Science.gov

Sample records for active layer temperature

  1. Active Layer Thermal Response to Stream Water Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzetto, K.; McKnight, D.

    2004-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is comprised of sediments below and adjacent to a stream through which stream water flows in and out. In polar regions, the shape, dimensions, physical and chemical characteristics of this zone are affected by the seasonal freezing and thawing of the active layer. One factor that may influence the active layer temperature regime is stream water temperature, both its absolute value and cyclic variations in its value. Many of the glacial meltwater streams in Taylor Valley in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica, exhibit daily temperature patterns with lows of 0 or 1° C and highs of 10 or, on occasion, 15° C. Because the viscosity of water decreases significantly with increasing temperature, these daily maxima may increase infiltration and the exchange of water and heat between the stream and the hyporheic zone. To investigate the influence of stream water temperature and flow paths on the active layer temperature regime and vice versa, two conservative tracer injection experiments were conducted. Both took place in the same 200-meter reach, which was instrumented with temperature and conductivity probes. Both also took place at the same time of day during which the stream reaches its temperature maximum. However, in one experiment snow from a nearby patch was added to the stream to suppress the temperature maximum by 3° C from 10 to 7° C. The temperature data show that the snow addition slowed the rate of hyporheic zone warming and suppressed temperature increases in the hyporheic zone by 1-3° C when compared with the non-perturbation experiment. The electrical conductivity data indicate that during the snow addition experiment, the stream neither gained nor lost water while during the non-perturbation experiment, the stream lost water. These results suggest that the stream water cooling decreased infiltration and heat transfer into the hyporheic zone.

  2. Temperature distribution in a layer of an active thermal insulation system heated by a gas burner

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Shigenao . Inst. of Fluid Science); Shimizu, Naotaka . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    The temperature distribution in a layer of an active thermal insulation system was measured. A semitransparent porous layer was heated by a gas burner, and air was injected from the back face of the layer. The temperature in the layer was measured by thermocouples. The temperature distributions were compared with numerical solutions. The thermal penetration depth of the active thermal insulation layer with gas injection can be reduced to 3 mm. When the surface temperature of a conventional insulation layer without gas injection reached 1,500 K, the temperature at the back surface of a 10-mm-thick layer reached 600 K. The transient temperature of the active thermal insulation reached a steady state very quickly compared with that of the conventional insulation. These characteristics agreed qualitatively with the numerical solutions.

  3. Low-temperature photo-activated inorganic electron transport layers for flexible inverted polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Wook; Lee, Soo-Hyoung; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Sung Kyu

    2014-09-01

    A simple and versatile route of forming sol-gel-derived metal oxide n-type electron transport layers (ETLs) for flexible inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs) is proposed using low-temperature photochemical activation process. The photochemical activation, which is induced by deep ultraviolet irradiation on sol-gel films, allows formation of metal oxide n-type ETLs such as zinc oxide (ZnO) and indium gallium zinc oxide films at a low temperature. Compared to poly(3-hexylthiophene)/phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester inverted PSCs with thermally annealed ZnO ETLs (optimized efficiency of 3.26 ± 0.03 %), the inverted PSCs with photo-activated ZnO ETLs showed an improved efficiency of 3.60 ± 0.02 %. The enhanced photovoltaic property is attributed to efficient charge collection from low overall series resistance and high surface area-to-geometric area ratio by the photo-activated ZnO ETLs.

  4. Long-term active layer and ground surface temperature trends: results of 12 years of observations at Alaskan CALM sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiklomanov, N. I.; Nelson, F. E.; Streletskyi, D. A.; Klene, A. E.; Schimek, M.; Little, J.

    2006-12-01

    The uppermost layer of seasonal thawing above permafrost (the active layer) is an important regulator of energy and mass fluxes between the surface and the atmosphere in the polar regions. The Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) program is a network of sites at which data about active-layer thickness (ALT) and dynamics are collected. CALM was established in the 1990s to observe and detect the long-term response of the active layer and near-surface permafrost to changes in climate. Active layer monitoring is an important component of efforts to assess the effects of global change in permafrost environments. CALM strategies are evolving; this presentation showcases some additions to CALM observation procedures designed to monitor processes and detect changes not anticipated in the original CALM protocol of the early 1990s. In this study we used data from 12 (1995-2006) years of extensive, spatially oriented field observations at CALM sites in northern Alaska to examine landscape-specific spatial and temporal trends in active-layer thickness and air and ground surface temperature. Despite an observed increase in air temperature, active-layer thickness exhibited a decreasing trend over the study period. This result indicates that soil consolidation accompanying penetration of thaw into an ice-rich stratum at the base of the active layer has resulted in subsidence of the surface with little or no apparent thickening of the active layer, as traditionally defined. Differential Global Positioning Systems (DGPS) technology was used to detect frost heave and thaw settlement within representative landscapes. Preliminary results indicate that heave and settlement follow patterns of spatial variation similar to those of active-layer thickness. To evaluate the effect of vegetation on ground surface temperature, several heat-transfer coefficients were estimated, including land cover specific thermal diffusivity and empirical n-factors.

  5. Feedbacks between tall shrubland development and active layer temperatures in northwest Siberian arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, H. E.; Frost, G. V.; Walker, D. A.; Matyshak, G.

    2013-12-01

    Permafrost soils are a globally significant carbon store, but changes in permafrost thermal regime observed in recent decades across much of the Arctic suggest that permafrost carbon balance is likely to change with continued climate warming. Critical to changes in permafrost carbon balance in a warmer world, however, are feedbacks between changes in the composition and density of surface vegetation, and the thermal state of permafrost. Shrub expansion has been widely observed in the northwest Siberian Low Arctic, but the magnitude and direction of shrub-induced impacts to permafrost temperature and stability remain poorly understood. Here we evaluate changes to active layer properties and thermal regime that occur during tall shrubland development (shrubs > 1.5 m height) within a northwest Siberian landscape dominated by well-developed, small-scale patterned ground features (e.g., non-sorted circles). We measured the annual time-series of soil temperature at 5 cm and 20 cm depth, and the structural attributes of vegetation at patterned-ground microsites across four stages of tall shrubland development: low-growing tundra lacking erect shrubs, newly-developed shrublands, mature shrublands, and paludified shrublands. Mean summer soil temperatures declined with increasing shrub cover and moss thickness, but winter soil temperatures increased with shrub development. Shrubland development strongly attenuated cryoturbation, promoting the establishment of complete vegetation cover and the development of a continuous organic mat. Increased vegetation cover, in turn, led to further reduced cryoturbation and an aggrading permafrost table. These observations indicate that tall shrub expansion that is now occurring in patterned-ground landscapes of the northwest Siberian Arctic may buffer permafrost from atmospheric warming, and increase carbon storage in these systems at least in the short term.

  6. Thermally activated decomposition of (Ga,Mn)As thin layer at medium temperature post growth annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikhov, Y.; Konstantynov, P.; Domagala, J.; Sadowski, J.; Chernyshova, M.; Wojciechowski, T.; Syryanyy, Y.; Demchenko, I. N.

    2016-05-01

    The redistribution of Mn atoms in Ga1-xMnxAs layer during medium-temperature annealing, 250-450 oC, by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) recorded at ALBA facility, was studied. For this purpose Ga1-xMnxAs thin layer with x=0.01 was grown on AlAs buffer layer deposited on GaAs(100) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) followed by annealing. The examined layer was detached from the substrate using a “lift-off” procedure in order to eliminate elastic scattering in XAFS spectra. Fourier transform analysis of experimentally obtained EXAFS spectra allowed to propose a model which describes a redistribution/diffusion of Mn atoms in the host matrix. Theoretical XANES spectra, simulated using multiple scattering formalism (FEFF code) with the support of density functional theory (WIEN2k code), qualitatively describe the features observed in the experimental fine structure.

  7. Development of atomic layer deposition-activated microchannel plates for single particle detection at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelikov, Dmitry Sullivan, Neal; Rouffignac, Philippe de; Li, Huazhi; Narayanamoorthy, Jayasri; Tremsin, Anton S.

    2014-03-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology is used to nanoengineer functional films inside the pores of microchannel plate (MCP) electron multipliers, enabling a novel MCP manufacturing technology that substantially improves performance and opens novel applications. The authors have developed custom tools and recipes for the growth of conformal films, with optimized conductance and secondary electron emission inside very long channels (∼6–20 μm diameter and >600 μm length, with tens of millions of channels per single MCP) by ALD. The unique ability to tune the characteristics of these ALD films enables their optimization to applications where time-resolved single particle imaging can be performed in extreme conditions, such as high counting rates at cryogenic temperatures. Adhesion of the conductive and emissive nanofilms to the 20 μm pore MCP glass substrates and their mechanical stability over a very wide range of temperatures (10–700 K) were confirmed experimentally. Resistance of ALD MCPs was reproducible during multiple cool-down cycles with no film degradation observed. Optimizing resistance of novel MCPs for operation at cryogenic temperature should enable high count rate event detection at temperatures below 20 K.

  8. Last Decade of Changes in Ground Temperature and Active Layer Thickness in the High Canadian Arctic and in Barrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, V. E.; Cable, W.; Walker, D. A.; Yoshikawa, K.; Marchenko, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    The impact of climate warming on permafrost and the potential of climate feedbacks resulting from permafrost thawing have recently received a great deal of attention. Most of the permafrost observatories in the Northern Hemisphere show substantial warming of permafrost since circa 1980-1990. The magnitude of warming has varied with location, but was typically from 0.5 to 2°C. Permafrost is already thawing within the southern part of the permafrost domain. However, recent observations documented propagation of this process northward into the continuous permafrost zone. The close proximity of the exceptionally icy soil horizons to the ground surface, which is typical for the arctic tundra biome, makes tundra surfaces extremely sensitive to the natural and human-made changes that may resulted in development of processes such as thermokarst, thermal erosion, and retrogressive thaw slumps that strongly affect the stability of ecosystems and infrastructure. In 2003-2005, three Ecological Permafrost Observatories where established in the High Canadian Arctic (Green Cabin on the Banks Island, Mould Bay on the Prince Patrick Island, and Isachsen on the Ellef Ringnes Island) as a part of the University of Alaska Fairbanks NSF funded Biocomplexity Project. These observatories represent the northern part of the North American Arctic Transect (NAAT) established as a result of this project. The climatic and ground temperature data collected at these observatories show a general warming trend similar to what has been observed at the other locations in the North American Arctic. An important result of this resent warming is a significant increase in the active layer thickness (ALT) during the last decade. For example, ALT at the Isachsen observatory increased from 0.4-0.42 m in 2005 to 0.54 m in 2012. The maximum ALT of 0.58 m was recorded in 2008. In a shallow excavation across an ice wedge at the Isachsen site, we estimated that the top of the ice wedge ice was located at 42

  9. Investigating the effect of solvent boiling temperature on the active layer morphology of diffusive bilayer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohra, Varun; Dörling, Bernhard; Higashimine, Koichi; Murata, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Using chlorobenzene as a base solvent for the deposition of the poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) layer in P3HT:phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester diffusive bilayer solar cells, we investigate the effect of adding of small amounts of high-boiling-point solvents with similar chemical structures on the resulting active layer morphologies. The results demonstrate that the crystallinity of the P3HT films as well as the vertical donor-acceptor gradient in the active layer can be tuned by this approach. The use of high-boiling-point solvents improved all photovoltaic parameters and resulted in a 32% increase in power conversion efficiency.

  10. Active layers of high-performance lead zirconate titanate at temperatures compatible with silicon nano- and microelecronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Bretos, Iñigo; Jiménez, Ricardo; Tomczyk, Monika; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Vilarinho, Paula M.; Calzada, M. Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Applications of ferroelectric materials in modern microelectronics will be greatly encouraged if the thermal incompatibility between inorganic ferroelectrics and semiconductor devices is overcome. Here, solution-processable layers of the most commercial ferroelectric compound ─ morphotrophic phase boundary lead zirconate titanate, namely Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) ─ are grown on silicon substrates at temperatures well below the standard CMOS process of semiconductor technology. The method, potentially transferable to a broader range of Zr:Ti ratios, is based on the addition of crystalline nanoseeds to photosensitive solutions of PZT resulting in perovskite crystallization from only 350 °C after the enhanced decomposition of metal precursors in the films by UV irradiation. A remanent polarization of 10.0 μC cm−2 is obtained for these films that is in the order of the switching charge densities demanded for FeRAM devices. Also, a dielectric constant of ~90 is measured at zero voltage which exceeds that of current single-oxide candidates for capacitance applications. The multifunctionality of the films is additionally demonstrated by their pyroelectric and piezoelectric performance. The potential integration of PZT layers at such low fabrication temperatures may redefine the concept design of classical microelectronic devices, besides allowing inorganic ferroelectrics to enter the scene of the emerging large-area, flexible electronics. PMID:26837240

  11. Active layers of high-performance lead zirconate titanate at temperatures compatible with silicon nano- and microeletronic [corrected] devices.

    PubMed

    Bretos, Iñigo; Jiménez, Ricardo; Tomczyk, Monika; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Vilarinho, Paula M; Calzada, M Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Applications of ferroelectric materials in modern microelectronics will be greatly encouraged if the thermal incompatibility between inorganic ferroelectrics and semiconductor devices is overcome. Here, solution-processable layers of the most commercial ferroelectric compound--morphotrophic phase boundary lead zirconate titanate, namely Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT)--are grown on silicon substrates at temperatures well below the standard CMOS process of semiconductor technology. The method, potentially transferable to a broader range of Zr:Ti ratios, is based on the addition of crystalline nanoseeds to photosensitive solutions of PZT resulting in perovskite crystallization from only 350 °C after the enhanced decomposition of metal precursors in the films by UV irradiation. A remanent polarization of 10.0 μC cm(-2) is obtained for these films that is in the order of the switching charge densities demanded for FeRAM devices. Also, a dielectric constant of ~90 is measured at zero voltage which exceeds that of current single-oxide candidates for capacitance applications. The multifunctionality of the films is additionally demonstrated by their pyroelectric and piezoelectric performance. The potential integration of PZT layers at such low fabrication temperatures may redefine the concept design of classical microelectronic devices, besides allowing inorganic ferroelectrics to enter the scene of the emerging large-area, flexible electronics. PMID:26837240

  12. Active layers of high-performance lead zirconate titanate at temperatures compatible with silicon nano- and microelecronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretos, Iñigo; Jiménez, Ricardo; Tomczyk, Monika; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Vilarinho, Paula M.; Calzada, M. Lourdes

    2016-02-01

    Applications of ferroelectric materials in modern microelectronics will be greatly encouraged if the thermal incompatibility between inorganic ferroelectrics and semiconductor devices is overcome. Here, solution-processable layers of the most commercial ferroelectric compound - morphotrophic phase boundary lead zirconate titanate, namely Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (PZT) - are grown on silicon substrates at temperatures well below the standard CMOS process of semiconductor technology. The method, potentially transferable to a broader range of Zr:Ti ratios, is based on the addition of crystalline nanoseeds to photosensitive solutions of PZT resulting in perovskite crystallization from only 350 °C after the enhanced decomposition of metal precursors in the films by UV irradiation. A remanent polarization of 10.0 μC cm-2 is obtained for these films that is in the order of the switching charge densities demanded for FeRAM devices. Also, a dielectric constant of ~90 is measured at zero voltage which exceeds that of current single-oxide candidates for capacitance applications. The multifunctionality of the films is additionally demonstrated by their pyroelectric and piezoelectric performance. The potential integration of PZT layers at such low fabrication temperatures may redefine the concept design of classical microelectronic devices, besides allowing inorganic ferroelectrics to enter the scene of the emerging large-area, flexible electronics.

  13. Electron temperature differences and double layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C.; Hershkowitz, N.; Lonngren, K. E.

    1983-01-01

    Electron temperature differences across plasma double layers are studied experimentally. It is shown that the temperature differences across a double layer can be varied and are not a result of thermalization of the bump-on-tail distribution. The implications of these results for electron thermal energy transport in laser-pellet and tandem-mirror experiments are also discussed.

  14. Temperature dependent investigation of carrier transport, injection, and densities in 808 nm AlGaAs multi-quantum-well active layers for VCSELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Andreas P.; Kolb, Johanna S.; Römer, Friedhard; Weichmann, Ulrich; Moench, Holger; Witzigmann, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    The electro-optical efficiency of semiconductor vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) strongly depends on the efficient carrier injection into the quantum wells (QWs) in the laser active region. However, carrier injection degrades with increasing temperature which limits the VCSEL performance particularly in high power applications where self heating imposes high temperatures in operation. By simulation we investigate the transport of charge carriers in 808 nm AlGaAs multi-quantum-well active layers with special attention to the temperature dependence of carrier injection into the QWs. Experimental reference data was extracted from oxide-confined, top-emitting VCSELs. The transport simulations follow a drift-diffusion-model complemented by a customized, energy-resolved, semi-classical carrier capture theory. QW gain was calculated in the screened Hartree-Fock approximation with band structures from 8x8 k.p-theory. Using the gain data and by setting losses and the optical confinement factor according to experimental reference results, the appropriate threshold condition and threshold carrier densities in the QWs for a VCSEL are established in simulation for all transport considerations. With the combination of gain and transport model, we can explain experimental reference data for the injection efficiency and threshold current density. Our simulations show that the decreasing injection efficiency with temperature is not solely due to increased thermionic escape of carriers from the QWs. Carrier injection is also hampered by state filling in the QWs initiated from higher threshold carrier densities with temperature. Consequently, VCSEL properties not directly related to the active layer design like optical out-coupling or internal losses link the temperature dependent carrier injection to VCSEL mirror design.

  15. The Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost Database: metadata statistics and prospective analysis on future permafrost temperature and active layer depth monitoring site distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biskaborn, B. K.; Lanckman, J.-P.; Lantuit, H.; Elger, K.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Cable, W. L.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-03-01

    The Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost (GTN-P) provides the first dynamic database associated with the Thermal State of Permafrost (TSP) and the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) programs, which extensively collect permafrost temperature and active layer thickness data from Arctic, Antarctic and Mountain permafrost regions. The purpose of the database is to establish an "early warning system" for the consequences of climate change in permafrost regions and to provide standardized thermal permafrost data to global models. In this paper we perform statistical analysis of the GTN-P metadata aiming to identify the spatial gaps in the GTN-P site distribution in relation to climate-effective environmental parameters. We describe the concept and structure of the Data Management System in regard to user operability, data transfer and data policy. We outline data sources and data processing including quality control strategies. Assessment of the metadata and data quality reveals 63% metadata completeness at active layer sites and 50% metadata completeness for boreholes. Voronoi Tessellation Analysis on the spatial sample distribution of boreholes and active layer measurement sites quantifies the distribution inhomogeneity and provides potential locations of additional permafrost research sites to improve the representativeness of thermal monitoring across areas underlain by permafrost. The depth distribution of the boreholes reveals that 73% are shallower than 25 m and 27% are deeper, reaching a maximum of 1 km depth. Comparison of the GTN-P site distribution with permafrost zones, soil organic carbon contents and vegetation types exhibits different local to regional monitoring situations on maps. Preferential slope orientation at the sites most likely causes a bias in the temperature monitoring and should be taken into account when using the data for global models. The distribution of GTN-P sites within zones of projected temperature change show a high

  16. Systematic evaluation of textural properties, activation temperature and gas uptake of Cu2(pzdc)2L [L = dipyridyl-based ligands] porous coordination pillared-layer networks.

    PubMed

    García-Ricard, Omar J; Silva-Martínez, Juan C; Hernández-Maldonado, Arturo J

    2012-08-01

    In situ high temperature X-ray diffraction, nitrogen porosimetry and gas adsorption at room temperature were used to elucidate the effect of the degassing or activation temperature on the long-range and micropore textural properties of a series of coordination polymers with pillared-layer structures. Ramp-and-soak thermal gravimetric analysis performed at selected activation temperatures were used to verify the thermal stability of a CPL-n series [Cu(2)(pzdc)(2)L; pzdc = pyrazine-2,3-dicarboxylate; L = 4,4-azopyridine (apy) for CPL-4, 1,2-di-(4-pyridil)-ethylene (bpe) for CPL-5, N-(4-pyridyl)-isonicotinamide (pia) for CPL-6, and 1,2-di-(4-pyridyl)-glycol (dpyg) for CPL-7]. Although the activation temperatures were far below the decomposition point of the complexes, these resulted in significant and unique changes in micropore surface area and volume, even for CPL-4, -5 and -6, which contained pillar ligands with similar dimensions and similar structural long-range order. For the case of CPL-7, however, the framework appeared to be non-porous at any given activation temperature. Pure component equilibrium adsorption data gathered for CO(2), CH(4), and N(2) were used to elucidate the CPL-n materials potential for storage and separations at room temperature. All of the materials exhibited considerable selectivity toward CO(2), particularly at moderate pressures. Meanwhile, CO(2) isosteric heats of adsorption indicated that the pore functionalities arising from the pillar ligands provided similar interactions with the adsorbate in the cases of CPL-4 and -5. For CPL-6, the presence of the carbonyl (C[double bond, length as m-dash]O) group appeared to enhance interactions with CO(2) at low loadings. PMID:22714718

  17. Characterization and organic electric-double-layer-capacitor application of KOH activated coal-tar-pitch-based carbons: Effect of carbonization temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Poo Reum; Lee, Eunji; Kwon, Soon Hyung; Jung, Ji Chul; Kim, Myung-Soo

    2015-12-01

    The present study reports the influence of pre-carbonization on the properties of KOH-activated coal tar pitch (CTP). The change of crystallinity and pore structure of pre-carbonized CTPs as well as their activated carbons (ACs) as function of pre-carbonization temperature are investigated. The crystallinity of pre-carbonized CTPs increases with increasing the carbonization temperature up to 600 °C, but a disorder occurs during the carbonization around 700 °C and an order happens gradually with increasing the carbonization temperatures in range of 800-1000 °C. The CTPs pre-carbonized at high temperatures are more difficult to be activated with KOH than those pre-carbonized at low temperatures due to the increase of micro-crystalline size and the decrease of surface functional groups. The micro-pores and meso-pores are well developed at around 1.0 nm and 2.4 nm, respectively, as the ACs are pre-carbonized at temperatures of 500-600 °C, exhibiting high specific capacitances as electrode materials for electric double layer capacitor (EDLC). Although the specific surface area (SSA) and pore volume of ACs pre-carbonized at temperatures of 900-1000 °C are extraordinary low (non-porous) as compared to those of AC pre-carbonized at 600 °C, their specific capacitances are comparable to each other. The large specific capacitances with low SSA ACs can be attributed to the structural change resulting from the electrochemical activation during the 1st charge above 2.0 V.

  18. Monitoring of the ground surface temperature and the active layer in NorthEastern Canadian permafrost areas using remote sensing data assimilated in a climate land surface scheme.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, N.; Royer, A.; Krinner, G.; Roy, A.

    2014-12-01

    Projected future warming is particularly strong in the Northern high latitudes where increases of temperatures are up to 2 to 6 °C. Permafrost is present on 25 % of the northern hemisphere lands and contain high quantities of « frozen » carbon, estimated at 1400 Gt (40 % of the global terrestrial carbon). The aim of this study is to improve our understanding of the climate evolution in arctic areas, and more specifically of land areas covered by snow. The objective is to describe the ground temperature year round including under snow cover, and to analyse the active layer thickness evolution in relation to the climate variability. We use satellite data (fusion of MODIS land surface temperature « LST » and microwave AMSR-E brightness temperature « Tb ») assimilated in the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) of the Canadian climate model coupled with a simple radiative transfer model (HUT). This approach benefits from the advantages of each of the data type in order to complete two objectives : 1- build a solid methodology for retrieving the ground temperature, with and without snow cover, in taïga and tundra areas ; 2 - from those retrieved ground temperatures, derive the summer melt duration and the active layer depth. We describe the coupling of the models and the methodology that adjusts the meteorological input parameters of the CLASS model (mainly air temperature and precipitations derived from the NARR database) in order to minimise the simulated LST and Tb ouputs in comparison with satellite measurements. Using ground-based meteorological data as validation references in NorthEastern Canadian tundra, the results show that the proposed approach improves the soil temperatures estimates when using the MODIS LST and Tb at 10 and 19 GHz to constrain the model in comparison with the model outputs without satellite data. Error analysis is discussed for the summer period (2.5 - 4 K) and for the snow covered winter period (2 - 3.5 K). Further steps are

  19. Low-Temperature Electrical Characteristics of Si-Based Device with New Tetrakis NiPc-SNS Active Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Arzu Büyükyağci; Carbas, Buket Bezgın; Sönmezoğlu, Savaş; Soylu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    A new tetrakis 4-(2,5-di-2-thiophen-2-yl-pyrrol-1-yl)-substituted nickel phthalocyanine (NiPc-SNS) has been synthesized. This synthesized NiPc-SNS thin film was deposited on p-type Si substrate using the spin coating method (SCM) to fabricate a NiPc-SNS/ p-Si heterojunction diode. The temperature-dependent electrical characteristics of the NiPc-SNS/ p-Si heterojunction with good rectifying behavior were investigated by current-voltage ( I- V) measurements between 50 K and 300 K. The results indicate that the ideality factor decreases while the barrier height increases with increasing temperature. The barrier inhomogeneity across the NiPc-SNS/ p-Si heterojunction reveals a Gaussian distribution at low temperatures. These results provide further evidence of the more complicated mechanisms occurring in this heterojunction. Based on these findings, NiPc-SNS/ p-Si junction diodes are feasible for use in low-temperature applications.

  20. TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS UNDERGOING LAYERED ACCRETION

    SciTech Connect

    Lesniak, M. V.; Desch, S. J.

    2011-10-20

    We calculate the temperature structures of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) around T Tauri stars heated by both incident starlight and viscous dissipation. We present a new algorithm for calculating the temperatures in disks in hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium, based on Rybicki's method for iteratively calculating the vertical temperature structure within an annulus. At each iteration, the method solves for the temperature at all locations simultaneously, and converges rapidly even at high (>>10{sup 4}) optical depth. The method retains the full frequency dependence of the radiation field. We use this algorithm to study for the first time disks evolving via the magnetorotational instability. Because PPD midplanes are weakly ionized, this instability operates preferentially in their surface layers, and disks will undergo layered accretion. We find that the midplane temperatures T{sub mid} are strongly affected by the column density {Sigma}{sub a} of the active layers, even for fixed mass accretion rate M-dot . Models assuming uniform accretion predict midplane temperatures in the terrestrial planet forming region several x 10{sup 2} K higher than our layered accretion models do. For M-dot < 10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and the column densities {Sigma}{sub a} < 10 g cm{sup -2} associated with layered accretion, disk temperatures are indistinguishable from those of a passively heated disk. We find emergent spectra are insensitive to {Sigma}{sub a}, making it difficult to observationally identify disks undergoing layered versus uniform accretion.

  1. Growth of mushy layers with temperature modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guang-Yu; Wu, Chao; Zhong, Jin-Qiang

    2014-11-01

    Directional solidification of aqueous solutions produces a solid-melt coexisting zone whose growth rate can be predicted by the mushy-layer theory. We present measurements of mushy-layer growth when solidifying aqueous ammonium chloride with the cooling temperature modulated periodically TB (t) =T0 + Acos (ωt) . The mush-liquid interface h (t) evolves as the square root of time for a constant TB, but exhibits periodical humps in the present of modulations. The growth rate ḣ (t) is best approximate to ḣ (t) =ḣ0e - γωt / 2 π cos (ωt + π + ϕ (t)) , with a decay rate γ = 0 . 82 +/- 0 . 05 independent on the modulation amplitude A and frequency ω, and a phase-shift ϕ (t) increasingly lag behind TB as a function of time. We discuss a mushy-layer growth model based on the Neumann solution of the Stefan problem with periodical boundary conditions, and show that the numerical results are in agreement with the experimental observations. Supported by NSFC Grant 11202151.

  2. Low temperature double-layer capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J. (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Double-layer capacitors capable of operating at extremely low temperatures (e.g., as low as -75.degree. C.) are disclosed. Electrolyte solutions combining a base solvent (e.g., acetonitrile) and a cosolvent are employed to lower the melting point of the base electrolyte. Example cosolvents include methyl formate, ethyl acetate, methyl acetate, propionitrile, butyronitrile, and 1,3-dioxolane. An optimized concentration (e.g., 0.10 M to 0.75 M) of salt, such as tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate, is dissolved into the electrolyte solution. In some cases (e.g., 1,3-dioxolane cosolvent) additives, such as 2% by volume triethylamine, may be included in the solvent mixture to prevent polymerization of the solution. Conventional device form factors and structural elements (e.g., porous carbon electrodes and a polyethylene separator) may be employed.

  3. Electron temperature measurements in mid-latitude sporadic E layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutz, S. R.; Smith, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    By using rocket-borne Langmuir probes, electron temperature profiles have been obtained in five mid-latitude sporadic E layers. The data show the electron temperature within the layers to be lower than the electron temperature at the adjacent altitudes. This is consistent with the layers' being maintained by a vertical redistribution of ionization. The magnitude of the observed electron temperature variation is, however, larger than expected.

  4. Layered machinable ceramics for high temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Barsoum, M.W.; Brodkin, D.; El-Raghy, T.

    1997-03-01

    Recently the authors reported on the fabrication and characterization of a layered ternary compound Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2}, that was found to combine many of the best attributes of metals and ceramics. Like metals it is an excellent electric and thermal conductor, easily machinable, relatively soft, not susceptible to thermal shock and behaves plastically at higher temperatures. Like ceramics it is oxidation resistant, refractory, and, most importantly, it maintains its strength to temperatures that render the best superalloys available today unusable. Upon realizing the remarkable properties exhibited by Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} the authors carried out a literature search for other compounds with the same chemistry. They found one only, namely: Ti{sub 3}GeC{sub 2} which has properties that are very similar to Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2}. The purpose of this paper is two-fold. The first is to demonstrate the similarities between the properties of the H-phases, Ti{sub 3}GeC{sub 2} and Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2}. The second is to present some compelling microstructural evidence that indicates that these compounds behave as polycrystalline nanolaminates. To that effect the authors fabricated and characterized the following H-phases: Ti{sub 2}AlC, Ti{sub 2}AlN, Ti{sub 2}GeC and as well as Ti{sub 3}GeC{sub 2}. In addition they fabricated V{sub 2}AlC, Ta{sub 2}AlC, and Nb{sub 2}AlC and tested their machinability.

  5. Effect of temperature on layer separation by plasma hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Di, Z. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Nastasi, M.; Rossi, F.; Shao, L.; Thompson, P. E.

    2008-12-22

    We have studied hydrogen diffusion in plasma hydrogenated Si/SiGe/Si heterostructure at different temperatures. At low temperature, intrinsic point defects in the molecular beam epitaxy grown Si capping layer are found to compete with the buried strain SiGe layer for hydrogen trapping. The interaction of hydrogen with point defects affects the hydrogen long-range diffusion, and restricts the amount of hydrogen available for trapping by the SiGe layer. However, hydrogen trapping by the capping layer is attenuated with increasing hydrogenation temperature allowing more hydrogen to be trapped in the strain SiGe layer with subsequent surface blister formation. A potential temperature window for plasma hydrogenation induced layer separation is identified based on the combined considerations of trap-limited diffusion at low temperature and outdiffusion of H{sub 2} molecule together with the dissociation of Si-H bonds inside of H platelet at high temperature.

  6. Effect of temperature on layer separation by plasma-hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Di, Zengfeng; Michael, Nastasi A; Wang, Yongqiang

    2008-01-01

    We have studied hydrogen diffusion in plasma hydrogenated Si/SiGe/Si heterostructure at different temperatures. At low temperature, intrinsic point defects in the molecular beam epitaxy grown Si capping layer are found to compete with the buried strain SiGe layer for hydrogen trapping. The interaction of hydrogen with point defects affects the hydrogen long-range diffusion, and restricts the amount of hydrogen available for trapping by the SiGe layer. However, hydrogen trapping by the capping layer is attenuated with increasing hydrogenation temperature allowing more hydrogen to be trapped in the strain SiGe layer with subsequent surface blister formation. A potential temperature window for plasma hydrogenation induced layer separation is identified based on the combined considerations of trap-limited diffusion at low temperature and outdiffusion of H{sub 2} molecule together with the dissociation of Si-H bonds inside of H platelet at high temperature.

  7. Inverted low band gap polymer solar cells integrated with a low-temperature-annealed sol-gel-derived ZnO: Active layer thickness effect on the recombination process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhibi, O.; Ltaief, A.; Zghal, S.; Bouazizi, A.

    2013-08-01

    Structural of thin film of ZnO elaborated by sol-gel ZnO method, annealed at different temperatures were investigated by means of Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy analysis. The results show the formation of crystalline layer of ZnO after annealing at 150 °C. This thin film provided an effective hole blocking layer and an increased interfacial area for electron collection. Inverted bulk heterojunction organic solar cells were fabricated using ZnO film as the electron collecting layer. The influence of spin coating speed of the active layer on the performance of inverted-type organic solar cells has been investigated. The organic photoactive layers consisted of Poly[N-9‧-heptadecanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4‧,7‧-di-2-thienyl-2‧,1‧,3‧-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) and [6,6]-Phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC70BM) were spin coated onto ZnO thin film with two spin coating speeds at 600 and 2000 rpm. Experimental results showed that the short-circuit current density (Jsc), the fill factor (FF) and power conversion efficiency (PCE) increase with increasing spin coating speed. This result may be attributed to reducing series resistance and recombination processes in thinner photoactive layer. The impedance spectra of the devices were measured under illumination. A decrease in the charge recombination and the resistance of whole device were observed with the increase in the spin coating speed of the active layer.

  8. Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition

    DOEpatents

    Grubbs, Robert K.; Bogart, Gregory R.; Rogers, John A.

    2011-12-20

    Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

  9. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  10. Layer-by-layer nanoencapsulation of camptothecin with improved activity

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Gaurav; Pattekari, Pravin; Joshi, Chaitanya; Shutava, Tatsiana; DeCoster, Mark; Levchenko, Tatyana; Torchilin, Vladimir; Lvov, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    160 nm nanocapsules containing up to 60% of camptothecin in the core and 7–8 polyelectrolyte bilayers in the shell were produced by washless layer-by-layer assembly of heparin and block-copolymer of poly-L-lysine and polyethylene glycol. The outer surface of the nanocapsules was additionally modified with polyethylene glycol of 5 kDa or 20 kDa molecular weight to attain protein resistant properties, colloidal stability in serum and prolonged release of the drug from the capsules. An advantage of the LbL coated capsules is the preservation of camptothecin lactone form with the shell assembly starting at acidic pH and improved chemical stability of encapsulated drug at neutral and basic pH, especially in the presence of albumin that makes such formulation more active than free camptothecin. LbL nanocapsules preserve the camptothecin lactone form at pH 7.4 resulting in triple activity of the drug toward CRL2303 glioblastoma cell. PMID:24508806

  11. Effect of inerts on layer ignition temperatures of coal dust

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P.D.; Amyotte, P.R.; Pegg, M.J.

    1998-07-01

    An experimental study into the hot surface ignition of coal dust layers has been conducted. Two coals were examined: Prince coal from the Cape Breton Development Corporation and Pittsburgh coal from the United States Bureau of Mines. The effect of admixed inerts (dolomite and limestone) on the dust layer ignition temperature has been analyzed using a steady-state thermal explosion model. The analytical procedure used for evaluating the ignition temperature of a dust layer, heated from below and losing heat from its upper surface by convection, is an extension of the thermal explosion model of Thomas; namely, that of Thomas and Bowes. To commission the hot plate apparatus and validate the model predictions, a series of experiments were undertaken using sodium dithionite. This material is known to exhibit self-heating and there have been previous layer ignition temperature studies with which to compare results. It was demonstrated that an adequate estimate of the critical ignition temperature may be readily obtained by this analytical method. Furthermore, computed values of the critical ignition parameters for layers of coal dust admixed with inerts, accounting for changes in thermal conductivity, were in reasonable agreement with experimentally determined values.

  12. Kinetics of Ion Transport in Perovskite Active Layers and Its Implications for Active Layer Stability.

    PubMed

    Bag, Monojit; Renna, Lawrence A; Adhikari, Ramesh Y; Karak, Supravat; Liu, Feng; Lahti, Paul M; Russell, Thomas P; Tuominen, Mark T; Venkataraman, D

    2015-10-14

    Solar cells fabricated using alkyl ammonium metal halides as light absorbers have the right combination of high power conversion efficiency and ease of fabrication to realize inexpensive but efficient thin film solar cells. However, they degrade under prolonged exposure to sunlight. Herein, we show that this degradation is quasi-reversible, and that it can be greatly lessened by simple modifications of the solar cell operating conditions. We studied perovskite devices using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with methylammonium (MA)-, formamidinium (FA)-, and MA(x)FA(1-x) lead triiodide as active layers. From variable temperature EIS studies, we found that the diffusion coefficient using MA ions was greater than when using FA ions. Structural studies using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) show that for MAPbI3 a structural change and lattice expansion occurs at device operating temperatures. On the basis of EIS and PXRD studies, we postulate that in MAPbI3 the predominant mechanism of accelerated device degradation under sunlight involves thermally activated fast ion transport coupled with a lattice-expanding phase transition, both of which are facilitated by absorption of the infrared component of the solar spectrum. Using these findings, we show that the devices show greatly improved operation lifetimes and stability under white-light emitting diodes, or under a solar simulator with an infrared cutoff filter or with cooling. PMID:26414066

  13. Role of barrier layer on dielectric function of graphene double layer system at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Digish K.; Ambavale, Sagar K.; Prajapati, Ketan; Sharma, A. C.

    2016-05-01

    We have theoretically investigated the static dielectric function of graphene double layer system (GDLS) at finite temperatures within the random phase approximation. GDLS has been suspended on a substrate and barrier layer of three different materials; h-BN, Al2O3 and HfO2 has been introduced between two graphene sheets of GDLS. We have reported dependence of the overall dielectric function of GDLS on interlayer distance and the effect of the dielectric environment at finite temperatures. Results show close relation between changing environment and behavior of dielectric constant of GDLS.

  14. Plasma Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Cooper Seed Layers at Low Process Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jiajun

    In conventional Cu interconnect fabrication, a sputtered copper seed layer is deposited before the electrochemically deposited (ECD) copper plating step. However, as interconnect dimensions scale down, non-conformal seed layer growth and subsequent voiding of metallized structures is becoming a critical issue. With its established excellent thickness controllability and film conformality, atomic layer deposition (ALD) is becoming an attractive deposition approach for the sub-24nm fabrication regime. However, in order to achieve a smooth and continuous seed layer deposition, a low process temperature (below 100°C) is needed, given the tendency of Cu agglomeration at elevated temperature. In this research, plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD) Cu processes at low process temperature are developed using two novel precursors: Cuprum and AbaCus. The volatility and thermal stability of these two precursors are presented. Self-limiting nature of the PEALD processes are demonstrated. Key film properties including purity, resistivity, conformality, adhesion and platability are evaluated using multiple characterization techniques. In addition, film nucleation and growth of PEALD Cu at room temperature on different liner materials are studied. Via structures are employed for the investigation of film continuity on side walls. It is also shown that film conformality and platability can be improved by over saturating the plasma reactions.

  15. Room Temperature Magnetic Barrier Layers in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson-Cheeseman, B. B.; Wong, F. J.; Chopdekar, R. V.; Arenholz, E.; Suzuki, Y.

    2010-03-09

    We investigate the spin transport and interfacial magnetism of magnetic tunnel junctions with highly spin polarized LSMO and Fe3O4 electrodes and a ferrimagnetic NiFe2O4 (NFO) barrier layer. The spin dependent transport can be understood in terms of magnon-assisted spin dependent tunneling where the magnons are excited in the barrier layer itself. The NFO/Fe3O4 interface displays strong magnetic coupling, while the LSMO/NFO interface exhibits clear decoupling as determined by a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism. This decoupling allows for distinct parallel and antiparallel electrode states in this all-magnetic trilayer. The spin transport of these devices, dominated by the NFO barrier layer magnetism, leads to a symmetric bias dependence of the junction magnetoresistance at all temperatures.

  16. Oxide layer stability in lead-bismuth at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, F. J.; Soler, L.; Hernández, F.; Gómez-Briceño, D.

    2004-11-01

    Materials protection by 'in situ' oxidation has been studied in stagnant lead-bismuth, with different oxygen levels (H 2/H 2O ratios of 0.3 and 0.03), at temperatures from 535 °C to 600 °C and times from 100 to 3000 h. The materials tested were the martensitic steels F82Hmod, EM10 and T91 and the austenitic stainless steels, AISI 316L and AISI 304L. The results obtained point to the existence of an apparent threshold temperature above which corrosion occurs and the formation of a protective and stable oxide layer is not possible. This threshold temperature depends on material composition, oxygen concentration in the liquid lead-bismuth and time. The threshold temperature is higher for the austenitic steels, especially for the AISI 304L, and it increases with the oxygen concentration in the lead-bismuth. The oxide layer formed disappear with time and, after 3000 h all the materials, except AISI 304L, suffer corrosion, more severe for the martensitic steels and at the highest temperature tested.

  17. Effect of wall temperature on a supersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laderman, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Measurement of mean flow profiles in a fully developed Mach 3 turbulent boundary layer with negligible pressure gradient is reported. Data were acquired at several streamwise locations for wall-to-total temperature ratios of 0.94, 0.71, and 0.54. The results demonstrate that the velocity defect formulation of the law-of-the-wake, which successfully correlates compressible, adiabatic boundary layers, is also valid for nonadiabatic flows. It is also shown that for adiabatic walls, the linear Crocco relation between total temperature and velocity does not provide a valid test of the nature of the boundary-layer flow for practical cases where the Prandtl number departs from unity. Finally, the turbulent shear stress, mixing length, and eddy viscosity were extracted from the 'time-averaged' conservation equations using the measured mean flow profiles and found to be insensitive to wall temperature. In particular, the latter properties are in good agreement with earlier compressible, adiabatic correlations of turbulent transport properties.

  18. Intermediate coating layer for high temperature rubbing seals for rotary regenerators

    DOEpatents

    Schienle, James L.; Strangman, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. Because of the YSZ intermediate layer, the coating is thermodynamically stable and resists swelling at high temperatures.

  19. Investigation of the temperature field in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Clayton; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    The scaling and evolution of a developing turbulent thermal boundary layer is investigated. By allowing the temperature differences in the fluid to remain small enough to treat temperature as a passive scalar, the analysis can be extended to any turbulent convection/diffusion problem. Mean temperature scaling is developed and analyzed by utilizing the ``Asymptotic Invariance Principle'' developed by George and Castillo (1997). Possible effects of the Reynolds and Prandtl number are discussed. The derived power law solution for the inner and outer scaling is then used to develop a ``heat transfer law'' for the wall heat flux, qw. Data collection is performed with a newly developed MEMS sensor, allowing improved performance and reduced spatial and temporal filtering of the signal. Integration with a PIV system will allow direct measurements of the turbulent heat flux - θv to investigate the extent of the overlap layer and validity of the proposed scaling laws. Temperature variance 1/2 θ2 will also be investigated, with a possible scaling proposed.

  20. Finite ion temperature effects on scrape-off layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosetto, Annamaria; Halpern, Federico D.; Jolliet, Sébastien; Loizu, Joaquim; Ricci, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Ion temperature has been measured to be of the same order, or higher, than the electron temperature in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of tokamak machines, questioning its importance in determining the SOL turbulent dynamics. Here, we present a detailed analysis of finite ion temperature effects on the linear SOL instabilities, such as the resistive and inertial branches of drift waves and ballooning modes, and a discussion of the properties of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability in the SOL, identifying the η i = L n / L Ti threshold necessary to drive the mode unstable. The non-linear analysis of the SOL turbulent regimes by means of the gradient removal theory is performed, revealing that the ITG plays a negligible role in limited SOL discharges, since the ion temperature gradient is generally below the threshold for driving the mode unstable. It follows that the resistive ballooning mode is the prevailing turbulence regime for typical limited SOL parameters. The theoretical estimates are confirmed by non-linear flux-driven simulations of SOL plasma dynamics.

  1. Hot spot temperature measurements in DT layered implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Pravesh; Ma, T.; Macphee, A.; Callahan, D.; Chen, H.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D.; Edgell, D.; Hurricane, O.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Jarrott, L.; Kritcher, A.; Springer, P.

    2015-11-01

    The temperature of the burning DT hot spot in an ICF implosion is a crucial parameter in understanding the thermodynamic conditions of the fuel at stagnation and and the performance of the implosion in terms of alpha-particle self-heating and energy balance. The continuum radiation spectrum emitted from the hot spot provides an accurate measure of the emissivity-weighted electron temperature. Absolute measurements of the emitted radiation are made with several independent instruments including spatially-resolved broadband imagers, and space- and time-integrated monochromatic detectors. We present estimates of the electron temperature in DT layered implosions derived from the radiation spectrum most consistent with the available measurements. The emissivity-weighted electron temperatures are compared to the neutron-averaged apparent ion temperatures inferred from neutron time-of-flight detectors. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Finite ion temperature effects on scrape-off layer turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Mosetto, Annamaria Halpern, Federico D.; Jolliet, Sébastien; Loizu, Joaquim; Ricci, Paolo

    2015-01-15

    Ion temperature has been measured to be of the same order, or higher, than the electron temperature in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of tokamak machines, questioning its importance in determining the SOL turbulent dynamics. Here, we present a detailed analysis of finite ion temperature effects on the linear SOL instabilities, such as the resistive and inertial branches of drift waves and ballooning modes, and a discussion of the properties of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability in the SOL, identifying the η{sub i}=L{sub n}/L{sub T{sub i}} threshold necessary to drive the mode unstable. The non-linear analysis of the SOL turbulent regimes by means of the gradient removal theory is performed, revealing that the ITG plays a negligible role in limited SOL discharges, since the ion temperature gradient is generally below the threshold for driving the mode unstable. It follows that the resistive ballooning mode is the prevailing turbulence regime for typical limited SOL parameters. The theoretical estimates are confirmed by non-linear flux-driven simulations of SOL plasma dynamics.

  3. Low-temperature growth of silicon epitaxial layers codoped with erbium and oxygen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Shengurov, D. V.; Chalkov, V. Yu.; Denisov, S. A.; Shengurov, V. G.; Stepikhova, M. V.; Drozdov, M. N.; Krasilnik, Z. F.

    2013-03-15

    The fabrication technology and properties of light-emitting Si structures codoped with erbium and oxygen are reported. The layers are deposited onto (100) Si by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using an Er-doped silicon sublimation source. The partial pressure of the oxygen-containing gases in the growth chamber of the MBE facility before layer growth is lower than 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} Torr. The oxygen and erbium concentrations in the Si layers grown at 450 Degree-Sign C is {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} and 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}, respectively. The silicon epitaxial layers codoped with erbium and oxygen have high crystal quality and yield effective photoluminescence and electroluminescence signals with the dominant optically active Er-1 center forming upon postgrowth annealing at a temperature of 800 Degree-Sign C.

  4. Low-Temperature Plasma-Assisted Atomic Layer Deposition of Silicon Nitride Moisture Permeation Barrier Layers.

    PubMed

    Andringa, Anne-Marije; Perrotta, Alberto; de Peuter, Koen; Knoops, Harm C M; Kessels, Wilhelmus M M; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2015-10-14

    Encapsulation of organic (opto-)electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells, and field-effect transistors, is required to minimize device degradation induced by moisture and oxygen ingress. SiNx moisture permeation barriers have been fabricated using a very recently developed low-temperature plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition (ALD) approach, consisting of half-reactions of the substrate with the precursor SiH2(NH(t)Bu)2 and with N2-fed plasma. The deposited films have been characterized in terms of their refractive index and chemical composition by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The SiNx thin-film refractive index ranges from 1.80 to 1.90 for films deposited at 80 °C up to 200 °C, respectively, and the C, O, and H impurity levels decrease when the deposition temperature increases. The relative open porosity content of the layers has been studied by means of multisolvent ellipsometric porosimetry (EP), adopting three solvents with different kinetic diameters: water (∼0.3 nm), ethanol (∼0.4 nm), and toluene (∼0.6 nm). Irrespective of the deposition temperature, and hence the impurity content in the SiNx films, no uptake of any adsorptive has been observed, pointing to the absence of open pores larger than 0.3 nm in diameter. Instead, multilayer development has been observed, leading to type II isotherms that, according to the IUPAC classification, are characteristic of nonporous layers. The calcium test has been performed in a climate chamber at 20 °C and 50% relative humidity to determine the intrinsic water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of SiNx barriers deposited at 120 °C. Intrinsic WVTR values in the range of 10(-6) g/m2/day indicate excellent barrier properties for ALD SiNx layers as thin as 10 nm, competing with that of state-of-the-art plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited SiNx layers of a few hundred

  5. Melanin as an active layer in biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Piacenti da Silva, Marina Congiu, Mirko Oliveira Graeff, Carlos Frederico de; Fernandes, Jéssica Colnaghi Biziak de Figueiredo, Natália Mulato, Marcelo

    2014-03-15

    The development of pH sensors is of great interest due to its extensive application in several areas such as industrial processes, biochemistry and particularly medical diagnostics. In this study, the pH sensing properties of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET) based on melanin thin films as active layer are investigated and the physical mechanisms related to the device operation are discussed. Thin films were produced from different melanin precursors on indium tin oxide (ITO) and gold substrates and were investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in the pH range from 2 to 12. EGFETs with melanin deposited on ITO and on gold substrates showed sensitivities ranging from 31.3 mV/pH to 48.9 mV/pH, depending on the melanin precursor and the substrate used. The pH detection is associated with specific binding sites in its structure, hydroxyl groups and quinone imine.

  6. Melanin as an active layer in biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacenti da Silva, Marina; Fernandes, Jéssica Colnaghi; de Figueiredo, Natália Biziak; Congiu, Mirko; Mulato, Marcelo; de Oliveira Graeff, Carlos Frederico

    2014-03-01

    The development of pH sensors is of great interest due to its extensive application in several areas such as industrial processes, biochemistry and particularly medical diagnostics. In this study, the pH sensing properties of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET) based on melanin thin films as active layer are investigated and the physical mechanisms related to the device operation are discussed. Thin films were produced from different melanin precursors on indium tin oxide (ITO) and gold substrates and were investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. Experiments were performed in the pH range from 2 to 12. EGFETs with melanin deposited on ITO and on gold substrates showed sensitivities ranging from 31.3 mV/pH to 48.9 mV/pH, depending on the melanin precursor and the substrate used. The pH detection is associated with specific binding sites in its structure, hydroxyl groups and quinone imine.

  7. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specified surface of the body. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes: (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature.

  8. Atomic layer deposition of ultrathin blocking layer for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell on nanoporous substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wonjong; Cho, Gu Young; Noh, Seungtak; Tanveer, Waqas Hassan; Cha, Suk Won; Ji, Sanghoon; An, Jihwan

    2015-01-15

    An ultrathin yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) blocking layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was utilized for improving the performance and reliability of low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) supported by an anodic aluminum oxide substrate. Physical vapor-deposited YSZ and gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) electrolyte layers were deposited by a sputtering method. The ultrathin ALD YSZ blocking layer was inserted between the YSZ and GDC sputtered layers. To investigate the effects of an inserted ultrathin ALD blocking layer, SOFCs with and without an ultrathin ALD blocking layer were electrochemically characterized. The open circuit voltage (1.14 V) of the ALD blocking-layered SOFC was visibly higher than that (1.05 V) of the other cell. Furthermore, the ALD blocking layer augmented the power density and improved the reproducibility.

  9. CO2 capture at low temperatures (30-80 °C) and in the presence of water vapor over a thermally activated Mg-Al layered double hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Torres-Rodríguez, Daniela A; Lima, Enrique; Valente, Jaime S; Pfeiffer, Heriberto

    2011-11-10

    The carbonation process of a calcined Mg-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) was systematically analyzed at low temperatures, varying the relative humidity. Qualitative and quantitative experiments were performed. In a first set of experiments, the relative humidity was varied while maintaining a constant temperature. Characterization of the rehydrated products by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and solid-state NMR revealed that the samples did not recover the LDH structure; instead hydrated MgCO(3) was produced. The results were compared with similar experiments performed on magnesium oxide for comparison purposes. Then, in the second set of experiments, a kinetic analysis was performed. The results showed that the highest CO(2) capture was obtained at 50 °C and 70% of relative humidity, with a CO(2) absorption capacity of 2.13 mmol/g. PMID:21936518

  10. Planetary boundary layer response to surface temperature anomalies forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Xavier; Lapeyre, Guillaume; Plougonven, Riwal

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies showed that strong sea surface temperature (SST) fronts, on the scale of the western boundary currents, strongly affect the planetary boundary layer (PBL) but also all the troposphere. This renewed the interest of air-sea interactions at oceanic meso-scales. Mainly two mechanisms are proposed in the literature, the first one (due to Wallace et al 1989) is based on the destabilization of the PBL above SST anomalies, the second one (Lindzen and Nigam 1987) is based on the pressure anomalies linked to the atmosphere temperature adjustment to the SST. These two mechanisms predict different responses of the PBL to the SST. We did numerical simulations with a meso-scale atmospheric model (WRF) with the same configuration as the one described in Lambert et al 2013. The model is forced by a SST anomaly which is first a zonally or meridionally constant field and secondly a field of meso-scale structures. Firstly we studied the influence of the initial wind strength on the PBL response for the two different types of SST anomalies. We showed that the dominant mechanism can change according to weak or strong wind and to the orientation of the SST anomaly. Secondly after considering a dry atmosphere we switched on the humidity in our configuration. We studied how it influences the PBL response and whether the mechanism driving the PBL response is still the same as in the dry case.

  11. Total temperature probes for high-temperature hypersonic boundary-layer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, Cindy W.; Bauserman, Willard A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The design and test results of two types of total temperature probes that were used for hypersonic boundary-layer measurements are presented. The intent of each design was to minimize the total error and to maintain minimal size for measurements in boundary layers 1.0 in. thick and less. A single platinum-20-percent-rhodium shield was used in both designs to minimize radiation heat transfer losses during exposure to the high-temperature test stream. The shield of the smaller design was flattened at the flow entrance to an interior height of 0.02 in., compared with 0.03 in. for the larger design. The resulting vent-to-inlet area ratios were 60 and 50 percent. A stainless steel structural support sleeve that was used in the larger design was excluded from the smaller design, which resulted in an outer diameter of 0.059 in., to allow closer placement of the probes to each other and to the wall. These small design changes to improve resolution did not affect probe performance. Tests were conducted at boundary-layer-edge Mach numbers of 5.0 and 6.2. The nominal free-stream total temperatures were 2600 degrees and 3200 degrees R. The probes demonstrated extremely good reliability. The best performance in terms of recovery factor occurred when the wire-based Nusselt number was at least 0.04. Recommendations for future probe designs are included.

  12. Coupled annealing temperature and layer thickness effect on strengthening mechanisms of Ti/Ni multilayer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhou; Wang, Junlan

    2016-03-01

    A systematic study was performed on mechanical and microstructural properties of Ti/Ni multilayers with layer thickness from 200 nm to 6 nm and annealing temperature from room temperature to 500 °C. Based on the observed hardness evolution, a coupled layer-thickness and annealing-temperature dependent strengthening mechanism map is proposed. For as-deposited films, the deformation behavior follows the traditional trend of dislocation mediated strengthening to grain boundary mediated softening with decreasing layer thickness. For annealed films, grain boundary relaxation is considered to be the initial strengthening mechanism with higher activation temperature required for thicker layers. Under further annealing, solid solution hardening, intermetallic precipitation hardening, and fully intermixed alloy structure continue to strengthen the thin layered films, while recrystallization and grain-growth lead to the eventual softening of thick layered films. For the films with intermediate layer thickness, a strong orientation dependent hardness behavior is exhibited under high temperature annealing due to mechanism switch from grain growth softening to intermetallic precipitation hardening when changing the loading orientation from perpendicular to parallel to the layer interfaces.

  13. Thermal conductivity tensors of the cladding and active layers of interband cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuanle; Cui, Boya; Vurgaftman, I.; Canedy, C. L.; Kim, C. S.; Kim, M.; Bewley, W. W.; Merritt, C. D.; Abell, J.; Meyer, J. R.; Grayson, M.

    2014-12-01

    The cross-plane and in-plane thermal conductivities of the W-active stages and InAs/AlSb superlattice optical cladding layer of an interband cascade laser (ICL) were characterized for temperatures ranging from 15 K to 324 K. The in-plane thermal conductivity of the active layer is somewhat larger than the cross-plane value at temperatures above about 30 K, while the thermal conductivity tensor becomes nearly isotropic at the lowest temperatures studied. These results will improve ICL performance simulations and guide the optimization of thermal management.

  14. Long-term stability at high temperatures for birefringence in PAZO/PAH layer-by-layer films.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Quirina; Ribeiro, Paulo A; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Raposo, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Optical memories with long-term stability at high temperatures have long been pursued in azopolymers with photoinduced birefringence. In this study, we show that the residual birefringence in layer-by-layer (LbL) films made with poly[1-[4-(3-carboxy-4 hydroxyphenylazo)benzene sulfonamido]-1,2-ethanediyl, sodium salt] (PAZO) alternated with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) can be tuned by varying the extent of electrostatic interactions with film fabrication at different pHs for PAH. The dynamics of both writing and relaxation processes could be explained with a two-stage mechanism involving the orientation of the chromophores per se and the chain movement. Upon calculating the activation energies for these processes, we demonstrate semiquantitatively that reduced electrostatic interactions in films prepared at higher pH, for which PAH is less charged, are responsible for the longer stability at high temperatures. This is attributed to orientation of PAZO chromophores via cooperative aggregation, where the presence of counterions hindered relaxation. PMID:22335565

  15. Thin-Layer Chromatography: Four Simple Activities for Undergraduate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anwar, Jamil; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that can be used to introduce thin-layer chromatography at the undergraduate level in relatively less developed countries and that can be performed with very simple and commonly available apparati in high schools and colleges. Activities include thin-layer chromatography with a test-tube, capillary feeder, burette, and rotating…

  16. Implication of Blocking Layer Functioning with the Effect of Temperature in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kou, Dongxing; Chen, Shuanghong; Hu, Linhua; Wu, Sixin; Dai, Songyuan

    2016-06-01

    The properties of thin titanium dioxide blocking layers onto TCO in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have been widely reported as their intensity dependence of illumination intensity. Herein, a further investigation about their functioning with the effect of temperature is developed. The electron recombination process, photovoltage response on illumination intensity and photocurrent-voltage properties for DSCs with/without blocking layer at different temperatures are detected. It is found that the electron recombination via TCO becomes increasingly pronounced with increasing temperature and the effect of blocking layer is extremely temperature dependent. The band bending of the compact layer is more effectively to block electron losses at high temperatures, preventing large falloff of photovoltage. Hence, a resistive layer at the surface of TCO keeps comparable cell performances without falloff over a wide temperature range, while the device without blocking layer shows large decrease by over 10% at high temperature for contrast. PMID:27427620

  17. Sporadic E-Layers and Meteor Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, Obid

    2016-07-01

    In average width it is difficult to explain variety of particularities of the behavior sporadic layer Es ionospheres without attraction long-lived metallic ion of the meteoric origin. Mass spectrometric measurements of ion composition using rockets indicate the presence of metal ions Fe+, Mg+, Si+, Na+, Ca+, K+, Al+ and others in the E-region of the ionosphere. The most common are the ions Fe+, Mg+, Si+, which are primarily concentrated in the narrow sporadic layers of the ionosphere at altitudes of 90-130 km. The entry of meteoric matter into the Earth's atmosphere is a source of meteor atoms (M) and ions (M +) that later, together with wind shear, produce midlatitude sporadic Es layer of the ionosphere. To establish the link between sporadic Es layer and meteoroid streams, we proceeded from the dependence of the ionization coefficient of meteors b on the velocity of meteor particles in different meteoroid streams. We investigated the dependence of the critical frequency f0Es of sporadic E on the particle velocity V of meteor streams and associations. It was established that the average values of f0Es are directly proportional to the velocity V of meteor streams and associations, with the correlation coefficient of 0.53 < R < 0.74. Thus, the critical frequency of the sporadic layer Es increases with the increase of particle velocity V in meteor streams, which indicates the direct influence of meteor particles on ionization of the lower ionosphere and formation of long-lived metal atoms M and ions M+ of meteoric origin.

  18. Dynamics of the Thermal State of Active Layer at the Alaska North Slope and Northern Yakutia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodov, A. L.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Marchenko, S.; Shiklomanov, N. I.; Fedorov-Davydov, D.

    2010-12-01

    Dynamics of the active layer is one of the most important indexes, reflecting permafrost response to the modern climate changes. Monitoring of active layer thickness dynamics is the main goal of CALM (Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring) project. But, from different points of view, it is very important to know not only maximal depth of seasonal thawing but also dynamics of thermal field of active layer and duration of its staying in the unfrozen state. Current research was aimed on the analyzing data of temperature measurements have been done during the more then 10 years at the North Slope of Brooks Range (Alaska) and 2 years at the selected sites at the Northern Yakutia (Russia) and its comparison with the 17 to 10 years records of active layer thickness dynamics at the corresponding sites (http://www.udel.edu/Geography/calm/data/north.html). The area of investigation characterized by the typical tundra landscape and different kinds of micro topography. Reported observation sites located at the latitudinal range from 68.5 to 70.3N in Alaska and 70.5 to 71.75N in the Northern Yakutia. Observation have been done using the 1 meter long MRC probe with 11 sensors (every 10 cm) and single Campbell SCI A107 sensors in Alaska and 2-channel HOBO U23 data loggers with TMC-HD thermistors in the Northern Yakutia. Analyses of CALM data show what most observation sites in Alaska (except located near the Brooks Range and at the Arctic Ocean coast) do not subjected to the significant sustainable changes of active layer thickness over the last 10 years. At the same time active layer thickness at the Yakutian sites was increasing. Temperature observations show decreasing of the mean annual temperature at the average depth of active layer bottom at the Alaskan sites. But, because of general trend to increasing of period of thawing it does not lead to the decreasing of active layer thickness. Recent equipment deployment at the Tiksi and Allaikha sites (Northern Yakutia) does not

  19. Effect of surface energy and seed layer annealing temperature on ZnO seed layer formation and ZnO nanowire growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Sub; Mahmud, Imtiaz; Shin, Han Jae; Park, Min-Kyu; Ranjkesh, Amid; Lee, Do Kyung; Kim, Hak-Rin

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the effects of surface energy and seed layer annealing temperature (Tannealing) on seed layer growth and hydrothermally-grown zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs). In this work, by varying the ultraviolet ozone (UVO) treatment times on a silicon surface, the surface energy conditions for the seed layer formation changed and the seed layer was annealed under different Tannealing conditions. Under a lower surface energy condition of the substrate, with increasing Tannealing, the coverage density and the average thickness of the seed layer increased, but island-like growth was observed. This case was inevitably accompanied by an increase in surface roughness, which resulted in agglomerated low density growth of ZnO NWs. After sufficient UVO treatment, hydroxyl groups on the silicon surface activated the ZnO seed layer formation in the chemical reaction and increased the bonding energy between the active nucleation sites of the seed layer and the substrate surface. This ensured higher coverage density of the seed layer with lower surface roughness under the same Tannealing condition, thereby providing the ZnO NW growth with an enhanced density and aspect ratio as well as good crystallinity.

  20. Room-Temperature Oxidation of Formaldehyde by Layered Manganese Oxide: Effect of Water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinlong; Zhang, Pengyi; Li, Jinge; Jiang, Chuanjia; Yunus, Rizwangul; Kim, Jeonghyun

    2015-10-20

    Layered manganese oxide, i.e., birnessite was prepared via the reaction of potassium permanganate with ammonium oxalate. The water content in the birnessite was adjusted by drying/calcining the samples at various temperatures (30 °C, 100 °C, 200 °C, 300 °C, and 500 °C). Thermogravimetry-mass spectroscopy showed three types of water released from birnessite, which can be ascribed to physically adsorbed H2O, interlayer H2O and hydroxyl, respectively. The activity of birnessite for formaldehyde oxidation was positively associated with its water content, i.e., the higher the water content, the better activity it has. In-situ DRIFTS and step scanning XRD analysis indicate that adsorbed formaldehyde, which is promoted by bonded water via hydrogen bonding, is transformed into formate and carbonate with the consumption of hydroxyl and bonded water. Both bonded water and water in air can compensate the consumed hydroxyl groups to sustain the mineralization of formaldehyde at room temperature. In addition, water in air stimulates the desorption of carbonate via water competitive adsorption, and accordingly the birnessite recovers its activity. This investigation elucidated the role of water in oxidizing formaldehyde by layered manganese oxides at room temperature, which may be helpful for the development of more efficient materials. PMID:26426569

  1. Active unjamming of confluent cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, M. Cristina

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. Motivated by these observations, we have studied a model of dense tissues that combines self-propelled particle models and vertex models of confluent cell layers. In this model, referred to as self-propelled Voronoi (SPV), cells are described as polygons in a Voronoi tessellation with directed noisy cell motility and interactions governed by a shape energy that incorporates the effects of cell volume incompressibility, contractility and cell-cell adhesion. Using this model, we have demonstrated a new density-independent solid-liquid transition in confluent tissues controlled by cell motility and a cell-shape parameter measuring the interplay of cortical tension and cell-cell adhesion. An important insight of this work is that the rigidity and dynamics of cell layers depends sensitively on cell shape. We have also used the SPV model to test a new method developed by our group to determine cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces, hence providing the spatio-temporal distribution of stresses in motile dense tissues. This work was done with Dapeng Bi, Lisa Manning and Xingbo Yang. MCM was supported by NSF-DMR-1305184 and by the Simons Foundation.

  2. Improve oxidation resistance at high temperature by nanocrystalline surface layer.

    PubMed

    Xia, Z X; Zhang, C; Huang, X F; Liu, W B; Yang, Z G

    2015-01-01

    An interesting change of scale sequence occurred during oxidation of nanocrystalline surface layer by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment. The three-layer oxide structure from the surface towards the matrix is Fe3O4, spinel FeCr2O4 and corundum (Fe,Cr)2O3, which is different from the typical two-layer scale consisted of an Fe3O4 outer layer and an FeCr2O4 inner layer in conventional P91 steel. The diffusivity of Cr, Fe and O is enhanced concurrently in the nanocrystalline surface layer, which causes the fast oxidation in the initial oxidation stage. The formation of (Fe,Cr)2O3 inner layer would inhabit fast diffusion of alloy elements in the nanocrystalline surface layer of P91 steel in the later oxidation stage, and it causes a decrease in the parabolic oxidation rate compared with conventional specimens. This study provides a novel approach to improve the oxidation resistance of heat resistant steel without changing its Cr content. PMID:26269034

  3. Improve oxidation resistance at high temperature by nanocrystalline surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Z. X.; Zhang, C.; Huang, X. F.; Liu, W. B.; Yang, Z. G.

    2015-08-01

    An interesting change of scale sequence occurred during oxidation of nanocrystalline surface layer by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment. The three-layer oxide structure from the surface towards the matrix is Fe3O4, spinel FeCr2O4 and corundum (Fe,Cr)2O3, which is different from the typical two-layer scale consisted of an Fe3O4 outer layer and an FeCr2O4 inner layer in conventional P91 steel. The diffusivity of Cr, Fe and O is enhanced concurrently in the nanocrystalline surface layer, which causes the fast oxidation in the initial oxidation stage. The formation of (Fe,Cr)2O3 inner layer would inhabit fast diffusion of alloy elements in the nanocrystalline surface layer of P91 steel in the later oxidation stage, and it causes a decrease in the parabolic oxidation rate compared with conventional specimens. This study provides a novel approach to improve the oxidation resistance of heat resistant steel without changing its Cr content.

  4. Improve oxidation resistance at high temperature by nanocrystalline surface layer

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Z. X.; Zhang, C.; Huang, X. F.; Liu, W. B.; Yang, Z. G.

