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Sample records for active lecture group

  1. Implementing Small-Group Activities in Large Lecture Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yazedjian, Ani; Kolkhorst, Brittany Boyle

    2007-01-01

    This study examines student perceptions regarding the effectiveness of small-group work in a large lecture class. The article considers and illustrates from students' perspectives the ways in which small-group activities could enhance comprehension of course material, reduce anonymity associated with large lecture classes, and promote student…

  2. 2012 AGU section and focus group awardees and named lecturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Danica

    2012-11-01

    Each year, more than 20 awards are presented by AGU sections and focus groups to recipients at various stages in their careers. In addition, nearly 25 individuals are selected annually to present lectures under the Bowie Lecture Series and the Section and Focus Group Named Lecture Series. The Bowie Lecture Series was inaugurated in 1989 to commemorate the fiftieth presentation of the William Bowie Medal, which is AGU's highest honor and is named for AGU's first president. Named lectures are designated by sections and focus groups to honor and memorialize distinguished scientists in their respective fields of science.

  3. A comparison of teaching strategies: lecture notes combined with structured group discussion versus lecture only.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jacqueline Patterson; Mighten, Althea

    2005-07-01

    In this study, we compared two teaching strategies: lecture notes combined with structured group discussion versus lecture only. We sought to help nurse educators identify the most effective teaching strategies for nursing students. We compared the examination scores of two groups of students who took a 3-credit medical-surgical nursing course. The control group (N = 88) received lecture only as the teaching method, whereas the experimental group (N = 81) received word-processed lecture notes along with structured group discussion. A one-tailed, independent sample t test was used to compare the mean examination scores of the two groups. The chi-square test was used to determine whether a significant difference existed between the course-passing rates of the two groups. The results showed a statistically significant difference between the means of the experimental and control groups. However, no statistically significant difference existed between the course-passing rate of students in the experimental group and that of students in the control group. These results provide strong support for the use of lecture notes in conjunction with structured group discussion as a teaching strategy. We recommend replicating this study using samples from other courses, and conducting further studies that include students' NCLEX-RN results as a third dependent variable.

  4. Active Learning in ASTR 101 Lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Grace L.

    1998-12-01

    The lecture is the most common teaching method used at colleges and universities, but does this format facilitate student learning? Lectures can be brilliantly delivered, but they are received by a passive audience. As time passes during a lecture, student attention and effective notetaking diminish. Many students become more interested in a subject and retain information longer in courses that rely on active rather than passive teaching methods. Interactive teaching strategies such as the think-pair-share-(write), the 3-minute paper, and the misconception confrontation can be used to actively engage students during lecture. As a cooperative learning strategy, the think-pair-share-(write) technique requires active discussion by everyone in the class. The "write" component structures individual accountability into the activity. The 3-minute paper is an expansion of the standard 1-minute paper feedback technique, but is required of all students rather than voluntary or anonymous. The misconception confrontation technique allows students to focus on how their pre- conceived notions differ from the scientific explanation. These techniques can be easily adopted by anyone currently using a standard lecture format for introductory astronomy. The necessary components are a commitment by the instructor to require active participation by all students and a willingness to try new teaching methods.

  5. Using online lectures to make time for active learning.

    PubMed

    Prunuske, Amy J; Batzli, Janet; Howell, Evelyn; Miller, Sarah

    2012-09-01

    To make time in class for group activities devoted to critical thinking, we integrated a series of short online lectures into the homework assignments of a large, introductory biology course at a research university. The majority of students viewed the online lectures before coming to class and reported that the online lectures helped them to complete the in-class activity and did not increase the amount of time they devoted to the course. In addition, students who viewed the online lecture performed better on clicker questions designed to test lower-order cognitive skills. The in-class activities then gave the students practice analyzing the information in groups and provided the instructor with feedback about the students' understanding of the material. On the basis of the results of this study, we support creating hybrid course models that allow students to learn the fundamental information outside of class time, thereby creating time during the class period to be dedicated toward the conceptual understanding of the material.

  6. Playing Games during a Lecture Hour: Experience with an Online Blood Grouping Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhaskar, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Theory lectures are boring and sleep inducing for students, and it is difficult to get their full attention during 1 h of lecture. The ability of students to concentrate diminishes 20-25 min after the start of the lecture. There is also a lack of active participation of students during theory lectures. In an effort to break the monotony of the…

  7. Is Active Learning Like Broccoli? Student Perceptions of Active Learning in Large Lecture Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, C. Veronica; Cardaciotto, LeeAnn

    2011-01-01

    Although research suggests that active learning is associated with positive outcomes (e.g., memory, test performance), use of such techniques can be difficult to implement in large lecture-based classes. In the current study, 1,091 students completed out-of-class group exercises to complement course material in an Introductory Psychology class.…

  8. Redesign of a large lecture course into a small-group learning course.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, Stefanie P; O'Connor, Shanna K

    2013-02-12

    Objective. To describe the redesign of a large self-care course previously delivered in a traditional lecture format to a small-group case-based course.Design. Prereadings and study guides were used to facilitate students' independent learning prior to class. Large lecture classes were replaced with smaller group-based learning classes. This change in delivery format allowed students to spend the majority of class time conducting small-group learning activities, such as case studies to promote communication, problem solving, and interpersonal skills.Assessment. Changes in course delivery were assessed over a 2-year period by comparing students' grades and satisfaction ratings on course evaluations. A comparison of course evaluations between the class formats revealed that students were provided more opportunities to develop verbal communication skills and tackle and resolve unfamiliar problems in the revised course. The activities resulted in better overall course grades.Conclusions. Redesigning to a small-group discussion format for a self-care course can be accomplished by increasing student accountability for acquiring factual content outside the classroom. Compared with student experiences in the previous large lecture-based class, students in the smaller-class format reported a preference for working in teams and achieved significantly better academic grades with the new course format. PMID:23459199

  9. Continuous-Grouped-Self-Learning: In the Perspective of Lecturers, Tutors and Laboratory Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azau, Mohd Azrin Mohd; Yao, Low Ming; Aik, Goo Soon; Yeong, Chin Kock; Nor, Mohamad Nizam; Abdullah, Ahmad Yusri; Jamil, Mohd Hafidz Mohamad; Yahya, Nasiruddin; Abas, Ahmad Fauzi; Saripan, M. Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the perception of lecturers, tutors and lab instructors towards the implemented Continuous-Group-Self-Learning (CGSL) in the Department of Computer and Communication System Engineering (CCSE), Universiti Putra Malaysia. This innovative system introduces mock teaching and student-lecturer role as a technique of delivery. The…

  10. Using Small-Group Discussions in Science Lectures: A Study of Two Professors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windschitl, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a technique used in two science lecture courses (biochemistry and introductory meteorology), in which lectures were interspersed with frequent, brief discussions within spontaneously formed small groups. Some differences were found in the ways the two professors managed the technique, but both felt in-class participation…

  11. Developing specialized guided worksheets for active learning in physics lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujarittham, T.; Emarat, N.; Arayathanitkul, K.; Sharma, M. D.; Johnston, I.; Tanamatayarat, J.

    2016-03-01

    As universities attempt to integrate active learning into their lectures, a range of strategies is emerging. Amongst the strategies is pre-prepared worksheets which students work through, facilitated by the lecturer. Despite the fact that worksheets have not yet been the subject of much research activity, there are instances of their use. Once such instance is by a pair of physics lecturers at Mahidol University, Thailand. The worksheets, called guided worksheets as they provide structure for students to take notes as the content in the lectures progresses, are prepared by the lecturers and have been in use since 2004. Evaluations showed that the guided worksheets met their intent but there were issues around certain topics which students found challenging. Concerted effort lead to the development of research based specialized guided worksheets for those topics that had issues. These specialized guided worksheets requiring substantially more interactions and student problem solving in line with active learning strategies, have been in use since 2012. This paper aims to describe the design of the specialized guided worksheets for the topic of electric field, and its evaluation. Pre- and post-tests were implemented over 2 years. The first was with guided worksheets with 260 students in 2011, and the second included specialized guided worksheets with 163 students in 2012. Gains on student understanding were higher in 2012 and students who were interviewed indicated that they found the specialized guided worksheets helpful for learning. The results indicate that the specialized guided worksheets made a difference in topics that students find challenging.

  12. Gaining A Geological Perspective Through Active Learning in the Large Lecture Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapp, J. L.; Richardson, R. M.; Slater, S. J.

    2008-12-01

    NATS 101 A Geological Perspective is a general education course taken by non science majors. We offer 600 seats per semester, with four large lecture sections taught by different faculty members. In the past we have offered optional once a week study groups taught by graduate teaching assistants. Students often feel overwhelmed by the science and associated jargon, and many are prone to skipping lectures altogether. Optional study groups are only attended by ~50% of the students. Faculty members find the class to be a lot of work, mainly due to the grading it generates. Activities given in lecture are often short multiple choice or true false assignments, limiting the depth of understanding we can evaluate. Our students often lack math and critical thinking skills, and we spend a lot of time in lecture reintroducing ideas students should have already gotten from the text. In summer 2007 we were funded to redesign the course. Our goals were to 1) cut the cost of running the course, and 2) improve student learning. Under our redesign optional study groups were replaced by once a week mandatory break out sessions where students complete activities that have been introduced in lecture. Break out sessions substitute for one hour of lecture, and are run by undergraduate preceptors and graduate teaching assistants (GTAs). During the lecture period, lectures themselves are brief with a large portion of the class devoted to active learning in small groups. Weekly reading quizzes are submitted via the online course management system. Break out sessions allow students to spend more time interacting with their fellow students, undergraduate preceptors, and GTAs. They get one on one help in break out sessions on assignments designed to enhance the lecture material. The active lecture format means less of their time is devoted to listening passively to a lecture, and more time is spent peer learning an interacting with the instructor. Completing quizzes online allows students

  13. Interactive lecture demonstrations, active learning, and the ALOP project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2011-05-01

    There is considerable evidence from the physics education literature that traditional approaches are ineffective in teaching physics concepts. A better teaching method is to use the active learning environment, which can be created using interactive lecture demonstrations. Based on the active learning methodology and within the framework of the UNESCO mandate in physics education and introductory physics, the ALOP project (active learning in optics and photonics) was started in 2003, to provide a focus on an experimental area that is adaptable and relevant to research and educational conditions in many developing countries. This project is discussed in this paper.

  14. The Effectiveness of Lecture-Integrated, Web-Supported Case Studies in Large Group Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzawi, May; Dawson, Maureen M.

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of lecture-integrated and web-supported case studies in supporting a large and academically diverse group of undergraduate students was evaluated in the present study. Case studies and resource (web)-based learning were incorporated as two complementary interactive learning strategies into the traditional curriculum. A truncated…

  15. Group Simulation for "Authentic" Assessment in a Maternal-Child Lecture Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensel, Desiree; Stanley, Leah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to explore student perceptions and outcomes surrounding the use of a labor and delivery simulation as a midterm exam in a maternal-newborn lecture course. An exploratory case study design was used to gain a holistic view of the simulation experience. Data from focus groups, written debriefings, simulation…

  16. Variations of Solar Activity and Irradiance (Julius Bartels Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, Sami K.

    2015-04-01

    Variations in solar activity and its fluctuating irradiance have been invoked as drivers of the Earth's space environment and its climate. Although, such variations and fluctuations have been followed for decades, partly even centuries, a number of important and basic questions surrounding them remain unanswered, or controversial. This also leads to significant uncertainties in the role played by the Sun in, e.g., driving climate change. In this lecture I provide an overview of our present knowledge and understanding of solar variability, covering both, commonly accepted and some of the more controversial aspects.

  17. Research on Group Learning and Cognitive Science: A Study of Motivation, Knowledge, and Self-Regulation in a Large Lecture College Algebra Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David; Schraeder, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    At a research University near the east coast, researchers restructured a College Algebra course by formatting the course into two large lectures a week, an active recitation size laboratory class once a week, and an extra day devoted to active group work called Supplemental Practice (SP). SP was added as an extra day of class where the SP leader…

  18. Combining traditional anatomy lectures with e-learning activities: how do students perceive their learning experience?

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Heike; Waldboth, Simone; Mischo-Kelling, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate how students perceived their learning experience when combining traditional anatomy lectures with preparatory e-learning activities that consisted of fill-in-the-blank assignments, videos, and multiple-choice quizzes. Methods A qualitative study was conducted to explore changes in study behaviour and perception of learning. Three group interviews with students were conducted and thematically analysed. Results Data was categorized into four themes: 1. Approaching the course material, 2. Understanding the material, 3. Consolidating the material, and 4. Perceived learning outcome.  Students appreciated the clear structure of the course, and reported that online activities encouraged them towards a first engagement with the material. They felt that they were more active during in-class sessions, described self-study before the end-of-term exam as easier, and believed that contents would remain in their memories for a longer time. Conclusions By adjusting already existing resources, lectures can be combined fairly easily and cost-effectively with preparatory e-learning activities. The creation of online components promote well-structured courses, can help minimize ‘student passivity’ as a characteristic element of lectures, and can support students in distributing their studies throughout the term, thus suggesting enhanced learning. Further research work should be designed to confirm the afore-mentioned findings through objective measurements of student learning outcomes. PMID:26897012

  19. Active learning in the lecture theatre using 3D printed objects.

    PubMed

    Smith, David P

    2016-01-01

    The ability to conceptualize 3D shapes is central to understanding biological processes. The concept that the structure of a biological molecule leads to function is a core principle of the biochemical field. Visualisation of biological molecules often involves vocal explanations or the use of two dimensional slides and video presentations. A deeper understanding of these molecules can however be obtained by the handling of objects. 3D printed biological molecules can be used as active learning tools to stimulate engagement in large group lectures. These models can be used to build upon initial core knowledge which can be delivered in either a flipped form or a more didactic manner. Within the teaching session the students are able to learn by handling, rotating and viewing the objects to gain an appreciation, for example, of an enzyme's active site or the difference between the major and minor groove of DNA. Models and other artefacts can be handled in small groups within a lecture theatre and act as a focal point to generate conversation. Through the approach presented here core knowledge is first established and then supplemented with high level problem solving through a "Think-Pair-Share" cooperative learning strategy. The teaching delivery was adjusted based around experiential learning activities by moving the object from mental cognition and into the physical environment. This approach led to students being able to better visualise biological molecules and a positive engagement in the lecture. The use of objects in teaching allows the lecturer to create interactive sessions that both challenge and enable the student. PMID:27366318

  20. Active learning in the lecture theatre using 3D printed objects

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David P.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to conceptualize 3D shapes is central to understanding biological processes. The concept that the structure of a biological molecule leads to function is a core principle of the biochemical field. Visualisation of biological molecules often involves vocal explanations or the use of two dimensional slides and video presentations. A deeper understanding of these molecules can however be obtained by the handling of objects. 3D printed biological molecules can be used as active learning tools to stimulate engagement in large group lectures. These models can be used to build upon initial core knowledge which can be delivered in either a flipped form or a more didactic manner. Within the teaching session the students are able to learn by handling, rotating and viewing the objects to gain an appreciation, for example, of an enzyme’s active site or the difference between the major and minor groove of DNA. Models and other artefacts can be handled in small groups within a lecture theatre and act as a focal point to generate conversation. Through the approach presented here core knowledge is first established and then supplemented with high level problem solving through a "Think-Pair-Share" cooperative learning strategy. The teaching delivery was adjusted based around experiential learning activities by moving the object from mental cognition and into the physical environment. This approach led to students being able to better visualise biological molecules and a positive engagement in the lecture. The use of objects in teaching allows the lecturer to create interactive sessions that both challenge and enable the student. PMID:27366318

  1. Using lecture demonstrations and on-line discussion groups to enhance learning in a photonics and fiber optics unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzolini, Alexander

    2002-05-01

    A second year Photonics and Fiber Optics unit in our B. Sc. (Photonics) course at Swinburne University is delivered via power-point lectures, problem-solving tutorials and laboratory sessions. Student interest and participation in lectures is enhanced by the use of 'interactive learning' methods such as 'live' lecture demonstrations, 'virtual demonstration' video clips, computer simulations and on-line discussion groups. Hands-on lecture demonstrations add variety and excitement to lectures, and if used as part of the 'predict, observe, explain' sequence can illicit student interaction, critical thinking and peer dialog. Lecture demonstrations are also used to introduce or reinforce particular 'key concepts,' which assists comprehension for many students. Video clips are used to show lecture demonstrations that are too difficult to set up in a normal lecture. Similarly, interactive ray-tracing simulations greatly extend what can be taught with words and diagrams alone. Finally the cooperative learning style (developed in tutorial sessions) can be extended with properly structured (and assessed) on-line discussion groups, in which all students are expected to participate.

  2. Classroom Activities: Simple Strategies to Incorporate Student-Centered Activities within Undergraduate Science Lectures

    PubMed Central

    Lom, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The traditional science lecture, where an instructor delivers a carefully crafted monolog to a large audience of students who passively receive the information, has been a popular mode of instruction for centuries. Recent evidence on the science of teaching and learning indicates that learner-centered, active teaching strategies can be more effective learning tools than traditional lectures. Yet most colleges and universities retain lectures as their central instructional method. This article highlights several simple collaborative teaching techniques that can be readily deployed within traditional lecture frameworks to promote active learning. Specifically, this article briefly introduces the techniques of: reader’s theatre, think-pair-share, roundtable, jigsaw, in-class quizzes, and minute papers. Each technique is broadly applicable well beyond neuroscience courses and easily modifiable to serve an instructor’s specific pedagogical goals. The benefits of each technique are described along with specific examples of how each technique might be deployed within a traditional lecture to create more active learning experiences. PMID:23494568

  3. Students' Experiences of Active Engagement through Cooperative Learning Activities in Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on students' experiences of lectures which included many opportunities for active engagement through cooperative learning activities. At the end of a 13-week semester-long unit, 113 students completed a questionnaire which contained five open-ended questions focusing on the extent to which the students thought that the lecture…

  4. Lecturers' Perception of Research Activities for Knowledge Production in Universities in Cross River State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uchendu, C. C.; Osim, R. O.; Odigwe, F. N.; Alade, F. N.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined lecturers' perception of research activities for knowledge production in universities in Cross River State, Nigeria. Two hypotheses were isolated to give direction to this investigation. 240 university lecturers were sampled from a population of 1,868 from the two universities in Cross River State, using stratified random…

  5. Overhauling Technical Handouts for Active Student Participation: A Model for Improving Lecture Efficiency and Increasing Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakee, Keith

    2011-01-01

    This instructional paper is intended to provide an alternative approach to developing lecture materials, including handouts and PowerPoint slides, successfully developed over several years. The principal objective is to aid in the bridging of traditional "chalk and talk" lecture approaches with more active learning techniques, especially in more…

  6. Using Clickers to Facilitate Interactive Engagement Activities in a Lecture Room for Improved Performance by Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tlhoaele, Malefyane; Hofman, Adriaan; Naidoo, Ari; Winnips, Koos

    2014-01-01

    What impact can interactive engagement (IE) activities using clickers have on students' motivation and academic performance during lectures as compared to attending traditional types of lectures? This article positions the research on IE within the comprehensive model of educational effectiveness and Gagné's instructional events model.…

  7. Lecturers' experiences of facilitating guided group reflection with pre-registration BSc Nursing students.

    PubMed

    Mc Carthy, Jane; Cassidy, Irene; Tuohy, Dympna

    2013-01-01

    The development of reflective practitioners is integral to undergraduate nursing degree programmes. This study reports on lecturers' experiences of facilitating guided group reflection with pre-registration BSc Nursing students.The research purposively sampled lecturers (n=7) working in a department of nursing and midwifery at a third level institute in Ireland, all of whom were registered nurses. Using a qualitative research approach, data was collected through audio-taped semi-structured individual interviews. The data were thematically analysed using guidelines developed by Braun and Clarke (2006). Tripartite researcher discussion and further analysis of these initial individual analyses led to consensus regarding the three themes arising from the study. These were: Being a facilitator; Facilitating reflective learning and Creating structure. The discussion centred on: having knowledge and experience to effectively facilitate guided group reflection; the influence of the facilitator's personal philosophy on reflection and adult learning on group facilitation; and finally concerns regarding professional responsibility in response to students' reflective practice accounts.

