action potentials triggered by stimuli near the soma above a certain frequency trigger a calcium spike at distal dendrites, leading to further somatic depolarization, is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network (FFN) embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be

  20. Effects of Calcium Spikes in the Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron on Coincidence Detection and Activity Propagation.

    PubMed

    Chua, Yansong; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon, in which action potentials triggered by stimuli near the soma above a certain frequency trigger a calcium spike at distal dendrites, leading to further somatic depolarization, is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network (FFN) embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be

  1. Structural Discordance Between Neogene Detachments and Frontal Sevier Thrusts, Central Mormon Mountains, Southern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernicke, Brian; Walker, J. Douglas; Beaufait, Mark S.

    1985-02-01

    Detailed geologic mapping in the Mormon Mountains of southern Nevada provides significant insight into processes of extensional tectonics developed within older compressional orogens. A newly discovered, WSW-directed low-angle normal fault, the Mormon Peak detachment, juxtaposes the highest levels of the frontal most part of the east-vergent, Mesozoic Sevier thrust belt with autochthonous crystalline basement. Palinspastic analysis suggests that the detachment initially dipped 20-25° to the west and cut discordantly across thrust faults. Nearly complete lateral removal of the hanging wall from the area has exposed a 5 km thick longitudinal cross-section through the thrust belt in the footwall, while highly attenuated remnants of the hanging wall (nowhere more than a few hundred meters thick) structurally veneer the range. The present arched configuration of the detachment resulted in part from progressive "domino-style" rotation of a few degrees while it was active, but is largely due to rotation on younger, structurally lower, basement-penetrating normal faults that initiated at high-angle. The geometry and kinematics of normal faulting in the Mormon Mountains suggest that pre-existing thrust planes are not required for the initiation of low-angle normal faults, and even where closely overlapped by extensional tectonism, need not function as a primary control of detachment geometry. Caution must thus be exercised in interpreting low-angle normal faults of uncertain tectonic heritage such as those seen in the COCORP west-central Utah and BIRP's MOIST deep-reflection profiles. Although thrust fault reactivation has reasonably been shown to be the origin of a very few low-angle normal faults, our results indicate that it may not be as fundamental a component of orogenic architecture as it is now widely perceived to be. We conclude that while in many instances thrust fault reactivation may be both a plausible and attractive hypothesis, it may never be assumed.

  2. Beta 2-adrenergic stimulation causes detachment of natural killer cells from cultured endothelium.

    PubMed

    Benschop, R J; Oostveen, F G; Heijnen, C J; Ballieux, R E

    1993-12-01

    Physical exercise, mental stress, or infusion of beta-adrenergic agonists result in an increase in the number of natural killer (NK) cells in the peripheral circulation. In view of the specific migration pattern of NK cells in vivo, it has been suggested that these cells may be released from the marginating pool in blood vessels. In the present report, the in vitro effect of catecholamines on the adhesion of NK cells to unstimulated human endothelial cells (EC) was characterized. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were allowed to adhere to monolayers of EC, after which the adherent lymphocyte fraction was analyzed phenotypically by flow cytometry. NK cells were found to adhere preferentially to EC, a process that was reversed by the addition of various adrenergic agonists. Catecholamines selectively affected adhesion of NK cells and had no effect on T cell adhesion to EC, as was determined by the use of purified cell populations. Detachment of NK cells from EC could be achieved by short incubations (5 min) with epinephrine (EPI) and was concentration-dependent, with an ED50 of 2 x 10(-10)M. Using a panel of alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonists and antagonists, we show that the detachment of NK cells is mediated via beta 2-adrenergic receptors. In line with the lower affinity for beta 2-adrenergic receptors, norepinephrine was less effective than EPI in inducing detachment of NK cells from EC. Direct activation of adenylate-cyclase with forskolin gave similar results as observed with EPI, indicating that signaling through cAMP is necessary to induce detachment of NK cells from EC. The results of the present study lend support to the hypothesis that catecholamines, via beta 2-adrenergic receptors, can induce recruitment of NK cells from the marginating pool to the circulating pool, by changing the adhesive interactions between NK cells and EC.

  3. Detached Solidification of Germanium-Silicon Crystals on the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.; Croell, A.

    2016-01-01

    A series of Ge(sub 1-x) Si(sub x) crystal growth experiments are planned to be conducted in the Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) onboard the International Space Station. The primary objective of the research is to determine the influence of containment on the processing-induced defects and impurity incorporation in germanium-silicon alloy crystals. A comparison will be made between crystals grown by the normal and "detached" Bridgman methods and the ground-based float zone technique. Crystals grown without being in contact with a container have superior quality to otherwise similar crystals grown in direct contact with a container, especially with respect to impurity incorporation, formation of dislocations, and residual stress in crystals. "Detached" or "dewetted" Bridgman growth is similar to regular Bridgman growth in that most of the melt is in contact with the crucible wall, but the crystal is separated from the wall by a small gap, typically of the order of 10-100 microns. Long duration reduced gravity is essential to test the proposed theory of detached growth. Detached growth requires the establishment of a meniscus between the crystal and the ampoule wall. The existence of this meniscus depends on the ratio of the strength of gravity to capillary forces. On Earth, this ratio is large and stable detached growth can only be obtained over limited conditions. Crystals grown detached on the ground exhibited superior structural quality as evidenced by measurements of etch pit density, synchrotron white beam X-ray topography and double axis X-ray diffraction.

  4. Numerical Optimization of the Thermal Field in Bridgman Detached Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stelian, C.; Volz, M. P.; Derby, J. J.

    2009-01-01

    The global modeling of the thermal field in two vertical Bridgman-like crystal growth configurations, has been performed to get optimal thermal conditions for a successful detached growth of Ge and CdTe crystals. These computations are performed using the CrysMAS code and expand upon our previous analysis [1] that propose a new mechanism involving the thermal field and meniscus position to explain stable conditions for dewetted Bridgman growth. The analysis of the vertical Bridgman configuration with two heaters, used by Palosz et al. for the detached growth of Ge, shows, consistent with their results, that the large wetting angle of germanium on boron nitride surfaces was an important factor to promote a successful detached growth. Our computations predict that by initiating growth much higher into the hot zone of the furnace, the thermal conditions will be favorable for continued detachment even for systems that did not exhibit high contact angles. The computations performed for a vertical gradient freeze configuration with three heaters representative of that used for the detached growth of CdTe, show favorable thermal conditions for dewetting during the entirely growth run described. Improved thermal conditions are also predicted for coated silica crucibles when the solid-liquid interface advances higher into the hot zone during the solidification process. The second set of experiments on CdTe growth described elsewhere has shown the reattachment of the crystal to the crucible after few centimeters of dewetted growth. The thermal modeling of this configuration shows a second solidification front appearing at the top of the sample and approaching the middle line across the third heater. In these conditions, the crystal grows detached from the bottom, but will be attached to the crucible in the upper part because of the solidification without gap in this region. The solidification with two interfaces can be avoided when the top of the sample is positioned below

  5. Efficiency enhancement of solution-processed inverted organic solar cells with a carbon-nanotube-doped active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wen-Kai; Su, Shui-Hsiang; Yeh, Meng-Cheng; Huang, Yang-Chan; Yokoyama, Meiso

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed titanium-doped ZnO (TZO) is synthesized by the sol-gel method to be the electron-transporting layer (ETL) in an inverted organic solar cell (IOSC). Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are doped into an active layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl C 61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM). The addition of CNTs in the P3HT:PCBM composite increases the conjugation length of P3HT:PCBM:CNTs, which simultaneously enhances the capacity of the composite to absorb solar energy radiation. Vanadium oxide (V2O5) was spin-coated onto the active layer to be a hole-transporting layer (HTL). The power conversion efficiency (PCE) results indicate that the V2O5 nanobelt structure possesses better phase separation and provides a more efficient surface area for the P3HT:PCBM:CNT active layer to increase photocurrent. The optimized IOSCs exhibited an open circuit voltage (Voc), a short-circuit current density (Jsc), a fill factor (FF), and a PCE of 0.55 V, 6.50 mA/cm2, 58.34%, and 2.20%, respectively, under simulated AM1.5G illumination of 100 mW/cm2.

  6. Rotational auto-detachment of dipole-bound anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ard, S. G.; Compton, R. N.; Garrett, W. R.

    2016-04-01

    Rotational auto-detachment of acetonitrile, trimethyl-acetonitrile, acetone, and cyclobutanone dipole-bound anions was studied under varying conditions in a Rydberg electron transfer (RET) time-of-flight apparatus. Varying amounts of auto-detachment was observed for anions with similar electron affinity and dipole moment, but different moments of inertia. These results were found to be consistent with predictions based on the calculated rotational spectra for these anions, highlighting the importance of critical binding properties in understanding the stability and lifetime of dipole bound systems.

  7. Magnetic Detachment and Plume Control in Escaping Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P. F. Schmit and N. J. Fisch

    2008-11-05

    The model of two-fluid, axisymmetric, ambipolar magnetized plasma detachment from thruster guide fields is extended to include plasmas with non-zero injection angular velocity profiles. Certain plasma injection angular velocity profiles are shown to narrow the plasma plume, thereby increasing exhaust efficiency. As an example, we consider a magnetic guide field arising from a simple current ring and demonstrate plasma injection schemes that more than double the fraction of useful exhaust aperture area, more than halve the exhaust plume angle, and enhance magnetized plasma detachment.