    2015-01-01

    An interesting change of scale sequence occurred during oxidation of nanocrystalline surface layer by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment. The three-layer oxide structure from the surface towards the matrix is Fe3O4, spinel FeCr2O4 and corundum (Fe,Cr)2O3, which is different from the typical two-layer scale consisted of an Fe3O4 outer layer and an FeCr2O4 inner layer in conventional P91 steel. The diffusivity of Cr, Fe and O is enhanced concurrently in the nanocrystalline surface layer, which causes the fast oxidation in the initial oxidation stage. The formation of (Fe,Cr)2O3 inner layer would inhabit fast diffusion of alloy elements in the nanocrystalline surface layer of P91 steel in the later oxidation stage, and it causes a decrease in the parabolic oxidation rate compared with conventional specimens. This study provides a novel approach to improve the oxidation resistance of heat resistant steel without changing its Cr content. PMID:26269034

  5. Wafer-scale synthesis of multi-layer graphene by high-temperature carbon ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Janghyuk; Lee, Geonyeop; Kim, Jihyun

    2015-07-20

    We report on the synthesis of wafer-scale (4 in. in diameter) high-quality multi-layer graphene using high-temperature carbon ion implantation on thin Ni films on a substrate of SiO{sub 2}/Si. Carbon ions were bombarded at 20 keV and a dose of 1 × 10{sup 15 }cm{sup −2} onto the surface of the Ni/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate at a temperature of 500 °C. This was followed by high-temperature activation annealing (600–900 °C) to form a sp{sup 2}-bonded honeycomb structure. The effects of post-implantation activation annealing conditions were systematically investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Carbon ion implantation at elevated temperatures allowed a lower activation annealing temperature for fabricating large-area graphene. Our results indicate that carbon-ion implantation provides a facile and direct route for integrating graphene with Si microelectronics.

  6. Effects of Soil Property Uncertainty on Projected Active Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, D. R.; Atchley, A. L.; Coon, E.; Painter, S. L.; Wilson, C. J.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Liljedahl, A.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty in future climate is often assumed to contribute the largest uncertainty to active layer thickness (ALT) projections. However, the impact of soil property uncertainty on these projections may be significant. In this research, we evaluate the contribution of soil property uncertainty on ALT projections at the Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska. The effect of variations in porosity, thermal conductivity, saturation, and water retention properties of peat and mineral soil are evaluated. The micro-topography of ice wedge polygons present at the site is included in the analysis using three 1D column models to represent polygon center, rim and trough features. The Arctic Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) is used to model multiphase thermal and hydrological processes in the subsurface. We apply the Null-Space Monte Carlo (NSMC) algorithm to identify an ensemble of soil property combinations that produce simulated temperature profiles that are consistent with temperature measurements available from the site. ALT is simulated for the ensemble of soil property combinations for four climate scenarios. The uncertainty in ALT due to soil properties within and across climate scenarios is evaluated. This work was supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project LDRD201200068DR and by the The Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project. NGEE-Arctic is supported by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the DOE Office of Science.

  7. Active Layer Soil Carbon and Nutrient Mineralization, Barrow, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stan D. Wullschleger; Holly M. Vander Stel; Colleen Iversen; Victoria L. Sloan; Richard J. Norby; Mallory P. Ladd; Jason K. Keller; Ariane Jong; Joanne Childs; Deanne J. Brice

    2015-10-29

    This data set consists of bulk soil characteristics as well as carbon and nutrient mineralization rates of active layer soils manually collected from the field in August, 2012, frozen, and then thawed and incubated across a range of temperatures in the laboratory for 28 day periods in 2013-2015. The soils were collected from four replicate polygons in each of the four Areas (A, B, C, and D) of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Soil samples were coincident with the established Vegetation Plots that are located in center, edge, and trough microtopography in each polygon. Data included are 1) bulk soil characteristics including carbon, nitrogen, gravimetric water content, bulk density, and pH in 5-cm depth increments and also by soil horizon, 2) carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus mineralization rates for soil horizons incubated aerobically (and in one case both aerobically and anaerobically) for 28 days at temperatures that included 2, 4, 8, and 12 degrees C. Additional soil and incubation data are forthcoming. They will be available when published as part of another paper that includes additional replicate analyses.

  8. Sporadic Layer es and Siesmic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimov, Obid; Blokhin, Alexandr; Kalashnikova, Tatyana

    2016-07-01

    To determine the influence of seismogenic disturbances on the calm state of the iono-sphere and assess the impact of turbulence development in sporadic-E during earthquake prepa-ration period we calculated the variation in the range of semitransparency ∆fES = f0ES - fbES. The study was based primarily on the ionograms obtained by vertical sounding of the ionosphere at Dushanbe at nighttime station from 15 to 29 August 1986. In this time period four successive earthquakes took place, which serves the purpose of this study of the impact of seis-mogenic processes on the intensity of the continuous generation of ionospheric turbulence. Analysis of the results obtained for seismic-ionospheric effects of 1986 earthquakes at station Dushanbe has shown that disturbance of ionospheric parameters during earthquake prepa-ration period displays a pronounced maximum with a duration of t = 1-6 hours. Ionospheric effects associated with the processes of earthquake preparation emerge quite predictably, which verifies seismogenic disturbances in the ionosphere. During the preparation of strong earthquakes, ionograms of vertical sounding produced at station Dushanbe - near the epicenter area - often shown the phenomenon of spreading traces of sporadic Es. It is assumed that the duration of manifestation of seismic ionospheric precursors in Du-shanbe τ = 1 - 6 hours may be associated with deformation processes in the Earth's crust and var-ious faults, as well as dissimilar properties of the environment of the epicentral area. It has been shown that for earthquakes with 4.5 ≤ M ≤ 5.5 1-2 days prior to the event iono-spheric perturbations in the parameters of the sporadic layer Es and an increase in the value of the range of semitransparency Es - ΔfEs were observed, which could lead to turbulence at altitudes of 100-130 km.

  9. Analysis of Charge Carrier Transport in Organic Photovoltaic Active Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-03-01

    We present a systematic analysis of charge carrier transport in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices based on phenomenological, deterministic charge carrier transport models. The models describe free electron and hole transport, trapping, and detrapping, as well as geminate charge-pair dissociation and geminate and bimolecular recombination, self-consistently with Poisson's equation for the electric field in the active layer. We predict photocurrent evolution in devices with active layers of P3HT, P3HT/PMMA, and P3HT/PS, as well as P3HT/PCBM blends, and photocurrent-voltage (I-V) relations in these devices at steady state. Charge generation propensity, zero-field charge mobilities, and trapping, detrapping, and recombination rate coefficients are determined by fitting the modeling predictions to experimental measurements. We have analyzed effects of the active layer morphology for layers consisting of both pristine drop-cast films and of nanoparticle (NP) assemblies, as well as effects on device performance of insulating NP doping in conducting polymers and of specially designed interlayers placed between an electrode and the active layer. The model predictions provide valuable input toward synthesis of active layers with prescribed morphology that optimize OPV device performance.

  10. Curie temperature of ultrathin ferromagnetic layer with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    SciTech Connect

    You, Chun-Yeol

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the effect of the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) on the Curie temperature of the ultrathin ferromagnetic layers. It has been known that the Curie temperature of the ferromagnet depends on spin wave excitation energies, and they are affected by DMI. Therefore, the ferromagnetic transition temperature of the ultrathin ferromagnetic layer must be sensitive on the DMI. We find that the Curie temperature depends on the DMI by using the double time Green's function method. Since the DMI is arisen by the inversion symmetry breaking structure, the DMI is always important in the inversion symmetry breaking ultrathin ferromagnetic layers.

  11. Thermal expansion, anharmonicity and temperature-dependent Raman spectra of single- and few-layer MoSe₂ and WSe₂.

    PubMed

    Late, Dattatray J; Shirodkar, Sharmila N; Waghmare, Umesh V; Dravid, Vinayak P; Rao, C N R

    2014-06-01

    We report the temperature-dependent Raman spectra of single- and few-layer MoSe2 and WSe2 in the range 77-700 K. We observed linear variation in the peak positions and widths of the bands arising from contributions of anharmonicity and thermal expansion. After characterization using atomic force microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, the temperature coefficients of the Raman modes were determined. Interestingly, the temperature coefficient of the A(2)(2u) mode is larger than that of the A(1g) mode, the latter being much smaller than the corresponding temperature coefficients of the same mode in single-layer MoS2 and of the G band of graphene. The temperature coefficients of the two modes in single-layer MoSe2 are larger than those of the same modes in single-layer WSe2. We have estimated thermal expansion coefficients and temperature dependence of the vibrational frequencies of MoS2 and MoSe2 within a quasi-harmonic approximation, with inputs from first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. We show that the contrasting temperature dependence of the Raman-active mode A(1g) in MoS2 and MoSe2 arises essentially from the difference in their strain-phonon coupling. PMID:24692405

  12. Low temperature atomic layer deposited ZnO photo thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Oruc, Feyza B.; Aygun, Levent E.; Donmez, Inci; Biyikli, Necmi; Okyay, Ali K.; Yu, Hyun Yong

    2015-01-01

    ZnO thin film transistors (TFTs) are fabricated on Si substrates using atomic layer deposition technique. The growth temperature of ZnO channel layers are selected as 80, 100, 120, 130, and 250 °C. Material characteristics of ZnO films are examined using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction methods. Stoichiometry analyses showed that the amount of both oxygen vacancies and interstitial zinc decrease with decreasing growth temperature. Electrical characteristics improve with decreasing growth temperature. Best results are obtained with ZnO channels deposited at 80 °C; I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratio is extracted as 7.8 × 10{sup 9} and subthreshold slope is extracted as 0.116 V/dec. Flexible ZnO TFT devices are also fabricated using films grown at 80 °C. I{sub D}–V{sub GS} characterization results showed that devices fabricated on different substrates (Si and polyethylene terephthalate) show similar electrical characteristics. Sub-bandgap photo sensing properties of ZnO based TFTs are investigated; it is shown that visible light absorption of ZnO based TFTs can be actively controlled by external gate bias.

  13. Similarity Equations for Wind and Temperature Profiles in the Radix Layer, at the Bottom of the Convective Boundary Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoso, Edi; Stull, Roland

    2001-06-01

    In the middle of the convective boundary layer, also known as the mixed layer, is a relatively thick region where wind speed and potential temperature are nearly uniform with height. Below this uniform layer (UL), wind speed decreases to zero at the ground, and potential temperature increases to the surface skin value. This whole region below the UL is called the radix layer (RxL), and is of order hundreds of meters thick. Within the bottom of the RxL lies the classical surface layer (order of tens of meters thick) that obeys traditional Monin-Obukhov similarity theory.The RxL depth is shown to depend on friction velocity, Deardorff velocity, and boundary layer depth. The wind RxL is usually thicker than the temperature RxL. Using RxL depth, UL wind speed, and UL potential temperature as length, velocity, and temperature scales, respectively, one can form dimensionless heights, velocities, and temperatures. When observations obtained within the RxL are plotted in this dimensionless framework, the data collapse into similarity curves. This data collapse is tightly packed for data collected over single-location homogeneous surfaces, and shows more scatter for data collected along 72-km flight tracks over heterogeneous surfaces. Empirical profile equations are proposed to describe this RxL similarity. When these profile equations are combined with the flux equations from convective transport theory, the results are new flux-profile equations for a deep region within the bottom of the convective boundary layer.These RxL profile similarity equations are calibrated using data from four sites with different roughnesses: Minnesota, BLX96-Lamont, BLX96-Meeker, and BLX96-Winfield. The empirical parameters are found to be invariant from site to site, except for the profile shape parameter for wind speed. This parameter is found to depend on standard deviation of terrain elevation, rather than on the aerodynamic roughness length. The resulting parameter values are compared

  14. Reduced-temperature firing of solid oxide fuel cells with zirconia/ceria bi-layer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhan; Kennouche, David; Barnett, Scott A.

    2014-08-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with bi-layer Zirconia/Ceria electrolytes have been studied extensively because of their great potential for producing high power density at reduced operating temperature, important for reducing cost and thereby allowing broader SOFC commercialization. The bi-layer electrolytes are designed to take advantage of the high oxygen ion conductivity of Ceria, the low electronic conductivity of Zirconia, and the low reactivity of Ceria with high-performance cathodes. However, zirconia/ceria processing has proven problematic due to interdiffusion during high temperature co-firing, or ceria layer porosity after two-step firing. Here we first show a new method for bi-layer co-firing at a reduced temperature of 1250 °C, ∼150 °C lower than the usual sintering temperature, achieved using Fe2O3 as a sintering aid. This novel process enables high power density SOFCs by producing: (1) low-resistance Y0.16Zr0.92O2-δ (YSZ)/Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95 (GDC) electrolytes that also yield high open-circuit voltage, (2) dense GDC layers that prevent reactions between highly-active La0.6Sr0.4Fe0.8Co0.2O3 (LSFC) cathode materials and YSZ, and (3) Ni-YSZ anodes with high electrochemical activity due to fine-scale microstructure with high TPB densities.

  15. Performance enhancement of low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells by catalyst and support layer modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Timothy David

    Possible enhancement of low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) or direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) was investigated by modifying catalyst and support layers. Platinum (Pt) and platinum cobalt (Pt xCo1-x) alloys were prepared by pulsed electrodeposition onto Toray carbon paper. Composite supports composed of either commercial multi-walled nanofiber (MWNF) mats or MWNF layers on a commercial backing were also investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) were used to characterize the surface structure, composition, and catalyst loading. Various electrochemical techniques with a wet electrochemical cell, a Nuvant multi-array system, and a Scribner fuel cell system were used to study and rank the effectiveness of the catalysts and supports toward both the methanol oxidation reaction and the oxygen reduction reaction. The activity toward methanol oxidation of the electrodeposited Pt catalyst was found to be dependent on the deposited mass. Further comparisons between commercial electrodes in the Nuvant system showed these deposits can yield activities comparable to those of commercially available electrodes. The structure of the Pt electrodeposits was highly non-uniform due to the H2 evolution during the deposition process blocking the cathodes surface. The activities of the planar structured PtxCo1-x deposits were insignificant for both oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation. The composition of the deposits ranged from 5 to 15 at% Pt. It was found by both the Nuvant and Scribner systems that the addition of a thin hydrophilic MWNF layer to a hydrophobic electrode would enhance the performance of a DMFC anode. In the Nuvant system, the addition of a thin hydrophilic MWNF layer to a hydrophobic electrode also enhanced the PEM cathode activity. This however was not corroborated by Scribner analysis, showing a

  16. Exchange bias and room-temperature magnetic order in molecular layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Manuel; Ibrahim, Fatima; Boukari, Samy; Isshiki, Hironari; Joly, Loïc; Peter, Moritz; Studniarek, Michał; da Costa, Victor; Jabbar, Hashim; Davesne, Vincent; Halisdemir, Ufuk; Chen, Jinjie; Arabski, Jacek; Otero, Edwige; Choueikani, Fadi; Chen, Kai; Ohresser, Philippe; Wulfhekel, Wulf; Scheurer, Fabrice; Weber, Wolfgang; Alouani, Mebarek; Beaurepaire, Eric; Bowen, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Molecular semiconductors may exhibit antiferromagnetic correlations well below room temperature. Although inorganic antiferromagnetic layers may exchange bias single-molecule magnets, the reciprocal effect of an antiferromagnetic molecular layer magnetically pinning an inorganic ferromagnetic layer through exchange bias has so far not been observed. We report on the magnetic interplay, extending beyond the interface, between a cobalt ferromagnetic layer and a paramagnetic organic manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) layer. These ferromagnetic/organic interfaces are called spinterfaces because spin polarization arises on them. The robust magnetism of the Co/MnPc spinterface stabilizes antiferromagnetic ordering at room temperature within subsequent MnPc monolayers away from the interface. The inferred magnetic coupling strength is much larger than that found in similar bulk, thin or ultrathin systems. In addition, at lower temperature, the antiferromagnetic MnPc layer induces an exchange bias on the Co film, which is magnetically pinned. These findings create new routes towards designing organic spintronic devices.

  17. Active thermal isolation for temperature responsive sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, Scott D. (Inventor); Gray, David L. (Inventor); Carraway, Debra L. (Inventor); Reda, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The detection of flow transition between laminar and turbulent flow and of shear stress or skin friction of airfoils is important in basic research for validation of airfoil theory and design. These values are conventionally measured using hot film nickel sensors deposited on a polyimide substrate. The substrate electrically insulates the sensor and underlying airfoil but is prevented from thermally isolating the sensor by thickness constraints necessary to avoid flow contamination. Proposed heating of the model surface is difficult to control, requires significant energy expenditures, and may alter the basic flow state of the airfoil. A temperature responsive sensor is located in the airflow over the specified surface of a body and is maintained at a constant temperature. An active thermal isolator is located between this temperature responsive sensor and the specific surface of the body. The total thickness of the isolator and sensor avoid any contamination of the flow. The temperature of this isolator is controlled to reduce conductive heat flow from the temperature responsive sensor to the body. This temperature control includes (1) operating the isolator at the same temperature as the constant temperature of the sensor; and (2) establishing a fixed boundary temperature which is either less than or equal to, or slightly greater than the sensor constant temperature. The present invention accordingly thermally isolates a temperature responsive sensor in an energy efficient, controllable manner while avoiding any contamination of the flow.

  18. High Curie temperature drive layer materials for ion-implanted magnetic bubble devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fratello, V. J.; Wolfe, R.; Blank, S. L.; Nelson, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ion implantation of bubble garnets can lower the Curie temperature by 70 C or more, thus limiting high temperature operation of devices with ion-implanted propagation patterns. Therefore, double-layer materials were made with a conventional 2-micron bubble storage layer capped by an ion-implantable drive layer of high Curie temperature, high magnetostriction material. Contiguous disk test patterns were implanted with varying doses of a typical triple implant. Quality of propagation was judged by quasistatic tests on 8-micron period major and minor loops. Variations of magnetization, uniaxial anisotropy, implant dose, and magnetostriction were investigated to ensure optimum flux matching, good charged wall coupling, and wide operating margins. The most successful drive layer compositions were in the systems (SmDyLuCa)3(FeSi)5O12 and (BiGdTmCa)3(FeSi)5O12 and had Curie temperatures 25-44 C higher than the storage layers.

  19. Low temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of thin vanadium nitride layers for copper diffusion barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Rampelberg, Geert; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Deduytsche, Davy; Detavernier, Christophe; Blasco, Nicolas

    2013-03-18

    Thin vanadium nitride (VN) layers were grown by atomic layer deposition using tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)vanadium and NH{sub 3} plasma at deposition temperatures between 70 Degree-Sign C and 150 Degree-Sign C on silicon substrates and polymer foil. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed a composition close to stoichiometric VN, while x-ray diffraction showed the {delta}-VN crystal structure. The resistivity was as low as 200 {mu}{Omega} cm for the as deposited films and further reduced to 143 {mu}{Omega} cm and 93 {mu}{Omega} cm by annealing in N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}/He/N{sub 2}, respectively. A 5 nm VN layer proved to be effective as a diffusion barrier for copper up to a temperature of 720 Degree-Sign C.

  20. Active layer hydrology for Imnavait Creek, Toolik, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hinzman, L.D.; Kane, D.L.

    1987-04-01

    The hydrology of the active layer of a watershed is described. In the annual hydrologic cycle, snowmelt is the most significant event at Imnavait Creek located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Precipitation that has accumulated for more than 6 months on the surface melts in a relatively short period of 7 to 10 days once sustained melting occurs. Significant runoff events are few. Convective storms covering relatively small areas on the North Slope of Alaska can produce significant small-scale events in a small watershed scale,but these events are rapidly attenuated outside the basin. Data collection began in August 1984. We have continuously monitored the hydrologic, the meteorologic, and the soil's physical conditions. Information was collected through implementation of four snowmelt runoff plots and measurements of essential microclimate parameters. Soil moisture and temperature profiles were measured adjacent to each snowmelt runoff plot, and heat flux is collected adjacent to one of these plots. Meteorological parameters were measured locally. The water content of the snowpack prior to snowmelt was measured throughout the watershed and measured daily adjacent to each plot during snowmelt. The stream draining the basin was measured regularly during the spring melt event to provide information on watershed runoff rates and the volume of snowmelt.

  1. Active layer hydrology for Imnavait Creek, Toolik, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hinzman, L.D.; Kane, D.L.

    1987-04-01

    The hydrology of the active layer of a watershed is described. In the annual hydrologic cycle, snowmelt is the most significant event at Imnavait Creek located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Precipitation that has accumulated for more than 6 months on the surface melts in a relatively short period of 7 to 10 days once sustained melting occurs. Significant runoff events are few. Convective storms covering relatively small areas on the North Slope of Alaska can produce significant small-scale events in a small watershed scale,but these events are rapidly attenuated outside the basin. Data collection began in August 1984. We have continuously monitored the hydrologic, the meteorologic, and the soil`s physical conditions. Information was collected through implementation of four snowmelt runoff plots and measurements of essential microclimate parameters. Soil moisture and temperature profiles were measured adjacent to each snowmelt runoff plot, and heat flux is collected adjacent to one of these plots. Meteorological parameters were measured locally. The water content of the snowpack prior to snowmelt was measured throughout the watershed and measured daily adjacent to each plot during snowmelt. The stream draining the basin was measured regularly during the spring melt event to provide information on watershed runoff rates and the volume of snowmelt.

  2. Towards NOAA Forecasts of Permafrost Active Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livezey, M. M.; Jonassen, R. G.; Horsfall, F. M. C.; Jafarov, E. E.; Schaefer, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA's implementation of its 2014 Arctic Action Plan (AAP) lacks services related to permafrost change yet the Interagency Working Group on Coordination of Domestic Energy Development and Permitting in Alaska noted that warming permafrost challenges land-based development and calls for agencies to provide focused information needed by decision-makers. To address this we propose to link NOAA's existing seasonal forecasts of temperature and precipitation with a high-resolution model of the thermal state of permafrost (Jafarov et al., 2012) to provide near-term (one year ahead) forecasts of active layer thickness (ALT). Such forecasts would be an official NOAA statement of the expected thermal state of permafrost ALT in Alaska and would require: (1) long-term climate outlooks, (2) a permafrost model, (3) detailed specification of local spatial and vertical controls upon soil thermal state, (4) high-resolution vertical measurements of that thermal state, and (5) demonstration of forecast skill in pilot studies. Pilot efforts should focus on oil pipelines where the cost can be justified. With skillful forecasts, engineers could reduce costs of monitoring and repair as well as ecosystem damage by positioning equipment to more rapidly respond to predicted disruptions.

  3. Experimental investigation of the temperature field in the gas-liquid two-layer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatapova, E. Ya.; Filipenko, R. A.; Lyulin, Yu. V.; Graur, I. A.; Marchuk, I. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the temperature field across the liquid-gas two-layer system are presented. The liquid layer is locally heated from the bottom substrate, and the intensive liquid evaporation is observed. A technique for measuring the temperature profile across the liquid and gas layers (including their interface) is developed. To do these measurements, the microthermocouple is moved across the layers with the help of precision micropositioner with a step of 1 μm. The temperature jump at the liquid-gas interface is measured, and its value increases with the temperature increase. Detailed information on the temperature field near the interface is obtained by using the precise thermocouple displacement with a small step.

  4. Thermal regime of active layer at two lithologically contrasting sites on James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrbáček, Filip; Nývlt, Daniel; Láska, Kamil

    2016-04-01

    Antarctic Peninsula region (AP) represents one of the most rapidly warming parts of our planet in the last 50 years. Despite increasing research activities along both western and eastern sides of AP in last decades, there is still a lot of gaps in our knowledge relating to permafrost, active layer and its thermal and physical properties. This study brings new results of active layer monitoring on James Ross Island, which is the largest island in northern AP. Its northern part, Ulu Peninsula, is the largest ice-free area (more than 200 km2) in the region. Due its large area, we focused this study on sites located in different lithologies, which would affect local thermal regime of active layer. Study site (1) at Abernethy Flats area (41 m a.s.l.) lies ~7 km from northern coast. Lithologically is formed by disintegrated Cretaceous calcareous sandstones and siltstones of the Santa Marta Formation. Study site (2) is located at the northern slopes of Berry Hill (56 m a.s.l.), about 0.4 km from northern coastline. Lithology is composed of muddy to intermediate diamictites, tuffaceous siltstones to fine grained sandstones of the Mendel Formation. Data of air temperature at 2 meters above ground and the active layer temperatures at 75 cm deep profiles were obtained from both sites in period 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014. Small differences were found when comparing mean air temperatures and active temperatures at 5 and 75 cm depth in the period 2012-2014. While the mean air temperatures varied between -7.7 °C and -7.0 °C, the mean ground temperatures fluctuated between -6.6 °C and -6.1 °C at 5 cm and -6.9 °C and -6.0 °C at 75 cm at Abernethy Flats and Berry Hill slopes respectively. Even though ground temperature differences along the profiles weren't pronounced during thawing seasons, the maximum active layer thickness was significantly larger at Berry Hill slopes (80 to 82 cm) than at Abernethy Flats (52 to 64 cm). We assume this differences are affected by

  5. Active-layer thermal monitoring on the Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, R. F. M.; Schaefer, C. E. G. R.; Simas, F. M. B.; Francelino, M. R.; Fernandes-Filho, E. I.; Lyra, G. B.; Bockheim, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    International attention to climate change phenomena has grown in the last decade; the active layer and permafrost are of great importance in understanding processes and future trends due to their role in energy flux regulation. The objective of this paper is to present active-layer temperature data for one Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring South hemisphere (CALM-S) site located on the Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, maritime Antarctica over an 57-month period (2008-2012). The monitoring site was installed during the summer of 2008 and consists of thermistors (accuracy of ±0.2 °C), arranged vertically with probes at different depths, recording data at hourly intervals in a high-capacity data logger. A series of statistical analyses was performed to describe the soil temperature time series, including a linear fit in order to identify global trends, and a series of autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models was tested in order to define the best fit for the data. The affects of weather on the thermal regime of the active layer have been identified, providing insights into the influence of climate change on permafrost. The active-layer thermal regime in the studied period was typical of periglacial environments, with extreme variation in surface during the summer resulting in frequent freeze and thaw cycles. The active-layer thickness (ALT) over the studied period shows a degree of variability related to different annual weather conditions, reaching a maximum of 117.5 cm in 2009. The ARIMA model could describe the data adequately and is an important tool for more conclusive analysis and predictions when longer data sets are available. Despite the variability when comparing temperature readings and ACT over the studied period, no trend can be identified.

  6. Active layer thermal monitoring at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, R. F. M.; Schaefer, C. E. G. R.; Simas, F. N. B.; Francelino M., R.; Fernandes-Filho, E. I.; Lyra, G. B.; Bockheim, J. G.

    2014-07-01

    International attention to the climate change phenomena has grown in the last decade; the active layer and permafrost are of great importance in understanding processes and future trends due to their role in energy flux regulation. The objective of the this paper is to present active layer temperature data for one CALM-S site located at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica over an fifth seven month period (2008-2012). The monitoring site was installed during the summer of 2008 and consists of thermistors (accuracy of ± 0.2 °C), arranged vertically with probes at different depths, recording data at hourly intervals in a~high capacity data logger. A series of statistical analysis were performed to describe the soil temperature time series, including a linear fit in order to identify global trend and a series of autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models were tested in order to define the best fit for the data. The controls of weather on the thermal regime of the active layer have been identified, providing insights about the influence of climate chance over the permafrost. The active layer thermal regime in the studied period was typical of periglacial environment, with extreme variation at the surface during summer resulting in frequent freeze and thaw cycles. The active layer thickness (ALT) over the studied period showed variability related to different annual weather conditions, reaching a maximum of 117.5 cm in 2009. The ARIMA model was considered appropriate to treat the dataset, enabling more conclusive analysis and predictions when longer data sets are available. Despite the variability when comparing temperature readings and active layer thickness over the studied period, no warming trend was detected.

  7. Spectral and total temperature-dependent emissivities of few-layer structures on a metallic substrate.

    PubMed

    Blandre, Etienne; Chapuis, Pierre-Olivier; Vaillon, Rodolphe

    2016-01-25

    We investigate the thermal radiative emission of few-layer structures deposited on a metallic substrate and its dependence on temperature with the Fluctuational Electrodynamics approach. We highlight the impact of the variations of the optical properties of metallic layers on their temperature-dependent emissivity. Fabry-Pérot spectral selection involving at most two transparent layers and one thin reflective layer leads to well-defined peaks and to the amplification of the substrate emission. For a single Fabry-Pérot layer on a reflective substrate, an optimal thickness that maximizes the emissivity of the structure can be determined at each temperature. A thin lossy layer deposited on the previous structure can enhance interference phenomena, and the analysis of the participation of each layer to the emission shows that the thin layer is the main source of emission. Eventually, we investigate a system with two Fabry-Pérot layers and a metallic thin layer, and we show that an optimal architecture can be found. The total hemispherical emissivity can be increased by one order of magnitude compared to the substrate emissivity. PMID:26832589

  8. Back-calculation of temperature parameters for determination of asphalt layer modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Qinxi; Matsui, Kunihito; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Higashi, Shigeo

    2000-05-01

    The pavement elastic modulus of each layer was usually assumed not to be dependent on the environmental factors when the backcalculation of asphalt pavement was conducted from the measured surface deflections of FWD. However, it is well known that the elastic modulus of asphalt layer changes with the variation of temperature. Considering the influence of atmospheric temperature and radiant heat, the temperature distribution is nonlinear along the asphalt layer thickness, and has always been changed. Therefore, the distribution of elastic modulus in the asphalt layer has been considered to change as well. In this paper, we assume the elastic modulus distribution of the asphalt layer to vary with its temperature in terms of the exponential form. Based on the finite element method forward analysis, we propose a method to estimate a standard elastic modulus and temperature coefficient at 20 degrees Celsius for the asphalt layer from the backcalculation analysis. The corresponding FEM backcalculation program using Gauss-Newton method was developed to determine the pavement layer moduli and temperature dependent coefficient, in which the singular value decomposition (SVD) was used for the inverse analysis with scaling of unknown parameters. This method results in a smaller condition number that contributes to improvement of numerical stability. Both numerical simulation and measured data from FWD testing are used to demonstrate the potential applications of this method. As a result, the backcalculation procedure is less dependent on the user's initial values, fast in convergence rate and effective in the pavement engineering.

  9. The Closure of the Ocean Mixed Layer Temperature Budget using Level-Coordinate Model Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Seung-Bum; Fukumori, Ichiro; Lee, Tong

    2005-01-01

    Entrainment is an important element of the mixed layer mass, heat, and temperature budgets. Conventional procedures to estimate entrainment heat advection often do not permit the closure of heat and temperature budgets because of inaccuracies in its formulation. In this study a rigorous approach to evaluate the effect of entrainment using the output of a general circulation model (GCM) that does not have an explicit prognostic mixed layer model is described. The integral elements of the evaluation are 1) the rigorous estimates of the temperature difference between mixed layer water and entrained water at each horizontal grid point, 2) the formulation of the temperature difference such that the budget closes over a volume greater than one horizontal grid point, and 3) the apparent warming of the mixed layer during the mixed layer shoaling to account for the weak vertical temperature gradient within the mixed layer. This evaluation of entrainment heat advection is compared with the estimates by other commonly used ad hoc formulations by applying them in three regions: the north-central Pacific, the Kuroshio Extension, and the Nino-3 areas in the tropical Pacific. In all three areas the imbalance in the mixed layer temperature budget by the ad hoc estimates is significant, reaching a maximum of about 4 K yr(exp -1).

  10. Active layer thermal regime at different vegetation covers at Lions Rump, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Ivan C. C.; Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto G. R.; Fernandes, Raphael B. A.; Pereira, Thiago T. C.; Nieuwendam, Alexandre; Pereira, Antônio Batista

    2014-11-01

    Climate change impacts the biotic and abiotic components of polar ecosystems, affecting the stability of permafrost, active layer thickness, vegetation, and soil. This paper describes the active layer thermal regimes of two adjacent shallow boreholes, under the same soil but with two different vegetations. The study is location in Lions Rump, at King George Island, Maritime Antarctic, one of the most sensitive regions to climate change, located near the climatic limit of Antarctic permafrost. Both sites are a Turbic Cambic Cryosol formed on andesitic basalt, one under moss vegetation (Andreaea gainii, at 85 m a.s.l.) and another under lichen (Usnea sp., at 86 m a.s.l.), located 10 m apart. Ground temperature at same depths (10, 30 and 80 cm), water content at 80 cm depth and air temperature were recorded hourly between March 2009 and February 2011. The two sites showed significant differences in mean annual ground temperature for all depths. The lichen site showed a higher soil temperature amplitude compared to the moss site, with ground surface (10 cm) showing the highest daily temperature in January 2011 (7.3 °C) and the lowest daily temperature in August (- 16.5 °C). The soil temperature at the lichen site closely followed the air temperature trend. The moss site showed a higher water content at the bottommost layer, consistent with the water-saturated, low landscape position. The observed thermal buffering effect under mosses is primarily associated with higher moisture onsite, but a longer duration of the snowpack (not monitored) may also have influenced the results. Active layer thickness was approximately 150 cm at low-lying moss site, and 120 cm at well-drained lichen site. This allows to classify these soils as Cryosols (WRB) or Gelisols (Soil Taxonomy), with evident turbic features.

  11. Permafrost and active layer monitoring in the maritime Antarctic: Preliminary results from CALM sites on Livingston and Deception Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramos, M.; Vieira, G.; Blanco, J.J.; Hauck, C.; Hidalgo, M.A.; Tome, D.; Nevers, M.; Trindade, A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained from scientific work and experiments performed on Livingston and Deception Islands. Located in the South Shetland Archipelago, these islands have been some of the most sensitive regions over the last 50 years with respect to climate change with a Mean Annual Air Temperature (MAAT) close to -2 ºC. Three Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) sites were installed to record the thermal regime and the behaviour of the active layer in different places with similar climate, but with different soil composition, porosity, and water content. The study’s ultimate aim is to document the influence of climate change on permafrost degradation. Preliminary results, obtained in 2006, on maximum active-layer thickness (around 40 cm in the CALM of Deception Island), active layer temperature evolution, snow thickness, and air temperatures permit early characterization of energy exchange mechanisms between the ground and the atmosphere in the CALM-S sites.

  12. Incoherent scatter radar measurement of the average ion mass and temperature of a nighttime sporadic layer

    SciTech Connect

    Tepley, C.A.; Mathews, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    We report the results of incoherent scatter radar, total power, and ion line observations of a nighttime sporadic layer centered at 92-km altitude. The height variation of the absolute widths of the ion line yields a layer temperature of 210/sup 0/ +- 5 /sup 0/K and a mean ion mass of 50 +- 10 amu. This ion mass, when compared with average meteor composition, indicates that the layer is composed totally of metallic ions.

  13. Computational analysis of convective instabilities in a liquid layer subjected to an inclined gradient of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezar, D.; Rahal, S.

    2016-05-01

    A 3D numerical study of convective instabilities in a horizontal liquid layer (silicone oil with a Prandtl number Pr = 102) with an upper free surface is presented. The liquid layer is subjected to an inclined gradient of temperature. The influence of both gravity and thermocapillary forces on the formation of convective patterns is studied for different values of the liquid layer depth. Numerical results are found to be in good agreement with experimental data of other authors.

  14. Design method of the layered active magnetic regenerator (AMR) for hydrogen liquefaction by numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Inmyong; Kim, Youngkwon; Park, Jiho; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2015-09-01

    The design procedure of an active magnetic regenerator (AMR) operating between liquid nitrogen temperature and liquid hydrogen temperature is discussed with the selected magnetic refrigerants. Selected magnetic refrigerants (GdNi2, Dy0.85Er0.15Al2, Dy0.5Er0.5Al2, and Gd0.1Dy0.9Ni2) that have different transition temperatures are layered in an AMR to widen the temperature span. The optimum volume fraction of the layered refrigerants for the maximum COP with minimum volume is designed in a two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) using one dimensional numerical simulation. The entropy generation in each stage of the AMR is calculated by the numerical simulation to optimize the proposed design. The main sources of the entropy generation in the AMR are pressure drop, convection and conduction heat transfers in the AMR. However, the entropy generation by the convective heat transfer is mostly dominant in the optimized cases. In this paper, the design parameters and the operating conditions such as the distribution of the selected refrigerants in the layered AMR, the intermediate temperature between two stages and the mass flow rate of heat transfer fluid are specifically determined to maximize the performance of the AMR. The proposed design method will facilitate the construction of AMR systems with various magnetic refrigerants and conditions such as AMR size, operating temperature range, and magnetic field variation.

  15. Novel composite materials synthesized by the high-temperature interaction of pyrrole with layered oxide matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Alexandru Cezar

    The initial goal of the research presented herein was to develop the very first synthetic metal---high-temperature superconductor ceramic composite material, in the specific form of a polypyrrole---Bi2Sr2CaCu 2O8+delta nanocomposite. In the course of scientific investigation, this scope was broadened to encompass structurally and compositionally similar layered bismuthates and simpler layered oxides. The latter substrates were prepared through novel experimental procedures that enhanced the chance of yielding nanostructured morphologies. The designed novel synthesis approaches yielded a harvest of interesting results that may be further developed upon their dissemination in the scientific community. High-temperature interaction of pyrrole with molybdenum trioxide substrates with different crystalline phases and morphologies led to the formation of the first members of a new class of heterogeneous microcomposites characterized by incomplete occupancy by the metal oxide core of the volume encapsulated by the rigid, amorphous permeable polymeric membrane that reproduces the volume of the initial grain of precursor substrate. The method may be applied for various heterogeneous catalyst substrates for the precise determination of the catalytically active crystallographic planes. In a different project, room-temperature, templateless impregnation of molybdenum trioxide substrates with different crystalline phases and morphologies by a large excess of silver (I) cations led to the formation of 1-D nanostructured novel Ag-Mo-O ternary phase in what may be the simplest experimental procedure available to date that has yielded a 1-D nanostructure, regardless the nature of the constituent material. Interaction of this novel ternary phase with pyrrole vapors at high reaction temperatures led to heterogeneous nanostructured composites that exhibited a silver nanorod core. Nanoscrolls of vanadium pentoxide xerogel were synthesized through a novel, facile reflux-based method that

  16. Polymer Solar Cell Device Characteristics Are Independent of Vertical Phase Separation in Active Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2013-03-01

    Preferential segregation of organic semiconductor constituents in multicomponent thin-film active layers has long been speculated to affect the characteristics of bulk-heterojunction polymer solar cells. Using soft-contact lamination and delamination schemes - with which we have been able to remove compositionally well characterized polymer thin films, flip them over so as to reverse their composition profiles, and then transfer them onto existing device platforms - we showed unambiguously that the device performance of P3HT:PCBM solar cells are independent of the interfacial segregation characteristics of the active layers. Temperature-dependent single-carrier diode measurements of the organic semiconductor constituents suggest that the origin of this invariance stems from the fact that P3HT comprises a high density of mid-gap states. Hole carriers in these mid-gap states can in turn recombine with electrons at the electron-collecting interface, effectively promoting electron transfer from the cathode to the active layer.

  17. Interannual active layer thermal and dynamics evolution at the crater Lake CALM site, Deception Island (Antarctica).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Miguel; Vieira, Gonzalo; Ángel De Pablo, Miguel; Molina, Antonio; Abramov, Andrey

    2015-04-01

    Deception Island, is an active strato-volcano on South Shetland Archipelago of Antarctica (62° 55' 0″ S, 60° 37' 0″ W), is a cold region with harsh remote and hostile environmental conditions. The permafrost and active layer existence, and the cold climate conditions together with volcanic material with height water content inside made this region of the Earth a perfect site to study the active layer and permafrost evolution involved in the Circumpolar Active Layer South (CALM-S) program. The active layer is measured in late January or firs february (during the end of the thaw period) at the "Crater Lake" CALM site (62°58'06.7''; 60°40'44.8'') on Deception Island, Antarctica, at the period 2006 to 2014 we obtained a mean annual value of 29,7±2 cm. In this paper, we describe the spatial active layer thickness distribution and report the reduction on the mean thickness between February 2006 and 2014. Below the active layer, permafrost could be also reported (with a mean thickness of 4.5± 0.5 m.) based on the temperature data acquired by sensors installed at different depth inside the soil; three different shallow boreholes was drilled (1.0 m., 1.6 m., 4.5 m. in depth) and we have been registered its temperature gradient at the 2010 to 2013 period. Here we use all those data 1) to describe the thermal behavior of the permafrost at the CALM site, and 2) to describe its evolution (aggradation/degradation) along fourteen years of continuous measurements. We develop this study, to known the thermal behavior of the permafrost and the active layer related with the air/soil interaction being one of the most important factors the snow layer that was measured by the installation of termo-snowmeters with the complement of an automatic digital camera during the 2008 to 2014 period. On the other hand, the pyroclastics soil materials has a very high values of water content then the latent heat in the freezing/thawing process controls the active layer evolution and the

  18. Temperature and layer thickness dependent in situ investigations on epindolidione organic thin-film transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lassnig, R.; Striedinger, B.; Jones, A.O.F.; Scherwitzl, B.; Fian, A.; Głowacl, E.D.; Stadlober, B.; Winkler, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on in situ performance evaluations as a function of layer thickness and substrate temperature for bottom-gate, bottom-gold contact epindolidione organic thin-film transistors on various gate dielectrics. Experiments were carried out under ultra-high vacuum conditions, enabling quasi-simultaneous electrical and surface analysis. Auger electron spectroscopy and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) were applied to characterize the quality of the substrate surface and the thermal stability of the organic films. Ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to gain additional information on the layer formation and surface morphology of the hydrogen-bonded organic pigment. The examined gate dielectrics included SiO2, in its untreated and sputtered forms, as well as the spin-coated organic capping layers poly(vinyl-cinnamate) (PVCi) and poly((±)endo,exo-bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-ene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, diphenylester) (PNDPE, from the class of polynorbornenes). TDS and AFM revealed Volmer-Weber island growth dominated film formation with no evidence of a subjacent wetting layer. This growth mode is responsible for the comparably high coverage required for transistor behavior at 90–95% of a monolayer composed of standing molecules. Surface sputtering and an increased sample temperature during epindolidione deposition augmented the surface diffusion of adsorbing molecules and therefore led to a lower number of better-ordered islands. Consequently, while the onset of charge transport was delayed, higher saturation mobility was obtained. The highest, bottom-contact configuration, mobilities of approximately 2.5 × 10−3cm2/Vs were found for high coverages (50 nm) on sputtered samples. The coverage dependence of the mobility showed very different characteristics for the different gate dielectrics, while the change of the threshold voltage with coverage was approximately the same for all systems. An apparent decrease of the mobility with increasing coverage on the

  19. Statistical Averages of F-Layer Electron Density, Electron Temperature and Ion Temperature Over Millstone Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Holt, J. M.; Goncharenko, L.

    2001-12-01

    All Millstone Hill incoherent scatter radar data collected since 1978 are available through the Madrigal Database at MIT Haystack Observatory. A set of empirical models for basic and derived incoherent scatter parameters, including electron density Ne, electron and ion temperatures Te and Ti, electric field and parallel ion drift is being developed from this extensive dataset. Such models of the average behavior of key ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) parameters, based on long term accumulated data, are important for space weather studies not only in terms of quantitative descriptions of the IT system but also in terms of clarifying several outstanding scientific problems. This paper presents Ne, Te and Ti averages in the ionospheric F-layer from which local empirical models can be generated. We sort every parameter measured locally into bins. The binning parameters are local time (0000-2400 LT), the day of year (season), and altitude (150-1000 km). Each data point belongs to a certain bin and has corresponding solar flux index F107 and geomagnetic index Ap. For each bin, a multiple regression is performed for a function including (1) the constant term, (2) linear effect terms of F107 and (3) Ap, and (4) the F107 and Ap cross effect term, to give a set of fitting coefficients, such that our model of bin averages is keyed to F107 and Ap. The deviations of actual data from the model represent the remaining day-to-day variability. We will present the data distribution of each bin and discuss the main features of our averages and models.

  20. Temperature, Pulse, and Respiration. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runge, Lillian

    This learning activity package on temperature, pulse, and respiration is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics…

  1. Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant-temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spina, Eric F.

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective in the two research investigations performed under NASA Langley sponsorship (Turbulence measurements in hypersonic boundary layers using constant temperature anemometry and Reynolds stress measurements in hypersonic boundary layers) has been to increase the understanding of the physics of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. The study began with an extension of constant-temperature thermal anemometry techniques to a Mach 11 helium flow, including careful examinations of hot-wire construction techniques, system response, and system calibration. This was followed by the application of these techniques to the exploration of a Mach 11 helium turbulent boundary layer (To approximately 290 K). The data that was acquired over the course of more than two years consists of instantaneous streamwise mass flux measurements at a frequency response of about 500 kHz. The data are of exceptional quality in both the time and frequency domain and possess a high degree of repeatability. The data analysis that has been performed to date has added significantly to the body of knowledge on hypersonic turbulence, and the data reduction is continuing. An attempt was then made to extend these thermal anemometry techniques to higher enthalpy flows, starting with a Mach 6 air flow with a stagnation temperature just above that needed to prevent liquefaction (To approximately 475 F). Conventional hot-wire anemometry proved to be inadequate for the selected high-temperature, high dynamic pressure flow, with frequent wire breakage and poor system frequency response. The use of hot-film anemometry has since been investigated for these higher-enthalpy, severe environment flows. The difficulty with using hot-film probes for dynamic (turbulence) measurements is associated with construction limitations and conduction of heat into the film substrate. Work continues under a NASA GSRP grant on the development of a hot film probe that overcomes these shortcomings for hypersonic

  2. Improving ice nucleation activity of zein film through layer-by-layer deposition of extracellular ice nucleators.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ke; Yu, Hailong; Lee, Tung-Ching; Huang, Qingrong

    2013-11-13

    Zein protein has been of scientific interest in the development of biodegradable functional food packaging. This study aimed at developing a novel zein-based biopolymer film with ice nucleation activity through layer-by-layer deposition of biogenic ice nucleators, that is, extracellular ice nucleators (ECINs) isolated from Erwinia herbicola , onto zein film surface. The adsorption behaviors and mechanisms were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). On unmodified zein surface, the highest ECINs adsorption occurred at pH 5.0; on UV/ozone treated zein surface followed by deposition of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) layer, the optimum condition for ECINs adsorption occurred at pH 7.0 and I 0.05 M, where the amount of ECINs adsorbed was also higher than that on unmodified zein surface. QCM-D analyses further revealed a two-step adsorption process on unmodified zein surfaces, compared to a one-step adsorption process on PDADMAC-modified zein surface. Also, significantly, in order to quantify the ice nucleation activity of ECINs-coated zein films, an empirical method was developed to correlate the number of ice nucleators with the ice nucleation temperature measured by differential scanning calorimetry. Calculated using this empirical method, the highest ice nucleation activity of ECINs on ECINs-modified zein film reached 64.1 units/mm(2), which was able to elevate the ice nucleation temperature of distilled water from -15.5 °C to -7.3 °C. PMID:24106783

  3. Assessment of surface turbulent fluxes using geostationary satellite surface skin temperatures and a mixed layer planetary boundary layer scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diak, George R.; Stewart, Tod R.

    1989-01-01

    A method is presented for evaluating the fluxes of sensible and latent heating at the land surface, using satellite-measured surface temperature changes in a composite surface layer-mixed layer representation of the planetary boundary layer. The basic prognostic model is tested by comparison with synoptic station information at sites where surface evaporation climatology is well known. The remote sensing version of the model, using satellite-measured surface temperature changes, is then used to quantify the sharp spatial gradient in surface heating/evaporation across the central United States. An error analysis indicates that perhaps five levels of evaporation are recognizable by these methods and that the chief cause of error is the interaction of errors in the measurement of surface temperature change with errors in the assigment of surface roughness character. Finally, two new potential methods for remote sensing of the land-surface energy balance are suggested which will relay on space-borne instrumentation planned for the 1990s.

  4. Determination of heteroepitaxial layer relaxation at growth temperature from room temperature X-ray reciprocal space maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesener, Tobias; Klinger, Vera; Weuffen, Christoph; Lackner, David; Dimroth, Frank

    2013-04-01

    Lattice-mismatched heteroepitaxial growth in compound semiconductor layer structures, e.g. metamorphic buffers, is frequently used to combine materials with favorable properties. A detailed understanding of the strain relaxation during growth is important to optimize the buffer layers and to achieve high material quality. We present a method to determine the epilayer relaxation at growth temperature from room temperature X-ray diffraction measurements. For this the lattice parameters are measured with (004) and (224) reciprocal space maps along two orthogonal <110> directions to account for anisotropic misfit strain relaxation. Dissimilar thermal expansion coefficients of substrate and epilayer are taken into consideration when calculating the lattice parameters and epilayer relaxation parameters at growth temperature. The application of this method is discussed for GaAsxP1-x metamorphic buffer structure on Si with eight lattice-mismatched layers showing a relaxation parameter of over 130% at room temperature. All layers were found to be nearly 100% relaxed at growth temperature. The use of this method for other compound semiconductors is discussed.

  5. Single layer porous gold films grown at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Renyun; Hummelgård, Magnus; Olin, Håkan

    2010-11-01

    Large area porous gold films can be used in several areas including electrochemical electrodes, as an essential component in sensors, or as a conducting material in electronics. Here, we report on evaporation induced crystal growth of large area porous gold films at 20, 40 and 60 °C. The gold films were grown on liquid surface at 20 °C, while the films were grown on the wall of beakers when temperature increased to 40 and 60 °C. The porous gold films consisted of a dense network of gold nanowires as characterized by TEM and SEM. TEM diffraction results indicated that higher temperature formed larger crystallites of gold wires. An in situ TEM imaging of the coalescence of gold nanoparticles mimicked the process of the growth of these porous films, and a plotting of the coalescence time and the neck radius showed a diffusion process. The densities of these gold films were also characterized by transmittance, and the results showed film grown at 20 °C had the highest density, while the film grown at 60 °C had the lowest consistent with SEM and TEM characterization. Electrical measurements of these gold films showed that the most conductive films were the ones grown at 40 °C. The conductivities of the gold films were related to the amount of contamination, density and the diameter of the gold nanowires in the films. In addition, a gold film/gold nanoparticle hybrid was made, which showed a 10% decrease in transmittance during hybridization, pointing to applications as chemical and biological sensors.

  6. Temperature dependence of microwave oscillations in magnetic tunnel junctions with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Peng; Feng, Jiafeng E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Wei, Hongxiang E-mail: jiafengfeng@iphy.ac.cn; Han, Xiufeng; Fang, Bin; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming

    2015-01-05

    We experimentally study the temperature dependence of the spin-transfer-torque-induced microwave oscillations in MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction nanopillars with a perpendicularly magnetized free layer. We demonstrate that the oscillation frequency increases rapidly with decreasing temperature, which is mainly ascribed to the temperature dependence of both the saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We also find that a strong temperature dependence of the output power while a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of spectral linewidth are maintained for a constant dc bias in measured temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different dependences of oscillation frequency, output power, and linewidth are discussed.

  7. Layer-by-layer assembly of two temperature-responsive homopolymers at neutral pH and the temperature-dependent solubility of the multilayer film.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zan; Yin, Liang; Yuan, Gang; Wang, Liyan

    2012-02-01

    We fabricated a layer-by-layer (LbL) film of temperature-responsive homopolymers at neutral pH and studied its temperature-dependent solubility. We first measured the cloud point of mixed solutions of temperature-responsive polymers. The significant decrease of cloud point suggested that the intermolecular interaction between two polymer chains of different kinds was stronger than that between two polymer chains of the same kind. Strong intermolecular interaction between two polymer chains of different kinds is a prerequisite for LbL assembly. On the basis of the decrease of cloud point of mixed solutions of temperature-responsive homopolymers, we selected poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PVCL) and poly(2-hydroxypropyl acrylate) (PHPA) for LbL assembly. LbL films of the two polymers were fabricated at neutral pH at a constant temperature. When the film was immersed in purified water at a temperature lower than the assembly temperature, it can be partially dissolved with a diffusion-limited dissolution process. The temperature-responsive solubility of the LbL film is closely connected to the phase behavior of mixed solutions of the two polymers. Additionally, as compared to multilayer films of neutral polymers and poly(carboxylic acid)s, the PVCL/PHPA multilayer film is relatively stable when it was immersed in buffer solutions near physiological pH at the assembly temperature. Such LbL films with temperature-responsive solubility might be used as a dissolvable film or a smart capsule. PMID:22204705

  8. Surface Morphology Transformation Under High-Temperature Annealing of Ge Layers Deposited on Si(100).

    PubMed

    Shklyaev, A A; Latyshev, A V

    2016-12-01

    We study the surface morphology and chemical composition of SiGe layers after their formation under high-temperature annealing at 800-1100 °C of 30-150 nm Ge layers deposited on Si(100) at 400-500 °C. It is found that the annealing leads to the appearance of the SiGe layers of two types, i.e., porous and continuous. The continuous layers have a smoothened surface morphology and a high concentration of threading dislocations. The porous and continuous layers can coexist. Their formation conditions and the ratio between their areas on the surface depend on the thickness of deposited Ge layers, as well as on the temperature and the annealing time. The data obtained suggest that the porous SiGe layers are formed due to melting of the strained Ge layers and their solidification in the conditions of SiGe dewetting on Si. The porous and dislocation-rich SiGe layers may have properties interesting for applications. PMID:27541814

  9. The effects of fat layer on temperature distribution during microwave atrial fibrillation catheter ablation.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Fei; Nan, Qun; Guo, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of fat layer on the temperature distribution during microwave atrial fibrillation catheter ablation in the conditions of different ablation time; 3D finite element models (fat layer and no fat layer) were built, and temperature distribution was obtained based on coupled electromagnetic-thermal analysis at 2.45 GHz and 30 W of microwave power. Results shown: in the endocardial ablation, the existence of the fat layer did not affect the shape of the 50 °C contour before 30 s. The increase speed of depth became quite slowly in the model with fat layer after 30 s. When ablation depth needed fixed, there are no significant effect on effectively ablation depth whether fat layer over or not. However, the existence of fat layer makes the temperature lower in the myocardium, and maximum temperature point closer to the myocardium surface. What is more, in the model with fat layer, effective ablation reach lower maximum temperature and the shallower depth of 50 °C contour. But there are larger ablation axial length and transverse width. In this case, doctor should ensure safety of normal cardiac tissue around the target tissue. In the epicardial ablation, the existence of fat layer seriously affects result of the microwave ablation. The epicardial ablation needs more heating time to create lesion. But epicardial ablation can be better controlled in the shape of effective ablation area because of the slowly increase of target variables after the appearing of 50 °C contour. Doctor can choose endocardial or epicardial ablation in different case of clinic requirement. PMID:26296248

  10. Temperature, activity, and lizard life histories

    SciTech Connect

    Adolph, S.C.; Porter, W.P. )

    1993-08-01

    Lizard life-history characteristics vary widely among species and populations. Most authors seek adaptive or phylogenetic explanations for life-history patterns, which are usually presumed to reflect genetic differences. However, lizard life histories are often phenotypically plastic, varying in response to temperature, food availability, and other environmental factors. Despite the importance of temperature to lizard ecology and physiology, its effects on life histories have received relatively little attention. The authors present a theoretical model predicting the proximate consequences of the thermal environment for lizard life histories. Temperature, by affecting activity times, can cause variation in annual survival rate and fecundity, leading to a negative correlation between survival rate and fecundity among populations in different thermal environments. Thus, physiological and evolutionary models predict the same qualitative pattern of life-history variation in lizards. They tested their model with published life-history data from field studies of the lizard Sceloporus undulatus, using climate and geographical data to reconstruct estimated annual activity seasons. Among populations, annual activity times were negatively correlated with annual survival rate and positively correlated with annual fecundity. Proximate effects of temperature may confound comparative analyses of lizard life-history variation and should be included in future evolutionary models. 125 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Low temperature exfoliation process in hydrogen-implanted germanium layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferain, I. P.; Byun, K. Y.; Colinge, C. A.; Brightup, S.; Goorsky, M. S.

    2010-03-01

    The feasibility of transferring hydrogen-implanted germanium to silicon with a reduced thermal budget is demonstrated. Germanium samples were implanted with a splitting dose of 5×1016 H2+ cm-2 at 180 keV and a two-step anneal was performed. Surface roughness and x-ray diffraction pattern measurements, combined with cross-sectional TEM analysis of hydrogen-implanted germanium samples were carried out in order to understand the exfoliation mechanism as a function of the thermal budget. It is shown that the first anneal performed at low temperature (≤150 °C for 22 h) enhances the nucleation of hydrogen platelets significantly. The second anneal is performed at 300 °C for 5 min and is shown to complete the exfoliation process by triggering the formation of extended platelets. Two key results are highlighted: (i) in a reduced thermal budget approach, the transfer of hydrogen-implanted germanium is found to follow a mechanism similar to the transfer of hydrogen-implanted InP and GaAs, (ii) such a low thermal budget (<300 °C) is found to be suitable for directly bonded heterogeneous substrates, such as germanium bonded to silicon, where different thermal expansion coefficients are involved.

  12. Amorphous Silicon Carbide Passivating Layers to Enable Higher Processing Temperature in Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2015-04-06

    "Very efficient crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells have been demonstrated when thin layers of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are used for passivation and carrier selectivity in a heterojunction device. One limitation of this device structure is the (parasitic) absorption in the front passivation/collection a-Si:H layers; another is the degradation of the a-Si:H-based passivation upon temperature, limiting the post-processes to approximately 200°C thus restricting the contacting possibilities and potential tandem device fabrication. To alleviate these two limitations, we explore the potential of amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H), a widely studied material in use in standard a-Si:H thin-film solar cells, which is known for its wider bandgap, increased hydrogen content and stronger hydrogen bonding compared to a-Si:H. We study the surface passivation of solar-grade textured n-type c-Si wafers for symmetrical stacks of 10-nm-thick intrinsic a-SiC:H with various carbon content followed by either p-doped or n-doped a-Si:H (referred to as i/p or i/n stacks). For both doping types, passivation (assessed through carrier lifetime measurements) is degraded by increasing the carbon content in the intrinsic a-SiC:H layer. Yet, this hierarchy is reversed after annealing at 350°C or more due to drastic passivation improvements upon annealing when an a-SiC:H layer is used. After annealing at 350°C, lifetimes of 0.4 ms and 2.0 ms are reported for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, when using an intrinsic a-SiC:H layer with approximately 10% of carbon (initial lifetimes of 0.3 ms and 0.1 ms, respectively, corresponding to a 30% and 20-fold increase, respectively). For stacks of pure a-Si:H material the lifetimes degrade from 1.2 ms and 2.0 ms for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, to less than 0.1 ms and 1.1 ms (12-fold and 2-fold decrease, respectively). For complete solar cells using pure a-Si:H i/p and i/n stacks, the open-circuit voltage (Voc

  13. Influence of Atomic Layer Deposition Temperatures on TiO2/n-Si MOS Capacitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Daming; Hossain, T; Garces, N. Y.; Nepal, N.; Meyer III, Harry M; Kirkham, Melanie J; Eddy, C.R., Jr.; Edgar, J H

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the influence of temperature on the structure, composition, and electrical properties of TiO2 thin films deposited on n-type silicon (100) by atomic layer deposition (ALD). TiO2 layers around 20nm thick, deposited at temperatures ranging from 100 to 300 C, were studied. Samples deposited at 250 C and 200 C had the most uniform coverage as determined by atomic force microscopy. The average carbon concentration throughout the oxide layer and at the TiO2/Si interface was lowest at 200 C. Metal oxide semiconductor capacitors (MOSCAPs) were fabricated, and profiled by capacitance-voltage techniques. Negligible hysteresis was observed from a capacitance-voltage plot and the capacitance in the accumulation region was constant for the sample prepared at a 200 C ALD growth temperature. The interface trap density was on the order of 1013 eV-1cm-2 regardless of the deposition temperature.

  14. Investigations of Effects of Surface Temperature and Single Roughness Elements on Boundary-Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liepmann, Hans W; Fila, Gertrude H

    1947-01-01

    The laminar boundary layer and the position of the transition point were investigated on a heated flat plate. It was found that the Reynolds number of transition decreased as the temperature of the plate is increased. It is shown from simple qualitative analytical considerations that the effect of variable viscosity in the boundary layer due to the temperature difference produces a velocity profile with an inflection point if the wall temperature is higher than the free-stream temperature. This profile is confirmed by measurements. The instability of inflection-point profiles is discussed. Studies of the flow in the wake of large, two-dimensional roughness elements are presented. It is shown that a boundary-layer can separate and reattach itself to the wall without having transition take place.

  15. Monitoring of the active layer at Kapp Linne', SVALBARD 1972-2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerman, J.

    2003-04-01

    The active layer has been monitored at ten sites in the vicinity of Kapp Linné, (78o03'42" 13o37'07") Svalbard during the period 1972 - 2002. The ten sites differ in elevation, distance from the sea, vegetation cover, substrate and active periglacial processes. From 1994 the International permafrost Association "CALM" standard grids, with measurement within 100x100m squares, has been applied. Microclimate and soil temperatures have been monitored by data logger covering levels form 2 m above to 7m below the ground. The macroclimate is covered by complete data series from the nearby weather station at Kapp Linne’, covering the period 1912 to 2002. A number of periglacial processes, especially slope processes, are monitored parallel with the active layer. The mean active layer for the sites varies between 1,13m and 0,43m. The deepest active layer is found in the exposed, well drained raised beach ridges and the shallowest in the bogs. The interannual variability during the observation period do not correlate well with the MAAT but better with the summer climate, June - August mean or DDT. The data clearly illustrate colder summers during the period 1972 to 1983 and after that steadily increasing summer temperatures. The active layer follows the same general pattern with good correlations. There are several surface indications as a response to the deepening active layer especially in the bogs. Thermokarst scars appear frequently and a majority of the palsa like mounds and pounus have disappeared. A drastic change in the vegetation on the bogs has also occurred, from dry heath to wet Carex vegetation. In summary the observations from Kapp Linne’ are; 1. A clear trend towards milder summers, 2. A clear trend towards deeper active layers, 3. All sites show a similar pattern, 4. The bogs are getting strikingly wetter, 5. Mounds in the bog sites are disappearing, 6. The slow slope processes are getting accelerated, 7. Thermokarst depressions and scars are appearing in

  16. Titanium casting: the surface reaction layer of castings obtained using ultra-low-temperature molds.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, H; Onouchi, M; Hsu, H C; Kurotani, T; Nishiyama, M

    2001-03-01

    To examine whether the surface reaction layer of titanium castings can be reduced by lowering the mold temperature during casting, we cast titanium at three mold temperatures, including an ultra-low temperature produced by cooling the mold with liquid nitrogen, then measured the tensile strength and elongation of the castings. The titanium was cast using a centrifugal casting machine, and the molds were incinerated according to the manufacturers' instructions. Castings were then made with the molds at 200 degrees C, 600 degrees C, and an ultra-low temperature (-196 degrees C). The castability of titanium cast in the mold at the ultra-low temperature was good. The Vickers hardness near the surface layer of castings decreased as the mold temperature decreased. PMID:11383633

  17. Temperature Activated Diffusion of Radicals through Ion Implanted Polymers.

    PubMed

    Wakelin, Edgar A; Davies, Michael J; Bilek, Marcela M M; McKenzie, David R

    2015-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a promising technique for immobilizing biomolecules on the surface of polymers. Radicals generated in a subsurface layer by PIII treatment diffuse throughout the substrate, forming covalent bonds to molecules when they reach the surface. Understanding and controlling the diffusion of radicals through this layer will enable efficient optimization of this technique. We develop a model based on site to site diffusion according to Fick's second law with temperature activation according to the Arrhenius relation. Using our model, the Arrhenius exponential prefactor (for barrierless diffusion), D0, and activation energy, EA, for a radical to diffuse from one position to another are found to be 3.11 × 10(-17) m(2) s(-1) and 0.31 eV, respectively. The model fits experimental data with a high degree of accuracy and allows for accurate prediction of radical diffusion to the surface. The model makes useful predictions for the lifetime over which the surface is sufficiently active to covalently immobilize biomolecules and it can be used to determine radical fluence during biomolecule incubation for a range of storage and incubation temperatures so facilitating selection of the most appropriate parameters. PMID:26562064

  18. Layered YSZ/SCSZ/YSZ Electrolytes for Intermediate Temperature SOFC Part I: Design and Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Orlovskaya, Nina; Klimov, Mikhail; Huang, Xinyu; Cullen, David A; Graule, Thomas; Kuebler, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    (Sc2O3)0.1(CeO2)0.01(ZrO2)0.89 (SCSZ) ceramic electrolyte has superior ionic conductivity in the intermediate temperature range (700 800 C), but it does not exhibit good phase and chemical stability in comparison with 8 mol% Y2O3 ZrO2 (YSZ). To maintain high ionic conductivity and improve the stability in the whole electrolyte, layered structures with YSZ outer layers and SCSZ inner layers were designed. Because of a mismatch of coefficients of thermal expansion and Young's moduli of SCSZ and YSZ phases, upon cooling of the electrolytes after sintering, thermal residual stresses will arise, leading to a possible strengthening of the layered composite and, therefore, an increase in the reliability of the electrolyte. Laminated electrolytes with three, four, and six layers design were manufactured using tape-casting, lamination, and sintering techniques. After sintering, while the thickness of YSZ outer layers remained constant at 30 m, the thickness of the SCSZ inner layer varied from 30 m for a Y SC Y three-layered electrolyte, 60 m for a Y 2SC Y four-layered electrolyte, and 120 m for a Y 4SC Y six-layered electrolyte. The microstructure, crystal structure, impurities present, and the density of the sintered electrolytes were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray and neutron diffraction, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and water immersion techniques.

  19. Micromachined Active Magnetic Regenerator for Low-Temperature Magnetic Coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Weibo; Jaeger, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A design of an Active Magnetic Regenerative Refrigeration (AMRR) system has been developed for space applications. It uses an innovative 3He cryogenic circulator to provide continuous remote/distributed cooling at temperatures in the range of 2 K with a heat sink at about 15 K. A critical component technology for this cooling system is a highly efficient active magnetic regenerator, which is a regenerative heat exchanger with its matrix material made of magnetic refrigerant gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG). Creare Inc. is developing a microchannel GGG regenerator with an anisotropic structured bed for high system thermal efficiency. The regenerator core consists of a stack of thin, single-crystal GGG disks alternating with thin polymer insulating layers. The insulating layers help minimize the axial conduction heat leak, since GGG has a very high thermal conductivity in the regenerator s operating temperature range. The GGG disks contain micro channels with width near 100 micrometers, which enhance the heat transfer between the circulating flow and the refrigerant bed. The unique flow configuration of the GGG plates ensures a uniform flow distribution across the plates. The main fabrication challenges for the regenerator are the machining of high-aspect-ratio microchannels in fragile, single-crystal GGG disks and fabrication and assembly of the GGG insulation layers. Feasibility demonstrations to date include use of an ultrashort- pulse laser to machine microchannels without producing unacceptable microcracking or deposition of recast material, as shown in the figure, and attachment of a thin insulation layer to a GGG disk without obstructing the flow paths. At the time of this reporting, efforts were focused on improving the laser machining process to increase machining speed and further reduce microcracking.