  8. Educational Outcomes of Small-Group Discussion Versus Traditional Lecture Format in Dental Students' Learning and Skills Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Arias, Ana; Scott, Raymond; Peters, Ove A; McClain, Elizabeth; Gluskin, Alan H

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this prospective quantitative study was to compare the effect of different instructional formats on dental students' skills and knowledge acquisition for access cavity preparation. All first-year dental students were invited to participate in this study conducted during the four consecutive two-week endodontic rotation courses at the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in spring semester 2015. Four alphabetically distributed intact groups of students were randomly allocated to two groups (n=70 each) that participated in either small-group discussion or a traditional lecture on access preparation. The first outcome measure was skill acquisition, measured by the quality of access cavities prepared in extracted teeth at the conclusion of the session. Two blinded raters scored direct observations on a continuous scale. Knowledge, the second outcome measure, was scored with a multiple-choice and open-ended question test at the end of each two-week session. Data were obtained for 134 of the 140 students, for a 96% response rate. The results showed that students in the small-group discussion groups scored significantly higher than those in the lecture groups when skill performance was tested (p=8.9 × 10(-7)). However, no significant differences were found in the acquisition of knowledge between the two groups on the written test. Active student participation was significantly related to improved manual skill acquisition, but the format of the session does not seem to have had a direct influence on acquired knowledge. PMID:27037454

  9. Practice and Evaluation of Ability Grouping Lecture on Information Literacy Using a Chat Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujinaga, Kiyohisa

    A teaching methodology on information literacy that skilled and inexperienced students learn through different specific contents in a class is proposed. Skilled students collaboratively work using an e-Learning environment while a conventional projector-based lecture on how to use a computer is given for inexperienced students. The methodology had been put into practice for two years. Skilled students were divided into a few groups and members in a group collaboratively made a PowerPoint slide show using a chat tool as the communication media. The slide shows were evaluated by means of questionnaire to the inexperienced students. The results were nearly the same as those of teachers. The practice of the methodology resulted in that the concentration of the skilled students was promoted and the learning attitude of the inexperienced students was improved, compared with the case that the both skilled and inexperienced students learned through the same contents.

  10. Nipping an education myth in the bud: Poh's brain activity during lectures.

    PubMed

    Masters, Ken

    2014-08-01

    The debate around the value of lectures is raging strongly, and new empirical data arguing against the value of lectures comes from a chart showing student brain activity during lectures. The evidence from the chart, however, suffers from crucial problems. These include a small and unspecific sample, mislabeling of the student activities, and a misinterpretation of the type of measurement. This chart has appeared on the Internet, in education conferences and journals, and recently at a medical education conference. For medical education to be taken seriously, it is crucial that researchers apply the same standards that they would to clinical research. As a result, this chart should be avoided in the debate on the value of lectures before it has a chance to follow a pattern in medical education set by other myths.

  11. Active Learning in PhysicsTechnology and Research-based Techniques Emphasizing Interactive Lecture Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    Physics education research has shown that learning environments that engage students and allow them to take an active part in their learning can lead to large conceptual gains compared to traditional instruction. Examples of successful curricula and methods include Peer Instruction, Just in Time Teaching, RealTime Physics, Workshop Physics, Scale-Up, and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). An active learning environment is often difficult to achieve in lecture sessions. This presentation will demonstrate the use of sequences of Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs) that use real experiments often involving real-time data collection and display combined with student interaction to create an active learning environment in large or small lecture classes. Interactive lecture demonstrations will be done in the area of mechanics using real-time motion probes and the Visualizer. A video tape of students involved in interactive lecture demonstrations will be shown. The results of a number of research studies at various institutions (including international) to measure the effectiveness of ILDs and guided inquiry conceptual laboratories will be presented.

  12. Lecturers' Perceptions of Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Peter; Badger, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores how lecturers across a range of subjects perceived lectures. In particular, what did they regard the role of modern technology to be. Twenty-five lecturers were interviewed, using a semi-structured schedule. Results indicated a range of views from the lecture as an inspirational address to providing a detailed outline of each…

  13. A New Comparison of Active Learning Strategies to Traditional Lectures for Teaching College Astronomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoPresto, Michael C.; Slater, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Although traditional lectures are still the dominant form of undergraduate instruction, there have been relatively few studies comparing various learner-centered and active learning teaching strategies to one another in order to guide professors in making informed instructional decisions. To study the impact of different active learning…

  14. Explicit constructivism: a missing link in ineffective lectures?

    PubMed

    Prakash, E S

    2010-06-01

    This study tested the possibility that interactive lectures explicitly based on activating learners' prior knowledge and driven by a series of logical questions might enhance the effectiveness of lectures. A class of 54 students doing the respiratory system course in the second year of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program in my university was randomized to two groups to receive one of two types of lectures, "typical" lectures (n = 28, 18 women and 10 men) or "constructivist" lectures (n = 26, 19 women and 7 men), on the same topic: the regulation of respiration. Student pretest scores in the two groups were comparable (P > 0.1). Students that received the constructivist lectures did much better in the posttest conducted immediately after the lectures (6.8 +/- 3.4 for constructivist lectures vs. 4.2 +/- 2.3 for typical lectures, means +/- SD, P = 0.004). Although both types of lectures were well received, students that received the constructivist lectures appeared to have been more satisfied with their learning experience. However, on a posttest conducted 4 mo later, scores obtained by students in the two groups were not any different (6.9 +/- 3 for constructivist lectures vs. 6.9 +/- 3.7 for typical lectures, P = 0.94). This study adds to the increasing body of evidence that there is a case for the use of interactive lectures that make the construction of knowledge and understanding explicit, easy, and enjoyable to learners.

  15. Active Learning within a Lecture: Assessing the Impact of Short, In-Class Writing Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Adam; Phillmann, Kayah-Bah; Smart, Lona

    2001-01-01

    Describes an exercise named CARDS that was used in two sections of an introduction to psychology course. After a concept was presented in lecture, students were asked to respond to a question written on an index card and discuss their answers in groups. Presents the results of the assessment of student learning. (CMK)

  16. Does using active learning in thermodynamics lectures improve students’ conceptual understanding and learning experiences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiou, H.; Sharma, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Encouraging ‘active learning’ in the large lecture theatre emerges as a credible recommendation for improving university courses, with reports often showing significant improvements in learning outcomes. However, the recommendations are based predominantly on studies undertaken in mechanics. We set out to examine those claims in the thermodynamics module of a large first year physics course with an established technique, called interactive lecture demonstrations (ILDs). The study took place at The University of Sydney, where four parallel streams of the thermodynamics module were divided into two streams that experienced the ILDs and two streams that did not. The programme was first implemented in 2011 to gain experience and refine logistical matters and repeated in 2012 with approximately 500 students. A validated survey, the thermal concepts survey, was used as pre-test and post-test to measure learning gains while surveys and interviews provided insights into what the ‘active learning’ meant from student experiences. We analysed lecture recordings to capture the time devoted to different activities in a lecture, including interactivity. The learning gains were in the ‘high gain’ range for the ILD streams and ‘medium gain’ for the other streams. The analysis of the lecture recordings showed that the ILD streams devoted significantly more time to interactivity while surveys and interviews showed that students in the ILD streams were thinking in deep ways. Our study shows that ILDs can make a difference in students’ conceptual understanding as well as their experiences, demonstrating the potential value-add that can be provided by investing in active learning to enhance lectures.

  17. Maude Abbott Lecture. Hematopathology: a crescendo of scholarly activity.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, R F

    1994-02-01

    This lecture traces the evolution of hematopathology from the time of Thomas Hodgkin to the modern era of hybridoma antibodies, immunophenotyping, and molecular biology. It highlights the early concepts of Ludwig Aschoff and his school based on the observations of Metchnikoff, Ehrlich, and Maximow and the changes in concepts and terminology that have occurred in the ensuing 80 yr. The ongoing controversy on terminology and classifications of the malignant lymphomas from their first descriptions by Rudolf Virchow, Hans Kundrat, and Theodore Billroth is reviewed with reference to the development of the Working Formulation of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas for Clinical Usage and other classifications that are currently in vogue. Special attention is paid to the remarkable insight showed by Dorothy Reed in her morphologic descriptions of Hodgkin's disease, her thoughtful discussion on the nature of this disorder, and the conformation of her proposals inherent in the subsequent classification of Lukes and Butler. Acknowledgement is given to the remarkable discovery of Köhler and Milstein resulting in the advent of monoclonal antibodies that have revolutionized the field of hematopathology; to the many immunopathologists who have been responsible for the production of more than 1100 monoclonal antibodies comprising 78 clusters of differentiation; and to many of the leading molecular biologists who have (in the words of Berard) "helped to transform hematopathology from a difficult morphologic exercise into a functionally oriented biologic science."

  18. Wireless Laptops as Means for Promoting Active Learning in Large Lecture Halls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Miri; Lipson, Alberta; Lerman, Steven

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that examined the use of wireless laptops for promoting active learning in lecture halls. The study examined students' behavior in class and their perceptions of the new learning environment throughout three consecutive semesters. An online survey revealed that students have highly positive perceptions about the use…

  19. Transforming an Introductory Programming Course: From Lectures to Active Learning via Wireless Laptops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Miri; Harward, Judson; Kocur, George; Lerman, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Within the framework of MIT's course 1.00: Introduction to Computers and Engineering Problem Solving, this paper describes an innovative project entitled: "Studio 1.00" that integrates lectures with in-class demonstrations, active learning sessions, and on-task feedback, through the use of wireless laptop computers. This paper also describes a…

  20. A Simple and Effective Protein Folding Activity Suitable for Large Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a simple and inexpensive hands-on simulation of protein folding suitable for use in large lecture classes. This activity uses a minimum of parts, tools, and skill to simulate some of the fundamental principles of protein folding. The major concepts targeted are that proteins begin as linear polypeptides and fold to…

  1. Exploring Undergraduates' Perceptions of the Use of Active Learning Techniques in Science Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Ashley J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines students' mixed perceptions of the use of active learning techniques in undergraduate science lectures. Written comments from over 250 students offered an in-depth view of why students perceive these techniques as helping or hindering their learning and experience. Fourth- and fifth-year students were more likely to view…

  2. Podcasting Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brittain, Sarah; Glowacki, Pietrek; Van Ittersum, Jared; Johnson, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    At some point in their educations, students must learn copious amounts of information. To do this, they use a variety of well-known strategies such as study groups, note-taking services, and videotapes of lectures. In fall 2004, a group of first-year dental students at the University of Michigan (U-M) School of Dentistry asked to have all dental…

  3. An Analysis of Female Lecturers' Participation in Civil Engineering Research and Development Activities at One Polytechnic in Zimbabwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chikuvadze, Pinias; Matswetu, Vimbai Sharon; Mugijima, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to explore female lecturers' participation in civil engineering research and development activities at one polytechnic in Zimbabwe. Case study design was chosen for this study to make predictions, narration of events, comparisons and drawing of conclusions. The female lecturers were purposively sampled to participate in the…

  4. The evolutionary conformation from traditional lecture to active learning in an undergraduate biology course and its effects on student achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Kirsten Bakke

    In response to the declining number of students in the United States entering into the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) disciplines, there has been an attempt to retain student interest in the sciences through the implementation of more active learning in the classroom. Active learning is defined as any instructional method that requires students do something in the classroom rather than simply listen to a lecture (Herreid, 2006). These student centered approaches provide the students with the opportunity to work cooperatively while developing the skills required for critical inquiry. They also help the students make the connections between what is being taught and how it can be applied in a real world setting. Science education researchers have attempted to analyze the efficacy of active learning. Although they find it difficult to compare the data, they state unequivocally that "Active learning is a better strategy for learning than the traditional didactic lecture format" (Prince, 2004). However, even though research supports the efficacy of active learning, instructors find it difficult to adopt this pedagogy into their classrooms due to concerns such as loss of content knowledge and student resistance. This three year qualitative and quantitative study addressed the level of student learning and satisfaction in an introductory vertebrate biology class at a small liberal arts college. The courses were taught by the same instructor using three pedagogical methods; traditional lecture (TL), problem-based learning (PBL), and case-based learning (CBL). Student grades and levels of assessment were compared between the TL and PBL, while student attrition rates, course satisfaction and views of active and group learning were analyzed across all three sections. The evolutionary confirmations from TL to PBL and ultimately the adoption of CBL as the method of choice are discussed from the view of both the faculty member and the students.

  5. Group Activities for Math Enthusiasts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdener, J.; Milnikel, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we present three group activities designed for math students: a balloon-twisting workshop, a group proof of the irrationality of p, and a game of Math Bingo. These activities have been particularly successful in building enthusiasm for mathematics and camaraderie among math faculty and students at Kenyon College.

  6. Early High Tc Activity in Japan: The Franco Rasetti Lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2007-03-01

    From 1960 to 1980, R&D of superconductivity in Japan was carried out mainly to improve A15 superconducting wires and magnets. Improvement of wires were made mainly in the National Institute for Metals, and improvements of superconducting magnets were made in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute for future nuclear fusion reactors, the National Railway Laboratory for future maglev trains and also in the Electo-Technical Laboratory for MHD generators. I began the research of BPBO in 1975 and at that time the research of oxide superconductors was limited only to my laboratory in the University of Tokyo. During the study of this new superconductor, we learned quite a lot on how to make ceramic samples, how to measure electrical conductivity and magnetic susceptibility at low temperatures. In 1982, Prof. S. Nakajima organized a rather small group for investigating ``New Superconducting Phenomena,'' and I became a member of the group. In 1985, Nakajima expanded the research group to include more than 5 experimentalists and 5 theoreticians. The title of the research was ``New Superconducting Materials'' and the funds came from the Ministry of Education of Japan. In late October, 1986, we followed the first paper of Bednorz and Muller, and immediately found the material includes high temperature superconductor and reported it to the group meeting held in early November. In early December, we confirmed La2-xBaxCuO4 is the real high temperature superconductor, the critical temperature is 28K. I sent a copy of our paper to Prof. Beasley of California and asked to inform this fact to his colleagues. Asahi Shimbun, the biggest newspaper in Japan announced this in its science section, and then many people knew the high temperature superconductor had been discovered. Then many physicists and chemists rushed to this field very quickly and many kinds of materials were synthesized. In the Government, the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry

  7. Public Lectures and Exhibits: Outreach Activities at the 2013 Meeting of the Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Hernández-Terrones, Laura; Pérez-Cruz, Ligia

    2013-09-01

    The 2013 Joint Assembly Meeting of the Americas (MOA), held 14-17 May in Cancun, Mexico, included an outreach program with public lectures, exhibits, and a planetarium dome show, all held in parallel to the sessions, plenary presentations, town halls, and other events. The outreach activities run by enthusiastic volunteers attracted local students, the public, and meeting attendees. The meeting was sponsored by 14 societies across the Americas, and the scientific program encompassed topics in all areas of Earth and space sciences.

  8. Electures-Wiki--Toward Engaging Students to Actively Work with Lecture Recordings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Christoph; Ottmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present the integration of a Wiki with lecture recordings using a tool called "aofconvert", enabling the students to visually reference lecture recordings in the Wiki at a precise moment in time of the lecture. This tight integration between a Wiki and lecture materials allows the students to elaborate on the topics they learned…

  9. Evaluating the Use and Impact of Lecture Recording in Undergraduates: Evidence for Distinct Approaches by Different Groups of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadbeater, Wendy; Shuttleworth, Tom; Couperthwaite, John; Nightingale, Karl P.

    2013-01-01

    Lecture recordings are increasingly used to supplement lecture attendance within higher education, but their impact on student learning remains unclear. Here we describe a study to evaluate student use of lecture recordings and quantify their impact on academic performance. Questionnaire responses and online monitoring of student's access to…

  10. Lecturing the lecturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Jonathan

    2010-02-01

    João Magueijo's article "Cargo-cult training" about the failings of compulsory educational training for lecturers (December 2009 pp16-17) is an illustration of why some university lecturers do need to be educated about education. His argument that we should use lectures because students like them ignores the large body of educational research stating that this is the least effective form of education. It might, as the well-known aphorism states, be a successful means of transferring the notes of the lecturer to the notes of the students without going through the minds of either, but the evidence shows that only 10% of students learn material in this way. Rather, all the educational literature points to the fact that interactive, discursive methods are much more likely to produce learning with understanding.

  11. Making large class basic histology lectures more interactive: The use of draw-along mapping techniques and associated educational activities.

    PubMed

    Kotzé, Sanet Henriët; Mole, Calvin Gerald

    2015-01-01

    At Stellenbosch University, South Africa, basic histology is taught to a combination class of almost 400 first-year medical, physiotherapy, and dietetic students. Many students often find the amount of work in basic histology lectures overwhelming and consequently loose interest. The aim was to determine if a draw-along mapping activity would focus students during large class lectures. After each lecture on three basic histology tissues, a guided draw-along mapping session covering the work from the lecture was introduced in the form of a click-advance PowerPoint presentation which was used to demonstrate the unfolding of an "ideal" map. The lecturer simultaneously drew a similar map using an overhead projector allowing the students to draw their own maps on blank sheets of paper along with the lecturer. Students remained attentive during the activity and many participated in answering informal questions posed by the lecturer as the map-making session progressed. After the last session, students completed an anonymous, voluntary questionnaire (response rate of 78%). The majority of students found the draw-along maps useful (94%) and believed that its use should be continued in the future (93%). A significant increase (P < 0.001) was found in the test results of student cohorts who were given the current intervention compared to cohorts from previous years who were given mind maps as handouts only or had no intervention. The use of the draw-along mapping sessions were successful in focusing students during large class lectures while also providing them with a useful tool for their studies.

  12. Globalisation in the Lecture Room? Gender and Cultural Diversity in Work Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umans, Timurs

    2011-01-01

    This paper empirically investigates the relationship between cultural and gender diversity and performance in groups of business students working on complex assignments. The study finds that gender diversity in student groups has a positive influence on group outcomes, while cultural diversity, irrespective of its conceptualisation, leads to…

  13. Enhancing the Efficacy of Lecturers in Educating Student Cohorts Consisting of Culturally Diverse Groups in a Medical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakravarthi, Srikumar; Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Judson, John Paul

    2010-01-01

    Lecturers exert a potent influence over the achievement of all students, low-income culturally diverse students in particular. Although recent research has confirmed that lecturer involvement is critical for promoting academic engagement of low-income and ethnically diverse students in America and other countries, other literature suggests that…

  14. Changing the Nature of Lectures Using a Personal Response System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masikunis, George; Panayiotidis, Andreas; Burke, Linda

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the use of an Electronic Voting System (EVS) in large group lectures within a business and management undergraduate degree programme, in an attempt to make them more interactive. The intention was to ensure that the introduction of the EVS-style lecture was educationally driven, linked to interactive learning activities in…

  15. Delivering Science to Large Audiences: Experiments in Active Learning and Public Lectures at the University of Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, T.