  8. Bridgman Growth of Detached GeSi Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Schweizer, M.; Kaiser, N.; Cobb, S. D.; Vujisic, L.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The growth of detached crystals by the Bridgman technique, in which the growing crystal is not in contact with the crucible wall, has been observed both on earth and in microgravity conditions. Such detachment has particularly been in evidence in microgravity experiments, where the pressure head of the molten sample is absent. At present, the mechanisms contributing to the detachment are not completely understood and until recently detachment has not been reproducibly obtained. Key parameters which must be considered are the contact angle between the melt and the crucible and the growth angle. Another essential parameter is the pressure difference between the annular gap around the solid below the melt and the volume above the melt. Here we present results of the growth of Ge(0.98)Si(0.02) using adjustments in the applied temperature profile to control the pressure difference between the bottom and top of the melt. The technique is less susceptible to sample contamination than controlling the pressure by connecting the crucible to external gas sources. Using this technique, a pressure difference is created by decreasing the temperature in the volume above the melt while the sample is molten but prior to growth. A maximum pressure difference approximately equal to the pressure head of the molten sample can thus be obtained. Several GeSi crystals were grown in pyrolitic boron nitride crucibles. When a pressure difference was applied, samples were reproducibly grown mostly detached. For comparison, samples were also grown in a configuration in which gas could pass freely between the gap below the melt and the volume above the melt and no pressure difference could be established. These samples were initially attached. Existence of detachment was determined both by measuring the radius of the samples with a profilometer and by observations of the sample surfaces with optical and electron microscopy. The gap thickness between the crucible and detached crystal was on the

  9. Repeat Descemetopexy after Descemet's Membrane Detachment following Phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Datar, Sameer; Kelkar, Aditya; Jain, Ashish K; Kelkar, Jai; Kelkar, Shreekant; Gandhi, Poonam; Shah, Rachna; Kedia, Ruchika

    2014-05-01

    Descemet's membrane detachment (DMD) is an uncommon condition with a wide range of possible etiologies. Probably the commonest cause is a localized detachment occurring after cataract extraction surgery. Descemetopexy gives good anatomic attachment rates and visual outcomes and has become the standard treatment for DMD. However, in cases with failed initial descemetopexy, the next step in the management of such cases remains unclear. Before initiating a complex surgical procedure like keratoplasty, which requires good postoperative care and regular follow-ups, repeat descemetopexy with a long-term tamponade using 14% C3F8 gas for recurrent DMD is definitely a worthwhile attempt.

  10. Ultrasonic localization of choroidal detachment associated with flat anterior chamber.

    PubMed

    Portney, G L; Kohl, J W

    1975-01-01

    In postoperative patients with flat anterior chambers and small pupils or dense media, A-scan and B-scan ultrasonography can be useful tools in establishing the proper etiologic diagnosis. By searching for the presence of a choroidal detachment and determining its full location, complete drainage of the suprachoroidal fluid can be accomplished satisfactorily should this form of surgical intervention become necessary. If sufficient evidence of a choroidal detachment is not found, then therapy can be more assuredly directed at relief of pupillary block or reduction of excessive fistulization, other causes of a flat chamber.

  11. Pseudophakic flat anterior chamber following retinal detachment repair.

    PubMed

    Taylor, B C; Winslow, R L

    1981-09-01

    Flat anterior chambers were caused by varying mechanisms in 10 of 70 consecutive pseudophakic eyes operated on for retinal detachment. With iris or capsular implant fixation, three of 46 (7%) developed flat anterior chambers, and with anterior chamber lenses, the occurrence was seven of 24 (29%). Events initiating flat chambers included wound leak, pupillary block, and choroidal detachment. In eyes with flat anterior chambers, the retina could not be reattached in one case, extensive peripheral anterior synechia with persistent intraocular pressure elevation occurred in another case, and bullous keratopathy remained in two additional instances. Endothelial cell densities were obtained in eight eyes and were low on an age-related basis.

  12. Occurrence of Sporadic -E layer during the Low Solar Activity over the Anomaly Crest Region Bhopal, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhawre, Purushottam

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric anomaly crest regions are most challenging for scientific community to understand its mechanism and investigation, for this purpose we are investigating some inospheric result for this region. The study is based on the ionogram data recorded by IPS-71 Digital Ionosonde installed over anomaly crust region Bhopal (Geo.Lat.23.2° N, Geo. Long77.4° E, Dip latitude18.4°) over a four year period from January 2007 to December 2010, covering the ending phase of 23rd Solar Cycle and starting phase of 24th solar cycle. This particular period is felt to be very suitable for examining the sunspot number and it encompasses periods of low solar activities. Quarterly ionograms are analyzed for 24 hours during these study years and have been carefully examined to note down the presence of sporadic- E. We also note down the space weather activities along with the study. The studies are divided in mainly four parts with space and geomagnetic activities during these periods. The occurrence probability of this layer is highest in summer solstice, moderate during equinox and low during winter solstice. Remarkable occurrence peaks appear from June to July in summer and from December to January in winter. The layer occurrence showed a double peak variation with distinct layer groups, in the morning (0200 LT) and the other during evening (1800 LT).The morning layer descent was associated with layer density increase indicating the strengthening of the layer while it decreased during the evening layer descent. The result indicates the presence of semi-diurnal tide over the location while the higher descent velocities could be due to the modulation of the ionization by gravity waves along with the tides. The irregularities associated with the gradient-drift instability disappear during the counter electrojet and the current flow is reversed in westward.

  13. Active control of panel vibrations induced by boundary-layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1991-01-01

    Some problems in active control of panel vibration excited by a boundary layer flow over a flat plate are studied. In the first phase of the study, the optimal control problem of vibrating elastic panel induced by a fluid dynamical loading was studied. For a simply supported rectangular plate, the vibration control problem can be analyzed by a modal analysis. The control objective is to minimize the total cost functional, which is the sum of a vibrational energy and the control cost. By means of the modal expansion, the dynamical equation for the plate and the cost functional are reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations and the cost functions for the modes. For the linear elastic plate, the modes become uncoupled. The control of each modal amplitude reduces to the so-called linear regulator problem in control theory. Such problems can then be solved by the method of adjoint state. The optimality system of equations was solved numerically by a shooting method. The results are summarized.

  14. A multi-layered active target for the study of neutron-unbound nuclides at NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Jessica; Gueye, Paul; Redpath, Thomas; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics of neutron-unbound nuclides were investigated using a multi-layered Si/Be active target designed for use with the MoNA/LISA setup at the National Superconducting Cyclotron (NSCL). The setup consists of the MoNA/LISA arrays (for neutron detection) and a superconducting sweeper magnet (for charged separation) to identify products following the decay of neutron unbound states. The segmented target consisted of three 700 mg/cm2 beryllium targets and four 0.14 mm thick 62x62 mm2 silicon detectors. As a commissioning experiment for the target the decay of two-neutron unbound 26O populated in a one-proton removal reaction from a radioactive 27F beam was performed. The 27F secondary radioactive beam from the NSCL's Coupled Cyclotron Facility was produced from the fragmentation of a 140 MeV/u 48Ca beam incident on a thick beryllium target and then cleanly selected by the A1900 fragment separator. The energy loss and position spectra of the incoming beam and reaction products were used to calibrate the Silicon detectors to within 1.5% in both energy and position. A dedicated Geant4 model of the target was developed to simulate the energy loss within the target. A description of the experimental setup, simulation work, and energy and position calibration will be presented. DoE/NNSA - DE-NA0000979.

  15. The Modelling and Vibration Control of Beams with Active Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SHI, Y. M.; LI, Z. F.; HUA, H. X.; FU, Z. F.; LIU, T. X.

    2001-08-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is combined with the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) model of viscoelastic materials (VEM) to model a cantilever beam with active constrained layer damping treatments. This approach avoids time-consuming iteration in solving modal frequencies, modal damping ratios and responses. But the resultant finite element (FE) model has too many degrees of freedom (d.o.f.s) from the point of view of control, nor is it observable and controllable. A new model reduction procedure is proposed. An iterative dynamic condensation is performed in the physical space, and Guyan condensation is taken as an initial iteration approximation. A reduced order model (ROM) of suitable size emerges, but it is still not observable and controllable. Accordingly, a robust model reduction method is then employed in the state space. A numerical example proves that this procedure reduces the model and assures the stability, controllability and observability of the final reduced order model (FROM). Finally, a controller is designed by linear-quadratic Gaussian (LQG) method based on the FROM. The vibration attenuation is evident

  16. Active control of panel vibrations induced by a boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1995-01-01

    The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to consider the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. Although the sound radiation has not been included, the vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings are presented in three sections. In section two we describe results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Sections three and four are concerned with some analytical and numerical results in the optimal control of the linear and nonlinear panel vibrations, respectively, excited by the flow pressure fluctuations. Finally, in section five, we draw some conclusions from research findings.

  17. Preparation of active layers in polymer solar cells by aerosol jet printing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunhe; Zhou, Erjun; Miyanishi, Shoji; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Tajima, Keisuke

    2011-10-01

    Active layers of polymer solar cells were prepared by aerosol jet printing of organic inks. Various solvents and additives with high boiling points were screened for the preparation of high-quality polymer films. The effects on device performance of treating the films by thermal and solvent vapor annealing were also investigated. The components of the solvent were important for controlling the drying rate of the liquid films, reducing the number of particle-like protrusions on the film surface, and realizing high molecular ordering in the polymer phases. The optimized solar cell device with poly(3-hexylthiophene) and a C(60) derivative showed a high fill factor of 67% and power conversion efficiency of 2.53% without thermal annealing. The combination of poly[N-9-heptadecanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-3,6-bis(thiophen-5-yl)-2,5-diethylhexyl-2,5-dihydropyrrolo-[3,4-]pyrrole-1,4-dione] and a C(70) derivative led to power conversion efficiency of 3.92 and 3.14% for device areas of 0.03 and 1 cm(2), respectively.