  20. Local and Sustained Activity of Doxycycline Delivered with Layer-by-Layer Microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dong; Gould, David J; Sukhorukov, Gleb B

    2016-04-11

    Achieving localized delivery of small molecule drugs has the potential to increase efficacy and reduce off target and side effects associated with systemic distribution. Herein, we explore the potential use of layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled microcapsules for the delivery of doxycycline. Absorbance of doxycycline onto core dextran sulfate of preassembled microcapsules provides an efficient method to load both synthetic and biodegradable microcapsules with the drug. Application of an outer layer lipid coat enhances the sustained in vitro release of doxycycline from both microcapsule types. To monitor doxycycline delivery in a biological system, C2C12 mouse myoblasts are engineered to express EGFP under the control of the optimized components of the tetracycline regulated gene expression system. Microcapsules are not toxic to these cells, and upon delivery to the cells, EGFP is more efficiently induced in those cells that contain engulfed microcapsules and monitored EGFP expression clearly demonstrates that synthetic microcapsules with a DPPC coat are the most efficient for sustain intracellular delivery. Doxycycline released from microcapsules also displayed sustained activity in an antimicrobial growth inhibition assay compared with doxycycline solution. This study reveals the potential for LbL microcapsules in small molecule drug delivery and their feasible use for achieving prolonged doxycycline activity. PMID:26967921

  1. Use of Atomic Layer Deposition to Improve the Stability of Silver Substrates for In-Situ, High Temperature SERS Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    John, Joshy; Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Dai, Sheng; Sepaniak, Michael

    2010-01-01

    A method to stabilize silver surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates for in-situ, high temperature applications is demonstrated. Silver island films grown by thermal evaporation were coated with a thin layer (from 2.5nm to 5nm) of alumina by atomic layer deposition (ALD), which protects and stabilizes the SERS-active substrate without eliminating the Raman enhancement. The temporal stability of the alumina-coated silver island films was examined by measurement of the Raman intensity of rhodamine 6G molecules deposited onto bare and alumina-coated silver substrates over the course of thirty-four days. The coated substrates showed almost no change in SERS enhancement while the uncoated substrates exhibited a significant decrease in Raman intensity. To demonstrate the feasibility of the alumina-coated silver substrate as a probe of adsorbates and reactions at elevated temperatures, an in-situ SERS measurement of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate on bare and alumina-coated silver was performed at temperatures ranging from 25 C to 400 C. ALD deposition of an ultrathin alumina layer significantly improved the thermal stability of the SERS substrate thus enabling in-situ detection of the dehydration of the calcium nitrate tetrahydrate at elevated temperature. Despite some loss of Raman signal, the coated substrate exhibited greater thermal stability compared to the uncoated substrate. These experiments show that ALD can be used to synthesize stable SERS substrates capable of measuring adsorbates and processes at high temperature.

  2. Active layer hydrology for Imnavait Creek, Toolik, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    In the annual hydrologic cycle, snowmelt is the most significant event at Imnavait Creek located near Toolik Lake, Alaska. Precipitation that has accumulated for more than 6 months on the surface melts in a relatively short period of 7 to 10 days once sustained melting occurs. During the ablation period, runoff dominates the hydrologic cycle. Some meltwater goes to rewetting the organic soils in the active layer. The remainder is lost primarily because of evaporation, since transpiration is not a very active process at this time. Following the snowmelt period, evapotranspiration becomes the dominate process, with base flow contributing the other watershed losses. It is important to note that the water initally lost by evapotranspiration entered the organic layer during melt. This water from the snowpack ensures that each year the various plant communities will have sufficient water to start a new summer of growth.

  3. Temperature (de)activated patchy colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de las Heras, Daniel; Telo da Gama, Margarida M.

    2016-06-01

    We present a new model of patchy particles in which the interaction sites can be activated or deactivated by varying the temperature of the system. We study the thermodynamics of the system by means of Wertheim’s first order perturbation theory, and use Flory–Stockmayer theory of polymerization to analyse the percolation threshold. We find a very rich phase behaviour including lower critical points and reentrant percolation.

  4. Temperature (de)activated patchy colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    de Las Heras, Daniel; da Gama, Margarida M Telo

    2016-06-22

    We present a new model of patchy particles in which the interaction sites can be activated or deactivated by varying the temperature of the system. We study the thermodynamics of the system by means of Wertheim's first order perturbation theory, and use Flory-Stockmayer theory of polymerization to analyse the percolation threshold. We find a very rich phase behaviour including lower critical points and reentrant percolation. PMID:27115118

  5. Effect of temperature change on anammox activity.

    PubMed

    Lotti, T; Kleerebezem, R; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2015-01-01

    Autotrophic nitrogen removal appears as a prerequisite for the implementation of energy autarchic municipal wastewater treatment plants. Whilst the application of anammox-related technologies in the side-stream is at present state of the art, the feasibility of this energy-efficient process in main-stream conditions is still under investigation. Lower operating temperatures and ammonium concentrations, together with a demand for high and stable nitrogen removal efficiency, represent the main challenges to overcome for this appealing new frontier of the wastewater treatment field. In this study, we report the short-term effect of temperature on the maximum biomass specific activity of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) bacteria as evaluated by means of batch tests. The experiments were performed on anammox biomass sampled from two full-scale reactors and two lab-scale reactors, all characterized by different reactor configurations and operating conditions. The results indicate that for the anammox conversion, the temperature dependency cannot be accurately modeled by one single Arrhenius coefficient (i.e., θ) as typically applied for other biological processes. The temperature effect is increasing at lower temperatures. Adaptation of anammox bacteria after long-term cultivation at 20 and 10°C was observed. Implications for modeling and process design are finally discussed. PMID:25042674

  6. Solar activity and the mean global temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Sloan, T.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2009-01-01

    The variation with time from 1956 to 2002 of the globally averaged rate of ionization produced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere is deduced and shown to have a cyclic component of period roughly twice the 11 year solar cycle period. Long term variations in the global average surface temperature as a function of time since 1956 are found to have a similar cyclic component. The cyclic variations are also observed in the solar irradiance and in the mean daily sun spot number. The cyclic variation in the cosmic ray rate is observed to be delayed by 2-4 years relative to the temperature, the solar irradiance and daily sun spot variations suggesting that the origin of the correlation is more likely to be direct solar activity than cosmic rays. Assuming that the correlation is caused by such solar activity, we deduce that the maximum recent increase in the mean surface temperature of the Earth which can be ascribed to this activity is {\\lesssim }14% of the observed global warming.

  7. Layered shielding design for an active neutron interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    The use of source and detector shields in active neutron interrogation can improve detector signal. In simulations, a shielded detector with a source rotated π/3 rad relative to the opening decreased neutron flux roughly three orders of magnitude. Several realistic source and detector shield configurations were simulated. A layered design reduced neutron and secondary photon flux in the detector by approximately one order of magnitude for a deuterium-tritium source. The shield arrangement can be adapted for a portable, modular design.

  8. a Spatio-Temporal Framework for Modeling Active Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touyz, J.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Nelson, F. E.; Apanasovich, T. V.

    2015-07-01

    The Arctic is experiencing an unprecedented rate of environmental and climate change. The active layer (the uppermost layer of soil between the atmosphere and permafrost that freezes in winter and thaws in summer) is sensitive to both climatic and environmental changes, and plays an important role in the functioning, planning, and economic activities of Arctic human and natural ecosystems. This study develops a methodology for modeling and estimating spatial-temporal variations in active layer thickness (ALT) using data from several sites of the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring network, and demonstrates its use in spatial-temporal interpolation. The simplest model's stochastic component exhibits no spatial or spatio-temporal dependency and is referred to as the naïve model, against which we evaluate the performance of the other models, which assume that the stochastic component exhibits either spatial or spatio-temporal dependency. The methods used to fit the models are then discussed, along with point forecasting. We compare the predicted fit of the various models at key study sites located in the North Slope of Alaska and demonstrate the advantages of space-time models through a series of error statistics such as mean squared error, mean absolute and percent deviance from observed data. We find the difference in performance between the spatio-temporal and remaining models is significant for all three error statistics. The best stochastic spatio-temporal model increases predictive accuracy, compared to the naïve model, of 33.3%, 36.2% and 32.5% on average across the three error metrics at the key sites for a one-year hold out period.

  9. Optimizing pentacene thin-film transistor performance: Temperature and surface condition induced layer growth modification

    PubMed Central

    Lassnig, R.; Hollerer, M.; Striedinger, B.; Fian, A.; Stadlober, B.; Winkler, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present in situ electrical and surface analytical, as well as ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies on temperature and surface condition induced pentacene layer growth modifications, leading to the selection of optimized deposition conditions and entailing performance improvements. We prepared p++-silicon/silicon dioxide bottom-gate, gold bottom-contact transistor samples and evaluated the pentacene layer growth for three different surface conditions (sputtered, sputtered + carbon and unsputtered + carbon) at sample temperatures during deposition of 200 K, 300 K and 350 K. The AFM investigations focused on the gold contacts, the silicon dioxide channel region and the highly critical transition area. Evaluations of coverage dependent saturation mobilities, threshold voltages and corresponding AFM analysis were able to confirm that the first 3–4 full monolayers contribute to the majority of charge transport within the channel region. At high temperatures and on sputtered surfaces uniform layer formation in the contact–channel transition area is limited by dewetting, leading to the formation of trenches and the partial development of double layer islands within the channel region instead of full wetting layers. By combining the advantages of an initial high temperature deposition (well-ordered islands in the channel) and a subsequent low temperature deposition (continuous film formation for low contact resistance) we were able to prepare very thin (8 ML) pentacene transistors of comparably high mobility. PMID:26543442

  10. Observation and analysis of the temperature inversion layer by Raman lidar up to the lower stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufeng; Cao, Xiaoming; He, Tingyao; Gao, Fei; Hua, Dengxin; Zhao, Meina

    2015-12-01

    The vibration-rotational Raman lidar system built in Xi'an, China (34.233°N, 108.911°E) was used to simultaneously detect atmospheric temperature, water vapor, and aerosols under different weather conditions. Temperature measurement examples showed good agreement with radiosonde data in terms of the lapse rates and heights of the inversion layer under the lower stratosphere. The statistical temperature error due to the signal-to-noise ratio is less than 1 K up to a height of 15 km, and is estimated to be less than 3 K below a height of 22 km. High-quality temperature data were collected from 70 nighttime observations from October 2013 to May 2014, and were used to analyze the temperature inversion characteristics at Xi'an, which is a typical city in the northwest of China. The tropopause height over the Xi'an area was almost 17-18 km, and the inversion layer often formed above the cloud layer. In the winter at night, inversions within the boundary layer can easily form with a high occurrence of ∼60% based on 47 nights from 01 November 2013 to 21 January 2014. Continuous observation of atmospheric temperature, water vapor (relative humidity), and aerosols was carried out during one night, and the relevant changes were analyzed in the boundary layer via the joint observation of atmospheric visibility, PM2.5 and PM10 from a ground visibility meter and from a monitoring site, which revealed that the temperature inversion layer has a great influence on the formation of fog and haze during the winter night and early morning. PMID:26836664

  11. Unforeseen high temperature and humidity stability of FeCl3 intercalated few layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Wehenkel, Dominique Joseph; Bointon, Thomas Hardisty; Booth, Tim; Bøggild, Peter; Craciun, Monica Felicia; Russo, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    We present the first systematic study of the stability of the structure and electrical properties of FeCl3 intercalated few-layer graphene to high levels of humidity and high temperature. Complementary experimental techniques such as electrical transport, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy conclusively demonstrate the unforseen stability of this transparent conductor to a relative humidity up to 100% at room temperature for 25 days, to a temperature up to 150°C in atmosphere and to a temperature as high as 620°C in vacuum, that is more than twice higher than the temperature at which the intercalation is conducted. The stability of FeCl3 intercalated few-layer graphene together with its unique values of low square resistance and high optical transparency, makes this material an attractive transparent conductor in future flexible electronic applications. PMID:25567796

  12. Unforeseen high temperature and humidity stability of FeCl3 intercalated few layer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Wehenkel, Dominique Joseph; Bointon, Thomas Hardisty; Booth, Tim; Bøggild, Peter; Craciun, Monica Felicia; Russo, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    We present the first systematic study of the stability of the structure and electrical properties of FeCl3 intercalated few-layer graphene to high levels of humidity and high temperature. Complementary experimental techniques such as electrical transport, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy conclusively demonstrate the unforseen stability of this transparent conductor to a relative humidity up to 100% at room temperature for 25 days, to a temperature up to 150°C in atmosphere and to a temperature as high as 620°C in vacuum, that is more than twice higher than the temperature at which the intercalation is conducted. The stability of FeCl3 intercalated few-layer graphene together with its unique values of low square resistance and high optical transparency, makes this material an attractive transparent conductor in future flexible electronic applications. PMID:25567796

  13. Efficient low-temperature transparent electrocatalytic layers based on graphene oxide nanosheets for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seon Hee; Jeong, Eun Ji; Han, Joong Tark; Kang, Hyon Chol; Cha, Seung I; Lee, Dong Yoon; Lee, Geon-Woong

    2015-05-27

    Electrocatalytic materials with a porous structure have been fabricated on glass substrates, via high-temperature fabrication, for application as alternatives to platinum in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Efficient, nonporous, nanometer-thick electrocatalytic layers based on graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were prepared on plastic substrates using electrochemical control at low temperatures of ≤100 °C. Single-layer, oxygen-rich GO nanosheets prepared on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates were electrochemically deoxygenated in acidic medium within a narrow scan range in order to obtain marginally reduced GO at minimum expense of the oxygen groups. The resulting electrochemically reduced GO (E-RGO) had a high density of residual alcohol groups with high electrocatalytic activity toward the positively charged cobalt-complex redox mediators used in DSCs. The ultrathin, alcohol-rich E-RGO layer on ITO-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate) was successfully applied as a lightweight, low-temperature counter electrode with an extremely high optical transmittance of ∼97.7% at 550 nm. A cobalt(II/III)-mediated DSC employing the highly transparent, alcohol-rich E-RGO electrode exhibited a photovoltaic power conversion efficiency of 5.07%. This is superior to that obtained with conventionally reduced GO using hydrazine (3.94%) and even similar to that obtained with platinum (5.10%). This is the first report of a highly transparent planar electrocatalytic layer based on carbonaceous materials fabricated on ITO plastics for application in DSCs. PMID:25945810

  14. Is the boundary layer of an ionic liquid equally lubricating at higher temperature?

    PubMed

    Hjalmarsson, Nicklas; Atkin, Rob; Rutland, Mark W

    2016-03-23

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to study the effect of temperature on normal forces and friction for the room temperature ionic liquid (IL) ethylammonium nitrate (EAN), confined between mica and a silica colloid probe at 25 °C, 50 °C, and 80 °C. Force curves revealed a strong fluid dynamic influence at room temperature, which was greatly reduced at elevated temperatures due to the reduced liquid viscosity. A fluid dynamic analysis reveals that bulk viscosity is manifested at large separation but that EAN displays a nonzero slip, indicating a region of different viscosity near the surface. At high temperatures, the reduction in fluid dynamic force reveals step-like force curves, similar to those found at room temperature using much lower scan rates. The ionic liquid boundary layer remains adsorbed to the solid surface even at high temperature, which provides a mechanism for lubrication when fluid dynamic lubrication is strongly reduced. The friction data reveals a decrease in absolute friction force with increasing temperature, which is associated with increased thermal motion and reduced viscosity of the near surface layers but, consistent with the normal force data, boundary layer lubrication was unaffected. The implications for ILs as lubricants are discussed in terms of the behaviour of this well characterised system. PMID:26976694

  15. Vibration control of cylindrical shells using active constrained layer damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Manas C.; Chen, Tung-Huei; Baz, Amr M.

    1997-05-01

    The fundamentals of controlling the structural vibration of cylindrical shells treated with active constrained layer damping (ACLD) treatments are presented. The effectiveness of the ACLD treatments in enhancing the damping characteristics of thin cylindrical shells is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. A finite element model (FEM) is developed to describe the dynamic interaction between the shells and the ACLD treatments. The FEM is used to predict the natural frequencies and the modal loss factors of shells which are partially treated with patches of the ACLD treatments. The predictions of the FEM are validated experimentally using stainless steel cylinders which are 20.32 cm in diameter, 30.4 cm in length and 0.05 cm in thickness. The cylinders are treated with ACLD patches of different configurations in order to target single or multi-modes of lobar vibrations. The ACLD patches used are made of DYAD 606 visco-elastic layer which is sandwiched between two layers of PVDF piezo-electric films. Vibration attenuations of 85% are obtained with maximum control voltage of 40 volts. Such attenuations are attributed to the effectiveness of the ACLD treatment in increasing the modal damping ratios by about a factor of four over those of conventional passive constrained layer damping (PCLD) treatments. The obtained results suggest the potential of the ACLD treatments in controlling the vibration of cylindrical shells which constitute the major building block of many critical structures such as cabins of aircrafts, hulls of submarines and bodies of rockets and missiles.

  16. High performance catalyzed-reaction layer for medium temperature operating solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, M.; Uchida, H.; Shibata, M.; Mochizuki, N.; Amikura, K. . Lab. of Electrochemical Energy Conversion)

    1994-02-01

    New concepts for a high performance catalyzed-reaction layer for medium temperature operating solid oxide fuel cells were proposed. Mixed conducting oxide particles, samaria-doped ceria (SDC), were employed as the anode material utilizing highly dispersed noble metal catalysts on their surface. As the cathode material, Sr-doped LaMnO[sub 3] (LSM) particles catalyzed with microcrystalline Pt were employed. Performances of the anode or cathode were examined in the cell using yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte at a series of operating temperatures. It was found that the anodic polarization resistance and its activation energy were greatly decreased by loading only a small amount of the catalysts (such as Ru, Rh, and Pt) onto the SDC particles. The polarization loss at the anode showed a minimum value by using the SDC particles with a mean diameter of 1.5 to 2.0 [mu]m. A large depolarizing effect was also observed with a Pt-catalyzed LSM cathode, especially at high current densities.

  17. Anomalous temperature dependence of layer spacing of de Vries liquid crystals: Compensation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, K.; Kocot, A.; Vij, J. K.; Stevenson, P. J.; Panov, A.; Rodriguez, D.

    2016-06-01

    Smectic liquid crystals that exhibit temperature independent layer thickness offer technological advantages for their use in displays and photonic devices. The dependence of the layer spacing in SmA and SmC phases of de Vries liquid crystals is found to exhibit distinct features. On entering the SmC phase, the layer thickness initially decreases below SmA to SmC (TA-C) transition temperature but increases anomalously with reducing temperature despite the molecular tilt increasing. This anomalous observation is being explained quantitatively. Results of IR spectroscopy show that layer shrinkage is caused by tilt of the mesogen's rigid core, whereas the expansion is caused by the chains getting more ordered with reducing temperature. This mutual compensation arising from molecular fragments contributing to the layer thickness differs from the previous models. The orientational order parameter of the rigid core of the mesogen provides direct evidence for de Vries cone model in the SmA phase for the two compounds investigated.

  18. Effect of etching stop layer on characteristics of amorphous IGZO thin film transistor fabricated at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xifeng; Xin, Enlong; Chen, Longlong; Shi, Jifeng; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-03-01

    Transparent bottom-gate amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) had been successfully fabricated at relative low temperature. The influence of reaction gas ratio of N2O and SiH4 during the growth of etching stop layer (SiOx) on the characteristics of a-IGZO TFTs was investigated. The transfer characteristics of the TFTs were changed markedly because active layer of a-IGZO films was modified by plasma in the growth process of SiOx. By optimizing the deposition parameters of etching stop layer process, a-IGZO TFTs were manufactured and exhibited good performance with a field-effect mobility of 8.5 cm2V-1s-1, a threshold voltage of 1.3 V, and good stability under gate bias stress of 20 V for 10000 s.

  19. Mobility enhancement and temperature dependence in top-gated single-layer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2013-10-01

    The deposition of a high-κ oxide overlayer is known to significantly enhance the room-temperature electron mobility in single-layer MoS2 (SLM) but not in single-layer graphene. We give a quantitative account of how this mobility enhancement is due to the nondegeneracy of the two-dimensional electron gas system in SLM at accessible temperatures. Using our charged impurity scattering model [Ong and Fischetti, Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.86.121409 86, 121409 (2012)] and temperature-dependent polarizability, we calculate the charged impurity-limited mobility (μimp) in SLM with and without a high-κ (HfO2) top-gate oxide at different electron densities and temperatures. We find that the mobility enhancement is larger at low electron densities and high temperatures because of finite-temperature screening, thus explaining the enhancement of the mobility observed at room temperature. μimp is shown to decrease significantly with increasing temperature, suggesting that the strong temperature dependence of measured mobilities should not be interpreted as being solely due to inelastic scattering with phonons. We also reproduce the recently seen experimental trend in which the temperature scaling exponent (γ) of μimp∝T-γ is smaller in top-gated SLM than in bare SLM. Finally, we show that ˜37% mobility enhancement can be achieved by reducing the HfO2 thickness from 20 to 2 nm.

  20. Activation Layer Stabilization of High Polarization Photocathodes in Sub-Optimal RF Gun Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory A. Mulhollan

    2010-11-16

    Specific activation recipes for bulk, 100 nm thick MBE grown and high polarization III-V photocathode material have been developed which mitigate the effects of exposure to background gasses. Lifetime data using four representative gasses were acquired for bulk GaAs, 100 nm unstrained GaAs and strained superlattice GaAs/GaAsP, all activated both with Cs and then Cs and Li (bi-alkali). Each photoemitter showed marked resilience improvement when activated using the bi-alkali recipe compared to the standard single alkali recipe. A dual alkali activation system at SLAC was constructed, baked and commissioned with the purpose of performing spin-polarization measurements on electrons emitted from the bi-alkali activated surfaces. An end station at SSRL was configured with the required sources for energy resolved photoemission measurements on the bi-alkali activated and CO2 dosed surfaces. The bi-alkali recipes were successfully implemented at SLAC/SSRL. Measurements at SLAC of the photoelectron spin-polarization from the modified activation surface showed no sign of a change in value compared to the standard activated material, i.e., no ill effects. Analysis of photoemission data indicates that the addition of Li to the activation layer results in a multi-layer structure. The presence of Li in the activation layer also acts as an inhibitor to CO2 absorption, hence better lifetimes in worse vacuum were achieved. The bi-alkali activation has been tested on O2 activated GaAs for comparison with NF3 activated surfaces. Comparable resilience to CO2 exposure was achieved for the O2 activated surface. An RF PECVD amorphous silicon growth system was modified to allow high temperature heat cleaning of GaAs substrates prior to film deposition. Growth versus thickness data were collected. Very thin amorphous silicon germanium layers were optimized to exhibit good behavior as an electron emitter. Growth of the amorphous silicon germanium films on the above substrates was fine tuned

  1. Surface activation of CNT Webs towards layer by layer assembly of biosensors.

    PubMed

    Musameh, Mustafa; Huynh, Chi P; Hickey, Mark; Kyratzis, Ilias Louis

    2016-04-25

    Several surface activation methods such as chemical, electrochemical and plasma have been used for enhancing the electrochemical performance of carbon based electrodes for various applications. However, some of these surface activation methods may not be useful depending on the chemical and physical properties of the activated surface. Herein we investigate the surface activation of carbon nanotube (CNT) webs by electrochemical and plasma techniques to enhance their electrochemical performance and enable the fabrication of a biosensor using the layer-by-layer (LBL) approach. The pretreated CNT webs were characterized by SEM, TEM, Raman, XPS and electrochemical methods. TEM images and Raman analysis showed an increase in the level of surface defects upon pretreatment with higher number of defects after electrochemical pretreatment. XPS analysis showed an increase in the level of oxygen functional groups after pretreatment (4 to 5 times increase) which resulted in enhanced water wettability especially for plasma pretreated CNT webs. The pretreated CNT web electrodes also showed an enhanced electrochemical activity towards the oxidation and reduction of different redox probes with higher sensitivity for the electrochemically pretreated CNT web electrode that was accompanied by a higher level of noise in amperometric measurements. A highly linear response was obtained for the untreated and the electrochemically pretreated CNT web electrodes towards the amperometric detection of NADH (R(2) of 0.9996 and 0.9986 respectively) while a non-linear response was observed for the plasma pretreated CNT web electrode (R(2) of 0.8538). The pretreated CNT web electrodes enabled the fabrication of a LBL biosensor for alcohol detection with highest operational stability obtained for the plasma pretreated CNT web surface. PMID:26818435

  2. Catalytically active single-atom niobium in graphitic layers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Guo, Junjie; Guan, Pengfei; Liu, Chunjing; Huang, Hao; Xue, Fanghong; Dong, Xinglong; Pennycook, Stephen J; Chisholm, Matthew F

    2013-01-01

    Carbides of groups IV through VI (Ti, V and Cr groups) have long been proposed as substitutes for noble metal-based electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. However, their catalytic activity has been extremely limited because of the low density and stability of catalytically active sites. Here we report the excellent performance of a niobium-carbon structure for catalysing the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. A large number of single niobium atoms and ultra small clusters trapped in graphitic layers are directly identified using state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. This structure not only enhances the overall conductivity for accelerating the exchange of ions and electrons, but it suppresses the chemical/thermal coarsening of the active particles. Experimental results coupled with theory calculations reveal that the single niobium atoms incorporated within the graphitic layers produce a redistribution of d-band electrons and become surprisingly active for O2 adsorption and dissociation, and also exhibit high stability. PMID:23715283

  3. Low Temperature Double-layer Capacitors with Improved Energy Density: An Overview of Recent Development Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.; Yushin, Gleb; Korenblit, Yair; Kajdos, Adam; Kvit, Alexander; Jagiello, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors are finding increased use in a wide range of energy storage applications, particularly where high pulse power capabilities are required. Double-layer capacitors store charge at a liquid/solid interface, making them ideal for low temperature power applications, due to the facile kinetic processes associated with the rearrangement of the electrochemical double-layer at these temperatures. Potential low temperature applications include hybrid and electric vehicles, operations in polar regions, high altitude aircraft and aerospace avionics, and distributed environmental and structural health monitoring. State-of-the-art capacitors can typically operate to -40 C, with a subsequent degradation in power performance below room temperature. However, recent efforts focused on advanced electrolyte and electrode systems can enable operation to temperatures as low as -70 C, with capacities similar to room temperature values accompanied by reasonably low equivalent series resistances. This presentation will provide an overview of recent development efforts to extend and improve the wide temperature performance of these devices.

  4. Effects of AlN Coating Layer on High Temperature Characteristics of Langasite SAW Sensors.

    PubMed

    Shu, Lin; Peng, Bin; Cui, Yilin; Gong, Dongdong; Yang, Zhengbing; Liu, Xingzhao; Zhang, Wanli

    2016-01-01

    High temperature characteristics of langasite surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices coated with an AlN thin film have been investigated in this work. The AlN films were deposited on the prepared SAW devices by mid-frequency magnetron sputtering. The SAW devices coated with AlN films were measured from room temperature to 600 °C. The results show that the SAW devices can work up to 600 °C. The AlN coating layer can protect and improve the performance of the SAW devices at high temperature. The SAW velocity increases with increasing AlN coating layer thickness. The temperature coefficients of frequency (TCF) of the prepared SAW devices decrease with increasing thickness of AlN coating layers, while the electromechanical coupling coefficient (K²) of the SAW devices increases with increasing AlN film thickness. The K² of the SAW devices increases by about 20% from room temperature to 600 °C. The results suggest that AlN coating layer can not only protect the SAW devices from environmental contamination, but also improve the K² of the SAW devices. PMID:27608027

  5. High temperature solid oxide fuel development activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, E.R.

    1993-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse tubular SOFC development activities and current program status. Goal is to develop a cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 h. Test results are presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 40,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Two 25-kW SOFC customer tests units were delivered in 1992; a 20-kW SOFC system is bein manufactured and will be operated by Southern California Edison in 1995. Megawatt class generators are being developed.

  6. Upper mixed layer temperature anomalies at the North Atlantic storm-track zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshonkin, S. N.; Diansky, N. A.

    1995-10-01

    Synoptic sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) were determined as a result of separation of time scales smaller than 183 days. The SSTAs were investigated using daily data of ocean weather station C (52.75°N; 35.5°W) from 1 January 1976 to 31 December 1980 (1827 days). There were 47 positive and 50 negative significant SSTAs (lifetime longer than 3 days, absolute value greater than 0.10 °C) with four main intervals of the lifetime repetitions: 1. 4-7 days (45% of all cases), 2. 9-13 days (20-25%), 3. 14-18 days (10-15%), and 4. 21-30 days (10-15%) and with a magnitude 1.5-2.0 °C. An upper layer balance model based on equations for temperature, salinity, mechanical energy (with advanced parametrization), state (density), and drift currents was used to simulate SSTA. The original method of modelling taking into account the mean observed temperature profiles proved to be very stable. The model SSTAs are in a good agreement with the observed amplitudes and phases of synoptic SSTAs during all 5 years. Surface heat flux anomalies are the main source of SSTAs. The influence of anomalous drift heat advection is about 30-50% of the SSTA, and the influence of salinity anomalies is about 10-25% and less. The influence of a large-scale ocean front was isolated only once in February-April 1978 during all 5 years. Synoptic SSTAs develop just in the upper half of the homogeneous layer at each winter. We suggest that there are two main causes of such active sublayer formation: 1. surface heat flux in the warm sectors of cyclones and 2. predominant heat transport by ocean currents from the south. All frequency functions of the ocean temperature synoptic response to heat and momentum surface fluxes are of integral character (red noise), though there is strong resonance with 20-days period of wind-driven horizontal heat advection with mixed layer temperature; there are some other peculiarities on the time scales from 5.5 to 13 days. Observed and modelled frequency functions

  7. Multi-layer thermoelectric-temperature-mapping microbial incubator designed for geo-biochemistry applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Gen; Liu, Man-Chi; Tsai, Ming-Fei; Yu, Wei-Shun; Chen, Jian-Zhang; Cheng, I-Chun; Lin, Pei-Chun

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel, vertical temperature-mapping incubator utilizing eight layers of thermoelectric (TE) modules mounted around a test tube. The temperature at each layer of the TE module is individually controlled to simulate the vertical temperature profile of geo-temperature variations with depth. Owing to the constraint of non-intrusion to the filled geo-samples, the temperature on the tube wall is adopted for measurement feedback. The design considerations for the incubator include spatial arrangement of the energy transfer mechanism, heating capacity of the TE modules, minimum required sample amount for follow-up instrumental or chemical analysis, and the constraint of non-intrusion to the geo-samples during incubation. The performance of the incubator is experimentally evaluated with two tube conditions and under four preset temperature profiles. Test tubes are either empty or filled with quartz sand, which has comparable thermal properties to the materials in the geo-environment. The applied temperature profiles include uniform, constant temperature gradient, monotonic-increasing parabolic, and parabolic. The temperature on the tube wall can be controlled between 20 °C and 90 °C with an averaged root mean squared error of 1 °C. PMID:22559585

  8. Room temperature broadband terahertz gains in graphene heterostructures based on inter-layer radiative transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Linlong; Du, Jinglei; Shi, Haofei Wei, Dongshan; Du, Chunlei

    2014-10-15

    We exploit inter-layer radiative transitions to provide gains to amplify terahertz waves in graphene heterostructures. This is achieved by properly doping graphene sheets and aligning their energy bands so that the processes of stimulated emissions can overwhelm absorptions. We derive an expression for the gain estimation and show the gain is insensitive to temperature variation. Moreover, the gain is broadband and can be strong enough to compensate the free carrier loss, indicating graphene based room temperature terahertz lasers are feasible.

  9. A study on intermediate buffer layer of coated Fiber Bragg Grating cryogenic temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, R.; Araujo, F.; Araujo, J.; Neumann, H.; Ramalingam, R.

    2015-12-01

    The sensor characteristics of a coated Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) thermal sensor for cryogenic temperatures depends mainly on the coating materials. The sensitivity of the coated FBG can be improved by enhancing the effective thermal strain transfer between the different layers and the bare FBG. The dual coated FBG's has a primary layer and the secondary layer. The primary coating acts as an intermediate buffer between the secondary coating and the bare FBG. The outer secondary coating is normally made of metals with high thermal expansion coefficient. In this work, a detailed study is carried out on chromium and titanium intermediate buffer layers with various coating thicknesses and combinations. To improve the sensitivity, the secondary coating layer was tested with Indium, Lead and Tin. The sensors were then calibrated in a cryogenic temperature calibration facility at Institute of Technical Physics (ITEP), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The sensors were subjected to several thermal cycles between 4.2 and 80 K to study the sensor performance and its thermal characteristics. The sensor exhibits a Bragg wavelength shift of 13pm at 20K. The commercially available detection equipment with a resolution of 1pm can result in a temperature resolution of 0.076 K at 20K.

  10. Algorithm for Estimating the Plume Centerline Temperature and Ceiling Jet Temperature in the Presence of a Hot Upper Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, William D.; Notarianni, Kathy A.; Tapper, Phillip Z.

    1998-01-01

    The experiments were designed to provide insight into the behavior of jet fuel fires in aircraft hangars and to study the impact of these fires on the design and operation of a variety of fire protection systems. As a result, the test series included small fires designed to investigate the operation of UV/IR detectors and smoke detectors as well as large fires which were used to investigate the operation of ceiling mounted heat detectors and sprinklers. The impact of the presence or absence of draft curtains was also studied in the 15 m hangar. It is shown that in order to predict the plume centerline temperature within experimental uncertainty, the entrainment of the upper layer gas must be modeled. For large fires, the impact of a changing radiation fraction must also be included in the calculation. The dependence of the radial temperature profile of the ceiling jet as a function of layer development is demonstrated and a ceiling jet temperature algorithm which includes the impact of a growing layer is developed.

  11. LES on Plume Dispersion in the Convective Boundary Layer Capped by a Temperature Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Hiromasa; Tamura, Tetsuro; Abe, Satoshi

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) is applied to the problem of plume dispersion in the spatially-developing convective boundary layer (CBL) capped by a temperature inversion. In order to generate inflow turbulence with buoyant forcing, we first, simulate the neutral boundary layer flow (NBL) in the driver region using Lund's method. At the same time, the temperature profile possessing the inversion part is imposed at the entrance of the driver region and the temperature field is calculated as a passive scalar. Next, the buoyancy effect is introduced into the flow field in the main region. We evaluate the applicability of the LES model for atmospheric dispersion in the CBL flow and compare the characteristics of plume dispersion in the CBL flow with those in the neutral boundary layer. The Richardson number based on the temperature increment across the inversion obtained by the present LES model is 22.4 and the capping effect of the temperature inversion can be captured qualitatively in the upper portion of the CBL. Characteristics of flow and temperature fields in the main portion of CBL flow are similar to those of previous experiments[1],[2] and observations[3]. Concerning dispersion behavior, we also find that mean concentrations decrease immediately above the inversion height and the peak values of r.m.s concentrations are located near the inversion height at larger distances from the point source.

  12. Experiments on the active control of transitional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, P. A.; Rioual, J.-L.; Fisher, M. J.

    Experimental results are presented which demonstrate that the streamwise position of the transition region of a flat plate boundary layer can be actively controlled. The means of control is through the application of suction through the surface of the plate, a progressive increase in suction rate being capable of producing transition at progressively larger distances downstream from the plate leading edge. A simple digital feedback regulator based on an integral control law is shown to be most effective in regulating the position of transition, an error signal being derived from measurements of pressure fluctuations on the surface of the plate.

  13. On Active Layer Environments and Processes in Western Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, C. D.; Meiklejohn, I.; Nel, W.

    2012-12-01

    The current understanding of Antarctic permafrost is poor, particularly regarding its evolution, the current thermal characteristics, and relationships with pedogenesis, hydrology, geomorphic, dynamics, biotic activity and response to global changes. Results from borehole temperature measurements over a four-year period in Western Dronning Maud Land suggest that the active layer depth is dependent on the substrate, latitude, altitude and the volume of ground exposed; the latter alludes to the potential impact of surrounding ice on the ground thermal regime. The active layer depths at the monitoring sites, varied between 16 cm at Vesleskarvet, a small nunatak at 850 masl to 28 cm in granitic till at Jutulsessen (1 270 masl). The mean near surface (1.5 cm depth) ground temperatures from 2009 to 2012 in the region have a narrow range from -16.4°C at 850m to -17.5°C at 1270 masl. Permafrost temperatures for the same locations vary between -16.3°C and -18.3°C. While little variability exists between the mean temperatures at the study locations, each site is distinct and seasonal and shorter-term frost cycles have produced landforms that are characteristic of both permafrost and diurnal frost environments. One of the key aspects of investigation is the control that the active layer has on autochthonous blockfield development in the region. The, thus far, exploratory research is being used to understand controls on the landscape and the relationship between distribution and abundance of biota. Given the rapidly changing climates in the region, improving knowledge of what drives patterns of biodiversity at a local and regional scale is vital to assess consequences of environmental change.

  14. Thermal characterization of high temperature reactor particle layers by photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, D.; Rochais, D.

    2010-03-01

    Thermal diffusivity of particle pyrolytic carbon layers deposited on 500 μm diameter spherical particle before irradiation has been measured using photoreflectance microscopy (PM). This technique is used to characterize of such small constituents at a microscopic scale and temperature controlled up to 1000 °C. Nevertheless, one of the layers - buffer layer - needs a particular analysis due to its porous structure. Indeed, measurements by PM on this material only permit to obtain the thermal diffusivity of the solid skeleton. These require the use of a numerical homogenization technique to estimate an effective thermal conductivity. The effect of temperature is discussed. Mapping of the thermal diffusivity of coated fuel particles provides useful data for modelling fuel performance during the nuclear reactors operation.

  15. Temperature dependence of proximity-induced supercurrent in single and multi-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Akinobu; Goto, Hidenori; Tomori, Hikari; Tanaka, Sho; Ootuka, Youiti; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Hayashi, Masahiko; Yoshioka, Hideo

    2010-03-01

    Graphene is an attracting material for the superconducting proximity effect. In single layer graphene (SLG), the peculiar band structure leads to the relativistic Josephson effect, while in multilayer graphene (MLG), the layered structure with large modulation of carrier density from negative to positive values provides a novel situation of conventional proximity effect. Here we present experimental study on superconducting proximity effect in SLG and MLG. For SLG with junction length of 220 nm, we observed gate-voltage dependent critical supercurrent Ic, and its temperature dependences for all gate voltages were well explained by a conventional theory for short and dirty junctions (KO1 theory). On the other hand, in MLG junctions, Ic(T) (-(T/T0)^2), where T0 is a sample- and gate- dependent constant. This behavior can be explained by a successive transition model, in which a graphene layer with larger carrier density has a higher temperature for the onset of supercurrent.

  16. Layer formation on metal surfaces in lead-bismuth at high temperatures in presence of zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewen, Eric P.; Yount, Hannah J.; Volk, Kevin; Kumar, Arvind

    2003-09-01

    If the operating temperature lead-bismuth cooled fission reactor could be extended to 800 °C, they could produce hydrogen directly from water. A key issue for the deployment of this technology at these temperatures is the corrosion of the fuel cladding and structural materials by the lead-bismuth. Corrosion studies of several metals were performed to correlate the interaction layer formation rate as a function of time, temperature, and alloy compositions. The interaction layer is defined as the narrow band between the alloy substrate and the solidified lead-bismuth eutectic on the surface. Coupons of HT-9, 410, 316L, and F22 were tested at 550 and 650 °C for 1000 h inside a zirconium corrosion cell. The oxygen potential ranged from approximately 10 -22 to 10 -19 Pa. Analyses were performed on the coupons to determine the depth of the interaction layer and the composition, at each time step (100, 300, and 1000 h). The thickness of the interaction layer on F22 at 550 °C was 25.3 μm, the highest of all the alloys tested, whereas at 650 °C, the layer thickness was only 5.6 μm, the lowest of all the alloys tested. The growth of the interaction layer on F22 at 650 °C was suppressed, owing to the presence of Zr (at 1500 wppm) in the LBE. In the case of 316L, the interaction layers of 4.9 and 10.6 μm were formed at 550 and 650 °C, respectively.

  17. Strength and Young's modulus of silicon carbide layers of HTGR fuel particles at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Fukuda, Kousaku

    1991-06-01

    Strength and Young's modulus of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide layers of coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) were measured from room temperature up to 1480°C (1753 K) in helium atmosphere. The diametrical compression test was applied to micro-specimens of ring shaped SiC. Young's modulus decreased slightly from room temperature up to around 1200 °C (1473 K) and decreased rapidly above this temperature. The strength remained almost unchanged from room temperature up to around 1300°C (1573 K) and decreased rapidly above this temperature. The fracture surfaces indicated that fracture mechanisms changed from transgranular to intergranular, which corresponded with the rapid decrease in strength.

  18. Influence of atomic layer deposition valve temperature on ZrN plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition growth

    SciTech Connect

    Muneshwar, Triratna Cadien, Ken

    2015-11-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) relies on a sequence of self-limiting surface reactions for thin film growth. The effect of non-ALD side reactions, from insufficient purging between pulses and from precursor self-decomposition, on film growth is well known. In this article, precursor condensation within an ALD valve is described, and the effect of the continuous precursor source from condensate evaporation on ALD growth is discussed. The influence of the ALD valve temperature on growth and electrical resistivity of ZrN plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD) films is reported. Increasing ALD valve temperature from 75 to 95 °C, with other process parameters being identical, decreased both the growth per cycle and electrical resistivity (ρ) of ZrN PEALD films from 0.10 to 0.07 nm/cycle and from 560 to 350 μΩ cm, respectively. Our results show that the non-ALD growth resulting from condensate accumulation is eliminated at valve temperatures close to the pressure corrected boiling point of precursor.

  19. Temperature Oscillation Modulated Self-Assembly of Periodic Concentric Layered Magnesium Carbonate Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shihong; Wang, Zheng Jim; Chang, Ting-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Intriguing patterns of periodic, concentric, layered, mineral microstructure are present in nature and organisms, yet they have elusive geneses. We hypothesize temperature oscillation can be an independent factor that causes the self-assembly of such patterns in mineral phases synthesized in solution. Static experiments verify that rhythmic concentric multi-layered magnesium carbonate microhemispheres can be synthesized from bicarbonate solution by temperature oscillation, without use of a chemical template, additive or gel-diffusion system. Appropriate reactant concentration and initial pH value can restrain the competitive growth of other mineral generations. Polarized light microscopy images indicate the microhemispheres are crystalline and the crystallinity increases with incubation time. The thickness of a single mineral layer of microhemisphere in microscale is precisely controlled by the waveform parameters of the temperature oscillation, while the layer number, which can reach tens to about one hundred, is constrained by the temperature oscillation period number. FT-IR spectra show that these microhemispheres synthesized under different conditions can be identified as the basic form of magnesium carbonate, hydromagnesite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2⋅4H2O). SEM images exhibit the characteristic microscopic texture of the alternating dark and light rings of these microhemispheres. TEM images and ED patterns suggest the nanoflakes of microhemispheres are present in polycrystalline form with some degree of oriented assembly. The temperature oscillation modulated self-assembly may offer a new mechanism to understand the formation of layered microstructure of minerals in solution, and provide a non-invasive and programmable means to synthesize hierarchically ordered materials. PMID:24520410

  20. Temperature oscillation modulated self-assembly of periodic concentric layered magnesium carbonate microparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Shihong; Wang, Zheng Jim; Chang, Ting-Tung

    2014-01-01

    Intriguing patterns of periodic, concentric, layered, mineral microstructure are present in nature and organisms, yet they have elusive geneses. We hypothesize temperature oscillation can be an independent factor that causes the self-assembly of such patterns in mineral phases synthesized in solution. Static experiments verify that rhythmic concentric multi-layered magnesium carbonate microhemispheres can be synthesized from bicarbonate solution by temperature oscillation, without use of a chemical template, additive or gel-diffusion system. Appropriate reactant concentration and initial pH value can restrain the competitive growth of other mineral generations. Polarized light microscopy images indicate the microhemispheres are crystalline and the crystallinity increases with incubation time. The thickness of a single mineral layer of microhemisphere in microscale is precisely controlled by the waveform parameters of the temperature oscillation, while the layer number, which can reach tens to about one hundred, is constrained by the temperature oscillation period number. FT-IR spectra show that these microhemispheres synthesized under different conditions can be identified as the basic form of magnesium carbonate, hydromagnesite (Mg5(CO3)4(OH)2 ⋅ 4H2O). SEM images exhibit the characteristic microscopic texture of the alternating dark and light rings of these microhemispheres. TEM images and ED patterns suggest the nanoflakes of microhemispheres are present in polycrystalline form with some degree of oriented assembly. The temperature oscillation modulated self-assembly may offer a new mechanism to understand the formation of layered microstructure of minerals in solution, and provide a non-invasive and programmable means to synthesize hierarchically ordered materials. PMID:24520410

  1. Substituted Quaternary Ammonium Salts Improve Low-Temperature Performance of Double-Layer Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; Smart, Marshall C.; West, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Double-layer capacitors are unique energy storage devices, capable of supporting large current pulses as well as a very high number of charging and discharging cycles. The performance of doublelayer capacitors is highly dependent on the nature of the electrolyte system used. Many applications, including for electric and fuel cell vehicles, back-up diesel generators, wind generator pitch control back-up power systems, environmental and structural distributed sensors, and spacecraft avionics, can potentially benefit from the use of double-layer capacitors with lower equivalent series resistances (ESRs) over wider temperature limits. Higher ESRs result in decreased power output, which is a particular problem at lower temperatures. Commercially available cells are typically rated for operation down to only 40 C. Previous briefs [for example, Low Temperature Supercapacitors (NPO-44386), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), p. 32, and Supercapacitor Electrolyte Solvents With Liquid Range Below 80 C (NPO-44855), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 1 (January 2010), p. 44] discussed the use of electrolytes that employed low-melting-point co-solvents to depress the freezing point of traditional acetonitrile-based electrolytes. Using these modified electrolyte formulations can extend the low-temperature operational limit of double-layer capacitors beyond that of commercially available cells. This previous work has shown that although the measured capacitance is relatively insensitive to temperature, the ESR can rise rapidly at low temperatures, due to decreased electrolyte conductance within the pores of the high surface- area carbon electrodes. Most of these advanced electrolyte systems featured tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEATFB) as the salt. More recent work at JPL indicates the use of the asymmetric quaternary ammonium salt triethylmethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEMATFB) or spiro-(l,l')-bipyrrolidium tetrafluoroborate (SBPBF4) in a 1:1 by volume solvent

  2. Dual active layer a-IGZO TFT via homogeneous conductive layer formation by photochemical H-doping

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, InGaZnO (IGZO) thin film transistors (TFTs) with a dual active layer (DAL) structure are fabricated by inserting a homogeneous embedded conductive layer (HECL) in an amorphous IGZO (a-IGZO) channel with the aim of enhancing the electrical characteristics of conventional bottom-gate-structure TFTs. A highly conductive HECL (carrier concentration at 1.6 × 1013 cm-2, resistivity at 4.6 × 10-3 Ω∙cm, and Hall mobility at 14.6 cm2/Vs at room temperature) is fabricated using photochemical H-doping by irradiating UV light on an a-IGZO film. The electrical properties of the fabricated DAL TFTs are evaluated by varying the HECL length. The results reveal that carrier mobility increased proportionally with the HECL length. Further, a DAL TFT with a 60-μm-long HECL embedded in an 80-μm-long channel exhibits comprehensive and outstanding improvements in its electrical properties: a saturation mobility of 60.2 cm2/Vs, threshold voltage of 2.7 V, and subthreshold slope of 0.25 V/decade against the initial values of 19.9 cm2/Vs, 4.7 V, and 0.45 V/decade, respectively, for a TFT without HECL. This result confirms that the photochemically H-doped HECL significantly improves the electrical properties of DAL IGZO TFTs. PMID:25435832

  3. Temperature control for the gate workfunction engineering of TiC film by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Choong-Ki; Ahn, Hyun Jun; Moon, Jung Min; Lee, Sukwon; Moon, Dong-II; Park, Jeong Soo; Cho, Byung-Jin; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Lee, Seok-Hee

    2015-12-01

    The effects of the deposition temperature on titanium carbide film formed by atomic layer deposition are investigated for gate workfunction (WF) engineering. As the deposition temperature increases from 250 °C to 500 °C, the WF of the TiC decreases from 5.24 eV to 4.45 eV. This WF dependency on the deposition temperature is mainly attributed to the average WF of each orientation of the sub-planes of the TiC film. An investigation of a tunable WF is conducted through Auger electron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction.

  4. Temperature-dependent mechanical properties of single-layer molybdenum disulphide: Molecular dynamics nanoindentation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junhua; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Rabczuk, Timon

    2013-12-01

    The temperature-dependent mechanical properties of single-layer molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) are obtained using molecular dynamics (MD) nanoindentation simulations. The Young's moduli, maximum load stress, and maximum loading strain decrease with increasing temperature from 4.2 K to 500 K. The obtained Young's moduli are in good agreement with those using our MD uniaxial tension simulations and the available experimental results. The tendency of maximum loading strain with different temperature is opposite with that of metal materials due to the short range Stillinger-Weber potentials in MoS2. Furthermore, the indenter tip radius and fitting strain effect on the mechanical properties are also discussed.

  5. Effect of Reaction Temperature of CdS Buffer Layers by Chemical Bath Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Chae-Woong; Jung, Duk Young; Jeong, Chaehwan

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated CdS deposition on a Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) film via chemical bath deposition (CBD) in order to obtain a high-quality optimized buffer layer. The thickness and reaction temperature (from 50 degrees C to 65 degrees C) were investigated, and we found that an increase in the reaction temperature during CBD, resulted in a thicker CdS layer. We obtained a thin film with a thickness of 50 nm at a reaction temperature of 60 degrees C, which also exhibited the highest photoelectric conversion efficiency for use in solar cells. Room temperature time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) measurements were performed on the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film and CdS/CIGS samples to determine the recombination process of the photo-generated minority carrier. The device performance was found to be dependent on the thickness of the CdS layer. As the thickness of the CdS increases, the fill factor and the series resistance increased to 61.66% and decreased to 8.35 Ω, respectively. The best condition was observed at a reaction temperature of 60 degrees C, and its conversion efficiency was 12.20%. PMID:27483883

  6. Investigation of layered systems and temperature-dependent thermophysical characterization by photothermal methods with periodic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirtoc, M.

    2010-03-01

    The salient features of periodically modulated photoacoustic (PA), photothermal radiometry (PTR) and photopyroelectric (PPE) methods are reviewed with emphasis on their use for characterization of layered samples. Using a general one-dimensional (1-D) heat diffusion model, explicit solutions for up to six layers are given in terms of thermal impedances. Two typical model configurations can be transformed and combined using symmetry properties in order to match a particular excitation/cell configuration couple. Different special cases allow for simultaneous measurement of two thermal parameters. For temperature-dependent investigations the direct temperature-conversion feature of the PPE method is advantageous. We show results on the temperature calibration of LiTaO3 and PVDF pyroelectric sensors.

  7. High temperature and current density induced degradation of multi-layer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Baoming; Haque, M. A.; Mag-isa, Alexander E.; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo

    2015-10-19

    We present evidence of moderate current density, when accompanied with high temperature, promoting migration of foreign atoms on the surface of multi-layer graphene. Our in situ transmission electron microscope experiments show migration of silicon atoms at temperatures above 800 °C and current density around 4.2 × 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}. Originating from the micro-machined silicon structures that clamp the freestanding specimen, the atoms are observed to react with the carbon atoms in the multi-layer graphene to produce silicon carbide at temperatures of 900–1000 °C. In the absence of electrical current, there is no migration of silicon and only pyrolysis of polymeric residue is observed.

  8. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenwei; Al-Jawhari, Hala A.; Nayak, Pradipta K.; Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Wei, Nini; Hedhili, M. N.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190°C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field. PMID:25892711

  9. Dissimilarity between temperature-humidity in the atmospheric surface layer and implications for estimates of evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancelli, D. M.; Dias, N. L.; Chamecki, M.

    2012-12-01

    In several methods used in water resources to estimate evaporation from land and water surfaces, a fundamental assumption is that temperature (T) and specific humidity (q) fluctuations behave similarly in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL). In the Energy-Budget Bowen Ratio method it is assumed that both eddy diffusivities are equal, while in the variance method it is often assumed that all the Monin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) functions for the two scalars are equal. However, it is well-known that the T-q similarity does not always hold and that the dissimilarity found in practice can significantly impact the estimates of evaporation. Given the frequent dissimilarity between temperature and humidity, two important problems arise. The first one is related to the choice of the function used to characterize scalar similarity, given that not all commonly used functions are equally capable of identifying scalar dissimilarity. The second problem is associated with the identification of the physical mechanisms behind scalar dissimilarity in each particular case: local advection, nonstationarity, surface heterogeneity, active/passive roles of the scalars, entrainment fluxes at the top of the atmospheric boundary layer are typically cited as possible causes, but seldom a convincing argument is presented. In this work we combine experimental data and numerical simulations to study similarity between T and q in the ASL. Data measured over a lake in Brazil suggests a strong relationship between scalar similarity and the balance between local production and dissipation of scalar variance, which is in practice related to the strength of the surface forcing. Scalar variance and covariance budgets are used to derive a set of dimensionless Scalar Flux numbers that are capable of diagnosing the balance between gradient production and molecular dissipation of scalar variance and covariance. Experimental data shows that these Scalar Flux numbers are good predictors of scalar (dis

  10. Sea ice, winter convection, and the temperature minimum layer in the Southern Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Toole, J.M.

    1981-09-20

    The structure of the near surface waters in the Southern Ocean, poleward of the Antarctic Polar Front but away from continental margins, is investigated with a three-dimensional time-dependent numerical model which resolves the annual sea ice cycle. The growth and decay of the ice field is predicted, using one of Semtner's (1976) thermodynamic ice models, in terms of specified atmospheric data and computed thermohaline characteristics of the ocean layers. The ice field is found to be sensitive to the lateral advection of heat by the oceanic circulation as well as vertical heat transports due to deep winter convection. The model treats the temperature minimum layer in the Southern Ocean as the remnant of a deep winter mixed layer which becomes capped by surface heating and precipitation in summer. The predicted thermohaline characteristics of the temperature minimum layer and the surface mixed layer are in good agreement with observations. Finally, the annual air-sea heat exchange predicted by the model is discussed. The model's predicted area averaged heat loss experienced by the ocean south of the Atlantic Polar Front is much smaller than was previously estimated. This is attributed to errors in the southern region of the model domain. It is suggested that models, which include the interactions between sea ice and surface, deep, and bottom waters along the continental margins, are needed to investigate this region.

  11. Distinct temperature sensitivity of soil carbon decomposition in forest organic layer and mineral soil

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenhua; Li, Wei; Jiang, Ping; Wang, Hui; Bai, Edith

    2014-01-01

    The roles of substrate availability and quality in determining temperature sensitivity (Q10) of soil carbon (C) decomposition are still unclear, which limits our ability to predict how soil C storage and cycling would respond to climate change. Here we determined Q10 in surface organic layer and subsurface mineral soil along an elevation gradient in a temperate forest ecosystem. Q10 was calculated by comparing the times required to respire a given amount of soil C at 15 and 25°C in a 350-day incubation. Results indicated that Q10 of the organic layer was 0.22–0.71 (absolute difference) higher than Q10 of the mineral soil. Q10 in both the organic layer (2.5–3.4) and the mineral soil (2.1–2.8) increased with decreasing substrate quality during the incubation. This enhancement of Q10 over incubation time in both layers suggested that Q10 of more labile C was lower than that of more recalcitrant C, consistent with the Arrhenius kinetics. No clear trend of Q10 was found along the elevation gradient. Because the soil organic C pool of the organic layer in temperate forests is large, its higher temperature sensitivity highlights its importance in C cycling under global warming. PMID:25270905

  12. Concentration and temperature effects on ovostatin activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moriarity, Debra M.

    1994-01-01

    Light scattering experiments performed at Mississippi State University using MSFC ovostatin preparations indicated that at low ovostatin concentrations, below 0.2 mg/ml, the protein was dissociating from a tetramer into dimers. Since the proposed mechanism of action involved the tetrameric form of the protein, we hypothesized that perhaps under the conditions of our assays at various O/T ratios the ovostatin was becoming dissociated into an inactive dimer. To examine this possibility we assayed the ovostatin activity as a function of ovostatin concentration and of temperature of the assay. Data are presented that show the results of these assays at 23 C, 30 C, 37 C and 42 C respectively. The data are highly suggestive that there is a decrease in ovostatin activity as the concentration of the protein falls below 0.06 mg/ml. This may not be of any physiological importance, however, since the concentration of ovostatin in the egg is about 0.5 mg/ml. Curiously, the dissociation of the tetramer into dimers does not show a significant temperature dependence as would be expected for an equilibrium reaction. Whether this is in fact the case, or whether the differences are so small as to not be discerned from the current data remains to be seen. Another aspect to consider is that in the egg the primary role of the ovostatin may or may not be as a protease inhibitor. Although the inhibition of collagenase by ovostatin may be an important aspect of embryogenesis, it is also possible that it functions as a binding protein for some substance. In this regard, all ovostatin preparations from MSFC have shown an approximately 88,000 MW protein associated with the ovostatin. The identity of this protein is not currently known and may be the subject of future studies.

  13. Room temperature performance of 4 V aqueous hybrid supercapacitor using multi-layered lithium-doped carbon negative electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Sho; Yamamoto, Rie; Sugimoto, Shigeyuki; Sugimoto, Wataru

    2016-09-01

    Water-stable multi-layered lithium-doped carbon (LixC6) negative electrode using poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-lithium bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) polymer electrolyte containing N-methyl-N-propylpiperidinium bis(trifluoromethansulfonyl)imide (PP13TFSI) ionic liquid was developed. Electrochemical properties at 60 °C of the aqueous hybrid supercapacitor using activated carbon positive electrode and a multi-layered LixC6 negative electrode (LixC6 | PEO-LiTFSI | LTAP) without PP13TFSI exhibited performance similar to that using Li anode (Li | PEO-LiTFSI | LTAP). A drastic decrease in ESR was achieved by the addition of PP13TFSI to PEO-LiTFSI, allowing room temperature operation. The ESR of the multi-layered LixC6 negative electrode with PEO-LiTFSI-PP13TFSI at 25 °C was 801 Ω cm2, which is 1/6 the value of the multi-layered Li negative electrode with PEO-LiTFSI (5014 Ω cm2). Charge/discharge test of the aqueous hybrid supercapacitor using multi-layered LixC6 negative electrode with PEO-LiTFSI-PP13TFSI at 25 °C afforded specific capacity of 20.6 mAh (g-activated carbon)-1 with a working voltage of 2.7-3.7 V, and good long-term capability up to 3000 cycles. Furthermore, an aqueous hybrid supercapacitor consisting of a high capacitance RuO2 nanosheet positive electrode and multi-layered LixC6 negative electrode with PEO-LiTFSI-PP13TFSI showed specific capacity of 196 mAh (g-RuO2)-1 and specific energy of 625 Wh (kg-RuO2)-1 in 2.0 M acetic acid-lithium acetate buffered solution at 25 °C.

  14. Safe and Durable High-Temperature Lithium-Sulfur Batteries via Molecular Layer Deposited Coating.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Lushington, Andrew; Sun, Qian; Xiao, Wei; Liu, Jian; Wang, Biqiong; Ye, Yifan; Nie, Kaiqi; Hu, Yongfeng; Xiao, Qunfeng; Li, Ruying; Guo, Jinghua; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Sun, Xueliang

    2016-06-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising high energy storage candidate in electric vehicles. However, the commonly employed ether based electrolyte does not enable to realize safe high-temperature Li-S batteries due to the low boiling and flash temperatures. Traditional carbonate based electrolyte obtains safe physical properties at high temperature but does not complete reversible electrochemical reaction for most Li-S batteries. Here we realize safe high temperature Li-S batteries on universal carbon-sulfur electrodes by molecular layer deposited (MLD) alucone coating. Sulfur cathodes with MLD coating complete the reversible electrochemical process in carbonate electrolyte and exhibit a safe and ultrastable cycle life at high temperature, which promise practicable Li-S batteries for electric vehicles and other large-scale energy storage systems. PMID:27175936

  15. Low temperature fabrication of perovskite solar cells with TiO2 nanoparticle layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, Masato; Oku, Takeo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Yamada, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Hiroki; Minami, Satoshi; Kohno, Kazufumi

    2016-02-01

    TiO2/CH3NH3PbI3-based photovoltaic devices were fabricated by a spin-coating method using a mixture solution. TiO2 require high-temperature processing to achieve suitably high carrier mobility. TiO2 electron transport layers and TiO2 scaffold layers for the perovskite were fabricated from TiO2 nanoparticles with different grain sizes. The photovoltaic properties and microstructures of solar cells were characterized. Nanoparticle sizes of these TiO2 were 23 nm and 3 nm and the performance of solar cells was improved by combination of two TiO2 nanoparticles

  16. Active Flow Control on a Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Susan Althoff; Owens, Lewis R.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Allan, Brian G.; Schuster, Ernest P.

    2004-01-01

    Boundary layer ingestion (BLI) is explored as means to improve overall system performance for Blended Wing Body configuration. The benefits of BLI for vehicle system performance benefit are assessed with a process derived from first principles suitable for highly-integrated propulsion systems. This performance evaluation process provides framework within which to assess the benefits of an integrated BLI inlet and lays the groundwork for higher-fidelity systems studies. The results of the system study show that BLI provides a significant improvement in vehicle performance if the inlet distortion can be controlled, thus encouraging the pursuit of active flow control (AFC) as a BLI enabling technology. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet distortion was assessed using a 6% scale model of a 30% BLI offset, diffusing inlet. The experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel with a model inlet designed specifically for this type of testing. High mass flow pulsing actuators provided the active flow control. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion was determined by 120 total pressure measurements located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum freestream Mach number of 0.15 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the pulsed actuation can reduce distortion from 29% to 4.6% as measured by the circumferential distortion descriptor DC60 using less than 1% of inlet mass flow. Closed loop control of the actuation was also demonstrated using a sidewall surface static pressure as the response sensor.

  17. Effects of low-temperature buffer-layer thickness and growth temperature on the SEE sensitivity of GaAs HIGFET circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherford, T.R.; Fouts, D.J.; Marshall, P.W. |; Marshall, C.J.; Mathes, B.; LaMacchia, M.

    1997-12-01

    Heavy-ion Single Event Effects (SEE) test results reveal the role of growth temperature and buffer layer thickness in the use of a low-temperature grown GaAs (LT GaAs) buffer layer for suppressing SEE sensitivity in GaAs HIGFET circuits.

  18. Active layer thermal monitoring at Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Roberto; Schaefer, Carlos; Simas, Felipe; Pregesbauer, Michael; Bockheim, James

    2013-04-01

    International attention on the climate change phenomena has grown in the last decade, intense modelling of climate scenarios were carried out by scientific investigations searching the sources and trends of these changes. The cryosphere and its energy flux became the focus of many investigations, being recognised as a key element for the understanding of future trends. The active layer and permafrost are key components of the terrestrial cryosphere due to their role in energy flux regulation and high sensitivity to climate change (Kane et al., 2001; Smith and Brown, 2009). Compared with other regions of the globe, our understanding of Antarctic permafrost is poor, especially in relation to its thermal state and evolution, its physical properties, links to pedogenesis, hydrology, geomorphic dynamics and response to global change (Bockheim, 1995, Bockheim et al., 2008). The active layer monitoring site was installed in the summer of 2008, and consist of thermistors (accuracy ± 0.2 °C) arranged in a vertical array (Turbic Eutric Cryosol 600 m asl, 10.5 cm, 32.5 cm, 67.5 cm and 83.5 cm). King George Island experiences a cold moist maritime climate characterized by mean annual air temperatures of -2°C and mean summer air temperatures above 0°C for up to four months (Rakusa-Suszczewski et al., 1993, Wen et al., 1994). Ferron et al., (2004) found great variability when analysing data from 1947 to1995 and identified cycles of 5.3 years of colder conditions followed by 9.6 years of warmer conditions. All probes were connected to a Campbell Scientific CR 1000 data logger recording data at hourly intervals from March 1st 2008 until November 30th 2012. Meteorological data for Fildes was obtained from the near by stations. We calculated the thawing days, freezing days; thawing degree days and freezing degree days; all according to Guglielmin et al. (2008). The active lawyer thickness was calculated as the 0 °C depth by extrapolating the thermal gradient from the two

  19. Clothing insulation and temperature, layer and mass of clothing under comfortable environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the microclimate temperature and clothing insulation (Icl) under comfortable environmental conditions. In total, 20 subjects (13 women, 7 men) took part in this study. Four environmental temperatures were chosen: 14°C (to represent March/April), 25°C (May/June), 29°C (July/August), and 23°C (September/October). Wind speed (0.14ms-1) and humidity (45%) were held constant. Clothing microclimate temperatures were measured at the chest (Tchest) and on the interscapular region (Tscapular). Clothing temperature of the innermost layer (Tinnermost) was measured on this layer 30 mm above the centre of the left breast. Subjects were free to choose the clothing that offered them thermal comfort under each environmental condition. We found the following results. 1) All clothing factors except the number of lower clothing layers (Llower), showed differences between the different environmental conditions (P<0.05). The ranges of Tchest were 31.6 to 33.5°C and 32.2 to 33.4°C in Tscapular. The range of Tinnermost was 28.6 to 32.0°C. The range of the upper clothing layers (Lupper) and total clothing mass (Mtotal) was 1.1 to 3.2 layers and 473 to 1659 g respectively. The range of Icl was 0.78 to 2.10 clo. 2) Post hoc analyses showed that analysis of Tinnermost produced the same results as for that of Icl. Likewise, the analysis of Lupper produced the same result as the analysis of the number of total layers (Ltotal) within an outfit. 3) Air temperature (ta) had positive relationships with Tchest and Tscapular and with Tinnermost but had inverse correlations with Icl, Mtotal, Lupper and Ltotal. Tchest, Tscapular, and Tinnermost increased as ta rose. 4) Icl had inverse relationships with Tchest and Tinnermost, but positive relationships with Mtotal, Lupper and Ltotal. Icl could be estimated by Mtotal, Lupper, and Tscapular using a multivariate linear regression model. 5) Lupper had positive relationships with Icl

  20. Synthesis and high temperature transport properties of new quaternary layered selenide NaCuMnSe{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Pavan Kumar, V.; Varadaraju, U.V.

    2014-04-01

    Synthesis and high temperature transport properties of NaCu{sub 1+x}Mn{sub 1−x}Se{sub 2}, (x=0−0.75) a new quaternary layered selenide, are reported. NaCuMnSe{sub 2} crystallizes in a trigonal unit cell with space group of P-3m1 (a=4.1276 Å, c=7.1253 Å). The isovalent substitution of Mn{sup 2+} by Cu{sup 2+} is carried out. All the compositions show semiconducting nature, whereas the Seebeck coefficient increases gradually over the entire measured temperature range. Compositions with x=0 and 0.025 follow thermally activated behavior. With increase in copper concentration the conduction mechanism transforms to 2D variable range hopping (VRH) for x=0.05 and 0.075. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of NaCuMnSe{sub 2}. - Highlights: • A new quaternary layered selenide NaCuMnSe{sub 2} is synthesized. • All the compositions show semiconducting nature, whereas the Seebeck coefficient increases gradually over the entire measured temperature range. • Conduction mechanism transforms from thermally activated behavior to 2D variable range hopping with increase in copper concentration.

  1. Activated oil sands fluid coke for electrical double-layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuliani, Jocelyn E.; Kirk, Donald W.; Jia, Charles Q.; Tong, Shitang

    2014-12-01

    Electrochemical capacitors are important energy storage devices that have high power density, rapid charging cycles and are highly cyclable. In this study, activated fluid coke has demonstrated high surface area, improved capacitive properties, and high energy density. Fluid coke is a by-product generated from continuous high temperature bitumen upgrading, resulting in the formation of nearly spherical particles with concentric carbon layers. The residual sulphur impurities in fluid coke may enhance its energy storage performance. The activated coke samples have high specific surface areas, up to 1960 m2 g-1, and show promising capacitive performance, in 4 M KOH electrolyte, with high gravimetric and specific capacitances of 228-257 F g-1 and 13-14 μF cm-2, respectively. These results are comparable to other top performing activated carbon materials [1-3]. The activated fluid coke maintains high performance at fast charging rates, greater than 160 F g-1 at a current density of 7500 mA g-1. Activated fluid coke's high capacitance and promising rate performance are potentially associated with its unique layered, and the moderate sulphur content in the chemical structure. Activated fluid coke is a unique opportunity to use a limited use by-product to generate activated carbon that has a high surface area and promising energy storage properties.

  2. Urban Heat Island and Its Influence on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Temperature Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadygrov, N.; Kruchenitsky, G.; Lykov, A.