    1999-12-01

    The problem of disseminating scientific knowledge to the broader community in an effective and efficient way is always with us. At the University of Michigan we have been addressing this problem in several ways. Every year we teach introductory physics to about 3000 students. We believe that, in addition to a pedagogical responsibility, this is an important opportunity for outreach. We report on a variety of approaches to active learning in large lecture classes which are aimed at aiding student comprehension of conceptual material. These have the side affect of improving their general impression of science. In addition to the traditional classroom, we have also engaged in a broader outreach program through the Saturday Morning Physics lecture series, which through a combination of programming and advertising draws audiences of 250 a week to 15 weeks of lectures on topics of current research. We conclude with some general observations about the relation between the success of these public lectures and our large lecture classes. This work is supported by a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation, the University of Michigan, and the Ted Annis Foundation.

  16. Making Large Class Basic Histology Lectures More Interactive: The Use of Draw-Along Mapping Techniques and Associated Educational Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotzé, Sanet Henriët; Mole, Calvin Gerald

    2015-01-01

    At Stellenbosch University, South Africa, basic histology is taught to a combination class of almost 400 first-year medical, physiotherapy, and dietetic students. Many students often find the amount of work in basic histology lectures overwhelming and consequently loose interest. The aim was to determine if a draw-along mapping activity would…

  17. Incorporating Active Learning with PowerPoint-Based Lectures Using Content-Based Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gier, Vicki S.; Kreiner, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Instructors often use Microsoft PowerPoint lectures and handouts as support tools to provide students with the main concepts of the lectures. Some instructors and researchers believe that PowerPoint encourages student passivity. We conducted 2 studies to determine whether the use of content-based questions (CBQs) would enhance learning when…

  18. The Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhury, S. Raj

    2011-01-01

    Academic lectures for the purpose of instruction maintain an important presence in most colleges and universities worldwide. This chapter examines the current state of the lecture and how learning sciences research can inform the most effective use of this method. The author presents evidence that the lecture can be an effective element of…

  19. Supporting Student Research Group Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopatin, Dennis E.

    1993-01-01

    This discussion describes methods that foster a healthy Student Research Group (SRG) and permits it to fulfill its responsibility in the development of the student researcher. The model used in the discussion is that of the University of Michigan School of Dentistry SRG. (GLR)

  20. Lectures based on cardinal symptoms in undergraduate medicine - effects of evaluation-based interventions on teaching large groups

    PubMed Central

    Kuhnigk, Olaf; Weidtmann, Katja; Anders, Sven; Hüneke, Bernd; Santer, René; Harendza, Sigrid

    2011-01-01

    Despite critical voices lectures are still an important teaching format in current medical curricula. With the curricular reform at Hamburg Medical Faculty in the year 2004, all subject specific lectures were replaced by cardinal symptom oriented lectures (LSV) in the new clinical curriculum. LSVs are taught throughout all six thematic blocks in years three to five. Since regular student evaluations after each thematic block seemed to demand improvement of the LSVs, this study was carried out using evaluations of individual LSVs by the participating students and by trained auditors (final year students and academic staff). Based on these evaluations feedback containing the individual evaluation data was given in written form to the lecturers combined with information material on planning an LSV using modern didactic techniques. In a second evaluation period, the effects of this intervention were studied. Only small improvements in the LSVs’ quality were noted regarding the level of marks achieved. When individual items were evaluated, especially the didactic quality, significant improvements were noticeable. Overall, on the basis of individual items students ranked the quality of the LSVs significantly higher than trained auditors during the first evaluation period. This effect was no longer seen after the second evaluation period. The inter rater reliability among the auditors was very good. This study shows that regular quality assurance is needed on the structural levels and for staff to accompany the process of embedding teaching formats into curricular concepts. Further investigation is needed to determine the adequate frequency of evaluation and the format of feedback to guarantee sustainable effects of the didactic quality of lectures. PMID:21818230

  1. Using paper presentation breaks during didactic lectures improves learning of physiology in undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Ahmad; Ghazvini, Kiarash

    2016-03-01

    Many studies have emphasized the incorporation of active learning into classrooms to reinforce didactic lectures for physiology courses. This work aimed to determine if presenting classic papers during didactic lectures improves the learning of physiology among undergraduate students. Twenty-two students of health information technology were randomly divided into the following two groups: 1) didactic lecture only (control group) and 2) didactic lecture plus paper presentation breaks (DLPP group). In the control group, main topics of gastrointestinal and endocrine physiology were taught using only the didactic lecture technique. In the DLPP group, some topics were presented by the didactic lecture method (similar to the control group) and some topics were taught by the DLPP technique (first, concepts were covered briefly in a didactic format and then reinforced with presentation of a related classic paper). The combination of didactic lecture and paper breaks significantly improved learning so that students in the DLPP group showed higher scores on related topics compared with those in the control group (P < 0.001). Comparison of the scores of topics taught by only the didactic lecture and those using both the didactic lecture and paper breaks showed significant improvement only in the DLPP group (P < 0.001). Data obtained from the final exam showed that in the DLPP group, the mean score of the topics taught by the combination of didactic lecture and paper breaks was significantly higher than those taught by only didactic lecture (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the combination of paper presentation breaks and didactic lectures improves the learning of physiology.

  2. Using paper presentation breaks during didactic lectures improves learning of physiology in undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Ahmad; Ghazvini, Kiarash

    2016-03-01

    Many studies have emphasized the incorporation of active learning into classrooms to reinforce didactic lectures for physiology courses. This work aimed to determine if presenting classic papers during didactic lectures improves the learning of physiology among undergraduate students. Twenty-two students of health information technology were randomly divided into the following two groups: 1) didactic lecture only (control group) and 2) didactic lecture plus paper presentation breaks (DLPP group). In the control group, main topics of gastrointestinal and endocrine physiology were taught using only the didactic lecture technique. In the DLPP group, some topics were presented by the didactic lecture method (similar to the control group) and some topics were taught by the DLPP technique (first, concepts were covered briefly in a didactic format and then reinforced with presentation of a related classic paper). The combination of didactic lecture and paper breaks significantly improved learning so that students in the DLPP group showed higher scores on related topics compared with those in the control group (P < 0.001). Comparison of the scores of topics taught by only the didactic lecture and those using both the didactic lecture and paper breaks showed significant improvement only in the DLPP group (P < 0.001). Data obtained from the final exam showed that in the DLPP group, the mean score of the topics taught by the combination of didactic lecture and paper breaks was significantly higher than those taught by only didactic lecture (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the combination of paper presentation breaks and didactic lectures improves the learning of physiology. PMID:26873895

  3. Transforming a Large-Lecture Course into an Active, Engaging, and Collaborative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoerger, Sharon; Krieger, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, a large lecture hall course follows a teacher-centered approach to instruction. This was the case for the "gateway" course in the undergraduate Information Technology and Informatics (ITI) major in the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. This paper describes the journey…

  4. Surviving Lecture: A Pedagogical Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Lecture is the approach traditionally used to teach music theory courses. Although efficient in the delivery of large amounts of information in a short period of time, lecture lacks the effectiveness of an active learning approach. "Theory Survivor" is a unique cooperative-learning method based on the Student Teams-Achievement Divisions technique…

  5. Lecture Alternatives in Teaching English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judy, Stephen, Ed.

    The five sections of the document are: General Discussion; Classroom Experiences; Evaluation and Non-Lecture Teaching; A Closing Note; and Appendix. The ten papers presented are as follows: "Lecture Alternatives and the English Class" by Stephen Judy; "Let's See How it Goes: A View of the Teacher as Manager of Student-Initiated Activities" by…

  6. Brief, cooperative peer-instruction sessions during lectures enhance student recall and comprehension*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Niu; Henderson, Charles N.R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the academic impact of cooperative peer instruction during lecture pauses in an immunology/endocrinology course. Methods: Third-quarter students participated across iterations of the course. Each class offered 20 lectures of 50 minutes each. Classes were divided into a peer-instruction group incorporating cooperative peer instruction and a control group receiving traditional lectures. Peer-instruction group lectures were divided into 2–3 short presentations followed by a multiple-choice question (MCQ). Students recorded an initial answer and then had 1 minute to discuss answers with group peers. Following this, students could submit a revised answer. The control group received the same lecture material, but without MCQs or peer discussions. Final-exam scores were compared across study groups. A mixed-design analysis of covariance was used to analyze the data. Results: There was a statistically significant main effect for the peer-instruction activity (F(1, 93) = 6.573, p = .012, r = .257), with recall scores higher for MCQs asked after peer-instruction activities than for those asked before peer instruction. Final-exam scores at the end of term were greater in the peer-instruction group than the control group (F(1, 193) = 9.264, p = .003, r = .214; question type, F(1, 193) = 26.671, p = .000, r = .348). Conclusion: Lectures with peer-instruction pauses increase student recall and comprehension compared with traditional lectures. PMID:26967766

  7. Improving Your Lecturing. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Nancy A.; And Others

    A guide for faculty who want to improve their lecturing skills is presented. After identifying advantages and disadvantages of the lecture method, suggestions are offered for effective lecture preparation, with attention to organizing the body of the lecture, and beginning and closing the lecture. Vocal aspects of lecture delivery are addressed,…

  8. AMEE Medical Education Guide No. 22: Refreshing lecturing: a guide for lecturers.

    PubMed

    Brown, George; Manogue, Michael

    2001-05-01

    This guide provides an overview of research on lecturing, a model of the processes of lecturing and suggestions for improving lecturing, learning from lectures and ways of evaluating lectures. Whilst primarily directed at teachers in the healthcare professions, it is equally applicable to all teachers in higher education. Lectures are the most ubiquitous method of teaching so they are an important part of a teacher's repertoire. Lectures are at least as effective as other methods of teaching at imparting information and explaining. Intention, transmission and output are the basis of a model of lecturing. The key skills of preparing lectures, explaining and varying student activities may be derived from the model. Preparation is based on purposes, content, various structures of lectures and the preparation of audiovisual aids. The essential ingredients of explaining are clarity, interest and persuasion. By varying activities, one can renew attention and develop student learning. Learning from lectures can be improved by teaching students the structure of lectures and methods of listening and note-taking. Student ratings of lectures are useful but over-used and limited ways of evaluating lectures. Equally important is peer review and more important than either student ratings or peer feedback is reflection on the practice of lecturing by individuals and course teams.

  9. Advanced Extravehicular Activity Breakout Group Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, Joseph J.; Perka, Alan; Walz, Carl; Cobb, Sharon; Hanford, Anthony; Eppler, Dean

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph document summarizes the workings of the Advanced Extravehicular Activity (AEVA) Breakout group in a Martian environment. The group was tasked with: identifying potential contaminants and pathways for AEVA systems with respect to forward and backward contamination; identifying plausible mitigation alternatives and obstacles for pertinent missions; identifying topics that require further research and technology development and discuss development strategies with uncertain Planetary Protection (PP) requirements; Identifying PP requirements that impose the greatest mission/development costs; Identifying PP requirements/topics that require further definition;

  10. Issues of onset in space plasma activity (Hannes Alfvén Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Karl

    2014-05-01

    Advances in space plasma dynamics have led to a picture in which major phenomena such as the magnetospheric/ionospheric substorm are viewed as the interplay of a number of processes of a more elementary nature (elements), details depending on the selected focus. The lecture first gives a brief characterization of a set of substorm elements, among them energy transfer into and release from the magnetotail, formation of thin current sheets, magnetic reconnection, current wedge, ballooning instability and auroral phenomena. (This list does not devaluate the classical substorm phases, but a subdivision is called for.) A detailed picture based on observation, theory and simulation, which is required to fully disentangle the interaction of substorm elements, is not yet available. Several aspects that did become reasonably clear in recent times are reviewed. It seems that some of the substorm elements have their own onset scenarios, so that the popular notion of a single substorm onset mechanism needs to be reconsidered. Regarding energy release from the magnetotail, linear stability analysis and numerical simulations point at a crucial role of breakdown of electron gyrotropy leading to instability for sufficient stretching of the magnetotail. The onset of that instability is to be distinguished from the onset of magnetic reconnection. The occurrence of the ballooning instability is discussed in terms of magnetic flux tube entropy. Several interpretations exist about the onset of the instability of the stretched tail. Particular attention is paid to diverging views about causation. To what extent is the ongoing cause-and-effect debate on substorm dynamics based on differences in authors' intuition rather than on irrefutable facts?

  11. Involving postgraduate's students in undergraduate small group teaching promotes active learning in both

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Ruchi; Modi, Jyoti Nath; Vyas, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lecture is a common traditional method for teaching, but it may not stimulate higher order thinking and students may also be hesitant to express and interact. The postgraduate (PG) students are less involved with undergraduate (UG) teaching. Team based small group active learning method can contribute to better learning experience. Aim: To-promote active learning skills among the UG students using small group teaching methods involving PG students as facilitators to impart hands-on supervised training in teaching and managerial skills. Methodology: After Institutional approval under faculty supervision 92 UGs and 8 PGs participated in 6 small group sessions utilizing the jigsaw technique. Feedback was collected from both. Observations: Undergraduate Feedback (Percentage of Students Agreed): Learning in small groups was a good experience as it helped in better understanding of the subject (72%), students explored multiple reading resources (79%), they were actively involved in self-learning (88%), students reported initial apprehension of performance (71%), identified their learning gaps (86%), team enhanced their learning process (71%), informal learning in place of lecture was a welcome change (86%), it improved their communication skills (82%), small group learning can be useful for future self-learning (75%). Postgraduate Feedback: Majority performed facilitation for first time, perceived their performance as good (75%), it was helpful in self-learning (100%), felt confident of managing students in small groups (100%), as facilitator they improved their teaching skills, found it more useful and better identified own learning gaps (87.5%). Conclusions: Learning in small groups adopting team based approach involving both UGs and PGs promoted active learning in both and enhanced the teaching skills of the PGs. PMID:26380201

  12. "They Drag My Marks Down!"--Challenges Faced by Lecturers in the Allocation of Marks for Multicultural Group Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Pat; U-Mackey, Alice; Crothers, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Our university hosts a diverse student cohort and, in certain discipline areas, international students and domestic students whose first language is not English outnumber their English-speaking peers. On the whole, group projects with these cohorts are challenging, and in particular, the allocation of marks is fraught with difficulty. Awarding the…

  13. The Educational Activities of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1981-01-01

    Describes educational activities of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific including learning packets on various astronomy concepts, Morrison lectures, newspaper columns, teacher workshops, cosponsoring astronomy oriented lectures, and providing speakers for various groups. (DS)

  14. Add a Teacher-Led Stimulation to Your Lecturing Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlbaw, Lynn Matthew

    1991-01-01

    Provides a way to enliven the classroom lecture by involving students in the lecture. Students role-play characters in the teacher's lecture becoming active learners through participation. Students learn their roles and make decisions based on the lecture situation presented. Provides an example unit on the growth of big business in U.S. history…

  15. Physical Activity, Physical Fitness, and Health. C.H. McCloy Research Lecture: 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Steven N.

    1993-01-01

    Examines recent evidence on the relations between physical activity, physical fitness, and health, noting the possible causal nature of the associations. The article evaluates the public health burden of sedentary lifestyles in the United States and provides suggestions for increasing participation in physical activity. (SM)

  16. Activating Students' Interest and Participation in Lectures and Practical Courses Using Their Electronic Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wijtmans, Maikel; van Rens, Lisette; van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline E.

    2014-01-01

    Interactive teaching with larger groups of students can be a challenge, but the use of mobile electronic devices by students (smartphones, tablets, laptops) can be used to improve classroom interaction. We have examined several types of tasks that can be electronically enacted in classes and practical courses using these devices: multiple choice…

  17. 2008 C. H. McCloy lecture. Social psychology and physical activity: back to the future.

    PubMed

    Gill, Diane L

    2009-12-01

    In the early 1970s, both my academic career and the psychology subdiscipline within kinesiology began as "social psychology and physical activity. "Since then, sport and exercise psychology research has shifted away from the social to a narrower biopsycho-(no social) approach, and professional practice has focused on the elite rather than the larger public. Psychology can contribute to an integrative and relevant professional discipline by going back to the future as social psychology and physical activity and by incorporating three of C. H. McCloy's themes (a) evidence-based practice, (b) beyond dualisms, and (c) commitment to public service. Our scholarship must move beyond dualisms to recognize complexities and connections and be truly scholarship for practice. Social psychology and physical activity can serve the public by advocating for inclusive, empowering physical activity programs that promote health and well being for all.

  18. Millikan Lecture 1996: Promoting active learning based on physics education research in introductory physics courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laws, P. W.

    1997-01-01

    Early in his career Robert Millikan experimented with a laboratory-based method of teaching introductory physics that bears close resemblance to Workshop Physics.® In this talk, key elements of Workshop Physics are summarized. Some Workshop Physics activities are described which involve apparati that are used for rapid observations of conceptual aspects of physical phenomena as well as for equation verification experiments. Challenges are discussed that must be faced if recently developed activity-based approaches to teaching based on the outcomes of physics education research are to provide a foundation for a major paradigm shift in physics teaching.

  19. Alternatives to Traditional Lecturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, David W.

    1984-01-01

    Alternatives to traditional, large-class lecturing are discussed. They include using canned lectures, demonstrations and lecture experiments, computer simulations, problem-solving strategies, breaks during lectures, and movies. Moving out of large classrooms to laboratories and resource rooms (or giving an examination) is also suggested. (JN)

  20. Using Audience Response Systems during Interactive Lectures to Promote Active Learning and Conceptual Understanding of Stoichiometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotes, Sandra; Cotuá, José

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a method of instruction using an active learning strategy for teaching stoichiometry through a process of gradual knowledge building. Students identify their misconceptions and progress through a sequence of questions based on the same chemical equation. An infrared device and software registered as the TurningPoint Audience…

  1. "Class-Bucks": A Motivational Tool to Encourage Active Student Participation during Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Jager, T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the influence of an extrinsic motivational tool, "class-bucks," on the possibility of improving first year student-teachers' participation in active learning at Tshwane University of Technology in South Africa. Research participants (n=289) were divided into four classes and engaged in this…

  2. C. H. McCloy Lecture: Fifty Years of Advancements in Fitness and Activity Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, Charles B.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 50 years progress in fitness and activity research has been influenced by social events, technical innovations, and changes in the field of physical education and kinesiology. The conventional wisdom of the 1950s yielded to a new wisdom based on research evidence. The author's research, as well as the research of others, from 1960 to…

  3. RET/PTC activation in papillary thyroid carcinoma: European Journal of Endocrinology Prize Lecture.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Massimo; Melillo, Rosa Marina; Fusco, Alfredo

    2006-11-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is frequently associated with RET gene rearrangements that generate the so-called RET/PTC oncogenes. In this review, we examine the data about the mechanisms of thyroid cell transformation, activation of downstream signal transduction pathways and modulation of gene expression induced by RET/PTC. These findings have advanced our understanding of the processes underlying PTC formation and provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches to this disease.