  18. Electrochemical release testing of nickel-titanium orthodontic wires in artificial saliva using thin layer activation.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, M; Gilliland, D; Ceccone, G; Chiesa, R; Cigada, A

    2005-11-01

    Alloys based on Ni-Ti intermetallics generally exhibit special shape memory and pseudoelastic properties, which make them desirable for use in the dental field as orthodontic wires. The possibility of nickel release from these materials is of high concern, because the allergenicity of this element. The aim of this study was to test pseudoelastic Ni-Ti wires in simulated physiological conditions, investigating the combined effect of strain and fluoridated media: the wires were examined both under strained (5% tensile strain) and unstrained conditions, in fluoridated artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. Real time electrochemical nickel release testing was performed using a novel application of a radiotracer based method, thin layer activation (TLA). TLA was validated, in unstrained conditions, against adsorptive stripping voltammetry methodology. Control tests were also performed in non-fluoridated artificial saliva. From our research it transpired that the corrosion behaviour of Ni-Ti alloy is highly affected by the fluoride content, showing a release of 4.79+/-0.10 microg/cm2/day, but, differently from other biomaterials, it does not seem to be affected by elastic tensile strain. The application of the TLA method in the biomedical field appears a suitable technique to monitor in real time the corrosion behaviour of biomedical devices.

  19. Numerical simulations used for a validity check on the laser induced photo-detachment diagnostic method in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Oudini, N.; Taccogna, F.; Aanesland, A.

    2014-06-15

    Laser photo-detachment is used as a method to measure or determine the negative ion density and temperature in electronegative plasmas. In essence, the method consists of producing an electropositive channel (negative ion free region) via pulsed laser photo-detachment within an electronegative plasma bulk. Electrostatic probes placed in this channel measure the change in the electron density. A second pulse might be used to track the negative ion recovery. From this, the negative ion density and temperature can be determined. We study the formation and relaxation of the electropositive channel via a two-dimensional Particle-In-Cell/Mote Carlo collision model. The simulation is mainly carried out in a Hydrogen plasma with an electronegativity of α = 1, with a parametric study for α up to 20. The temporal and spatial evolution of the plasma potential and the electron densities shows the formation of a double layer (DL) confining the photo-detached electrons within the electropositive channel. This DL evolves into two fronts that move in the opposite directions inside and outside of the laser spot region. As a consequence, within the laser spot region, the background and photo-detached electron energy distribution function relaxes/thermalizes via collisionless effects such as Fermi acceleration and Landau damping. Moreover, the simulations show that collisional effects and the DL electric field strength might play a non-negligible role in the negative ion recovery within the laser spot region, leading to a two-temperature negative ion distribution. The latter result might have important effects in the determination of the negative ion density and temperature from laser photo detachment diagnostic.

  20. Investigating the effect of solvent boiling temperature on the active layer morphology of diffusive bilayer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohra, Varun; Dörling, Bernhard; Higashimine, Koichi; Murata, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Using chlorobenzene as a base solvent for the deposition of the poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) layer in P3HT:phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester diffusive bilayer solar cells, we investigate the effect of adding of small amounts of high-boiling-point solvents with similar chemical structures on the resulting active layer morphologies. The results demonstrate that the crystallinity of the P3HT films as well as the vertical donor-acceptor gradient in the active layer can be tuned by this approach. The use of high-boiling-point solvents improved all photovoltaic parameters and resulted in a 32% increase in power conversion efficiency.

  1. The health behavior of Sri Lankan Buddhist nuns with type 2 diabetes: duty, devotion, and detachment.

    PubMed

    Wijesinghe, Sunny; Mendelson, Cindy

    2013-12-01

    Sri Lanka has experienced an increase in the rate of type 2 diabetes. Selfmanagement of diabetes among Sri Lanka's Buddhist nuns, who depend on food donations and limit physical activity in accord with the monastic code of conduct, presents unique challenges and has not been previously studied. The purpose of this focused ethnographic study of 10 Buddhist nuns was to understand how they managed their illness within the restrictions on diet and physical activity. Three themes-duty, devotion, and detachment-explained and described their health behavior regarding type 2 diabetes within the context of their daily routines and obligations.

  2. Catalytic activation of OKO zeolite with intersecting pores of 10- and 12-membered rings using atomic layer deposition of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, E; Pulinthanathu Sree, S; Thomas, K; Dendooven, J; De Prins, M; Vanbutsele, G; Breynaert, E; Gilson, J-P; Kirschhock, C E A; Detavernier, C; Martens, J A

    2014-05-07

    Tetrahedral framework aluminium was introduced in all-silica zeolite -COK-14 using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) involving alternating exposure to trimethylaluminium and water vapour. The modification causes permanent conversion of the originally interrupted framework of -COK-14 to a fully connected OKO type framework, and generates catalytic activity in the acid catalysed hydrocarbon conversion reaction.

  3. Aqueous Solution Processed Photoconductive Cathode Interlayer for High Performance Polymer Solar Cells with Thick Interlayer and Thick Active Layer.

    PubMed

    Nian, Li; Chen, Zhenhui; Herbst, Stefanie; Li, Qingyuan; Yu, Chengzhuo; Jiang, Xiaofang; Dong, Huanli; Li, Fenghong; Liu, Linlin; Würthner, Frank; Chen, Junwu; Xie, Zengqi; Ma, Yuguang

    2016-09-01

    An aqueous-solution-processed photoconductive cathode interlayer is developed, in which the photoinduced charge transfer brings multiple advantages such as increased conductivity and electron mobility, as well as reduced work function. Average power conversion efficiency over 10% is achieved even when the thickness of the cathode interlayer and active layer is up to 100 and 300 nm, respectively.

  4. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence OLEDs with fully solution processed organic layers exhibiting nearly 10% external quantum efficiency.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Ken; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Yokoyama, Daisuke; Sakai, Yoshiya; Nakayama, Akira; Fujita, Katsuhiko; Yamamoto, Kimihisa

    2017-02-21

    New solution processable and laminatable terminally modified carbazole-triazine thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) dendrimers are reported. An OLED device with fully solution processed organic layers exhibited an external quantum efficiency of up to 9.4% at 100 cd m(-2).

  5. Signalling pathways involved in the activation of dendritic cells by layered double hydroxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Qin, Lili; Zhu, Di; Zhu, Rongrong; Sun, Jing; Wang, Shilong

    2010-02-01

    Layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoparticles are attractive as potential drug vectors for the targeting not only of tissues, but also of intracellular organelles, and particularly the acidic endolysosomes created after cell endocytosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of LDH nanoparticles designed as vectors to activate dendritic cells (DCs), as measured by various cellular functions. The study also explored the possible signaling pathway through which the LDH nanoparticles exerted their effects on the cellular functions of DCs. First, LDH nanoparticles with different ratios of Mg(OH)(2) to Al(OH)(3) (1:1, 2:1 and 3:1, called R1, R2 and R3 respectively) were optimized and had a hydrodynamic diameter of 57 nm with a zeta potential of +35 mV. Then, the efficient endocytosis of the optimized LDH nanoparticles by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) was monitored by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The effect of R1, R2 and R3 on the expression of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-12) and the co-stimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80, CD86, and MHC class II) in MDDCs was examined. The exposure of R1 caused a dose-dependent increase in the expression of TNF-alpha, IL-12, CD86 and CD40, while R2 and R3 did not up-regulate these cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules. Migration assays showed that R1 could increase the migration capacity of DCs to CCL21 and up-regulate the expression of CCR7. Furthermore, we found that R1 significantly increased the NF-kappaB expression in the nucleus (in a dose-dependent manner) and promoted the degradation of total IkappaBalpha levels, indicating that the NF-kappaB signaling pathway might involve in an R1-induced DC activation. Our results suggested that LDH nanoparticles, in the future, may function as a useful vector for ex vivo engineering to promote vaccine delivery in immune cells.

  6. Anatomical and Gene Expression Changes in the Retinal Pigmented Epithelium Atrophy 1 (rpea1) Mouse: A Potential Model of Serous Retinal Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Gabriel; Lewis, Geoffrey P.; Linberg, Kenneth A.; Chang, Bo; Hu, Quiri; Munson, Peter J.; Maminishkis, Arvydas; Miller, Sheldon S.; Fisher, Steven K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the rpea1 mouse whose retina spontaneously detaches from the underlying RPE as a potential model for studying the cellular effects of serous retinal detachment (SRD). Methods Optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed immediately prior to euthanasia; retinal tissue was subsequently prepared for Western blotting, microarray analysis, immunocytochemistry, and light and electron microscopy (LM, EM). Results By postnatal day (P) 30, OCT, LM, and EM revealed the presence of small shallow detachments that increased in number and size over time. By P60 in regions of detachment, there was a dramatic loss of PNA binding around cones in the interphotoreceptor matrix and a concomitant increase in labeling of the outer nuclear layer and rod synaptic terminals. Retinal pigment epithelium wholemounts revealed a patchy loss in immunolabeling for both ezrin and aquaporin 1. Anti-ezrin labeling was lost from small regions of the RPE apical surface underlying detachments at P30. Labeling for tight-junction proteins provided a regular array of profiles outlining the periphery of RPE cells in wild-type tissue, however, this pattern was disrupted in the mutant as early as P30. Microarray analysis revealed a broad range of changes in genes involved in metabolism, signaling, cell polarity, and tight-junction organization. Conclusions These data indicate changes in this mutant mouse that may provide clues to the underlying mechanisms of SRD in humans. Importantly, these changes include the production of multiple spontaneous detachments without the presence of a retinal tear or significant degeneration of outer segments, changes in the expression of proteins involved in adhesion and fluid transport, and a disrupted organization of RPE tight junctions that may contribute to the formation of focal detachments. PMID:27603725

  7. Characterizing the transition from high recycling to partial detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, A. G.; Allen, S. L.; Fenstermacher, M.; Lasnier, C.; Meyer, W. H.; Porter, G.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Bray, B. D.; Carlstrom, T. N.; Leonard, A. W.; Liu, C.; Eldon, D.; Groth, M.; Stangeby, P. C.; Tsui, C.