    2006-12-01

    The effect of megacity on atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) temperature is a well known phenomenon called "Urban Heat Island" revealed in increasing temperature over megacity relative to its suburb. Until recently the only way to investigate and gather the data about its vertical distribution was to observe temperature on the meteorological, TV towers and by radiosonde. The available information appears to be irregular in time and space. The situation has changed in recent years since the advent of temperature profiler based on microwave radiometer, which can produce the vertical distribution of ABL temperature up to 600 meters ASL with 5 minute sampling period. The station in the center of Moscow megacity and 2 observation sites near Moscow (20 km and 50 km away from city center) were equipped by MTP-5 radiometer in order to get quantitative estimations of the Heat Island Effect on ABL temperature field. Three sites were selected in order to look at transition from megacity to suburb. The main aim was not to get the climatological averages but to get the differences between Heat Island and its background (suburb). The period of observation was from beginning of 2000 till the middle of 2004. The ABL temperature model was developed separately for each station in the multiplicative manner as the product of seasonal and diurnal variations of ABL temperature in order to obtain the differences between Urban Heat Island and suburb ABL temperatures. As the result of data analysis, the amplitudes and phases of seasonal and diurnal harmonics, average annual noon temperature value, average temperature gradients and daily altitude-time crossection of ABL temperature were obtained. The analysis performed in this work has given us a better insight into the mechanism of Urban Heat Island influence on ABL temperature field with quantitative estimations of such influence.

  3. Characterization of cathode keeper wear by surface layer activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the erosion rates of the discharge cathode keeper in a 30 cm NSTAR configuration ion thruster were measured using a technique known as Surface Layer Activation (SLA). This diagnostic technique involves producing a radioactive tracer in a given surface by bombardment with high energy ions. The decrease in activity of the tracer material may be monitored as the surface is subjected to wear processes and correlated to a depth calibration curve, yielding the eroded depth. Analysis of the activities was achieved through a gamma spectroscopy system. The primary objectives of this investigation were to reproduce erosion data observed in previous wear studies in order to validate the technique, and to determine the effect of different engine operating parameters on erosion rate. The erosion profile at the TH 15 (23 kw) setting observed during the 8200 hour Life Demonstration Test (LDT) was reproduced. The maximum keeper erosion rate at this setting was determined to be 0.085 pm/hr. Testing at the TH 8 (1.4 kw) setting demonstrated lower erosion rates than TH 15, along with a different wear profile. Varying the keeper voltage was shown to have a significant effect on the erosion, with a positive bias with respect to cathode potential decreasing the erosion rate significantly. Accurate measurements were achieved after operating times of only 40 to 70 hours, a significant improvement over other erosion diagnostic methods.

  4. Temperature rise during experimental light-activated bleaching.

    PubMed

    Klaric, Eva; Rakic, Mario; Sever, Ivan; Tarle, Zrinka

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface and intrapulpal temperatures after treatments with different bleaching gels subjected to different types of light activation. A K-type thermocouple and infrared thermometer were used to measure the temperature increase during the 15- or 30-min treatment period. Light-emitting diode with a center wavelength of 405 nm (LED405), organic light-emitting diode (OLED), and femtosecond laser were tested and compared to ZOOM2. The tooth surface was treated with five bleaching agents and Vaseline which served as a control.The generalized estimating equation (GEE) model was applied for testing the differences in temperature increase. The ZOOM2 light source led to the largest increase in mean pulpal and tooth surface temperatures of 21.1 and 22.8 °C, followed by focused femtosecond laser which increased the pulpal and surface temperatures by up to 15.7 and 16.8 °C. Treatments with unfocused femtosecond laser, LED405, and OLED induced significantly lower mean temperature increases (p < 0.001 for each comparison with ZOOM2 and focused femtosecond laser), both in the pulp chamber (up to 2.7, 2.5, and 1.4 °C) and at the tooth surface (up to 3.2, 3.4, and 1.8 °C). Significant differences between pulp chamber and tooth surface measurements were obtained for all types of bleaching gel, during treatments with ZOOM2 (p < 0.001), LED405 (p < 0.001), and unfocused (p < 0.001) and focused femtosecond laser (p ≤ 0.002). Different bleaching agents or Vaseline can serve as an isolating layer. Focused femtosecond laser and ZOOM2 produced large temperature increases in the pulp chamber and at the tooth surface. Caution is advised when using these types of light activation, while LED405, OLED, and unfocused femtosecond laser could be safely used. PMID:23780710

  5. Room-temperature gating of molecular junctions using few-layer graphene nanogap electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro, Amelia; Prins, Ferry; Ruitenberg, Justus; Seldenthuis, Johannes; Aliaga-Alcalde, Nuria; Vandersypen, Lieven; van der Zant, Herre

    2012-02-01

    We report on a new method based on feedback controlled electroburning to controllably form nanogaps in few-layer graphene [1]. The gaps have separations on the order of 1-2 nm as estimated from a Simmons model for tunneling. Furthermore, molecules are deposited in the nanogaps. These molecular junctions display gateable IV-characteristics at room temperature. Gateable transport through molecules contacted between the electrodes demonstrates the potential of room-temperature operation of our molecular devices. Combined with the observed stability in time, our study shows that few-layer graphene nanogaps are an interesting alternative to metal electrodes. [1] Ferry Prins, Amelia Barreiro, Justus Ruitenberg, Johannes Seldenthuis, N'uria Aliaga-Alcalde, Lieven Vandersypen, Herre van der Zant, Nanoletters 11 (2011) 4607 - 4611

  6. New layered metal oxides as positive electrode materials for room-temperature sodium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Lin-Qin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Li-Quan

    2015-03-01

    In order to achieve better Na storage performance, most layered oxide positive electrode materials contain toxic and expensive transition metals Ni and/or Co, which are also widely used for lithium-ion batteries. Here we report a new quaternary layered oxide consisting of Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ti transition metals with O3-type oxygen stacking as a positive electrode for room-temperature sodium-ion batteries. The material can be simply prepared by a high-temperature solid-state reaction route and delivers a reversible capacity of 94 mAh/g with an average storage voltage of 3.2 V. This paves the way for cheaper and non-toxic batteries with high Na storage performance. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51222210 and 11234013) and the One Hundred Talent Project of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. Influence of the Halogen Activation on the Ozone Layer in XXIst Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Igor; Aloyan, Artash; Yermakov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the work is to evaluate a possible effect of heterophase chemical reactions (HCR) with participation of reservoir gases (ClONO2, HCl) and sulfate particles of the Junge layer on the ozone layer at mid-latitudes in the XXI century, which could be relevant for more accurate predicting a recovery of the ozone layer, taking into account that just these processes were the main cause of the ozone depletion at the end of XXth century. Required for calculating the dynamics of GHR data on the specific volume/surface of the sulfate aerosols in the lower stratosphere were taken from the data of field experiments. Their physico-chemical properties (chemical composition, density, water activity and free protons activity et al.) have been obtained with help of thermodynamic calculations (Atmospheric Inorganic Model, AIM). Altitude concentration profiles of individual gas components, as well as temperature and relative humidity (RH) at a given geographic location and season have been calculated using a two-dimensional model SOCRATES. The calculations have been made for the conditions of June 1995, 2040 and 2080 at 15 km altitude and 50° N latitude. It has been shown that the rate of ozone depletion as a result of processes involving halogen activation for the given conditions in 2040, 2080 is about 35% lower than a corresponding value in 1995 (a year of maximum effect of halogen activation). From this we can conclude that in the XXI century, despite the natural decline of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons. processes of halogen activation of the ozone depletion with participation of sulfate aerosols should be taken into account in the calculations of the recovery of the ozone layer at mid-latitudes.

  8. Measured and calculated wall temperatures on air-cooled turbine vanes with boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Gaugler, R. E.; Gladden, H. J.

    1982-11-01

    Convection cooled turbine vane metal wall temperatures experimentally obtained in a hot cascade for one vane design were compared with wall temperatures calculated with TACT1 and STAN5 computer codes which incorporated various models for predicting laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition. Favorable comparisons on both vane surface were obtained at high Reynolds number with only one of these transition models. When other models were used, temperature differences between calculated and experimental data obtained at the high Reynolds number were as much as 14 percent in the separation bubble region of the pressure surface. On the suction surface and at lower Reynolds number, predictions and data unsatisfactorily differed by as much as 22 percent. Temperature differences of this magnitude can represent orders of magnitude error in blade life prediction.

  9. Optimum growth temperature determination for GaInSb/InAs strained layer superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.L.; Wagner, R.J.; Waterman, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    To determine the optimum growth temperature for GaInSb/InAs strained layer superlattices (SLS) a series of SLS was grown over the temperature range 357-433 {degrees}C. Temperatures were estimated by determining the absorption spectrum of the GaAs substrate, hence its band gap, and thus its temperature. SLS were evaluated by single crystal x-ray diffraction and interband magnetoabsorption (IMA) measurements. X-ray spectra showed as many as eight peaks due to the superlattice. The quality of the superlattices as indicated by the x-ray data had a well defined maximum between 390 and 410 {degrees}C. IMA measurements indicated band gaps from 85 to 154 meV. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

  11. Exploring New Active Regions for Type 1 InasSb Strained-Layer Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Biefeld, R.M.; Kurtz, S.R.; Phillips, J.D.

    1999-05-13

    We report on the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of mid- infrared InAsSb/InPSb optically pumped lasers grown using a high speed rotating disk reactor (RDR). The devices contain AlAsSb claddings and strained, type 1, InAsSb/InPSb active regions. By changing the layer thickness and composition of InAsSb/InPSb SLSs, we have prepared structures with low temperature (<20K) photoluminescence wavelengths ranging from 3.4 to 4.8 µm. We find a variation of bandgap from 0.272 to 0.324 eV for layer thicknesses of 9.0 to 18.2 nm. From these data we have estimated a valence band offset for the InAsSb/InPSb interface of about 400 meV. An InAsSb/InPSb SLS, optically pumped laser structure was grown on an InAs substrate with AlAs0.l6Sb0.84 claddings. A lasing threshold and spectrally narrowed laser emission was seen from 80 K through 200 K, the maximum temperature where Iasing occurred. The temperature dependence of the SLS laser threshold is described by a characteristic temperature, T0 = 72 K, from 80 to 200 K.

  12. The inner region of the unstable boundary layer over hilly prairie for temperature and humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brutsaert, Wilfried; Sugita, Michiaki

    1990-01-01

    The analytical treatment of wind-speed, temperature, and humidity data above nonuniform surfaces is utilized to test the Monin-Obukhov similarity at the inner region of the atmospheric boundary layer. The data profiles are analyzed, and independent measurements of the surface fluxes of sensible heat and water vapor are incorporated into the analysis. It is shown that the mean profiles of the potential temperature and specific humidity can be described using the Monin-Obukhov similarity functions in an area with unstable conditions.

  13. Anomalous thermal expansion of InSe layered semiconductors in the low-temperature region

    SciTech Connect

    Krynetskii, I. B.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Shabanova, N. P. Tsikunov, A. V.; Kovalenko, R. I.; Rodin, V. V.; Gavrilkin, S. Yu.

    2013-05-15

    The temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of an InSe single crystal in the (001) plane is measured in the temperature range 7-50 K. A peak in the thermal expansion is detected near T = 10 K, after which the sample shrinks upon heating. The effect of an external magnetic field of up to 6 T, which is parallel to the (001) plane, on the TEC is investigated. The observed partial suppression of the peak and crystal compression by the field indicates the relation of these anomalies to possible electron ordering in InSe layers.

  14. Effect of horizontal heat and fluid flow on the vertical temperature distribution in a semiconfining layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Ge, S.

    1996-01-01

    By including the constant flow of heat and fluid in the horizontal direction, we develop an analytical solution for the vertical temperature distribution within the semiconfining layer of a typical aquifer system. The solution is an extension of the previous one-dimensional theory by Bredehoeft and Papadopulos [1965]. It provides a quantitative tool for analyzing the uncertainty of the horizontal heat and fluid flow. The analytical results demonstrate that horizontal flow of heat and fluid, if at values much smaller than those of the vertical, has a negligible effect on the vertical temperature distribution but becomes significant when it is comparable to the vertical.

  15. Infrared spectral emittance profiles of spectrally selective solar absorbing layers at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Soule, D E; Smith, D W

    1977-11-01

    A study was made to characterize parametrically the spectrally selective absorptance profiles of typical interference, bulk absorption, and mixed-type absorbing layers for solar-thermal conversion at temperatures to 500 degrees C. A five parameter empirical Fermi function was used to model the spectral absorptance converted from the measured spectral reflectance. An alternative method using the Fermi model is presented for defining the ir spectral emittance profile, as scaled to the measured hemispherical total emittahce. PMID:20174248

  16. Variable but persistent coexistence of Prochlorococcus ecotypes along temperature gradients in the ocean's surface mixed layer.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Jeremy W; Lin, Yajuan; Gainer, P Jackson; Post, Anton F; Johnson, Zackary I; Zinser, Erik R

    2016-04-01

    The vast majority of the phytoplankton communities in surface mixed layer of the oligotrophic ocean are numerically dominated by one of two ecotypes of Prochlorococcus, eMIT9312 or eMED4. In this study, we surveyed large latitudinal transects in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean to determine if these ecotypes discretely partition the surface mixed layer niche, or if populations exist as a continuum along key environmental gradients, particularly temperature. Transitions of dominance occurred at approximately 19-21°C, with the eMED4 ecotype dominating the colder, and eMIT9312 ecotype dominating the warmer regions. Within these zones of regional dominance, however, the minority ecotype was not competed to extinction. Rather, a robust log-linear relationship between ecotype ratio and temperature characterized this stabilized coexistence: for every 2.5°C increase in temperature, the eMIT9312:eMED4 ratio increased by an order of magnitude. This relationship was observed in both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in pyrosequencing assays. Water column stratification also contributed to the ecotype ratio along the basin-scale transects, but to a lesser extent. Finally, instances where the ratio of the eMED4 and eMIT9312 abundances did not correlate well with temperature were identified. Such occurrences are likely due to changes in water temperatures outpacing changes in community structure. PMID:26743532

  17. Comparison of EL emitted by LEDs on Si substrates containing Ge and Ge/GeSn MQW as active layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, B.; Arguirov, T.; Kittler, M.; Oehme, M.; Kostecki, K.; Kasper, E.; Schulze, J.

    2015-02-01

    We analyzed Ge- and GeSn/Ge multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs). The structures were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on Si. In the Ge LEDs the active layer was 300 nm thick. Sb doping was ranging from 1×1018 to 1×1020 cm-3. An unintentionally doped Ge-layer served as reference. The LEDs with the MQWs consist of ten alternating GeSn/Ge-layers. The Ge-layers were 10 nm thick and the GeSn-layers were grown with 6 % Sn and thicknesses between 6 and 12 nm. The top contact of all LEDs was identical. Accordingly, the light extraction is comparable. The electroluminescence (EL) analysis was performed under forward bias at different currents. Sample temperatures between <300 K and 80 K were studied. For the reference LED the direct transition at 0.8 eV dominates. With increasing current the peak is slightly redshifted due to Joule heating. Sb doping of the active Ge-layer affects the intensity and at 3×1019 cm-3 the strongest emission appears. It is ~4 times higher as compared to the reference. Moreover a redshift of the peak position is caused by bandgap narrowing. The LEDs with undoped GeSn/Ge-MQWs as active layer show a very broad luminescence band with a peak around 0.65 eV, pointing to a dominance of the GeSn-layers. The light emission intensity is at least 17 times stronger as compared to the reference Ge-LED. Due to incorporation of Sn in the MQWs the active layer should approach to a direct semiconductor. In indirect Si and Ge we observed an increase of intensity with increasing temperature, whereas the intensity of GeSn/Ge-MQWs was much less affected. But a deconvolution of the spectra revealed that the energy of indirect transition in the wells is still below the one of the direct transition.

  18. Influence of topography on the temperature variation around the tropical tropopause layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubokawa, H.; Masaki, S.; Fujiwara, M.; Suzuki, J.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature variations in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) are an important factor for dehydration in the UTLS region. It is known that Kelvin waves induce large temperature variations in the TTL. We investigated the temperature variations in the TTL using both numerical data produced by the Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM) and various observational data including satellite data (the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate; COSMIC), the reanalysis data of different resolution (ERA-40-interim, NCEP-CFSR, MERRA, YOTC-ECMWF), and radiosonde data for the Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intra-seasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY). We found that all the data shows that the temperature variations become larger over the mountainous regions of the Indonesian maritime continent than over the oceanic regions and that the large temperature variations are associated with Kelvin waves. As, the horizontal resolution of the reanalysis becomes higher, the standard deviations of the TTL temperature near the mountains became larger. When Kelvin waves passed over the Indonesian maritime continent, the amplitude of temperature becomes about 2 K larger over the mountainous regions. The power spectrum for the periods between 7 days and 12 days was larger over the mountainous regions compared with that over the ocean. The sensitivity study using the stretch-NICAM shows that the height of mountains clearly affect the amplitude of temperature near the TTL.

  19. Modeling the snow surface temperature with a one-layer energy balance snowmelt model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, J.; Tarboton, D. G.; Luce, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Snow surface temperature is a key control on and result of dynamically coupled energy exchanges at the snow surface. The snow surface temperature is the result of the balance between external forcing (incoming radiation) and energy exchanges above the surface that depend on surface temperature (outgoing longwave radiation and turbulent fluxes) and the transport of energy into the snow by conduction and meltwater influx. Because of the strong insulating properties of snow, thermal gradients in snow packs are large and nonlinear, a fact that has led many to advocate multiple layer snowmelt models over single layer models. In an effort to keep snowmelt modeling simple and parsimonious, the Utah Energy Balance (UEB) snowmelt model used only one layer but allowed the snow surface temperature to be different from the snow average temperature by using an equilibrium gradient parameterization based on the surface energy balance. Although this procedure was considered an improvement over the ordinary single layer snowmelt models, it still resulted in discrepancies between modeled and measured snowpack energy contents. In this paper we evaluate the equilibrium gradient approach, the force-restore approach, and a modified force-restore approach when they are integrated as part of a complete energy and mass balance snowmelt model. The force-restore and modified force-restore approaches have not been incorporated into the UEB in early versions, even though Luce and Tartoton have done work in calculating the energy components using these approaches. In addition, we evaluate a scheme for representing the penetration of a refreezing front in cold periods following melt. We introduce a method to adjust effective conductivity to account for the presence of ground near to a shallow snow surface. These parameterizations were tested against data from the Central Sierra Snow Laboratory, CA, Utah State University experimental farm, UT, and subnivean snow laboratory at Niwot Ridge, CO

  20. Transparent conductive indium oxide film deposited on low temperature substrates by activated reactive evaporation.

    PubMed

    Marcovitch, O; Klein, Z; Lubezky, I

    1989-07-15

    High quality conductive coatings for the visible region were prepared on low temperature glass substrates. The conductive layer was an indium oxide film deposited by the activated reactive evaporation technique using a glow discharge hollow cathode ion gun. An antireflective layer of MgF(2) was deposited over the conductive layer. The average transmission in the visible region of the coated glass with sheet resistance of < 15 Omega/sq was greater than 90%. The coating was durable and passed a series of environmental tests according to MIL-C-675C. PMID:20555600

  1. An active control system for the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, James

    This thesis presents the development process and the experimental results of a system constructed to apply real-time control to the structures of the turbulent boundary layer region in order to reduce surface shear stress. The system is composed of three main components: an array of MEMS surface shear stress, tauw sensors; a MEMS flap actuator; and a control logic which integrates the hardware components together into a closed system. The objective of this system is to reduce the stress contained in streak-like regions of high tauw. The sensor array, used to image the tauw distribution, is an extension of the thermal based tauw sensor developed by Jiang. Numerous studies have been performed using this device, the results of which have validated its performance. For this study, a new temperature compensation methodology, based on the surface temperature of the sensor chip, was employed in order to account for possible temperature variations at the wall surface. The actuator, a pneumatically driven flap, is developed as part of the present research. The device is, in essence, a 3 mm x 1 mm cantilever beam that sits on top of an inflatable diaphragm and is capable of actuation frequencies of over 200 Hz and amplitudes of over .11 mm. When it is oscillated in the open loop mode, the effect over one cycle of motion is an average reduction by as much as 2.5% in tauw in the region immediately downstream. A neural network is employed to identify the streak-like regions of interest. Results have shown that this network is successful in identifying the streak-like regions of interest. The control logic employs this network in a predictive, feed-forward scheme to determine the appropriate actuator response. Offline studies have shown that under optimal conditions, the signature of the streak-like regions can be eliminated. Online results conform well to the offline predictions. While unable to achieve the optimal conditions, online experiments show that the system is capable

  2. Microbial Activity in Active and Upper Permafrost Layers in Axel Heiberg Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. A.; Allan, J.; Cheng, K.; Chourey, K.; Hettich, R. L.; Layton, A.; Liu, X.; Murphy, J.; Mykytczuk, N. C.; Phelps, T. J.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Saarunya, G.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Whyte, L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2011-12-01

    Data on microbial communities and their metabolic activity in Arctic wetlands and underlying permafrost sediments is lacking. Samples were collected from different depths of a cryosol (D1, D2) and upper permafrost (D3) at the Axel Heiberg Island in July 2009. Upper cryosol has lower H2O but higher C and N content when compared to deeper horizons including upper permafrost layer. Deep cryosol and upper permafrost contained SO42- (155 and 132 ppm) and NO3- (0.12 and 0.10 ppm), respectively. The phylogenetic analyses of the environmental 16S rRNA genes showed the putative SRB were more abundant in permafrost (8%) than in cryosols, D1 (0.2%) and D2 (1.1%). Putative denitrifying bacteria varied along depth with near 0.1% in D1 and a significant increase in D2 (2.7%) and D3 (2.2%). Methanogens were not detected; methanotrophs were present at low levels in D3 (1%). Two sets of microcosms were set up. Firstly, anaerobic microcosms, amended with 10 mM glucose, sulfate or nitrate, were cultivated at varying temperatures (15o, 6o, and 0o C) for 10 months. Metabolic activity was monitored by measuring CO2 and CH4 every 3 months. A total of 89.5% of the D3-originated microcosms showed higher activity in comparison to cryosols in first 3 months. CH4 was not detected in these microcosms, whereas CO2 production was higher at 15o C or with glucose. Metaproteomics analyses of microcosms with higher levels of CO2 production indicated the presence of stress responsive proteins (e.g. DnaK, GroEL) and proteins essential for energy production and survival under carbon starvation (e.g. F0F1 ATP synthase, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase). These proteins have been previously shown to be up-regulated at low temperatures by permafrost bacteria. Metaproteomics data based on the draft sequences indicated the presence of proteins from the genera Bradyrhizobium, Sphingomonas, Lysinibacillus and Methylophilaceae and these bacteria were also detected by pyrosequencing. Secondly, a duplicate set of anaerobic

  3. Surface activation-based nanobonding and interconnection at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howlader, M. M. R.; Yamauchi, A.; Suga, T.

    2011-02-01

    Flip chip nanobonding and interconnect system (NBIS) equipment with high precision alignment has been developed based on the surface activated bonding method for high-density interconnection and MEMS packaging. The 3σ alignment accuracy in the IR transmission system was approximately ±0.2 µm. The performance of the NBIS has been preliminarily investigated through bonding between relatively rough surfaces of copper through silicon vias (Cu-TSVs) and gold-stud bumps (Au-SBs), and smooth surfaces of silicon wafers. The Cu-TSVs of 55 µm diameter and the Au-SBs of 35 µm diameter with ~6-10 nm surface roughness (RMS) were bonded at room temperature after surface activation using an argon fast atom beam (Ar-FAB) under 0.16 N per bump. Silicon wafers of 50 mm diameter with ~0.2 nm RMS surface roughness were bonded without heating after surface activation. Void-free interfaces both in Cu-TSV/Au-SB and silicon/silicon with bonding strength equivalent to bulk fracture of Au and silicon, respectively, were achieved. A few nm thick amorphous layers were observed across the silicon/silicon interface that was fabricated by the Ar-FAB. This study in the interconnection and bonding facilitates the required three-dimensional integration on the same surface for high-density electronic and biomedical systems.

  4. Modulated ionomer distribution in the catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells for high temperature operation.

    PubMed

    Choo, Min-Ju; Oh, Keun-Hwan; Kim, Hee-Tak; Park, Jung-Ki

    2014-08-01

    Ionomer distribution is an important design parameter for high performance polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs); however, the nano-scale modulation of the ionomer morphology has not been intensively explored. Here, we propose a new route to modulate the ionomer distribution that features the introduction of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to the cathode catalyst layer and the leaching the PEG phase from the catalyst layer using a water effluent during operation. The key concept in the approach is the expansion of the ionomer thin film through the PEG addition. We demonstrate that the modulated ionomer distribution increases the electrochemical active area and proton transport property, without loss in oxygen transport, at a fixed ionomer content. At a high temperature of 120 °C, the power performance at 0.6 V is increased by 1.73-fold with the modulated ionomer distribution as a result of 1.25-fold increase in the electrochemical active area and two-fold increase in the proton transport rate in the catalyst layer. PMID:24777945

  5. Practical engineering: control of active systems using the stagnation temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lunde, P.J.

    1982-04-01

    Solar active systems with flat plate collectors are discussed with reference to the temperature at which the system should be activated. It is concluded that the system should be activated when the stagnation temperature (temperature under the absorber plate when no fluid is circulating) equals the temperature of the fluid in storage. A thermistor Wheatstone bridge control system is described which will eliminate pump relay chatter and the permissible control differential is calculated from the collector efficiency curve. To avoid dedication of an entire collector to house the control system, a method is described for determining the stagnation temperature using a portion of an active collector. For an active solar hot water system, a calculation is carried out to show that a 2/sup 0/F temperature differential (stagnation temperature-storage temperature) is satisfactory. (MJJ)

  6. Two-tracer spectroscopy diagnostics of temperature profile in the conduction layer of a laser-ablated plastic foil

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jiyan; Yang Guohong; Hu Xin; Yang Jiamin; Ding Yaonan; Ding Yongkun; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian; Xu Yan; Yan Jun; Pei Wenbin

    2010-11-15

    A technique that combines the diagnostics of electron temperature history and the measurements of ablation velocity with two-tracer x-ray spectroscopy has been developed for diagnosing the temperature profiles in the thermal conduction layers of laser-ablated plastic foils. The electron temperature in the plastic ablator was diagnosed using the isoelectronic line ratios of Al Ly{alpha} line to Mg Ly{alpha} line, emitted from a tracer layer of Al/Mg mixture buried under the ablator. The ablation velocity was inferred from the time delay between the onset time of x-ray line emissions from Al and Mg tracer layers buried at two depths in the ablator, respectively. From the measured electron temperatures and ablation velocity, the electron temperature profile in the conduction layer was inferred. The measured temperature profile was compared with the simulated one and reasonable agreement was found.

  7. Ground-state energy trends in single and multilayered coupled InAs/GaAs quantum dots capped with InGaAs layers: Effects of InGaAs layer thickness and annealing temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, S.; Ghosh, K.; Jejurikar, S.; Mishra, A.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Investigation of ground state energy in single and multi-layered InAs/GaAs QD. • Strain reducing layer (InGaAs) prevents the formation of non-radiative. • Strain reducing layer (InGaAs) is responsible for high activation energy. • Significant deviation from the Varshni model, E(T) = E − αT{sup 2}/T + β. - Abstract: Vertically coupled, multilayered InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) covered with thin InGaAs strain-reducing layers (SRLs) are in demand for various technological applications. We investigated low temperature photoluminescence of single and multilayered structures in which the SRL thickness was varied. The SRL layer was responsible for high activation energies. Deviation of experimental data from the Varshni (1967) model, E(T) = E − ∞ T{sup 2}/T + β, suggests that the InAs-layered QDs have properties different from those in bulk material. Anomalous ground-state peak linewidths (FWHM), especially for annealed multilayer structures, were observed. A ground-state peak blue-shift with a broadened linewidth was also observed. Loss of intensity was detected in samples annealed at 800 °C. Presence of SRLs prevents formation of non-radiative centers under high temperature annealing. The results indicate the potential importance of such structures in optoelectronic applications.

  8. Architectural evolution of the Nojima fault and identification of the activated slip layer by Kobe earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hidemi; Omura, Kentaro; Matsuda, Tatsuo; Ikeda, Ryuji; Kobayashi, Kenta; Murakami, Masaki; Shimada, Koji

    2007-07-01

    Evolutionary history of Nojima Fault zone is clarified by comprehensive examinations of petrological, geophysical, and geochemical characterizations on a fault zone in deep-drilled core penetrating the Nojima Fault. On the basis of the results, we reconstruct a whole depth profile of the architecture of the Nojima Fault and identify the primal slip layer activated by 1995 Kobe earthquake. The deepest part (8- to 12-km depth) of the fault zone is composed of thin slip layers of pseudotachylite (5 to 10 mm thick each, 10 cm in total). Middle depth (4- to 8-km depth) of the fault zone is composed of fault core (6 to 10 m thick), surrounded by thick (100 m thick) damage zone, characterized by zeolite precipitation. The shallow part of the fault zone (1- to 4-km depth) is composed of distributed narrow shear zones, which are characterized by combination of thin (0.5 cm thick each, 10 cm in total) ultracataclasite layers at the core of shear zones, surrounded by thicker (1 to 3 m thick) damage zones associated with carbonate precipitation. An extremely thin ultracataclasite layer (7 mm thick), activated by the 1995 Kobe earthquake, is clearly identified from numerous past slip layers, overprinting one of the shear zones, as evidenced by conspicuous geological and geophysical anomalies. The Nojima Fault zone was 10 to 100 times thicker at middle depth than that of shallower and deeper depths. The thickening would be explained as a combination of physical and chemical effects as follows. (1) Thickening of "fault core" at middle depth would be attributed to normal stress dependence on thickness of the shear zone and (2) an extreme thickening of "damage zone" in middle depth of the crust would result from the weakening of the fault zone due to super hydrostatic fluid pressure at middle depths. The high fluid pressure would result from faster sealing with low-temperature carbonate at the shallower fault zone.

  9. Observational evidence of temperature trends at two levels in the surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, X.; Pielke, R. A., Sr.; Mahmood, R.; Fiebrich, C. A.; Aiken, R.

    2015-09-01

    Long-term surface air temperatures at 1.5 m screen level over land are used in calculating a global average surface temperature trend. This global trend is used by the IPCC and others to monitor, assess, and describe global warming or warming hiatus. Current knowledge of near-surface temperature trends with respect to height, however, is limited and inadequately understood because surface temperature observations at different heights in the surface layer in the world are rare especially from a high-quality and long-term climate monitoring network. Here we use high-quality two-height Oklahoma Mesonet observations, synchronized in time, fixed in height, and situated in relatively flat terrain, to assess temperature trends and differentiating temperature trends with respect to heights (i.e., near-surface lapse rate trend) over the period 1997 to 2013. We show that the near-surface lapse rate has significantly decreased with a trend of -0.18 ± 0.03 °C (10 m)-1 decade-1 indicating that the 9 m height temperatures increased faster than temperatures at the 1.5 m screen level and conditions at the 1.5 m height cooled faster than at the 9 m height. However, neither of the two individual height temperature trends by themselves were statistically significant. The magnitude of lapse rate trend is greatest under lighter winds at night. Nighttime lapse rate trends were significantly more negative than daytime lapse rate trends and the average lapse rate trend was three times more negative under calm conditions than under windy conditions. Our results provide the first observational evidence of near-surface temperature changes with respect to height that could enhance the assessment of climate model predictions.

  10. Rotational Raman lidar with a multispectral detector for temperature profiling in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Yabuki, M.; Tsuda, T.

    2013-12-01

    Temperature profiling in the atmospheric boundary layer is essential for studying atmospheric processes such as dynamics, thermodynamics, and cloud physics. The rotational Raman (RR) lidar has the ability to conduct continuous observation of the spatial distributions of atmospheric temperature. In this study, a combination of the temperature lidar with a multispectral detector is proposed, in order to construct a system that is compact, robust, and easy to align for the detection of RR signals. The multispectral detector enables simultaneous acquisition of multi-channel photon counts and provides spectral and range-resolved data by applying lidar techniques. Conventional temperature lidar detects the ratio of two RR lidar signals of opposite temperature dependence in combination with several edge- and interference-filters. Conversely, the multispectral detector can define the shape of the RR spectrum. Therefore, the proposed system with a multispectral detector detects the variation of the lidar signals by temperature as well as that of the wavelength shift of the emitted laser. It is suggested that this technique can reduce uncertainties in the optical alignment of the polychromator and in the stability of laser wavelength. The statistical temperature-error derived from the proposed method depends on both the spectral resolution and the spectral range of the multispectral detector. The ideal settings for multispectral observation were estimated by the theoretical simulation of the effect of both spectral resolution and spectral range on the accuracy of temperature estimation. Further, we construct the temperature lidar by employing the multispectral detector with the ideal spectral resolution derived from the simulation. In this presentation, we introduce our proposed system and the preliminary results of the temperature observation from RR lidar with a multi spectral detector.

  11. Vegetation-Soil-Active Layer Relationships Along a Low-Arctic Bioclimate Gradient, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. A.; Jia, G. J.; Epstein, H. E.; Shiklomanov, N.; Nelson, F.; Hinzman, L. D.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2002-12-01

    Northern Alaska has three of five Arctic bioclimate subzones, which are representative of the circumpolar Low Arctic. This portion of the Arctic has more or less continuous tundra plant cover and well-developed moss canopies. We examined the biomass and remotely sensed spectral properties of the vegetation canopy, active-layer thickness, and the soil properties at 21 sites on the Arctic Slope and Seward Peninsula of Alaska. The sites were grouped into three bioclimate subzones according the summer warmth at the sites. The summer warmth index (SWI) is the sum of the mean monthly temperatures greater than 0 degrees C. Subzone C, the coldest subzone, occurs in a narrow strip along the northern coast of the Alaska. Subzone D covers most of the Arctic Coastal Plain and the northwest portion of the Seward Peninsula, and Subzone E covers most of the Foothills and most of the unforested portion of the Seward Peninsula. The SWIs in Subzones C, D, and E are generally less than 10-15 degrees C, 15-25 degrees C, and 25-35 degrees C respectively. The average active layer depths were 44, 55, and 47 cm respectively The shallow active layer in Subzone E is to a large degree a response to the denser vegetation canopies in Subzone E. Total plant biomass in Subzone C, D, and E averaged 421 g m-2, 503 g m-2, and 1178 g m-2 respectively. The much higher biomass in Subzone E was due primarily to woody shrubs (40 g m-2 in Subzone C, 51 g m-2 in Subzone D, and 730 g m-2 in Subzone E). The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is one measure of greenness. Highest NDVI values were obtained from acidic tundra regions in Subzone E, and the lowest NDVI values were obtained in the nonacidic areas of Subzone C. In summary, the insulative properties of the vegetation play a very important role controlling the thickness of the active layer, and the amount of vegetation biomass differs according to summer warmth and soil properties. Acidic soils in the warmest parts of the Arctic (Subzone E

  12. Synthesis and high temperature transport properties of new quaternary layered selenide NaCuMnSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan Kumar, V.; Varadaraju, U. V.

    2014-04-01

    Synthesis and high temperature transport properties of NaCu1+xMn1-xSe2, (x=0-0.75) a new quaternary layered selenide, are reported. NaCuMnSe2 crystallizes in a trigonal unit cell with space group of P-3m1 (a=4.1276 Å, c=7.1253 Å). The isovalent substitution of Mn2+ by Cu2+ is carried out. All the compositions show semiconducting nature, whereas the Seebeck coefficient increases gradually over the entire measured temperature range. Compositions with x=0 and 0.025 follow thermally activated behavior. With increase in copper concentration the conduction mechanism transforms to 2D variable range hopping (VRH) for x=0.05 and 0.075.

  13. Sea ice edge position impact on the atmospheric boundary layer temperature structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavina, Elena; Repina, Irina

    2016-04-01

    Processes happening in the Arctic region nowadays strongly influence global climate system; the polar amplification effect can be considered one of the main indicators of ongoing changes. Dramatic increase in amount of ice-free areas in the Arctic Ocean, which took place in 2000s, is one of the most significant examples of climate system dynamic in polar region. High amplitude of changes in Arctic climate, both observed and predicted, and existing inaccuracies of climate and weather forecasting models, enforce the development of a more accurate one. It is essential to understand the physics of the interaction between atmosphere and ocean in the Northern Polar area (particularly in boundary layer of the atmosphere) to improve the models. Ice conditions have a great influence on the atmospheric boundary layer in the Arctic. Sea ice inhibits the heat exchange between atmosphere and ocean water during the polar winter, while the heat exchange above the ice-free areas increases rapidly. Due to those significant temperature fluctuations, turbulence of heat fluxes grows greatly. The most intensive interaction takes place at marginal ice zones, especially in case of the cold outbreak - intrusion of cooled air mass from the ice to free water area. Still, thermal structure and dynamic of the atmosphere boundary layer are not researched and described thoroughly enough. Single radio sounding observations from the planes being done, bur they do not provide high-resolution data which is necessary for study. This research is based on continuous atmosphere boundary layer temperature and sea ice observation collected in the Arctic Ocean during the two NABOS expeditions in August and September in 2013 and 2015, as well as on ice conditions satellite data (NASA TEAM 2 and VASIA 2 data processing). Atmosphere temperature data has been obtained with Meteorological Temperature Profiler MTP-5 (ATTEX, Russia). It is a passive radiometer, which provides continuous data of atmospheric

  14. Temperature-dependent mechanical properties of single-layer molybdenum disulphide: Molecular dynamics nanoindentation simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Junhua; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Rabczuk, Timon

    2013-12-02

    The temperature-dependent mechanical properties of single-layer molybdenum disulphide (MoS{sub 2}) are obtained using molecular dynamics (MD) nanoindentation simulations. The Young's moduli, maximum load stress, and maximum loading strain decrease with increasing temperature from 4.2 K to 500 K. The obtained Young's moduli are in good agreement with those using our MD uniaxial tension simulations and the available experimental results. The tendency of maximum loading strain with different temperature is opposite with that of metal materials due to the short range Stillinger-Weber potentials in MoS{sub 2}. Furthermore, the indenter tip radius and fitting strain effect on the mechanical properties are also discussed.

  15. Surface-layer effect in MnTiO3 ceramics at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Teng; Wang, Chunchang; Sun, Xiaohong; Wang, Guojing; Lei, Changmei; Liu, Lina

    2012-12-01

    MnTiO3 ceramics were prepared via the traditional solid-state reaction route. The low-temperature (100-330 K) dielectric properties of MnTiO3 have been systematically investigated in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 5 MHz. Our results showed that MnTiO3 exhibits intrinsic dilectric response in a wide temperature range up to 200 K. A relaxation appears near room temperature. This relaxation can be enhanced by annealing treatment in oxygen and weakened in nitrogen. Reducing the sample thickness gradually leads to the disappearance of the relaxation. Based on these experimental facts, the relaxation was ascribed to be a Maxwell-Wagner relaxation due to surface-layer effect.

  16. Monitoring of the permafrost surface active layer in Quebec and in the Arctic using remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, Nicolas; Royer, Alain; Krinner, Gerhard; Roy, Alexandre

    2014-05-01

    Projected future warming is particularly strong in the Northern high latitudes. Increases of temperatures are up to 2 to 6°C in the northern high latitudes, and up to 3 to 8°C in the North Pole area. Permafrosts (grounds with negative temperatures at least two years in a row) are present on 25 % of the northern hemisphere lands and contain high quantities of « frozen » carbon, estimated at 1400 Gt (40 % of the global terrestrial carbon). Recent studies have shown that a significant part (50%) of the first meters of the permafrost could melt within 2050, and 90 % within 2100. The aim of this study is to help understand the climate evolution in arctic areas, and more specifically of land areas covered by snow. We want to describe the ground temperature all year round even under snow cover. We hope to be able to deduce the active layer thickness evolution over the last ten years in northern Quebec. With the use of satellite data (fusion of Modis land surface temperature « LST » and AMSR-E brillance temperature « Tb », land cover …), and with the assimilation of these observations in the Canadian Landscape Surface Scheme (CLASS, CLASS-SSA) and in a simple radiative transfert model (HUT), we try to benefit from the advantages of each one of the sources in order to complete two objectives : 1- build a solid methodology in order to retrieve the land surface temperature, with and without snow cover, in taïga and toundra areas ; 2 - from those retrieved land surface temperatures, describe the ground temperature during summer as well as in winter (under snow) so that we can have a better look at the summer melt of the permafrost active layer. We have proposed a methodology that takes into account the evolution of two main input parameters of the CLASS model (air temperature and precipitations) in order to minimise the LST and Tb ouput. The proposed methodology seems to improve the results on the LST and Tb at 10 and 19 GHz in summer in a toundra environment

  17. Origins of large critical temperature variations in single-layer cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, A.D.; Kondo, T.; Khasanov, R.; Kolesikov, N.N.; Timonina; Rotenberg, E.; Ohta, T.; Bendounan, A.; Sassa, Y.; Fedorov, A.; Paihes, S.; Santander-Syro, A.F.; Chang, J.; Shi, M.; Mesot, J.; Fretwell, H.M.; Kaminski, A.

    2008-08-26

    We study the electronic structures of two single-layer superconducting cuprates, Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CuO{sub 6+{delta}} (Tl2201) and (Bi{sub 1.35}Pb{sub 0.85}) (Sr{sub 1.47}La{sub 0.38}) CuO{sub 6+{delta}} (Bi2201) which have very different maximum critical temperatures (90 K and 35 K, respectively) using angular-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We are able to identify two main differences in their electronic properties. First, the shadow band that is present in double-layer and low T{sub c,max} single-layer cuprates is absent in Tl2201. Recent studies have linked the shadow band to structural distortions in the lattice and the absence of these in Tl2201 may be a contributing factor in its T{sub c,max}. Second, Tl2201's Fermi surface (FS) contains long straight parallel regions near the antinode, while in Bi2201 the antinodal region is much more rounded. Since the size of the superconducting gap is largest in the antinodal region, differences in the band dispersion at the antinode may play a significant role in the pairing and therefore affect the maximum transition temperature.

  18. Laboratory investigation of a thermally stable boundary layer subject to a step change in wall temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Buren, Tyler; Williams, Owen J.; Smits, Alexander J.

    2014-11-01

    Thermally stable boundary layers with a step change in boundary condition are seen in industrial applications (e.g. plate heat exchangers) as well as in nature (e.g. onshore breezes). Previous studies indicate that bulk indicators of stability are often insufficient to describe the local state of turbulence because the local flow strongly depends on its upstream history. Experiments were conducted to gain further insight into these flows. A low-speed wind tunnel was used to generate a rough-wall boundary layer at up to Reθ = 1500 . After a development length of approximately 22 δ , the downstream half of the tunnel wall was heated, creating a step change in wall temperature of up to 135° C . Particle image velocimetry and a thermocouple rake were used to measure the fluctuating velocity field and mean temperature profile at three locations downstream of the step change. We examine the rate of growth of the internal boundary layer and the corresponding evolution of the turbulent stresses in relation to changes in mean local stratification. This work was supported by the Princeton University Cooperative Institute for Climate Science.

  19. Vertical profiles of trapped greenhouse gases in Alaskan permafrost active layers before the spring thaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Eunji; Yang, Ji-woong; Kim, Yongwon; Ahn, Jinho

    2015-04-01

    Seasonally frozen ground over permafrost is important in controlling annual greenhouse gas exchange between permafrost and atmosphere. Soil microbes decompose soil carbon and generate carbon dioxide and methane when they become activated. However, the actual greenhouse gas emission follows various efflux pathways. For example, seasonal freezing of the top soil layers can either restrain or press the gas emission from deeper layers. It has been reported that abrupt release of methane during spring is attributable to the emission of trapped gases that had failed to be released instantly after formation (1, 2). In order to examine the seasonally trapped greenhouse gases, we drilled five Alaskan permafrost cores before spring thaw; one from coastal tundra, two from typical boreal forests, one from area where fire occurred, and one from peat accumulated sites. Vertical profiles of carbon dioxide and methane concentrations were obtained with 5-10 cm depth intervals. We found methane peaks from two cores, indicating inhibition of methane efflux. We also analyzed organic carbon, nitrogen and water contents and compared them with the greenhouse gas profiles. We are continuing analysis for the soil temperature profiles of the sampling boreholes because the detailed temperature information might be related to microbial activity, and can be used as indirect indicators of soil water freezing and latent heat influences at some active layer depth (zero curtain effects). All the high-resolution analyses for subsurface environments may help to improve understanding greenhouse gas emission from permafrost regions. 1. Mastepanov M, et al. (2008) Large tundra methane burst during onset of freezing. Nature 456(7222):628-630. 2. Song C, et al. (2012) Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region. Environmental Research Letters 7(3):034009.

  20. Synthesis of transparent aqueous sols of colloidal layered niobate nanocrystals at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Ban, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Shogo; Ohya, Yutaka

    2011-12-01

    Transparent aqueous sols of colloidal tetramethylammonium niobate nanocrystals were synthesized by mixing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH), niobium ethoxide, and water at TMAOH/Nb≥0.7 at room temperature. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the thin films prepared by evaporating the colloidal solutions on a glass substrate indicated that the colloidal niobate had a layered crystalline structure. Two types of layered structures are known as a layered niobate, i.e. M(4)Nb(6)O(17)·nH(2)O and MNb(3)O(8) (M=H, H(3)O, or alkaline metal). Raman spectra and electron diffraction suggested that the niobate nanocrystals were similar in crystal structure to M(4)Nb(6)O(17)·nH(2)O compounds. Moreover, when niobium oxide thin films were fabricated from the niobate colloidal solutions by the sol-gel method, oriented T-Nb(2)O(5) thin films, whose c-axis was parallel to the substrate surface, were obtained. The orientation of the thin films was probably attributed to the layered structure of the colloidal niobate nanocrystals. PMID:21903222

  1. Black sea surface temperature anomaly on 5th August 1998 and the ozone layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manev, A.; Palazov, K.; Raykov, St.; Ivanov, V.

    2003-04-01

    BLACK SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE ANOMALY ON 5th AUGUST 1998 AND THE OZONE LAYER THICKNESS A. Manev , K. Palazov , St. Raykov, V. Ivanov Solar Terrestrial Influences Laboratory, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences amanev@abv.bg This paper focuses on the peculiarities of the Black Sea surface temperature anomaly on 05.08.1998. Researching the daily temperature changes in a number of control fields in the course of 8-10 years, we have found hidden correlations and anomalous deviations in the sea surface temperatures on a global scale. Research proves the statistical reliability of the temperature anomaly on the entire Black Sea surface registered on 04.-05.08.1998. In the course of six days around these dates the temperatures are up to 2°C higher than the maximum temperatures in this period in the other seven years. A more detailed analysis of the dynamics of the anomaly required the investigation of five Black Sea surface characteristic zones of 75x75 km. The analysis covers the period 20 days - 10 days before and 10 days after the anomaly. Investigations aimed at interpreting the reasons for the anomalous heating of the surface waters. We have tried to analyze the correlation between sea surface temperature and the global ozone above the Black Sea by using simultaneously data from the two satellite systems NOAA and TOMS. Methods of processing and comparing the data from the two satellite systems are described. The correlation coefficients values for the five characteristic zones are very high and close, which proves that the character of the correlation ozone - sea surface temperature is the same for the entire Black Sea surface. Despite the high correlation coefficient, we have proved that causality between the two phenomena at the time of the anomaly does not exit.

  2. Active millimeter wave detection of concealed layers of dielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, N. J.; Baker, J. G.; Rezgui, N. D.; Southgate, M.; Alder, J. F.

    2007-04-01

    Extensive work has been published on millimetre wave active and passive detection and imaging of metallic objects concealed under clothing. We propose and demonstrate a technique for revealing the depth as well as the outline of partially transparent objects, which is especially suited to imaging layer materials such as explosives and drugs. The technique uses a focussed and scanned FMCW source, swept through many GHz to reveal this structure. The principle involved is that a parallel sided dielectric slab produces reflections at both its upper and lower surfaces, acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer. This produces a pattern of alternating reflected peaks and troughs in frequency space. Fourier or Burg transforming this pattern into z-space generates a peak at the thickness of the irradiated sample. It could be argued that though such a technique may work for single uniform slabs of dielectric material, it will give results of little or no significance when the sample both scatters the incident radiation and gives erratic reflectivities due to its non-uniform thickness and permittivity . We show results for a variety of materials such as explosive simulants, powder and drugs, both alone and concealed under clothing or in a rucksack, which display strongly directional reflectivities at millimeter wavelengths, and whose location is well displayed by a varying thickness parameter as the millimetre beam is scanned across the target. With this system we find that samples can easily be detected at standoff distances of at least 4.6m.

  3. Microbial diversity in European alpine permafrost and active layers.

    PubMed

    Frey, Beat; Rime, Thomas; Phillips, Marcia; Stierli, Beat; Hajdas, Irka; Widmer, Franco; Hartmann, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Permafrost represents a largely understudied genetic resource. Thawing of permafrost with global warming will not only promote microbial carbon turnover with direct feedback on greenhouse gases, but also unlock an unknown microbial diversity. Pioneering metagenomic efforts have shed light on the permafrost microbiome in polar regions, but temperate mountain permafrost is largely understudied. We applied a unique experimental design coupled to high-throughput sequencing of ribosomal markers to characterize the microbiota at the long-term alpine permafrost study site 'Muot-da-Barba-Peider' in eastern Switzerland with an approximate radiocarbon age of 12 000 years. Compared to the active layers, the permafrost community was more diverse and enriched with members of the superphylum Patescibacteria (OD1, TM7, GN02 and OP11). These understudied phyla with no cultured representatives proposedly feature small streamlined genomes with reduced metabolic capabilities, adaptations to anaerobic fermentative metabolisms and potential ectosymbiotic lifestyles. The permafrost microbiota was also enriched with yeasts and lichenized fungi known to harbour various structural and functional adaptation mechanisms to survive under extreme sub-zero conditions. These data yield an unprecedented view on microbial life in temperate mountain permafrost, which is increasingly important for understanding the biological dynamics of permafrost in order to anticipate potential ecological trajectories in a warming world. PMID:26832204

  4. Fabrication of low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells with a nanothin protective layer by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Ji, Sanghoon; Chang, Ikwhang; Lee, Yoon Ho; Park, Joonho; Paek, Jun Yeol; Lee, Min Hwan; Cha, Suk Won

    2013-01-01

    Anode aluminum oxide-supported thin-film fuel cells having a sub-500-nm-thick bilayered electrolyte comprising a gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) layer and an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) layer were fabricated and electrochemically characterized in order to investigate the effect of the YSZ protective layer. The highly dense and thin YSZ layer acted as a blockage against electron and oxygen permeation between the anode and GDC electrolyte. Dense GDC and YSZ thin films were fabricated using radio frequency sputtering and atomic layer deposition techniques, respectively. The resulting bilayered thin-film fuel cell generated a significantly higher open circuit voltage of approximately 1.07 V compared with a thin-film fuel cell with a single-layered GDC electrolyte (approximately 0.3 V). PMID:23342963

  5. Fabrication of low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells with a nanothin protective layer by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Sanghoon; Chang, Ikwhang; Lee, Yoon Ho; Park, Joonho; Paek, Jun Yeol; Lee, Min Hwan; Cha, Suk Won

    2013-01-01

    Anode aluminum oxide-supported thin-film fuel cells having a sub-500-nm-thick bilayered electrolyte comprising a gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) layer and an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) layer were fabricated and electrochemically characterized in order to investigate the effect of the YSZ protective layer. The highly dense and thin YSZ layer acted as a blockage against electron and oxygen permeation between the anode and GDC electrolyte. Dense GDC and YSZ thin films were fabricated using radio frequency sputtering and atomic layer deposition techniques, respectively. The resulting bilayered thin-film fuel cell generated a significantly higher open circuit voltage of approximately 1.07 V compared with a thin-film fuel cell with a single-layered GDC electrolyte (approximately 0.3 V).

  6. Quantitative estimates of disturbances contributed by a megalopolis to the temperature field of the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadygrov, N. E.; Kruchenitskii, G. M.; Lykov, A. D.

    2007-02-01

    Seasonal and diurnal variations in the temperature of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are analyzed, and the features of spatial and temporal variations in ABL temperature that are caused by the influence of a megalopolis are revealed. The gradients of air temperature for the megalopolis, its vicinity, and background conditions are compared. A multiplicative model of the seasonal diurnal variability of ABL temperature is constructed, and the relative frequencies of unstable ABL-temperature stratification are studied.

  7. Low-Temperature TiOx Compact Layer for Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zonghao; Chen, Qi; Hong, Ziruo; Zhou, Huanping; Xu, Xiaobao; De Marco, Nicholas; Sun, Pengyu; Zhao, Zhixin; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Yang, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Here, we demonstrate an effective low-temperature approach to fabricate a uniform and pinhole-free compact TiO2 layer for enhancing photovoltaic performance of perovskite solar cells. TiCl4 was used to modify TiO2 for efficient charge generation and significantly reduced recombination loss. We found that a TiO2 layer with an appropriate TiCl4 treatment possesses a smooth surface with full coverage of the conductive electrode. Further studies on charge carrier dynamics confirmed that the TiCl4 treatment improves the contact of the TiO2/perovskite interface, facilitating charge extraction and suppressing charge recombination. On the basis of the treatment, we improved the open circuit voltage from 1.01 V of the reference cell to 1.08 V, and achieved a power conversion efficiency of 16.4%. PMID:27058279

  8. Direct Selective Laser Sintering/Melting of High Density Alumina Powder Layers at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, J.; Meyers, S.; Kruth, J. P.; Vleugels, J.

    Direct selective laser sintering (SLS) or selective laser melting (SLM) are additive manufacturing techniques that can be used to produce three-dimensional ceramic parts directly, without the need for a sacrificial binder. In this paper, a low laser energy density is applied to SLS/SLM high density powder layers of sub-micrometer alumina at elevated temperatures (up to 800̊C). In order to achieve this, a furnace was designed and built into a commercial SLS machine. This furnace was able to produce a homogeneously heated cylindrical zone with a height of 60 mm and a diameter of 32 mm. After optimizing the layer deposition and laser scanning parameters, two ceramic parts with a density up to 85% and grain sizes as low as 5 μm were successfully produced.

  9. Microstructure and Nanoindentation Characterization of Low Temperature Hybrid Treated layer on Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triwiyanto, Askar; Hussain, Patthi; Che Ismail, Mokhtar

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the hybrid treated layer on austenitic AISI 316L stainless steels were characterized to investigate the improvement on its surface properties. Characterization of this resulting layer was performed by FESEM (Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope), USPM (Universal Scanning Probe Microscope) and nanoindentation. By using these methods, changes in the mechanical properties due to the diffusion of carbon and nitrogen at low temperature treatments have been traced. This hybrid treated sample has confirmed a considerable increase in hardness and a small rise in the elastic modulus compared to the untreated sample. It is found that all treated samples have enhance E/H ratio which exhibited the decreasing tendency to plastic deformation and reduced the mismatch of properties, while keeping deformation within the elastic range.

  10. Electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices controlled by the thickness of paraelectric layer in a wide temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, D. C.; Lin, S. P.; Chen, W. J.; Zheng, Yue Xiong, W. M.; Wang, Biao

    2014-10-15

    As functions of the paraelectric layer thickness, misfit strain and temperature, the electrocaloric properties of ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices are investigated using a time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau thermodynamic model. Ferroelectric phase transition driven by the relative thickness of the superlattice is found to dramatically impact the electrocaloric response. Near the phase transition temperature, the magnitude of the electrocaloric effect is maximized and shifted to lower temperatures by increasing the relative thickness of paraelectric layer. Theoretical calculations also imply that the electrocaloric effect of the superlattices depends not only on the relative thickness of paraelectric layer but also on misfit strain. Furthermore, control of the relative thickness of paraelectric layer and the misfit strain can change availably both the magnitude and the temperature sensitivity of the electrocaloric effect, which suggests that ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices may be promising candidates for use in cooling devices in a wide temperature range.

  11. Low-Temperature Growth of Two-Dimensional Layered Chalcogenide Crystals on Liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yubing; Deng, Bing; Zhou, Yu; Ren, Xibiao; Yin, Jianbo; Jin, Chuanhong; Liu, Zhongfan; Peng, Hailin

    2016-03-01

    The growth of high-quality two-dimensional (2D) layered chalcogenide crystals is highly important for practical applications in future electronics, optoelectronics, and photonics. Current route for the synthesis of 2D chalcogenide crystals by vapor deposition method mainly involves an energy intensive high-temperature growth process on solid substrates, often suffering from inhomogeneous nucleation density and grain size distribution. Here, we first demonstrate a facile vapor-phase synthesis of large-area high-quality 2D layered chalcogenide crystals on liquid metal surface with relatively low surface energy at a growth temperature as low as ∼100 °C. Uniform and large-domain-sized 2D crystals of GaSe and GaxIn1-xSe were grown on liquid metal surface even supported on a polyimide film. As-grown 2D GaSe crystals have been fabricated to flexible photodetectors, showing high photoresponse and excellent flexibility. Our strategy of energy-sustainable low-temperature growth on liquid metal surface may open a route to the synthesis of high-quality 2D crystals of Ga-, In-, Bi-, Hg-, Pb-, or Sn-based chalcogenides and halides. PMID:26913671

  12. High antiferromagnetic transition temperature for a layered hexagonal compound: SrRu2O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiaqiang

    4d or 5d transition metal oxides (TMOs) are less correlated and have a larger bandwidth than 3d TMOs. A high magnetic ordering temperature for 4d/5d TMOs is not expected. It was therefore a surprise when a perovskite, SrTcO3, was reported to order magnetically around 1000 K. Unfortunately, the radioactive nature of Tc prevented further investigation of the underlying mechanism for the high magnetic ordering temperature. Here we report antiferromagnetic order of SrRu2O6 >at 565 K. Two features distinguish this compound from SrTcO3: (1) SrRu2O6 is not radioactive, which allows the study of the underlying physics by a large variety of techniques as well as the possible fine tuning of the magnetic ground state; and (2) SrRu2O6 crystallizes into a quasi-two-dimensional structure with layers of edge-sharing RuO6 octahedra separated by nonmagnetic Sr layers. Our density functional calculations and Monte Carlo simulations suggest an origin of the reduced moment size and the high Neel temperature. Work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division and by the CEM and NSF MRSEC under Grant No. DMR-1420451.

  13. Temperature-Dependent Deicing Properties of Electrostatically Anchored Branched Brush Layers of Poly(ethylene oxide).

    PubMed

    Heydari, Golrokh; Tyrode, Eric; Visnevskij, Ceslav; Makuska, Ricardas; Claesson, Per M

    2016-05-01

    The hydration water of hydrophilic polymers freezes at subzero temperatures. The adsorption of such polymers will result in a hydrophilic surface layer that strongly binds water. Provided this interfacial hydration water remains liquidlike at subzero temperatures, its presence could possibly reduce ice adhesion, in particular, if the liquidlike layer is thicker than or comparable to the surface roughness. To explore this idea, a diblock copolymer, having one branched bottle-brush block of poly(ethylene oxide) and one linear cationic block, was electrostatically anchored on flat silica surfaces. The shear ice adhesion strength on such polymer-coated surfaces was investigated down to -25 °C using a homebuilt device. In addition, the temperature dependence of the ice adhesion on surfaces coated with only the cationic block, only the branched bottle-brush block, and with linear poly(ethylene oxide) was investigated. Significant ice adhesion reduction, in particular, at temperatures above -15 °C, was observed on silica surfaces coated with the electrostatically anchored diblock copolymer. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements on bulk polymer solutions demonstrate different thermal transitions of water interacting with branched and linear poly(ethylene oxide) (with hydration water melting points of about -18 and -10 °C, respectively). This difference is consistent with the low shear ice adhesion strength measured on surfaces carrying branched bottle-brush structured poly(ethylene oxide) at -10 °C, whereas no significant adhesion reduction was obtained with linear poly(ethylene oxide) at this temperature. We propose a lubrication effect of the hydration water bound to the branched bottle-brush structured poly(ethylene oxide), which, in the bulk, does not freeze until -18 °C. PMID:27064661

  14. Study of multi-layer active magnetic regenerators using magnetocaloric materials with first and second order phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Engelbrecht, K.; Nielsen, K. K.; Neves Bez, H.; Bahl, C. R. H.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetocaloric materials (MCM) with a first order phase transition (FOPT) usually exhibit a large, although sharp, isothermal entropy change near their Curie temperature, compared to materials with a second order phase transition (SOPT). Experimental results of applying FOPT materials in recent magnetocaloric refrigerators (MCR) demonstrated the great potential for these materials, but a thorough study on the impact of the moderate adiabatic temperature change and strong temperature dependence of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is lacking. Besides, comparing active magnetic regenerators (AMR) using FOPT and SOPT materials is also of fundamental interest. We present modeling results of multi-layer AMRs using FOPT and SOPT materials based on a 1D numerical model. First the impact of isothermal entropy change, adiabatic temperature change and shape factor describing the temperature dependence of the MCE are quantified and analyzed by using artificially built magnetocaloric properties. Then, based on measured magnetocaloric properties of La(Fe,Mn,Si)13H y and Gd, an investigation on how to layer typical FOPT and SOPT materials with different temperature spans is carried out. Moreover, the sensitivity of variation in Curie temperature distribution for both groups of AMRs is investigated. Finally, a concept of mixing FOPT and SOPT materials is studied for improving the stability of layered AMRs with existing materials.

  15. Layered antiferromagnetism with high Neel temperature in the intermetallic compound Mn2Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelevskyi, Sergii; Mohn, Peter

    2009-03-01

    On the basis of earlier experimental studies the intermetallic compound Mn2Au has been characterized as a non-magnetically ordered material. Here we report the results of first-principles calculations based on Local Spin-Density Approximation which describe Mn2Au to have a narrow band antiferromagnetic ground state with rigid local moments on the Mn sites. Calculations of the inter-atomic exchange constants based on the magnetic force theorem and a Monte-Carlo modeling of the resulting Heisenberg-like Hamiltonian predict a very high Neel-temperature of ˜1580K. This temperature is considerably higher than for the other known high-temperature antiferromagnetic L10-type Mn based binary alloys, which are widely used in magnetic storage applications. The source of the difficulties in determining magnetic order from the earlier experiments is discussed. The observed meta-magnetic like behavior and a susceptibility anomaly at low temperatures are linked to the frustrated magnetism on Mn anti-site impurities. We believe that the high temperature antiferromagnetism of Mn2Au may have quite an impact in technology. In particular, it can be considered as a candidate for the application as a ``pinning'' layer in GMR devices.

  16. High performance catalyzed-reaction layer for medium temperature operating solid oxide fuel cells. 3: Effects of composition and morphology on performance of anode and cathode layers

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Tsuno, A.

    1995-12-31

    Polarization properties of catalyzed-reaction layers, which the authors developed for medium temperature operating SOFC, were greatly improved by controlling their compositions and microstructures. The amount of Pt catalysts loaded on Sr-doped LaMnO{sub 3} (LSM) cathode was reduced down to 1/5 by decreasing size of Pt particles. A large depolarizing effect was observed on the Pt-catalyzed LSM cathode, especially at high current densities. The anodic overpotential for the samaria-doped ceria (SDC) layer was appreciably lowered by applying both highly dispersed Ru microcrystals and 0.1{micro}m-sized SDC particles onto the SDC layer.

  17. Effect of collisional temperature isotropisation on ELM parallel transport in a tokamak scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coulette, David; Hirstoaga, Sever A.; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2016-08-01

    We develop a hybrid model to describe the parallel transport in a tokamak scrape-off layer following an edge-localized mode (ELM) event. The parallel dynamics is treated with a kinetic Vlasov–Poisson model, while the evolution of the perpendicular temperature {{T}\\bot} is governed by a fluid equation. The coupling is ensured by isotropising collisions. The model generalises an earlier approach where {{T}\\bot} was constant in space and time (Manfredi et al 2011 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 53 015012). Numerical results show that the main effect comes from electron–electron collisions, which limit the decrease of the parallel electron temperature and increase the potential drop in the Debye sheath in front of the surface. Ion–ion collisions have an almost negligible impact. The net effect is an increased peak power load on the target plates.

  18. Growing aluminum nitride films by Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarala, V. A.; Altakhov, A. S.; Martens, V. Ya; Lisitsyn, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    Aluminum nitride films have been grown by Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition method. It was found that at temperatures of 250 °C and 280 °C increase of the plasma exposure step duration over 6 s, as well as increase of reactor purge step duration over 1 s does not affect the growth rate, however, it affects the microstructure of the films. It was found that crystalline aluminum nitride films deposit with plasma exposure duration over 10 s and the reactor purging over 10 s. When the temperature drops the increase of reactor purge step duration and plasma exposure step duration over 20 s is required for crystalline AlN film growth.

  19. Bifacial MIS inversion layer solar cells based on low temperature silicon surface passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, K.; Hezel, R.

    A novel bifacial silicon solar cell fabricated by a simple low-temperature process is introduced. The front side is characterized by an MIS contact grid and a charged plasma silicon nitride layer. The rear side is made up of ohmic grid lines in combination with silicon nitride for surface passivation. This appears to be the first bifacial solar cell without any highly doped region and completely processed at temperatures below 500 C. An AM1 efficiency of 15 and 13.2 percent was achieved for front and back illumination, respectively. The dependence of the solar cell data on cell thickness was experimentally investigated in the range from 80 microns to 330 microns. This thickness dependence was confirmed by theoretical one-dimensional calculations.

  20. Low-temperature performance of yttria-stabilized zirconia prepared by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Dong Young; Kim, Ho Keun; Kim, Jun Woo; Bae, Kiho; Schlupp, Meike V. F.; Park, Suk Won; Prestat, Michel; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2015-01-01

    We report on the performance of thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) synthesized by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at temperatures of 50-525 °C. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used for conductivity measurements. Relatively high conductivity values were observed in the low-temperature region when compared to reference values of YSZ synthesized by other methods. To investigate the conduction mechanism, various experimental variables were modified during the electrical measurements, including the ratio of yttria to zirconia in the ALD YSZ films and the atmospheric conditions. To relate the electrical properties to the structural characteristics, the crystallinity and microstructure were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Finally, the suitability of an ALD YSZ membrane as the electrolyte of micro solid oxide fuel cells was evaluated. An open circuit voltage of almost 1 V and decent power output were successfully measured below 100 °C.

  1. An Experimental Study of the Statistics of Temperature Fluctuations in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Frola, Elena; Mazzino, Andrea; Cassola, Federico; Mortarini, Luca; Ferrero, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    A statistical characterization for two-point temperature fluctuations in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is analyzed and its implications on the long-standing closure problem discussed. Despite the non-triviality of the dynamics of temperature fluctuations, our analysis supports the idea that the most relevant statistical properties can be captured solely in terms of two scaling exponents. They turned out to be weakly dependent on the stability properties of the PBL. Its statistics have been investigated by collecting data from a field experiment carried out in the urban area of Turin (Italy) from January 2007 to March 2008. Our results confirm those from a large-eddy simulation (LES) analysis carried out for the convective PBL with different level of convection. We extend the scenario to the stable PBL, a regime much more difficult to simulate when exploiting LES.

  2. Mechanisms Controlling the Interannual Variation of Mixed Layer Temperature Averaged over the Nino-3 Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Seung-Bum; Lee, Tong; Fukumori, Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    The present study examines processes governing the interannual variation of MLT in the eastern equatorial Pacific.Processes controlling the interannual variation of mixed layer temperature (MLT) averaged over the Nino-3 domain (5 deg N-5 deg S, 150 deg-90 deg W) are studied using an ocean data assimilation product that covers the period of 1993-2003. The overall balance is such that surface heat flux opposes the MLT change but horizontal advection and subsurface processes assist the change. Advective tendencies are estimated here as the temperature fluxes through the domain's boundaries, with the boundary temperature referenced to the domain-averaged temperature to remove the dependence on temperature scale. This allows the authors to characterize external advective processes that warm or cool the water within the domain as a whole. The zonal advective tendency is caused primarily by large-scale advection of warm-pool water through the western boundary of the domain. The meridional advective tendency is contributed to mostly by Ekman current advecting large-scale temperature anomalies through the southern boundary of the domain. Unlike many previous studies, the subsurface processes that consist of vertical mixing and entrainment are explicitly evaluated. In particular, a rigorous method to estimate entrainment allows an exact budget closure. The vertical mixing across the mixed layer (ML) base has a contribution in phase with the MLT change. The entrainment tendency due to the temporal change in ML depth is negligible compared to other subsurface processes. The entrainment tendency by vertical advection across the ML base is dominated by large-scale changes in upwelling and the temperature of upwelling water. Tropical instability waves (TIWs) result in smaller-scale vertical advection that warms the domain during La Nina cooling events. However, such a warming tendency is overwhelmed by the cooling tendency associated with the large-scale upwelling by a factor of

  3. Neutral wetting brush layers for block copolymer thin films using homopolymer blends processed at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceresoli, M.; Palermo, M.; Ferrarese Lupi, F.; Seguini, G.; Perego, M.; Zuccheri, G.; Phadatare, S. D.; Antonioli, D.; Gianotti, V.; Sparnacci, K.; Laus, M.