  4. RET/PTC activation in papillary thyroid carcinoma: European Journal of Endocrinology Prize Lecture.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Massimo; Melillo, Rosa Marina; Fusco, Alfredo

    2006-11-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is frequently associated with RET gene rearrangements that generate the so-called RET/PTC oncogenes. In this review, we examine the data about the mechanisms of thyroid cell transformation, activation of downstream signal transduction pathways and modulation of gene expression induced by RET/PTC. These findings have advanced our understanding of the processes underlying PTC formation and provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches to this disease. PMID:17062879

  5. The Mikamo lecture. Role of higher nervous activity in sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Lown, B

    1990-06-01

    The brain receives and catalogues myriads of information from within and without the organism. These inputs promote neural integration of bodily function through a multiplicity of cybernetic feedback loops. Higher nervous activity shapes the contours of perceived well-being and determines the course and progress of disease. Behavioral and neural factors play an important role in cardiovascular function and are especially relevant to the problem of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Clinical data attesting to the role of biobehavioral factors in SCD derive from a diversity of sources. It has long been known that bereavement increases the prevalence of cardiac fatality. Business failure rates are strongly related to increased mortality among persons aged 55 and over. Recession in economic activity, with increasing unemployment, is associated with augmented death rates from ischemic heart disease. In extensive surveys conducted among London civil servants, Rose and Marmot found not only the level but the type of employment to be a factor determining coronary heart disease mortality. Blue collar workers had a 3.6 times greater chance of dying from heart disease than an age-matched population in the higher ranks of civil service. A man's employment status was a stronger predictor of risk for dying from coronary heart disease than any of the usual risk factors, such as smoking, blood pressure, height-weight ratio, leisure time activities, glucose tolerance, or plasma cholesterol. Operation of behavioral factors is also suggested by the time of occurrence of sudden death. Among 3,983 men followed for more than 30 years, Rabkin and co-workers observed an excess proportion of fatalities on Mondays. No such pattern was noted for cancer mortality. Not only the day of the week but the time of day appears to be a factor. Muller and co-workers found a significant preponderance in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and sudden death from 6:00 AM to noon. They could not implicate

  6. Effects of Requiring Physical Fitness in a Lecture-Based College Course: Students' Attitudes toward Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esslinger, Keri A.; Grimes, Amanda R.; Pyle, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated students' attitudes toward physical activity (PA) when including a required PA component in a university-required personal wellness class. The study included (a) an experimental group of students enrolled in a personal wellness course in which there was a required PA requirement and (b) a control group of students…

  7. Informing Complex Interventions in Technology-Rich Teaching Ecologies: A Study of Structured Lecture Podcasting to Facilitate Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickles, David James

    2010-01-01

    Since 2005, there has been rapid adoption of the use of podcasting in schools. In this flood of adoption, content has been recorded and distributed, but predominantly not internally structured or pedagogically integrated. This research aims to remedy pedagogical deficiencies in lecture podcasting by making use of chapter feature technology to…

  8. Group Work vs. Whole Class Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanveer, Asma

    2008-01-01

    Group work has only been recently introduced in the education system of Pakistan but many primary teachers, especially in the public schools, are still not aware of how different kinds of strategies that is group work and whole class teaching facilitate learning among students. This paper aims to provide an overview of teaching strategies to…

  9. 45 CFR 73.735-706 - Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. 73.735-706... OF CONDUCT Outside Activities § 73.735-706 Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. (a) Employees are encouraged to engage in teaching and lecturing activities which are not part of their official duties...

  10. 45 CFR 73.735-706 - Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. 73.735-706... OF CONDUCT Outside Activities § 73.735-706 Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. (a) Employees are encouraged to engage in teaching and lecturing activities which are not part of their official duties...

  11. 45 CFR 73.735-706 - Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. 73.735-706... OF CONDUCT Outside Activities § 73.735-706 Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. (a) Employees are encouraged to engage in teaching and lecturing activities which are not part of their official duties...

  12. 45 CFR 73.735-706 - Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. 73.735-706... OF CONDUCT Outside Activities § 73.735-706 Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. (a) Employees are encouraged to engage in teaching and lecturing activities which are not part of their official duties...

  13. Public Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    An outreach activity is being organized by the Turkish community at CERN, on 5 June 2010 at CERN Main Auditorium. The activity consists of several talks that will take 1.5h in total. The main goal of the activity will be describing the CERN based activities and experiments as well as stimulating the public's attention to the science related topics. We believe the wide communication of the event has certain advantages especially for the proceeding membership process of Turkey.

  14. Public Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-11

    An outreach activity is being organized by the Turkish community at CERN, on 5 June 2010 at CERN Main Auditorium. The activity consists of several talks that will take 1.5h in total. The main goal of the activity will be describing the CERN based activities and experiments as well as stimulating the public's attention to the science related topics. We believe the wide communication of the event has certain advantages especially for the proceeding membership process of Turkey.

  15. DOING Physics--Physics Activities for Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicker, Earl, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an activity which demonstrates standing waves in air generated by a loudspeaker driven by an audio oscillator. The waves are detected by cool spots on a glowing nichrome wire contained in an inexpensive piece of equipment. Also describes activities involving analysis of kinematics through data taking and graphing. (JM)

  16. DOING Physics--Physics Activities for Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Glenn; Insley, Peter

    1985-01-01

    Explains two activities: (1) a "rotator demonstration" (a turntable, pendulum, chalk, and other materials), which can be used in many activities to demonstrate rotational concepts; and (2) an "Eskimo yo-yo," consisting of two balls (plus long strings and a glass tube) which rotate in opposite directions to show centripetal force. (JN)

  17. Attention Breaks in Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, A. H.; Percival, F.

    1976-01-01

    Describes research into student attention patterns during lectures that suggests that student attention declines steadily during a lecture, and that the rate of decrease is dependent upon several variables including subject difficulty. (MLH)

  18. University Lecturer Publication Output: Qualifications, Time and Confidence Count

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Brian; Kay, Russell

    2010-01-01

    An investigation of factors which differentiate between university lecturers in relation to publication output is reported. The study drew on data from lecturers working full-time at two large Australian universities. Measures of research publication output were used to select two groups of lecturers (N[subscript 1] = 119; N[subscript 2] = 119);…

  19. Practical strategies for effective lectures.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Peter H; McCallister, Jennifer W; Luks, Andrew M; Le, Tao T; Fessler, Henry E

    2015-04-01

    Lecturing is an essential teaching skill for scientists and health care professionals in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. However, few medical or scientific educators have received training in contemporary techniques or technology for large audience presentation. Interactive lecturing outperforms traditional, passive-style lecturing in educational outcomes, and is being increasingly incorporated into large group presentations. Evidence-based techniques range from the very simple, such as inserting pauses for audience discussion, to more technologically advanced approaches such as electronic audience response systems. Alternative software platforms such as Prezi can overcome some of the visual limits that the ubiquitous PowerPoint imposes on complex scientific narratives, and newer technology formats can help foster the interactive learning environment. Regardless of the technology, adherence to good principles of instructional design, multimedia learning, visualization of quantitative data, and informational public speaking can improve any lecture. The storyline must be clear, logical, and simplified compared with how it might be prepared for scientific publication. Succinct outline and summary slides can provide a roadmap for the audience. Changes of pace, and summaries or other cognitive breaks inserted every 15-20 minutes can renew attention. Graphics that emphasize clear, digestible data graphs or images over tables, and simple, focused tables over text slides, are more readily absorbed. Text slides should minimize words, using simple fonts in colors that contrast to a plain background. Adherence to these well-established principles and addition of some new approaches and technologies will yield an engaging lecture worth attending. PMID:25746051

  20. Practical strategies for effective lectures.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Peter H; McCallister, Jennifer W; Luks, Andrew M; Le, Tao T; Fessler, Henry E

    2015-04-01

    Lecturing is an essential teaching skill for scientists and health care professionals in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. However, few medical or scientific educators have received training in contemporary techniques or technology for large audience presentation. Interactive lecturing outperforms traditional, passive-style lecturing in educational outcomes, and is being increasingly incorporated into large group presentations. Evidence-based techniques range from the very simple, such as inserting pauses for audience discussion, to more technologically advanced approaches such as electronic audience response systems. Alternative software platforms such as Prezi can overcome some of the visual limits that the ubiquitous PowerPoint imposes on complex scientific narratives, and newer technology formats can help foster the interactive learning environment. Regardless of the technology, adherence to good principles of instructional design, multimedia learning, visualization of quantitative data, and informational public speaking can improve any lecture. The storyline must be clear, logical, and simplified compared with how it might be prepared for scientific publication. Succinct outline and summary slides can provide a roadmap for the audience. Changes of pace, and summaries or other cognitive breaks inserted every 15-20 minutes can renew attention. Graphics that emphasize clear, digestible data graphs or images over tables, and simple, focused tables over text slides, are more readily absorbed. Text slides should minimize words, using simple fonts in colors that contrast to a plain background. Adherence to these well-established principles and addition of some new approaches and technologies will yield an engaging lecture worth attending.

  1. In Defense of the Populist Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrad, Mark Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) programs like Microsoft PowerPoint and Apple Keynote have become the norm for large university lecture classes, but their record in terms of student engagement and active learning is mixed at best. Here, the author presents the merits of a "populist" lecture style that takes full advantage of the…

  2. Mountain Biking with Groups: A "Safe" Activity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Terry

    2001-01-01

    A survey mailed to 200 British mountain bike leaders found that rates of cycling accidents and injuries were greater in forests and woodlands than on terrain where a license is required to lead groups of young cyclists. Excessive speed was mentioned in most accidents, coupled with poor use of breaks in many cases. (SV)

  3. Group Learning as Relational Economic Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Eisuke; Atencio, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss group learning in line with economic perspectives of embeddedness and integration emanating from the work of Karl Polanyi. Polanyi's work defines economy as a necessary interaction among human beings for survival; the economy is considered inextricably linked from broader society and social relations…

  4. Doing Physics--Physics Activities for Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicker, Earl, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Materials needed and procedures for conducting two activities are provided. The first investigates drops of a liquid which float on water in a watchglass resting on top of a loudspeaker. The second investigates electromagnetic phenomena. (JN)

  5. Active microwave users working group program planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Bare, J.; Brown, W. E., Jr.; Childs, L. F.; Dellwig, L. F.; Heighway, J. E.; Joosten, R.; Lewis, A. J.; Linlor, W.; Lundien, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed programmatic and technical development plan for active microwave technology was examined in each of four user activities: (1) vegetation; (2) water resources and geologic applications, and (4) oceanographic applications. Major application areas were identified, and the impact of each application area in terms of social and economic gains were evaluated. The present state of knowledge of the applicability of active microwave remote sensing to each application area was summarized and its role relative to other remote sensing devices was examined. The analysis and data acquisition techniques needed to resolve the effects of interference factors were reviewed to establish an operational capability in each application area. Flow charts of accomplished and required activities in each application area that lead to operational capability were structured.

  6. 431st Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Robert Crease

    2016-07-12

    Crease presents "Recombinant Science: The Birth of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider," a lecture that follows on the 429th Brookhaven Lecture, in which Crease talked about the early history of BNL. Both lectures are part of the ongoing celebration of BNL's 60th anniversary year.

  7. Manual for CLE Lecturers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shellaberger, Donna J.

    This manual is designed to help lawyers develop the skills needed to present effective, stimulating continuing legal education (CLE) lectures. It focuses on the particular purpose and nature of CLE lecturing, relationships and interplay of personalities in CLE, commitments and constraints which lecturers should observe, program structure and…

  8. 431st Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Crease

    2007-12-12

    Crease presents "Recombinant Science: The Birth of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider," a lecture that follows on the 429th Brookhaven Lecture, in which Crease talked about the early history of BNL. Both lectures are part of the ongoing celebration of BNL's 60th anniversary year.

  9. The Spaced Lecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sitler, Helen Collins

    1997-01-01

    In a classroom research project, one college teacher experimented with a variation on conventional lecture method to improve student understanding of content. At logical points in the lecture, approximately 15-20 minutes apart, the lecturer pauses and directs students to review the material and paraphrase it in writing. Analysis of student notes…

  10. Laughter in University Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesi, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses laughter in spoken academic discourse, with the aim of discovering why lecturers provoke laughter in their lectures. A further purpose of the paper is to identify episodes in British data which may differ from those in other cultural contexts where other lecturing practices prevail, and thus to inform the design of study skills…

  11. DOING Physics--Physics Activities for Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwicker, Earl, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes three demonstrations/activities that involve forces: (1) a canoe-like boat made from copper window screen; (2) magnetic forces with a paper clip and ceramic magnetic; and (3) an "icemobile" machine that cuts ice cubes without an obvious source of energy. (DH)

  12. Intrinsic deficiencies of lectures as a teaching method.

    PubMed

    Pale, Predrag

    2013-06-01

    Lectures were, still are and seem to remain a dominant form of teaching, despite an increased research and use of other methods of teaching and leverage of technology aimed at improving teaching results and efficiency. Learning, as the result of a lecture, greatly depends on the subject, the competence and abilities of the lecturer as well as on other transient causes. However, lectures also have some intrinsic deficiencies as a teaching method pertinent to their very nature. In order to fully understand the teaching value of lectures and their role and proper use in educational systems, their deficiencies have been studied in a theoretical analysis from the perspective of cognitive learning theories. Fifteen deficiencies have been identified and clustered in three categories based on root causes of deficiencies: synchronicity problems, time constraint and individual student abilities, needs and knowledge. These findings can be used to adjust expected learning outcomes of lectures, to properly (re)design lecture content and process and to design other learning and teaching activities that would compensate and complement lectures. Recommendations are given on replacing and amending lectures with other instructional methods, amending lectures in the course of delivery with additional content and tools and complementing lectures after delivery with content, tools and activities. Suggestions on the use of information technology that could substitute, reduce or eliminate at least some of the deficiencies are made. Lecture captures seem to be valuable supplement for live lectures compensating in all three categories of deficiencies. Suggestions and directions for further research are given.

  13. Individual and group dynamics in purchasing activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Guo, Jin-Li; Fan, Chao; Liu, Xue-Jiao

    2013-01-01

    As a major part of the daily operation in an enterprise, purchasing frequency is in constant change. Recent approaches on the human dynamics can provide some new insights into the economic behavior of companies in the supply chain. This paper captures the attributes of creation times of purchase orders to an individual vendor, as well as to all vendors, and further investigates whether they have some kind of dynamics by applying logarithmic binning to the construction of distribution plots. It’s found that the former displays a power-law distribution with approximate exponent 2.0, while the latter is fitted by a mixture distribution with both power-law and exponential characteristics. Obviously, two distinctive characteristics are presented for the interval time distribution from the perspective of individual dynamics and group dynamics. Actually, this mixing feature can be attributed to the fitting deviations as they are negligible for individual dynamics, but those of different vendors are cumulated and then lead to an exponential factor for group dynamics. To better describe the mechanism generating the heterogeneity of the purchase order assignment process from the objective company to all its vendors, a model driven by product life cycle is introduced, and then the analytical distribution and the simulation result are obtained, which are in good agreement with the empirical data.

  14. Lectures on Yangian symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-08-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfel’d's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang–Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang–Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dilatation operator and tree-level scattering amplitudes. These lectures are illustrated by several examples, in particular the two-dimensional chiral Gross–Neveu model, the Heisenberg spin chain and { N }=4 superconformal Yang–Mills theory in four dimensions.

  15. Lectures on Yangian symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-08-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfel’d's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang-Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dilatation operator and tree-level scattering amplitudes. These lectures are illustrated by several examples, in particular the two-dimensional chiral Gross-Neveu model, the Heisenberg spin chain and { N }=4 superconformal Yang-Mills theory in four dimensions.

  16. Taxonomy of Lecture Note-Taking Skills and Subskills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Musalli, Alaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Note taking (NT) in lectures is as active a skill as listening, which stimulates it, and as challenging as writing, which is the end product. Literature on lecture NT misses an integration of the processes involved in listening with those in NT. In this article, a taxonomy is proposed of lecture NT skills and subskills based on a similar list…

  17. Advice for New and Student Lecturers on Probability and Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Lecture is a common presentation style that gives instructors a lot of control over topics and time allocation, but can limit active student participation and learning. This article presents some ideas to increase the level of student involvement in lecture. The examples and suggestions are based on the author's experience as a senior lecturer for…

  18. Activities of the Boom and Chassis Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dell, Jason Scott; Meeks, Thomas Bayne; Merkel, Kelly; Nelson, Brent; Winchell, Tom

    1992-01-01

    Group One of the NASA Lunar Enabler Project has designed the primary chassis and boom structures for the lunar vehicle. Both components also feature V-clamps that were adapted to interface connections within the structure. The chassis features a front end, rear end section, middle cross-section, and face plate. The rear section contains an extra compartment for the engine, hydraulic pump, fuel bottles, and oil reservoir necessary for the wheel drives. Each section consists of tubular aluminum 6061-T6. The boom features four degrees of freedom system, where the minimum factor of safety of any part is 1.5 (but, normally much higher). It consists of a tapered upper boom, lower boom, and three elbows that complement the articulation joints. Each section of the boom has been constructed from aluminum 6061-T6. There are four joints and eight V-clamps in the boom assembly. The V-clamps feature support rings that prevent axial rotation. They provide easy adaptability and assembly.

  19. Activities of the Boom and Chassis Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell, Jason Scott; Meeks, Thomas Bayne; Merkel, Kelly; Nelson, Brent; Winchell, Tom

    Group One of the NASA Lunar Enabler Project has designed the primary chassis and boom structures for the lunar vehicle. Both components also feature V-clamps that were adapted to interface connections within the structure. The chassis features a front end, rear end section, middle cross-section, and face plate. The rear section contains an extra compartment for the engine, hydraulic pump, fuel bottles, and oil reservoir necessary for the wheel drives. Each section consists of tubular aluminum 6061-T6. The boom features four degrees of freedom system, where the minimum factor of safety of any part is 1.5 (but, normally much higher). It consists of a tapered upper boom, lower boom, and three elbows that complement the articulation joints. Each section of the boom has been constructed from aluminum 6061-T6. There are four joints and eight V-clamps in the boom assembly. The V-clamps feature support rings that prevent axial rotation. They provide easy adaptability and assembly.

  20. Just do it: flipped lecture, determinants and debate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kensington-Miller, Barbara; Novak, Julia; Evans, Tanya

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a case study of two pure mathematicians who flipped their lecture to teach matrix determinants in two large mathematics service courses (one at Stage I and the other at Stage II). The purpose of the study was to transform the passive lecture into an active learning opportunity and to introduce valuable mathematical skills, such as debate, argument and disagreement. The students were told in advance to use the online material to prepare, which had a short handout on matrix determinants posted, as the lesson would be interactive and would rely on them having studied this. At the beginning of the lesson, the two mathematicians worked together to model the skill of professional disagreement, one arguing for the cofactor expansion method and the other for the row reduction method. After voting for their preferred method, the students worked in small groups on examples to defend their choice. Each group elected a spokesperson and a political style debate followed as the students argued the pros and cons of each technique. Although one lecture does not establish whether the flipped lecture model is preferable for student instruction, the paper presents a case study for pursuing this approach and for further research on incorporating this style of teaching in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics subjects.