    2014-10-01

    Experiments at DIII-D have explored the transition from the high recycling to the partially detached divertor condition in L- and H-mode with an unprecedented level of detail. Improved divertor and core Thomson scattering diagnostics were coupled with high resolution spectroscopic studies of molecular and neutral emissions. 2-D Te and ne profiles of the outer leg reveal the earliest indications of formation of the detachment front at the target plate, reducing local Te at the outer strike point from 8-10 eV to 2-3 eV with a marginal (< 10 %) increase in upstream. These data help guide and expose any missing physics in simulations of detachment onset using state-of-the-art boundary codes, and in predictions for operation with a partial detached divertor in future devices. This work supported in part by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC52-07NA27344 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  8. Engineering Design Guidance for Detached Breakwaters as Shoreline Stabilization Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    Lakeview Park shoreline. Combinations of wave height, period, direction, and still-water levels were studied to determine test conditions that produced a...77 Structural Design Objectives ........................... 77 Design Wave and Water Level Selection .................... 77...Chesapeake Bay at Bay Ridge, Maryland ................... 9 Figure 8. Aerial view of Lakeview Park , Lorain, Ohio ......... 13 Figure 9. Detached

  9. Turbulent Simulations of Divertor Detachment Based On BOUT + + Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Xu, Xueqiao; Xia, Tianyang; Ye, Minyou

    2015-11-01

    China Fusion Engineering Testing Reactor is under conceptual design, acting as a bridge between ITER and DEMO. The detached divertor operation offers great promise for a reduction of heat flux onto divertor target plates for acceptable erosion. Therefore, a density scan is performed via an increase of D2 gas puffing rates in the range of 0 . 0 ~ 5 . 0 ×1023s-1 by using the B2-Eirene/SOLPS 5.0 code package to study the heat flux control and impurity screening property. As the density increases, it shows a gradually change of the divertor operation status, from low-recycling regime to high-recycling regime and finally to detachment. Significant radiation loss inside the confined plasma in the divertor region during detachment leads to strong parallel density and temperature gradients. Based on the SOLPS simulations, BOUT + + simulations will be presented to investigate the stability and turbulent transport under divertor plasma detachment, particularly the strong parallel gradient driven instabilities and enhanced plasma turbulence to spread heat flux over larger surface areas. The correlation between outer mid-plane and divertor turbulence and the related transport will be analyzed. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675075.

  10. Cohesive detachment of an elastic pillar from a dissimilar substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, N. A.; Khaderi, S. N.; McMeeking, R. M.; Arzt, E.

    The adhesion of micron-scale surfaces due to intermolecular interactions is a subject of intense interest spanning electronics, biomechanics and the application of soft materials to engineering devices. The degree of adhesion is sensitive to the diameter of micro-pillars in addition to the degree of elastic mismatch between pillar and substrate. Adhesion-strength-controlled detachment of an elastic circular cylinder from a dissimilar substrate is predicted using a Dugdale-type of analysis, with a cohesive zone of uniform tensile strength emanating from the interface corner. Detachment initiates when the opening of the cohesive zone attains a critical value, giving way to crack formation. When the cohesive zone size at crack initiation is small compared to the pillar diameter, the initiation of detachment can be expressed in terms of a critical value Hc of the corner stress intensity. The estimated pull-off force is somewhat sensitive to the choice of stick/slip boundary condition used on the cohesive zone, especially when the substrate material is much stiffer than the pillar material. The analysis can be used to predict the sensitivity of detachment force to the size of pillar and to the degree of elastic mismatch between pillar and substrate.

  11. Spontaneous resolution of optic nerve coloboma-associated retinal detachment.

    PubMed

    Ying, Michelle S; Fuller, Jeff; Young, Joshua; Marcus, Dennis M

    2004-01-01

    We report a congenital neurosensory retinal detachment associated with an optic nerve coloboma with subsequent spontaneous reattachment. This represents the earliest reported case of such a clinical situation. An observation period is recommended for infants with this clinical course to allow for the opportunity of spontaneous reattachment.

  12. Existence and Stability of Menisci in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2011-01-01

    Detached growth, also referred to as dewetted growth, is a Bridgman crystal growth process in which the melt is in contact with the crucible wall but the crystal is not. A meniscus bridges the gap between the top of the crystal and the crucible wall. The Young-Laplace capillary equation was used to calculate the crystal radii of detached states as a function of the pressure differential across the meniscus. The detached states depend on the contact angle of the melt with the crucible wall, the growth angle of the melt with respect to the solidifying crystal, and the Bond number. A static stability analysis was performed on the calculated detached states. The stability criterion was the sign of the second variation of the potential energy upon admissible meniscus shape perturbations. The conditions considered corresponded to the growth of Ge and InSb, in both terrestrial and microgravity conditions. Stability was found to depend significantly on whether the interior surface was considered to be microscopically rough or smooth, corresponding to pinned or unpinned states. It was also found that all meniscus shapes which are single-valued functions of the radius are statically stable in a microgravity environment.

  13. Liquid Droplet Detachment and Entrainment in Microscale Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidrovo, Carlos

    2005-11-01

    In this talk we will present a first order study of liquid water detachment and entrainment into air flows in hydrophobic microchannels. Silicon based microstructures consisting of 23 mm long U-shaped channels of different geometry were used for this purpose. The structures are treated with a Molecular Vapor Deposition (MVD) process that renders them hydrophobic. Liquid water is injected through a side slot located 2/3 of the way downstream from the air channel inlet. The water entering the air channel beads up into slugs or droplets that grow in size at this injection location until they fill and flood the channel or are carried away by the air flow. The slugs/droplets dimensions at detachment are correlated against superficial gas velocity and proper dimensionless parameters are postulated and examined to compare hydrodynamic forces against surface tension. It is found that slug/droplet detachment is dominated by two main forces: pressure gradient drag, arising from confinement of a viscous flow in the channel, and inertial drag, arising from the stagnation of the air due to obstruction by the slugs/droplets. A detachment regime map is postulated based on the relative importance of these forces under different flow conditions.

  14. Commitment and Detachment in English and Bulgarian Academic Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassileva, Irena

    2001-01-01

    Examines similarities and differences in the degree of commitment and detachment in English, Bulgarian, and Bulgarian English research articles in linguistics. Analysis shows considerable difference in the overall distribution of hedges and boosters throughout the introductions, discussions, and conclusions of the articles, which may lead to…

  15. Rear Detachments: Capturing and Resourcing How the Army Fights

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    operations/ plans officer), is the Rear Detachment Commander. Captain Basil H. Liddell-Hart was correct in noting that “even the bonds of patriotism...January, 2010; Kyle Moore and Erica Koelder, “Family Readiness in the ARFORGEN Cycle,” Engineer, May/August 2010. 8 Godwin, The Mission, Organization

  16. Active Vibration Control of Elastic Beam by Means of Shape Memory Alloy Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Q.; Levy, C.

    1996-01-01

    The mathematical model of a flexible beam covered with shape memory alloy (SMA) layers is presented. The SMA layers are used as actuators, which are capable of changing their elastic modulus and recovery stress, thus changing the natural frequency of, and adjusting the excitation to, the vibrating beam. The frequency factor variation as a function of SMA Young's modulus, SMA layer thickness and beam thickness is discussed. Also control of the beam employing an optimal linear control law is evaluated. The control results indicate how the system reacts to various levels of excitation input through the non-homogeneous recovery shear term of the governing differential equation.

  17. The South Tibetan Detachment System: Thermal and mechanical transition from deeper to upper structural levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montomoli, Chiara; Rodolfo, Carosi; Visonà, Dario

    2013-04-01

    The South Tibetan Detachment System (STDS) is a primary tectonic feature of the Himalayan chain, cropping out for more than 2000 km along the belt. It separates the low-grade-metamorphic rocks of the Tibetan Sedimentary Sequence (TSS) in the hanging-wall, from the high-grade-metamorphic rocks of the High Himalayan Crystallines (HHC) in the footwall. The architecture of the STDS is made up by a lower ductile shear zone affecting high -grade metamorphic rocks of the HHC and the lower portion of the TSS, deformed under amphibolite facies conditions (i.e. Checka Formation, Everest series, Haimanta Group). An upper low-angle normal fault divides the high-grade metamorphic rocks from the very-low-grade rocks of the TSS. Several competing tectonic models, regarding the exhumation and extrusion of the high-grade metamorphic rocks of the HHC are nowadays objects of debates. In these models the STDS, joined with the partly coeval lower Main Central Thrust played a crucial role. The knowledge of the thermal and structural activity of the STDS can give a fundamental contribution to discriminate among the different proposed tectonic models. By the way most of the structural and thermal studies focused on the kinematic and thermal profiles of the footwall rocks and only few studies have been concentrated on the hanging-wall rocks. During this work we focused on two sections of the STDS cropping out east of the Ama Drime range (Dingyee area, Southern Tibet) and west of the Annapurna massif (Kaligandaki valley, Central Nepal). Here we concentrated on the hanging-wall rocks of the STDS represented by Ordovician limestone in the first transect and by impure marbles and quartzites in the second one. Meso and microstructural studies have been accompanied by illite crystallinity analyses, calcite-dolomite geothermometer and stable isotope analyses on selected samples. Microfabric analysis of calcite shows shape and lattice preferred orientations as well as grain size reduction within

  18. Experimental Characterization of Plasma Detachment from Magnetic Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Christopher Scott