    2015-10-01

    Binary homopolymer blends of two hydroxyl-terminated polystyrene (PS-OH) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA-OH) homopolymers (Mn ˜ 16000 g mol-1) were grafted on SiO2 substrates by high-temperature (T > 150 °C), short-time (t < 600 s) thermal treatments. The resulting brush layer was tested to screen preferential interactions of the SiO2 substrate with the different symmetric and asymmetric PS-b-PMMA block copolymers deposited on top of the grafted molecules. By properly adjusting the blend composition and the processing parameters, an efficient surface neutralization path was identified, enabling the formation, in the block copolymer film, of homogeneous textures of lamellae or cylinders perpendicularly oriented with respect to the substrate. A critical interplay between the phase segregation of the homopolymer blends and their grafting process on the SiO2 was observed. In fact, the polar SiO2 is preferential for the PMMA-rich phase that forms a homogeneous layer on the substrate, while the PS-rich phase is located at the polymer-air interface. During the thermal treatment, phase segregation and grafting proceed simultaneously. Complete wetting of the PS rich phase on the PMMA rich phase leads to the formation of a PS/PMMA bilayer. In this case, the progressive diffusion of PS chains toward the polymer-SiO2 interface during the thermal treatment allows tuning of the brush layer composition.

  4. Low temperature temporal and spatial atomic layer deposition of TiO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Aghaee, Morteza Maydannik, Philipp S.; Johansson, Petri; Kuusipalo, Jurkka; Creatore, Mariadriana; Homola, Tomáš; Cameron, David C.

    2015-07-15

    Titanium dioxide films were grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using titanium tetraisopropoxide as a titanium precursor and water, ozone, or oxygen plasma as coreactants. Low temperatures (80–120 °C) were used to grow moisture barrier TiO{sub 2} films on polyethylene naphthalate. The maximum growth per cycle for water, ozone, and oxygen plasma processes were 0.33, 0.12, and 0.56 Å/cycle, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry was used to evaluate the chemical composition of the layers and the origin of the carbon contamination was studied by deconvoluting carbon C1s peaks. In plasma-assisted ALD, the film properties were dependent on the energy dose supplied by the plasma. TiO{sub 2} films were also successfully deposited by using a spatial ALD (SALD) system based on the results from the temporal ALD. Similar properties were measured compared to the temporal ALD deposited TiO{sub 2}, but the deposition time could be reduced using SALD. The TiO{sub 2} films deposited by plasma-assisted ALD showed better moisture barrier properties than the layers deposited by thermal processes. Water vapor transmission rate values lower than 5 × 10{sup −4} g day{sup −1} m{sup −2} (38 °C and 90% RH) was measured for 20 nm of TiO{sub 2} film deposited by plasma-assisted ALD.

  5. Low Temperature Photosensitive Polyimide Based Insulating Layer Formation for Microelectromechanical Systems Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Zhu, T.; Wu, W. J.; Tang, S. H.; Liu, J. Q.; Tu, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    Photosensitive polyimide (PSPI) based insulating layer fabrication for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) application has been systematically investigated in this work. The PSPI was spin coated on a silicon substrate as an insulating layer between two metal lines. In consideration of thermal properties, a low temperature hard bake process was carefully optimized. Finally, the polyimide insulating layer was hardened by exposure to air at 80°C for 120 min + 150°C for 60 min + 180°C for 60 min + 250°C for 60 min + 350°C for 60 min in a dry furnace. Using this optimized hardening process, the outgassing effect in post-fabrication heat treatment can be completely eliminated, which presented an excellent thermal resistance in MEMS fabrications. The reliability test was accomplished through an immersion in organic solvent and acid/base solution in order to verify the corrosion resistance of the PSPI frame for insulating application. The excellent resistance which is on the order of 108 Ω between two metal lines, shows an outstanding insulating property.

  6. Silica nanoparticles for the layer-by-layer assembly of fully electro-active cytochrome c multilayers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background For bioanalytical systems sensitivity and biomolecule activity are critical issues. The immobilization of proteins into multilayer systems by the layer-by-layer deposition has become one of the favorite methods with this respect. Moreover, the combination of nanoparticles with biomolecules on electrodes is a matter of particular interest since several examples with high activities and direct electron transfer have been found. Our study describes the investigation on silica nanoparticles and the redox protein cytochrome c for the construction of electro-active multilayer architectures, and the electron transfer within such systems. The novelty of this work is the construction of such artificial architectures with a non-conducting building block. Furthermore a detailed study of the size influence of silica nanoparticles is performed with regard to formation and electrochemical behavior of these systems. Results We report on interprotein electron transfer (IET) reaction cascades of cytochrome c (cyt c) immobilized by the use of modified silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) to act as an artificial matrix. The layer-by-layer deposition technique has been used for the formation of silica particles/cytochrome c multilayer assemblies on electrodes. The silica particles are characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Zeta-potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The modified particles have been studied with respect to act as an artificial network for cytochrome c and to allow efficient interprotein electron transfer reactions. We demonstrate that it is possible to form electro-active assemblies with these non-conducting particles. The electrochemical response is increasing linearly with the number of layers deposited, reaching a cyt c surface concentration of about 80 pmol/cm2 with a 5 layer architecture. The interprotein electron transfer through the layer system and the influence of particle size are

  7. Hot-Film and Hot-Wire Anemometry for a Boundary Layer Active Flow Control Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenahan, Keven C.; Schatzman, David M.; Wilson, Jacob Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Unsteady active flow control (AFC) has been used experimentally for many years to minimize bluff-body drag. This technology could significantly improve performance of rotorcraft by cleaning up flow separation. It is important, then, that new actuator technologies be studied for application to future vehicles. A boundary layer wind tunnel was constructed with a 1ft-x-3ft test section and unsteady measurement instrumentation to study how AFC manipulates the boundary layer to overcome adverse pressure gradients and flow separation. This unsteady flow control research requires unsteady measurement methods. In order to measure the boundary layer characteristics, both hot-wire and hot-film Constant Temperature Anemometry is used. A hot-wire probe is mounted in the flow to measure velocity while a hot-film array lays on the test surface to measure skin friction. Hot-film sensors are connected to an anemometer, a Wheatstone bridge circuit with an output that corresponds to the dynamic flow response. From this output, the time varying flow field, turbulence, and flow reversal can be characterized. Tuning the anemometers requires a fan test on the hot-film sensors to adjust each output. This is a delicate process as several variables drastically affect the data, including control resistance, signal input, trim, and gain settings.

  8. Multiscale Covariability of Surface Wind, Humidity and Temperature in the Subtropical Marine Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fildier, Benjamin; Collins, William

    2016-04-01

    Trade cumulus and stratocumulus clouds in oceanic subtropical regions are sources of much uncertainty in current global climate model (GCM) simulations. Errors in low cloud fraction and rain amounts are a result of inadequate parameterizations for describing the small-scale boundary layer processes specific to the convective and cloud-formation dynamics of those regions. While most cloud parameterization techniques do consider sub-grid scale variability in specific humidity (q), the significant fluctuations in temperature (T) and wind speed (u) in the boundary layer are still often neglected. In order to better acknowledge the interactions of these fields with cloud and convection, understanding their codependence seems crucial. For example, using the negative correlations between T and q on large scales has helped to improve cloud parameterizations, and wind shear is known to modulate cloud layer decoupling and affect the liquid water path (LWP). While numerous studies document the spatial properties of T , q and u independently through power spectra and multifractal analyses, the covariation between these three variables and their spatial increments - and how these relationships change across spatial scales - has not been adequately and quantitatively characterized. The present work focuses on the spatial covariability and multiscale coupling between fluctuations in q, T and u in the marine boundary layer and seeks to understand which pieces of information are required for better predicting LWP on a variety of scales from a few tens to a few hundred kms. We use remote-sensing measurements of thermodynamic variables from MODIS and surface wind estimates from QuikSCAT. The scale-by-scale covariability of two variables is quantified through their Fourier and wavelet cross spectra, using Haar wavelets; these spectra permit the calculation of multiscale coupling exponents when appropriate. Results from this study are threefold: (1) we quantify the contributions of

  9. Low Temperature Transport in Networks Based on Multi-layer Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnam, Ashkan; Johnson, Jason; An, Yanbin; Biswas, Amlan; Ural, Ant

    2010-03-01

    We fabricate and characterize networks composed of narrow but long multi-layer graphene nanoribbons. Fabrication is based on chemical processing of expandable graphite and vacuum filtration of the produced ribbons. We analyze the structure of the networks by various electron and optical imaging techniques, then pattern the networks into four point probe structures using photolithography and plasma etching and measure their resistivity down to 4.2 K. Due to the disordered nature of the networks, resistivity depicts insulating behavior explained by Mott Variable Range Hopping (VRH) at low temperatures. We also investigate the dependence of the network resistivity on electric and magnetic fields. VRH theory can explain most of the magnetoresistance data, although carrier-carrier interaction also becomes important at high fields and the lowest temperatures. Resistivity also decreases sharply at electric fields higher than 10 V/cm. A high localization radius is extracted from this dependence, which is likely due to the high conductance of the nanoribbons and/or good electrical contact between them. The multi-layer graphene nanoribbon networks depict favorable electrical properties that advocate their use for applications such as bolometers, photodetectors, and gas sensors.

  10. The Deformation of the Multi-Layered Panel of Sheet Metals Under Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Wook; Woo, Dong-Uk

    A Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) stack consists of several layered unit cells. In each unit cell, the stiff structure of the separator plate contains the softer components, such as electrodes. When surface pressure acts on the stack over an extended period of time at elevated temperatures, the stiffness of the separator plate tends to degrade. Moreover, the demands for large electrode area (to increase the electric capacity of a unit cell) and thinner separator plates (to reduce weight) complicate the design of a separator plate with high stiffness. To evaluate the stiffness of the separator plate at elevated temperatures, we design and test a tiny, multi-layered separator plate specimen using a three-point bending tool. To determine the optimal structure of the separator plate, we investigate three design factors: angle, pitch and height. We adopt the Taguchi method to evaluate the experiments, and use finite element analysis to examine the experimental results. Based on these results, pitch is the most effective of these factors. As the pitch narrows, the stiffness of the separator plate increases. Therefore, we propose the pitch factor as a design criterion for the separator plate of the MCFC stack.

  11. Perovskite Solar Cells Based on Low-Temperature Processed Indium Oxide Electron Selective Layers.

    PubMed

    Qin, Minchao; Ma, Junjie; Ke, Weijun; Qin, Pingli; Lei, Hongwei; Tao, Hong; Zheng, Xiaolu; Xiong, Liangbin; Liu, Qin; Chen, Zhiliang; Lu, Junzheng; Yang, Guang; Fang, Guojia

    2016-04-01

    Indium oxide (In2O3) as a promising n-type semiconductor material has been widely employed in optoelectronic applications. In this work, we applied low-temperature solution-processed In2O3 nanocrystalline film as an electron selective layer (ESL) in perovskite solar cells (PSCs) for the first time. By taking advantages of good optical and electrical properties of In2O3 such as high mobility, wide band gap, and high transmittance, we obtained In2O3-based PSCs with a good efficiency exceeding 13% after optimizing the concentration of the precursor solution and the annealing temperature. Furthermore, to enhance the performance of the In2O3-based PSCs, a phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) layer was introduced to modify the surface of the In2O3 film. The PCBM film could fill up the pinholes or cracks along In2O3 grain boundaries to passivate the defects and make the ESL extremely compact and uniform, which is conducive to suppressing the charge recombination. As a result, the efficiency of the In2O3-based PSC was improved to 14.83% accompanied with VOC, JSC, and FF being 1.08 V, 20.06 mA cm(-2), and 0.685, respectively. PMID:26996215

  12. Acoustic receptivity of compressible boundary layers: Receptivity by way of surface-temperature variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan

    1994-01-01

    The Goldstein-Ruban theory has been extended within the framework of Zavol'skii et al. to study the acoustic receptivity of compressible boundary layers. We consider the receptivity produced in a region of localized, small-amplitude variation in the surface temperature and compare it with the receptivity that is induced through a similar mechanism by a variation in the suction velocity at the surface. It is found that the orientation of the acoustic wave can have a significant impact on the receptivity process, with the maximum receptivity at a given sound-pressure level being produced by upstream oriented acoustic waves. At sufficiently low Mach numbers, the variation of receptivity with the acoustic-wave orientation can be predicted analytically and is the same for both surface suction and surface heating. However, as a result of the acoustic refraction across the mean boundary layer, the above dependence can become rather complex and, also, dependent on the type of surface nonuniformity. The results also suggest that the receptivity caused by temperature nonuniformities may turn out to be more significant than that produced by the mean-flow perturbations associated with strip suction.

  13. CuInP2S6 Room Temperature Layered Ferroelectric

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Belianinov, Alex; He, Qian; Dziaugys, Andrius; Maksymovych, Petro; Eliseev, Eugene; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Morozovska, Anna N.; Banys, Juras; Vysochanskii, Yulian; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we explore ferroelectric properties of cleaved 2-D flakes of copper indium thiophosphate, CuInP2S6 (CITP), and probe size effects along with limits of ferroelectric phase stability, by ambient and ultra high vacuum scanning probe microscopy. CITP belongs to the only material family known to display ferroelectric polarization in a van der Waals, layered crystal at room temperature and above. Our measurements directly reveal stable, ferroelectric polarization as evidenced by domain structures, switchable polarization, and hysteresis loops. We found that at room temperature the domain structure of flakes thicker than 100 nm is similar to the cleaved bulk surfaces,more » whereas below 50 nm polarization disappears. We ascribe this behavior to a well-known instability of polarization due to depolarization field. Furthermore, polarization switching at high bias is also associated with ionic mobility, as evidenced both by macroscopic measurements and by formation of surface damage under the tip at a bias of 4 V—likely due to copper reduction. Mobile Cu ions may therefore also contribute to internal screening mechanisms. Finally, the existence of stable polarization in a van-der-Waals crystal naturally points toward new strategies for ultimate scaling of polar materials, quasi-2D, and single-layer materials with advanced and nonlinear dielectric properties that are presently not found in any members of the growing “graphene family”.« less

  14. Effects of High-frequency Wind Sampling on Simulated Mixed Layer Depth and Upper Ocean Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong; Liu, W. Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on a near-global ocean model are studied by forcing the model with a 12 hourly averaged wind product and its 24 hourly subsamples in separate experiments. The differences in mixed layer depth and sea surface temperature resulting from these experiments are examined, and the underlying physical processes are investigated. The 24 hourly subsampling not only reduces the high-frequency variability of the wind but also affects the annual mean wind because of aliasing. While the former effect largely impacts mid- to high-latitude oceans, the latter primarily affects tropical and coastal oceans. At mid- to high-latitude regions the subsampled wind results in a shallower mixed layer and higher sea surface temperature because of reduced vertical mixing associated with weaker high-frequency wind. In tropical and coastal regions, however, the change in upper ocean structure due to the wind subsampling is primarily caused by the difference in advection resulting from aliased annual mean wind, which varies with the subsampling time. The results of the study indicate a need for more frequent sampling of satellite wind measurement and have implications for data assimilation in terms of identifying the nature of model errors.

  15. CuInP2S6 Room Temperature Layered Ferroelectric

    SciTech Connect

    Belianinov, Alex; He, Qian; Dziaugys, Andrius; Maksymovych, Petro; Eliseev, Eugene; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Morozovska, Anna N.; Banys, Juras; Vysochanskii, Yulian; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we explore ferroelectric properties of cleaved 2-D flakes of copper indium thiophosphate, CuInP2S6 (CITP), and probe size effects along with limits of ferroelectric phase stability, by ambient and ultra high vacuum scanning probe microscopy. CITP belongs to the only material family known to display ferroelectric polarization in a van der Waals, layered crystal at room temperature and above. Our measurements directly reveal stable, ferroelectric polarization as evidenced by domain structures, switchable polarization, and hysteresis loops. We found that at room temperature the domain structure of flakes thicker than 100 nm is similar to the cleaved bulk surfaces, whereas below 50 nm polarization disappears. We ascribe this behavior to a well-known instability of polarization due to depolarization field. Furthermore, polarization switching at high bias is also associated with ionic mobility, as evidenced both by macroscopic measurements and by formation of surface damage under the tip at a bias of 4 V—likely due to copper reduction. Mobile Cu ions may therefore also contribute to internal screening mechanisms. Finally, the existence of stable polarization in a van-der-Waals crystal naturally points toward new strategies for ultimate scaling of polar materials, quasi-2D, and single-layer materials with advanced and nonlinear dielectric properties that are presently not found in any members of the growing “graphene family”.

  16. Few layer graphene synthesis via SiC decomposition at low temperature and low vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayali, Emre; Mercan, Elif; Emre Oren, Ersin; Cambaz Buke, Goknur

    2016-04-01

    Based on the large-scale availability and good electrical properties, the epitaxial graphene (EG) on SiC exhibits a big potential for future electronic devices. However, it is still necessary to work continuously on lowering the formation temperature and vacuum values of EG while improving the quality and increasing the lateral size to fabricate high-performance electronic devices at reduced processing costs. In this study, we investigated the effect of the presence of Mo plate and hydrogen atmosphere as well as the vacuum annealing durations on SiC decomposition. Our studies showed that the graphene layers can be produced at lower annealing temperatures (1200 °C) and vacuum values (10-4 Torr) in the presence of Mo plate and hydrogen. For high quality continuous graphene formation, Mo plate should be in contact with SiC. If there is a gap between Mo and SiC, non-wetting oxide droplets on few layer graphene (FLG) are recorded. Moreover, it is found that the morphology of these islands can be controlled by changing the annealing time and atmosphere conditions, and applying external disturbances such as vibration.

  17. Liquid-layering induced, temperature-dependent thermal conductivity enhancement in ZnO-propylene glycol nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganthi, Kuppusamy Swaminathan; Parthasarathy, Meera; Rajan, Kalpoondi Sekar

    2013-03-01

    Experiments were carried out on preparation of colloidal dispersions of ZnO nanoparticles in propylene glycol leading to ZnO-propylene glycol nanofluids. Thermal conductivity of these nanofluids was measured as a function of nanoparticle concentration (⩽2 vol.%), temperature (10-60 °C) and aggregate size. A strong dependence of thermal conductivity enhancement on temperature with higher enhancements at lower temperatures has been observed. Our results on temperature and aggregation dependence of thermal conductivity enhancement show that the thermal conductivity enhancement in ZnO-propylene glycol nanofluids is attributed to formation of solvation layers (liquid layers) of base fluid on the ZnO nanoparticle surfaces.

  18. Temperature structure of the tropical tropopause layer in radiative-convective equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birner, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    The tropical tropopause layer (TTL) shows a curious stratification structure: temperature continues to decrease beyond the level of main convective outflow (~200 hPa) up to the cold point tropopause (~100 hPa), but TTL lapse rates are smaller than in the upper troposphere. A cold point tropopause well separated from the level of main convective outflow has previously been shown to be consistent with the detailed radiative balance in the TTL even if dynamical effects were absent. More generally, the cold tropical tropopause is controlled by adiabatic cooling due to large-scale upwelling (forced by extratropical or tropical waves). TTL cooling can also come from the large-scale hydrostatic response aloft deep convective heating as well as from overshooting convection. Here, results based on idealized radiative-convective equilibrium model simulations are presented, contrasting single-column with cloud-resolving simulations. While all of the above processes are capable of producing a TTL-like region in isolation, their combination is found to produce crucial feedbacks. In particular, both water vapour and ozone are found to have strong radiative effects on TTL temperatures, highlighting important feedbacks between transport circulations setting temperatures and tracer structures and the resulting tracer structures in turn affecting temperatures.

  19. Radiative scaling of the nocturnal boundary layer and the diurnal temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Alan K.

    2006-04-01

    A radiative scaling for the warm season nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) is proposed, based on the daily mean surface net longwave radiation flux. Using this scaling, a conceptual model is proposed for the NBL, with parameters estimated from multiple linear regression of model data from the European Centre reanalysis, averaged over river basins from the tropics to high latitudes. A radiative temperature scale, computed from surface net longwave radiation flux and the slope of the Stefan-Boltzmann law, primarily determines the strength of the NBL and the amplitude of the diurnal temperature range, although the length of the nighttime period and the surface wind stress play important subsidiary roles. A related radiative velocity scale or radiative conductance, the duration of the nighttime period and the ratio of the scaled surface heat flux (which increases with wind stress) to the NBL strength determine the depth of the NBL. From an observational perspective, this suggests that the diurnal temperature range may give a useful estimate of surface net longwave radiation flux. From a modeling perspective, this provides a framework for relating model physical parameterizations, especially the coupling at night between the surface, the ground and the atmosphere, to observables, the diurnal temperature range and the strength and depth of the NBL. The model is then applied to estimate the nocturnal rise in concentration of gases such as CO2 and radon that are emitted at the surface.

  20. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T; van Wees, Bart J

    2007-08-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic transport phenomena such as anomalously quantized Hall effects, absence of weak localization and the existence of a minimum conductivity. In addition to dissipative transport, supercurrent transport has also been observed. Graphene might also be a promising material for spintronics and related applications, such as the realization of spin qubits, owing to the low intrinsic spin orbit interaction, as well as the low hyperfine interaction of the electron spins with the carbon nuclei. Here we report the observation of spin transport, as well as Larmor spin precession, over micrometre-scale distances in single graphene layers. The 'non-local' spin valve geometry was used in these experiments, employing four-terminal contact geometries with ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes making contact with the graphene sheet through a thin oxide layer. We observe clear bipolar (changing from positive to negative sign) spin signals that reflect the magnetization direction of all four electrodes, indicating that spin coherence extends underneath all of the contacts. No significant changes in the spin signals occur between 4.2 K, 77 K and room temperature. We extract a spin relaxation length between 1.5 and 2 mum at room temperature, only weakly dependent on charge density. The spin polarization of the ferromagnetic contacts is calculated from the measurements to be around ten per cent. PMID:17632544

  1. Electronic spin transport and spin precession in single graphene layers at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombros, Nikolaos; Jozsa, Csaba; Popinciuc, Mihaita; Jonkman, Harry T.; van Wees, Bart J.

    2007-08-01

    Electronic transport in single or a few layers of graphene is the subject of intense interest at present. The specific band structure of graphene, with its unique valley structure and Dirac neutrality point separating hole states from electron states, has led to the observation of new electronic transport phenomena such as anomalously quantized Hall effects, absence of weak localization and the existence of a minimum conductivity. In addition to dissipative transport, supercurrent transport has also been observed. Graphene might also be a promising material for spintronics and related applications, such as the realization of spin qubits, owing to the low intrinsic spin orbit interaction, as well as the low hyperfine interaction of the electron spins with the carbon nuclei. Here we report the observation of spin transport, as well as Larmor spin precession, over micrometre-scale distances in single graphene layers. The `non-local' spin valve geometry was used in these experiments, employing four-terminal contact geometries with ferromagnetic cobalt electrodes making contact with the graphene sheet through a thin oxide layer. We observe clear bipolar (changing from positive to negative sign) spin signals that reflect the magnetization direction of all four electrodes, indicating that spin coherence extends underneath all of the contacts. No significant changes in the spin signals occur between 4.2K, 77K and room temperature. We extract a spin relaxation length between 1.5 and 2μm at room temperature, only weakly dependent on charge density. The spin polarization of the ferromagnetic contacts is calculated from the measurements to be around ten per cent.

  2. Effect of process parameters on hardness, temperature profile and solidification of different layers processed by direct metal laser sintering (DMLS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sazzad Hossain; Mian, Ahsan; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2016-07-01

    In DMLS process objects are fabricated layer by layer from powdered material by melting induced by a controlled laser beam. Metallic powder melts and solidifies to form a single layer. Solidification map during layer formation is an important route to characterize micro-structure and grain morphology of sintered layer. Generally, solidification leads to columnar, equiaxed or mixture of these two types grain morphology depending on solidification rate and thermal gradient. Eutectic or dendritic structure can be formed in fully equiaxed zone. This dendritic growth has a large effect on material properties. Smaller dendrites generally increase ductility of the layer. Thus, materials can be designed by creating desired grain morphology in certain regions using DMLS process. To accomplish this, hardness, temperature distribution, thermal gradient and solidification cooling rate in processed layers will be studied under change of process variables by using finite element analysis, with specific application to Ti-6Al-4V.

  3. Processes governing the temperature structure of the tropical tropopause layer (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birner, T.

    2013-12-01

    The tropical tropopause layer (TTL) is among the most important but least understood regions of the global climate system. The TTL sets the boundary condition for atmospheric tracers entering the stratosphere. Specifically, TTL temperatures control stratospheric water vapor concentrations, which play a key role in the radiative budget of the entire stratosphere with implications for tropospheric and surface climate. The TTL shows a curious stratification structure: temperature continues to decrease beyond the level of main convective outflow (~200 hPa) up to the cold point tropopause (~100 hPa), but TTL lapse rates are smaller than in the upper troposphere. A cold point tropopause well separated from the level of main convective outflow requires TTL cooling which may be the result of: 1) the detailed radiative balance in the TTL, 2) large-scale upwelling (forced by extratropical or tropical waves), 3) the large-scale hydrostatic response aloft deep convective heating, 4) overshooting convection, 5) breaking gravity waves. All of these processes may act in isolation or combine to produce the observed TTL temperature structure. Here, a critical discussion of these processes / mechanisms and their role in lifting the cold point tropopause above the level of main convective outflow is presented. Results are based on idealized radiative-convective equilibrium model simulations, contrasting single-column with cloud-resolving simulations, as well on simulations with chemistry-climate models and reanalysis data. While all of the above processes are capable of producing a TTL-like region in isolation, their combination is found to produce important feedbacks. In particular, both water vapor and ozone are found to have strong radiative effects on TTL temperatures, highlighting important feedbacks between transport circulations setting temperatures and tracer structures and the resulting tracer structures in turn affecting temperatures.

  4. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from the receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiency (ηsel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ηsel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.

  5. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from themore » receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiency (ηsel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ηsel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.« less

  6. Grain sorting in the morphological active layer of a braided river physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, P.; Ashmore, P.; Gardner, J. T.

    2015-07-01

    A physical scale model of a gravel-bed braided river was used to measure vertical grain size sorting in the morphological active layer aggregated over the width of the river. This vertical sorting is important for analyzing braided river sedimentology, for numerical modeling of braided river morpho-dynamics and for measuring and predicting bed load transport rate. We define the morphological active layer as the bed material between the maximum and minimum bed elevations at a point over extended time periods sufficient for braiding processes to re-work the river bed. The vertical extent of the active layer was measured using 40 hourly high-resolution DEMs of the model river bed. An image texture algorithm was used to map bed material grain size of each DEM. Analysis of the 40 DEMs and texture maps provides data on the geometry of the morphological active layer and variation in grain size in three-dimensions. Normalizing active layer thickness and dividing into 10 sub-layers we show that all grain sizes occur with almost equal frequency in all sub-layers. Occurrence of patches and strings of coarser (or finer) material relates to preservation of particular morpho-textural features within the active layer. For numerical modeling and bed load prediction a morphological active layer that is fully mixed with respect to grain size is a reliable approximation.

  7. Study of cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature series in a nocturnal boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqueda, Gregorio; Sastre, Mariano; Viñas, Carmen; Viana, Samuel; Yagüe, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    The main characteristic of the Planetary Boundary Layer is the turbulent flow that can be understood as the motions of many superimposed eddies with different scales, which are very irregular and produce mixing among the atmospheric properties. Spectral analysis is a widely used statistical tool to know the size of eddies into the flow. The Turbulent Kinetic Energy is split in fractions for each scale of eddy by mean the power spectrum of the wind velocity components. Also, the fluctuation of the other variables as temperature, humidity, gases concentrations or material particles presents in the atmosphere can be divided according to the importance of different scales in a similar way than the wind. A Cross-spectrum between two time series is used in meteorology to know their correlation in frequency space. Specially, coespectrum, or real part of cross-spectrum, amplitud and coherence give us many information about the low or high correlation between two variables in a particular frecuency or scale (Stull, 1988). In this work we have investigated cross-spectra of velocity components and temperature measured along the summer 2009 at the CIBA, Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere, located in Valladolid province (Spain), which is on a quite flat terrain (Cuxart et al., 2000; Viana et al., 2009). In these experimental dataset, among other instrumentation, two sonic anemometers (20 Hz, sampling rate) at 1.5 m and 10 m height are available. Cross-spectra between variables of the two levels, specially, wind vertical component and sonic temperature, under stable stratification are studied in order to improve the knowledge of the proprieties of the momentum and heat fluxes near the ground in the PBL. Nevertheless, power spectral of horizontal components of the wind, at both levels, have been also analysed. The spectra and cross-spectra were performed by mean the Blackman-Tukey method, widely utilised in the time series studies (Blackman & Tukey, 1958) and, where it is

  8. Low-Temperature Process for Atomic Layer Chemical Vapor Deposition of an Al2O3 Passivation Layer for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoonbae; Lee, Jihye; Sohn, Sunyoung; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have drawn extensive attention due to their light weight, cost efficiency, portability, and so on. However, OPV cells degrade quickly due to organic damage by water vapor or oxygen penetration when the devices are driven in the atmosphere without a passivation layer. In order to prevent damage due to water vapor or oxygen permeation into the devices, passivation layers have been introduced through methods such as sputtering, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD). In this work, the structural and chemical properties of Al2O3 films, deposited via ALCVD at relatively low temperatures of 109 degrees C, 200 degrees C, and 300 degrees C, are analyzed. In our experiment, trimethylaluminum (TMA) and H2O were used as precursors for Al2O3 film deposition via ALCVD. All of the Al2O3 films showed very smooth, featureless surfaces without notable defects. However, we found that the plastic flexible substrate of an OPV device passivated with 300 degrees C deposition temperature was partially bended and melted, indicating that passivation layers for OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates need to be formed at temperatures lower than 300 degrees C. The OPV cells on plastic flexible substrates were passivated by the Al2O3 film deposited at the temperature of 109 degrees C. Thereafter, the photovoltaic properties of passivated OPV cells were investigated as a function of exposure time under the atmosphere. PMID:27483916

  9. Atomic Layer-by-Layer Deposition of Pt on Pd Nanocubes for Catalysts with Enhanced Activity and Durability toward Oxygen Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shuifen; Choi, Sang; Lu, Ning; Roling, Luke T.; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Zhang, Lei; Park, Jinho; Wang, Jinguo; Kim, Moon J.; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Mavrikakis, Manos; Xia, Younan

    2014-06-11

    An effective strategy for reducing the Pt content while retaining the activity of a Pt-based catalyst is to deposit the Pt atoms as ultrathin skins of only a few atomic layers thick on nanoscale substrates made of another metal. During deposition, however, the Pt atoms often take an island growth mode because of a strong bonding between Pt atoms. Here we report a versatile route to the conformal deposition of Pt as uniform, ultrathin shells on Pd nanocubes in a solution phase. The introduction of the Pt precursor at a relatively slow rate and high temperature allowed the deposited Pt atoms to spread across the entire surface of a Pd nanocube to generate a uniform shell. The thickness of the Pt shell could be controlled from one to six atomic layers by varying the amount of Pt precursor added into the system. Compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pd@PnL (n = 1-6) core-shell nanocubes showed enhancements in specific activity and durability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model (100) surfaces suggest that the enhancement in specific activity can be attributed to the weakening of OH binding through ligand and strain effects, which, in turn, increases the rate of OH hydrogenation. A volcano-type relationship between the ORR specific activity and the number of Pt atomic layers was derived, in good agreement with the experimental results. Both theoretical and experimental studies indicate that the ORR specific activity was maximized for the catalysts based on Pd@Pt2-3L nanocubes. Because of the reduction in Pt content used and the enhancement in specific activity, the Pd@Pt1L nanocubes showed a Pt mass activity with almost three-fold enhancement relative to the Pt/C catalyst.

  10. Temperature impact on the spectra of the spin-wave resonance in two-layer magnetic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyuzin, A. M.; Bakulin, M. A.; Radaikin, V. V.; Sabaev, S. N.; Yantsen, N. V.

    2016-05-01

    A sharp difference has been revealed in the behavior of the temperature dependences of the spectra of the spin-wave resonance of two-layer films with different parameters of the pinning layers. The calculations have shown that the effect of the disappearance and subsequent appearance of spin-wave modes in the specific temperature ranges was connected with the decrease in the degree of pinning because of the convergence of the fields of uniform resonance in the layers of excitation and pinning of spin fluctuations.

  11. Statistical significance of trends and trend differences in layer-average atmospheric temperature time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santer, B. D.; Wigley, T. M. L.; Boyle, J. S.; Gaffen, D. J.; Hnilo, J. J.; Nychka, D.; Parker, D. E.; Taylor, K. E.

    2000-03-01

    This paper examines trend uncertainties in layer-average free atmosphere temperatures arising from the use of different trend estimation methods. It also considers statistical issues that arise in assessing the significance of individual trends and of trend differences between data sets. Possible causes of these trends are not addressed. We use data from satellite and radiosonde measurements and from two reanalysis projects. To facilitate intercomparison, we compute from reanalyses and radiosonde data temperatures equivalent to those from the satellite-based Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU). We compare linear trends based on minimization of absolute deviations (LA) and minimization of squared deviations (LS). Differences are generally less than 0.05°C/decade over 1959-1996. Over 1979-1993, they exceed 0.10°C/decade for lower tropospheric time series and 0.15°C/decade for the lower stratosphere. Trend fitting by the LA method can degrade the lower-tropospheric trend agreement of 0.03°C/decade (over 1979-1996) previously reported for the MSU and radiosonde data. In assessing trend significance we employ two methods to account for temporal autocorrelation effects. With our preferred method, virtually none of the individual 1979-1993 trends in deep-layer temperatures are significantly different from zero. To examine trend differences between data sets we compute 95% confidence intervals for individual trends and show that these overlap for almost all data sets considered. Confidence intervals for lower-tropospheric trends encompass both zero and the model-projected trends due to anthropogenic effects. We also test the significance of a trend in d(t), the time series of differences between a pair of data sets. Use of d(t) removes variability common to both time series and facilitates identification of small trend differences. This more discerning test reveals that roughly 30% of the data set comparisons have significant differences in lower-tropospheric trends

  12. Interfacial diffusion behavior in Ni-BaTiO 3 MLCCs with ultra-thin active layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Huiling; Wang, Xiaohui; Tian, Zhibin; Zhang, Hui; Li, Longtu

    2014-03-01

    The interfacial structure and diffusion behavior between the dielectric layers (BaTiO3) and internal electrode layers (Ni) in X5R-type multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs, from -55°C to 85°C, at a temperature capacitance coefficient within ±15%) with ultra-thin active layers ( T = 1-3 µm) have been investigated by several microstructural techniques (SEM/TEM/HRTEM) with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). In the MLCC samples with different active layer thicknesses (1-3 µm), weak interfacial diffusion was observed between BaTiO3 and Ni. It was also found that the diffusion capability of Ni into the BaTiO3 layer was stronger than that of BaTiO3 to the Ni electrode, which indicated that the diffusion of Ni was the dominant factor for the interfacial diffusion behavior in the ultra-thin layered MLCCs. The mechanism of Ni diffusion is discussed in this study as well.

  13. Observing the morphology of single-layered embedded silicon nanocrystals by using temperature-stable TEM membranes

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Daniel; Laube, Jan; Zacharias, Margit; Kübel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Summary We use high-temperature-stable silicon nitride membranes to investigate single layers of silicon nanocrystal ensembles by energy filtered transmission electron microscopy. The silicon nanocrystals are prepared from the precipitation of a silicon-rich oxynitride layer sandwiched between two SiO2 diffusion barriers and subjected to a high-temperature annealing. We find that such single layers are very sensitive to the annealing parameters and may lead to a significant loss of excess silicon. In addition, these ultrathin layers suffer from significant electron beam damage that needs to be minimized in order to image the pristine sample morphology. Finally we demonstrate how the silicon nanocrystal size distribution develops from a broad to a narrow log-normal distribution, when the initial precipitation layer thickness and stoichiometry are below a critical value. PMID:25977867

  14. Observing the morphology of single-layered embedded silicon nanocrystals by using temperature-stable TEM membranes.

    PubMed

    Gutsch, Sebastian; Hiller, Daniel; Laube, Jan; Zacharias, Margit; Kübel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We use high-temperature-stable silicon nitride membranes to investigate single layers of silicon nanocrystal ensembles by energy filtered transmission electron microscopy. The silicon nanocrystals are prepared from the precipitation of a silicon-rich oxynitride layer sandwiched between two SiO2 diffusion barriers and subjected to a high-temperature annealing. We find that such single layers are very sensitive to the annealing parameters and may lead to a significant loss of excess silicon. In addition, these ultrathin layers suffer from significant electron beam damage that needs to be minimized in order to image the pristine sample morphology. Finally we demonstrate how the silicon nanocrystal size distribution develops from a broad to a narrow log-normal distribution, when the initial precipitation layer thickness and stoichiometry are below a critical value. PMID:25977867

  15. Transient temperature distributions in simple conducting bodies steadily heated through a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Hermon M

    1953-01-01

    An analysis is made of the transient heat-conduction effects in three simple semi-infinite bodies: the flat insulated plate, the conical shell, and the slender solid cone. The bodies are assumed to have constant initial temperatures and, at zero time, to begin to move at a constant speed and zero angle of attack through a homogeneous atmosphere. The heat input is taken as that through a laminar boundary layer. Radiation heat transfer and transverse temperature gradients are assumed to be zero. The appropriate heat-conduction equations are solved by an iteration method, the zeroeth-order terms describing the situation in the limit of small time. The method is presented and the solutions are calculated to three orders which are sufficient to give reasonably accurate results when the forward edge has attained one-half the total temperature rise (nose half-rise time). Flight Mach number and air properties occur as parameters in the result. Approximate expressions for the extent of the conduction region and nose half-rise times as functions of the parameters of the problem are presented. (author)

  16. Regional Surface Fluxes From Remotely Sensed Skin Temperature and Lower Boundary Layer Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Michiaki; Brutsaert, Wilfried

    1990-12-01

    During First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project Field Experiment in north-eastern Kansas, surface temperature was measured by infrared radiation thermometers at some 12 stations spread over the 15 × 15 km experimental area. These data, together with wind and temperature profiles in the unstable atmospheric boundary layer measured by means of radiosondes, were analyzed within the framework of Monin-Obukhov similarity. The radiometric scalar roughness corresponding to the radiometric surface temperature was found to increase as the season progressed; for the spring campaign the mean value was zoh,r = 4.56 × 10-7 m and for the fall zoh, r = 1.01 × 10 -2 m. The radiometric scalar roughness could also be expressed as a function of solar elevation and to a lesser extent, of canopy height or leaf area index. For an elevation range 10° ≤ α ≤ 75° the regression equation is zoh,r = exp [-0.735 - 3.61 tan (α)]. With this function good agreement (r = 0.87) was obtained between the profile-derived regional surface flux of sensible heat and the mean flux measured independently at ground-based stations under unstable conditions. Similarly, regional values of evaporation, obtained by means of the energy budget method from these sensible heat flux estimates, were in good agreement (r = 0.96).

  17. Characterization of ZnO film grown on polycarbonate by atomic layer deposition at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gyeong Beom; Han, Gwon Deok; Shim, Joon Hyung; Choi, Byoung-Ho

    2015-01-15

    ZnO is an attractive material for use in various technological products such as phosphors, gas sensors, and transparent conductors. Recently, aluminum-doped zinc oxide has received attention as a potential replacement for indium tin oxide, which is one of the transparent conductive oxides used in flat panel displays, organic light-emitting diodes, and organic solar cells. In this study, the characteristics of ZnO films deposited on polycarbonate (PC) substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) are investigated for various process temperatures. The growth mechanism of these films was investigated at low process temperatures using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD and XPS were used to determine the preferred orientation and chemical composition of the films, respectively. Furthermore, the difference of the deposition mechanisms on an amorphous organic material, i.e., PC substrate and an inorganic material such as silicon was discussed from the viewpoint of the diffusion and deposition of precursors. The structure of the films was also investigated by chemical analysis in order to determine the effect of growth temperature on the films deposited by ALD.

  18. Thermal expansion of gallium arsenide layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leszczynski, M.; Walker, J. F.

    1993-03-01

    The thermal expansion of low-temperature (190-220 °C) MBE grown gallium arsenide (LT GaAs) was measured using x-ray diffraction methods. The experiment was performed in order to observe the influence of high nonstoichiometric excess (about 1%) of arsenic on the thermal expansion of gallium arsenide. The diffraction measurements enabled the simultaneous monitoring of the lattice constants of the LT GaAs layers and their semi-insulating GaAs substrates. Their lattice mismatch was only slightly temperature dependent and decreased by about 5% with a temperature rise from 77 K (in dark) up to 550 K. This means that the value of the thermal expansion coefficient of as-grown LT GaAs was lower only by about 0.05×10-6 K-1 than that of the semi-insulating GaAs substrate. Reduction of arsenic excess by air annealing at 420 °C resulted in the decrease of lattice mismatch and the difference in the thermal expansion. This means that both are related to such point defects as arsenic antisites and interstitials. The experimental results are compared with the previously published data for variously doped gallium arsenide samples.

  19. The effect of growth temperature of seed layer on the structural and optical properties of ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Khyati; Singh, Inderpreet; Bhatnagar, P. K.; Peta, Koteswara Rao

    2016-05-01

    The structural and optical properties of ZnO nanorods are investigated as a function of growth temperature of the seed layer. The seed layer comprising of ZnO nanocrystallites is grown on ITO substrates at five different temperatures (150-550 °C) and the nanorods are grown on the seed layer by the facile hydrothermal method. The seed layer grown at 350 °C is observed to be uniformly textured with c-axis orientation leading to the synthesis of vertically aligned nanorods with smaller diameter. The HR-TEM analysis and the intense peak along (002) direction in the XRD spectra of this sample implied that the nanorods possess c-axis orientation. An enhanced UV emission is also observed in the photoluminescence spectra of this sample. The diversity in the morphology and orientation of the seeds at different temperatures has been explained by the growth kinetics of the ZnO nanocrystallites.

  20. Effects of spatial variation of skull and cerebrospinal fluid layers on optical mapping of brain activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuping; Shibahara, Nanae; Kuramashi, Daishi; Okawa, Shinpei; Kakuta, Naoto; Okada, Eiji; Maki, Atsushi; Yamada, Yukio

    2010-07-01

    In order to investigate the effects of anatomical variation in human heads on the optical mapping of brain activity, we perform simulations of optical mapping by solving the photon diffusion equation for layered-models simulating human heads using the finite element method (FEM). Particularly, the effects of the spatial variations in the thicknesses of the skull and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) layers on mapping images are investigated. Mapping images of single active regions in the gray matter layer are affected by the spatial variations in the skull and CSF layer thicknesses, although the effects are smaller than those of the positions of the active region relative to the data points. The increase in the skull thickness decreases the sensitivity of the images to active regions, while the increase in the CSF layer thickness increases the sensitivity in general. The images of multiple active regions are also influenced by their positions relative to the data points and by their depths from the skin surface.

  1. Insight into the Oriented Growth of Surface-Attached Metal-Organic Frameworks: Surface Functionality, Deposition Temperature, and First Layer Order.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jin-Liang; Kind, Martin; Grytz, Claudia M; Farr, Frederic; Diefenbach, Martin; Tussupbayev, Samat; Holthausen, Max C; Terfort, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    The layer-by-layer growth of a surface-attached metal-organic framework (SURMOF), [Cu2(F4bdc)2(dabco)] (F4bdc = tetrafluorobenzene-1,4-dicarboxylate and dabco = 1,4-diazabicyclo-[2.2.2]octane), on carboxylate- and pyridine-terminated surfaces has been investigated by various surface characterization techniques. Particular attention was paid to the dependency of the crystal orientation and morphology on surface functionality, deposition temperature, and first layer order. For the fully oriented deposition of SURMOFs, not only a suitable surface chemistry but also the appropriate temperature has to be chosen. In the case of carboxylate-terminated surfaces, the expected [100] oriented [Cu2(F4bdc)2(dabco)] SURMOF can be achieved at low temperatures (5 °C). In contrast, the predicted [001] oriented SURMOF on pyridine-terminated surface was obtained only at high deposition temperatures (60 °C). Interestingly, we found that rearrangement processes in the very first layer determine the final orientation (distribution) of the growing crystals. These effects could be explained by a surprisingly hampered substitution at the apical position of the Cu2-paddle wheel units, which requires significant thermal activation, as supported by quantum-chemical calculations. PMID:26051709

  2. Amorphous Inorganic Electron-Selective Layers for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells: Feasible Strategy Towards Room-Temperature Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Shi, Yantao; Li, Bo; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiangyuan; Bai, Xiaogong; Wang, Shufeng; Hao, Ce; Ma, Tingli

    2016-03-01

    Inorganic electron-selective layers (ESLs) are fabricated at extremely low temperatures of 70°C or even 25°C by a simple solution route. This is of great significance because the attained PCEs confirm the feasibility of room-temperature coating of inorganic amorphous ESLs through a solution method for the first time. PMID:26708492

  3. Layer-by-layer engineered nanocapsules of curcumin with improved cell activity.

    PubMed

    Kittitheeranun, Paveenuch; Sajomsang, Warayuth; Phanpee, Sarunya; Treetong, Alongkot; Wutikhun, Tuksadon; Suktham, Kunat; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong

    2015-08-15

    Nanocarriers based on electrostatic Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of CaCO3 nanoparticles (CaCO3 NPs) was investigated. These inorganic nanoparticles was used as templates to construct nanocapsules made from films based on two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), and poly (sodium 4-styrene-sulfonate sodium salt), followed by core dissolution. The naked CaCO3 NPs, CaCO3 NPs coated with the polyelectrolytes and hollow nanocapsules were found with hexagonal shape with average sizes of 350-400 nm. A reversal of the surface charge between positive to negative zeta potential values was found, confirming the adsorption of polyelectrolytes. The loading efficiency and release of curcumin were controlled by the hydrophobic interactions between the drug and the polyelectrolyte matrix of the hollow nanocapsules. The quantity of curcumin released from hollow nanocapsules was found to increase under acidic environments, which is a desirable for anti-cancer drug delivery. The hollow nanocapsules were found to localize in the cytoplasm and nucleus compartment of Hela cancer cells after 24 h of incubation. Hollow nanocapsules were non-toxic to human fibroblast cells. Furthermore, curcumin loaded hollow nanocapsules exhibited higher in vitro cell inhibition against Hela cells than that of free curcumin, suggesting that polyelectrolyte based-hollow nanocapsules can be utilized as new carriers for drug delivery. PMID:26143232

  4. Influences and interactions of inundation, peat, and snow on active layer thickness: Modeling Archive

    DOE Data Explorer

    Scott Painter; Ethan Coon; Cathy Wilson; Dylan Harp; Adam Atchley

    2016-04-21

    This Modeling Archive is in support of an NGEE Arctic publication currently in review [4/2016]. The Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) was used to simulate thermal hydrological conditions across varied environmental conditions for an ensemble of 1D models of Arctic permafrost. The thickness of organic soil is varied from 2 to 40cm, snow depth is varied from approximately 0 to 1.2 meters, water table depth was varied from -51cm below the soil surface to 31 cm above the soil surface. A total of 15,960 ensemble members are included. Data produced includes the third and fourth simulation year: active layer thickness, time of deepest thaw depth, temperature of the unfrozen soil, and unfrozen liquid saturation, for each ensemble member. Input files used to run the ensemble are also included.

  5. Morphology and crystallinity control of ultrathin TiO2 layers deposited on carbon nanotubes by temperature-step atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-Nuñez, Carlos; Zhang, Yucheng; Li, Meng; Chawla, Vipin; Erni, Rolf; Michler, Johann; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2015-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with titanium oxide (TiO2) have generated considerable interest over the last decade and become a promising nanomaterial for a wide range of energy applications. The efficient use of the outstanding electrical properties of this nanostructure relies heavily on the quality of the interface and the thickness and morphology of the TiO2 layer. However, complete surface coverage of the chemically inert CNTs and appropriate control of the morphology of the TiO2 layer have not been achieved so far. Here, we report a new strategy to obtain ultrathin TiO2 coatings deposited by ``Temperature-step'' Atomic Layer Deposition (TS-ALD) with complete surface coverage of non-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and controlled morphology and crystallinity of the TiO2 film. This strategy consists of adjusting the temperature during the ALD deposition to obtain the desired morphology. Complete coverage of long non-functionalized MWCNTs with conformal anatase layers was obtained by using a low temperature of 60 °C during the nucleation stage followed by an increase to 220 °C during the growth stage. This resulted in a continuous and amorphous TiO2 layer, covered with a conformal anatase coating. Starting with the deposition at 220 °C and reducing to 60 °C resulted in sporadic crystal grains at the CNT/TiO2 interface covered with an amorphous TiO2 layer. The results were accomplished through an extensive study of nucleation and growth of titanium oxide films on MWCNTs, of which a detailed characterization is presented in this work.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with titanium oxide (TiO2) have generated considerable interest over the last decade and become a promising nanomaterial for a wide range of energy applications. The efficient use of the outstanding electrical properties of this nanostructure relies heavily on the quality of the interface and the thickness and morphology of the TiO2 layer. However, complete surface coverage of the

  6. On the reliability of scrape-off layer ion temperature measurements by retarding field analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Kocan, M.; Gunn, J. P.; Pascal, J.-Y.; Gauthier, E.; Komm, M.; Bonhomme, G.

    2008-07-15

    The retarding field analyzer (RFA) is one of the only widely accepted diagnostics for measurements of ion temperature T{sub i} in the tokamak scrape-off layer. In this paper we analyze some instrumental effects of the RFA and their influence on T{sub i} measurements. It is shown that selective ion transmission through the RFA slit is responsible for an overestimation of T{sub i} by less than 14%, even for a relatively thick slit plate. Therefore, thicker slit plates are preferable, since they reduce, e.g., the risk of melting during off-normal events, and the effect of positive space charge inside the cavity. The influence of the electron repelling grid, as well as misalignment of the slit with respect to the magnetic field on T{sub i} measurements are negligible.

  7. Conformal single-layer encapsulation of PEDOT at low substrate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nan; Wang, Xiaoxue; Gleason, Karen K.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a single-layer encapsulation method for poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT). This method is achieved by initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) process, which is scalable and employs solvent-free and low-substrate temperature conditions. The encapsulant used, poly(divinylbenzene-co-maleic anhydride) (PDVB-MA), was first time synthesized via vapor phase process. This cross-linked iCVD polymer can be rapidly deposited (40 nm min-1) with uniform and conformal morphology. In the test of PEDOT degradation, the encapsulation extended the halflife of PEDOT to 900 h at 30 °C in air, which is more than 10 times of the counterpart without encapsulation.

  8. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties of Ni nanotubes synthesized by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Alejandro; Palma, Juan L; Denardin, Juliano C; Escrig, Juan

    2016-08-26

    Highly-ordered and conformal Ni nanotube arrays were prepared by combining atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a porous alumina matrix with a subsequent thermal reduction process. In order to obtain NiO tubes, one ALD NiCp2/O3 cycle was repeated 2000 times. After the ALD process, the sample is reduced from NiO to metallic Ni under hydrogen atmosphere. Their magnetic properties such as coercivity and squareness have been determined in a vibrating sample magnetometer in the temperature range from 5-300 K for applied magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the nanotube axis. Ni nanotubes synthesized by ALD provide a promising opportunity for potential applications in spintronics, data storage and bio-applications. PMID:27454022

  9. Low Temperature Double-Layer Capacitors Using Asymmetric and Spiro-Type Quaternary Ammonium Salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J. (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Double-layer capacitors capable of operating at extremely low temperatures (e.g., as low as -80.degree. C.) are disclosed. Electrolyte solutions combining a base solvent (e.g., acetonitrile) and a cosolvent are employed to lower the melting point of the base electrolyte. Example cosolvents include methyl formate, ethyl acetate, methyl acetate, propionitrile, butyronitrile, and 1,3-dioxolane. A quaternary ammonium salt including at least one of triethylmethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEMATFB) and spiro-(1,1')-bipyrrolidium tetrafluoroborate (SBPBF.sub.4), is used in an optimized concentration (e.g., 0.10 M to 0.75 M), dissolved into the electrolyte solution. Conventional device form factors and structural elements (e.g., porous carbon electrodes and a polyethylene separator) may be employed.

  10. Temperature-dependent magnetic properties of Ni nanotubes synthesized by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Alejandro; Palma, Juan L.; Denardin, Juliano C.; Escrig, Juan

    2016-08-01

    Highly-ordered and conformal Ni nanotube arrays were prepared by combining atomic layer deposition (ALD) in a porous alumina matrix with a subsequent thermal reduction process. In order to obtain NiO tubes, one ALD NiCp2/O3 cycle was repeated 2000 times. After the ALD process, the sample is reduced from NiO to metallic Ni under hydrogen atmosphere. Their magnetic properties such as coercivity and squareness have been determined in a vibrating sample magnetometer in the temperature range from 5–300 K for applied magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the nanotube axis. Ni nanotubes synthesized by ALD provide a promising opportunity for potential applications in spintronics, data storage and bio-applications.

  11. Temperature dependent transmission and optical bistability in a 1D photonic crystal with a liquid crystal defect layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan Entezar, Samad; Madani, Amir; Karimi Habil, Mojtaba; Namdar, Abdolrahman; Tajalli, Habib

    2013-12-01

    The transmission properties of a one-dimensional periodic structure with anisotropic defect layer is investigated using a ? transfer matrix method. A layer of homogeneously aligned nematic liquid crystal is taken as a defect. We show that the frequency and polarization of the defect mode is modified by changing the operating temperature and liquid crystal orientation. Also the temperature dependent nonlinear response of the defect structure is investigated. It is shown that the threshold intensity needed to achieve the bistability depends on the operating temperature. So, the structure can be used as a thermal switch at the frequency near the defect mode.

  12. Superconducting slab in contact with thin superconducting layer at higher critical temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba-Ortega, J.; Silva, Clécio C. de Souza; Aguiar, J. Albino

    2009-07-01

    Within the framework of nonlinear time dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations (TDGL) we study the properties of a mesoscopic superconducting film with both surfaces in contact with a thin superconducting layer at a higher critical temperature. The properties of the layer are taken into account by the de Gennes boundary conditions via the extrapolation length b. We assume that the magnetic field is parallel to the multilayer interfaces. We obtain magnetization curves and calculate the spatial distribution of the superconducting electron density using a numerical method based on the technique of gauge invariant variables. This work tests both the rectangular cross-section size and b limit for the occurrence of vortices in a mesoscopic sample of area d xxd y where d y = 80 ξ(0) and dx varies discretely from 20 ξ(0) to 3 ξ(0). Our data also show a linear behavior of the magnetization curve and a power-law of order parameter modulus in limit b → 0 -.

  13. Low-temperature growth of layered molybdenum disulphide with controlled clusters.

    PubMed

    Mun, Jihun; Kim, Yeongseok; Kang, Il-Suk; Lim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Jeong Won; Park, Hyun Min; Kim, Taesung; Kang, Sang-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Layered molybdenum disulphide was grown at a low-temperature of 350 °C using chemical vapour deposition by elaborately controlling the cluster size. The molybdenum disulphide grown under various sulphur-reaction-gas to molybdenum-precursor partial-pressure ratios were examined. Using spectroscopy and microscopy, the effect of the cluster size on the layered growth was investigated in terms of the morphology, grain size, and impurity incorporation. Triangular single-crystal domains were grown at an optimized sulphur-reaction-gas to molybdenum-precursor partial-pressure ratio. Furthermore, it is proved that the nucleation sites on the silicon-dioxide substrate were related with the grain size. A polycrystalline monolayer with the 100-nm grain size was grown on a nucleation site confined substrate by high-vacuum annealing. In addition, a field-effect transistor was fabricated with a MoS2 monolayer and exhibited a mobility and on/off ratio of 0.15 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 10(5), respectively. PMID:26902316

  14. Low-temperature growth of layered molybdenum disulphide with controlled clusters

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Jihun; Kim, Yeongseok; Kang, Il-Suk; Lim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Jeong Won; Park, Hyun Min; Kim, Taesung; Kang, Sang-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Layered molybdenum disulphide was grown at a low-temperature of 350 °C using chemical vapour deposition by elaborately controlling the cluster size. The molybdenum disulphide grown under various sulphur-reaction-gas to molybdenum-precursor partial-pressure ratios were examined. Using spectroscopy and microscopy, the effect of the cluster size on the layered growth was investigated in terms of the morphology, grain size, and impurity incorporation. Triangular single-crystal domains were grown at an optimized sulphur-reaction-gas to molybdenum-precursor partial-pressure ratio. Furthermore, it is proved that the nucleation sites on the silicon-dioxide substrate were related with the grain size. A polycrystalline monolayer with the 100-nm grain size was grown on a nucleation site confined substrate by high-vacuum annealing. In addition, a field-effect transistor was fabricated with a MoS2 monolayer and exhibited a mobility and on/off ratio of 0.15 cm2 V−1 s−1 and 105, respectively. PMID:26902316

  15. Measuring the Boundary Layer and Inner Accretion Disk Temperatures for WX Ceti during Superoutburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Fried, Robert; Szkody, Paula; Sirk, Martin M.; Schmidt, Gary

    2002-07-01

    We obtained EUV photometry, optical spectroscopy, and multicolor optical photometry for WX Cet during its 1998 November superoutburst. WX Cet is only the second short-period, low mass transfer cataclysmic variable (TOAD) to ever be observed in the EUV. Our determined superhump period is consistent with that found by Kato et al. (0.059 day), and we confirm that superhumps are gray in the optical. The optical spectra provide direct evidence that the line emission region is optically thick, and our multiwavelength photometric measurements are used to determine the inner accretion disk and boundary layer temperatures during superoutburst. Using a determined distance to WX Cet of ~130 pc, we find TID=21,000 K and TBL~72,500 K. Both values are in good agreement with that expected by models of the superoutburst continuum being produced by the inner disk and boundary layer. Some observations were made with the Apache Point Observatory (APO) 3.5 m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC).

  16. Low-temperature growth of layered molybdenum disulphide with controlled clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Jihun; Kim, Yeongseok; Kang, Il-Suk; Lim, Sung Kyu; Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Jeong Won; Park, Hyun Min; Kim, Taesung; Kang, Sang-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Layered molybdenum disulphide was grown at a low-temperature of 350 °C using chemical vapour deposition by elaborately controlling the cluster size. The molybdenum disulphide grown under various sulphur-reaction-gas to molybdenum-precursor partial-pressure ratios were examined. Using spectroscopy and microscopy, the effect of the cluster size on the layered growth was investigated in terms of the morphology, grain size, and impurity incorporation. Triangular single-crystal domains were grown at an optimized sulphur-reaction-gas to molybdenum-precursor partial-pressure ratio. Furthermore, it is proved that the nucleation sites on the silicon-dioxide substrate were related with the grain size. A polycrystalline monolayer with the 100-nm grain size was grown on a nucleation site confined substrate by high-vacuum annealing. In addition, a field-effect transistor was fabricated with a MoS2 monolayer and exhibited a mobility and on/off ratio of 0.15 cm2 V-1 s-1 and 105, respectively.

  17. Low-temperature integration of lead-based ferroelectric capacitors on Si with diffusion barrier layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. T.; Maki, K.; Aggarwal, S.; Nagaraj, B.; Nagarajan, V.; Salamanca-Riba, L.; Ramesh, R.; Dhote, A. M.; Auciello, O.

    2002-05-01

    Ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate thin films have been integrated on silicon substrates using Ti-Al-based conducting diffusion barriers produced by sputter deposition. The microstructure of the Ti-Al barrier layer was systematically altered through changes in the sputtering conditions, specifically the power density and deposition pressure. We find that the crystallinity of the Ti-Al film strongly correlates with sputtering power density and ambient i.e., it is amorphous at low power density and/or high deposition pressure, and polycrystalline at high power density and/or low deposition pressure. Electron energy loss spectroscopy studies demonstrate that the amorphous Ti-Al (a-Ti-Al) films contain a higher concentration of dissolved oxygen than crystalline Ti-Al. A low temperature sol-gel process has been used to prepare Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 PZT films at 450 °C on conducting Si wafers with a-Ti-Al conducting barrier layer and La-Sr-Co-O top and bottom electrodes. The excellent ferroelectric properties obtained with the a-Ti-Al barrier provide a promising approach for integration of PZT-based capacitors with silicon transistor technology for the fabrication of nonvolatile ferroelectric memories.

  18. Morphology and crystallinity control of ultrathin TiO2 layers deposited on carbon nanotubes by temperature-step atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Guerra-Nuñez, Carlos; Zhang, Yucheng; Li, Meng; Chawla, Vipin; Erni, Rolf; Michler, Johann; Park, Hyung Gyu; Utke, Ivo

    2015-06-28

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with titanium oxide (TiO2) have generated considerable interest over the last decade and become a promising nanomaterial for a wide range of energy applications. The efficient use of the outstanding electrical properties of this nanostructure relies heavily on the quality of the interface and the thickness and morphology of the TiO2 layer. However, complete surface coverage of the chemically inert CNTs and appropriate control of the morphology of the TiO2 layer have not been achieved so far. Here, we report a new strategy to obtain ultrathin TiO2 coatings deposited by "Temperature-step" Atomic Layer Deposition (TS-ALD) with complete surface coverage of non-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and controlled morphology and crystallinity of the TiO2 film. This strategy consists of adjusting the temperature during the ALD deposition to obtain the desired morphology. Complete coverage of long non-functionalized MWCNTs with conformal anatase layers was obtained by using a low temperature of 60 °C during the nucleation stage followed by an increase to 220 °C during the growth stage. This resulted in a continuous and amorphous TiO2 layer, covered with a conformal anatase coating. Starting with the deposition at 220 °C and reducing to 60 °C resulted in sporadic crystal grains at the CNT/TiO2 interface covered with an amorphous TiO2 layer. The results were accomplished through an extensive study of nucleation and growth of titanium oxide films on MWCNTs, of which a detailed characterization is presented in this work. PMID:26018433

  19. Study on the behavior of atomic layer deposition coatings on a nickel substrate at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi Baba Heidary, Damoon; Randall, Clive A.

    2016-06-01

    Although many techniques have been applied to protect nickel (Ni) alloys from oxidation at intermediate and high temperatures, the potential of atomic layer deposition (ALD) coatings has not been fully explored. In this paper, the application of ALD coatings (HfO2, Al2O3, SnO2, and ZnO) on Ni foils has been evaluated by electrical characterization and transmission electron microscopy analyses in order to assess their merit to increase Ni oxidation resistance; particular consideration was given to preserving Ni electrical conductivity at high temperatures. The results suggested that as long as the temperature was below 850 °C, the ALD coatings provided a physical barrier between outside oxygen and Ni metal and hindered the oxygen diffusion. It was illustrated that the barrier power of ALD coatings depends on their robustness, thicknesses, and heating rate. Among the tested ALD coatings, Al2O3 showed the maximum protection below 900 °C. However, above that temperature, the ALD coatings dissolved in the Ni substrate. As a result, they could not offer any physical barrier. The dissolution of ALD coatings doped on the NiO film, formed on the top of the Ni foils. As found by the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), this doping affected the electronic transport process, through manipulating the Ni3+/Ni2+ ratio in the NiO films and the chance of polaron hopping. It was demonstrated that by using the ZnO coating, one would be able to decrease the electrical resistance of Ni foils by two orders of magnitude after exposure to 1020 °C for 4 min. In contrast, the Al2O3 coating increased the resistance of the uncoated foil by one order of magnitude, mainly due to the decrease in the ratio of Ni3+/Ni2+.

  20. Study on the behavior of atomic layer deposition coatings on a nickel substrate at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Heidary, Damoon Sohrabi Baba; Randall, Clive A

    2016-06-17

    Although many techniques have been applied to protect nickel (Ni) alloys from oxidation at intermediate and high temperatures, the potential of atomic layer deposition (ALD) coatings has not been fully explored. In this paper, the application of ALD coatings (HfO2, Al2O3, SnO2, and ZnO) on Ni foils has been evaluated by electrical characterization and transmission electron microscopy analyses in order to assess their merit to increase Ni oxidation resistance; particular consideration was given to preserving Ni electrical conductivity at high temperatures. The results suggested that as long as the temperature was below 850 °C, the ALD coatings provided a physical barrier between outside oxygen and Ni metal and hindered the oxygen diffusion. It was illustrated that the barrier power of ALD coatings depends on their robustness, thicknesses, and heating rate. Among the tested ALD coatings, Al2O3 showed the maximum protection below 900 °C. However, above that temperature, the ALD coatings dissolved in the Ni substrate. As a result, they could not offer any physical barrier. The dissolution of ALD coatings doped on the NiO film, formed on the top of the Ni foils. As found by the electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), this doping affected the electronic transport process, through manipulating the Ni(3+)/Ni(2+) ratio in the NiO films and the chance of polaron hopping. It was demonstrated that by using the ZnO coating, one would be able to decrease the electrical resistance of Ni foils by two orders of magnitude after exposure to 1020 °C for 4 min. In contrast, the Al2O3 coating increased the resistance of the uncoated foil by one order of magnitude, mainly due to the decrease in the ratio of Ni(3+)/Ni(2+). PMID:27152985

  1. Exact solutions of laminar-boundary-layer equations with constant property values for porous wall with variable temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoughe, Patrick L; Livingood, John N B

    1955-01-01

    Exact solution of the laminar-boundary-layer equations for wedge-type flow with constant property values are presented for transpiration-cooled surfaces with variable wall temperatures. The difference between wall and stream temperature is assumed proportional to a power of the distance from the leading edge. Solutions are given for a Prandtl number of 0.7 and ranges of pressure-gradient, cooling-air-flow, and wall-temperature-gradient parameters. Boundary-layer profiles, dimensionless boundary-layer thicknesses, and convective heat-transfer coefficients are given in both tabular and graphical form. Corresponding results for constant wall temperature and for impermeable surfaces are included for comparison purposes.

  2. Temperature and Structure of Active Eruptions from a Handheld Camcorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, Jani; Carling, Greg T.; Saito, Takeshi; Dangerfield, Anne; Tingey, David G.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; Lopes, Rosaly M.; Howell, Robert R.; Diniega, Serina; Turtle, Elizabeth P.

    2014-11-01

    A commercial handheld digital camcorder can operate as a high-resolution, short-wavelength, low-cost thermal imaging system for monitoring active volcanoes, when calibrated against a laboratory heated rock of similar composition to the given eruptive material. We utilize this system to find full pixel brightness temperatures on centimeter scales at close but safe proximity to active lava flows. With it, observed temperatures of a Kilauea tube flow exposed in a skylight reached 1200 C, compared with pyrometer measurements of the same flow of 1165 C, both similar to reported eruption temperatures at that volcano. The lava lake at Erta Ale, Ethiopia had crack and fountain temperatures of 1175 C compared with previous pyrometer measurements of 1165 C. Temperature calibration of the vigorously active Marum lava lake in Vanuatu is underway, challenges being excessive levels of gas and distance from the eruption (300 m). Other aspects of the fine-scale structure of the eruptions are visible in the high-resolution temperature maps, such as flow banding within tubes, the thermal gradient away from cracks in lake surfaces, heat pathways through pahoehoe crust and temperature zoning in spatter and fountains. High-resolution measurements such as these reveal details of temperature, structure, and change over time at the rapidly evolving settings of active lava flows. These measurement capabilities are desirable for future instruments exploring bodies with active eruptions like Io, Enceladus and possibly Venus.

  3. Noncontact Temperature Measurements of Organic Layers in an Organic Light-Emitting Diode Using Wavenumber-Temperature Relations of Raman Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Takuro; Furukawa, Yukio

    2008-05-01

    We have measured the temperatures of the organic layers in operating organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by Raman spectroscopy. The wavenumbers of the Raman bands due to N,N'-di-naphthaleyl-N,N'-diphenyl-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPD) and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) have been measured as a function of temperature in the range of 25-191 °C. The observed positions of strong bands around 1607 cm-1 (NPD) and 1531 cm-1 (CuPc) shifted downward linearly with increasing temperature in the ranges lower than 92 and 191 °C, respectively. We have determined the temperatures of the NPD and CuPc layers in an operating OLED from the wavenumber-temperature relations of these bands.