  1. Combining podcasts, online lectures and workshops to promote student engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinton, John

    2010-05-01

    • Students looking blankly into space. • Numbers of students attending lectures falling. • Only a small group of students engaging in discussion. • Few students reading the additional papers that I had recommended. These statements summarise the situation I found myself in 2007 while teaching a final year course in Environmental Risk Assessment. I wanted the students to engage more fully but recognised that this was difficult with a class of around eighty students. So I decided that the following year I would move away from the lecture-practical paradigm and into the new world of online lectures and podcasting. However, delivering solely through online lectures didn't ensure that the students would engage with the material, so the online lectures were incorporated into a series of workshops. The idea was that prior to the workshop the student would watch the lecture, read the recommended papers and come along to discuss them and carry out some form of activity before taking an online test. The tests were designed to be simple: if the student had done the reading, watched the lectures and participated in the workshops then 100% was achievable. Alongside the workshops I kept my numerical risk assessment exercise, based on modelling soil erosion in a small catchment, which constituted most of the assessment, running as it had in previous years. So did it work? Overall the module was well received getting mostly positive feedback Most students watched the online lectures and many commented positively on the experience. The ability to watch the lecture when they wanted and to rewind the lecture so that they could go over the material again was a popular feature. However, a few students missed the opportunity to ask questions during the lecture or had problems with internet access off campus. Students also read more than in a typical module although one student complained that there was too much reading. Generally the workshop element was well received with most

  2. Confchem Conference on Flipped Classroom: Student Engagement with Flipped Chemistry Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seery, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    This project introduces the idea of "flipped lecturing" to a group of second-year undergraduate students. The aim of flipped lecturing is to provide much of the "content delivery" of the lecture in advance, so that the lecture hour can be devoted to more in-depth discussion, problem solving, and so on. As well as development of…

  3. The 2015 C. H. McCloy Lecture: Road Trip Toward More Inclusive Physical Activity: Maps, Mechanics, Detours, and Traveling Companions.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    This essay stems from the 35th annual C. H. McCloy Research Lecture at the 2015 SHAPE America National Convention & Expo in Seattle, WA. The lecture series has 2 main aims. First, it provides an annual forum for a contemporary scholar to delve deeply into her/his work and to share that work with her/his peers. Second, it is an enduring tribute to the pioneering work and influential career of Charles Henry McCloy (March 30, 1886-September 18, 1959), research professor emeritus at the University of Iowa. This essay is composed of 6 sections: a prologue, a biography of McCloy, my autobiography, the fundamental premises and overarching aims of my work, a summary of my research contributions aimed at promoting inclusive physical activity, and an epilogue. The entire article is built around the construct of maps, mechanics, detours, and traveling companions. Paradigm shifts and insights are unraveled as the work unfolds and becomes increasingly integrated. Rarely does a scholar have the chance to provide a narrative of this nature, and it is hoped that this essay will inspire others to discover their own scholarly pathways and to contextualize and reflect on their contributions for the greater good of the field of kinesiology and society.

  4. The 2015 C. H. McCloy Lecture: Road Trip Toward More Inclusive Physical Activity: Maps, Mechanics, Detours, and Traveling Companions.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    This essay stems from the 35th annual C. H. McCloy Research Lecture at the 2015 SHAPE America National Convention & Expo in Seattle, WA. The lecture series has 2 main aims. First, it provides an annual forum for a contemporary scholar to delve deeply into her/his work and to share that work with her/his peers. Second, it is an enduring tribute to the pioneering work and influential career of Charles Henry McCloy (March 30, 1886-September 18, 1959), research professor emeritus at the University of Iowa. This essay is composed of 6 sections: a prologue, a biography of McCloy, my autobiography, the fundamental premises and overarching aims of my work, a summary of my research contributions aimed at promoting inclusive physical activity, and an epilogue. The entire article is built around the construct of maps, mechanics, detours, and traveling companions. Paradigm shifts and insights are unraveled as the work unfolds and becomes increasingly integrated. Rarely does a scholar have the chance to provide a narrative of this nature, and it is hoped that this essay will inspire others to discover their own scholarly pathways and to contextualize and reflect on their contributions for the greater good of the field of kinesiology and society. PMID:26558637

  5. Supporting "Learning by Design" Activities Using Group Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fessakis, Georgios; Tatsis, Konstantinos; Dimitracopoulou, Angelique

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a case study of the educational exploitation of group blogging for the implementation of a "learning by design" activity. More specifically, a group of students used a blog as a communication and information management tool in the University course of ICT-enhanced Geometry learning activities. The analysis of the designed…

  6. Teacher Educators' Design and Implementation of Group Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Hei, Miranda S. A.; Sjoer, Ellen; Admiraal, Wilfried; Strijbos, Jan-Willem

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe how teacher educators design and implement group learning activities (GLAs). We used the Group Learning Activities Instructional Design (GLAID) framework to analyse their descriptions. The GLAID framework includes eight components: (1) interaction, (2) learning objectives and outcomes, (3) assessment, (4) task…

  7. Combination of didactic lectures and review sessions in endocrinology leads to improvement in student performance as measured by assessments.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Ayisha; Cozine, Cassy; Rizvi, Farwa

    2013-03-01

    There can be no single best way of learning, and each teaching mode has its own merits and demerits. Didactic lectures in and of themselves are insufficient, whereas a problem-based tutorial alone can be as ineffective. This study was conducted to determine if a problem-based review after didactic lectures would lead to better student performance. To compare performance, the same student group was taught three units of endocrinology (growth hormone, thyroid hormone, and diabetes). Students were divided into the following three groups: diabetes didactic lectures only, growth hormone didactic lectures plus review, and thyroid hormone didactic lectures plus review. All three topics were covered in the didactic lectures, but only growth hormone and thyroid hormone topics were covered in the review session. At the end of the course, all students were given formative assessments in the form of multiple-choice questions. A highly significant increase (P < 0.000) in the percentage of correct responses on the questions covering growth hormone (mean: 0.838, SD: 0.158) and thyroid hormone (mean: 0.686, SD: 0.232) compared with diabetes (mean: 0.478, SD: 0.259) was observed. In conclusion, this study provides further evidence that the combination of didactic lectures and an active review session leads to an improvement in student performance.

  8. Lecture versus DVD and Attitude Change toward Female Masturbation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keels, Megan; Lee, Zoey; Knox, David; Wilson, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Four-hundred and ninety eight female undergraduate students at a large southeastern university participated in a study to assess how lecture versus DVD format affected attitude change towards female masturbation. All groups were given a pre and post test to assess masturbatory attitudes. Group 1 experienced a masturbation lecture. Group 2…

  9. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  10. Lectures on Law Enforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettleship, Lois

    Three lectures on law enforcement are presented that were prepared for study purposes at Johnson County Community College. The first lecture examines the fundamental ideas of the Age of Enlightenment and discusses their influence on the American Revolution, the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. Major provisions of the Bill of…

  11. Diamond Anniversary Lecture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dewey A.; And Others

    This document contains the texts of four lectures that were presented as part of a series commemorating the 75th anniversary of Ohio State University's Department of Agricultural Education. The first lecture, "The Conceptualization Process and Vocational Education Management," (Dewey A. Adams) discusses a five-step management behavior approach for…

  12. Group-wise FMRI Activation Detection on DICCCOL Landmarks

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jinglei; Guo, Lei; Zhu, Dajiang; Zhang, Tuo; Hu, Xintao; Han, Junwei; Liu, Tianming

    2014-01-01

    Group-wise activation detection in task-based fMRI has been widely used because of its robustness to noises and its capacity to deal with variability of individual brains. However, current group-wise fMRI activation detection methods typically rely on the co-registration of individual brains’ fMRI images, which has difficulty in dealing with the remarkable anatomic variation of different brains. As a consequence, the resulted misalignments could significantly degrade the required inter-subject correspondences, thus substantially reducing the sensitivity and specificity of group-wise fMRI activation detection. To deal with these challenges, this paper presents a novel approach to detecting group-wise fMRI activation on our recently developed and validated Dense Individualized and Common Connectivity-based Cortical Landmarks (DICCCOL). The basic idea here is that the first-level general linear model (GLM) analysis is first performed on the fMRI signal of each corresponding DICCCOL landmark in individual brain’s own space, and then the estimated effect sizes of the same landmark from a group of subjects are statistically assessed with the mixed-effect model at the group level. Finally, the consistently activated DICCCOL landmarks are determined and declared in a group-wise fashion in response to external block-based stimuli. Our experimental results have demonstrated that the proposed approach can detect meaningful activations. PMID:24777386

  13. The Time-Compressed Lecture: An Alternative for Increased Teacher-Learner Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klavon, Albert James

    This investigation compared time-compressed lectures with lectures taped at a normal word rate and examined the direct application of compressed lectures to the educational process. Participants in this study, 87 college students enrolled in Botany 100, were randomly assigned to four groups--one control group and three treatment groups. The…

  14. Music during Lectures: Will Students Learn Better?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dosseville, Fabrice; Laborde, Sylvain; Scelles, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the influence of music during learning on the academic performance of undergraduate students, and more particularly the influence of affects induced by music. Altogether 249 students were involved in the study, divided into a control group and an experimental group. Both groups attended the same videotaped lecture, with the…

  15. Lecture Notes and Essays in Astrophysics.III. 3rd Symposium of the Astrophysics Group of the Spanish Royal Physical Society (RSEF).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulla, A.; Manteiga, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Third volume of "Lecture Notes and Essays in Astrophysics" highlights some important contributions of Spanish astrophysicists to Planetology, Solar and Stellar Physics, Extragalactic Astronomy, Cosmology and astronomical instrumentation. After decades without a dedicated mission, Venus is again in fashion. On the one hand, Ricardo Hueso and collaborators, and on the other Miguel Angel Lopez-Valverde, review ESA Venus Express contribution to the understanding of the atmosphere of the neighbouring planet. Carme Jordi describes in a comprehensive essay the main observational calibration techniques and methods for the determination of mass, radius, temperature, chemical composition and luminosity of a star. Dying stars are fundamental to understand the nature of dark energy, probably the most fundamental problem in Physics today. Type Ia supernovae have played a fundamental role showing the acceleration of the expansion rate of the Universe a decade ago. Inma Dominguez and collaborators go into detail on how the knowledge of the fundamental physics of thermonuclear supernovae explotions condition their role as astrophysical candles.

  16. Activity Group Therapy for Emotionally Disturbed Pre-School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plenk, Agnes M.

    1978-01-01

    The article discusses the comprehensive services offered emotionally disturbed preschool children by a voluntary social agency (the Childrens Center in Salt Lake City, Utah), focusing on activity group therapy, the major therapeutic tool used there. (Author/DLS)

  17. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  18. Effects of Collaborative Activities on Group Identity in Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Hyungsung; Seo, Sumin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of collaborative activities on group identity in a virtual world such as "Second Life." To achieve this purpose, this study adopted events that promoted participants' interactions using tools inherent in "Second Life." The interactive tools given to the control group in…

  19. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  20. The Web-Lecture - a viable alternative to the traditional lecture format?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, S.

    2004-12-01

    Educational research shows that students learn best in an environment with emphasis on teamwork, problem-solving, and hands-on experience. Still professors spend the majority of their time with students in the traditional lecture-hall setting where the combination of large classes and limited time prevents sufficient student-teacher interaction to foster an active learning environment. Can modern computer technology be used to provide "lecture-type" information to students via the World Wide Web? If so, will that help professors make better and/or different use of their scheduled time with the students? Answering these questions was the main motivation for the Extra-Solar Planet Project. The Extra-Solar Planet Project was designed to test the effectiveness of a lecture available to the student on the World Wide Web (Web-Lecture) and to engage the students in an active learning environment were their use the information presented in the Web-Lecture. The topic of the Web-Lecture was detection of extra-solar planets and the project was implemented into an introductory astronomy course at University of Wisconsin Madison in the spring of 2004. The Web-Lecture was designed to give an interactive presentation of synchronized video, audio and lecture notes. It was created using the eTEACH software developed at the University of Wisconsin Madison School of Engineering. In my talk, I will describe the project, show excerpts of the Web-Lecture, and present assessments of student learning and results of student evaluations of the web-lecture format.

  1. 10 Suggestions for Enhancing Lecturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzmann, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following suggestions for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2) Lectures must be…

  2. Learning from Online Video Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecht, H. David

    2012-01-01

    This study empirically examines the instructional value of online video lectures--videos that a course's instructor prepares to supplement classroom or online-broadcast lectures. The study examines data from a classroom course, where the videos have a slower, more step-by-step lecture style than the classroom lectures; student use of videos is…

  3. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  4. Carter Memorial Lecture 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledhill, Robin

    2003-09-01

    The 2003 Carter Memorial Lecture was given in May by Dr Ben R Oppenheimer, Kalbfleisch Research Fellow in the Department of Astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Public lectures entitled "Aliens: The Scientific Search for Life on Other Planets" were given in Nelson, Dunedin, Christchurch, Wellington, Wanganui, Napier, Hamilton and Auckland. University seminars entitled "The Lyot Project" were given in Christchurch, Wellington, Hamilton and Auckland.

  5. AMUM LECTURE: Therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques.

  6. Indian dental students' preferences regarding lecture courses.

    PubMed

    Parolia, Abhishek; Mohan, Mandakini; Kundabala, M; Shenoy, Ramya

    2012-03-01

    Teaching and learning activities in the dental clinic or hospital are a challenging area for students as well as teachers. With various teaching methodologies being used in dental schools around the world, gaining greater understanding of students' attitudes toward these methodologies would be useful for dental educators. The objective of this study was to explore the preferences of dental students in India about various aspects of lecture courses. A structured survey consisting of ten closed-ended questions was developed, and 2,680 undergraduate students from forty-three dental schools in India were approached via e-mail with a follow-up postal mailing. Of these, 1,980 students responded, for a response rate of 73.8 percent. Most of the students reported preferring lectures with the aid of PowerPoint and chalkboard. They preferred morning lectures from 8 am to 10 am for a maximum of thirty to forty minutes for each lecture, and they preferred to receive information about the lecture topic in advance. The students said that delivery of clinical demonstrations was beneficial after the lectures, and they preferred learning-based rather than exam-oriented education. The respondents also said that attendance should be made compulsory and that numerical marking of examinations should not be replaced by a grading system.

  7. Interpolated testing influences focused attention and improves integration of information during a video-recorded lecture.

    PubMed

    Jing, Helen G; Szpunar, Karl K; Schacter, Daniel L

    2016-09-01

    Although learning through a computer interface has become increasingly common, little is known about how to best structure video-recorded lectures to optimize learning. In 2 experiments, we examine changes in focused attention and the ability for students to integrate knowledge learned during a 40-min video-recorded lecture. In Experiment 1, we demonstrate that interpolating a lecture with memory tests (tested group), compared to studying the lecture material for the same amount of time (restudy group), improves overall learning and boosts integration of related information learned both within individual lecture segments and across the entire lecture. Although mind wandering rates between the tested and restudy groups did not differ, mind wandering was more detrimental for final test performance in the restudy group than in the tested group. In Experiment 2, we replicate the findings of Experiment 1, and additionally show that interpolated tests influence the types of thoughts that participants report during the lecture. While the tested group reported more lecture-related thoughts, the restudy group reported more lecture-unrelated thoughts; furthermore, lecture-related thoughts were positively related to final test performance, whereas lecture-unrelated thoughts were negatively related to final test performance. Implications for the use of interpolated testing in video-recorded lectures are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27295464

  8. Interpolated testing influences focused attention and improves integration of information during a video-recorded lecture.

    PubMed

    Jing, Helen G; Szpunar, Karl K; Schacter, Daniel L

    2016-09-01

    Although learning through a computer interface has become increasingly common, little is known about how to best structure video-recorded lectures to optimize learning. In 2 experiments, we examine changes in focused attention and the ability for students to integrate knowledge learned during a 40-min video-recorded lecture. In Experiment 1, we demonstrate that interpolating a lecture with memory tests (tested group), compared to studying the lecture material for the same amount of time (restudy group), improves overall learning and boosts integration of related information learned both within individual lecture segments and across the entire lecture. Although mind wandering rates between the tested and restudy groups did not differ, mind wandering was more detrimental for final test performance in the restudy group than in the tested group. In Experiment 2, we replicate the findings of Experiment 1, and additionally show that interpolated tests influence the types of thoughts that participants report during the lecture. While the tested group reported more lecture-related thoughts, the restudy group reported more lecture-unrelated thoughts; furthermore, lecture-related thoughts were positively related to final test performance, whereas lecture-unrelated thoughts were negatively related to final test performance. Implications for the use of interpolated testing in video-recorded lectures are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Active Classroom Participation in a Group Scribbles Primary Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Wenli; Looi, Chee-Kit

    2011-01-01

    A key stimulus of learning efficacy for students in the classroom is active participation and engagement in the learning process. This study examines the nature of teacher-student and student-student discourse when leveraged by an interactive technology--Group Scribbles (GS) in a Primary 5 Science classroom in Singapore which supports rapid…

  10. Forestry Activities. A Guide for Youth Group Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Twenty-six activities related to forestry, conservation, and outdoor education comprise the content of this leader's guide. Designed for use with youth groups, ideas and techniques range from forest conservation mobiles, locating forest fires, and Christmas tree uses to litterbug campaigns, watershed experiments, and crossword puzzles. Activities…

  11. Planetology group s complex educational activity at Eötvös University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargitai, H.; Kereszturi, A.; Sik, A.; Varga, T.; Berczi, S.

    We describe the educational activities and the new educational materials made by the Planetology Group at the Eötvös University. Our specialization is in planetary surface geomorphology and cartography. We worked out and distributed various educational units, including Online hypermedia package, Atlas of Planetary Bodies in the Little Atlas Series of the Solar System [1], and On - and offline lecture note series educational video on Petrologic Studies of Solar System Materials. Hypermedia: We have prepared an online hypermedia environment for the distant education of planetology in Hungary. Our educational outreach project on our website includes a daily cosmic calendar, a monthly star map, and planetary topographic or photomosaic maps with nomenclature. Seminar: We organized an autumn semester course in 2001 named General Planetology at the Eötvös Loránd University of Sciences . In this course we kept lectures from a general point of view dealing with certain processes and spheres of planetary bodies. The Atlas of Planetary Bodies: In this - free - printed educational material we collected the most important and typical features of our planetary neighbours - one feature for every body. Bodies of the Solar System - Slide Series: Like an assistant or a teaching material we compiled a series of photo slides. Video Education Online: A newly created video series have been made available online for download. The content of the film is related to our textbook (fig. 1., left) on Meteorites and Lunar Samples, where students can make their own drawings and colorings of the textures of thin sections. Under support of the Commission on Planetary Cartography of the International Cartographic Association we have prepared a multilingual map of Mars [3] for use in Central European universities, in Coatian, Czech, Hungarian and Polish languages. References: [1] Bérczi Sz. Hargitai H., Kereszturi Á., Sik A. (2001): Little Atlas of the Solar System Series (3): Atlas of

  12. Evolution and flare activity of a group in July 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, I.

    1983-03-01

    The evolution of a sunspot group with a delta configuration which passed over the solar disk on July 8--21, 1978, is studied on the basis of original materials consisting of photoheliograms, H..cap alpha.. filtergrams, and wide-band photographs obtained in Tashkent. More than 160 H..cap alpha.. flares, including 22 flares of importance 1 and 10 flares of importance 2, were observed in the active region (AR) containing this group according to Solar-Geophysical Data. As a result of a comparison of the evolutionary changes of the group with the flare activity of the AR it was found that the flare activity is connected with the formation of a new sunspot group within an old one, with its maximum falling at the time of formation of the first nuclei, and new nuclei are formed along the zero line of the longitudinal field of the old group; the nodes of the majority of flares are located near new nuclei, symmetrical relative to the zero line; the area of the new nuclei increases impulsively; the total area of the entire group varies, fluctuating about its average value, and flares happen during the slowing and cessation of the increase in area; some nuclei show proper motion at a velocity of approx.0.5 km/sec while others show intermittent motion, like pulsation, directed outside the old group; as a result of the development of new nuclei near old ones the small nuclei break up, while the boundary of the large nucleus is deformed on the side of the new nuclei and bright points shine within it.