    Magnetic nozzles, like Laval nozzles, are observed in several natural systems and have application in areas such as electric propulsion and plasma processing. Plasma flowing through these nozzles is inherently tied to the field lines and must separate for momentum redirection or particle transport to occur. Plasma detachment and associated mechanisms from a magnetic nozzle are investigated. Experimental results are presented from the plume of the VASIMRRTM VX-200 device flowing along an axisymmetric magnetic nozzle and operated at two ion energies to explore momentum dependent detachment. The argon plume expanded into a 150m3 vacuum chamber where the background pressure was low enough that charge-exchange mean-free-paths were longer than experiment scale lengths. This magnetic nozzle system is demonstrated to hydrodynamically scale up to astrophysical plasmas, particularly the solar chromosphere, implying general relevance to many systems. Plasma parameters were mapped over a large spatial range using measurements from multiple plasma diagnostics. The data show that the plume does not follow the magnetic field lines. A mapped integration of the ion flux shows the plume may be divided into three regions where 1) the plume briefly follows the magnetic flux, 2) diverges quadratically before 3) expanding with linear trajectories. Transitioning from region 1→2, the ion flux departs from the magnetic flux suggesting ion detachment. An instability forms in region 2 driving an oscillating electric field that causes ions to expand before enhancing electron cross-field transport through anomalous resistivity. Transitioning from region 2→3 the electric field dissipates, the trajectories linearize, and the plume effectively detaches. A delineation of sub-to-super Alfvenic flow aligns well with the inflection points of the linearization without a change in magnetic topology. The detachment process is best described as a two part process: First, ions detach by a breakdown of

  19. Feedbacks between tall shrubland development and active layer temperatures in northwest Siberian arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, H. E.; Frost, G. V.; Walker, D. A.; Matyshak, G.

    2013-12-01

    Permafrost soils are a globally significant carbon store, but changes in permafrost thermal regime observed in recent decades across much of the Arctic suggest that permafrost carbon balance is likely to change with continued climate warming. Critical to changes in permafrost carbon balance in a warmer world, however, are feedbacks between changes in the composition and density of surface vegetation, and the thermal state of permafrost. Shrub expansion has been widely observed in the northwest Siberian Low Arctic, but the magnitude and direction of shrub-induced impacts to permafrost temperature and stability remain poorly understood. Here we evaluate changes to active layer properties and thermal regime that occur during tall shrubland development (shrubs > 1.5 m height) within a northwest Siberian landscape dominated by well-developed, small-scale patterned ground features (e.g., non-sorted circles). We measured the annual time-series of soil temperature at 5 cm and 20 cm depth, and the structural attributes of vegetation at patterned-ground microsites across four stages of tall shrubland development: low-growing tundra lacking erect shrubs, newly-developed shrublands, mature shrublands, and paludified shrublands. Mean summer soil temperatures declined with increasing shrub cover and moss thickness, but winter soil temperatures increased with shrub development. Shrubland development strongly attenuated cryoturbation, promoting the establishment of complete vegetation cover and the development of a continuous organic mat. Increased vegetation cover, in turn, led to further reduced cryoturbation and an aggrading permafrost table. These observations indicate that tall shrub expansion that is now occurring in patterned-ground landscapes of the northwest Siberian Arctic may buffer permafrost from atmospheric warming, and increase carbon storage in these systems at least in the short term.

  20. PARALLEL EVOLUTION OF QUASI-SEPARATRIX LAYERS AND ACTIVE REGION UPFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Mandrini, C. H.; Cristiani, G. D.; Nuevo, F. A.; Vásquez, A. M.; Baker, D.; Driel-Gesztelyi, L. van; Démoulin, P.; Pick, M.; Vargas Domínguez, S.

    2015-08-10

    Persistent plasma upflows were observed with Hinode’s EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) at the edges of active region (AR) 10978 as it crossed the solar disk. We analyze the evolution of the photospheric magnetic and velocity fields of the AR, model its coronal magnetic field, and compute the location of magnetic null-points and quasi-sepratrix layers (QSLs) searching for the origin of EIS upflows. Magnetic reconnection at the computed null points cannot explain all of the observed EIS upflow regions. However, EIS upflows and QSLs are found to evolve in parallel, both temporarily and spatially. Sections of two sets of QSLs, called outer and inner, are found associated to EIS upflow streams having different characteristics. The reconnection process in the outer QSLs is forced by a large-scale photospheric flow pattern, which is present in the AR for several days. We propose a scenario in which upflows are observed, provided that a large enough asymmetry in plasma pressure exists between the pre-reconnection loops and lasts as long as a photospheric forcing is at work. A similar mechanism operates in the inner QSLs; in this case, it is forced by the emergence and evolution of the bipoles between the two main AR polarities. Our findings provide strong support for the results from previous individual case studies investigating the role of magnetic reconnection at QSLs as the origin of the upflowing plasma. Furthermore, we propose that persistent reconnection along QSLs does not only drive the EIS upflows, but is also responsible for the continuous metric radio noise-storm observed in AR 10978 along its disk transit by the Nançay Radio Heliograph.

  1. Active layer thermal monitoring of a Dry Valley of the Ellsworth Mountains, Continental Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto; Michel, Roberto; Souza, Karoline; Senra, Eduardo; Bremer, Ulisses

    2015-04-01

    The Ellsworth Mountains occur along the southern edge of the Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf and are subdivided by the Minnesota Glacier into the Heritage Range to the east and the Sentinel Range to the West. The climate of the Ellsworth Mountains is strongly controlled by proximity to the Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf and elevation. The mean annual air temperature at the 1,000 m level is estimated to be -25°C, and the average annual accumulation of water-equivalent precipitation likely ranges from 150 to 175 mm yr-1 (Weyant, 1966). The entire area is underlain by continuous permafrost of unknown thickness. Based on data collected from 22 pits, 41% of the sites contained dry permafrost below 70 cm, 27% had ice-cemented permafrost within 70 cm of the surface, 27% had bedrock within 70 cm, and 5% contained an ice-core (Bockheim, unpublished; Schaefer et al., 2015). Dry-frozen permafrost, which may be unique to Antarctica, appears to form from sublimation of moisture in ice-cemented permafrost over time. Active-layer depths in drift sheets of the Ellsworth Mountains range from 15 to 50 cm (Bockheim, unpublished); our understanding of Antarctic permafrost is poor, especially at the continent. The active layer monitoring sites were installed at Edson Hills, Ellsworth_Mountains, in the summer of 2012, and consist of thermistors (accuracy ± 0.2 °C) installed at 1 m above ground for air temperature measurements at two soil profiles on quartzite drift deposits, arranged in a vertical array (Lithic Haplorthel 886 m asl, 5 cm, 10 cm, 30 cm and Lithic Anyorthel 850 m asl, 5 cm, 10 cm, 30 cm). All probes were connected to a Campbell Scientific CR 1000 data logger recording data at hourly intervals from January 2nd 2012 until December 29th 2013. We calculated the thawing days (TD), freezing days (FD); isothermal days (ID), freeze thaw days (FTD), thawing degree days (TDD) and freezing degree days (FDD); all according to Guglielmin et al. (2008). Temperature at 5 cm reaches a maximum

  2. PLIF Visualization of Active Control of Hypersonic Boundary Layers Using Blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Alderfer, David W.; Berry, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging was used to visualize the boundary layer flow on a 1/3-scale Hyper-X forebody model. The boundary layer was perturbed by blowing out of orifices normal to the model surface. Two blowing orifice configurations were used: a spanwise row of 17-holes spaced at 1/8 inch, with diameters of 0.020 inches and a single-hole orifice with a diameter of 0.010 inches. The purpose of the study was to visualize and identify laminar and turbulent structures in the boundary layer and to make comparisons with previous phosphor thermography measurements of surface heating. Jet penetration and its influence on the boundary layer development was also examined as was the effect of a compression corner on downstream boundary layer transition. Based upon the acquired PLIF images, it was determined that global surface heating measurements obtained using the phosphor thermography technique provide an incomplete indicator of transitional and turbulent behavior of the corresponding boundary layer flow. Additionally, the PLIF images show a significant contribution towards transition from instabilities originating from the underexpanded jets. For this experiment, a nitric oxide/nitrogen mixture was seeded through the orifices, with nitric oxide (NO) serving as the fluorescing gas. The experiment was performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center.

  3. Numerical investigation on active isolation of ground shock by soft porous layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.; Sun, W.; Anand, S.

    2009-04-01

    The mitigation and reduction of blast-induced ground shock in near field is an interesting topic worth considering for the protection of buried structures. Soft porous materials are usually used to form an isolation layer around the buried structures. However, the interaction of soft porous layer and surrounding geomedia as well as buried structures is not well understood. In this paper, the effects of soft porous layer barriers on the reduction of buried blast-induced ground shock are numerically studied. Based on the prototype dimensions of a centrifuge test, a numerical model is set up with two steel boxes symmetrically buried at two sides of the charge. One box is directly located in soil mass without protection (unprotected) and the other is located behind a soft porous layer barrier (protected). The soft porous layer barriers studied here include an open trench, an inundated water trench, three in-filled geofoam walls with different densities, and a concrete wall. The numerical responses of the two boxes are evaluated when subjected to the protection of different soft porous layer barriers. These numerical simulations show that both open trench and geofoam barriers can effectively reduce blast-induced stress waves. However, inundated water trench and concrete wall have almost no effect on the reduction of ground shock. Therefore, a geofoam barrier is more practicable in soil mass.

  4. On the dynamic computation of the model constant in delayed detached eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Z.; Reddy, K. R.; Durbin, P. A.