  4. Geochemical drivers of organic matter decomposition in the active layer of Arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herndon, E.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; Mann, B.; Graham, D. E.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Gu, B.; Liang, L.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic tundra soils store large quantities of organic carbon that are susceptible to decomposition and release to the atmosphere as CO2 and CH4. Decomposition rates are limited by cold temperatures and widespread anoxia; however, ongoing changes in soil temperature, thaw depth, and water saturation are expected to influence rates and pathways of organic matter decomposition. In order to predict greenhouse gas releases from high-latitude ecosystems, it is necessary to identify how geochemical factors (e.g. terminal electron acceptors, carbon substrates) influence CO2 and CH4 production in tundra soils. This study evaluates spatial patterns of aqueous geochemistry in the active layer of low- to high-centered polygons located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory in northern Alaska. Pore waters from saturated soils were low in sulfate and nitrate but contained abundant Fe which may serve a major terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic microbial metabolism. Relatively high concentrations of soluble Fe accumulated in the middle of the active layer near the boundary between the organic and mineral horizon, and we infer that Fe-oxide reduction and dissolution in the mineral horizon produced soluble Fe that diffused upwards and was stabilized by complexation with dissolved organic matter. Fe concentrations in the bulk soil were higher in organic than mineral horizons due to the presence of these organic-Fe complexes and Fe-oxide precipitates. Dissolved CH4 increased with increasing proportions of dissolved Fe(III) in saturated soils from transitional and low-centered polygons. The opposite trend was observed in drier soils from flat- and high-centered polygons where deeper oxidation fronts may inhibit methanogenesis. Using multiple spectroscopic and molecular methods (e.g. UV-Vis, Fourier transform infrared, ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry), we also observed that pore waters from the middle of the active layer contained more aromatic organics than in mineral

  5. High-temperature degradation in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface passivation layers on crystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kühnhold, Saskia; Saint-Cast, Pierre; Kafle, Bishal; Hofmann, Marc; Colonna, Francesco; Zacharias, Margit

    2014-08-07

    In this publication, the activation and degradation of the passivation quality of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) layers with different thicknesses (10 nm, 20 nm, and 110 nm) on crystalline silicon (c-Si) during long and high temperature treatments are investigated. As indicated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, the concentration of tetrahedral and octahedral sites within the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer changes during temperature treatments and correlates with the amount of negative fixed charges at the Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface, which was detected by Corona Oxide Characterization of Semiconductors. Furthermore, during a temperature treatment at 820 °C for 30 min, the initial amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer crystallize into the γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} structure and was enhanced by additional oxygen as was proven by x-ray diffraction measurements and underlined by Density Functional Theory simulations. The crystallization correlates with the increase of the optical density up to 20% while the final Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer thickness decreases at the same time up to 26%. All observations described above were detected to be Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer thickness dependent. These observations reveal novel aspects to explain the temperature induced passivation and degradation mechanisms of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers at a molecular level like the origin of the negative fixe charges at the Si/SiO{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface or the phenomena of blistering. Moreover, the crystal phase of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} does not deliver good surface passivation due to a high concentration of octahedral sites leading to a lower concentration of negative fixed charges at the interface.

  6. Low-temperature optical spectroscopy of single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechinger, Gerd; Nagler, Philipp; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias

    In recent years, layered materials beyond graphene have attracted immense interest in the scientific community. Among those, particularly the semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) in their monolayer form are in the focus of the current research due to their intriguing optical properties and their potential application in valleytronic-based devices. The optical properties are governed by excitonic features, even at room temperature. The excitons in monolayer TMDCs have unusually large binding energies due to the two-dimensional carrier confinement and weak dielectric screening. Here, we investigate the photoluminescence spectra of monolayer TMDCs at low temperatures. We present clear evidence for the existence of biexcitons in monolayer WS2, exhibiting a superlinear behavior in excitation-power-dependent measurements. Applying a gate-voltage in a FET-configuration, we can identify charge-neutral and negatively charged excitons (trions) in the optical spectrum of different TMDCs. The trion binding energies range in the order of 30 meV. The evolution of the excitonic peaks under the application of external magnetic fields give further insight into the internal structure of these materials.

  7. Grain sorting in the morphological active layer of a braided river physical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, P.; Ashmore, P.; Gardner, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    A physical scale model of a gravel-bed braided river was used to measure vertical grain size sorting in the morphological active layer aggregated over the width of the river. This vertical sorting is important for analyzing braided river sedimentology, for numerical modeling of braided river morphodynamics, and for measuring and predicting bedload transport rate. We define the morphological active layer as the bed material between the maximum and minimum bed elevations at a point over extended time periods sufficient for braiding processes to rework the river bed. The vertical extent of the active layer was measured using 40 hourly high-resolution DEMs (digital elevation models) of the model river bed. An image texture algorithm was used to map bed material grain size of each DEM. Analysis of the 40 DEMs and texture maps provides data on the geometry of the morphological active layer and variation in grain size in three dimensions. By normalizing active layer thickness and dividing into 10 sublayers, we show that all grain sizes occur with almost equal frequency in all sublayers. Occurrence of patches and strings of coarser (or finer) material relates to preservation of particular morpho-textural features within the active layer. For numerical modeling and bedload prediction, a morphological active layer that is fully mixed with respect to grain size is a reliable approximation.

  8. Activation energies and temperature effects from electrical spectra of soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apparent permittivity often has soil-specific temperature responses as well as soil water responses. These variations affect dielectric sensors, often requiring site-specific calibrations. Variations of permittivity as a function of frequency and temperature can be used to calculate activation energ...

  9. Effects of stratified active layers on high-altitude permafrost warming: a case study on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xicai; Li, Yanping; Yu, Qihao; Shi, Xiaogang; Yang, Daqing; Roth, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    Seasonally variable thermal conductivity in active layers is one important factor that controls the thermal state of permafrost. The common assumption is that this conductivity is considerably lower in the thawed than in the frozen state, λt/λf < 1. Using a 9-year dataset from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) in conjunction with the GEOtop model, we demonstrate that the ratio λt/λf may approach or even exceed 1. This can happen in thick (> 1.5 m) active layers with strong seasonal total water content changes in the regions with summer-monsoon-dominated precipitation pattern. The conductivity ratio can be further increased by typical soil architectures that may lead to a dry interlayer. The unique pattern of soil hydraulic and thermal dynamics in the active layer can be one important contributor for the rapid permafrost warming at the study site. These findings suggest that, given the increase in air temperature and precipitation, soil hydraulic properties, particularly soil architecture in those thick active layers must be properly taken into account in permafrost models.

  10. Ambient temperature and activation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuinn, L.; Hajat, S.; Wilkinson, P.; Armstrong, B.; Anderson, H. R.; Monk, V.; Harrison, R.

    2013-09-01

    The degree to which weather influences the occurrence of serious cardiac arrhythmias is not fully understood. To investigate, we studied the timing of activation of implanted cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) in relation to daily outdoor temperatures using a fixed stratum case-crossover approach. All patients attending ICD clinics in London between 1995 and 2003 were recruited onto the study. Temperature exposure for each ICD patient was determined by linking each patient's postcode of residence to their nearest temperature monitoring station in London and the South of England. There were 5,038 activations during the study period. Graphical inspection of ICD activation against temperature suggested increased risk at lower but not higher temperatures. For every 1 °C decrease in ambient temperature, risk of ventricular arrhythmias up to 7 days later increased by 1.2 % (95 % CI -0.6 %, 2.9 %). In threshold models, risk of ventricular arrhythmias increased by 11.2 % (0.5 %, 23.1 %) for every 1° decrease in temperature below 2 °C. Patients over the age of 65 exhibited the highest risk. This large study suggests an inverse relationship between ambient outdoor temperature and risk of ventricular arrhythmias. The highest risk was found for patients over the age of 65. This provides evidence about a mechanism for some cases of low-temperature cardiac death, and suggests a possible strategy for reducing risk among selected cardiac patients by encouraging behaviour modification to minimise cold exposure.

  11. Calculating activation energies for temperature compensation in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2011-10-01

    Many biological species possess a circadian clock, which helps them anticipate daily variations in the environment. In the absence of external stimuli, the rhythm persists autonomously with a period of approximately 24 h. However, single pulses of light, nutrients, chemicals or temperature can shift the clock phase. In the case of light- and temperature-cycles, this allows entrainment of the clock to cycles of exactly 24 h. Circadian clocks have the remarkable property of temperature compensation, that is, the period of the circadian rhythm remains relatively constant within a physiological range of temperatures. For several organisms, temperature-regulated processes within the circadian clock have been identified in recent years. However, how these processes contribute to temperature compensation is not fully understood. Here, we theoretically investigate temperature compensation in general oscillatory systems. It is known that every oscillator can be locally temperature compensated around a reference temperature, if reactions are appropriately balanced. A balancing is always possible if the control coefficient with respect to the oscillation period of at least one reaction in the oscillator network is positive. However, for global temperature compensation, the whole physiological temperature range is relevant. Here, we use an approach which leads to an optimization problem subject to the local balancing principle. We use this approach to analyse different circadian clock models proposed in the literature and calculate activation energies that lead to temperature compensation.

  12. The Influence of High Aerosol Concentration on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Temperature Stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Khaykin, M.N.; Kadygrove, E.N.; Golitsyn, G.S.

    2005-03-18

    Investigations of the changing in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) radiation balance as cased by natural and anthropogenic reasons is an important topic of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The influence of aerosol on temperature stratification of ABL while its concentration was extremely high within a long period of time was studied experimentally. The case was observed in Moscow region (Russia) with the transport of combustion products from peat-bog and forest fires in July-September, 2002. At this time the visibility was some times at about 100-300 m. Aerosol concentration measured by Moscow University Observatory and A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics field station in Zvenigorod (55.7 N; 36.6 E) for several days was in 50-100 times more than background one (Gorchakov at al 2003). The high aerosol concentration can change the radiation balance at ABL, and so to change thermal stratification in ABL above the mega lopolis. For the analysis the data were used of synchronous measurements by MTP-5 (Microwave Temperature Profiler operating at wavelength 5 mm) in two locations, namely: downtown Moscow and country-side which is 50 km apart to the West (Zvenigorod station). (Kadygrov and Pick 1998; Westwater at al 1999; Kadygrov at al 2002). Zvenigorod station is located in strongly continental climate zone which is in between of the climates of ARM sites (NSANorth Slope of Alaska and SGP-Southern Great Plains). The town of Zvenigorod has little industry, small traffic volume and topography conductive to a good air ventilation of the town. For these reasons Zvenigorod can be considered as an undisturbed rural site. For the analysis some days were chosen with close meteorological parameters (average temperature, humidity, wind, pressure and cloud form) but strongly differing in aerosol concentration level.

  13. Anthropogenic Aerosol Effects on Sea Surface Temperatures: Mixed-Layer Ocean Experiments with Explicit Aerosol Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin; Knutti, Reto

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols affect the Earth's radiative balance both through direct and indirect effects. These effects can lead to a reduction of the incoming solar radiation at the surface, i.e. dimming, which may lead to a change in sea surface temperatures (SST) or SST pattern. This, in turn, may affect precipitation patterns. The goal of the present work is to achieve an estimate of the equilibrium SST changes under anthropogenic aerosol forcing since industrialisation. We show preliminary results from mixed-layer ocean (MLO) experiments with explicit aerosol representation performed with ECHAM6-HAM. The (fixed) MLO heat flux into the deep ocean was derived from atmosphere only runs with fixed climatological SSTs (1961-1990 average) and present day (year 2000) aerosols and GHG burdens. Some experiments we repeated with an alternative MLO deep ocean heat flux (based on pre-industrial conditions) to test the robustness of our results with regard to this boundary condition. The maximum surface temperature responses towards anthropogenic aerosol and GHG forcing (separately and combined) were derived on a global and regional scale. The same set of experiments was performed with aerosol and GHG forcings representative of different decades over the past one and a half centuries. This allows to assess how SST patterns at equilibrium changed with changing aerosol (and GHG) forcing. Correlating SST responses with the change in downward clear-sky and all-sky shortwave radiation provides a first estimate of the response to anthropogenic aerosols. Our results show a clear contrast in hemispheric surface temperature response, as expected from the inter-hemispheric asymmetry of aerosol forcing The presented work is part of a project aiming at quantifying the effect of anthropogenic aerosol forcing on SSTs and the consequences for global precipitation patterns. Results from this study will serve as a starting point for further experiments involving a dynamic ocean model, which

  14. On the '-1' scaling of air temperature spectra in atmospheric surface layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D.; Katul, G. G.; Gentine, P.

    2015-12-01

    The spectral properties of scalar turbulence at high wavenumbers have been extensively studied in turbulent flows, and existing theories explaining the k-5/3 scaling within the inertial subrange appear satisfactory at high Reynolds numbers. Equivalent theories for the low wavenumber range have been comparatively lacking because boundary conditions prohibit attainment of such universal behavior. A number of atmospheric surface layer (ASL) experiments reported a k-1 scaling in air temperature spectra ETT(k) at low wavenumbers but other experiments did not. Here, the occurrence of a k-1 scaling in ETT(k) in an idealized ASL flow across a wide range of atmospheric stability regimes is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Experiments reveal a k-1 scaling persisted across different atmospheric stability parameter values (ζ) ranging from mildly unstable to mildly stable conditions (-0.1< ζ < 0.2). As instability increases, the k-1 scaling vanishes. Based on a combined spectral and co-spectral budget models and upon using a Heisenberg eddy viscosity as a closure to the spectral flux transfer term, conditions promoting a k-1 scaling are identified. Existence of a k-1 scaling is shown to be primarily linked to an imbalance between the production and dissipation rates of half the temperature variance. The role of the imbalance between the production and dissipation rates of half the temperature variance in controlling the existence of a '-1' scaling suggests that the '-1' scaling in ETT(k) does not necessarily concur with the '-1' scaling in the spectra of longitudinal velocity Euu(k). This finding explains why some ASL experiments reported k-1 in Euu(k) but not ETT(k). It also differs from prior arguments derived from directional-dimensional analysis that lead to simultaneous k-1 scaling in Euu(k) and ETT(k) at low wavenumbers in a neutral ASL.

  15. Interstratified nanohybrid assembled by alternating cationic layered double hydroxide nanosheets and anionic layered titanate nanosheets with superior photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bizhou; Sun, Ping; Zhou, Yi; Jiang, Shaofeng; Gao, Bifen; Chen, Yilin

    2014-09-15

    Oppositely charged 2D inorganic nanosheets of ZnAl-layered double hydroxide and layered titanate were successfully assembled into an interstratified nanohybrid through simply mixing the corresponding nanosheet suspensions. Powder X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscope clearly revealed that the component nanosheets in the as-obtained nanohybrid ZnAl-Ti3O7 retain the 2D sheet skeletons of the pristine materials and that the two kinds of nanosheets are well arranged in a layer-by-layer alternating fashion with a basal spacing of about 1.3 nm, coincident with the thickness summation of the two component nanosheets. The effective interfacial heterojunction between them and the high specific surface area resulted in that the nanohybrid exhibits a superior photocatalytic activity in the degradation of methylene blue with a reaction constant k of 2.81 × 10(-2)min(-1), which is about 9 and 4 times higher than its precursors H2Ti3O7 and ZnAl-LDH, respectively. Based on UV-vis, XPS and photoelectrochemical measurements, a proposed photoexcitation model was provided to understand its photocatalytic behavior. PMID:25151238

  16. Salix polaris growth responses to active layer detachment and solifluction processes in High Arctic.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siekacz, Liliana

    2015-04-01

    The work is dedicated to demonstrate the potential of Salix polaris grow properties in the dendrogemorphologic image, analyzing periglacially induced slope processes in the high Arctic.. Observed anatomical and morphological plants responses to solifluction and active layer detachment processes are presented qualitatively and quantitatively as a summary of presented features frequency. The results are discussed against the background of the other research results in this field. The investigations was performed in Ebba valley, in the vicinity of Petunia Bay, northernmost part of Billefjorden in central Spitsbergen (Svalbard). Environmental conditions are characterized by annual precipitation sum lower than 200 mm (Hagen et al.,1993) and average summer temperature of about 5°C, with maximum daily temperatures rarely exceeding 10°C (Rachlewicz, 2009). Collected shrub material was prepared according to the methods presented by Schweingruber and Poschlod (2005). Thin (approx. 15-20μm) sections of the whole cross-section were prepared with a sledge microtome, stained with Safranine and Astra blue and finally permanently fixed on microslides with Canada balsam and dried. Snapshots were taken partially for each cross-section with digital camera (ColorView III, Olympus) connected to a microscope (Olympus BX41) and merged into one, high resolution image. After all, ring widths were measured in 3-4 radii in every single cross-section using ImageJ software. Analyzed plants revealed extremely harsh environmental conditions of their growth. Buchwał et al. (2013) provided quantitative data concerning missing rings and partially missing rings in shrubs growing on Ebba valley floor. Mean ring width at the level of 79μm represents one of the smallest values of yearly growth ever noted. The share of missing rings and partially missing rings was 11,2% and 13,6% respectively. Plants growing on Ebba valley slope indicate almost twice smaller values of ring width (41μm), and higher

  17. Application of Satellite SAR Imagery in Mapping the Active Layer of Arctic Permafrost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ting-Jun; Li, Shu-Sun

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this project is to map the spatial variation of the active layer over the arctic permafrost in terms of two parameters: (i) timing and duration of thaw period and (ii) differential frost heave and thaw settlement of the active layer. To achieve this goal, remote sensing, numerical modeling, and related field measurements are required. Tasks for the University of Colorado team are to: (i) determine the timing of snow disappearance in spring through changes in surface albedo (ii) simulate the freezing and thawing processes of the active layer and (iii) simulate the impact of snow cover on permafrost presence.

  18. Enhancement of the superconducting transition temperature of FeSe by intercalation of a molecular spacer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrard-Lucas, Matthew; Free, David G.; Sedlmaier, Stefan J.; Wright, Jack D.; Cassidy, Simon J.; Hara, Yoshiaki; Corkett, Alex J.; Lancaster, Tom; Baker, Peter J.; Blundell, Stephen J.; Clarke, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in a layered iron arsenide has led to an intensive search to optimize the superconducting properties of iron-based superconductors by changing the chemical composition of the spacer layer between adjacent anionic iron arsenide layers. Superconductivity has been found in iron arsenides with cationic spacer layers consisting of metal ions (for example, Li+, Na+, K+, Ba2+) or PbO- or perovskite-type oxide layers, and also in Fe1.01Se (ref. ) with neutral layers similar in structure to those found in the iron arsenides and no spacer layer. Here we demonstrate the synthesis of Lix(NH2)y(NH3)1-yFe2Se2 (x~0.6 y~0.2), with lithium ions, lithium amide and ammonia acting as the spacer layer between FeSe layers, which exhibits superconductivity at 43(1) K, higher than in any FeSe-derived compound reported so far. We have determined the crystal structure using neutron powder diffraction and used magnetometry and muon-spin rotation data to determine the superconducting properties. This new synthetic route opens up the possibility of further exploitation of related molecular intercalations in this and other systems to greatly optimize the superconducting properties in this family.

  19. Thickness dependence of the levitation performance of double-layer high-temperature superconductor bulks above a magnetic rail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, R. X.; Zheng, J.; Liao, X. L.; Che, T.; Gou, Y. F.; He, D. B.; Deng, Z. G.

    2014-10-01

    A double-layer high-temperature superconductor (HTSC) arrangement was proposed and proved to be able to bring improvements to both levitation force and guidance force compared with present single-layer HTSC arrangement. To fully exploit the applied magnetic field by a magnetic rail, the thickness dependence of a double-layer HTSC arrangement on the levitation performance was further investigated in the paper. In this study, the lower-layer bulk was polished step by step to different thicknesses, and the upper-layer bulk with constant thickness was directly superimposed on the lower-layer one. The levitation force and the force relaxation of the double-layer HTSC arrangement were measured above a Halbach magnetic rail. Experimental result shows that a bigger levitation force and a less levitation force decay could be achieved by optimizing the thickness of the lower-layer bulk HTSC. This thickness optimization method could be applied together with former reported double-layer HTSC arrangement method with aligned growth sector boundaries pattern. This series of study on the optimized combination method do bring a significant improvement on the levitation performance of present HTS maglev systems.

  20. Sensitivity of nocturnal boundary layer temperature to tropospheric aerosol surface radiative forcing under clear-sky conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Udaysankar S.; McNider, Richard; Patadia, Falguni; Christopher, Sundar A.; Fuller, Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Since the middle of the last century, global surface air temperature exhibits an increasing trend, with nocturnal temperatures increasing at a much higher rate. Proposed causative mechanisms include the radiative impact of atmospheric aerosols on the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) where the temperature response is amplified due to shallow depth and its sensitivity to potential destabilization. A 1-D version of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System is used to examine the sensitivity of the nocturnal boundary layer temperature to the surface longwave radiative forcing (SLWRF) from urban aerosol loading and doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. The analysis is conducted for typical midlatitude nocturnal boundary layer case days from the CASES-99 field experiment and is further extended to urban sites in Pune and New Delhi, India. For the cases studied, locally, the nocturnal SLWRF from urban atmospheric aerosols (2.7-47 W m-2) is comparable or exceeds that caused by doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide (3 W m-2), with the surface temperature response ranging from a compensation for daytime cooling to an increase in the nocturnal minimum temperature. The sensitivity of the NBL to radiative forcing is approximately 4 times higher compared to the daytime boundary layer. Nighttime warming or cooling may occur depending on the nature of diurnal variations in aerosol optical depth. Soil moisture also modulates the magnitude of SLWRF, decreasing from 3 to 1 W m-2 when soil saturation increases from 37% to 70%. These results show the importance of aerosols on the radiative balance of the climate system.

  1. An Algorithm to Generate Deep-Layer Temperatures from Microwave Satellite Observations for the Purpose of Monitoring Climate Change. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Fleming, Henry E.

    1994-01-01

    An algorithm for generating deep-layer mean temperatures from satellite-observed microwave observations is presented. Unlike traditional temperature retrieval methods, this algorithm does not require a first guess temperature of the ambient atmosphere. By eliminating the first guess a potentially systematic source of error has been removed. The algorithm is expected to yield long-term records that are suitable for detecting small changes in climate. The atmospheric contribution to the deep-layer mean temperature is given by the averaging kernel. The algorithm computes the coefficients that will best approximate a desired averaging kernel from a linear combination of the satellite radiometer's weighting functions. The coefficients are then applied to the measurements to yield the deep-layer mean temperature. Three constraints were used in deriving the algorithm: (1) the sum of the coefficients must be one, (2) the noise of the product is minimized, and (3) the shape of the approximated averaging kernel is well-behaved. Note that a trade-off between constraints 2 and 3 is unavoidable. The algorithm can also be used to combine measurements from a future sensor (i.e., the 20-channel Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)) to yield the same averaging kernel as that based on an earlier sensor (i.e., the 4-channel Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU)). This will allow a time series of deep-layer mean temperatures based on MSU measurements to be continued with AMSU measurements. The AMSU is expected to replace the MSU in 1996.

  2. The Effect of High Temperature Annealing on the Grain Characteristics of a Thin Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Carbide Layer.

    SciTech Connect

    Isabella J van Rooyen; Philippus M van Rooyen; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

    2013-08-01

    The unique combination of thermo-mechanical and physiochemical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) provides interest and opportunity for its use in nuclear applications. One of the applications of SiC is as a very thin layer in the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles for high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This SiC layer, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is designed to withstand the pressures of fission and transmutation product gases in a high temperature, radiation environment. Various researchers have demonstrated that macroscopic properties can be affected by changes in the distribution of grain boundary plane orientations and misorientations [1 - 3]. Additionally, various researchers have attributed the release behavior of Ag through the SiC layer as a grain boundary diffusion phenomenon [4 - 6]; further highlighting the importance of understanding the actual grain characteristics of the SiC layer. Both historic HTGR fission product release studies and recent experiments at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) [7] have shown that the release of Ag-110m is strongly temperature dependent. Although the maximum normal operating fuel temperature of a HTGR design is in the range of 1000-1250°C, the temperature may reach 1600°C under postulated accident conditions. The aim of this specific study is therefore to determine the magnitude of temperature dependence on SiC grain characteristics, expanding upon initial studies by Van Rooyen et al, [8; 9].

  3. Effect of substrate nitridation temperature on the persistent photoconductivity of unintentionally-doped GaN layer grown by PAMBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Nisha; Choursia, B.; Barvat, Arun; Anand, Kritika; Kushvaha, S. S.; Singh, V. N.; Pal, Prabir; Khanna, Suraj P.

    2016-05-01

    The surface roughness and defect density of GaN epitaxial layers grown on c-plane sapphire substrate are investigated and found to be dependent on nitridation temperature. GaN epitaxial layers grown after nitridation of sapphire at 200°C have a higher defect density and higher surface roughness compared to the GaN layers grown at 646°C nitridation as confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The persistent photoconductivity (PPC) was observed in both samples and it was found to be decreasing with decreasing temperature in the range 150-300°C due to long carrier lifetime and high electron mobility at low temperature. The photoresponse of the GaN films grown in this study exhibit improved PPC due to their better surface morphology at 646°C nitrided sample. The point defects or extended microstructure defects limits the photocarrier lifetime and electron mobility at 200°C nitrided sample.

  4. Characterization of mismatched SiGe grown on low temperature Si buffer layers by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, K. K.; Zhang, F. C.; Rieh, J.-S.; Bhattacharya, P.

    1997-05-01

    Several types of buffer layer structures, including superlattice and step-graded layers, have been employed to reduce the threading dislocation in SiGe epitaxial layers. A new technique, using a 0.1 μm thick Si buffer grown at 450°C by molecular beam epitaxy, provides the best results. For a 0.5 μm thick Si 0.85Ge 0.15 layer, the dislocation density is ⩽ 10 5cm -2. Hall measurements indicate an improvement in the hole mobility of a 1 μm thick Boron doped Si 0.7Ge 0.3 layer. A {SiGe}/{Si} heterojunction bipolar transistor has been fabricated exploiting the low temperature Si buffer. Transmission electron microscopy of the structure does not indicate any evidence of threading dislocations.

  5. Low-temperature thermoluminescence study of GaSe:Mn layered single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delice, S.; Gasanly, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mangan doped GaSe single crystals have been studied by thermoluminescence measurements performed with various heating rates between 0.4 and 1.0 K/s in the temperature range of 10-300 K. Thermoluminescence spectra exhibited four distinguishable peaks having maximum temperatures at 47, 102, 139 and 191 K revealing the existence of trapping levels in the crystals. Curve fitting and initial rise methods were applied to observed peaks to determine the activation energies of four trapping levels. Capture cross-sections of each level were also evaluated using the obtained energy values. Moreover, heating rate dependencies of the obtained peaks were investigated. It was shown that increase in the heating rate resulted in the decrease in thermoluminescence intensity and shift of the peak maximum temperatures to higher values. Discrete, single trap behaviour was established for acceptor level related with the peak at 191 K by analysing the sequentially obtained peaks with different stopping temperatures between 15 and 65 K.

  6. A family of layered chiral porous magnets exhibiting tunable ordering temperatures.

    PubMed

    Atzori, Matteo; Benmansour, Samia; Mínguez Espallargas, Guillermo; Clemente-León, Miguel; Abhervé, Alexandre; Gómez-Claramunt, Patricia; Coronado, Eugenio; Artizzu, Flavia; Sessini, Elisa; Deplano, Paola; Serpe, Angela; Mercuri, Maria Laura; Gómez García, Carlos J

    2013-09-01

    A simple change of the substituents in the bridging ligand allows tuning of the ordering temperatures, Tc, in the new family of layered chiral magnets A[M(II)M(III)(X2An)3]·G (A = [(H3O)(phz)3](+) (phz = phenazine) or NBu4(+); X2An(2-) = C6O4X2(2-) = 2,5-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone derivative dianion, with M(III) = Cr, Fe; M(II) = Mn, Fe, Co, etc.; X = Cl, Br, I, H; G = water or acetone). Depending on the nature of X, an increase in Tc from ca. 5.5 to 6.3, 8.2, and 11.0 K (for X = Cl, Br, I, and H, respectively) is observed in the MnCr derivative. Furthermore, the presence of the chiral cation [(H3O)(phz)3](+), formed by the association of a hydronium ion with three phenazine molecules, leads to a chiral structure where the Δ-[(H3O)(phz)3](+) cations are always located below the Δ-[Cr(Cl2An)3](3-) centers, leading to a very unusual localization of both kinds of metals (Cr and Mn) and to an eclipsed disposition of the layers. This eclipsed disposition generates hexagonal channels with a void volume of ca. 20% where guest molecules (acetone and water) can be reversibly absorbed. Here we present the structural and magnetic characterization of this new family of anilato-based molecular magnets. PMID:23968133

  7. Aircraft Measurements of Temperature and Liquid Water Content in Entrainment Interface Layer of Stratocumulus Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haman, K. E.; Gerber, H.; Kumala, W.; Malinowski, S. P.

    2009-09-01

    Entrainment of dry, warm air from above the cloud and its mixing with the colder cloudy air is an important process in dynamics of inversion topped stratocumulus, leading to formation of a transition layer of complex structure - Entrainment Interface Layer (EIL). It consists of mutual filaments if cloudy and clear air of various thickness at different stages of stirring, mixing and homogenization. Borders between these filaments are often very sharp, with temperature jumps of few kelvins and liquid water content (LWC) jumps of up to 0.5 gmE-3 over distance of few centimeters, which cannot be resolved by means of standard aircraft instrumentation. This layer is an area of various specific dynamic and thermodynamic phenomena; in particular it is a source of downdrafts penetrating the cloud as the so called "cloud holes". Small scale structure of EIL has been investigated in 2001 during DYCOMS II campaign in marine stratocumulus over Eastern Pacific, by means of Ultrafast Aircraft Thermometer (UFT-F) from University of Warsaw and PVM-100A LWC-meter from Gerber Scientific, Inc. Some results of this research has been published in 2007 in Quarterly Journal of RMS. UFT-F has a thermoresistive sensing element protected against impact of cloud droplets and response time constant of order 10E-4s. PVM-100A is an optical instrument and has spatial resolution of order 10 cm. For recording a sampling rate of 1kHz has been typically applied with 10 kHz (for UFT-F only) on selected fragments of flights. Unfortunately, for some technical reasons, these two instruments, installed on the NCAR C-130 aircraft, were separated by about 6 meters what limited possibilities and precision of comparing their indications. There were also some failures during the flights due to which many potentially interesting measurements and observations have been lost. Opportunity to get improved observations of EIL appeared in 2008 at POST (Physics of Stratocumulus Top) Project. During POST a number of

  8. Catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanowires on ITO seed layer/glass by thermal evaporation method: Effects of ITO seed layer laser annealing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsultany, Forat H.; Hassan, Z.; Ahmed, Naser M.

    2016-04-01

    Novel catalyst-free growth of ZnO nanowires (ZnO-NWs) on ITO seeds/glass substrate by thermal evaporation method, and effects of continuous wave CO2 laser thermal annealed seed layer on the morphology and properties of ZnO-NWs growth were investigated. The effects of sputtered ITO seed layer laser annealing temperature on the morphological, structural, and optical properties of ZnO-NWs was systematically investigated at temperatures 250, 350, and 450 °C, respectively. The surface morphology and structure of the seeds and the products of ZnO-NWs were characterized in detail by using field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Optical properties were further examined through photoluminescence, and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. A growth mechanism was proposed on the basis of obtained results. The results showed that the nanowires were strongly dependent on the seed layer annealing temperatures, which played an important role in nucleation and dissimilar growth of the nanowires with varying sizes and geometric shapes.

  9. Temperature Distribution in Multi-Anvil Assemblies Derived From Spinel Layer Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Westrenen, W.; Van Orman, J. A.; Van Orman, J. A.; Fei, Y.; Watson, E. B.

    2001-12-01

    Experiments performed at pressures (P) and temperatures (T) relevant to planetary interiors often require uniform heating of the experimental charge. Quantitative knowledge of the thermal structure of high-pressure assemblies is needed to determine maximum sample volumes and optimize assembly design. We present measurements of the T distribution in a range of multi-anvil assemblies, at P between 6 - 14 GPa, and at T up to 2250 K, based on the growth rate of a MgAl2O4 spinel layer at the interface between MgO and Al2O3 assembly filler pieces. Recently, Watson et al. (CMP, in press) presented an empirical equation linking the thickness of a spinel layer growing at the interface between MgO and Al2O3 to P, T, and time. Their equation is based on experiments performed in a piston cylinder apparatus, at P up to 4 GPa and T up to 2250 K. We extend the P range of this equation to 14 GPa, using standard 18/11, 10/5 and 8/3 pressure cells. In the 18/11 and 10/5 assemblies with straight graphite and Re furnaces respectively, the upper half contained an alumina rod (enclosing thermocouple wires) surrounded by an MgO cylinder, while the lower half consisted of alumina tubing sandwiched between MgO cylinders. The 8/3 assembly (with a Re foil heater) consisted of an outer alumina cylinder filled with MgO. Spinel layer thicknesses were obtained from high-resolution X-ray maps of sectioned and polished run products using an electron probe. In the 18/11 assembly, at 6 GPa and 2123 K, axial T remains constant within 2 mm of the assembly center. From the edges of this 'hot spot' T decreases parabolically with distance. The radial gradient is small (on the order of 15 K over 0.5 mm distance from the center of the assembly). At 14 GPa in the 8/3 assembly the hot spot is close to 1 mm long. T gradients outside the hot spot are large: 2 mm from the assembly center T has decreased by around 175 K. At 14 GPa, spinel growth is significantly slower than expected from the Watson et al

  10. Temperature systematically modifies neural activity for sweet taste

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Temperature can modify neural and behavioral responses to taste stimuli that elicit “sweetness,” a perception linked to intake of calorie-laden foods. However, the role of temperature in the neural representation of sweet taste is poorly understood. Here we made electrophysiological recordings from gustatory neurons in the medulla of inbred mice to study how adjustments in taste solution temperature to cool (18°C), ambient (22°C), and warm (30°C and 37°C) values changed the magnitude and latency of gustatory activity to sucrose (0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.17, 0.31, and 0.56 M). Analysis of 22 sucrose-best neurons revealed that temperature markedly influenced responses to sucrose, which, across concentrations, were largest when solutions were warmed to 30°C. However, reducing solution temperature from warm to ambient to cool progressively steepened the slope of the sucrose concentration-response function computed across cells (P < 0.05), indicating that mean activity to sucrose increased more rapidly with concentration steps under cooling than with warming. Thus the slope of the sucrose concentration-response function shows an inverse relation with temperature. Temperature also influenced latency to the first spike of the sucrose response. Across neurons, latencies were shorter when sucrose solutions were warmed and longer, by hundreds of milliseconds, when solutions were cooled (P < 0.05), indicating that temperature is also a temporal parameter of sucrose activity. Our findings reveal that temperature systematically modifies the timing of gustatory activity to sucrose in the mammalian brain and how this activity changes with concentration. Results further highlight how oral somatosensory cues function as physiological modulators of gustatory processing. PMID:24966301

  11. Using Wind and Temperature Fields to Study Dehydration Mechanisms in the Tropical Tropopause Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, Jasna; Miller, Timothy; Robertson, Franklin

    2008-01-01

    The tropics are the main region for troposphere-to-stratosphere transport (TST) of air. One of the dominant mechanisms that control tropical TST of water vapor is freeze-drying by the cold tropical tropopause. This mechanism is supported by evidence from satellite observations of the "tape recorder", where seasonal changes in stratospheric water vapor are in phase with seasonal changes in tropopause temperatures in the tropics. Over the last few years, however, the concept of the tropical tropopause has evolved from a single material surface to a layer called the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). A recent hypothesis on dehydration mechanisms suggests that dehydration and entry point into the stratosphere are not always co-located (Holton and Gettelman, 2001). Instead, dehydration can occur during horizontal advection through Lagrangian 'cold pools', or coldest regions along a parcel's trajectory, as air ascends within the TTL while the entry point into the stratosphere occurs at a different geographical location. In this study, we investigate the impact that these Lagrangian cold pools have on TTL moisture. For this purpose, we use in situ measurements of TTL water vapor obtained aboard NASA's WB-57 aircraft over the Eastern Tropical Pacific, and we compare these measurements to minimum saturation water vapor mixing ratios obtained from three-dimensional backward trajectory calculations. Aircraft measurements show frequent unsaturated conditions, which suggest that the entry value of stratospheric water vapor in this region was not set by local saturation conditions. Trajectory calculations, driven by both ECMWF operational analysis and reanalysis winds and temperature fields, are used to explore the impact (e.g., geographical location, timing, dehydration magnitude) of the Lagrangian cold pools intercepted by the parcels sampled by the aircraft. We find noteworthy differences in the location of the Lagrangian cold pools using the two ECMWF data sets, namely

  12. Temperature and illumination intensity dependence of photoconductivity in sputter-deposited heteroepitaxial (100)CdTe layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. R.; Cook, J. G.; Mukherjee, G.

    1991-06-01

    The photoconductivity behavior and the Hall-effect of sputter-deposited heteroepitaxial (100)CdTe layers grown at temperatures between 300 and 325 C were investigated. The (100)CdTe epilayers were found to be highly photoconductive and exhibited photoconductivity/dark conductivity ratios as high as 1 x 10 to the 6th at around 200 K. Photoconductivity showed a sublinear dependence on the illumination intensity and was higher at higher temperatures. It is shown that the model of Simmons and Taylor (1974) developed to explain photoconductivity in amorphous semiconductors is also applicable to the (100)CdTe epitaxial layers.

  13. High-rate/high-temperature capability of a single-layer zicar-separator nickel-hydrogen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1995-01-01

    A 50 Ampere-hour nickel-hydrogen cell with a single-layer Zircar separator stack design was fully charged and then discharged at a 2C current rate to an end voltage of 1 volt. This extreme test resulted in high temperatures which were recorded at three locations on the cell, i.e., the cell wall, the boss (barrel of the compression seal), and a terminal. The results provide new information about the high-temperature and high-discharge-rate capabilities of nickel-hydrogen cells. This information also adds to the growing data base for single-layer zirconium-oxide-cloth (Zircar) separator cell designs.

  14. The Role of Organic Capping Layers of Platinum Nanoparticles in Catalytic Activity of CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeong Y.; Aliaga, Cesar; Renzas, J. Russell; Lee, Hyunjoo; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-12-17

    We report the catalytic activity of colloid platinum nanoparticles synthesized with different organic capping layers. On the molecular scale, the porous organic layers have open spaces that permit the reactant and product molecules to reach the metal surface. We carried out CO oxidation on several platinum nanoparticle systems capped with various organic molecules to investigate the role of the capping agent on catalytic activity. Platinum colloid nanoparticles with four types of capping layer have been used: TTAB (Tetradecyltrimethylammonium Bromide), HDA (hexadecylamine), HDT (hexadecylthiol), and PVP (poly(vinylpyrrolidone)). The reactivity of the Pt nanoparticles varied by 30%, with higher activity on TTAB coated nanoparticles and lower activity on HDT, while the activation energy remained between 27-28 kcal/mol. In separate experiments, the organic capping layers were partially removed using ultraviolet light-ozone generation techniques, which resulted in increased catalytic activity due to the removal of some of the organic layers. These results indicate that the nature of chemical bonding between organic capping layers and nanoparticle surfaces plays a role in determining the catalytic activity of platinum colloid nanoparticles for carbon monoxide oxidation.

  15. Wetting layer evolution and its temperature dependence during self-assembly of InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    For InAs/GaAs(001) quantum dot (QD) system, the wetting layer (WL) evolution and its temperature dependence were studied using reflectance difference spectroscopy and were analyzed with a rate equation model. WL thicknesses showed a monotonic increase at relatively low growth temperatures but showed an initial increase and then decrease at higher temperatures, which were unexpected from a thermodynamic understanding. By adopting a rate equation model, the temperature dependence of QD formation rate was assigned as the origin of different WL evolutions. A brief discussion on the indium desorption was given. Those results gave hints of the kinetic aspects of QD self-assembly. PMID:23110846

  16. Application of Satellite SAR Imagery in Mapping the Active Layer of Arctic Permafrost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Shu-Sun; Romanovsky, V.; Lovick, Joe; Wang, Z.; Peterson, Rorik

    2003-01-01

    A method of mapping the active layer of Arctic permafrost using a combination of conventional synthetic aperture radar (SAR) backscatter and more sophisticated interferometric SAR (INSAR) techniques is proposed. The proposed research is based on the sensitivity of radar backscatter to the freeze and thaw status of the surface soil, and the sensitivity of INSAR techniques to centimeter- to sub-centimeter-level surface differential deformation. The former capability of SAR is investigated for deriving the timing and duration of the thaw period for surface soil of the active layer over permafrost. The latter is investigated for the feasibility of quantitative measurement of frost heaving and thaw settlement of the active layer during the freezing and thawing processes. The resulting knowledge contributes to remote sensing mapping of the active layer dynamics and Arctic land surface hydrology.

  17. Improvement of performance in low temperature solid oxide fuel cells operated on ethanol and air mixtures using Cu-ZnO-Al2O3 catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, M.; Espiell, F.; Segarra, M.

    2015-10-01

    Anode-supported single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells with and without Cu-ZnO-Al2O3 catalyst layers deposited on the anode support have been operated on ethanol and air mixtures. The cells consist of gadolinia-doped ceria electrolyte, Ni-doped ceria anode, and La0.6Sr0.4CoO3-δ-doped ceria cathode. Catalyst layers with different Cu-ZnO-Al2O3 ratios are deposited and sintered at several temperatures. Since the performance of single-chamber fuel cells strongly depends on catalytic properties of electrodes for partial oxidation of ethanol, the cells are electrochemically characterized as a function of the temperature, ethanol-air molar ratio and gas flow rate. In addition, catalytic activities of supported anode, catalytic layer-supported anode and cathode for partial oxidation of ethanol are analysed. Afterwards, the effect of composition and sintering temperature of catalyst layer on the cell performance are determined. The results indicate that the cell performance can be significantly enhanced using catalyst layers of 30:35:35 and 40:30:30 wt.% Cu-ZnO-Al2O3 sintered at 1100 °C, achieving power densities above 50 mW cm-2 under 0.45 ethanol-air ratio at temperatures as low as 450 °C. After testing for 15 h, all cells present a gradual loss of power density, without carbon deposition, which is mainly attributed to the partial re-oxidation of Ni at the anode.

  18. The effect of the annealing temperature on the transition from conductor to semiconductor behavior in zinc tin oxide deposited atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Byung Du; Choi, Dong-won Choi, Changhwan; Park, Jin-Seong

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the electrical properties of zinc tin oxide (ZTO) films deposited via atomic layer deposition and compared them to ZnO and SnO{sub 2} films as a function of the annealing temperature. The ZTO and ZnO, except for SnO{sub 2}, films exhibited an electrical transition from a metal to semiconductor characteristics when annealed above 300 °C. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses indicate that the relative area of the oxygen vacancy-related peak decreased from 58% to 41% when annealing at temperatures above 400 °C. Thin film transistors incorporating ZTO active layers demonstrated a mobility of 13.2 cm{sup 2}/V s and a negative bias instability of −0.2 V.

  19. Quantifying contributions to the recent temperature variability in the tropical tropopause layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Matthes, K.; Schmidt, T.

    2014-08-01

    The recently observed variability in the tropical tropopause layer, which features an unexpected warming of 1.1 K over the past decade (2001-2011), is investigated with a number of sensitivity experiments from simulations with NCAR's CESM-WACCM chemistry climate model. The experiments have been designed to specifically quantify the contributions from natural as well as anthropogenic factors, such as solar variability (Solar), sea surface temperatures (SSTs), the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO), stratospheric aerosols (Aerosol), greenhouse gases (GHGs), as well as the dependence on the vertical resolution in the model. The results show that, in the TTL: a cooling in tropical SSTs leads to a weakening of tropical upwelling around the tropical tropopause and hence relative downwelling and adiabatic warming of 0.3 K decade-1; an increased QBO amplitude results in a 0.3 K decade-1 warming; increasing aerosols in the lower stratosphere lead to a 0.4 K decade-1 warming; a prolonged solar minimum and increased GHGs contribute about 0.2 and 0.1 K decade-1 to a cooling, respectively. Two simulations with different vertical resolution show that the vertical resolution can strongly influence the response of the TTL temperature to changes such as SSTs. With higher vertical resolution, an extra 0.6 K decade-1 warming can be simulated through the last decade, compared with results from the "standard" low vertical resolution simulation. Considering all the factors mentioned above, we compute a net 1.3 K decade-1 warming, which is in very good agreement with the observed 1.1 K decade-1 warming over the past decade in the TTL. The model results indicate that the recent warming in the TTL is mainly due to internal variability, i.e. the QBO and tropical SSTs.

  20. Quantifying contributions to the recent temperature variability in the tropical tropopause layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Matthes, K.; Schmidt, T.

    2015-05-01

    The recently observed variability in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), which features a warming of 0.9 K over the past decade (2001-2011), is investigated with a number of sensitivity experiments from simulations with NCAR's CESM-WACCM chemistry-climate model. The experiments have been designed to specifically quantify the contributions from natural as well as anthropogenic factors, such as solar variability (Solar), sea surface temperatures (SSTs), the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), stratospheric aerosols (Aerosol), greenhouse gases (GHGs) and the dependence on the vertical resolution in the model. The results show that, in the TTL from 2001 through 2011, a cooling in tropical SSTs leads to a weakening of tropical upwelling around the tropical tropopause and hence relative downwelling and adiabatic warming of 0.3 K decade-1; stronger QBO westerlies result in a 0.2 K decade-1 warming; increasing aerosols in the lower stratosphere lead to a 0.2 K decade-1 warming; a prolonged solar minimum contributes about 0.2 K decade-1 to a cooling; and increased GHGs have no significant influence. Considering all the factors mentioned above, we compute a net 0.5 K decade-1 warming, which is less than the observed 0.9 K decade-1 warming over the past decade in the TTL. Two simulations with different vertical resolution show that, with higher vertical resolution, an extra 0.8 K decade-1 warming can be simulated through the last decade compared with results from the "standard" low vertical resolution simulation. Model results indicate that the recent warming in the TTL is partly caused by stratospheric aerosols and mainly due to internal variability, i.e. the QBO and tropical SSTs. The vertical resolution can also strongly influence the TTL temperature response in addition to variability in the QBO and SSTs.

  1. Study of near scrape-off layer (SOL) temperature and density gradient lengths with Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H. J.; Wolfrum, E.; Eich, T.; Kurzan, B.; Potzel, S.; Stroth, U.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2015-12-01

    Improvements to the Thomson scattering diagnostic have enabled the study of near scrape-off layer (SOL) decay lengths in the 2014 ASDEX Upgrade experimental campaign. A database of H-mode discharges has been studied using a two-line fit method for the core and log-linear fit for the near SOL region under both attached and detached divertor conditions. SOL electron temperature {{T}e} profiles have been found to have a radial exponential decay distribution which does not vary poloidally, consistent with the two-point model. In attached H-mode regimes, a log-linear regression shows that the SOL upstream dataset has the same main parametric dependencies as the scaling inferred from downstream Infrared camera measurements. A simple collisional relation from two-point model is found to best relate the upstream decay lengths and downstream divertor power widths. The SOL {{T}e} gradient length appears to be independent of {{T}e} pedestal parameters, but may correlate with the pedestal electron pressure parameters. Both the pedestal and SOL density and temperature scale lengths are linearly correlated with an almost constant gradient ratio, {ηe} . The smaller gradient ratio {ηe} and the fact that the Spitzer-Härm model is more valid, agrees with the studied plasma lying in the collisional regime. A transition to flat SOL ne profiles, previously reported for L-mode plasmas in many machines, has been observed in AUG detatched H-mode regimes. When the flattening of density profile happens in H-mode detached plasmas, the broadening of near SOL {{T}e} decay length {λ{{Te,u}}} also appears which may be good news for future machines.

  2. Geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppälä, A.; Randall, C. E.; Clilverd, M. A.; Rozanov, E.; Rodger, C. J.

    2009-10-01

    Here we use the ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature data sets from 1957 to 2006 to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the A p index. Previous modeling work has suggested that NO x produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in surface air temperatures (SATs). We find that during winter months, polar SATs in years with high A p index are different than in years with low A p index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, depending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings (SSWs) are excluded. We take into account solar irradiance variations, unlike previous analyses of geomagnetic effects in ERA-40 and operational data. Although we cannot conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating wintertime surface air temperatures. We tested our SAT results against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation, the El Niño Southern Oscillation and the Southern Annular Mode. The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode, and we cannot robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature variability and geomagnetic activity.

  3. Thermal Controls on the South Asian Monsoon through Boundary Layer Equivalent Potential Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, D.; Kuang, Z.; Boos, W.

    2012-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) was previously considered as an elevated heat source that drives the large-scale boreal summer South Asian monsoon (SAM). Recent studies suggested the Himalayas alone can produce strong SAM by insulating warm and moist air south of the Himalayas from extratropical air. Almost all of these studies, however, used fairly coarse resolution models that barely resolve the Himalayan mountain range. Here we used the high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting model to conduct a series of integrations exploring the thermal controls on SAM. Our results confirmed the recent studies, and show that SAM weakens as the height of the Himalayas decreases. We also conducted simulations with surface heat flux perturbations in different areas. It is shown that the strength of SAM, indicated by the Webster and Yang Index (WYI), is highly correlated with the boundary layer equivalent potential temperature (θeb) south of the Himalayas, collocated with the θeb maxima. The results are interpreted under convective quasi-equilibrium: surface heat flux contributes to θeb, and WYI is determined by the θeb maxima. We also assessed the relative importance of surface heat flux perturbations in different parts of South Asia.; JJA θeb. Black contours denote the elevation with intervals of 1500m. Dotted contour shows the coastline. ; Correlation coefficient between the WYI and θeb (significance level 0.05).

  4. Wind and Temperature Oscillations Generated by Wave-Turbulence Interactions in the Stably Stratified Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jielun; Mahrt, Larry; Nappo, Carmen; Lenschow, Donald

    2015-04-01

    We investigate atmospheric internal gravity waves (IGWs): their generation and induction of global intermittent turbulence in the nocturnal stable atmospheric boundary layer based on the new concept of turbulence generation discussed in Sun et al. (2012). The IGWs are generated by air lifted by convergence forced by the colliding background flow and cold currents near the ground. The buoyancy-forced IGWs enhance wind speed at the wind-speed wave crests such that the bulk shear instability generates large coherent eddies, which augment local turbulent mixing and vertically redistribute momentum and heat. The periodically enhanced turbulent mixing, in turn, modifies the air temperature and flow oscillations of the original IGWs. These turbulence-forced oscillations (TFOs) resemble waves and coherently transport momentum and sensible heat. The observed momentum and sensible heat fluxes at the IGW frequency, which are either due to the buoyancy-forced IGWs themselves or by the TFOs, are larger than turbulent fluxes near the surface. The IGWs enhance not only the bulk shear at the wave crests, but also local shear over the wind speed troughs of the surface IGWs. Temporal and spatial variations of turbulent mixing as a result of this wave-induced turbulent mixing change the mean air flow and the shape of the IGWs.

  5. An elevated temperature study of a Ti adhesion layer on polyimide

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A.A.; Cordill, M.J.; Bowles, L.; Schalko, J.; Dehm, G.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium layers are used to promote adhesion between polymer substrates for flexible electronics and the Cu or Au conducting lines. Good adhesion of conducting lines in flexible circuits is critical in improving circuit performance and increasingcircuit lifetime. Nominally 50 nm thick Ti films on polyimide (PI) are investigated by fragmentation testing under uniaxial tensile load in the as-deposited state, at 350 °C, and after annealing. The cracking and buckling of the films show clear differences between the as-deposited and the thermally treated samples, cracks are much straighter and buckles are smaller following heat treatment. These changes are correlated to a drop in adhesion of the samples following heat treatment. Adhesion values are determined from the buckle dimensions using a total energy approach as described in the work of Cordill et al. (Acta Mater. 2010). Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of the Ti/PI interface found evidence of a ~ 5 nm thick interlayer between the largely columnar Ti and the amorphous PI. This interlayer is amorphous in the as-deposited state but nano-crystalline in those coatings tested at elevated temperature or annealed. It is put forward that this alteration of the interfacial structure causes the reduced adhesion. PMID:23525510

  6. Highly efficient low color temperature organic LED using blend carrier modulation layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yao-Ching; Chen, Szu-Hao; Shen, Shih-Ming; Wang, Ching-Chiun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Jou, Jwo-Huei

    2012-10-01

    Color temperature (CT) of light has great effect on human physiology and psychology, and low CT light, minimizing melatonin suppression and decreasing the risk of breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. We demonstrates the incorporation of a blend carrier modulation interlayer (CML) between emissive layers to improve the device performance of low CT organic light emitting diodes, which exhibits an external quantum efficiency of 22.7% and 36 lm W-1 (54 cd A-1) with 1880 K at 100 cd m-2, or 20.8% and 29 lm W-1 (50 cd A-1) with 1940 K at 1000 cd m-2. The result shows a CT much lower than that of incandescent bulbs, which is 2500 K with 15 lmW-1 efficiency, and even as low as that of candles, which is 2000 K with 0.1 lmW-1. The high efficiency of the proposed device may be attributed to its CML, which helps effectively distribute the entering carriers into the available recombination zones.

  7. Processes of interannual mixed layer temperature variability in the thermocline ridge of the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen Kumar, B.; Vialard, J.; Lengaigne, M.; Murty, V. S. N.; Foltz, G. R.; McPhaden, M. J.; Pous, S.; de Boyer Montégut, C.

    2014-11-01

    Sea-surface temperature interannual anomalies (SSTAs) in the thermocline ridge of the southwestern tropical Indian Ocean (TRIO) have several well-documented climate impacts. In this paper, we explore the physical processes responsible for SSTA evolution in the TRIO region using a combination of observational estimates and model-derived surface layer heat budget analyses. Vertical oceanic processes contribute most to SSTA variance from December to June, while lateral advection dominates from July to November. Atmospheric fluxes generally damp SSTA generation in the TRIO region. As a result of the phase opposition between the seasonal cycle of vertical processes and lateral advection, there is no obvious peak in SSTA amplitude in boreal winter, as previously noted for heat content anomalies. Positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events and the remote influence of El Niño induce comparable warming over the TRIO region, though IOD signals peak earlier (November-December) than those associated with El Niño (around March-May). Mechanisms controlling the SSTA growth in the TRIO region induced by these two climate modes differ strongly. While SSTA growth for the IOD mostly results from southward advection of warmer water, increased surface shortwave flux dominates the El Niño SSTA growth. In both cases, vertical oceanic processes do not contribute strongly to the initial SSTA growth, but rather maintain the SSTA by opposing the effect of atmospheric negative feedbacks during the decaying phase.

  8. Field portable low temperature porous layer open tubular cryoadsorption headspace sampling and analysis part II: Applications.

    PubMed

    Harries, Megan; Bukovsky-Reyes, Santiago; Bruno, Thomas J

    2016-01-15

    This paper details the sampling methods used with the field portable porous layer open tubular cryoadsorption (PLOT-cryo) approach, described in Part I of this two-part series, applied to several analytes of interest. We conducted tests with coumarin and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (two solutes that were used in initial development of PLOT-cryo technology), naphthalene, aviation turbine kerosene, and diesel fuel, on a variety of matrices and test beds. We demonstrated that these analytes can be easily detected and reliably identified using the portable unit for analyte collection. By leveraging efficiency-boosting temperature control and the high flow rate multiple capillary wafer, very short collection times (as low as 3s) yielded accurate detection. For diesel fuel spiked on glass beads, we determined a method detection limit below 1 ppm. We observed greater variability among separate samples analyzed with the portable unit than previously documented in work using the laboratory-based PLOT-cryo technology. We identify three likely sources that may help explain the additional variation: the use of a compressed air source to generate suction, matrix geometry, and variability in the local vapor concentration around the sampling probe as solute depletion occurs both locally around the probe and in the test bed as a whole. This field-portable adaptation of the PLOT-cryo approach has numerous and diverse potential applications. PMID:26726934

  9. Layered structure of room-temperature ionic liquids in microemulsions by multinuclear NMR spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Falcone, R Dario; Baruah, Bharat; Gaidamauskas, Ernestas; Rithner, Christopher D; Correa, N Mariano; Silber, Juana J; Crans, Debbie C; Levinger, Nancy E

    2011-06-01

    Microemulsions form in mixtures of polar, nonpolar, and amphiphilic molecules. Typical microemulsions employ water as the polar phase. However, microemulsions can form with a polar phase other than water, which hold promise to diversify the range of properties, and hence utility, of microemulsions. Here microemulsions formed by using a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) as the polar phase were created and characterized by using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. (1)H, (11)B, and (19)F NMR spectroscopy was applied to explore differences between microemulsions formed by using 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim][BF(4)]) as the polar phase with a cationic surfactant, benzylhexadecyldimethylammonium chloride (BHDC), and a nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100 (TX-100). NMR spectroscopy showed distinct differences in the behavior of the RTIL as the charge of the surfactant head group varies in the different microemulsion environments. Minor changes in the chemical shifts were observed for [bmim](+) and [BF(4)](-) in the presence of TX-100 suggesting that the surfactant and the ionic liquid are separated in the microemulsion. The large changes in spectroscopic parameters observed are consistent with microstructure formation with layering of [bmim](+) and [BF(4)](-) and migration of Cl(-) within the BHDC microemulsions. Comparisons with NMR results for related ionic compounds in organic and aqueous environments as well as literature studies assisted the development of a simple organizational model for these microstructures. PMID:21547960

  10. Thermal processes within the active layer of the rock glacier Murtèl-Corvatsch, Upper Engadin, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panz, Melanie; Hoelzle, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Coarse debris is a characteristic ground material in high alpine environments. The special thermal properties of this ground material favour the existence of permafrost. However, the most important processes explaining the common thermal anomaly found within these materials are still not yet fully understood. Many different approaches try to explain these processes. The most common explanation is the heat transfer between atmosphere and ground, driven by heat convection in autumn and winter and stable stratification of the interstitial air in summer. These processes could be shown at the investigated site in an earlier study (Hanson and Hoelzle 2005). On the contrary, Gruber and Hoelzle (2008) tried to explain the observed measurements independent of convective processes, only based on model calculations, which were based on the interaction between winter snow cover and the very low thermal conductivity of the coarse debris layer. In the present study, we took the ground surface temperature data from the uppermost 90 cm of the active layer of the rock glacier Murtèl-Corvatsch in combination with meteorological data, such as air temperature, snow depth and radiation to analyze the dominant heat transfer mechanisms during the different seasons. The main focus was to assess the contribution of convective processes. The potential for free convection was estimated using the Rayleigh number. In addition, the air circulation within the uppermost active layer measured by three wind sensors was taken into consideration. These data were compared with the other climate variables of the nearby meteorological station. After analyzing the data, it can be concluded that the potential for free convection in the cavities of the upper blocky layer is high as soon as the stable thermal stratification during the summer month gets instable due to a cooling of the surface. Especially in the autumn and early winter months a strong ground cooling could be observed caused by the low air

  11. Lidar measurements of the atmospheric entrainment zone and the potential temperature jump across the top of the mixed layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, R.; Eloranta, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    Lidar data of the atmospheric entrainment zone from six days of clear air convection obtained in central Illinois during July 1979 are presented. A new method to measure the potential temperature jump across the entrainment zone based on only one temperature sounding and continuous lidar measurements of the mixed layer height is developed. An almost linear dependence is found between the normalized entrainment rate and the normalized thickness of the entrainment zone.

  12. Room temperature active regenerative magnetic refrigeration: Magnetic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shir, Farhad; Yanik, Levent; Bennett, Lawrence H.; Della Torre, Edward; Shull, Robert D.

    2003-05-01

    Nanocomposites have several advantages as a refrigerant for 100-300 K applications compared to the other common methods of assembling a magnetic refrigeration bed, such as a layered thermal bed, or mixing of different magnetic materials. This article discusses the thermodynamics and heat transfer analysis of an ideal and real active magnetic regenerative refrigeration cycle. An algorithm for the choice of optimum parameters is derived.

  13. Highly sensitive multi-layer pressure sensor with an active nanostructured layer of an organic molecular metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laukhin, V.; Lebedev, V.; Laukhina, E.; Rovira, C.; Veciana, J.

    2016-03-01

    This work addresses to the modern technologies that need to be instrumented with lightweight highly sensitive pressure sensors. The paper presents the development of a new plain flexible thin pressure sensor using a nanostructured layer of the highly sensitive organic piezoresistive metal β-(BEDT-TTF)2I3 as an active component; BEDT-TTF=bis (ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene. The original construction approach permits one to operate the developed sensor on the principle of electrical resistance variations when its piezoresistive layer is elongated under a pressure increase. The pressure sensing element and a set of gold electrodes were integrated into one compact multi-layer design. The construction was optimized to enable one generic design for pressure ranges from 1 to 400 bar. The pressure tests showed that the sensor is able to control a small pressure change as a well definite electrical signal. So the developed type of the sensors is very attractive as a new generation of compact, lightweight, low-cost sensors that might monitor pressure with a good level of measurement accuracy.

  14. Effect of sintering temperatures and screen printing types on TiO2 layers in DSSC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supriyanto, Agus; Furqoni, Lutfi; Nurosyid, Fahru; Hidayat, Jojo; Suryana, Risa

    2016-03-01

    Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell (DSSC) is a candidate solar cell, which has a big potential in the future due to its eco-friendly material. This research is conducted to study the effect of sintering temperature and the type of screen-printing toward the characteristics of TiO2 layer as a working electrode in DSSC. TiO2 layers were fabricated using a screen-printing method with a mesh size of T-49, T-55, and T-61. TiO2 layers were sintered at temperatures of 600°C and 650°C for 60 min. DSSC structure was composed of TiO2 as semiconductors, ruthenium complex as dyes, and carbon as counter electrodes. The morphology of TiO2 layer was observed by using Nikon E2 Digital Camera Microscopy. The efficiencies of DSSC were calculated from the I-V curves. The highest efficiency is 0.015% at TiO2 layer fabricated with screen type T-61 and at a sintering temperature of 650°C.

  15. Crystallinity Modulation of Layered Carbon Nitride for Enhanced Photocatalytic Activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhai; Shen, Yanfei; Li, Ying; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2016-08-22

    As an emerging metal-free semiconductor, covalently bonded carbon nitride (CN) has attracted much attention in photocatalysis. However, drawbacks such as a high recombination rate of excited electrons and holes hinder its potential applications. Tailoring the crystallinity of semiconductors is an important way to suppress unwanted charge recombination, but has rarely been applied to CN so far. Herein, a simple method to synthesize CN of high crystallinity by protonation of specific intermediate species during conventional polymerization is reported. Interestingly, the as-obtained CN exhibited improved photocatalytic activities of up to seven times those of the conventional bulk CN. This approach, with only a slight change to the conventional method, provides a facile way to effectively regulate the crystallinity of bulk CN to improve its photocatalytic activities and sheds light on large-scale industrial applications of CN with high efficiency for sustainable energy. PMID:27436164

  16. Effect of low-temperature conditions on passive layer growth in Li intercalation materials: In situ impedance study

    SciTech Connect

    Barsoukov, E.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, J.H.; Yoon, C.O.; Lee, H.

    1998-08-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the formation of insulating layers at the surfaces of microscopic particles of mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB), graphite, and hard carbon during the first Li-intercalation into these materials at ambient temperature as well as at {minus}20 C. Investigations were carried out in a three-electrode sandwich cell, designed for impedance measurements in the frequency range 64 kHz to 5 mHz. The impedance spectra, obtained in the potential range 1.5 and 0.02 V during the first charge, were analyzed by complex nonlinear least square fits. A new model, taking into account the porous structure of the intercalation material, electrochemical processes at the interface, as well as spherical diffusion of Li ions toward the centers of the particles, has been used for this analysis. The first intercalation at {minus}20 C results in formation of an insulating layer, which is about 90 times thinner than in the room-temperature case, as concluded from an analysis of experimental results. The irreversible capacity loss, which is 1.3 times larger at {minus}20 C that at room temperature, is ascribed to the formation of a porous precipitate of electrolyte decomposition products on the particle surface. Additional Li intercalation at room temperature results in an irreversible capacity loss of 26% from the initial value, and formation of a composite layer, including low-temperature and room-temperature deposited components.

  17. In-plane and through-plane local and average Nusselt numbers in fibrous porous materials with different fiber layer temperatures: Gas diffusion layers for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghifar, Hamidreza

    2016-09-01

    Convective heat transfer inside fibrous gas diffusion layers (GDLs) noticeably impacts the heat and water management of air-cooled polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Cutting-edge experiments have recently proved that convective heat transfer inside fibrous GDLs increases their thermal resistances considerably. However, heat transfer coefficients are difficult to measure experimentally or compute numerically for the millions of the tiny pores inside microstructural GDLs. The present study provides robust analytic models for predicting the heat transfer coefficient for both through-plane and in-plane flows inside fibrous media such as GDLs. The model is based on the unit cell approach and the integral method. Closed-form formulas are developed for local and average heat transfer coefficients. The model considers the temperature variations of the fiber layers along the medium thickness while assuming the same temperature for all the fibers in each layer. The model is well verified by COMSOL numerical data for a few pores inside a GDL. The simple, closed-form easy-to-use formulas developed in this study can be readily employed for predicting Nusselt number inside multilayer fibrous porous materials.

  18. Variability of OH rotational temperatures on time scales from hours to 15 years by kinetic temperature variations, emission layer changes, and non-LTE effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Rotational temperatures derived from hydroxyl (OH) line emission are frequently used to study atmospheric temperatures at altitudes of about 87 km. While the measurement only requires intensities of a few bright lines of an OH band, the interpretation can be complicated. Ground-based temperatures are averages for the entire, typically 8 km wide emission layer. Variations in the rotational temperature are then caused by changes of the kinetic temperature and the OH emission profile. The latter can also be accompanied by differences in the layer-averaged efficiency of the thermalisation of the OH rotational level populations. Since this especially depends on the frequency of collisions with O_2, which is low at high altitudes, the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) contribution to the measured temperatures can be significant and variable. In order to understand the impact of the different sources of OH rotational temperature variations from time scales of hours to a solar cycle, we have studied spectra from the astronomical echelle spectrographs X-shooter and UVES located at Cerro Paranal in Chile. While the X-shooter data spanning 3.5 years allowed us to measure temperatures for 25 OH and two O_2 bands, the UVES spectra cover no more than 10 OH bands simultaneously but a period of about 15 years. These data have been complemented by kinetic temperature and OH and O_2 emission profiles from the multi-channel radiometer SABER on the TIMED satellite. Taking the O_2 and SABER kinetic temperatures as reference and considering the different band-dependent emission profiles, we could evaluate the contribution of non-LTE effects to the measured OH rotational temperatures depending on line set, band, and time. Non-LTE contributions are significant for most bands and can exceed 10 K. The amplitudes of their average nocturnal and seasonal variation are of the order of 1 to 2 K.