  13. Reflections on High School English: NDEA Institute Lectures 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Gary, Ed.

    Lectures presented at the 1965 National Defense Education Act Institutes for Advanced Study in English are presented in this book. Selected for their interest to both experienced and prospective English teachers, the lectures are grouped into four categories. (1) Of general interest to the English teacher are John Gerrietts' portrait of the…

  14. A Marriage of Continuance: Professional Development for Mathematics Lecturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Bill; Oates, Greg; Paterson, Judy; Thomas, Mike

    2015-01-01

    In a 2-year project, we developed and trialled a mode of lecturing professional development amongst staff in our department of mathematics. Theoretically grounded in Schoenfeld's resources, orientations, and goals (ROG) model of teacher action, a group met regularly to discuss both the video excerpts of themselves lecturing along with written pre-…

  15. The Evolutionary Conformation from Traditional Lecture to Active Learning in an Undergraduate Biology Course and Its Effects on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diederich, Kirsten Bakke

    2010-01-01

    In response to the declining number of students in the United States entering into the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) disciplines, there has been an attempt to retain student interest in the sciences through the implementation of more active learning in the classroom. Active learning is defined as any instructional method that…

  16. Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis award lecture. Cytokine-mediated activation of vascular endothelium. Physiology and pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Pober, J. S.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of endothelial cell activation has been extremely useful in understanding endothelial cell function. The morphologic definition of activation from the 1960s has been replaced by a cell biologic definition in the 1980s, but recent studies have suggested that these phenomena are two aspects of the same processes. Moreover, the initial distinction of endothelial cell activation, a beneficial reaction, from injury and dysfunction, a harmful sequence, has become more complex as clinical studies have revealed that activation can produce dysfunction, with or without injury. Most importantly, as our in vivo studies indicate, the concept of activation is a testable hypothesis, as modern immunochemical and molecular biologic techniques have been employed to bridge the gap between in vitro culture experiments and patient-based clinical research. PMID:2462353

  17. Some Comparisons Between Conventional College Teaching Methods and a Composite of Procedures Involving Large Lecture Groups, Seminars, and Reduced Class Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Alvin T.

    This study's purpose was to determine differences in achievement, attitude, and critical thinking in junior college freshman subjects that could be attributed to either of two ways of teaching English and history and to use the data to make decisions on pupil deployment and on plant and staff use. The experimental group comprised students taking…

  18. In-Group and Out-Group Membership Mediates Anterior Cingulate Activation to Social Exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Krill, Austen; Platek, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was employed to examine sensitivity to social exclusion in three conditions: same-race, other-race, and self-resembling faces. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), specifically the dorsal ACC, has been targeted as a key substrate in the physical and social pain matrix and was hypothesized to regulate activation response to various facial conditions. We show that participants demonstrated greatest ACC activation when being excluded by self-resembling and same-race faces, relative to other-race faces. Additionally, participants expressed greater distress and showed increased ACC activation as a result of exclusion in the same-race condition relative to the other-race condition. A positive correlation between implicit racial bias and activation in the amygdala was also evident. Implicit attitude about other-race faces partly explains levels of concern about exclusion by out-group individuals. These findings suggest that individuals are more distressed and their brain (i.e. neural alarm system) responds with greater activation when being excluded by individuals whom they are more likely to share group membership with. PMID:19597546

  19. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience.

    PubMed

    Varao-Sousa, Trish L; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms.

  20. Lectures in accelerator theory

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M

    1980-01-01

    Lecture I deals with the behavior of particles in the nonlinear field arising from the electromagnetic interaction of colliding beams. The case treated, that of counter-rotating proton beams crossing each other at a non-zero angle, has the simple feature that the force between the beam is one dimensional. In lecture II, an analysis of the development of traveling waves on particle beams is presented. The situation studied is that of a uniform beam current in a circular accelerator and the excitation for the coherent motion is induced by the resistivity of the vacuum chamber wall. Finally, in lecture III, a description of the current accumulation process used at the proton storage rings at CERN (The ISR) is given. Particle pulses of rather low average current are injected and stored along the length and width of the vacuum chamber. The efficiency is very high and large currents (over 40 amperes) have been achieved.

  1. Modulation of Group I Ribozyme Activity by Cationic Porphyrins

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Shigeyoshi; Ito, Tatsunobu; Tanaka, Takahiro; Furuta, Hiroyuki; Ikawa, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    The effects of cationic porphyrins on the catalytic activities of four group I ribozymes were investigated. A cationic porphyrin possessing four pyridinium moieties (pPyP) inhibited two group IC3 ribozymes (Syn Rz and Azo Rz) and a group IC1 ribozyme (Tet Rz). In the case of a group IA2 ribozyme (Td Rz), however, pPyP served not only as an inhibitor but also as an activator, and the effects of pPyP were dependent on its concentration. To analyze the structural and electronic factors determining the effects of pPyP on group I ribozymes, three cationic porphyrins (pPyNCP, pPyF4P, and TMPyP) were also examined. As interactions between small organic molecules and nucleic acids are attractive and important issues in biochemistry and biotechnology, this study contributes to the development of porphyrin-based molecules that can modulate functions of structured RNA molecules. PMID:25811638

  2. Group I fibers: pressor reflex and cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Decandia, G F; Decandia, M; Orani, G P

    1991-09-01

    Experiments were performed on cats to see whether stimulation of group I afferent fibers from gastrocnemius-soleus muscles induced changes in cardiac activity, in addition to the increase in systemic arterial pressure already established. The results show that the increase in arterial pressure is accompanied by an increase in systolic left ventricular pressure, without any significant changes in cardiac inotropism and chronotropism. It is concluded that the cardiac innervation is not an important efferent pathway of the pressor reflex evoked by stimulating group I afferent fibers, and that the reflex increase in arterial pressure depends mainly on an increase in peripheral vascular resistance. PMID:1742468

  3. Fission Activities of the Nuclear Reactions Group in Uppsala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adili, A.; Alhassan, E.; Gustavsson, C.; Helgesson, P.; Jansson, K.; Koning, A.; Lantz, M.; Mattera, A.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Sjöstrand, H.; Solders, A.; Tarrío, D.; Österlund, M.; Pomp, S.

    This paper highlights some of the main activities related to fission of the nuclear reactions group at Uppsala University. The group is involved for instance in fission yield experiments at the IGISOL facility, cross-section measurements at the NFS facility, as well as fission dynamics studies at the IRMM JRC-EC. Moreover, work is ongoing on the Total Monte Carlo (TMC) methodology and on including the GEF fission code into the TALYS nuclear reaction code. Selected results from these projects are discussed.

  4. The Lecture Is Dead Long Live the e-Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folley, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    This research paper investigates if the traditional lecture is no longer appropriate for Neomillennial Learning Styles and whether an alternative blended approach could/should be used? Over the past decade the lecture as we know it, has gradually been under attack from constructivists, Twigg (1999) for example argues that the lecture is in the…

  5. 2008 C. H. McCloy Lecture: Social Psychology and Physical Activity--Back to the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Diane L.

    2009-01-01

    In the early 1970s, both my academic career and the psychology subdiscipline within kinesiology began as "social psychology and physical activity." Since then, sport and exercise psychology research has shifted away from the social to a narrower bio-psycho-(no social) approach, and professional practice has focused on the elite rather than the…

  6. 1994 C. H. McCloy Research Lecture: Does Physical Activity Play a Role in Preventing Osteoporosis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drinkwater, Barbara L.

    1994-01-01

    Review considers problems encountered in relating women's physical activity to increases in bone mass, noting the implications of recommending exercise to help prevent osteoporosis based on that information. Research indicates that for the full benefit of exercise on skeletal health, there must be adequate gonadal hormone levels. (SM)

  7. Understanding Kepler's Third Law Through Interactive Lecture Demonstrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Karen T.

    2010-01-01

    Kepler's Third Law is fundamental to understanding not only the orbital motion of planets and moons in our own solar system, but also how astronomers determine masses of stars, black holes, extrasolar planets, and galaxies. However, understanding planetary orbits and Kepler's 3rd law (in its general form) relies upon concepts from Newton's Laws of Motion, Newton's Law of Gravity, projectile motion, and centripetal acceleration. Drawing upon the work of the Activity Based Physics Group, I have put together a collection of interactive lecture demonstrations, essentially a "mini course" in physics, designed to give students a conceptual understanding of these various topics in mechanics.

  8. Medical student concentration during lectures.

    PubMed

    Stuart, J; Rutherford, R J

    1978-09-01

    A simple procedure, based on a questionnaire, was used for the assessment of student concentration during lectures. Analysis of 1353 questionnaires from 12 lectures showed that student concentration rose sharply to reach a maximum in 10-15 min, and fell steadily thereafter. The data suggest that the optimum length of a lecture may be 30 instead of 60 min. This method by which student feedback is obtained may also be used to improve lecturing performance.

  9. College Students' Perceptions of the Traditional Lecture Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covill, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    Fifty-one college students responded to survey questions regarding their perceptions of the traditional lecture method of instruction that they received in a 200-level psychology course. At a time when many professors are being encouraged to use active learning methods instead of lectures, it is important to consider the students' perspective. Do…

  10. Just Do It: Flipped Lecture, Determinants and Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kensington-Miller, Barbara; Novak, Julia; Evans, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of two pure mathematicians who flipped their lecture to teach matrix determinants in two large mathematics service courses (one at Stage I and the other at Stage II). The purpose of the study was to transform the passive lecture into an active learning opportunity and to introduce valuable mathematical skills,…

  11. Explicit Constructivism: A Missing Link in Ineffective Lectures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prakash, E. S.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the possibility that interactive lectures explicitly based on activating learners' prior knowledge and driven by a series of logical questions might enhance the effectiveness of lectures. A class of 54 students doing the respiratory system course in the second year of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program in my…

  12. In Defence of the Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    In response to the lecture format coming under "attack" and being replaced by online materials and smaller tutorials, this paper attempts to offer not only a defence but also to assert that the potential value of the lecture is difficult to replicate through other learning formats. Some of the criticisms against lectures will be…

  13. Justice and Lecturer Professionalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macfarlane, Bruce

    2001-01-01

    Presents a conceptual framework for debating the ethics of pedagogy. The concepts of procedural, retributive, remedial, and distributive justice are presented as a means of incorporating many of the key ethical challenges that confront lecturers new to higher education. Recommends this justice framework as a means of encouraging practitioners to…

  14. 412th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Vanier

    2016-07-12

    With new radiation detectors, finding smuggled nuclear materials in a huge container among thousands of others in a busy port becomes possible. To learn about these new detectors from a specialist who has spent several years developing these technologies, watch the 412th Brookhaven Lecture, "Advanced Neutron Detection Methods: New Tools for Countering Nuclear Terrorism."

  15. 410th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Steinberg

    2016-07-12

    In a lecture titled "Hotter, Denser, Faster, Smaller...and Nearly Perfect: What's the Matter at RHIC?", Steinberg discusses the basic physics of the quark-gluon plasma and BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, with a focus on several intriguing results from RHIC's recently ended PHOBOS experiment.

  16. Organic Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silversmith, Ernest F.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a listing of 35 demonstrations designed to generate interest in organic chemistry and help put points across. Topics include opening lecture; molecular structure and properties; halogenation; nucleophilic substitution, alkenes and dienes, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, alcohols and phenols, aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, amines,…

  17. 416th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Dax Fu

    2016-07-12

    "Molecular Design of a Metal Transporter." Metal transporters are proteins residing in cell membranes that keep the amount of zinc and other metals in the body in check by selecting a nutritional metal ion against a similar and much moreabundant toxic one. How transporter proteins achieve this remarkable sensitivity is one of the questions addressed by Fu in this lecture.

  18. Participatory Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin

    1979-01-01

    The use of participatory lecture demonstrations in the classroom is described. Examples are given for the following topics: chromatography, chemical kinetics, balancing equations, the gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, Henry's law of gas solubility, electronic energy levels in atoms, and translational, vibrational, and rotational energies of…

  19. When Lecturing: Teach!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Warren R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques that can be used to make the lecture method of teaching more effective include using pictures or objects to facilitate memory, using guided fantasies to stimulate students' imagination of processes, and the suggestopedia method for memorizing facts, principles, and vocabulary. (MSE)

  20. 412th Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Vanier

    2006-02-15

    With new radiation detectors, finding smuggled nuclear materials in a huge container among thousands of others in a busy port becomes possible. To learn about these new detectors from a specialist who has spent several years developing these technologies, watch the 412th Brookhaven Lecture, "Advanced Neutron Detection Methods: New Tools for Countering Nuclear Terrorism."

  1. 423rd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Mei Bai

    2016-07-12

    Among other things, scientists at BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are studying a fundamental question of particle physics: What is responsible for proton "spin"? Physicist Mei Bai discusses this topic at the 423rd Brookhaven Lecture, "RHIC: The Worlds First High-Energy, Polarized-Proton Collider."

  2. 426th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    David Jaffe

    2016-07-12

    "The Pesky Neutrino". In this lecture, Jaffe describes the past, present and possible future of the "pesky" neutrino, the existence of which was first hypothesized in 1930 to rescue energy conservation in the radioactive beta decay of nuclei. Recent evidence that neutrinos are massive is the only experimental evidence in particle physics that is inconsistent with the Standard Model.

  3. Abstract of Lectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, Lucien

    1993-01-01

    Three lectures will be given. The first one will draw from the general literature on microwave sounding from space. The next two will focus on a description of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and results obtained from its measurements relating to atmospheric chemistry and dynamics; this will draw from material recently published (or soon-to-be published) by the MLS team.

  4. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  5. 416th Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Dax Fu

    2006-06-21

    "Molecular Design of a Metal Transporter." Metal transporters are proteins residing in cell membranes that keep the amount of zinc and other metals in the body in check by selecting a nutritional metal ion against a similar and much moreabundant toxic one. How transporter proteins achieve this remarkable sensitivity is one of the questions addressed by Fu in this lecture.

  6. 410th Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Steinberg

    2005-12-21

    In a lecture titled "Hotter, Denser, Faster, Smaller...and Nearly Perfect: What's the Matter at RHIC?", Steinberg discusses the basic physics of the quark-gluon plasma and BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, with a focus on several intriguing results from RHIC's recently ended PHOBOS experiment.

  7. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  8. 453rd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Richard Ferrieri

    2016-07-12

    In this lecture titled "Striving Towards Energy Sustainability: How Will Plants Play a Role in Our Future?" Richard Ferrieri discusses how radiotracers and positron emission tomography (PET imaging) are providing a new look into plant processes that could lead to more renewable biofuels.

  9. How Much Structuring Is Beneficial with Regard to Examination Scores? A Prospective Study of Three Forms of Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Claus H.; Rosen, Evelyne N.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a superiority of active learning forms compared with traditional lecture. However, there is still debate as to what degree structuring is necessary with regard to high exam outcomes. Seventy-five students from a premedical school were randomly attributed to an active lecture group, a cooperative group, or a…

  10. Exploring Tablet PC Lectures: Lecturer Experiences and Student Perceptions in Biomedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Julia; Kotsanas, George; Dawson, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Lecturers using tablet PCs with specialised pens can utilise real-time changes in lecture delivery via digital inking. We investigated student perceptions and lecturer experiences of tablet PC lectures in large-enrolment biomedicine subjects. Lecturers used PowerPoint or Classroom Presenter software for lecture preparation and in-lecture pen-based…

  11. (Role) Playing Politics in an Environmental Chemistry Lecture Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smythe, A. Meredith; Higgins, Daniel A.

    2007-02-01

    Mock congressional hearings are described as an active learning, role-playing activity for the environmental chemistry lecture course. Each student plays dual roles in this activity, alternately serving as a witness and committee member on hearing topics selected by the class. As witnesses, the students assume the roles of scientists, politicians, industrial representatives, and environmental group representatives and present both written and oral arguments for or against a particular issue. At other times, they play the role of congressional committee members and question the witnesses. Hearings are held on topics related to renewable and nonrenewable energy; hazardous waste; water, soil, and air pollution; water quality; and genetic engineering. This activity greatly enriches the educational experience for the students by allowing them to become actively engaged in learning and debating specific issues related to course materials.

  12. Dynamic regulation of Polycomb group activity during plant development.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2012-11-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes play important roles in phase transitions and cell fate determination in plants and animals, by epigenetically repressing sets of genes that promote either proliferation or differentiation. The continuous differentiation of new organs in plants, such as leaves or flowers, requires a highly dynamic PcG function, which can be induced, modulated, or repressed when necessary. In this review, we discuss the recent advance in understanding PcG function in plants and focus on the diverse molecular mechanisms that have been described to regulate and counteract PcG activity in Arabidopsis.

  13. Dynamic regulation of Polycomb group activity during plant development.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2012-11-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes play important roles in phase transitions and cell fate determination in plants and animals, by epigenetically repressing sets of genes that promote either proliferation or differentiation. The continuous differentiation of new organs in plants, such as leaves or flowers, requires a highly dynamic PcG function, which can be induced, modulated, or repressed when necessary. In this review, we discuss the recent advance in understanding PcG function in plants and focus on the diverse molecular mechanisms that have been described to regulate and counteract PcG activity in Arabidopsis. PMID:22999383

  14. Pulling My Gut out--Simple Tools for Engaging Students in Gross Anatomy Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2010-01-01

    A lecture is not necessarily a monologue, promoting only passive learning. If appropriate techniques are used, a lecture can stimulate active learning too. One such method is demonstration, which can engage learners' attention and increase the interaction between the lecturer and the learners. This article describes two simple and useful tools for…

  15. Effective Management of Part-Time Lecturers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth; Betts, Derek; Dominey, Jan; Goulding, Jeanne

    The approaches to management of part-time lecturing staff in the United Kingdom's further education (FE) colleges were examined in a study that included the following research activities: review of relevant publications and Further Education Funding Council (FEFC) statistics; postal survey of 454 FE colleges in England and Wales that elicited 67…

  16. The Colloqution Module: Remedy for Somnifacient Lectures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pultorak, Robert W.