    2015-02-01

    The current work puts forth an implementation of a dynamic procedure to locally compute the value of the model constant CDES, as used in the eddy simulation branch of Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES). Former DDES formulations [P. R. Spalart et al., "A new version of detached-eddy simulation, resistant to ambiguous grid densities," Theor. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 20, 181 (2006); M. S. Gritskevich et al., "Development of DDES and IDDES formulations for the k- ω shear stress transport model," Flow, Turbul. Combust. 88, 431 (2012)] are not conducive to the implementation of a dynamic procedure due to uncertainty as to what form the eddy viscosity expression takes in the eddy simulation branch. However, a recent, alternate formulation [K. R. Reddy et al., "A DDES model with a Smagorinsky-type eddy viscosity formulation and log-layer mismatch correction," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 50, 103 (2014)] casts the eddy viscosity in a form that is similar to the Smagorinsky, LES (Large Eddy Simulation) sub-grid viscosity. The resemblance to the Smagorinsky model allows the implementation of a dynamic procedure similar to that of Lilly [D. K. Lilly, "A proposed modification of the Germano subgrid-scale closure method," Phys. Fluids A 4, 633 (1992)]. A limiting function is proposed which constrains the computed value of CDES, depending on the fineness of the grid and on the computed solution.

  5. Active layer and permafrost thermal regime in a patterned ground soil in Maritime Antarctica, and relationship with climate variability models.

    PubMed

    Chaves, D A; Lyra, G B; Francelino, M R; Silva, Ldb; Thomazini, A; Schaefer, Cegr

    2017-04-15

    Permafrost and active layer studies are important to understand and predict regional climate changes. The objectives of this work were: i) to characterize the soil thermal regime (active layer thickness and permafrost formation) and its interannual variability and ii) to evaluate the influence of different climate variability modes to the observed soil thermal regime in a patterned ground soil in Maritime Antarctica. The study was carried out at Keller Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica. Six soil temperatures probes were installed at different depths (10, 30 and 80cm) in the polygon center (Tc) and border (Tb) of a patterned ground soil. We applied cross-correlation analysis and standardized series were related to the Antarctic Oscillation Index (AAO). The estimated active layer thickness was approximately 0.75cm in the polygon border and 0.64cm in the center, indicating the presence of permafrost (within 80cm). Results indicate that summer and winter temperatures are becoming colder and warmer, respectively. Considering similar active layer thickness, the polygon border presented greater thawing days, resulting in greater vulnerability to warming, cooling faster than the center, due to its lower volumetric heat capacity (Cs). Cross-correlation analysis indicated statistically significant delay of 1day (at 10cm depth) in the polygon center, and 5days (at 80cm depth) for the thermal response between atmosphere and soil. Air temperature showed a delay of 5months with the climate variability models. The influence of southern winds from high latitudes, in the south facing slopes, favored freeze in the upper soil layers, and also contributed to keep permafrost closer to the surface. The observed cooling trend is linked to the regional climate variability modes influenced by atmospheric circulation, although longer monitoring period is required to reach a more precise scenario.

  6. Impacts of tundra fire on active layer condition and estimation of true resistivity value of soil in Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, K.; Sawada, Y.; Narita, K.; Fukuda, M.

    2007-12-01

    In Seward Peninsula, southwest Alaska, large tundra fires were occurred in 1997 and 2002, and a discontinuous permafrost area burned widely near the Kougarok River. After fires, a vegetation condition was destroyed and a ground surface thermal condition was changed. Then, field observations were conducted at burned and unburned sites in summer 2005, 2006 and 2007, in order to clarify impacts of the tundra fire on thermal and water conditions of active layer. From pit surveys, ground temperatures at burned sites showed 4-5 °C higher values than those at unburned sites. Soil water contents at burned sites showed relative high values in 2005, but low in 2006. Active layer thicknesses were significantly different between burned and unburned sites, about 60cm and 40cm, respectively. There is no significant increasing of the thickness between 2005 and 2006, however, the thickness in 2007 at north-facing sites increased to 80cm at the burned site and 50cm at the unburned site, respectively. Apparent electrical resistivity values up to 1m deep were obtained from electrical soundings in 2006, and values at burned sites were lower than those at unburned sites due to the thick active layer whose resistivity value is relatively low. As an apparent resistivity value is generally produced from the combination of a true resistivity value and a thickness of a layer, a simple calculation was carried out in order to estimate a true resistivity value of unfrozen mineral soil in the active layer. The calculated results showed that the true resistivity at burned sites was higher than that at unburned sites, which was seemed to correspond to a relative low water condition. This result is in agreement with the measured result of water content in 2006. Using this method, the apparent resistivity may show a soil water condition.

  7. The Toxicity and Anti-cancer Activity of the Hexane Layer of Melia azedarach L. var. japonica Makino's Bark Extract.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Woo; Kang, Se Chan

    2012-03-01

    In this study, the 4-week oral toxicity and anti-cancer activity of the hexane layer of Melia azedarach L. var. japonica Makino's bark extract were investigated. We carried out a hollow fiber (HF) assay and 28- day repeated toxicity study to confirm the anti-cancer effect and safety of the hexane layer. The HF assay was carried out using an A549 human adenocarcinoma cell via intraperitoneal (IP) site with or without cisplatin. In the result, the 200 mg/kg b.w of hexane layer with 4 mg/kg b.w of cisplatin treated group, showed the highest cytotoxicity aginst A549 carcinoma cells. For the 28-day repeated toxicity study, 6 groups of 10 male and female mice were given by gavage 200, 100, or 50 mg/kg b.w hexane layer with or without 4 mg/kg b.w of cisplatin against body weight, and were then sacrificed for blood and tissue sampling. The subacute oral toxicity study in mice with doses of 200, 100, and 50 mg/kg b.w hexane layer showed no significant changes in body weight gain and general behavior. The cisplatin-treated group significantly decreased in body weight compared to the control group but regained weight with 100 and 200 mg/kg b.w of hexane layer. The biochemical analysis showed significant increase in several parameters (ALT, total billirubin, AST, creatinine, and BUN) in cisplatin-treated groups. However, in the group given a co-treatment of hexane layer (200 mg/kg b.w), levels of these parameters decreased. In hematological analysis, cisplatin induced the reduction of WBCs and neutrophils but co-treatment with hexane layer (100 and 200 mg/kg b.w) improved these toxicities caused by cisplatin. The histological profile of the livers showed eosinophilic cell foci in central vein and portal triad in cisplatin treated mice. These results show that hexane layer might have an anti-cancer activity and could improve the toxicity of cisplatin.

  8. Critical taper analysis reveals lithological control of variations in detachment strength: An analysis of the Alpine basal detachment (Swiss Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hagke, C.; Oncken, O.; Evseev, S.

    2014-01-01

    Although evidence for weak detachments underlying foreland thrust belts exists, very little is known about the lateral variations in effective strength, as well as the geological nature of such variations. Using critical taper analysis, we show that a detailed and systematic measurement of surface slope of the Central European Alps reveals variations in strength parameter F along the detachment, based on the argument that the Alps are close to the critical state. We show that the basal detachment is very weak near the deformation front but strengthens toward the hinterland. Very low F (effective coefficient of friction plus normalized cohesion) values of <0.1 and even 0.05 occur within evaporites and within shales in Triassic (west) or Upper Cretaceous/Lower Tertiary sequences (east) used by the Alpine sole detachment. These very low values in shales--comparably low values are reported from other orogens--are caused partly by slightly elevated pore pressures (λ > 0.54) but may also require additional mechanisms of dynamic weakening.

  9. Detection and quantification of microtubule detachment from centrosomes and spindle poles.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Anutosh; Yang, Hailing; Cabral, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Microtubule detachment from microtubule organizing centers is an important cellular process required for normal cell proliferation. When cells enter mitosis, microtubule turnover increases along with a concurrent increase in microtubule detachment. MCAK, a kinesin-related protein whose abundance is highest during the early stages of mitosis, has been shown to regulate microtubule detachment. Abnormal increases or decreases in the frequency of detachment interfere with spindle function and inhibit cell division. It has been shown that drugs able to promote microtubule assembly (e.g., paclitaxel, epothilones) prevent cell division by suppressing microtubule detachment from centrosomes. Conversely, cytotoxic concentrations of microtubule destabilizing drugs (e.g., vinblastine, nocodazole), tubulin mutations that cause paclitaxel resistance, and specific β-tubulin isotypes increase the frequency of microtubule detachment. In this chapter, we describe a method to calculate the frequency of microtubule detachment by transfecting cells with EGFP-MAP4 and directly observing detachment by live cell imaging.

  10. Screening for anthracnose disease resistance in strawberry using a detached leaf assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inoculation of detached strawberry leaves with Colletotrichum species may provide a rapid, non-destructive method of identifying anthracnose resistant germplasm. The reliability and validity of assessing disease severity is critical to disease management decisions. We inoculated detached strawberr...

  11. Syphilis presenting as retinal detachment and orchitis in a young man with HIV.

    PubMed

    Yogo, Norihiro; Nichol, Aran Cunningham; Campbell, Thomas B; Erlandson, Kristine M

    2014-02-01

    Retinal detachment and testicular lesions are 2 rare presentations of syphilis. We describe a man with bilateral retinal detachment from ocular syphilis and syphilitic orchitis as a manifestation of syphilis and HIV coinfection.

  12. Layer-controllable WS2-reduced graphene oxide hybrid nanosheets with high electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Qi; Wang, Lianhui; Li, Xing'ao; Huang, Wei

    2015-06-21

    In this study, an efficient poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP)-assisted hydrothermal method for the in situ growth of WS2 nanosheets with layer-controllability on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is reported. The number of layers (from a monolayer to ∼25 layers) of the exfoliated WS2 can be accurately controlled by adjusting the amount of PVP. The layer structure and the morphology of the as-prepared hybrids are confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission microscopy. The X-ray diffraction, Raman, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of the obtained WS2-rGO hybrid nanosheets indicate highly crystallized structures, a clear Raman shift and a stoichiometry, which is dependent on the number of layers. Furthermore, these highly active and durable catalysts exhibit an electrocatalytic current density of 10 mA cm(-2) at a small hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) overpotential (-170 mV) and a Tafel slope of 52 mV dec(-1) with an excellent electrocatalytic stability (after 6 months storage).