  19. INTRAPULPAL TEMPERATURE VARIATION DURING BLEACHING WITH VARIOUS ACTIVATION MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Michida, Sílvia Masae de Araujo; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Marimoto, Ângela Regina Kimie; Garakis, Márcia Carneiro Valera; de Araújo, Maria Amélia Máximo

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intrapulpal temperature variation after bleaching treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide using different sources of activation. Material and Methods: Twenty-four human teeth were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction providing 48 specimens, and were divided into 4 groups (n=12): (G1) Control - Bleaching gel without light activation, (G2) Bleaching gel + halogen light, (G3) Bleaching gel + LED, (G4) Bleaching gel + Nd:YAG Laser. The temperatures were recorded using a digital thermometer at 4 time points: before bleaching gel application, 1 min after bleaching gel application, during activation of the bleaching gel, and after the bleaching agent turned from a dark-red into a clear gel. Data were analyzed statistically by the Dunnet's test, ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results: The mean intrapulpal temperature values (°C) in the groups were: G1: 0.617 ± 0.41; G2: 1.800 ± 0.68; G3: 0.975 ± 0.51; and G4: 4.325 ± 1.09. The mean maximum temperature variation (MTV) values were: 1.5°C (G1), 2.9°C (G2), 1.7°C (G3) and 6.9°C (G4). When comparing the experimental groups to the control group, G3 was not statistically different from G1 (p>0.05), but G2 and G4 presented significantly higher (p<0.05) intrapulpal temperatures and MTV. The three experimental groups differed significantly (p<0.05) from each other. Conclusions: The Nd:YAG laser was the activation method that presented the highest values of intrapulpal temperature variation when compared with LED and halogen light. The group activated by LED light presented the lowest values of temperature variation, which were similar to that of the control group. PMID:19936522

  20. Ion acoustic solitary waves and double layers in a plasma with two temperature electrons featuring Tsallis distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Shalini, Saini, N. S.

    2014-10-15

    The propagation properties of large amplitude ion acoustic solitary waves (IASWs) are studied in a plasma containing cold fluid ions and multi-temperature electrons (cool and hot electrons) with nonextensive distribution. Employing Sagdeev pseudopotential method, an energy balance equation has been derived and from the expression for Sagdeev potential function, ion acoustic solitary waves and double layers are investigated numerically. The Mach number (lower and upper limits) for the existence of solitary structures is determined. Positive as well as negative polarity solitary structures are observed. Further, conditions for the existence of ion acoustic double layers (IADLs) are also determined numerically in the form of the critical values of q{sub c}, f and the Mach number (M). It is observed that the nonextensivity of electrons (via q{sub c,h}), concentration of electrons (via f) and temperature ratio of cold to hot electrons (via β) significantly influence the characteristics of ion acoustic solitary waves as well as double layers.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Electric Transport in Few-layer Graphene under Large Charge Doping Induced by Electrochemical Gating

    PubMed Central

    Gonnelli, R. S.; Paolucci, F.; Piatti, E.; Sharda, Kanudha; Sola, A.; Tortello, M.; Nair, Jijeesh R.; Gerbaldi, C.; Bruna, M.; Borini, S.

    2015-01-01

    The temperature dependence of electric transport properties of single-layer and few-layer graphene at large charge doping is of great interest both for the study of the scattering processes dominating the conductivity at different temperatures and in view of the theoretically predicted possibility to reach the superconducting state in such extreme conditions. Here we present the results obtained in 3-, 4- and 5-layer graphene devices down to 3.5 K, where a large surface charge density up to about 6.8·1014 cm−2 has been reached by employing a novel polymer electrolyte solution for the electrochemical gating. In contrast with recent results obtained in single-layer graphene, the temperature dependence of the sheet resistance between 20 K and 280 K shows a low-temperature dominance of a T2 component – that can be associated with electron-electron scattering – and, at about 100 K, a crossover to the classic electron-phonon regime. Unexpectedly, this crossover does not show any dependence on the induced charge density, i.e. on the large tuning of the Fermi energy. PMID:25906088

  2. Contribution of S-Layer Proteins to the Mosquitocidal Activity of Lysinibacillus sphaericus

    PubMed Central

    Allievi, Mariana Claudia; Palomino, María Mercedes; Prado Acosta, Mariano; Lanati, Leonardo; Ruzal, Sandra Mónica; Sánchez-Rivas, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Lysinibacillus sphaericus strains belonging the antigenic group H5a5b produce spores with larvicidal activity against larvae of Culex mosquitoes. C7, a new isolated strain, which presents similar biochemical characteristics and Bin toxins in their spores as the reference strain 2362, was, however, more active against larvae of Culex mosquitoes. The contribution of the surface layer protein (S-layer) to this behaviour was envisaged since this envelope protein has been implicated in the pathogenicity of several bacilli, and we had previously reported its association to spores. Microscopic observation by immunofluorescence detection with anti S-layer antibody in the spores confirms their attachment. S-layers and BinA and BinB toxins formed high molecular weight multimers in spores as shown by SDS-PAGE and western blot detection. Purified S-layer from both L. sphaericus C7 and 2362 strain cultures was by itself toxic against Culex sp larvae, however, that from C7 strain was also toxic against Aedes aegypti. Synergistic effect between purified S-layer and spore-crystal preparations was observed against Culex sp. and Aedes aegypti larvae. This effect was more evident with the C7 strain. In silico analyses of the S-layer sequence suggest the presence of chitin-binding and hemolytic domains. Both biochemical characteristics were detected for both S-layers strains that must justify their contribution to pathogenicity. PMID:25354162

  3. Threading dislocation reduction in a GaN film with a buffer layer grown at an intermediate temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Youngji; Chang, Jiho; Ha, Joonseok; Lee, Hyun-jae; Fujii, Katsushi; Yao, Takafumi; Lee, Woong; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Yang, Jun-Mo; Yoo, Jungho

    2015-01-01

    Remarkable reduction of the threading dislocation (TD) density has been achieved by inserting a GaN layer grown at an intermediate temperature (900 °C) (IT-GaN layer), just prior to the growth of GaN at 1040 °C by using a hydride vapor phase epitaxy. The variation in the dislocation density variation along the growth direction was observed by using cathodoluminescence (CL) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A cross-sectional CL image revealed that the reduction of the TD density happened during the growth of IT-GaN layer. The TEM measurement provided the proof that the TD reduction could be ascribed to the masking of the TD by stacking faults in the IT-GaN layer.

  4. Elliptically Bent X-ray Mirrors with Active Temperature Stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng; Church, Matthew; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; McKinney, Wayne R.; Kirschman, Jonathan; Morrison, Greg; Noll, Tino; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-01-31

    We present details of design of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors developed and successfully used at the Advanced Light Source for submicron focusing. A distinctive feature of the mirror design is an active temperature stabilization based on a Peltier element attached directly to the mirror body. The design and materials have been carefully optimized to provide high heat conductance between the mirror body and substrate. We describe the experimental procedures used when assembling and precisely shaping the mirrors, with special attention paid to laboratory testing of the mirror-temperature stabilization. For this purpose, the temperature dependence of the surface slope profile of a specially fabricated test mirror placed inside a temperature-controlled container was measured. We demonstrate that with active mirror-temperature stabilization, a change of the surrounding temperature by more than 3K does not noticeably affect the mirror figure. Without temperature stabilization, the surface slope changes by approximately 1.5 ?mu rad rms (primarily defocus) under the same conditions.

  5. Active layer thermal monitoring of a Dry Valley of the Ellsworth Mountains, Continental Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto; Michel, Roberto; Souza, Karoline; Senra, Eduardo; Bremer, Ulisses

    2015-04-01

    The Ellsworth Mountains occur along the southern edge of the Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf and are subdivided by the Minnesota Glacier into the Heritage Range to the east and the Sentinel Range to the West. The climate of the Ellsworth Mountains is strongly controlled by proximity to the Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf and elevation. The mean annual air temperature at the 1,000 m level is estimated to be -25°C, and the average annual accumulation of water-equivalent precipitation likely ranges from 150 to 175 mm yr-1 (Weyant, 1966). The entire area is underlain by continuous permafrost of unknown thickness. Based on data collected from 22 pits, 41% of the sites contained dry permafrost below 70 cm, 27% had ice-cemented permafrost within 70 cm of the surface, 27% had bedrock within 70 cm, and 5% contained an ice-core (Bockheim, unpublished; Schaefer et al., 2015). Dry-frozen permafrost, which may be unique to Antarctica, appears to form from sublimation of moisture in ice-cemented permafrost over time. Active-layer depths in drift sheets of the Ellsworth Mountains range from 15 to 50 cm (Bockheim, unpublished); our understanding of Antarctic permafrost is poor, especially at the continent. The active layer monitoring sites were installed at Edson Hills, Ellsworth_Mountains, in the summer of 2012, and consist of thermistors (accuracy ± 0.2 °C) installed at 1 m above ground for air temperature measurements at two soil profiles on quartzite drift deposits, arranged in a vertical array (Lithic Haplorthel 886 m asl, 5 cm, 10 cm, 30 cm and Lithic Anyorthel 850 m asl, 5 cm, 10 cm, 30 cm). All probes were connected to a Campbell Scientific CR 1000 data logger recording data at hourly intervals from January 2nd 2012 until December 29th 2013. We calculated the thawing days (TD), freezing days (FD); isothermal days (ID), freeze thaw days (FTD), thawing degree days (TDD) and freezing degree days (FDD); all according to Guglielmin et al. (2008). Temperature at 5 cm reaches a maximum

  6. Low temperature activation of Au/Ti getter film for application to wafer-level vacuum packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming; Moulin, Johan; Lani, Sébastien; Hallais, Géraldine; Renard, Charles; Bosseboeuf, Alain

    2015-03-01

    Non-evaporable getter (NEG) thin films based on alloys of transition metals have been studied by various authors for vacuum control in wafer-level packages of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS). These materials have typically a relatively high activation temperature (300-450 °C) which is incompatible with some temperature sensitive MEMS devices. In this work we investigate the potential of Au/Ti system with a thin or ultrathin non oxidizable Au layer as a low activation temperature getter material. In this bilayer system, gettering activation is produced by thermal outdiffusion of titanium atoms through the gold film. The outdiffusion kinetics of titanium was modelled and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) at various temperatures. Results confirm that Au/Ti bilayer is a promising getter material for wafer-level packaging with an activation temperature below 300 °C for 1 h annealing time.

  7. Highly transparent low resistance Ga doped ZnO/Cu grid double layers prepared at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Cholho; Zhizhen, Ye; Jianguo, Lü

    2015-12-01

    Ga doped ZnO (GZO)/Cu grid double layer structures were prepared at room temperature (RT). We have studied the electrical and optical characteristics of the GZO/Cu grid double layer as a function of the Cu grid spacing distance. The optical transmittance and sheet resistance of the GZO/Cu grid double layer are higher than that of the GZO/Cu film double layer regardless of the Cu grid spacing distance and increase as the Cu grid spacing distance increases. The calculated values for the transmittance and sheet resistance of the GZO/Cu grid double layer well follow the trend of the experimentally observed transmittance and sheet resistance ones. For the GZO/Cu grid double layer with a Cu grid spacing distance of 1 mm, the highest figure of merit (ΦTC = 6.19 × 10-3 Ω-1) was obtained. In this case, the transmittance, resistivity and filling factor (FF) of the GZO/Cu grid double layer are 83.74%, 1.10 × 10-4 Ω·cm and 0.173, respectively. Project supported by the Key Project of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 91333203), the Program for Innovative Research Team in University of Ministry of Education of China (No. IRT13037), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51172204), and the Zhejiang Provincial Department of Science and Technology of China (No. 2010R50020).

  8. Electrodeposited Ag-Stabilization Layer for High Temperature Superconducting Coated Conductors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, R. N.; Mann, J.; Qiao, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.

    2010-11-01

    We developed a non-aqueous based electrodepostion process of Ag-stabilization layer on YBCO superconductor tapes. The non-aqueous electroplating solution is non-reactive to the HTS layer thus does not detoriate the critical current capability of the superconductor layer when plated directly on the HTS tape. The superconducting current capabilities of these tapes were measured by non-contact magnetic measurements.

  9. Stability and Morphology of Gold Nanoisland Arrays Generated from Layer-by-Layer Assembled Nanoparticle Multilayer Films: Effects of Heating Temperature and Particle Size

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Young-Seok; Aquino, Michael; Pham, ThienLoc V.; Rave, David; Ramirez, Michael; Lin, Kristopher; Vaccarello, Paul; Lopez, Gregory; Gredig, Thomas; Kwon, Chuhee

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the effects of heating temperature and composition of nanoparticle multilayer films on the morphology, stability, and optical property of gold nanoisland films prepared by nanoparticle self-assembly/heating method. First, nanoparticle-polymer multilayer films are prepared by the layer-by-layer assembly. Nanoparticle multilayer films are then heated at temperature ranging from 500 °C to 625 °C in air to induce an evaporation of organic matters from the films. During the heating process, the nanoparticles on the solid surface undergo coalescence, resulting in the formation of nanostructured gold island arrays. Characterization of nanoisland films using atomic force microscopy and UV-vis spectroscopy suggests that the morphology and stability of gold island films change when different heating temperatures are applied. Stable gold nanoisland thin film arrays can only be obtained after heat treatments at or above 575 °C. In addition, the results show that the use of nanoparticles with different sizes produces nanoisland films with different morphologies. Multilayer films containing smaller gold nanoparticles tend to produce more monodisperse and smaller island nanostructures. Other variables such as capping ligands around nanoparticles and molecular weight of polymer linkers are found to have only minimal effects on the structure of island films. The adsorption of streptavidin on the biotin-functionalized nanoisland films is studied for examining the biosensing capability of nanoisland arrays. PMID:21625329

  10. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO.sub.3, YCrO.sub.3 or LaMnO.sub.3 particles (32), on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate (30), (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure (34) between the doped particles (32), (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles (32) as a contact.

  11. Method of forming a dense, high temperature electronically conductive composite layer on a porous ceramic substrate

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1992-04-21

    An electrochemical device, containing a solid oxide electrolyte material and an electrically conductive composite layer, has the composite layer attached by: (A) applying a layer of LaCrO[sub 3], YCrO[sub 3] or LaMnO[sub 3] particles, on a portion of a porous ceramic substrate, (B) heating to sinter bond the particles to the substrate, (C) depositing a dense filler structure between the doped particles, (D) shaving off the top of the particles, and (E) applying an electronically conductive layer over the particles as a contact. 7 figs.

  12. Preliminary Study on Active Modulation of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes with the Radio Propagation in Layered Space Dusty Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shengguo; Li, Hailong; Fu, Luyao; Wang, Maoyan

    2016-06-01

    Radar echoes intensity of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) is greatly affected by the temperature of dusty plasma and the frequency of electromagnetic wave about the radar. In this paper, a new method is developed to explain the active experiment results of PMSE. The theory of wave propagation in a layered media is used to study the propagation characteristics of an electromagnetic wave at different electron temperatures. The simulation results show that the variation tendency of the reflected power fraction almost agrees with the results observed by radar in the European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association (EISCAT). The radar echoes intensity of PMSE greatly decreases with the increase of the radio frequency and the enhancement of the electron temperature. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 41104097 and 41304119) and by the National Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Environment, China Research Institute of Radiowave Propagation (CRIRP)

  13. Transition temperature range of thermally activated nickel-titanium archwires

    PubMed Central

    SPINI, Tatiana Sobottka; VALARELLI, Fabrício Pinelli; CANÇADO, Rodrigo Hermont; de FREITAS, Karina Maria Salvatore; VILLARINHO, Denis Jardim

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The shape memory resulting from the superelasticity and thermoelastic effect is the main characteristic of thermally activated NiTi archwires and is closely related to the transition temperature range (TTR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the TTR of thermally activated NiTi archwires commercially available. Material and Methods Seven different brands of 0.019"x0.025" thermally activated nickel-titanium archwires were tested as received by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) over the temperature range from -100°C to 150°C at 10°C/min. Results All thermally activated NiTi archwires analyzed presented stage transformation during thermal scanning with final austenitic temperature (Af) ranging from 20.39°C to 45.42°C. Three brands of NiTi archwires presented Af close to the room temperature and, this way, do not present properties of shape memory and pseudoelasticity that are desirable in clinical applications. Conclusions The thermally activated NiTi archwires present great variability in the TTR and the elastic parameters of each NiTi archwire should be provided by the manufacturers, to allow achievement of the best clinical performance possible. PMID:24676581

  14. AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration for low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews AMR (Active Magnetic Regenerative) refrigeration technology for low temperature applications that is a novel cooling method to expand the temperature span of magnetic refrigerator. The key component of the AMR system is a porous magnetic regenerator which allows a heat transfer medium (typically helium gas) to flow through it and therefore obviate intermittently operating an external heat switch. The AMR system alternatingly heats and cools the heat transfer medium by convection when the magneto-caloric effect is created under varying magnetic field. AMR may extend the temperature span for wider range than ADR (Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator) at higher temperatures above 10 K because magneto-caloric effects are typically concentrated in a small temperature range in usual magnetic refrigerants. The regenerative concept theoretically enables each magnetic refrigerant to experience a pseudo-Carnot magnetic refrigeration cycle in a wide temperature span if it is properly designed, although adequate thermodynamic matching of strongly temperature-dependent MCE (magneto-caloric effect) of the regenerator material and the heat capacity of fluid flow is often tricky due to inherent characteristics of magnetic materials. This paper covers historical developments, fundamental concepts, key components, applications, and recent research trends of AMR refrigerators for liquid helium or liquid hydrogen temperatures.

  15. A bulk similarity approach in the atmospheric boundary layer using radiometric skin temperature to determine regional surface fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brutsaert, Wilfried; Sugita, Michiaki

    1991-01-01

    Profiles of wind velocity and temperature in the outer region of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) were used together with surface temperature measurements, to determine regional shear stress and sensible heat flux by means of transfer parameterizations on the basis of bulk similarity. The profiles were measured by means of radiosondes and the surface temperatures by infrared radiation thermometry over hilly prairie terrain in northeastern Kansas during the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE). In the analysis, the needed similarity functions were determined and tested.

  16. The Thermo-Mechanical Problem of Internal and Edge Cracks in Multi-Layered Woven GFRP Laminates at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, T.; Shindo, Y.; Narita, F.

    2004-06-01

    This paper presents the thermo-mechanical response of multi-layered G-11 woven glass/epoxy laminates with internal and/or edge cracks under tensile loading at cryogenic temperatures obtained from a two-dimensional finite element analysis. A condition of generalized plane strain is assumed to exist in the composite. Cracks are considered to occur in the transverse fiber bundles and extend through the entire thickness of the fiber bundles. The finite element model accounts for the temperature-dependent constituent properties. A detailed examination of the Young's modulus and stress distributions near the crack tip is carried out which provides insight into material behavior at cryogenic temperatures.

  17. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by low-temperature atomic layer deposited titanium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Baochen; Hoex, Bram; Aberle, Armin G.; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Chi, Dongzhi

    2014-06-23

    In this work, we demonstrate that thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) titanium oxide (TiO{sub x}) films are able to provide a—up to now unprecedented—level of surface passivation on undiffused low-resistivity crystalline silicon (c-Si). The surface passivation provided by the ALD TiO{sub x} films is activated by a post-deposition anneal and subsequent light soaking treatment. Ultralow effective surface recombination velocities down to 2.8 cm/s and 8.3 cm/s, respectively, are achieved on n-type and p-type float-zone c-Si wafers. Detailed analysis confirms that the TiO{sub x} films are nearly stoichiometric, have no significant level of contaminants, and are of amorphous nature. The passivation is found to be stable after storage in the dark for eight months. These results demonstrate that TiO{sub x} films are also capable of providing excellent passivation of undiffused c-Si surfaces on a comparable level to thermal silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum oxide. In addition, it is well known that TiO{sub x} has an optimal refractive index of 2.4 in the visible range for glass encapsulated solar cells, as well as a low extinction coefficient. Thus, the results presented in this work could facilitate the re-emergence of TiO{sub x} in the field of high-efficiency silicon wafer solar cells.

  18. Linking geomagnetic activity and polar surface air temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seppala, Annika

    ERA-40 and ECMWF operational surface level air temperature (SAT) data sets from 1957 to 2006 were used to examine polar temperature variations during years with different levels of geomagnetic activity, as defined by the Ap index. Previous modelling work has suggested that NOx produced at high latitudes by energetic particle precipitation can eventually lead to detectable changes in polar SATs. We find that during winter months, ERA-40 and ECMWF polar SATs in years with high Ap index are different than in years with low Ap index; the differences are statistically significant at the 2-sigma level and range up to about ±4.5 K, de-pending on location. The temperature differences are larger when years with wintertime Sudden Stratospheric Warmings are excluded. Solar irradiance variations were taken into account in the analysis. Although using the re-analysis and operational data sets it was not possible to conclusively show that the polar SAT patterns are physically linked by geomagnetic activity, we conclude that geomagnetic activity likely plays a role in modulating polar wintertime surface air temperature patterns. The SAT results were tested against variation in the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO), the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Southern Annular Mode n (SAM). The results suggested that these were not driving the observed polar SAT variability. However, significant uncertainty is introduced by the Northern Annular Mode (NAM) and we could not robustly exclude a chance linkage between sea surface temperature (SST) variability and geomagnetic activity. Examining the physical link between geomagnetic activity and polar surface temperature variability patterns using atmospheric models is an ongoing task.

  19. Electroclinic effect in a chiral paranematic liquid-crystal layer above the bulk nematic-to-isotropic transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemitz, Ian R.; Lacaze, Emmanuelle; Rosenblatt, Charles

    2016-02-01

    Electroclinic measurements are reported for two chiral liquid crystals above their bulk chiral isotropic-nematic phase transition temperatures. It is found that an applied electric field E induces a rotation θ [∝Ε] of the director in the very thin paranematic layers that are induced by the cell's two planar-aligning substrates. The magnitude of the electroclinic coefficient dθ/dE close to the transition temperature is comparable to that of a bulk chiral nematic, as well as to that of a parasmectic region above a bulk isotropic-to-chiral smectic-A phase. However, dθ/dE in the paranematic layer varies much more slowly with temperature than in the parasmectic phase, and its relaxation time is slower by more than three orders of magnitude than that of the bulk chiral nematic electroclinic effect.

  20. High diffraction efficiency of three-layer diffractive optics designed for wide temperature range and large incident angle.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shan; Cui, Qingfeng; Piao, Mingxu; Zhao, Lidong

    2016-05-01

    A mathematical model of diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency affected by environment temperature change and incident angle for three-layer diffractive optics with different dispersion materials is put forward, and its effects are analyzed. Taking optical materials N-FK5 and N-SF1 as the substrates of multilayer diffractive optics, the effect on diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency with intermediate materials POLYCARB is analyzed with environment temperature change as well as incident angle. Therefore, three-layer diffractive optics can be applied in more wide environmental temperature ranges and larger incident angles for refractive-diffractive hybrid optical systems, which can obtain better image quality. Analysis results can be used to guide the hybrid imaging optical system design for optical engineers. PMID:27140370

  1. The distribution of temperature in an active region for a comet with known parameters of rotation and orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A. V.; Shulman, L. M.

    2005-06-01

    We calculated the temperature regime of an active region considered as a conical hole in dust layer. All the calculations are carried out for the case when the season effects are distinctly expressed. The temperature is defined from the geometrical parameters of the active region separately for ice bottom and dust walls. It is shown that dust walls are cooled very slowly for the small vertex angles of the crater structure. The temperature of the ice bottom practically does not change over the whole period of rotation, because it is retained at an approximately constant level by concentration of reradiated energy from the dust walls heated by the Sun.

  2. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-27

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  3. Tooth whitening and temperature rise with two bleaching activation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-02-01

    Objectives: To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and intra-pulpal temperature increase in vitro on extracted upper human incisors after chemical, zoom light and diode laser activated bleaching. Materials and Methods: Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n=10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power zoom activation light, for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. Degree of whitening was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and intrapulpal. Results: The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Conclusions: Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than zoom AP light. Diode lasers used to activate bleaching gels are not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulps using power settings of 2W.

  4. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-09-01

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  5. One-dimensional simulation of temperature and moisture in atmospheric and soil boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornstein, R. D.; Santhanam, K.

    1981-01-01

    Meteorologists are interested in modeling the vertical flow of heat and moisture through the soil in order to better simulate the vertical and temporal variations of the atmospheric boundary layer. The one dimensional planetary boundary layer model of is modified by the addition of transport equations to be solved by a finite difference technique to predict soil moisture.

  6. Interaction of Hydrodynamic and Temperature External Disturbances with the Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaponov, S. A.; Yudin, A. V.

    2002-07-01

    At present in solving problems of turbulence arising in boundary layers the study of their receptivity to external disturbances acquires great significance. In this case disturbance generation in boundary layers is attributed to stationary and nonstationary factors (surface vibration acoustic waves external turbulence etc.). One of the first authors to treat this problem and to introduce the tern receptivity vas Morkovin. There are a number of experimental and theoretical studies of subsonic boundary-layer receptivity. Much less is known, however, about the receptivity of a supersonic boundary layer, with all the publications in this field being devoted to studies of interaction of acoustic waves with the boundary layer. At the same time, a supersonic flow may contain not only acoustic disturbances, but also vortical and entropy or heat waves. The interaction of those with a supersonic boundary layer has not yet been adequately investigated. The problem of receptivity of vortical disturbances at subsonic velocities has been analyzed in some publications, but there is no agreement among the authors about the mechanism of disturbance generation in the boundary layer. In this work, excitation of stationary and nonstationary waves by external hydrodynamic disturbances in subsonic and supersonic boundary layers was calculated.

  7. Elevated temperature creep properties for selected active metal braze alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    Active metal braze alloys reduce the number of processes required for the joining of metal to ceramic components by eliminating the need for metallization and/or Ni plating of the ceramic surfaces. Titanium (Ti), V, and Zr are examples of active element additions which have been used successfully in such braze alloys. Since the braze alloy is expected to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch strains between the metal and ceramic materials, a knowledge of its elevated temperature mechanical properties is important. In particular, the issue of whether or not the creep strength of an active metal braze alloy is increased or decreased relative to its non-activated counterpart is important when designing new brazing processes and alloy systems. This paper presents a survey of high temperature mechanical properties for two pairs of conventional braze alloys and their active metal counterparts: (a) the conventional 72Ag-28Cu (Cusil) alloy, and the active braze alloy 62.2Ag- 36.2Cu-1.6Ti (Cusil ABA), and (b) the 82Au-18Ni (Nioro) alloy and the active braze alloy Mu-15.5M-0.75Mo-1.75V (Nioro ABA). For the case of the Cusil/Cusil ABA pair, the active metal addition contributes to solid solution strengthening of the braze alloy, resulting in a higher creep strength as compared to the non-active alloy. In the case of the Nioro/Nioro ABA pair, the Mo and V additions cause the active braze alloy to have a two-phase microstructure, which results in a reduced creep strength than the conventional braze alloy. The Garofalo sinh equation has been used to quantitatively describe the stress and temperature dependence of the deformation behavior. It will be observed that the effective stress exponent in the Garofalo sinh equation is a function of the instantaneous value of the stress argument.

  8. Effect of CVD Process Temperature on Activation Energy and Structural Growth of MWCNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrullah, S.; Mohamed, N. M.; Shaharun, M. S.; Saheed, M. S. M.; Irshad, M. I.

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of process temperature and activation energy on chemical vapor deposition growth of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A vertically fluidized bed reactor was used to grow MWCNTs by catalytic decomposition of ethylene over Fe2O3/Al2O3 at the cost of very low activation energy of 19.516 kJ/mole. FESEM, TEM, and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the growth parameters of MWCNTs in the temperature range of 873.15 K to 1273.15 K (600 °C to 1000 °C). SAED patterns were taken to investigate the crystallinity of the grown structures. The experimental results revealed that MWCNTs grown at the optimum process temperature of 1073.15 K (800 °C) exhibited hexagonal crystal structures, narrow diameter distribution and shorter inter-layer spacing. However, the inner and outer walls of most of MWCNTs grown at the temperatures above and below the optimum were non-uniform and defective. The higher process temperatures promoted the agglomeration of the catalyst particles and decomposition of the carbon precursor, which in return increased the tube diameter, surface defects and amorphous carbon content in the product. The intensity ratio plots also predicted low crystallinity in MWCNTs grown at unoptimized process temperatures. The highest I G/ I D ratio of 1.43 was determined at 1073.15 K (800 °C), which reflects high pct yield, purity and crystalline growth of MWCNTs.

  9. Stress versus temperature dependent activation energies in creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from that of dislocation climb to one of obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change, there occurs a change in the activation energy. It is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does a good job of correlating steady-state creep data, while a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy does a less desirable job of correlating the same data. Applications are made to copper and a LiF-22 mol. percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  10. Stress versus temperature dependence of activation energies for creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1992-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is associated with lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from dislocation climb to obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change in deformation mechanism occurs a change in the activation energy. When the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is obstacle-controlled dislocation glide, it is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does better than a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy in correlating steady-state creep data for both copper and LiF-22mol percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  11. Magnetization and magneto-transport staircaselike behavior in layered perovskite Sr2CoO4 at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiuhang; Yuan, Xueping; Xing, Lei; Xu, Mingxiang

    2016-06-01

    Polycrystalline layered perovskite Sr2CoO4 sample was synthesized by high temperature and high pressure method. The staircaselike behavior has been observed in the magnetization and resistivity versus field curves of Sr2CoO4 at low temperature. The main features of the steps can be obtained from the measured results: (i) the positions of the external magnetic field at which steps occur are varying in different measurement runs, (ii) the steps only appear at low temperature and disappear with a slight increase of the temperature, (iii) the steps are dependent on the temperature and field sweep rate. Based on the features of the magnetization and magneto-transport staircaselike behavior in Sr2CoO4, the unusual phenomenon can be ascribed to an avalanche of flipping domains in terms of the random field theory.

  12. Magnetization and magneto-transport staircaselike behavior in layered perovskite Sr2CoO4 at low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiuhang; Yuan, Xueping; Xing, Lei; Xu, Mingxiang

    2016-01-01

    Polycrystalline layered perovskite Sr2CoO4 sample was synthesized by high temperature and high pressure method. The staircaselike behavior has been observed in the magnetization and resistivity versus field curves of Sr2CoO4 at low temperature. The main features of the steps can be obtained from the measured results: (i) the positions of the external magnetic field at which steps occur are varying in different measurement runs, (ii) the steps only appear at low temperature and disappear with a slight increase of the temperature, (iii) the steps are dependent on the temperature and field sweep rate. Based on the features of the magnetization and magneto-transport staircaselike behavior in Sr2CoO4, the unusual phenomenon can be ascribed to an avalanche of flipping domains in terms of the random field theory. PMID:27293142

  13. Magnetization and magneto-transport staircaselike behavior in layered perovskite Sr2CoO4 at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuhang; Yuan, Xueping; Xing, Lei; Xu, Mingxiang

    2016-01-01

    Polycrystalline layered perovskite Sr2CoO4 sample was synthesized by high temperature and high pressure method. The staircaselike behavior has been observed in the magnetization and resistivity versus field curves of Sr2CoO4 at low temperature. The main features of the steps can be obtained from the measured results: (i) the positions of the external magnetic field at which steps occur are varying in different measurement runs, (ii) the steps only appear at low temperature and disappear with a slight increase of the temperature, (iii) the steps are dependent on the temperature and field sweep rate. Based on the features of the magnetization and magneto-transport staircaselike behavior in Sr2CoO4, the unusual phenomenon can be ascribed to an avalanche of flipping domains in terms of the random field theory. PMID:27293142

  14. Metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet photodetectors based on gallium nitride grown by atomic layer deposition at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekcan, Burak; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Bolat, Sami; Biyikli, Necmi; Okyay, Ali Kemal

    2014-10-01

    Proof-of-concept, first metal-semiconductor-metal ultraviolet photodetectors based on nanocrystalline gallium nitride (GaN) layers grown by low-temperature hollow-cathode plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition are demonstrated. Electrical and optical characteristics of the fabricated devices are investigated. Dark current values as low as 14 pA at a 30 V reverse bias are obtained. Fabricated devices exhibit a 15× UV/VIS rejection ratio based on photoresponsivity values at 200 nm (UV) and 390 nm (VIS) wavelengths. These devices can offer a promising alternative for flexible optoelectronics and the complementary metal oxide semiconductor integration of such devices.

  15. Enhanced photocurrent density in graphene/Si based solar cell (GSSC) by optimizing active layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Rosikhin, Ahmad Hidayat, Aulia Fikri; Syuhada, Ibnu; Winata, Toto

    2015-12-29

    Thickness dependent photocurrent density in active layer of graphene/Si based solar cell has been investigated via analytical – simulation study. This report is a preliminary comparison of experimental and analytical investigation of graphene/Si based solar cell. Graphene sheet was interfaced with Si thin film forming heterojunction solar cell that was treated as a device model for photocurrent generator. Such current can be enhanced by optimizing active layer thickness and involving metal oxide as supporting layer to shift photons absorption. In this case there are two type of devices model with and without TiO{sub 2} in which the silicon thickness varied at 20 – 100 nm. All of them have examined and also compared with each other to obtain an optimum value. From this calculation it found that generated currents almost linear with thickness but there are saturated conditions that no more enhancements will be achieved. Furthermore TiO{sub 2} layer is effectively increases photon absorption but reducing device stability, maximum current is fluctuates enough. This may caused by the disturbance of excitons diffusion and resistivity inside each layer. Finally by controlling active layer thickness, it is quite useful to estimate optimization in order to develop the next solar cell devices.

  16. Effect of low-temperature annealing on the electronic- and band-structures of (Ga,Mn)As epitaxial layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yastrubchak, O.; Wosinski, T.; Gluba, L.; Andrearczyk, T.; Domagala, J. Z.; Żuk, J.; Sadowski, J.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of outdiffusion of Mn interstitials from (Ga,Mn)As epitaxial layers, caused by post-growth low-temperature annealing, on their electronic- and band-structure properties has been investigated by modulation photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy. The annealing-induced changes in structural and magnetic properties of the layers were examined with high-resolution X-ray diffractometry and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, respectively. They confirmed an outdiffusion of Mn interstitials from the layers and an enhancement in their hole concentration, which were more efficient for the layer covered with a Sb cap acting as a sink for diffusing Mn interstitials. The PR results demonstrating a decrease in the band-gap-transition energy in the as-grown (Ga,Mn)As layers, with respect to that in the reference GaAs one, are interpreted by assuming a merging of the Mn-related impurity band with the GaAs valence band. Whereas an increase in the band-gap-transition energy caused by the annealing treatment of the (Ga,Mn)As layers is interpreted as a result of annealing-induced enhancement of the free-hole concentration and the Fermi level location within the valence band. The experimental results are consistent with the valence-band origin of itinerant holes mediating ferromagnetic ordering in (Ga,Mn)As, in agreement with the Zener model for ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  17. Effect of low-temperature annealing on the electronic- and band-structures of (Ga,Mn)As epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Yastrubchak, O. Gluba, L.; Żuk, J.; Wosinski, T. Andrearczyk, T.; Domagala, J. Z.; Sadowski, J.

    2014-01-07

    The effect of outdiffusion of Mn interstitials from (Ga,Mn)As epitaxial layers, caused by post-growth low-temperature annealing, on their electronic- and band-structure properties has been investigated by modulation photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy. The annealing-induced changes in structural and magnetic properties of the layers were examined with high-resolution X-ray diffractometry and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, respectively. They confirmed an outdiffusion of Mn interstitials from the layers and an enhancement in their hole concentration, which were more efficient for the layer covered with a Sb cap acting as a sink for diffusing Mn interstitials. The PR results demonstrating a decrease in the band-gap-transition energy in the as-grown (Ga,Mn)As layers, with respect to that in the reference GaAs one, are interpreted by assuming a merging of the Mn-related impurity band with the GaAs valence band. Whereas an increase in the band-gap-transition energy caused by the annealing treatment of the (Ga,Mn)As layers is interpreted as a result of annealing-induced enhancement of the free-hole concentration and the Fermi level location within the valence band. The experimental results are consistent with the valence-band origin of itinerant holes mediating ferromagnetic ordering in (Ga,Mn)As, in agreement with the Zener model for ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  18. Effect of process pressure and substrate temperature on CdS buffer layers deposited by using RF sputtering for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ji Hyun; Jung, Sung Hee; Chung, Chee Won

    2016-02-01

    The characteristics of CdS films deposited on Cu(In,Ga)Se2(CIGS)/Mo/glass and glass substrates by using RF magnetron sputtering were investigated. The deposition pressure and the substrate temperature were selected as key parameters to examine the electrical, compositional and optical properties of the films. As the deposition pressure was increased, the resistivity increased while the carrier concentration decreased owing to a stoichiometric change and Cd-O incorporation at high pressure. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy(FE-SEM) revealed that the CdS films on CIGS/Mo became denser as the pressure was increased, which was responsible for the high transmittance of the film deposited at high pressure. As the substrate temperature was increased, the deposition rate decreased, which could be explained by using Langmuir theory. As the temperature was increased from room temperature to 573 K, the resistivity increased and the carrier concentration decreased, which was attributed to an increase in [S]/[Cd] ratio. In addition, as the temperature was increased, the small grains were agglomerated to form larger grains due to the increase in the activity of grains at high temperature. CdS films were confirmed to be uniformly deposited on the CIGS layer by using RF sputtering. The large amount of interdiffusion between the CIGS and the CdS films deposited at a high substrate temperature were observed by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  19. Rapid electrostatics-assisted layer-by-layer assembly of near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Askar, Khalid; Leo, Sin-Yen; Xu, Can; Liu, Danielle; Jiang, Peng

    2016-11-15

    Here we report a rapid and scalable bottom-up technique for layer-by-layer (LBL) assembling near-infrared-active colloidal photonic crystals consisting of large (⩾1μm) silica microspheres. By combining a new electrostatics-assisted colloidal transferring approach with spontaneous colloidal crystallization at an air/water interface, we have demonstrated that the crystal transfer speed of traditional Langmuir-Blodgett-based colloidal assembly technologies can be enhanced by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. Importantly, the crystalline quality of the resultant photonic crystals is not compromised by this rapid colloidal assembly approach. They exhibit thickness-dependent near-infrared stop bands and well-defined Fabry-Perot fringes in the specular transmission and reflection spectra, which match well with the theoretical calculations using a scalar-wave approximation model and Fabry-Perot analysis. This simple yet scalable bottom-up technology can significantly improve the throughput in assembling large-area, multilayer colloidal crystals, which are of great technological importance in a variety of optical and non-optical applications ranging from all-optical integrated circuits to tissue engineering. PMID:27494632

  20. Layer-by-layer carbon nanotube bio-templates for in situ monitoring of the metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loh, Kenneth J.; Guest, Jeremy S.; Ho, Genevieve; Lynch, Jerome P.; Love, Nancy G.

    2009-03-01

    Despite the wide variety of effective disinfection and wastewater treatment techniques for removing organic and inorganic wastes, pollutants such as nitrogen remain in wastewater effluents. If left untreated, these nitrogenous wastes can adversely impact the environment by promoting the overgrowth of aquatic plants, depleting dissolved oxygen, and causing eutrophication. Although nitrification/denitrification processes are employed during advanced wastewater treatment, effective and efficient operation of these facilities require information of the pH, dissolved oxygen content, among many other parameters, of the wastewater effluent. In this preliminary study, a biocompatible CNT-based nanocomposite is proposed and validated for monitoring the biological metabolic activity of nitrifying bacteria in wastewater effluent environments (i.e., to monitor the nitrification process). Using carbon nanotubes and a pH-sensitive conductive polymer (i.e., poly(aniline) emeraldine base), a layer-by-layer fabrication technique is employed to fabricate a novel thin film pH sensor that changes its electrical properties in response to variations in ambient pH environments. Laboratory studies are conducted to evaluate the proposed nanocomposite's biocompatibility with wastewater effluent environments and its pH sensing performance.

  1. Carbon nanotubes supported cerium dioxide and platinum nanohybrids: Layer-by-layer synthesis and enhanced electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Xinyuan; Chen, Jiayi; Wang, Mengdi; Gu, Jialei; Wu, Ping; Sun, Dongmei; Tang, Yawen

    2015-08-01

    We successfully synthesize carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported cerium dioxide and platinum (Pt/CeO2/CNTs) nanohybrids via layer-by-layer assembly. The composition, morphology and structure of the as-prepared Pt/CeO2/CNTs nanohybrids are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). By comparison of the electrocatalytic properties of the Pt/CeO2/CNTs with the Pt/CNTs, we systematically investigate the promotion effect of CeO2 on the Pt/CeO2/CNTs catalysts towards methanol oxidation. It is found that the introduction of CeO2 not only enhances the electrocatalytic activity and stability of the Pt/CeO2/CNTs catalyst for methanol oxidation but also minimizes the CO poisoning, probably accounting for the good oxygen carrying capacity of CeO2 and its high stability in acidic solution.

  2. Tethered poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline) chains: temperature effects on layer structure and interactions probed by AFM experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    An, Junxue; Liu, Xiaoyan; Linse, Per; Dėdinaitė, Andra; Winnik, Françoise M; Claesson, Per M

    2015-03-17

    Thermoresponsive polymer layers on silica surfaces have been obtained by utilizing electrostatically driven adsorption of a cationic-nonionic diblock copolymer. The cationic block provides strong anchoring to the surface for the nonionic block of poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline), referred to as PIPOZ. The PIPOZ chain interacts favorably with water at low temperatures, but above 46 °C aqueous solutions of PIPOZ phase separate as water becomes a poor solvent for the polymer. We explore how a change in solvent condition affects interactions between such adsorbed layers and report temperature effects on both normal forces and friction forces. To gain further insight, we utilize self-consistent lattice mean-field theory to follow how changes in temperature affect the polymer segment density distributions and to calculate surface force curves. We find that with worsening of the solvent condition an attraction develops between the adsorbed PIPOZ layers, and this observation is in good agreement with predictions of the mean-field theory. The modeling also demonstrates that the segment density profile and the degree of chain interpenetration under a given load between two PIPOZ-coated surfaces rise significantly with increasing temperature. PMID:25686020

  3. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water.

    PubMed

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10^{-23}m^{3}), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes. PMID:27627349

  4. Near-Surface Motion in the Nocturnal, Stable Boundary Layer Observed with Fibre-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeman, Matthias J.; Selker, John S.; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2015-02-01

    The evolution of cold air layers near the surface was investigated for a night with stable conditions near the surface. Spatial air temperature observations at 276 co-located vertical profiles were made using high-resolution fibre-optic based distributed temperature sensing (DTS) in a quasi three-dimensional geometry oriented along a shallow depression in the landscape and analysed for patterns in near-surface flow. Temperature stratification was observed to be interrupted by transient temperature structures on the scale of metres for which the flow direction and velocity could be quantified. The high spatial resolution and large spatial domain of the DTS revealed temperature structures in a level of detail that exceeded the capability of traditional point observations of air temperature at low wind speeds. Further, composition techniques were applied to describe wave-like motions in the opposite direction of the mean flow, at intervals of approximately 200 s (5 mHz). The DTS technique delivered tomography on a scale of tens of metres. The spatial observations at high spatial (fractions of a metre) and temporal (sec) resolution provided new opportunities for detection and quantification of surface-flow features and description of complicated scale interactions. High-resolution DTS is therefore a valuable addition to experimental research on stable and weak-wind boundary layers near the surface.

  5. Temperature dependence of Raman shifts in layered ReSe{sub 2} and SnSe{sub 2} semiconductor nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Taube, A.; Łapińska, A.; Judek, J.; Zdrojek, M.

    2015-07-06

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are attractive for variety of nanoscale electronics and optoelectronics devices due to their unique properties. Despite growing progress in the research field of TMDCs, many of their properties are still unknown. In this letter, we report measurements of Raman spectra of rhenium diselenide (ReSe{sub 2}) and tin diselenide (SnSe{sub 2}) layered semiconductor nanosheets as a function of temperature (70–400 K). We analyze the temperature dependence of the positions of eight ReSe{sub 2} modes and SnSe{sub 2} A{sub 1g} mode. All observed Raman mode shifts exhibit nonlinear temperature dependence at low temperatures which is explained by optical phonon decay process into two or three acoustics phonons. The first order temperature coefficients (χ), determined for high temperatures, of rhenium diselenide Raman modes are in the range between −0.0033 and −0.0118 cm{sup −1}/K, whereas χ of tin diselenide A{sub 1g} mode was −0.0129 cm{sup −1}/K. Our findings are useful for further analysis of phonon and thermal properties of these dichalcogenide layered semiconductors.

  6. Discrete-Layer Piezoelectric Plate and Shell Models for Active Tip-Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyliger, P. R.; Ramirez, G.; Pei, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop computational tools for the analysis of active-sensory composite structures with added or embedded piezoelectric layers. The targeted application for this class of smart composite laminates and the analytical development is the accomplishment of active tip-clearance control in turbomachinery components. Two distinct theories and analytical models were developed and explored under this contract: (1) a discrete-layer plate theory and corresponding computational models, and (2) a three dimensional general discrete-layer element generated in curvilinear coordinates for modeling laminated composite piezoelectric shells. Both models were developed from the complete electromechanical constitutive relations of piezoelectric materials, and incorporate both displacements and potentials as state variables. This report describes the development and results of these models. The discrete-layer theories imply that the displacement field and electrostatic potential through-the-thickness of the laminate are described over an individual layer rather than as a smeared function over the thickness of the entire plate or shell thickness. This is especially crucial for composites with embedded piezoelectric layers, as the actuating and sensing elements within these layers are poorly represented by effective or smeared properties. Linear Lagrange interpolation polynomials were used to describe the through-thickness laminate behavior. Both analytic and finite element approximations were used in the plane or surface of the structure. In this context, theoretical developments are presented for the discrete-layer plate theory, the discrete-layer shell theory, and the formulation of an exact solution for simply-supported piezoelectric plates. Finally, evaluations and results from a number of separate examples are presented for the static and dynamic analysis of the plate geometry. Comparisons between the different approaches are provided when

  7. Contrasting effects of strabismic amblyopia on metabolic activity in superficial and deep layers of striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Adams, Daniel L; Economides, John R; Horton, Jonathan C

    2015-05-01

    To probe the mechanism of visual suppression, we have raised macaques with strabismus by disinserting the medial rectus muscle in each eye at 1 mo of age. Typically, this operation produces a comitant, alternating exotropia with normal acuity in each eye. Here we describe an unusual occurrence: the development of severe amblyopia in one eye of a monkey after induction of exotropia. Shortly after surgery, the animal demonstrated a strong fixation preference for the left eye, with apparent suppression of the right eye. Later, behavioral testing showed inability to track or to saccade to targets with the right eye. With the left eye occluded, the animal demonstrated no visually guided behavior. Optokinetic nystagmus was absent in the right eye. Metabolic activity in striate cortex was assessed by processing the tissue for cytochrome oxidase (CO). Amblyopia caused loss of CO in one eye's rows of patches, presumably those serving the blind eye. Layers 4A and 4B showed columns of reduced CO, in register with pale rows of patches in layer 2/3. Layers 4C, 5, and 6 also showed columns of CO activity, but remarkably, comparison with more superficial layers showed a reversal in contrast. In other words, pale CO staining in layers 2/3, 4A, and 4B was aligned with dark CO staining in layers 4C, 5, and 6. No experimental intervention or deprivation paradigm has been reported previously to produce opposite effects on metabolic activity in layers 2/3, 4A, and 4B vs. layers 4C, 5, and 6 within a given eye's columns. PMID:25810480

  8. Contrasting effects of strabismic amblyopia on metabolic activity in superficial and deep layers of striate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Daniel L.; Economides, John R.

    2015-01-01

    To probe the mechanism of visual suppression, we have raised macaques with strabismus by disinserting the medial rectus muscle in each eye at 1 mo of age. Typically, this operation produces a comitant, alternating exotropia with normal acuity in each eye. Here we describe an unusual occurrence: the development of severe amblyopia in one eye of a monkey after induction of exotropia. Shortly after surgery, the animal demonstrated a strong fixation preference for the left eye, with apparent suppression of the right eye. Later, behavioral testing showed inability to track or to saccade to targets with the right eye. With the left eye occluded, the animal demonstrated no visually guided behavior. Optokinetic nystagmus was absent in the right eye. Metabolic activity in striate cortex was assessed by processing the tissue for cytochrome oxidase (CO). Amblyopia caused loss of CO in one eye's rows of patches, presumably those serving the blind eye. Layers 4A and 4B showed columns of reduced CO, in register with pale rows of patches in layer 2/3. Layers 4C, 5, and 6 also showed columns of CO activity, but remarkably, comparison with more superficial layers showed a reversal in contrast. In other words, pale CO staining in layers 2/3, 4A, and 4B was aligned with dark CO staining in layers 4C, 5, and 6. No experimental intervention or deprivation paradigm has been reported previously to produce opposite effects on metabolic activity in layers 2/3, 4A, and 4B vs. layers 4C, 5, and 6 within a given eye's columns. PMID:25810480

  9. Thermal behavior and catalytic activity in naphthalene destruction of Ce-, Zr- and Mn-containing oxide layers on titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyeva, Marina S.; Rudnev, Vladimir S.; Wiedenmann, Florian; Wybornov, Svetlana; Yarovaya, Tatyana P.; Jiang, Xin

    2011-11-01

    The present paper is devoted to studies of the composition and surface structure, including those after annealing at high temperatures, and catalytic activity in the reaction of naphthalene destruction of Ce-, Zr- and Mn-containing oxide layers on titanium obtained by means of the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. The composition and structure of the obtained systems were investigated using the methods of X-ray phase and energy dispersive analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was demonstrated that Ce- and Zr- containing structures had relatively high thermal stability: their element and phase compositions and surface structure underwent virtually no changes after annealing in the temperature range 600-800 °C. Annealing of Ce- and Zr-containing coatings in the temperature range 850-900 °C resulted in substantial changes of their surface composition and structure: a relatively homogeneous and porous surface becomes coated by large pole-like crystals. The catalytic studies showed rather high activity of Ce- and Zr-containing coatings in the reaction of naphthalene destruction at temperatures up to 850 °C. Mn-containing structures of the type MnOx + SiO2 + TiO2/Ti have a well-developed surface coated by “nano-whiskers”. The phase composition and surface structure of manganese-containing layers changes dramatically in the course of thermal treatment. After annealing above 600 °C nano-whiskers vanish with formation of molten structures on the surface. The Mn-containing oxide systems demonstrated lower conversion degrees than the Ce- and Zr-containing coatings, which can be attributed to substantial surface modification and formation of molten manganese silicates at high temperatures.

  10. Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels using Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid passive/active noise control system utilizing constrained layer damping and model predictive feedback control is presented. This system is used to control the sound radiation of panels due to broadband disturbances. To facilitate the hybrid system design, a methodology for placement of constrained layer damping which targets selected modes based on their relative radiated sound power is developed. The placement methodology is utilized to determine two constrained layer damping configurations for experimental evaluation of a hybrid system. The first configuration targets the (4,1) panel mode which is not controllable by the piezoelectric control actuator, and the (2,3) and (5,2) panel modes. The second configuration targets the (1,1) and (3,1) modes. The experimental results demonstrate the improved reduction of radiated sound power using the hybrid passive/active control system as compared to the active control system alone.

  11. Effect of layered composite meta-structures on the optical activity and ellipticity of structural biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, E. H.; Hor, Y. Li; Leong, Eunice S. P.; Liu, Y. J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we design layered composite meta-structures to investigate its' effect on the optical activity and circular dichroism (CD). The layered composite meta-structures consist of thin gammadion nanostructure with thickness λ/10, where λ is the incident wavelength. The layered meta-structures are alternate between a dielectric and gold (AU) material. Each layered composite meta-gammadion is arranged together in an array of pitch 700 nm. In the first case, 3 layers of meta-gammadion, with metal-insulator-metal (MIM) and insulator-metal-insulator (IMI) configuration are simulated with material properties from optical hand book. There are 3 modes in the CD spectrum, which can be characterized into Bloch CD mode and hybrid CD modes. Compared with the CD spectrum of whole structure of gammadion in gold with same total height, the CD of the MIM layered composite are larger. When the number layer increase to 5, it is observed that the CD is reduced by 30% and there is a red shift in the Bloch CD mode and a slight blue shift in the hybrid CD modes. By further increasing the number of layers to 7, we observed further CD increment and larger wavelength shift in the CD modes. The layered composite meta-gammadion is fabricated using template stripping method. Experimental results also show excellent agreement with the simulation results for CD and wavelength shift. We submerge the layered meta-gammadion into a solution of chiral molecules. The CD spectrum of the meta-gammadion shows a larger wavelength shift compared to pure metal structures. This indicate a more sensitive and robust detection of chiral molecules.

  12. Improved performance of polymer solar cells using PBDTT-F-TT:PC71BM blend film as active layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Yue; Gao, Xiumin; Lu, Xinmiao; Xin, Qing; Lin, Jun; Zhao, Jufeng

    2016-07-01

    A detailed study of high-efficiency polymer solar cells (PSCs) based on a low bandgap polymer PBDTT-F-TT and PC71BM as the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer is carried out. By using 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) as solvent additive to control the morphology of active layer and comparing different device architecture to optimize the optical field distribution, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the resulted devices can be reached as high as 9.34%. Comprehensive characterization and optical modeling of the resulting devices is performed to understand the effect of DIO and device geometry on photovoltaic performance. It was found that the addition of DIO can significantly improve the nanoscale morphology and increased electron mobility in the BHJ layer. The inverted device architecture was chosen because the results from optical modeling shows that it offers better optical field distribution and exciton generation profile. Based on these results, a low-temperature processed ZnO was finally introduced as an electron transport layer to facility the fabrication on flexible substrates and showed comparable performance with the device based on conventional ZnO interlayer prepared by sol-gel process.

  13. Spot temperatures and area coverages on active dwarf stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarr, Steven H.; Neff, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Two active K dwarfs are examined to determine the temperatures of the stars and to estimate the locations and sizes of cool spots on the stellar surfaces. Two wavelength regions with TiO absorption bands at different temperature sensitivities are modeled simultaneously using the method developed by Huenemoerder and Ramsey (1987). The spectrum of BD +26deg730 shows excess absorption in the TiO band, and the absence of the 8860 A band in HD 82558 indicates that its spots are warmer than those of BD +26deg730.

  14. Two-dimensional quasi-double-layers in two-electron-temperature, current-free plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, Mario; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2013-02-01

    The expansion of a plasma with two disparate electron populations into vacuum and channeled by a divergent magnetic nozzle is analyzed with an axisymmetric model. The purpose is to study the formation and two-dimensional shape of a current-free double-layer in the case when the electric potential steepening can still be treated within the quasineutral approximation. The properties of this quasi-double-layer are investigated in terms of the relative fraction of the high-energy electron population, its radial distribution when injected into the nozzle, and the geometry and intensity of the applied magnetic field. The two-dimensional double layer presents a curved shape, which is dependent on the natural curvature of the equipotential lines in a magnetically expanded plasma and the particular radial distribution of high-energy electrons at injection. The double layer curvature increases the higher the nozzle divergence is, the lower the magnetic strength is, and the more peripherally hot electrons are injected. A central application of the study is the operation of a helicon plasma thruster in space. To this respect, it is shown that the curvature of the double layer does not increment the thrust, it does not modify appreciably the downstream divergence of the plasma beam, but it increases the magnetic-to-pressure thrust ratio. The present study does not attempt to cover current-free double layers involving plasmas with multiple populations of positive ions.

  15. Two-dimensional quasi-double-layers in two-electron-temperature, current-free plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, Mario; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2013-02-15

    The expansion of a plasma with two disparate electron populations into vacuum and channeled by a divergent magnetic nozzle is analyzed with an axisymmetric model. The purpose is to study the formation and two-dimensional shape of a current-free double-layer in the case when the electric potential steepening can still be treated within the quasineutral approximation. The properties of this quasi-double-layer are investigated in terms of the relative fraction of the high-energy electron population, its radial distribution when injected into the nozzle, and the geometry and intensity of the applied magnetic field. The two-dimensional double layer presents a curved shape, which is dependent on the natural curvature of the equipotential lines in a magnetically expanded plasma and the particular radial distribution of high-energy electrons at injection. The double layer curvature increases the higher the nozzle divergence is, the lower the magnetic strength is, and the more peripherally hot electrons are injected. A central application of the study is the operation of a helicon plasma thruster in space. To this respect, it is shown that the curvature of the double layer does not increment the thrust, it does not modify appreciably the downstream divergence of the plasma beam, but it increases the magnetic-to-pressure thrust ratio. The present study does not attempt to cover current-free double layers involving plasmas with multiple populations of positive ions.

  16. Temperature-gated thermal rectifier for active heat flow control.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Shen, Sheng; Wang, Kevin; Abate, Yohannes; Lee, Sangwook; Wu, Junqiao; Yin, Xiaobo; Majumdar, Arun; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-08-13

    Active heat flow control is essential for broad applications of heating, cooling, and energy conversion. Like electronic devices developed for the control of electric power, it is very desirable to develop advanced all-thermal solid-state devices that actively control heat flow without consuming other forms of energy. Here we demonstrate temperature-gated thermal rectification using vanadium dioxide beams in which the environmental temperature actively modulates asymmetric heat flow. In this three terminal device, there are two switchable states, which can be regulated by global heating. In the "Rectifier" state, we observe up to 28% thermal rectification. In the "Resistor" state, the thermal rectification is significantly suppressed (<1%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of solid-state active-thermal devices with a large rectification in the Rectifier state. This temperature-gated rectifier can have substantial implications ranging from autonomous thermal management of heating and cooling systems to efficient thermal energy conversion and storage. PMID:25010206

  17. Dependence of structure and temperature for lithium-rich layered-spinel microspheres cathode material of lithium ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Di; Yu, Ruizhi; Wang, Xianyou; Ge, Long; Yang, Xiukang

    2015-01-01

    Homogeneous lithium-rich layered-spinel 0.5Li2MnO3·0.5LiMn1/3Ni1/3Co1/3O2 microspheres (~1 μm) are successfully prepared by a solvothermal method and subsequent high-temperature calcinations process. The effects of temperature on the structure and performance of the as-prepared cathode material are systemically studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), galvanostatical charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectra. The results show that a spinel Li4Mn5O12 component can be controllably introduced into the lithium-rich layered material at 750°C. Besides, it has been found that the obtained layered-spinel cathode material represents excellent electrochemical characteristics. For example, it can deliver a high initial discharge capacity of 289.6 mAh g−1 between 2.0 V and 4.6 V at a rate of 0.1 C at room temperature, and a discharge capacity of 144.9 mAh g−1 at 5 C and 122.8 mAh g−1 even at 10 C. In addition, the retention of the capacity is still as high as 88% after 200 cycles, while only 79.9% for the single-phase layered material. The excellent electrochemical performance of the as-prepared cathode material can probably be attributed to the hybrid structures combining a fast Li-ion diffusion rate of 3D spinel Li4Mn5O12 phase and a high capacity of the layered Li-Mn-Ni-Co-O component. PMID:25672573

  18. MAPLE prepared heterostructures with arylene based polymer active layer for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanculescu, F.; Rasoga, O.; Catargiu, A. M.; Vacareanu, L.; Socol, M.; Breazu, C.; Preda, N.; Socol, G.; Stanculescu, A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents some studies about the preparation by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique of heterostructures with single layer of arylene based polymer, poly[N-(2-ethylhexyl)2.7-carbazolyl vinylene]/AMC16 and poly[N-(2-ethylhexyl)2.7-carbazolyl 1.4-phenylene ethynylene]/AMC22, and with layers of these polymers mixed with Buckminsterfullerene/C60 in the weight ratio of 1:2 (AMC16:C60) and 1:3 (AMC22:C60). The deposited layers have been characterized by spectroscopic (UV-Vis-NIR, PL, FTIR) and microscopic (SEM, AFM) methods. The effect of the polymer particularities on the optical and electrical properties of the structures based on polymer and polymer:C60 mixed layer has been analyzed. The study of the electrical properties has revealed typical solar cell behavior for the heterostructure prepared by MAPLE on glass/ITO/PEDOT-PSS with AMC16, AMC22 and AMC22:C60 layer, confirming that this method is adequate for the preparation of polymeric and mixed active layers for solar cells applications. The highest photovoltaic effect was shown by the solar cell structure realized with single layer of AMC16 polymer: glass/ITO/PEDOT-PSS/AMC16/Al.

  19. Material properties and field-effect transistor characteristics of hybrid organic/graphene active layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Lee, Jongho; Chowdhury, Sk. Fahad; Akinwande, Deji; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2012-10-01

    We report on the material properties and device characteristics of field-effect transistors (FETs) consisting of hybrid mono-layer graphene/organic semiconductor active layers. By capping with selected organic and polymeric layers, transformation of the electronic characteristics of mono-layer graphene FETs was observed. The off-state current is reduced while the on-state current and field-effect mobility are either unaffected or increased after depositing π-conjugated organic semiconductors. Significantly, capping mono-layer graphene FETs with fluoropolymer improved the on-off current ratio from 5 to 10 as well as increased the field-effect mobility by factor of two compared to plain graphene FETs. Removal of π-conjugated organic semiconductors or fluoropolymer from graphene FETs results in a return to the original electronic properties of mono-layer graphene FETs. This suggests that weak reversible electronic interactions between graphene and π-conjugated organic semiconductors/fluoropolymer favorably tune the material and electrical characteristics of mono-layer graphene.

  20. Antimicrobial Activity Evaluation on Silver Doped Hydroxyapatite/Polydimethylsiloxane Composite Layer.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, C S; Groza, A; Iconaru, S L; Popa, C L; Chapon, P; Chifiriuc, M C; Hristu, R; Stanciu, G A; Negrila, C C; Ghita, R V; Ganciu, M; Predoi, D

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was the preparation, physicochemical characterization, and microbiological evaluation of novel hydroxyapatite doped with silver/polydimethylsiloxane (Ag:HAp-PDMS) composite layers. In the first stage, the deposition of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer layer on commercially pure Si disks has been produced in atmospheric pressure corona discharges. Finally, the new silver doped hydroxyapatite/polydimethylsiloxane composite layer has been obtained by the thermal evaporation technique. The Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layers were characterized by various techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The antimicrobial activity of the Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layer was assessed against Candida albicans ATCC 10231 (ATCC-American Type Culture Collection) by culture based and confirmed by SEM and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) methods. This is the first study reporting the antimicrobial effect of the Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layer, which proved to be active against Candida albicans biofilm embedded cells. PMID:26504849

  1. Antimicrobial Activity Evaluation on Silver Doped Hydroxyapatite/Polydimethylsiloxane Composite Layer

    PubMed Central

    Ciobanu, C. S.; Groza, A.; Iconaru, S. L.; Popa, C. L.; Chapon, P.; Chifiriuc, M. C.; Hristu, R.; Stanciu, G. A.; Negrila, C. C.; Ghita, R. V.; Ganciu, M.; Predoi, D.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was the preparation, physicochemical characterization, and microbiological evaluation of novel hydroxyapatite doped with silver/polydimethylsiloxane (Ag:HAp-PDMS) composite layers. In the first stage, the deposition of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer layer on commercially pure Si disks has been produced in atmospheric pressure corona discharges. Finally, the new silver doped hydroxyapatite/polydimethylsiloxane composite layer has been obtained by the thermal evaporation technique. The Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layers were characterized by various techniques, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectroscopy (GDOES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The antimicrobial activity of the Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layer was assessed against Candida albicans ATCC 10231 (ATCC—American Type Culture Collection) by culture based and confirmed by SEM and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) methods. This is the first study reporting the antimicrobial effect of the Ag:HAp-PDMS composite layer, which proved to be active against Candida albicans biofilm embedded cells. PMID:26504849

  2. Urban Geocryology: Mapping Urban-Rural Contrasts in Active-Layer Thickness, Barrow Penninsula, Northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klene, A. E.; Nelson, F. E.

    2014-12-01

    As development proceeds in the high latitudes, information about interactions between urban influences and the thickness of the active layer above permafrost becomes vital, particularly given the possibility of increasing temperatures accompanying climate change. Permafrost characteristics are often mapped at small geographical scales (i.e., over large areas), at low resolution, and without extensive field validation. Although maps of active-layer thickness (ALT) have been created for areas of relatively undisturbed terrain, this has rarely been done within urbanized areas, even though ALT is a critical factor in the design of roads, buildings, pipelines, and other elements of infrastructure. The need for detailed maps of ALT is emphasized in work on potential hazards in permafrost regions associated with global warming scenarios. Northern Alaska is a region considered to be at moderate to high risk for thaw-induced damage under climatic warming. The Native Village of Barrow (71°17'44"N; 156°45' 59"W), the economic, transportation, and administrative hub of the North Slope Borough, is the northernmost community in the USA, and the largest native settlement in the circum-Arctic. A winter urban heat island in Barrow, earlier snowmelt in the village, and dust deposition downwind of gravel pads and roads are all urban effects that could increase ALT. A recent empirical study documented a 17 to 41 cm difference in ALT between locations in the village of Barrow and surrounding undeveloped tundra, even in similar land-cover classes. We mapped ALT in the Barrow Peninsula, with particular attention to contrasts between the urbanized village and relatively undisturbed tundra in the nearby Barrow Environmental Observatory. The modified Berggren solution, an advanced analytic solution to the general Stefan problem of calculating frost and thaw depth, was used in a geographic context to map ALT over the 150 km² area investigated in the Barrow Urban Heat Island Study. The

  3. High temperature sensor/microphone development for active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrout, Thomas R.

    1993-01-01

    The industrial and scientific communities have shown genuine interest in electronic systems which can operate at high temperatures, among which are sensors to monitor noise, vibration, and acoustic emissions. Acoustic sensing can be accomplished by a wide variety of commercially available devices, including: simple piezoelectric sensors, accelerometers, strain gauges, proximity sensors, and fiber optics. Of the several sensing mechanisms investigated, piezoelectrics were found to be the most prevalent, because of their simplicity of design and application and, because of their high sensitivity over broad ranges of frequencies and temperature. Numerous piezoelectric materials are used in acoustic sensors today; but maximum use temperatures are imposed by their transition temperatures (T(sub c)) and by their resistivity. Lithium niobate, in single crystal form, has the highest operating temperature of any commercially available material, 650 C; but that is not high enough for future requirements. Only two piezoelectric materials show potential for use at 1000 C; AlN thin film reported to be piezoactive at 1150 C, and perovskite layer structure (PLS) materials, which possess among the highest T(sub c) (greater than 1500 C) reported for ferroelectrics. A ceramic PLS composition was chosen. The solid solution composition, 80% strontium niobate (SN) and 20% strontium tantalate (STa), with a T(sub c) approximately 1160 C, was hot forged, a process which concurrently sinters and renders the plate-like grains into a highly oriented configuration to enhance piezo properties. Poled samples of this composition showed coupling (k33) approximately 6 and piezoelectric strain constant (d33) approximately 3. Piezoactivity was seen at 1125 C, the highest temperature measurement reported for a ferroelectric ceramic. The high temperature piezoelectric responses of this, and similar PLS materials, opens the possibility of their use in electronic devices operating at temperatures up to

  4. Increase of the blocking temperature of Fe-Ag granular multilayers with increasing number of the layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogh, Judit; Kaptás, Dénes; Kiss, László F.; Dézsi, István; Nakanishi, Akio; Devlin, Eamonn; Vasilakaki, Marianna; Margaris, George; Trohidou, Kalliopi N.

    2016-03-01

    Multilayers of 0.4 nm Fe and 5 nm Ag with repetition number, n=1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 were prepared by vacuum evaporation onto Si wafer. The blocking temperature was determined by measuring the field cooled and zero field cooled magnetization curves with a SQUID magnetometer and it was found to increase by almost an order of magnitude from around 20 K for the single Fe layer sample up to around 160 K for n=20. Significant increase of the average size of the superparamagnetic Fe grains by increasing the number of the Fe layers was excluded by conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements of the paramagnetic state. The role of the dipole-dipole interactions and their interplay with the out-of-plain magnetic anisotropy in the variation of the blocking temperature has been investigated by Monte-Carlo simulations.

  5. Probing temperature gradients within the GaN buffer layer of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with Raman thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Hodges, C. Pomeroy, J.; Kuball, M.

    2014-02-14

    We demonstrate the ability of confocal Raman thermography using a spatial filter and azimuthal polarization to probe vertical temperature gradients within the GaN buffer layer of operating AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors. Temperature gradients in the GaN layer are measured by using offset focal planes to minimize the contribution from different regions of the GaN buffer. The measured temperature gradient is in good agreement with a thermal simulation treating the GaN thermal conductivity as homogeneous throughout the layer and including a low thermal conductivity nucleation layer to model the heat flow between the buffer and substrate.

  6. Room-Temperature Optical Tunability and Inhomogeneous Broadening in 2D-Layered Organic-Inorganic Perovskite Pseudobinary Alloys.