    1985-01-01

    A "colloqution module" (an instructional unit/strategy used in a conversation) consists of a reading assignment and a series of questions/activities. The strategy is suggested as an alternative to the lecture method. A sample module on insecticides (together with design information and advantages/disadvantages) is included. (DH)

  17. Space station group activities habitability module study: A synopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, David; Glassman, Terry

    1987-01-01

    Space station habitability was studied by investigating crew activity routines, proximities, ergonomic envelopes, and group volumes. Ten alternative schematic interior designs were proposed. Preliminary conclusions include: (1) in-service interior modifications may be necessary and should be planned for; (2) design complexity will be increased if the module cluster is reduced from five to three; (3) the increased crew circulation attendant upon enhancement of space station activity may produce human traffic bottlenecks and should be planned for; (4) a single- or two-person quiet area may be desirable to provide crew members with needed solitude during waking hours; and (5) the decision to choose a two-shift or three-shift daily cycle will have a significant impact on the design configuration and operational efficiency of the human habitat.

  18. Pulling my gut out--simple tools for engaging students in gross anatomy lectures.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2010-01-01

    A lecture is not necessarily a monologue, promoting only passive learning. If appropriate techniques are used, a lecture can stimulate active learning too. One such method is demonstration, which can engage learners' attention and increase the interaction between the lecturer and the learners. This article describes two simple and useful tools for demonstration during gross anatomy lectures. One is an apron for demonstrating midgut rotation and the other is a simple "human" model for demonstrating the relationship between the uterus and the peritoneum.

  19. B.Gregory Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Troisième série de "Gregory lectures" en mémoire de B.Gregory (1919-1977),DG de 1965 à 1970. La première conférence B.Gregory a été donné par le Prof.V.Weisskopf, son prédécesseur. Chris Greeg (?)de Berkley prend aussi la parole

  20. B.Gregory Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-11

    Troisième série de "Gregory lectures" en mémoire de B.Gregory (1919-1977),DG de 1965 à 1970. La première conférence B.Gregory a été donné par le Prof.V.Weisskopf, son prédécesseur. Chris Greeg (?)de Berkley prend aussi la parole

  1. [A study on comparison of learning effects between a board game and a lecture about infection control].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Hitomi; Kishimoto, Keiko; Matsuda, Toshiyuki; Fukushima, Noriko

    2014-01-01

      In order to provide an opportunity for community pharmacists to actively learn about infection control, this study created learning materials through a board game format and verified characteristics of learning by determining and comparing evaluation according to viewpoint and motivational effects between a lecture and the game. To create the board game, we collected cases of infection from 30 community pharmacists. The game was created using collected and created case studies, and we held a workshop on infection control. Participants were assigned to a lecture (n=32) or game group (n=27) and completed a questionnaire before and after the workshop. The questionnaire included the evaluation according to viewpoint based on the ministry's curriculum guidelines and the motivational effect of Keller's ARCS motivation model. In the evaluation according to viewpoint, the lecture group scores were significantly higher on "knowledge and understanding" than the game group scores. In the comparison of the motivational effects, the game group was significantly higher in three out of the four items of the ARCS motivation model, "Attention", "Relevance", and "Satisfaction". These results indicate that learning through the game aroused the curiosity of the learners, increased the learning outcome, and maintained certain levels of motivation. In addition, the evaluation according to viewpoint showed that the lecture group understood the key concepts and knowledge regarding infection control, whereas there was a possibility that the game group required additional motivational factors for learning and maintaining motivation level.

  2. Environmental distribution, abundance and activity of the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, K. G.; Biddle, J.; Teske, A.

    2011-12-01

    Many marine sedimentary microbes have only been identified by 16S rRNA sequences. Consequently, little is known about the types of metabolism, activity levels, or relative abundance of these groups in marine sediments. We found that one of these uncultured groups, called the Miscellaneous Crenarchaeotal Group (MCG), dominated clone libraries made from reverse transcribed 16S rRNA, and 454 pyrosequenced 16S rRNA genes, in the White Oak River estuary. Primers suitable for quantitative PCR were developed for MCG and used to show that 16S rRNA DNA copy numbers from MCG account for nearly all the archaeal 16S rRNA genes present. RT-qPCR shows much less MCG rRNA than total archaeal rRNA, but comparisons of different primers for each group suggest bias in the RNA-based work relative to the DNA-based work. There is no evidence of a population shift with depth below the sulfate-methane transition zone, suggesting that the metabolism of MCG may not be tied to sulfur or methane cycles. We classified 2,771 new sequences within the SSU Silva 106 database that, along with the classified sequences in the Silva database was used to make an MCG database of 4,646 sequences that allowed us to increase the named subgroups of MCG from 7 to 19. Percent terrestrial sequences in each subgroup is positively correlated with percent of the marine sequences that are nearshore, suggesting that membership in the different subgroups is not random, but dictated by environmental selective pressures. Given their high phylogenetic diversity, ubiquitous distribution in anoxic environments, and high DNA copy number relative to total archaea, members of MCG are most likely anaerobic heterotrophs who are integral to the post-depositional marine carbon cycle.

  3. A Comparison of Traditional and Television Lectures as a Means of Instruction in Biology at a Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firstman, Aranga

    A study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of using the television lecture series "Introducing Biology" to traditional lecture techniques in a college-level Animal Biology course. The interest levels and subject course mastery of three groups of students were compared: (1) a control group who attended two 50-minute lectures per week; (2)…

  4. Re-Imagining the Traditional Lecture: An Action Research Approach to Teaching Student Teachers to "Do" Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tormey, Roland; Henchy, Deirdre

    2008-01-01

    Although we were required to lecture to large groups of over 170 students, the traditional lecture clashed with our commitment to teach in a way that was student-centred, relational and socially and politically transformative. In this context, and using an action research approach, we sought to turn our large-group lectures into a space that both…

  5. Activities of the IERS Working Group on prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, W.

    2008-04-01

    The International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) established a Working Group on Prediction (WGP) to investigate what IERS prediction products are useful to the user community in addition to making a detailed examination of the fundamental properties of the different input data sets and algorithms. The major goals and objectives of the WGP are to determine the desired Earth orientation prediction products, the importance of observational accuracy, which types of input data provide an optimal prediction, the strengths and weaknesses of various prediction algorithms, and the interactions between series and algorithms that are beneficial or harmful. To focus the research efforts of the WGP, the user community was polled to ascertain what prediction products are needed and at what level of accuracy. The current status of WGP activities and the anticipated future directions are presented.

  6. Photovoltaic Reliability Group activities in USA and Brazil (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Cruz, Leila R. O.

    2015-09-01

    Recently prices of photovoltaic (PV) systems have been reduced considerably and may continue to be reduced making them attractive. If these systems provide electricity over the stipulated warranty period, it would be possible attain socket parity within the next few years. Current photovoltaic module qualifications tests help in minimizing infant mortality but do not guarantee useful lifetime over the warranty period. The PV Module Quality Assurance Task Force (PVQAT) is trying to formulate accelerated tests that will be useful towards achieving the ultimate goal of assuring useful lifetime over the warranty period as well as to assure manufacturing quality. Unfortunately, assuring the manufacturing quality may require 24/7 presence. Alternatively, collecting data on the performance of fielded systems would assist in assuring manufacturing quality. Here PV systems installed by home-owners and small businesses can constitute as an important untapped source of data. The volunteer group, PV - Reliable, Safe and Sustainable Quality! (PVRessQ!) is providing valuable service to small PV system owners. Photovoltaic Reliability Group (PVRG) is initiating activities in USA and Brazil to assist home owners and small businesses in monitoring photovoltaic (PV) module performance and enforcing warranty. It will work in collaboration with small PV system owners, consumer protection agencies. Brazil is endowed with excellent solar irradiance making it attractive for installation of PV systems. Participating owners of small PV systems would instruct inverter manufacturers to copy the daily e-mails to PVRG and as necessary, will authorize the PVRG to carry out review of PV systems. The presentation will consist of overall activities of PVRG in USA and Brazil.

  7. A Comparison of a Traditional Lecture-Based and Online Supplemental Video and Lecture-Based Approach in an Engineering Statics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halupa, Colleen M.; Caldwell, Benjamin W.

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental research study evaluated two intact undergraduate engineering statics classes at a private university in Texas. Students in the control group received traditional lecture, readings and homework assignments. Those in the experimental group also were given access to a complete set of online video lectures and videos…

  8. Lectures on Astroparticle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigl, Günter

    2005-08-01

    These are extended notes of a series of lectures given at the XIth Brazilian School of Cosmology and Gravitation. They provide a selection of topics at the intersection of particle and astrophysics. The first part gives a short introduction to the theory of electroweak interactions, with specific emphasize on neutrinos. In the second part we apply this framework to selected topics in astrophysics and cosmology, namely neutrino oscillations, neutrino hot dark dark matter, and big bang nucleosynthesis. The last part is devoted to ultra high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos where again particle physics aspects are emphasized. The often complementary role of laboratory experiments is also discussed in several examples.

  9. A marriage of continuance: professional development for mathematics lecturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Bill; Oates, Greg; Paterson, Judy; Thomas, Mike

    2015-06-01

    In a 2-year project, we developed and trialled a mode of lecturing professional development amongst staff in our department of mathematics. Theoretically grounded in Schoenfeld's resources, orientations, and goals (ROG) model of teacher action, a group met regularly to discuss both the video excerpts of themselves lecturing along with written pre- and post-lecture statements of their "ROGs". We found evidence of improved teaching performance but more interestingly, identified key aspects of our practice and of undergraduate mathematics that received repeated attention and developed further theoretical insight into lecturer behaviour in mathematics. The trial has been successful enough to be expanded into further groups that now constitute a professional development culture within our department.

  10. An assessment of teaching strategies used by lecturers at a nursing college in Mpumalanga.

    PubMed

    Maunye, T J; Meyer, S M; van Velden, C E

    2009-09-01

    The need for the utilization of various teaching strategies by lecturers when facilitating learning cannot be overemphasized. The aim of this study was to establish if lecturers at a Nursing College in Mpumalanga were using teaching strategies that could facilitate the personal development of nursing learners. A quantitative approach was followed for this study. The participants of the study were all lecturers at a Nursing College in Mpumalanga. Data was gathered by means of a questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to describe and summarize data regarding the type of teaching strategies used and the recommendations that could enhance the utilization of various teaching strategies. The data revealed that the teaching strategies mostly utilized required active participation of the learners namely:formal/informal writing of assignments; learner-led class presentation; group sessions; clinical case studies; role-playing and clinical rounds. Inclusion of certain strategies such as problem-based learning, structured accompaniment and computer literacy for learners could enhance the personal development of nursing learners. Although lecturers did use some of the teaching strategies that could enhance the personal development of nursing learners, staff development regarding the utilization of various teaching strategies was highlighted as an important factor to be considered. Other findings revealed that lack of resources have a negative influence on the utilization of various teaching strategies.

  11. Where learning starts? A framework for thinking about lectures in university mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, David

    2010-07-01

    Lectures have been widely criticized as a method of teaching, but remain a standard component of most university mathematics courses. Does this necessarily harm students' education? This critical review contends that many arguments against lecturing are misconceived, at least when applied to mathematics. The effectiveness of lectures in carrying out various functions is discussed with reference to some recent educational research. There is evidence that lectures can be effective in communicating information, modelling reasoning and motivating students. Therefore, when supported appropriately by other activities, lectures provide an effective component of a mathematical education.

  12. Activities of the EMRAS Tritium/C14 Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.A.; Balonov, M.; Venter, A

    2005-07-15

    A new model evaluation program, Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS), was initiated by the International Atomic Energy Agency in September 2003. EMRAS includes a working group (WG) on modeling tritium and C-14 transfer through the environment to biota and man. The main objective of this WG is to develop and test models of the uptake, formation and translocation of organically bound tritium (OBT) in food crops, animals and aquatic systems. To the extent possible, the WG is carrying out its work by comparing model predictions with experimental data to identify the modeling approaches and assumptions that lead to the best agreement between predictions and observations. Results for scenarios involving a chronically contaminated aquatic ecosystem and short-term exposure of soybeans are presently being analyzed. In addition, calculations for scenarios involving chronically contaminated terrestrial food chains and hypothetical short-term releases are currently underway, and a pinetree scenario is being developed. The preparation of datasets on tritium dynamics in large animals and fish is being encouraged, since these are the areas of greatest uncertainty in OBT modeling. These activities will be discussed in this paper.

  13. Update on Activities of CEOS Disaster Management Support Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, H. M.; Lauritson, L.

    The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Disaster Management Support Group (DMSG) has supported natural and technological disaster management on a worldwide basis by fostering improved utilization of existing and planned Earth Observation (EO) satellite data. The DMSG has focused on developing and refining recommendations for the application of satellite data to selected hazard areas--drought, earthquake, fire, flood, ice, landslide, oil spill, and volcanic hazards. Particular emphasis was placed on working closely with space agencies, international and regional organizations, and commercial organizations on the implementation of these recommendations. The DMSG is in its last year with its primary focus on documenting its work and migrating on going activities to other fora. With over 300 participants from more than 140 organizations, the DMSG has found strong support among CEOS space agencies and the Integrated Global Observing Strategy (IGOS), as well as an enthusiastic reception from numerous international, regional, and national emergency managers, and distinct interest from the commercial sector. In addition, the group has worked to give full support to the work of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS) in pursuit of decisions taken at UNISPACE III and the United Nations International Strategy on Disaster Reduction (ISDR). In conjunction with the IGOS, several of the DMSG hazards teams (earthquake, landslide, and solid Earth dimensions of volcanoes) are joining in the effort to develop an IGOS Geohazards theme team. Cooperation efforts with organizations such as IGOS, COPUOS, and ISDR will hopefully lead to the pick up of much of the on going DMSG activities. Since the inception of this ad hoc working group and its predecessor project, the DMSG has developed and refined recommendations for the application of satellite data by bringing together experts from eight hazard areas to identify user needs, as well as

  14. Food for thought: Five lectures on lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1987-01-01

    The topics covered in these lectures are the heavy anti qq potential, glueballs, the chiral transition with dynamical fermions, Weak interaction matrix elements on the lattice and Monte Carlo renormalization group. Even though for the most part these lectures are reviews, many new results and ideas are also presented. The emphasis is on critical analysis of existing data, exposing bottlenecks and a discussion of open problems. Five individual papers have been indexed separately.

  15. Teaching pathophysiology: strategies to enliven the traditional lecture.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, Elizabeth R; Hyde, Yolanda M; Tesh, Anita S; Kautz, Donald D

    2014-01-01

    The depth and breadth of pathophysiology content, foundational for nursing practice, is well suited for traditional lecture delivery. Use of creative strategies can deepen students' understanding while respecting students' diverse talents and ways of learning. The authors discuss strategies they used, including case studies, questions asked during lecture using immediate feedback technology, creative visual demonstrations, group pathophysiologic theory projects, short videos, and games, to enhance students' understanding and retention of content.

  16. Lecture Demonstrations on Earthquakes for K-12 Teachers and Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, M. D.; Patterson, G. L.

    2005-12-01

    Lecture Demonstrations on Earthquakes for K-12 Teachers and Students Since 1975, the Center for Earthquake Research and Information, (CERI), at The University of Memphis, has strived to satisfy its information transfer directives through diverse education and outreach efforts, providing technical and non-technical earthquake information to the general public, K-16 teachers and students, professional organizations, and state and federal organizations via all forms of written and electronic communication. <> Through these education and outreach efforts, CERI tries to increase earthquake hazard awareness to help limit future losses. <>In the past three years, education programs have reached over 20,000 K-16 students and teachers through in-service training workshops for teachers and earthquake/earth science lecture demonstrations for students. The presentations include an hour-long lecture demonstration featuring graphics and an informal question and answer format. Graphics used include seismic hazard maps, damage photos, plate tectonic maps, layers of the Earth, and more, all adapted for the audience. Throughout this presentation, manipulatives such as a Slinky, Silly Putty, a foam Earth with depth and temperature features, and Popsicle sticks are used to demonstrate seismic waves, the elasticity of the Earth, the Earth's layers and their features, and the brittleness of the crust. Toward the end, a demonstration featuring a portable shake table with a dollhouse mounted on it is used to illustrate earthquake-shaking effects. This presentation is also taken to schools when they are unable to visit CERI. Following this presentation, groups are then taken to the Public Earthquake Resource Center at CERI, a space featuring nine displays, seven of which are interactive. The interactive displays include a shake table and building blocks, a trench with paleoliquefaction features, computers with web access to seismology sites, a liquefaction model, an oscilloscope and

  17. Incorporating More Individual Accountability in Group Activities in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Charles T., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A modified model of cooperative learning known as the GIG model (for group-individual-group) designed and implemented in a large enrollment freshman chemistry course. The goal of the model is to establish a cooperative environment while emphasizing greater individual accountability using both group and individual assignments. The assignments were…

  18. Some Factors Relevant to Group Activities in Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mugglestone, Patricia

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the handling of groups. The teacher should be aware of variables: size of group, composition (by ability, needs, etc.), seating arrangement, group structure, etc. Cooperative, competitive or individual work should be used, depending on the learning goal. The teacher must be perceptive, flexible, and must have good organizing ability.…

  19. Co-ordinated Classroom Lectures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Darell Boyd

    From a series of lectures, a selection of eight are oriented principally toward the biologically developing child, and the physiological operations in visual process. The numbered lectures are--(1) The Coordinated Classroom, its Philosophy and Principles, (2) An Outline of a Biological Point of View, (3) The Evolution of Structure--despite man's…

  20. Tools To Support Electronic Lectures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the nature of electronic performance support and ways it can be used to enhance conventional lecturing. Describes the generic processes and related tools involved in creating and using electronic lectures. Concludes with a short case study of a prototype system recently created to investigate staff and student attitudes toward this…

  1. Learning in Lectures: Multiple Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Leigh N.; Joyce, Sadhbh; Petocz, Peter; Rodd, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Lectures remain the lynchpin of mathematics teaching at university even with advances in information technology and access to the internet. This paper examines the requirements for learning mathematics and shows how important it is for lecturers to be aware of the different modes of presentation they are using. Ways to assist students to make the…

  2. ESP Methodology for Science Lecturers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Angela; Mulyana, Cukup

    A program designed to teach university science lecturers in Indonesia how to design and teach one-semester courses in English for special purposes (ESP) is described. The program provided lecturers with training in language teaching methodology and course design. The piloting of the teacher training course, focusing on physics instruction, is…

  3. Quantity, Quality, and Variety of Pupil Responses during an Open-Communication Structured Group Directed Reading-Thinking Activity and a Closed Communication Structured Group Directed Reading Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petre, Richard M.

    The quality, quantity, and variety of pupil responses while using two different group directed reading activities, the Directed Reading Activity (DRA), and the Directed Reading-Thinking Activity (DRTA) were investigated in this study. The subjects, all fourth graders in two nearby communities, were grouped into above-grade-level, at-grade-level,…

  4. Space Weather Activities of IONOLAB Group: IONOLAB-TEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikan, F.; Sezen, U.; Arikan, O.; Ugurlu, O.; Nayir, H.