  13. Layer-controllable WS2-reduced graphene oxide hybrid nanosheets with high electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Qi; Wang, Lianhui; Li, Xing'ao; Huang, Wei

    2015-06-01

    In this study, an efficient poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP)-assisted hydrothermal method for the in situ growth of WS2 nanosheets with layer-controllability on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is reported. The number of layers (from a monolayer to ~25 layers) of the exfoliated WS2 can be accurately controlled by adjusting the amount of PVP. The layer structure and the morphology of the as-prepared hybrids are confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission microscopy. The X-ray diffraction, Raman, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of the obtained WS2-rGO hybrid nanosheets indicate highly crystallized structures, a clear Raman shift and a stoichiometry, which is dependent on the number of layers. Furthermore, these highly active and durable catalysts exhibit an electrocatalytic current density of 10 mA cm-2 at a small hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) overpotential (-170 mV) and a Tafel slope of 52 mV dec-1 with an excellent electrocatalytic stability (after 6 months storage).

  14. Electroluminescence of a Multi-Layered Organic Light-Emitting Diode Utilizing Trans-4-[p-[N-methyl-N-(hydroxymethyl)amino]styryl]-N-Methylphridinium Tetraphenylborate as the Active Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xue-Yuan; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Xu, Chun-Xiang; Qiao, Yi; Cui, Yi-Ping

    2006-06-01

    Employing an organic dye salt of trans-4-[p-[N-methyl-N-(hydroxymethyl)amino]styryl]-N-methylphridinium tetraphenylborate (ASPT) as the active layer, 8-hydrocyquinoline aluminium (Alq3) as the electron transporting layer and N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'-diamine (TPD) as the hole transporting layer, respectively, we fabricate a multi-layered organic light-emitting diode and observe the colour tunable electroluminescence (EL). The dependence of the EL spectra on the applied voltage is investigated in detail, and the recombination mechanism is discussed by considering the variation of the hole-electron recombination region.

  15. Detachment of CVD-grown graphene from single crystalline Ni films by a pure gas phase reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Patrick; Henß, Ann-Kathrin; Weinl, Michael; Diehl, Leo; Keefer, Daniel; Lippmann, Judith; Schulz, Anne; Kraus, Jürgen; Schreck, Matthias; Wintterlin, Joost

    2016-11-01

    Despite great previous efforts there is still a high need for a simple, clean, and upscalable method for detaching epitaxial graphene from the metal support on which it was grown. We present a method based on a pure gas phase reaction that is free of solvents and polymer supports and avoids mechanical transfer steps. The graphene was grown on 150 nm thick, single crystalline Ni(111) films on Si(111) wafers with YSZ buffer layers. Its quality was monitored by using low energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy. The gas phase etching uses a chemical transport reaction, the so-called Mond process, based on the formation of gaseous nickel tetracarbonyl in ~ 1 bar of CO at ~ 75 °C and by adding small amounts of sulfide catalysts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the detached graphene. It was found that the method successfully removes the nickel from underneath the graphene layer, so that the graphene lies on the insulating oxide buffer layer. Small residual particles of nickel sulfide and cracks in the obtained graphene layer were identified. The defect concentrations were comparable to graphene samples obtained by wet chemical etching and by the bubbling transfer.

  16. Modeling Active Layer Depth Over Permafrost for the Arctic Drainage Basin and the Comparison to Measurements at CALM Field Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelke, C.; Zhang, T.; Serreze, M.; Armstrong, R.

    2002-12-01

    A finite difference model for one-dimensional heat conduction with phase change is applied to investigate soil freezing and thawing processes over the Arctic drainage basin. Calculations are performed on the 25~km~x~25~km resolution NSIDC EASE-Grid. NCEP re-analyzed sigma-0.995 surface temperature with a topography correction, and SSM/I-derived weekly snow height are used as forcing parameters. The importance of using an annual cycle of snow density for different snow classes is emphasized. Soil bulk density and the percentages of silt/clay and sand/gravel are from the SoilData System of the International Geosphere Biosphere Programme. In addition, we parameterize a spatially and vertically variable peat layer and modify soil bulk density and thermal conductivity accordingly. Climatological soil moisture content is from the Permafrost/Water Balance Model (P/WBM) at the University of New Hampshire. The model domain is divided into 3~layers with distinct thermal properties of frozen and thawed soil, respectively. Calculations are performed on 54~model nodes ranging from a thickness of 10~cm near the surface to 1~m at 15~m depth. Initial temperatures are chosen according to the grid cell's IPA permafrost classification on EASE grid. Active layer depths, simulated for the summers of 1999 and 2000, compare well to maximal thaw depths measured at about 60 Circumarctic Active Layer Monitoring Network (CALM) field sites. A remaining RMS-error between modeled and measured values is attributed mainly to scale discrepancies (100~m~x~100~m vs. 25~km~x~25~km) based on differences in the fields of air temperature, snow height, and soil bulk density. For the whole pan-Arctic land mass and the time period 1980 through 2001, this study shows the regionally highly variable active layer depth, frozen ground depth, lengths of freezing and thawing periods, and the day of year when the maxima are reached.

  17. Active constrained layer damping of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of functionally graded plates using piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Satyajit; Ray, M. C.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, a geometrically nonlinear dynamic analysis has been presented for functionally graded (FG) plates integrated with a patch of active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatment and subjected to a temperature field. The constraining layer of the ACLD treatment is considered to be made of the piezoelectric fiber-reinforced composite (PFRC) material. The temperature field is assumed to be spatially uniform over the substrate plate surfaces and varied through the thickness of the host FG plates. The temperature-dependent material properties of the FG substrate plates are assumed to be graded in the thickness direction of the plates according to a power-law distribution while the Poisson's ratio is assumed to be a constant over the domain of the plate. The constrained viscoelastic layer of the ACLD treatment is modeled using the Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method. Based on the first-order shear deformation theory, a three-dimensional finite element model has been developed to model the open-loop and closed-loop nonlinear dynamics of the overall FG substrate plates under the thermal environment. The analysis suggests the potential use of the ACLD treatment with its constraining layer made of the PFRC material for active control of geometrically nonlinear vibrations of FG plates in the absence or the presence of the temperature gradient across the thickness of the plates. It is found that the ACLD treatment is more effective in controlling the geometrically nonlinear vibrations of FG plates than in controlling their linear vibrations. The analysis also reveals that the ACLD patch is more effective for controlling the nonlinear vibrations of FG plates when it is attached to the softest surface of the FG plates than when it is bonded to the stiffest surface of the plates. The effect of piezoelectric fiber orientation in the active constraining PFRC layer on the damping characteristics of the overall FG plates is also discussed.

  18. Improving Morphological Quality and Uniformity of Hydrothermally Grown ZnO Nanowires by Surface Activation of Catalyst Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Gonzalo; Lozano, Helena; Cases-Utrera, Joana; Lee, Minbaek; Esteve, Jaume

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a study about the dependence of the hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanowires (NWs) with the passivation level of the active surface of the Au catalyst layer. The hydrothermal method has many potential applications because of its low processing temperature, feasibility, and low cost. However, when a gold thin film is utilized as the seed material, the grown NWs often lack morphological homogeneity; their distribution is not uniform and the reproducibility of the growth is low. We hypothesize that the state or condition of the active surface of the Au catalyst layer has a critical effect on the uniformity of the NWs. Inspired by traditional electrochemistry experiments, in which Au electrodes are typically activated before the measurements, we demonstrate that such activation is a simple way to effectively assist and enhance NW growth. In addition, several cleaning processes are examined to find one that yields NWs with optimal quality, density, and vertical alignment. We find cyclic voltammetry measurements to be a reliable indicator of the seed-layer quality for subsequent NW growth. Therefore, we propose the use of this technique as a standard procedure prior to the hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO NWs to control the growth reproducibility and to allow high-yield wafer-level processing.

  19. Detached macroalgae: Its importance to inshore sandy beach fauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Kyla K.; Wilding, Thomas A.; Horstmeyer, Lena; Weigl, Simon; Heymans, Johanna J.

    2014-10-01

    Kelp forests shed a large proportion of their biomass through storm-mediated defoliation, senescence of kelp blades, and constant erosion of particulate organic matter from the kelp fronds. Much of this detached macroalgae drifts in the water column and is deposited on intertidal zones of beaches. Detached macroalgae may provide inshore sandy beach fauna with refuge and food subsidies in an exposed and bare environment, with limited in situ primary production. We evaluated the relationship between detached macroalgae and the density of inshore fauna, where 'inshore' was the body of water extending from low water seawards for approximately 50 m. Inshore fauna were sampled using a push-net (1 mm mesh) on 11 beaches, and using a beam-trawl (4 mm mesh) on a subset of 8 beaches. On each beach, the density of detached macroalgae in the water column was quantified, together with a suite of physico-chemical beach characteristics. Push-net samples principally comprised omnivorous and detritivorous crustaceans such as gammarid amphipods, mysids and valviferan isopods, which have limited swimming abilities and reside inshore year-round. Beam-trawl fauna were mainly carnivorous decapods and fish, which undergo seasonal inshore-offshore migrations to utilize sandy beaches as nursery habitats. Linear models predicted increases of 11% (95% CI: 3.5-19%) and 2.4% (95% CI: 0.7-4.2%) in the density of push-net and beam-trawl fauna, respectively, with a 1 ℓ.100 m-3 increase in detached macroalgae. This suggests that detached macroalgae is more important in the provision of food and shelter to small, weak-swimming detritivores/omnivores than to larger and more mobile predators. The densities of large predators were mostly explained by physical beach characteristics, which overshadowed the role of macroalgae. Maximum abundances of decapods and fish were found on wide, flat beaches with low wave heights. Large accumulations of macroalgae may inhibit the foraging efficiencies of

  20. Non-activation ZnO array as a buffering layer to fabricate strongly adhesive metal-organic framework/PVDF hollow fiber membranes.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanbin; Meng, Qin; Li, Xiaonian; Zhang, Congyang; Fan, Zheng; Zhang, Guoliang

    2014-09-04

    A non-activation (NA) ZnO array is directly grown on a PVDF hollow fiber membrane. The defect-free MOF layers can be synthesized easily on the NA-ZnO array without any activation procedure. The array and MOF layers are strongly adhered to the hollow fiber membrane. The prepared ZIF membranes exhibit excellent gas separation performances.