    PubMed

    Lanty, Gaëtan; Jemli, Khaoula; Wei, Yi; Leymarie, Joël; Even, Jacky; Lauret, Jean-Sébastien; Deleporte, Emmanuelle

    2014-11-20

    We focus here our attention on a particular family of 2D-layered and 3D hybrid perovskite molecular crystals, the mixed perovskites (C6H5-C2H4-NH3)2PbZ4(1-x)Y4x and (CH3-NH3)PbZ3(1-x)Y3x, where Z and Y are halogen ions such as I, Br, and Cl. Studying experimentally the disorder-induced effects on the optical properties of the 2D mixed layered materials, we demonstrate that they can be considered as pseudobinary alloys, exactly like Ga1-xAlxAs, Cd1-xHgxTe inorganic semiconductors, or previously reported 3D mixed hybrid perovskite compounds. 2D-layered and 3D hybrid perovskites afford similar continuous optical tunability at room temperature. Our theoretical analysis allows one to describe the influence of alloying on the excitonic properties of 2D-layered perovskite molecular crystals. This model is further refined by considering different Bohr radii for pure compounds. This study confirms that despite a large binding energy of several 100 meV, the 2D excitons present a Wannier character rather than a Frenkel character. The small inhomogeneous broadening previously reported in 3D hybrid compounds at low temperature is similarly consistent with the Wannier character of free excitons. PMID:26276477

  7. Effects of temperature and gas phase impurities on the composition of Co-B alloy surface layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, O. Yu.; Olyanina, N. V.; Bel'tyukov, A. L.; Lad'yanov, V. I.

    2015-05-01

    Layers formed on the surfaces of Co-B melts in vacuum and in a helium atmosphere with oxygen and carbon contamination are purified. It is established that films containing B2O3 and CoO oxides form on the melt surfaces, leading to abnormalities in the temperature dependences of viscosity. It is shown that increasing the boron content in the Co100- x B x alloys lowers the temperature of oxide disappearance. Raising the oxygen content stabilizes oxides, while carbon impurities block their formation.

  8. Temperature controlled icy dust reservoir of sodium: A possible mechanism for the formation of sporadic sodium layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Shican; Tang, Yihuan; Dou, Xiankang

    2015-06-01

    Using seven years, from 2006 to 2013, sodium lidar observations over Hefei, China (31.80°N, 117.3°E), we attempt to propose a possible mechanism for the formation of sporadic sodium layers (SSLs or NaS). We analyze the relationship between low temperature (<150 K) and SSL occurrence and detect a statistically significant link that the low temperature (<150 K) occur in three days before an SSL with an occurrence rate of 93.4% (57/61). The sharp decrease of water vapor concentration nearby before an SSL and the recover after the SSL are also detected frequently. Based upon these evidences and some case studies, we propose an icy dust reservoir in the formation of an SSL. The icy dust could form in the extremely cold mesopause region where the temperature falls below 150 K and it will absorb sodium atoms to form a solid sodium metal film as a sodium reservoir. The icy dust will then sublimate rapidly when meeting with warm air (e.g., 150 K < T < 190 K) and leave behind the solid metal atom film. The remanent sodium film might release vapor sodium atoms finally by some means through high temperature (e.g., >190 K and sometimes even >230 K) and form a sporadic sodium layer. Although not conclusive and highly uncertain, the icy dust reservoir model not only provides a good explanation for the observed characteristics of SSLs; it is also in good agreement with many other observations, such as the simultaneous sporadic sodium and iron layers, the behavior of SSLs on small time scale, the deviation of the sodium density profile of SSLs from the normal one, and the sharply decreased scale height above the peak of the sodium layer. These results further suggest that the icy dust might be a viable option of sodium reservoir for the formation of SSLs.

  9. Small amplitude electron-acoustic double layers and solitons in fully relativistic plasmas of two-temperature electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Nam C.

    2009-04-15

    A Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for fully relativistic one dimensional plasmas of arbitrarily large streaming speed and temperature is derived by using the reductive perturbation method. For plasmas with more than two species of particles, the coefficient representing quadratic nonlinearity in KdV can vanish at critical values of certain parameters. To describe the nonlinear evolution at this critical parameter, a modified KdV (mKdV) equation that contains a cubic nonlinear term is obtained. Furthermore, a mixed mKdV equation pertaining to parameters in the vicinity of the critical values is also derived, in which the quadratic and cubic nonlinearities are both present. As an illustration of the results, the mixed mKdV equation is applied to a plasma comprised of cold ions and electrons having cold (T=0) and finite temperature components. For warm temperature T<layer (kink) and solitary waves can exist, which have phase speed {radical}(3T/(4+{alpha})m{sub e}) in the rest frame of plasma, where {alpha} is the polytropic index of the equation of state of the warm electrons. The thickness of the transitional layer of the kink structure is of the order of Debye length {lambda}{sub D}. For extremely high temperature T>>m{sub e}c{sup 2}, it is also found that double layer and soliton-type solutions can exist with phase speed {radical}({alpha}-1)c, which is equal to the well known relativistic sound speed c/{radical}(3) for {alpha}=4/3. The thickness of the transition layer scales as {delta}{approx}T{sup -1/4}, which is different from the T<

  10. Low-temperature ({<=}200 Degree-Sign C) plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of dense titanium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Samal, Nigamananda; Du Hui; Luberoff, Russell; Chetry, Krishna; Bubber, Randhir; Hayes, Alan; Devasahayam, Adrian

    2013-01-15

    Titanium nitride (TiN) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry for its diffusion barrier and seed layer properties. However, it has seen limited adoption in other industries in which low temperature (<200 Degree-Sign C) deposition is a requirement. Examples of applications which require low temperature deposition are seed layers for magnetic materials in the data storage (DS) industry and seed and diffusion barrier layers for through-silicon-vias (TSV) in the MEMS industry. This paper describes a low temperature TiN process with appropriate electrical, chemical, and structural properties based on plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition method that is suitable for the DS and MEMS industries. It uses tetrakis-(dimethylamino)-titanium as an organometallic precursor and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as co-reactant. This process was developed in a Veeco NEXUS Trade-Mark-Sign chemical vapor deposition tool. The tool uses a substrate rf-biased configuration with a grounded gas shower head. In this paper, the complimentary and self-limiting character of this process is demonstrated. The effects of key processing parameters including temperature, pulse time, and plasma power are investigated in terms of growth rate, stress, crystal morphology, chemical, electrical, and optical properties. Stoichiometric thin films with growth rates of 0.4-0.5 A/cycle were achieved. Low electrical resistivity (<300 {mu}{Omega} cm), high mass density (>4 g/cm{sup 3}), low stress (<250 MPa), and >85% step coverage for aspect ratio of 10:1 were realized. Wet chemical etch data show robust chemical stability of the film. The properties of the film have been optimized to satisfy industrial viability as a Ruthenium (Ru) preseed liner in potential data storage and TSV applications.

  11. Satellite and Skin Layer Effects on the Accuracy of Sea Surface Temperature Measurements from the GOES Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wick, Gary A.; Bates, John J.; Scott, Donna J.

    2000-01-01

    The latest Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have facilitated significant improvements in our ability to measure sea surface temperature (SST) from geostationary satellites. Nonetheless, difficulties associated with sensor calibration and oceanic near-surface temperature gradients affect the accuracy of the measurements and our ability to estimate and interpret the diurnal cycle of the bulk SST. Overall, measurements of SST from the GOES Imagers on the GOES 8-10 satellites are shown to have very small bias (less than 0.02 K) and rms differences of between 0.6 and 0.9 K relative to buoy observations. Separate consideration of individual measurement times, however, demonstrates systematic bias variations of over 0.6 K with measurement hour. These bias variations significantly affect both the amplitude and shape of estimates of the diurnal SST cycle. Modeled estimates of the temperature difference across the oceanic cool skin and diurnal thermocline show that bias variations up to 0.3 K can result from variability in the near-surface layer. Oceanic near-surface layer and known "satellite midnight" calibration effects, however, explain only a portion of the observed bias variations, suggesting other possible calibration concerns. Methods of explicitly incorporating skin layer and diurnal thermocline effects in satellite bulk SST measurements were explored in an effort to further improve the measurement accuracy. While the approaches contain more complete physics, they do not yet significantly improve the accuracy of bulk SST measurements due to remaining uncertainties in the temperature difference across the near-surface layer.

  12. Reduction of dislocation density in mismatched SiGe/Si using a low-temperature Si buffer layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linder, K. K.; Zhang, F. C.; Rieh, J.-S.; Bhattacharya, P.; Houghton, D.

    1997-06-01

    The reduction of the dislocation density in relaxed SiGe/Si heterostructures using a low-temperature Si(LT-Si) buffer has been investigated. We have shown that a 0.1 μm LT-Si buffer reduces the threading dislocation density in mismatched Si0.85Ge0.15/Si epitaxial layers as low as ˜104cm-2. Samples were grown by both gas-source molecular beam epitaxy and ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition.

  13. A green synthesis of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate; lower temperature solid-state reaction and improved materials performance

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Makoto; Morita, Masashi; Igarashi, Shota; Sato, Soh

    2013-10-15

    A layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, with the size range from 0.1 to 30 µm was prepared to show the effects of the particle size on the materials performance. The potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction as reported previously, where the reaction temperature was varied. The reported temperature for the titanate preparation was higher than 800 °C, though 600 °C is good enough to obtain single-phase potassium lithium titanate. The lower temperature synthesis is cost effective and the product exhibit better performance as photocatalysts due to surface reactivity. - Graphical abstract: Finite particle of a layered titanate, potassium lithium titanate, was prepared by solid-state reaction at lower temperature to show modified materials performance. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Potassium lithium titanate was prepared by solid-state reaction. • Lower temperature reaction resulted in smaller sized particles of titanate. • 600 °C was good enough to obtain single phased potassium lithium titanate. • The product exhibited better performance as photocatalyst.

  14. Turbulent transport of heat and momentum in a boundary layer subject to deceleration, suction and variable wall temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlando, A. F.; Moffat, R. J.; Kays, W. M.

    1974-01-01

    The relationship between the turbulent transport of heat and momentum in an adverse pressure gradient boundary layer was studied. An experimental study was conducted of turbulent boundary layers subject to strong adverse pressure gradients with suction. Near-equilibrium flows were attained, evidenced by outer-region similarity in terms of defect temperature and defect velocity profiles. The relationship between Stanton number and enthalpy thickness was shown to be the same as for a flat plate flow both for constant wall temperature boundary conditions and for steps in wall temperature. The superposition principle used with the step-wall-temperature experimental result was shown to accurately predict the Stanton number variation for two cases of arbitrarily varying wall temperature. The Reynolds stress tensor components were measured for strong adverse pressure gradient conditions and different suction rates. Two peaks of turbulence intensity were found: one in the inner and one in the outer regions. The outer peak is shown to be displaced outward by an adverse pressure gradient and suppressed by suction.

  15. High Temperature Evaluation of an Active Clearance Control System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Shawn C.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Oswald, Jay J.

    2006-01-01

    A mechanically actuated blade tip clearance control concept was evaluated in a nonrotating test rig to quantify secondary seal leakage at elevated temperatures. These tests were conducted to further investigate the feasibility of actively controlling the clearance between the rotor blade tips and the surrounding shroud seal in the high pressure turbine (HPT) section of a turbine engine. The test environment simulates the state of the back side of the HPT shroud seal with pressure differentials as high as 120 psig and temperatures up to 1000 F. As expected, static secondary seal leakage decreased with increasing temperature. At 1000 F, the test rig's calculated effective clearance (at 120 psig test pressure) was 0.0003 in., well within the industry specified effective clearance goal.

  16. Temperature-dependent excitonic effects in the optical properties of single-layer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Sánchez, Alejandro; Palummo, Maurizia; Marini, Andrea; Wirtz, Ludger

    2016-04-01

    Temperature influences the performance of two-dimensional (2D) materials in optoelectronic devices. Indeed, the optical characterization of these materials is usually realized at room temperature. Nevertheless, most ab initio studies are still performed without including any temperature effect. As a consequence, important features are thus overlooked, such as the relative height of the excitonic peaks and their broadening, directly related to the temperature and to the nonradiative exciton relaxation time. We present ab initio calculations of the optical response of single-layer MoS2, a prototype 2D material, as a function of temperature using density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory. We compute the electron-phonon interaction using the full spinorial wave functions, i.e., fully taking into account the effects of spin-orbit interaction. We find that bound excitons (A and B peaks) and resonant excitons (C peak) exhibit different behavior with temperature, displaying different nonradiative linewidths. We conclude that the inhomogeneous broadening of the absorption spectra is mainly due to electron-phonon scattering mechanisms. Our calculations explain the shortcomings of previous (zero-temperature) theoretical spectra and match well with the experimental spectra acquired at room temperature. Moreover, we disentangle the contributions of acoustic and optical phonon modes to the quasiparticles and exciton linewidths. Our model also allows us to identify which phonon modes couple to each exciton state, which is useful for the interpretation of resonant Raman-scattering experiments.

  17. Active layer thickness and thaw subsidence in permafrost terrain: results from long-term observations near Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiklomanov, N. I.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Nelson, F. E.

    2012-12-01

    data analysis indicate that long-term changes in ALT are accompanied by pronounced interannual variability. No significant trends are observed in the active-layer record over the last 20 years. The values from the 1960s are generally higher than in the 1990s and are very similar to those of the 2000s. Following below-average thaw in 1991-1993, there was a general increase in ALT, followed by stabilization in the thawing regime during 1999-2011. The sampled areas showed net subsidence of the ground surface over the period of observation (2003-2011), reducing average surface elevation by 0.13 m. To evaluate the integrated thermal response of this permafrost landscape to climatic forcing, site-average annual thaw depth values were correlated with the square root of DDT, estimated from site-specific air temperature records and accumulated by the date of thaw depth and surface elevation measurements. The linear best-fit regression equation was used, in conjunction with the DDT record, to estimate the vertical position of the ground surface years prior to 2003, when DGPS surveys were initiated. Results indicate that over the 18 year period the elevation of the permafrost table has decreased by 0.33 m. Only 36% (0.12 m) of this change is attributable to increased active-layer thickness, while 64% (0.21m) is attributable to subsidence of the ground surface.

  18. Development of a low activation concrete shielding wall by multi-layered structure for a fusion reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Maegawa, Toshio; Yoshimatsu, Kenji; Sato, Koichi; Nonaka, Akira; Takakura, Kosuke; Ochiai, Kentaro; Konno, Chikara

    2011-10-01

    A multi-layered concrete structure has been developed to reduce induced activity in the shielding for neutron generating facilities such as a fusion reactor. The multi-layered concrete structure is composed of: (1) an inner low activation concrete, (2) a boron-doped low activation concrete as the second layer, and (3) ordinary concrete as the outer layer of the neutron shield. With the multi-layered concrete structure the volume of boron is drastically decreased compared to a monolithic boron-doped concrete. A 14 MeV neutron shielding experiment with multi-layered concrete structure mockups was performed at FNS and several reaction rates and induced activity in the mockups were measured. This demonstrated that the multi-layered concrete effectively reduced low energy neutrons and induced activity.

  19. Room-temperature ferromagneticlike behavior in Mn-implanted and postannealed InAs layers deposited by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Arrabal, R.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L.; Martin-Gonzalez, M. S.; Munnik, F.

    2009-04-01

    We report on the magnetic and structural properties of Ar- and Mn-implanted InAs epitaxial films grown on GaAs (100) by molecular beam epitaxy and the effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) for 30 s at 750 deg. C. Channeling particle induced x-ray emission (PIXE) experiments reveal that after Mn implantation almost all Mn atoms are substitutional in the In site of the InAs lattice, like in a diluted magnetic semiconductor. All of these samples show diamagnetic behavior. However, after RTA treatment the Mn-InAs films exhibit room-temperature magnetism. According to PIXE measurements the Mn atoms are no longer substitutional. When the same set of experiments was performed with Ar as implantation ion, all of the layers present diamagnetism without exception. This indicates that the appearance of room-temperature ferromagneticlike behavior in the Mn-InAs-RTA layer is not related to lattice disorder produced during implantation but to a Mn reaction produced after a short thermal treatment. X-ray diffraction patterns and Rutherford backscattering measurements evidence the segregation of an oxygen-deficient MnO{sub 2} phase (nominally MnO{sub 1.94}) in the Mn-InAs-RTA epitaxial layers which might be the origin of the room-temperature ferromagneticlike response observed.

  20. Photoconductivity of ultra-thin Ge(GeSn) layers grown in Si by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talochkin, A. B.; Chistokhin, I. B.; Mashanov, V. I.

    2016-04-01

    Photoconductivity (PC) spectra of Si/Ge(GeSn)/Si structures with the ultra-thin (1.0-2.3 nm) Ge and GeSn alloy layers grown by the low-temperature (T = 100 °C) molecular beam epitaxy are studied. Photoresponse in the range of 1.2-0.4 eV related to light absorption in the buried Ge(GeSn) layer is observed. It is shown that in case of lateral PC, a simple diffusion model can be used to determine the absorption coefficient of this layer α ˜ 105 cm-1. This value is 100 times larger than that of a single Ge quantum dot layer and is reached significantly above the band gap of most bulk semiconductors. The observed absorption is caused by optical transitions between electron and hole states localized at the interfaces. The anomalous high value of α can be explained by the unusual state of Ge(GeSn) layer with high concentration of dangling bonds, the optical properties of which have been predicted theoretically by Knief and von Niessen (Phys. Rev. B 59, 12940 (1999)).

  1. Molecular simulation of adsorption and separation of mixtures of short linear alkanes in pillared layered materials at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Zhuo; Liu, Zi-Yang; Che, Yu-Liang; Zhang, Dan

    2007-08-15

    Grand canonical Monte Carlo and configurational-bias Monte Carlo techniques are carried out to simulate the adsorption of ternary and quaternary mixtures of short linear alkanes, involving methane, ethane, propane, and n-butane, in pillared layered materials at ambient temperature, T=300 K. In the simulation, a pillared layered pore is modeled by a uniform distribution of pillars between two layered walls built by making two separate talc lamellas parallel each other with a given size of interlayer distance. The interaction between fluid molecules and two layered walls is measured by storing potentials calculated in advance at a series of grid points. The interaction between fluid molecules and pillars is also calculated by a site-to-site method. The potential model proposed in this work is proved to be effective because of the simulation result being good agreement with the experimental data for the adsorption of nitrogen at 77 K. Then, the adsorption isotherms of mixtures of short linear alkanes in pillared layered pores with three different porosities psi=0.98, 0.93 and 0.85, and three pore widths H=1.02, 1.70 and 2.38 nm at 300 K are obtained by taking advantage of the model. The simulation results tell us that the longer chain component is preferentially adsorbed at low pressures, and its adsorption increases and then decreases as the pressure increases while the shorter chain component is still adsorbed at high pressures. Moreover, the sorption selectivity of pillared layered materials for the longest chain component in alkane mixtures increases as the mole fraction of methane in the gas phase increases. The selectivity of pillared layered materials for the longest chain component in alkane mixtures also increases as the pore width decreases and the porosity increases. PMID:17482203

  2. Role of Cobalt Content in Improving the Low-Temperature Performance of Layered Lithium-Rich Cathode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Kou, Jianwen; Chen, Lai; Su, Yuefeng; Bao, Liying; Wang, Jing; Li, Ning; Li, Weikang; Wang, Meng; Chen, Shi; Wu, Feng

    2015-08-19

    Layered lithium-rich cathode material, Li1.2Ni0.2-xCo2xMn0.6-xO2 (x = 0-0.05) was successfully synthesized using a sol-gel method, followed by heat treatment. The effects of trace amount of cobalt doping on the structure, morphology, and low-temperature (-20 °C) electrochemical properties of these materials are investigated systematically. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm that the Co has been doped into the Ni/Mn sites in the transition-metal layers without destroying the pristine layered structure. The morphological observations reveal that there are no changes of morphology or particle size after Co doping. The electrochemical performance results indicate that the discharge capacities and operation voltages are drastically lowered along with the decreasing temperature, but their fading rate becomes slower when increasing the Co contents. At -20 °C, the initial discharge capacity of sample with x = 0 could retain only 22.1% (57.3/259.2 mAh g(-1)) of that at 30 °C, while sample with x = 0.05 could maintain 39.4% (111.3/282.2 mAh g(-1)). Activation energy analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results reveal that such an enhancement of low-temperature discharge capacity is originated from the easier interface reduction reaction of Ni(4+) or Co(4+) after doping trace amounts of Co, which decreases the activation energy of the charge transfer process above 3.5 V during discharging. PMID:26222273

  3. Low frequency solitons and double layers in a magnetized plasma with two temperature electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rufai, O. R.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2012-12-15

    Finite amplitude non-linear ion-acoustic solitary waves and double layers are studied in a magnetized plasma with cold ions fluid and two distinct groups of Boltzmann electrons, using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique. The conditions under which the solitary waves and double layers can exist are found both analytically and numerically. We have shown the existence of negative potential solitary waves and double layers for subsonic Mach numbers, whereas in the unmagnetized plasma they can only in the supersonic Mach number regime. For the plasma parameters in the auroral region, the electric field amplitude of the solitary structures comes out to be 49 mV/m which is in agreement of the Viking observations in this region.

  4. Activity induces traveling waves, vortices and spatiotemporal chaos in a model actomyosin layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Inspired by the actomyosin cortex in biological cells, we investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a model describing a contractile active polar fluid sandwiched between two external media. The external media impose frictional forces at the interface with the active fluid. The fluid is driven by a spatially-homogeneous activity measuring the strength of the active stress that is generated by processes consuming a chemical fuel. We observe that as the activity is increased over two orders of magnitude the active polar fluid first shows spontaneous flow transition followed by transition to oscillatory dynamics with traveling waves and traveling vortices in the flow field. In the flow-tumbling regime, the active polar fluid also shows transition to spatiotemporal chaos at sufficiently large activities. These results demonstrate that level of activity alone can be used to tune the operating point of actomyosin layers with qualitatively different spatiotemporal dynamics.

  5. Activity induces traveling waves, vortices and spatiotemporal chaos in a model actomyosin layer

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Rajesh; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the actomyosin cortex in biological cells, we investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of a model describing a contractile active polar fluid sandwiched between two external media. The external media impose frictional forces at the interface with the active fluid. The fluid is driven by a spatially-homogeneous activity measuring the strength of the active stress that is generated by processes consuming a chemical fuel. We observe that as the activity is increased over two orders of magnitude the active polar fluid first shows spontaneous flow transition followed by transition to oscillatory dynamics with traveling waves and traveling vortices in the flow field. In the flow-tumbling regime, the active polar fluid also shows transition to spatiotemporal chaos at sufficiently large activities. These results demonstrate that level of activity alone can be used to tune the operating point of actomyosin layers with qualitatively different spatiotemporal dynamics. PMID:26877263

  6. Photocatalytic activity of layered perovskite-like oxides in practically valuable chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, I. A.; Zvereva, I. A.

    2016-03-01

    The photocatalytic properties of layered perovskite-like oxides corresponding to the Ruddlesen–Popper, Dion–Jacobson and Aurivillius phases are considered. Of the photocatalytic reactions, the focus is on the reactions of water splitting, hydrogen evolution from aqueous solutions of organic substances and degradation of model organic pollutants. Possibilities to conduct these reactions under UV and visible light in the presence of layered perovskite-like oxides and composite photocatalysts based on them are shown. The specific surface area, band gap energy, particle morphology, cation and anion doping and surface modification are considered as factors that affect the photocatalytic activity. Special attention is paid to the possibilities to enhance the photocatalytic activity by intercalation, ion exchange and exfoliation, which are inherent in this class of compounds. Conclusions are made about the prospects for the use of layered perovskite-like oxides in photocatalysis. The bibliography includes 253 references.

  7. Low-temperature catalyst activator: mechanism of dense carbon nanotube forest growth studied using synchrotron radiation

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Akito; Izumi, Yudai; Ikenaga, Eiji; Ohkochi, Takuo; Kotsugi, Masato; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Muro, Takayuki; Kawabata, Akio; Murakami, Tomo; Nihei, Mizuhisa; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of the one-order-of-magnitude increase in the density of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) achieved by a recently developed thermal chemical vapor deposition process was studied using synchrotron radiation spectroscopic techniques. In the developed process, a Ti film is used as the underlayer for an Fe catalyst film. A characteristic point of this process is that C2H2 feeding for the catalyst starts at a low temperature of 450°C, whereas conventional feeding temperatures are ∼800°C. Photoemission spectroscopy using soft and hard X-rays revealed that the Ti underlayer reduced the initially oxidized Fe layer at 450°C. A photoemission intensity analysis also suggested that the oxidized Ti layer at 450°C behaved as a support for nanoparticle formation of the reduced Fe, which is required for dense CNT growth. In fact, a CNT growth experiment, where the catalyst chemical state was monitored in situ by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, showed that the reduced Fe yielded a CNT forest at 450°C. Contrarily, an Fe layer without the Ti underlayer did not yield such a CNT forest at 450°C. Photoemission electron microscopy showed that catalyst annealing at the conventional feeding temperature of 800°C caused excess catalyst agglomeration, which should lead to sparse CNTs. In conclusion, in the developed growth process, the low-temperature catalyst activation by the Ti underlayer before the excess Fe agglomeration realised the CNT densification. PMID:25075343

  8. Water-temperature data acquisition activities in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pauszek, F.H.

    1972-01-01

    Along with the growing interest in water quality during the last decade, the need for data on all types of water-quality parameters has also increased. One parameter of particular interest, because of its many ramifications, is temperature. It influences many of the chemical and physical processes that take place in water. The solubility of gases--for example, oxygen and carbon dioxide--and the solution of mineral matter in water are functions of temperature. Such physical properties as density and viscosity vary with temperature. Oxidation of organic materials, as well as algal and bacterial growth, is promoted or retarded by favorable or unfavorable temperatures. Further, temperature bears on the utility of water: as a source of public water supplies; for industrial use, particularly if the water is used for cooling; and in the field of recreation involving contact sports, fishing, and fish culture. In recent years, temperature changes resulting from inflow of heated industrial waste, particularly effluent from power generating plants, have increased the need for temperature data to determine the degree of change, its effect on ecology, and the effect of any remedial action. Thus, because of the many extensive and intensive effects, a large amount of temperature data is collected on surface and ground waters by many agencies throughout the country. Moreover, because of its importance, there is a widespread interest in temperature even by those who are not active collectors of the data themselves. The industrialist, the manager, the public official, and others at one time or another may have need for temperature data and may well raise the questions: Who is collecting temperature data? What is the extent of the activity? Where are the data being collected? The purpose of this report is to answer these questions. The information in the report is confined to the activities of Federal and non-Federal agencies. It is based on information furnished to the Office of

  9. High-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal synthesis, characterization, and structural relationships of layered uranyl arsenates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsin-Kuan; Ramachandran, Eswaran; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Chang, Wen-Jung; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2014-09-01

    Five new uranyl arsenates, Na14[(UO2)5(AsO4)8]·2H2O (1), K6[(UO2)5O5(AsO4)2] (2a), K4[(UO2)3O2(AsO4)2] (2b), Rb4[(UO2)3O2(AsO4)2] (3), and Cs6[(UO2)5O2(AsO4)4] (4), were synthesized by high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal reactions at about 560 °C and 1440 bar and were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Crystal data for compound 1: triclinic, P1, a = 7.0005(3) Å, b = 12.1324(4) Å, c = 13.7428(5) Å, α = 64.175(2)°, β = 89.092(2)°, γ = 85.548(2)°, V = 1047.26(7) Å(3), Z = 1, R1 = 0.0185; compound 2a: monoclinic, P2₁/c, a = 6.8615(3) Å, b = 24.702(1) Å, c = 7.1269(3) Å, β = 98.749(2)°, V = 1193.89(9) Å(3), Z = 2, R1 = 0.0225; compound 2b: monoclinic, P2₁/c, a = 6.7852(3) Å, b = 17.3640(8) Å, c = 7.1151(3) Å, β = 98.801(3)°, V = 828.42(6) Å(3), Z = 2, R1 = 0.0269; compound 3: monoclinic, P2₁/m, a = 6.9783(3) Å, b = 17.4513(8) Å, c = 7.0867(3) Å, β = 90.808(3)°, V = 862.94(7) Å(3), Z = 2, R1 = 0.0269; compound 4: triclinic, P1, a = 7.7628(3) Å, b = 9.3324(4) Å, c = 11.9336(4) Å, α = 75.611(2)°, β = 73.136(2)°, γ = 86.329(2)°, V = 801.37(5) Å(3), Z = 1, R1 = 0.0336. The five compounds have layer structures consisting of uranyl square, pentagonal, and hexagonal bipyramids as well as AsO4 tetrahedra. Compound 1 contains chains of discrete uranyl square and pentagonal bipyramids, 2a contains three-polyhedron-wide ribbons of edge- and corner-sharing uranyl square and pentagonal bipyramids, 2b and 3 contain dimers of edge-shairing pentagonal bipyramids that share edges with hexagonal bipyramids to form chains, and 4 contains one-polyhedron-wide zigzag chains of edge-sharing uranyl polyhedra. The double sheet structure of 1 is new, but the chain topology has been observed in an organically templated uranyl sulfate. Compound 2b is a new geometrical isomer of the phosphuranylite group. The sheet anion topologies of 2a and 4 can be obtained by

  10. Isotope analysis of diamond-surface passivation effect of high-temperature H2O-grown atomic layer deposition-Al2O3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Saito, Tatsuya; Matsumura, Daisuke; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The Al2O3 film formed using an atomic layer deposition (ALD) method with trimethylaluminum as Al precursor and H2O as oxidant at a high temperature (450 °C) effectively passivates the p-type surface conduction (SC) layer specific to a hydrogen-terminated diamond surface, leading to a successful operation of diamond SC field-effect transistors at 400 °C. In order to investigate this excellent passivation effect, we carried out an isotope analysis using D2O instead of H2O in the ALD and found that the Al2O3 film formed at a conventional temperature (100 °C) incorporates 50 times more CH3 groups than the high-temperature film. This CH3 is supposed to dissociate from the film when heated afterwards at a higher temperature (550 °C) and causes peeling patterns on the H-terminated surface. The high-temperature film is free from this problem and has the largest mass density and dielectric constant among those investigated in this study. The isotope analysis also unveiled a relatively active H-exchange reaction between the diamond H-termination and H2O oxidant during the high-temperature ALD, the SC still being kept intact. This dynamic and yet steady H termination is realized by the suppressed oxidation due to the endothermic reaction with H2O. Additionally, we not only observed the kinetic isotope effect in the form of reduced growth rate of D2O-oxidant ALD but found that the mass density and dielectric constant of D2O-grown Al2O3 films are smaller than those of H2O-grown films. This is a new type of isotope effect, which is not caused by the presence of isotopes in the films unlike the traditional isotope effects that originate from the presence of isotopes itself. Hence, the high-temperature ALD is very effective in forming Al2O3 films as a passivation and/or gate-insulation layer of high-temperature-operation diamond SC devices, and the knowledge of the aforementioned new isotope effect will be a basis for further enhancing ALD technologies in general.

  11. Influence of Saline on Temperature Profile of Laser Lithotripsy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Igor N.; Donalisio da Silva, Rodrigo; Gustafson, Diedra; Sehrt, David; Kim, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: We established an ex vivo model to evaluate the temperature profile of the ureter during laser lithotripsy, the influence of irrigation on temperature, and thermal spread during lithotripsy with the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: Two ex vivo models of Ovis aries urinary tract and human calcium oxalate calculi were used. The Open Ureteral Model was opened longitudinally to measure the thermal profile of the urothelium. On the Clinical Model, anterograde ureteroscopy was performed in an intact urinary system. Temperatures were measured on the external portion of the ureter and the urothelium during lithotripsy and intentional perforation. The lithotripsy group (n=20) was divided into irrigated (n=10) and nonirrigated (n=10), which were compared for thermal spread length and values during laser activation. The intentional perforation group (n=10) was evaluated under saline flow. The Ho:YAG laser with a 365 μm laser fiber and power at 10W was used (1J/Pulse at 10 Hz). Infrared Fluke Ti55 Thermal Imager was used for evaluation. Maximum temperature values were recorded and compared. Results: On the Clinical Model, the external ureteral wall obtained a temperature of 37.4°C±2.5° and 49.5°C±2.3° (P=0.003) and in the Open Ureteral Model, 49.7°C and 112.4°C with and without irrigation, respectively (P<0.05). The thermal spread along the external ureter wall was not statically significant with or without irrigation (P=0.065). During intentional perforation, differences in temperatures were found between groups (opened with and without irrigation): 81.8°±8.8° and 145.0°±15.0°, respectively (P<0.005). Conclusion: There is an increase in the external ureteral temperature during laser activation, but ureteral thermal values decreased when saline flow was applied. Ureter thermal spread showed no difference between irrigated and nonirrigated subgroups. This is the first laser lithotripsy thermography study

  12. Effects of growth temperature on the properties of atomic layer deposition grown ZrO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarel, G.; Ferrari, S.; Spiga, S.; Wiemer, C.; Tallarida, G.; Fanciulli, M.

    2003-07-01

    Zirconium dioxide films are grown in 200 atomic layer deposition cycles. Zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl4) and water (H2O) are used as precursors. A relatively high dielectric constant (κ=22), wide band gap, and conduction band offset (5.8 and 1.4 eV, respectively) indicate that zirconium dioxide is a most promising substitute for silicon dioxide as a dielectric gate in complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. However, crystallization and chlorine ions in the films might affect their electrical properties. These ions are produced during atomic layer deposition in which the ZrCl4 precursor reacts with the growth surface. It is desirable to tune the composition, morphology, and structural properties in order to improve their benefit on the electrical ones. To address this issue it is necessary to properly choose the growth parameters. This work focuses on the effects of the growth temperature Tg. ZrO2 films are grown at different substrate temperatures: 160, 200, 250, and 350 °C. Relevant modification of the film structure with a change in substrate temperature during growth is expected because the density of reactive sites [mainly Si+1-(OH)-1 bonds] decreases with an increase in temperature [Y. B. Kim et al., Electrochem. Solid-State Lett. 3, 346 (2000)]. The amorphous film component, for example, that develops at Si+1-(OH)-1 sites on the starting growth surface, is expected to decrease with an increase in growth temperature. The size and consequences of film property modifications with the growth temperature are investigated in this work using x-ray diffraction and reflectivity, and atomic force microscopy. Time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry is used to study contaminant species in the films. From capacitance-voltage (CV) and current-voltage (IV) measurements, respectively, the dielectric constant κZrO2 and the leakage current are studied as a function of the film growth temperature.

  13. [Multi-layer perceptron neural network based algorithm for simultaneous retrieving temperature and emissivity from hyperspectral FTIR data].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jie; Xiao, Qing; Li, Xiao-Wen; Liu, Qin-Huo; Du, Yong-Ming

    2008-04-01

    The present paper firstly points out the defect of typical temperature and emissivity separation algorithms when dealing with hyperspectral FTIR data: the conventional temperature and emissivity algorithms can not reproduce correct emissivity value when the difference between the ground-leaving radiance and object's blackbody radiation at its true temperature and the instrument random noise are on the same order, and this phenomenon is very prone to occur rence near 714 and 1 250 cm(-1) in the field measurements. In order to settle this defect, a three-layer perceptron neural network has been introduced into the simultaneous inversion of temperature and emissivity from hyperspectral FTIR data. The soil emissivity spectra from the ASTER spectral library were used to produce the training data, the soil emissivity spectra from the MODIS spectral library were used to produce the test data, and the result of network test shows the MLP is robust. Meanwhile, the ISSTES algorithm was used to retrieve the temperature and emissivity form the test data. By comparing the results of MLP and ISSTES, we found the MLP can overcome the disadvantage of typical temperature and emisivity separation, although the rmse of derived emissivity using MLP is lower than the ISSTES as a whole. Hence, the MLP can be regarded as a beneficial complementarity of the typical temperature and emissivity separation. PMID:18619297

  14. Synthesis of metal-incorporated graphitic microporous carbon terminated with highly-ordered graphene walls—Controlling the number of graphene layers by ambient-temperature metal sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arghya Narayan; Min, Bong-Ki; Joo, Sang Woo

    2013-03-01

    Metal-incorporated, graphitic microporous carbon, containing highly ordered graphene layers, has been converted from highly thin amorphous carbon film by a metal nanoparticle sputtering process at ambient substrate temperature. A standard direct-current magnetron sputtering system is used in this purpose. The process consists of a dual effect of activation and graphitization of amorphous carbon to graphitic microporous carbon. The sputtering plasma, containing energetic ions and sub-atomic particles, act as dry-etchant to activate the a:C film to transform it into microporous carbon. Whereas, the inelastic 'knock-on' collision between metal nanoparticles/ions and the nuclei of C atoms manifests the atom displacement and re-arrangement into ordered structure to form graphitic domains within the microporous carbon network. The average number of graphene layer formation has been controlled by adjusting the sputtering voltage and current, as the carbon atom displacement rate is dependent on the irradiation current density. Raman spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy confirms the high controllability of the number of graphene layer formation as a function of sputtering parameters. The method is simple, cost-effective and compatible with modern solid-state device fabrication processing, as it comprises vacuum-based physical vapor deposition techniques, and also, can be adopted easily for transitional metal incorporation into graphene and other carbon nanostructures for potential hydrogen storage and related clean energy applications.

  15. Intercalation and controlled release of pharmaceutically active compounds from a layered double hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Khan, A I; Lei, L; Norquist, A J; O'Hare, D

    2001-11-21

    A series of pharmaceutically active compounds including diclofenac, gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, naproxen, 2-propylpentanoic acid, 4-biphenylacetic acid and tolfenamic acid can be reversibly intercalated into a layered double hydroxide, initial studies suggest that these materials may have application as the basis of a novel tuneable drug delivery system. PMID:12240066

  16. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  17. Toward Efficient Thick Active PTB7 Photovoltaic Layers Using Diphenyl Ether as a Solvent Additive.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yifan; Goh, Tenghooi; Fan, Pu; Shi, Wei; Yu, Junsheng; Taylor, André D

    2016-06-22

    The development of thick organic photovoltaics (OPV) could increase absorption in the active layer and ease manufacturing constraints in large-scale solar panel production. However, the efficiencies of most low-bandgap OPVs decrease substantially when the active layers exceed ∼100 nm in thickness (because of low crystallinity and a short exciton diffusion length). Herein, we report the use of solvent additive diphenyl ether (DPE) that facilitates the fabrication of thick (180 nm) active layers and triples the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of conventional thienothiophene-co-benzodithiophene polymer (PTB7)-based OPVs from 1.75 to 6.19%. These results demonstrate a PCE 20% higher than those of conventional (PTB7)-based OPV devices using 1,8-diiodooctane. Morphology studies reveal that DPE promotes the formation of nanofibrillar networks and ordered packing of PTB7 in the active layer that facilitate charge transport over longer distances. We further demonstrate that DPE improves the fill factor and photocurrent collection by enhancing the overall optical absorption, reducing the series resistance, and suppressing bimolecular recombination. PMID:27253271

  18. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  19. Monitoring active layer thaw and freeze-back in four different periglacial landforms in Svalbard using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliussen, H.; Oswald, A.; Watanabe, T.; Christiansen, H. H.; Matsuoka, N.

    2012-04-01

    Thawing and freezing of the active layer has an important impact on the underlying permafrost through latent heat effects and changes in effective thermal conductivity and mechanisms of heat transport. Information on the active layer freeze/thaw dynamics is therefore important to understand the permafrost response to climate variability. In addition, active layer deepening may be an early sign of permafrost degradation, making monitoring programs such as the CALM network important. Active layer depths are traditionally measured by mechanical probing in fine-grained sediments or by vertical arrays of ground temperature sensors. The first technique prevents measurements to be made in stony sediments, while the latter technique gives only a point value of the active layer depth. In this study we have tested Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) as a tool to measure and monitor active layer depth and freeze/thaw dynamics. The electrical resistivity of the ground is largely dependent on the unfrozen water content, making resistivity monitoring a potentially valuable tool to delineate freeze and thaw extent, and patterns in soil moisture. The results presented here are part of the IPY 2007-2009 research project 'Permafrost Observatory Project: A Contribution to the Thermal State of Permafrost in Norway and Svalbard' (TSP NORWAY) and the IPA periglacial working group project on 'High-Resolution Periglacial Climate Indicators'. Electrode arrays were installed permanently in four different periglacial landforms in the Adventdalen valley area in central Svalbard; a solifluction slope in May 2007, a loess terrace (the UNISCALM site) in September 2007, and a mudboil site and ice-wedge site in June 2009 (Watanabe et al., submitted). The arrays were 16m long, giving maximum profile depths of 2m, and electrodes were installed with 0.2m spacing. Measurements were made with irregular but approximately two- to four-week time intervals, depending on weather conditions and

  20. Effect of Temperature on the Warpage Behavior of a Multi-Layered Thin-Core Flexible Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuñega, Jonee Christine P.; Amorsolo, Alberto V., Jr.

    This paper describes the experimental research of the warpage behavior of a thin-core flexible substrate made of multiple layers of metal and polymer components. The composite substrate was subjected to varied temperatures inside a Shadow Moiré chamber and the warpage behavior was carefully measured at different intervals up to the peak temperature. The maximum displacement was carefully monitored using the principle of Shadow Moiré technique which has been used as a non-contact method in obtaining the 3-D shapes and surface morphologies of materials and allows fine tuning of contours to achieve the best resolution. The same measurement procedures were done during its cool down stage. Different surface profiles were created on the substrate which varies depending on the distribution of the metal and polymer components. It also showed that the magnitude of displacement caused by the warpage gradually changes over temperature. By correlating the observed warpage morphologies of the substrate with that of the temperature load, two warpage mechanisms were observed—one that is largely controlled by the thermo-mechanical properties of the individual layers of the substrate creating a saddle shaped warpage behavior and one that is due to the global response of the bulk properties of the substrate with its surrounding materials.

  1. Low-Temperature Solution-Processed Kesterite Solar Cell Based on in Situ Deposition of Ultrathin Absorber Layer.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi; Azimi, Hamed; Gasparini, Nicola; Salvador, Michael; Chen, Wei; Khanzada, Laraib S; Brandl, Marco; Hock, Rainer; Brabec, Christoph J

    2015-09-30

    The production of high-performance, solution-processed kesterite Cu2ZnSn(Sx,Se1-x)4 (CZTSSe) solar cells typically relies on high-temperature crystallization processes in chalcogen-containing atmosphere and often on the use of environmentally harmful solvents, which could hinder the widespread adoption of this technology. We report a method for processing selenium free Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) solar cells based on a short annealing step at temperatures as low as 350 °C using a molecular based precursor, fully avoiding highly toxic solvents and high-temperature sulfurization. We show that a simple device structure consisting of ITO/CZTS/CdS/Al and comprising an extremely thin absorber layer (∼110 nm) achieves a current density of 8.6 mA/cm(2). Over the course of 400 days under ambient conditions encapsulated devices retain close to 100% of their original efficiency. Using impedance spectroscopy and photoinduced charge carrier extraction by linearly increasing voltage (photo-CELIV), we demonstrate that reduced charge carrier mobility is one limiting parameter of low-temperature CZTS photovoltaics. These results may inform less energy demanding strategies for the production of CZTS optoelectronic layers compatible with large-scale processing techniques. PMID:26353923

  2. Low-temperature gas-barrier films by atomic layer deposition for encapsulating organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Ming-Hung; Yu, Hui-Huan; Chou, Kun-Yi; Jou, Jwo-Huei; Lin, Kung-Liang; Wang, Chin-Chiun; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Dependences of gas-barrier performance on the deposition temperature of atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) Al2O3, HfO2, and ZnO films were studied to establish low-temperature ALD processes for encapsulating organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). By identifying and controlling the key factors, i.e. using H2O2 as an oxidant, laminating Al2O3 with HfO2 or ZnO layers into AHO or AZO nanolaminates, and extending purge steps, OLED-acceptable gas-barrier performance (water vapor transmission rates ∼ 10‑6 g m‑2 d‑1) was achieved for the first time at a low deposition temperature of 50 °C in a thermal ALD mode. The compatibility of the low-temperature ALD process with OLEDs was confirmed by applying the process to encapsulate different types of OLED devices, which were degradation-free upon encapsulation and showed adequate lifetime during accelerated aging tests (pixel shrinkage <5% after 240 h at 60 °C/90% RH).

  3. A Novel Surface Structure Consisting of Contact-active Antibacterial Upper-layer and Antifouling Sub-layer Derived from Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Salt Polyurethanes.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiehua; Gao, Yunlong; Luo, Feng; Tan, Hong; Wang, Kunjie; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Contact-active antibacterial surfaces play a vital role in preventing bacterial contamination of artificial surfaces. In the past, numerous researches have been focused on antibacterial surfaces comprising of antifouling upper-layer and antibacterial sub-layer. In this work, we demonstrate a reversed surface structure which integrate antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer. These surfaces are prepared by simply casting gemini quaternary ammonium salt waterborne polyurethanes (GWPU) and their blends. Due to the high interfacial energy of gemini quaternary ammonium salt (GQAS), chain segments containing GQAS can accumulate at polymer/air interface to form an antibacterial upper-layer spontaneously during the film formation. Meanwhile, the soft segments composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) formed the antifouling sub-layer. Our findings indicate that the combination of antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer endow these surfaces strong, long-lasting antifouling and contact-active antibacterial properties, with a more than 99.99% killing efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria attached to them. PMID:27561546

  4. A Novel Surface Structure Consisting of Contact-active Antibacterial Upper-layer and Antifouling Sub-layer Derived from Gemini Quaternary Ammonium Salt Polyurethanes

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Li, Jiehua; Gao, Yunlong; Luo, Feng; Tan, Hong; Wang, Kunjie; Fu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Contact-active antibacterial surfaces play a vital role in preventing bacterial contamination of artificial surfaces. In the past, numerous researches have been focused on antibacterial surfaces comprising of antifouling upper-layer and antibacterial sub-layer. In this work, we demonstrate a reversed surface structure which integrate antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer. These surfaces are prepared by simply casting gemini quaternary ammonium salt waterborne polyurethanes (GWPU) and their blends. Due to the high interfacial energy of gemini quaternary ammonium salt (GQAS), chain segments containing GQAS can accumulate at polymer/air interface to form an antibacterial upper-layer spontaneously during the film formation. Meanwhile, the soft segments composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) formed the antifouling sub-layer. Our findings indicate that the combination of antibacterial upper-layer and antifouling sub-layer endow these surfaces strong, long-lasting antifouling and contact-active antibacterial properties, with a more than 99.99% killing efficiency against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria attached to them. PMID:27561546

  5. Topside electron temperature models for low and high solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, V. K.; Sethi, N. K.; Mahajan, K. K.

    It is now well known that in the topside ionosphere thermal conduction from the protonosphere becomes the dominant factor over the heating and loss terms in shaping the ionospheric electron temperature (Te) profile. By analyzing a limited database of incoherent scatter (IS) Te measurements, Mahajan and Pandey [J. Geophys. Res. 85 (1980) 213] reported a correlation between the electron heat flux and electron density in the topside ionosphere. Since attention has been steadily mounting for the empirical modeling of Te, we now exploit the large database of IS measurements of Te and Ne at Arecibo during 1989-1990 (high solar activity), as well as during 1975-1976 (low solar activity) for this purpose. We again find a functional relationship between heat flux and electron density in the topside ionosphere during both the solar activities. These functional relationships are used to generate topside Te profiles.

  6. The Relation Between Wind Speed and Air-Sea Temperature Difference in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer off Northwest Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettle, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Wind speed and atmospheric stability have an important role in determining the turbulence in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) as well as the surface wave field. The understanding of MABL dynamics in northwest Europe is complicated by fetch effects, the proximity of coastlines, shallow topography, and larger scale circulation patterns (e.g., cold air outbreaks). Numerical models have difficulty simulating the marine atmospheric boundary layer in coastal areas and partially enclosed seas, and this is partly due to spatial resolution problems at coastlines. In these offshore environments, the boundary layer processes are often best understood directly from time series measurements from fixed platforms or buoys, in spite of potential difficulties from platform flow distortion as well as the spatial sparseness of the data sets. This contribution presents the results of time series measurements from offshore platforms in the North Sea and Norwegian Sea in terms of a summary diagnostic - wind speed versus air-sea temperature difference (U-ΔT) - with important implications for understanding atmospheric boundary layer processes. The U-ΔT diagram was introduced in earlier surveys of data from coastal (Sletringen; O.J. Andersen and J. Løvseth, J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn., 57, 97-109, 1995) and offshore (Statfjord A; K.J. Eidsvik, Boundary-Layer Meteorol., 32, 103-132, 1985) sites in northwest Europe to summarize boundary layer conditions at a given location. Additional information from a series of measurement purpose-built offshore measurement and oil/gas production platforms from the southern North Sea to the Norwegian Sea illustrates how the wind characteristics vary spatially over large distances, highlighting the influence of cold air outbreaks, in particular. The results are important for the offshore wind industry because of the way that wind turbines accrue fatigue damage in different conditions of atmospheric stability and wind speed.

  7. Evidence for a temperature rise in the outer layers of alpha Lyrae, from Copernicus observations of Lyman-alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praderie, F.; Simonneau, E.; Snow, T. P., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Copernicus satellite observations of the Ly-alpha profiles in alpha Lyrae (Vega) are used to determine whether classical radiative-equilibrium LTE model atmospheres can fit the thermal structure in the outer layers of that star. Two plane-parallel LTE model photospheres of alpha Lyrae are considered: a line-blanketed radiative-equilibrium model with an effective temperature of 9650 K and log g of 4.05, and the same model with a temperature of 9500 K and log g of 4.0. The profiles of the Ly-alpha wings are computed, and it is found that classical LTE models are unable to predict either the observed violet wing or the red wing longwards of 1239 A, regardless of the line source function. It is concluded that the electron temperature must increase outwards over the surface value reached in radiative equilibrium.

  8. Low-temperature solution-processed tin oxide as an alternative electron transporting layer for efficient perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Weijun; Fang, Guojia; Liu, Qin; Xiong, Liangbin; Qin, Pingli; Tao, Hong; Wang, Jing; Lei, Hongwei; Li, Borui; Wan, Jiawei; Yang, Guang; Yan, Yanfa

    2015-06-01

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells with the high efficiencies typically use high-temperature processed TiO2 as the electron transporting layers (ETLs). Here, we demonstrate that low-temperature solution-processed nanocrystalline SnO2 can be an excellent alternative ETL material for efficient perovskite solar cells. Our best-performing planar cell using such a SnO2 ETL has achieved an average efficiency of 16.02%, obtained from efficiencies measured from both reverse and forward voltage scans. The outstanding performance of SnO2 ETLs is attributed to the excellent properties of nanocrystalline SnO2 films, such as good antireflection, suitable band edge positions, and high electron mobility. The simple low-temperature process is compatible with the roll-to-roll manufacturing of low-cost perovskite solar cells on flexible substrates. PMID:25987132

  9. Temperature and bias-voltage dependence of atomic-layer-deposited HfO{sub 2}-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Fabretti, Savio; Zierold, Robert; Nielsch, Kornelius; Voigt, Carmen; Ronning, Carsten; Peretzki, Patrick; Seibt, Michael; Thomas, Andy

    2014-09-29

    Magnetic tunnel junctions with HfO{sub 2} tunnel barriers were prepared through a combination of magnetron sputtering and atomic layer deposition. We investigated the tunneling transport behavior, including the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio and the current-voltage characteristics between room temperature and 2 K. Here, we achieved a tunneling magneto resistance ratio of 10.3% at room temperature and 19.3% at 2 K. Furthermore, we studied the bias-voltage and temperature dependencies and compared the results with those of commonly used alumina- and magnesia-based magnetic tunnel junctions. We observed a polycrystalline/amorphous electrode-barrier system via high-resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Tension-induced phase transition of single-layer molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junhua; Kou, Liangzhi; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Rabczuk, Timon

    2014-07-25

    We show that the hexagonal structure of single-layer molybdenum disulphide (MoS2), under uniaxial tension along a zigzag direction for large deformations, can transfer to a new quadrilateral structure by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations when the temperature is below 40 K. The new phase remains stable after unloading, even at room temperature. The Young's modulus of the new phase along the zigzag direction is about 2.5 times higher than that of normal MoS2. Checking against density functional theory calculations shows that the new phase is preserved and displays excellent electrical conductivity. Our results provide physical insights into the origins of the new phase transition of MoS2 at low temperatures. PMID:24980057

  11. Effect of treatment temperature on surface wettability of methylcyclosiloxane layer formed by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, Takahiro; Sasagawa, Keisuke; Furukawa, Takuya; Kumagai, Sou; Yamamoto, Erina; Chiba, Satoshi; Kamiyama, Naosumi; Kiguchi, Takayoshi

    2016-08-01

    The surface wettability of the native Si oxide surfaces were tuned by chemical adsorption of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TMCTS) molecules through thermal CVD method at different temperature. Water contact angle measurements revealed that the water contact angles of the TMCTS-modified Si oxide surfaces at the temperature of 333-373 K were found to be in the range of 92 ± 2-102 ± 2°. The advancing and receding water contact angle of the surface prepared at 333 K were found to be 97 ± 2/92 ± 2°, showing low contact angle hysteresis surface. The water contact angles of the surfaces prepared at the temperature of 373-413 K increased with an increase in the treatment temperature. When the treatment temperature was more than 423 K, the water contact angles of TMCTS-modified surfaces were found to become more than 150°, showing superhydrophobic surface. AFM study revealed that the surface roughness of the TMCTS-modified surface increased with an increase in the treatment temperature. This geometric morphology enhanced the surface hydrophobicity. The surface roughness could be fabricated due to the hydrolysis/condensation reactions in the gas phase during CVD process. The effect of the treatment temperature on the reactivity of the TMCTS molecules were also investigated using a thermogravimetric analyzer.

  12. Temperature profiling of the atmospheric boundary layer with rotational Raman lidar during the HD(CP)2 observational prototype experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammann, E.; Behrendt, A.; Le Mounier, F.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2014-11-01

    The temperature measurements of the Rotational Raman Lidar of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH RRL) during the High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2 Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in April and May 2013 are discussed. The lidar consists of a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm with 10 W average power at 50 Hz, a two-mirror scanner, a 40 cm receiving telescope and a highly efficient polychromator with cascading interference filters for separating four signals: the elastic backscatter signal, two rotational Raman signals with different temperature dependence, and the vibrational Raman signal of water vapor. The main measurement variable of the UHOH RRL is temperature. For the HOPE campaign, the lidar receiver was optimized for high and low background levels, respectively, with a novel switch for the passband of the second rotational Raman channel. The instrument delivers atmospheric profiles of water vapor mixing ratio as well as particle backscatter coefficient and particle extinction coefficient as further products. As examples for the measurement performance, measurements of the temperature gradient and water vapor mixing ratio revealing the development of the atmospheric boundary layer within 25 h are presented. As expected from simulations, a significant advance during nighttime was achieved with the new low-background setting. A two-mirror scanner allows for measurements in different directions. When pointing the scanner to low elevation, measurements close to the ground become possible which are otherwise impossible due to the non-total overlap of laser beam and receiving telescope field-of-view in the near range. We present an example of a low-level temperature measurement which resolves the temperature gradient at the top of the stable nighttime boundary layer a hundred meters above the ground.

  13. Temperature profiling of the atmospheric boundary layer with rotational Raman lidar during the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammann, E.; Behrendt, A.; Le Mounier, F.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2015-03-01

    The temperature measurements of the rotational Raman lidar of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH RRL) during the High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observation Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in April and May 2013 are discussed. The lidar consists of a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm with 10 W average power at 50 Hz, a two-mirror scanner, a 40 cm receiving telescope, and a highly efficient polychromator with cascading interference filters for separating four signals: the elastic backscatter signal, two rotational Raman signals with different temperature dependence, and the vibrational Raman signal of water vapor. The main measurement variable of the UHOH RRL is temperature. For the HOPE campaign, the lidar receiver was optimized for high and low background levels, with a novel switch for the passband of the second rotational Raman channel. The instrument delivers atmospheric profiles of water vapor mixing ratio as well as particle backscatter coefficient and particle extinction coefficient as further products. As examples for the measurement performance, measurements of the temperature gradient and water vapor mixing ratio revealing the development of the atmospheric boundary layer within 25 h are presented. As expected from simulations, a reduction of the measurement uncertainty of 70% during nighttime was achieved with the new low-background setting. A two-mirror scanner allows for measurements in different directions. When pointing the scanner to low elevation, measurements close to the ground become possible which are otherwise impossible due to the non-total overlap of laser beam and receiving telescope field of view in the near range. An example of a low-level temperature measurement is presented which resolves the temperature gradient at the top of the stable nighttime boundary layer 100 m above the ground.

  14. Investigation of wall temperature and angle of attack effects on boundary layer stability over a blunt cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Liang; Xinliang, Li

    2014-11-01

    A new PSE (parabolized stability equations) method based on the general orthogonal curvilinear system of coordinates is developed. Combined with DNS data, the PSE method is used to investigate the effects of wall temperature and angle of attack (AOA) on stability of the boundary layer over a blunt cone. Results indicate that cooling the surface leads to higher wave number appearing in streamwise for a given frequency disturbance wave. Cooling the surface induces stronger harmonic and 3D disturbances comparing to the adiabatic wall case, which further accelerates the growth of multi disturbance modes in blunt cone boundary layer. Thus finally decreases the transition Reynolds number. Although the non-parallelism is markedly in conical flow, the non-parallel effects on the evolution characteristic of disturbance is not so obviously. So the PSE approach is a useful method in analysis of the hypersonic boundary layer stability over a blunt cone. The combined effects of the wall temperature and the AOA on the transition over the blunt cone are further to be studied in our present work. Many new nonmonotonic changes of transition position versus above variables have been found. This work was supported by the NSFC Projects (11372330, 11072248), the 863 Program (No. 2012AA01A304) and the CAS Program (Nos. KJCX2-EW-J01, XXH12503-02-02-04).

  15. Effects of Precipitation on Ocean Mixed-Layer Temperature and Salinity as Simulated in a 2-D Coupled Ocean-Cloud Resolving Atmosphere Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K-M.; Adamec, D.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere model is used to investigate possible roles of convective scale ocean disturbances induced by atmospheric precipitation on ocean mixed-layer heat and salt budgets. The model couples a cloud resolving model with an embedded mixed layer-ocean circulation model. Five experiment are performed under imposed large-scale atmospheric forcing in terms of vertical velocity derived from the TOGA COARE observations during a selected seven-day period. The dominant variability of mixed-layer temperature and salinity are simulated by the coupled model with imposed large-scale forcing. The mixed-layer temperatures in the coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models show similar variations when salinity effects are not included. When salinity effects are included, however, differences in the domain-mean mixed-layer salinity and temperature between coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models could be as large as 0.3 PSU and 0.4 C respectively. Without fresh water effects, the nocturnal heat loss over ocean surface causes deep mixed layers and weak cooling rates so that the nocturnal mixed-layer temperatures tend to be horizontally-uniform. The fresh water flux, however, causes shallow mixed layers over convective areas while the nocturnal heat loss causes deep mixed layer over convection-free areas so that the mixed-layer temperatures have large horizontal fluctuations. Furthermore, fresh water flux exhibits larger spatial fluctuations than surface heat flux because heavy rainfall occurs over convective areas embedded in broad non-convective or clear areas, whereas diurnal signals over whole model areas yield high spatial correlation of surface heat flux. As a result, mixed-layer salinities contribute more to the density differences than do mixed-layer temperatures.

  16. Average Potential Temperature of the Upper Mantle and Excess Temperatures Beneath Regions of Active Upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putirka, K. D.

    2006-05-01

    The question as to whether any particular oceanic island is the result of a thermal mantle plume, is a question of whether volcanism is the result of passive upwelling, as at mid-ocean ridges, or active upwelling, driven by thermally buoyant material. When upwelling is passive, mantle temperatures reflect average or ambient upper mantle values. In contrast, sites of thermally driven active upwellings will have elevated (or excess) mantle temperatures, driven by some source of excess heat. Skeptics of the plume hypothesis suggest that the maximum temperatures at ocean islands are similar to maximum temperatures at mid-ocean ridges (Anderson, 2000; Green et al., 2001). Olivine-liquid thermometry, when applied to Hawaii, Iceland, and global MORB, belie this hypothesis. Olivine-liquid equilibria provide the most accurate means of estimating mantle temperatures, which are highly sensitive to the forsterite (Fo) contents of olivines, and the FeO content of coexisting liquids. Their application shows that mantle temperatures in the MORB source region are less than temperatures at both Hawaii and Iceland. The Siqueiros Transform may provide the most precise estimate of TpMORB because high MgO glass compositions there have been affected only by olivine fractionation, so primitive FeOliq is known; olivine thermometry yields TpSiqueiros = 1430 ±59°C. A global database of 22,000 MORB show that most MORB have slightly higher FeOliq than at Siqueiros, which translates to higher calculated mantle potential temperatures. If the values for Fomax (= 91.5) and KD (Fe-Mg)ol-liq (= 0.29) at Siqueiros apply globally, then upper mantle Tp is closer to 1485 ± 59°C. Averaging this global estimate with that recovered at Siqueiros yields TpMORB = 1458 ± 78°C, which is used to calculate plume excess temperatures, Te. The estimate for TpMORB defines the convective mantle geotherm, and is consistent with estimates from sea floor bathymetry and heat flow (Stein and Stein, 1992), and

  17. Active wireless temperature sensors for aerospace thermal protection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Karunaratne, K. S. G.

    2003-07-01

    Vehicle system health diagnostics is an area where major improvements have been identified for potential implementation into the design of new reusable launch vehicles in order to reduce life-cycle costs, to increase safety margins, and to improve mission reliability. NASA Ames is leading the effort to advance inspection and health management technologies for thermal protection systems. This paper summarizes a joint effort by NASA Ames and Korteks to develop active "wireless" sensors that can be embedded in the thermal protection system to monitor subsurface temperature histories. These devices are thermocouples integrated with radio-frequency identification circuits to enable non-contact communication of temperature data through aerospace thermal protection materials. Two generations of prototype sensors are discussed. The advanced prototype collects data from three type-k thermocouples attached to a 25-mm square integrated circuit and can communicate through 7 to 10 cm thickness of thermal protection materials.

  18. Active Wireless Temperature Sensors for Aerospace Thermal Protection Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milos, Frank S.; Karunaratne, K.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Health diagnostics is an area where major improvements have been identified for potential implementation into the design of new reusable launch vehicles in order to reduce life-cycle costs, to increase safety margins, and to improve mission reliability. NASA Ames is leading the effort to advance inspection and health management technologies for thermal protection systems. This paper summarizes a joint project between NASA Ames and Korteks to develop active wireless sensors that can be embedded in the thermal protection system to monitor sub-surface temperature histories. These devices are thermocouples integrated with radio-frequency identification circuitry to enable acquisition and non-contact communication of temperature data through aerospace thermal protection materials. Two generations of prototype sensors are discussed. The advanced prototype collects data from three type-k thermocouples attached to a 2.54-cm square integrated circuit.

  19. Low Temperature Nitridation of Si Oxide Utilizing Activated Nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uraoka, Yukiharu; Yano, Hiroshi; Hatayama, Tomoaki; Fuyuki, Takashi

    2002-06-01

    Oxynitride or nitride films are promising materials as a substitute for silicon dioxide because of their high dielectric constant and blocking effect on B penetration. The purpose of this work is to fabricate ultrathin oxynitride films by nitridation of thermal oxide utilizing activated nitrogen at very low temperature. We analyzed nitrogen concentration in the films using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was confirmed that 9.6 at.%nitrogen was introduced, and that NSi2O was dominant in nitrided films at temperatures as low as 400°C. We succeeded in decreasing the leakage current by one order of magnitude by nitridation of films with thicknesses of 40-60 nm.

  20. Comparison of different irrigation activation techniques on smear layer removal: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Akyuz Ekim, Sefika Nur; Erdemir, Ali

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of different irrigation activation techniques on smear layer removal. About 80 single-rooted human maxillary central teeth were decoronated to a standardized length.The samples were prepared by using ProTaper system to size F4 and divided into eight equal groups (n = 10) according to the final irrigation activation technique; distilled water was used as an irrigant in Group 1. The other groups were treated with 2.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA, respectively. Conventional syringe irrigation (CSI) was used in Group 2. Irrigation solutions were activated using passive ultrasonic irrigation (PUI, Group 3), EndoVac apical negative pressure (ANP, Group 4), diode laser (Group 5), Nd:YAG laser (Group 6), Er:YAG laser (Group 7), and Er:YAG laser using with photon-induced photoacoustic streaming (PIPS™, Group 8). Teeth were split longitudinally and subjected to scanning electron microscope (SEM). PIPS showed the best removal of smear layer when compared with PUI, ANP, Nd:YAG, and Er:YAG, but the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Smear layer scores obtained with PIPS technique were statistically significant different from those of obtained with control, CSI and diode laser groups (P < 0.05). All experimental irrigation techniques except ANP and diode laser removed smear layer more effectively at the coronal and middle levels compared to the apical level (P < 0.05). Irrigation activated/delivered techniques except diode laser have a positive effect on removing of smear layer. PMID:25582378

  1. Ultrathin and stable active layer of dense composite membrane enabled by poly(dopamine).

    PubMed

    Li, Ben; Liu, Wanpeng; Jiang, Zhongyi; Dong, Xiao; Wang, Baoyi; Zhong, Yurong

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrate that dopamine is able to self-polymerize and adhere firmly onto the substrate, which can create a hierarchical structure comprising an ultrathin active layer and a porous support layer. Such an approach opens a novel way to fabricating highly efficient and stable composite materials including composite membranes. More specifically, in this study the composite membranes are fabricated by simply dipping microporous substrate in aqueous dopamine solution under mild conditions. Nanoindentation measurement reveals the tight adhesion of dopamine onto microporous substrate, which is ascribed to numerous pi-pi and hydrogen-bonding interactions. The chemical composition of the active layer is analyzed by XPS, which demonstrates the self-polymerization of dopamine. The water contact angle of the dopamine coated membranes is reduced remarkably compared with that of the uncoated counterpart. Stylus profiler measurements display that the poly(dopamine) thickness increases as the coating time increases. FESEM images of the membranes' cross section show that an active layer (<100 nm) is deposited on the porous polysulfone (PS) substrate. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is introduced to probe the fractional free volume properties throughout the cross section of the composite membranes and reveal that after dopamine double-coating the active layer becomes thicker and more compact. Moreover, pH and concentration of the dopamine solution exert notable influence on the fractional free volume of the composite membranes. The as-prepared membranes are tentatively employed for pervaporative desulfurization and exhibits satisfying separation performance as well as durability. This facile, versatile, and efficient approach enables a promising prospect for the wide applications of such novel kinds of ultrathin composite materials. PMID:19366196

  2. Realizing the full potential of Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT) Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Chen, A.; Liu, L.; Parsekian, A.; Jafarov, E. E.; Panda, S. K.; Zebker, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT) product uses the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique to measure ground subsidence, active layer thickness (ALT), and thermokarst activity in permafrost regions. ReSALT supports research for the Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) field campaign in Alaska and northwest Canada and is a precursor for a potential Nasa-Isro Synthetic Aperture Radar (NISAR) product. ALT is a critical parameter for monitoring the status of permafrost and thermokarst activity is one of the key drivers of change in permafrost regions. The ReSALT product currently includes 1) long-term subsidence trends resulting from the melting and subsequent drainage of excess ground ice in permafrost-affected soils, 2) seasonal subsidence resulting from the expansion of soil water into ice as the active layer freezes and thaws, and 3) ALT estimated from the seasonal subsidence assuming a vertical profile of water within the soil column. ReSALT includes uncertainties for all parameters and is validated against in situ measurements from the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) network, Ground Penetrating Radar and mechanical probe measurements. We present high resolution ReSALT products on the North Slope of Alaska: Prudhoe Bay, Barrow, Toolik Lake, Happy Valley, and the Anaktuvuk fire zone. We believe that the ReSALT product could be expanded to include maps of individual thermokarst features identified as spatial anomalies in the subsidence trends, with quantified expansion rates. We illustrate the technique with multiple examples of thermokarst features on the North Slope of Alaska. Knowing the locations and expansion rates for individual features allows us to evaluate risks to human infrastructure. Our results highlight the untapped potential of the InSAR technique to remotely sense ALT and thermokarst dynamics over large areas of the Arctic.