  1. Embedding metal electrodes in thick active layers for ITO-free plasmonic organic solar cells with improved performance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangjun; Mason, Daniel R; In, Sungjun; Park, Namkyoo

    2014-06-30

    We propose and numerically investigate the optical performance of a novel plasmonic organic solar cell with metallic nanowire electrodes embedded within the active layer. A significant improvement (~15%) in optical absorption over both a conventional ITO organic solar cell and a conventional plasmonic organic solar cell with top-loaded metallic grating is predicted in the proposed structure. Optimal positioning of the embedded metal electrodes (EME) is shown to preserve the condition for their strong plasmonic coupling with the metallic back-plane, meanwhile halving the hole path length to the anode which allows for a thicker active layer that increases the optical path length of propagating modes. With a smaller sheet resistance than a typical 100 nm thick ITO film transparent electrode, and an increased optical absorption and hole collection efficiency, our EME scheme could be an excellent alternative to ITO organic solar cells.

  2. Enhanced Performance of Organic Thin Film Transistor Devices Using Hydroxyethyl-Terminated P3HT as the Active Layer.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Je-Yuan; Tsiang, Raymond Chien-Chao

    2015-05-01

    Hydroxyethyl-terminated poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT-OH) have been synthesized via a catalyst-transfer polycondensation using Grignard metathesis mediated by a nickel-based catalyst. This hydrophilic P3HT-OH is compared against the hydrophobic P3HT when used as an active layer on silicon dioxide (SiO2) wafer for organic thin-film-transistor (OTFT) fabrication. Hydroxyl groups at a 7.5% weight content lead to more chain regularity when polymer is bonded to SiO2 wafer surface and thus enhance the performance of OTFT Device, such as an 114.2% increase in ON/OFF ratio, an 12.4% increase in mobility, a 23.3% decrease in threshold voltage and a 30.1% decrease in surface roughness. Analysis and measurements reported in this paper have illustrated for the first time the feasibility of imparting hydrophilicity to the active layer for improving the OTFT performance.

  3. Determining the Scattering Properties of Vertically-Structured Nepheloid Layers from the Fusion of Active and Passive Optical Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Determining the Scattering Properties of Vertically- Structured Nepheloid Layers from the Fusion of Active and Passive Optical Sensors Curtis D...and water-column inherent optical properties including, if possible, the retrieval of the vertical structure of water-column and benthic- boundary...kilometers a day, possibly providing estimates of the vertical structure of IOPs, as well as bathymetry and bottom classification, with concomitant

  4. Measurement of the fractional oxygenation of leghemoglobin in intact detached pea nodules by reflectance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, J.D.; Owens, T.G. ); LaRue, T.A. )

    1989-10-01

    A method is presented for the rapid measurement of the spectral properties of detached nodules of pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Sparkle) by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. After correcting the spectra for surface light scattering, the spectrum of leghemoglobin is obtained. From this, the fractional oxygenation of leghemoglobin and the internal O{sub 2} concentration can be calculated. With this method, we determined internal O{sub 2} while measuring nitrogenase activity (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) in detached pea nodules over a range of external O{sub 2} concentrations. Nitrogenase activity was maximum when leghemoglobin was 25% oxygenated, corresponding to a calculated free O{sub 2} concentration of 45 nanomolar in infected cells. Advantages of this method over previous methods which employed transmitted light are: (a) many nodules can be assayed simultaneously, (b) nitrogenase activity (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) can be determined at the same time as spectra are recorded, and (c) spectra can be obtained from nodules submerged in buffer containing metabolic effectors.

  5. Intellectual property rights and detached human body parts.

    PubMed

    Pila, Justine

    2014-01-01

    This paper responds to an invitation by the editors to consider whether the intellectual property (IP) regime suggests an appropriate model for protecting interests in detached human body parts. It begins by outlining the extent of existing IP protection for body parts in Europe, and the relevant strengths and weaknesses of the patent system in that regard. It then considers two further species of IP right of less obvious relevance. The first are the statutory rights of ownership conferred by domestic UK law in respect of employee inventions, and the second are the economic and moral rights recognised by European and international law in respect of authorial works. In the argument made, both of these species of IP right may suggest more appropriate models of sui generis protection for detached human body parts than patent rights because of their capacity better to accommodate the relevant public and private interests in respect of the same.

  6. Pneumoretinopexy in the treatment of retinal detachment with macular hole.

    PubMed

    Menchini, U; Scialdone, A; Visconti, C; Brancato, R

    1988-01-01

    Nine eyes of nine patients affected by retinal detachment with macular hole were treated with pneumoretinopexy and postoperative positioning. All the eyes were myopic (mean 13.3 d., sd 3.3), two were amblyopic and one was aphakic. The operative technique included eye softening and intravitreal SF6 gas injection only. Barrage laser photocoagulation was carried out after retinal reattachment. In seven eyes (77.8%) the retina reattached in a mean of three days and the visual acuity improved. No recurrences were observed after a mean of 11.6 months. No severe complications occurred. Vitreous flare was present in 44% and increase of floaters in 55% of the eyes. We believe that pneumoretinopexy can be employed as the first treatment in case of myopic retinal detachment with macular hole.

  7. Abrupt tectonics and rapid slab detachment with grain damage.

    PubMed

    Bercovici, David; Schubert, Gerald; Ricard, Yanick

    2015-02-03

    A simple model for necking and detachment of subducting slabs is developed to include the coupling between grain-sensitive rheology and grain-size evolution with damage. Necking is triggered by thickened buoyant crust entrained into a subduction zone, in which case grain damage accelerates necking and allows for relatively rapid slab detachment, i.e., within 1 My, depending on the size of the crustal plug. Thick continental crustal plugs can cause rapid necking while smaller plugs characteristic of ocean plateaux cause slower necking; oceanic lithosphere with normal or slightly thickened crust subducts without necking. The model potentially explains how large plateaux or continental crust drawn into subduction zones can cause slab loss and rapid changes in plate motion and/or induce abrupt continental rebound.

  8. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with bilateral serous macular detachment.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Luisa; Silva, Nuno Aguiar; Medeiros, Marco Dutra; Flores, Rita; Maduro, Vitor

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a malignant hematopoietic neoplasia, which is rare in adults. Although ocular fundus alterations may be commonly observed in the course of the disease, such alterations are rarely the presenting signs of the disease. Here we describe the case of a patient with painless and progressive loss of visual acuity (right eye, 2/10; left eye, 3/10) developing over two weeks, accompanied by fever and cervical lymphadenopathy. Fundus examination showed bilateral macular serous detachment, which was confirmed by optical coherence tomography. Fluorescein angiography revealed hyperfluorescent pinpoints in the posterior poles. The limits of the macular detachment were revealed in the late phase of the angiogram. The results of blood count analysis triggered a thorough, systematic patient examination. The diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia B (CD10+) was established, and intensive systemic chemotherapy was immediately initiated. One year after the diagnosis, the patient remains in complete remission without any ophthalmologic alterations.

  9. Shape Evolution of Detached Bridgman Crystals Grown in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2015-01-01

    Detached (or dewetted) Bridgman crystal growth defines that process in which a gap exists between a growing crystal and the crucible wall. In microgravity, the parameters that influence the existence of a stable gap are the growth angle of the solidifying crystal, the contact angle between the melt and the crucible wall, and the pressure difference across the meniscus. During actual crystal growth, the initial crystal radius will not have the precise value required for stable detached growth. Beginning with a crystal diameter that differs from stable conditions, numerical calculations are used to analyze the transient crystal growth process. Depending on the initial conditions and growth parameters, the crystal shape will either evolve towards attachment at the crucible wall, towards a stable gap width, or inwards towards eventual collapse of the meniscus. Dynamic growth stability is observed only when the sum of the growth and contact angles exceeds 180 degrees.

  10. Modeling of detachment experiments at DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Canik, John M.; Briesemeister, Alexis R.; Lasnier, C. J.; ...

    2014-11-26

    Edge fluid–plasma/kinetic–neutral modeling of well-diagnosed DIII-D experiments is performed in order to document in detail how well certain aspects of experimental measurements are reproduced within the model as the transition to detachment is approached. Results indicate, that at high densities near detachment onset, the poloidal temperature profile produced in the simulations agrees well with that measured in experiment. However, matching the heat flux in the model requires a significant increase in the radiated power compared to what is predicted using standard chemical sputtering rates. Lastly, these results suggest that the model is adequate to predict the divertor temperature, provided thatmore » the discrepancy in radiated power level can be resolved.« less

  11. Modeling of detachment experiments at DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Canik, John M.; Briesemeister, Alexis R.; Lasnier, C. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Lore, J. D.; McLean, A. G.; Watkins, J. G.

    2014-11-26

    Edge fluid–plasma/kinetic–neutr