    2009-04-01

    Space Weather (SW) is the concept of changing environmental conditions in outer space and affect Earth and its technological systems. SW is a consequence of the solar activities and the coupling of solar energy on Earth's atmosphere due to the Earth's magnetic field. The monitoring and prediction of SW has utmost importance for HF communication, Satellite communication, navigation and guidance systems, Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite systems, Space Craft exit and entry into the atmosphere. Ionosphere is the plasma layer of the atmosphere that is ionized by solar radiation and it is a key player of SW. Ionosphere is a temporally and spatially varying, dispersive, anisotropic and inhomogeneous medium that is characterized primarily by its electron density distribution. IONOLAB is a group of researchers of various disciplines, getting together to handle challenges of the Earth's ionosphere. The team has researchers from Hacettepe University and Bilkent University, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering and General Command of Mapping of Turkish Army. One of the most important contributions of IONOLAB group is the automated web-based computation service for Total Electron Content (TEC). TEC corresponds to the line integral of electron density distribution on a given path. TEC can also be expressed as the amount of free electrons within 1 m2 cross-sectional area of the cylinder on the ray path. Global Position System (GPS) provides a cost-effective medium for monitoring of ionosphere using the signals recorded by stationary GPS receivers in estimating TEC. IONOLAB group has developed IONOLAB-TEC for reliable and robust estimates for all latitudes and both calm and disturbed days by using RINEX, IONEX and satellite ephemeris data provided from the IGS centers. IONOLAB-TEC consists of a regularized signal estimation algorithm which combines signals from all GPS satellites for a given instant and a given receiver, for a desired time period or for 24 hours

  5. The Use of a Group Blog to Actively Support Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of blogs in higher education, there remains a lack of knowledge and consensus about the use and value of blogging in higher education, particularly when used for long periods. This article investigates the use of a group blog to assist traditional teaching activities and foster collaborative learning through the…

  6. Evaluation of physiology lectures conducted by students: comparison between evaluation by staff and students.

    PubMed

    Kommalage, Mahinda; Gunawardena, Sampath

    2011-03-01

    As a peer-assisted learning process, minilectures on physiology were conducted by students. During this process, students lecture to their colleagues in the presence of faculty staff members. These lectures were evaluated by faculty staff and students simultaneously. The aim of this study was to compare feedback from faculty members and students on 66 minilectures conducted by students. Their perception of different qualities of lecture was assessed using a questionnaire. There were significant correlations between students and faculty members for many qualities of the lecture, including the speed of the lecture, retaining attention, clear introduction, and the overall quality of the lecture. However, ratings for gesture, eye contact, language usage, illustration usage, audiovisuals, voice usage, and important points stressed were significantly different between students and faculty members. Multiple regression analysis was performed to assess the degree of effect of different aspects of a lecture on its overall quality. Aspects such as gesture, eye contact, and language usage showed very low β-values, suggesting a poor contribution of these factors to the overall quality of the lecture for both students and faculty members. The speed of the lecture, retaining attention, and clear introduction were qualities that faculty members and students rated equally, and these were the main contributors to the overall quality of the lecture. Awareness about the possible discrepancy between ratings given by faculty members and students may be important when interpreting the evaluation results of formal lectures by these two groups.

  7. Fulbrights for Soviet Lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Craig

    The Council for International Exchange of Scholars is still accepting applications for Fulbright awards to lecture in the sciences in the Soviet Union for academic year 1989-1990. Because the original deadline, September 15, has passed, applications will be processed immediately, and the 1989-1990 Fulbright Scholar Program Faculty Grants close when an adequate number of applicants is approved for nomination.Applications can be in the “Any Field” category or in the more specific categories sought by the Soviet Union, including geophysics at Tashkent; geology at the Gubkin Institute of Oil, Chemical, and Gas Industry; environmental sciences (cultivation of microalgae in sewage; continental shelf development, water resources protection, and economic aspects); and forest restoration technology. Awards are also available in chemistry, life sciences, and physics and astronomy.

  8. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  9. Lecture on Thermal Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    This lecture will cover solar thermal radiation, particularly as it relates to the high energy solar processes that are the subject of this summer school. After a general review of thermal radiation from the Sun and a discussion of basic definitions, the various emission and absorption mechanisms will be described including black-body emission, bremsstrahlung, free-bound, and atomic line emissions of all kinds. The bulk of the time will be spent discussing the observational characteristics of thermal flare plasma and what can be learned about the flare energy release process from observations of the thermal radiation at all wavelengths. Information that has been learned about the morphology, temperature distribution, and composition of the flare plasma will be presented. The energetics of the thermal flare plasma will be discussed in relation to the nonthermal energy of the particles accelerated during the flare. This includes the total energy, the radiated and conductive cooling processes, and the total irradiated energy.

  10. Aeroelasticity - Frontiers and beyond /von Karman Lecture/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, I. E.

    1976-01-01

    The lecture aims at giving a broad survey of the current reaches of aeroelasticity with some narrower views for the specialist. After a short historical review of concepts for orientation, several topics are briefly presented. These touch on current flight vehicles having special points of aeroelastic interest; recent developments in the active control of aeroelastic response including control of flutter; remarks on the unsteady aerodynamics of arbitrary configurations; problems of the space shuttle related to aeroelasticity; and aeroelastic response in flight.

  11. Skills for Living: Group Counseling Activities for Elementary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morganett, Rosemarie Smead

    This book can help counselors in the school or mental health setting create meaningful group experiences for children who, for whatever reason, are behind in social and life skill development. The group agendas have been developed with children from grades 2-5 in mind. Although each topic stands alone, children can benefit from more than one…

  12. The Fantastic Facilitator: Engaging Activities for Leading Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duttweiler, Patricia Cloud

    This document is designed to help facilitators with the formation and development of effective teams of people who have no previous history as a team and no training in group processes. Part 1 provides a narrative explanation of the stages of group development (investing in membership, forming attachments to subgroups, confronting/debating issues,…

  13. An Activity Group Experience for Disengaged Elderly Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John Ewing; Bodden, Jack L.

    1978-01-01

    Tested the activity theory (which proposes that elderly persons remain in active contact with their environment) and disengagement theory (which suggests adjustment comes through reduction of activity and social contact). Disengaged elderly were identified. Subjects demonstrated significant improvement over the untreated control subjects. Results…

  14. Assessment of Lecture Strategy with Different Teaching Aids

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Kumar, Jayballabh; Kumar, Gaurav; Kapoor, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Medical/dental colleges in Northern India cater to students with diverse backgrounds, mother tongues, levels of comprehending English, and intelligence levels. This study was conducted to identify lecture strategy and teaching aid best suited for North Indian dental and medical students. It was conducted in two parts – 1. Survey of teachers’ and students’ opinion to obtain their preferences in teaching-learning practices followed in a conventional lecture, and 2. Comparison of students’ performances after a single trial lecture with different groups of students, using different teaching aids (TAs). Materials and Methods: Opinions of 33 faculty teaching first year dental/ medical students and 506 volunteer students (320 female) were compiled. Students were divided into four groups. A single trial lecture was held with each group (on the same topic, using identical lesson plan, by the same teacher) using a different teaching aid with each group. Lecture strategy was designed according to students’ preferences (as obtained from opinion survey) regarding language of instruction and the number of mental breaks. TAs used with different groups were chalk and board (C&B), PowerPoint (PPT), overhead projector (OHP), and a combination of C&B and PPT. Pre- and post-tests using multiple choice questions were conducted with each group. Results of post-test questionnaire and feedback from faculty attending the lecture were assessed for students’ satisfaction and attentiveness in all four groups. Results: Survey results indicated that although 97.6% students believed they had good/fair proficiency in English, 83.6% preferred being taught in a combination of English and Hindi; 44.3% students preferred C&B, 40.1% preferred PPT and 15.6% preferred the use of OHP as TA. After conducting a trial lecture with different TAs with each group, more than 90% students expressed satisfaction with the TA used for that group. Significantly better

  15. Group Problem Solving as a Zone of Proximal Development activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Eric

    2006-12-01

    Vygotsky described learning as a process, intertwined with development, which is strongly influenced by social interactions with others that are at differing developmental stages.i These interactions create a Zone of Proximal Development for each member of the interaction. Vygotsky’s notion of social constructivism is not only a theory of learning, but also of development. While teaching introductory physics in an interactive format, I have found manifestations of Vygotsky’s theory in my classroom. The source of evidence is a paired problem solution. A standard mechanics problem was solved by students in two classes as a homework assignment. Students handed in the homework and then solved the same problem in small groups. The solutions to both the group and individual problem were assessed by multiple reviewers. In many cases the group score was the same as the highest individual score in the group, but in some cases, the group score was higher than any individual score. For this poster, I will analyze the individual and group scores and focus on three groups solutions and video that provide evidence of learning through membership in a Zone of Proximal Development. Endnotes i L. Vygotsky -Mind and society: The development of higher mental processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. (1978).

  16. Lecturing with a Virtual Whiteboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanovic, Zoran

    2006-09-01

    Recent advances in computer technology, word processing software, and projection systems have made traditional whiteboard lecturing obsolete. Tablet personal computers connected to display projectors and running handwriting software have replaced the marker-on-whiteboard method of delivering a lecture. Since the notes can be saved into an electronic file, they can be uploaded to a class website to be perused by the students later. This paper will describe the author's experiences in using this new technology to deliver physics lectures at an engineering school. The benefits and problems discovered will be reviewed and results from a survey of student opinions will be discussed.

  17. To Lecture or Not to Lecture? That is the Question.

    PubMed

    Oja, Kenneth John; Kelly, Lesly

    2016-01-01

    A quasi-experimental mixed-methods study compared the effects of an unfolding case study with lecture in a nursing orientation class on new graduate registered nurses' knowledge, perceived learning, and satisfaction with the instructional method. Although results showed that the unfolding case study was engaging, learners who received content in a lecture format achieved significantly higher posttest scores. Nursing professional development specialists will find this article helpful when considering instructional methods for new graduate registered nurses.

  18. In-Class versus Online Video Lectures: Similar Learning Outcomes, but a Preference for In-Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous findings suggest some advantages to using an online format to deliver declarative knowledge and to using class time for active learning and discussion. During 4 weeks of an introductory psychology course, students were assigned on alternate weeks to attend one of two lecture formats: in-class lecture or online video lecture with an…

  19. Formation of nanostructured Group IIA metal activated sensors: The transformation of Group IIA metal compound sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tune, Travis C.; Baker, Caitlin; Hardy, Neil; Lin, Arthur; Widing, Timothy J.; Gole, James L.

    2015-05-01

    Trends in the Group IIA metal oxides and hydroxides of magnesium, calcium, and barium are unique in the periodic table. In this study we find that they display novel trends as decorating nanostructures for extrinsic semiconductor interfaces. The Group IIA metal ions are strong Lewis acids. We form these M2+ ions in aqueous solution and bring these solutions in contact with a porous silicon interface to form interfaces for conductometric measurements. Observed responses are consistent with the formation of MgO whereas the heavier elements display behaviors which suggest the effect of their more basic nature. Mg(OH)2, when formed, represents a weak base whereas the heavier metal hydroxides of Ca, Sr, and Ba are strong bases. However, the hydroxides tend to give up hydrogen and act as Brönsted acids. For the latter elements, the reversible interaction response of nanostructures deposited to the porous silicon (PS) interface is modified, as the formation of more basic sites appears to compete with M2+ Lewis acidity and hydroxide Brönsted acidity. Mg2+ forms an interface whose response to the analytes NH3 and NO is consistent with MgO and well explained by the recently developing Inverse Hard/Soft Acid/Base model. The behavior of the Ca2+ and Ba2+ decorated interfaces as they interact with the hard base NH3 follows a reversal of the model, indicating a decrease in acidic character as the observed conductometric response suggests the interaction with hydroxyl groups. A change from oxide-like to hydroxide-like constituents is supported by XPS studies. The changes in conductometric response is easily monitored in contrast to changes associated with the Group IIA oxides and hydroxides observed in XPS, EDAX, IR, and NMR measurements.

  20. Parents' Networking Strategies: Participation of Formal and Informal Parent Groups in School Activities and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanat, Carolyn L.

    2010-01-01

    This case study examined parent groups' involvement in school activities and their participation in decision making. Research questions included the following: (1) What is the nature of parent groups in schools? (2) What activities and issues gain parent groups' attention and participation? (3) How do parent groups communicate concerns about…

  1. Scaffolding of Small Groups' Metacognitive Activities with an Avatar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenaar, Inge; Chiu, Ming Ming; Sleegers, Peter; van Boxtel, Carla

    2011-01-01

    Metacognitive scaffolding in a computer-supported learning environment can influence students' metacognitive activities, metacognitive knowledge and domain knowledge. In this study we analyze how metacognitive activities mediate the relationships between different avatar scaffolds on students' learning. Multivariate, multilevel analysis of the…

  2. Supporting Mobile Collaborative Activities through Scaffolded Flexible Grouping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boticki, Ivica; Looi, Chee-Kit; Wong, Lung-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    Within the field of Mobile Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (mCSCL), we are interested in exploring the space of collaborative activities that enable students to practice communication, negotiation and decision-making skills. Collaboration is via learning activities that circumvent the constraints of fixed seating or locations of…

  3. First Steps Toward Increasing Student Engagement During Lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2008-05-01

    Have you tried to repurpose materials you've gotten from another lecturer or publisher that you thought could express a concept exceptionally well, only to find when you used the same materials, they did not have the dramatic effect on your students you desired? It would be easy to conclude that student apathy is to blame. But, if students listening to your lecture take on the same bored appearance and passive disposition often observed when you are showing a video, consider whether your instructional approach is designed to intellectually engage students. An information-download lecture has often been described as…the process by which the teacher's notes get transferred into students' notebooks without passing through the brains of either. That brilliant set of lecture materials that you thought would be perfect might need to be adjusted to meet the learning styles of your students to actively engage them in developing conceptual understanding.

  4. Classroom-Based Interdependent Group Contingencies Increase Children's Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhl, Sarah; Rudrud, Eric H.; Witts, Benjamin N.; Schulze, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of 2 interdependent group contingencies (individual vs. cumulative classroom goal setting) on the number of pedometer-recorded steps taken per day. Thirty third-grade students in 2 classrooms participated. An ABACX design was conducted in which the X phase referred to a replication of the most successful phase…

  5. Exploring how nurse lecturers maintain clinical credibility.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Melanie T

    2005-01-01

    The role of the nurse lecturer is changing. There is growing pressure from the government and professionals alike to recruit nurse teachers who posses both practical and recent experience of nursing [Department of Health, 1999. Making a Difference: Strengthening the Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting Contribution to Health and Health Care. DOH, London; UKCC, 2000. Standards for the Preparation of Teachers of Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting. UKCC, London]. Whilst much of the literature available suggests a growing concern amongst practitioners, students and nurse educationalists themselves about the importance of being ;clinically credible', what is not clear is how tangible it is to maintain currency and clinical credibility. In addition, the term ;clinical credibility' is in itself ill-defined. An exploratory study was undertaken within one higher education institution which sought to seek the views of nurse lecturers. The principles of ethnography were applied to this research. The sample included six of the most recently appointed nurse lecturers within one academic faculty who taught predominantly on pre-registration programmes. Data from individual and focus group interviews was analysed using a thematic content analysis approach. The findings are discussed which embrace the concepts of: working ;hands on' in the clinical area, clinical currency, transferability of skills, clinical visibility and role development. Recommendations for the development of professional practice are offered. PMID:19038175

  6. Introductory lecture: nanoplasmonics.

    PubMed

    Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Nanoplasmonics or nanoscale metal-based optics is a field of science and technology with a tremendously rich and colourful history. Starting with the early works of Michael Faraday on gold nanocolloids and optically-thin gold leaf, researchers have been fascinated by the unusual optical properties displayed by metallic nanostructures. We now can enjoy selecting from over 10 000 publications every year on the topic of plasmonics and the number of publications has been doubling about every three years since 1990. This impressive productivity can be attributed to the significant growth of the scientific community as plasmonics has spread into a myriad of new directions. With 2015 being the International Year of Light, it seems like a perfect moment to review some of the most notable accomplishments in plasmonics to date and to project where the field may be moving next. After discussing some of the major historical developments in the field, this article will analyse how the most successful plasmonics applications are capitalizing on five key strengths of metallic nanostructures. This Introductory Lecture will conclude with a brief look into the future. PMID:25968246

  7. Introductory lecture: nanoplasmonics.

    PubMed

    Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Nanoplasmonics or nanoscale metal-based optics is a field of science and technology with a tremendously rich and colourful history. Starting with the early works of Michael Faraday on gold nanocolloids and optically-thin gold leaf, researchers have been fascinated by the unusual optical properties displayed by metallic nanostructures. We now can enjoy selecting from over 10 000 publications every year on the topic of plasmonics and the number of publications has been doubling about every three years since 1990. This impressive productivity can be attributed to the significant growth of the scientific community as plasmonics has spread into a myriad of new directions. With 2015 being the International Year of Light, it seems like a perfect moment to review some of the most notable accomplishments in plasmonics to date and to project where the field may be moving next. After discussing some of the major historical developments in the field, this article will analyse how the most successful plasmonics applications are capitalizing on five key strengths of metallic nanostructures. This Introductory Lecture will conclude with a brief look into the future.

  8. Leveraging the Shapley Lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, S.

    1998-05-01

    The Shapley Lectureships are both an honor and a privilege. The program has long provided the non-specialist a rare glimpse of the latest result of astronomical investigations. Shapley Lecturers carry the banner for the most interesting of all the sciences. They share the beauty and strength of astronomy by representing the discipline to non-specialists. It is important that we contribute what we can to this program. One might benefit from the frequent travel of most astronomers. Most research trips are now covered by grant money, by university money, and by Government money. Leverage this travel. For example, many meetings are held near places with small colleges. Consider sending a Shapley brochure to the science departments before your trip. Such trips may often be used to elicit a Shapley visit. Advertise the program. When we talk about astronomy to others we help all of us to keep this science alive. I will share the results of my Shapley Visits made in the last four years while traveling for NASA and NSF.

  9. Small Group Instruction: A Study in Remedial Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Ping-Tung

    1977-01-01

    This study compared the impacts of small-group instruction and lecture demonstration teaching on achievement and attitudes toward mathematics. Results indicated that small-group instruction was superior to the lecture method in producing achievement in remedial mathematics. (SD)

  10. Conversation Strategies: Pair and Group Activities for Developing Communicative Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kehe, David; Kehe, Peggy Dustin

    The guide is designed for use in English-as-a-Second-Language instruction at the intermediate level. The activities are designed to be enjoyable and encourage students to interact, but also to be non-threatening to even the most reserved students. The exercises develop strategic conversation skills. Each has three parts: a teacher's introduction;…

  11. Novel, high-activity hydroprocessing catalysts: Iron group phosphides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianqin

    A series of iron, cobalt and nickel transition metal phosphides was synthesized by means of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) of the corresponding phosphates. The same materials, Fe2P, CoP and NO, were also prepared on a silica (SiO2) support. The phase purity of these catalysts was established by x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the surface properties were determined by N2 BET specific surface area (Sg) measurements and CO chemisorption. The activities of the silica-supported catalysts were tested in a three-phase trickle bed reactor for the simultaneous hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) of quinoline and hydrodesulfurization (HDS) of dibenzothiophene using a model liquid feed at realistic conditions (30 atm, 370°C). The reactivity studies showed that the nickel phosphide (Ni2P/SiO2) was the most active of the catalysts. Compared with a commercial Ni-Mo-S/gamma-Al 2O3 catalyst at the same conditions, Ni2P/silica had a substantially higher HDS activity (100% vs. 76%) and HDN activity (82% vs. 38%). Because of their good hydrotreating activity, an extensive study of the preparation of silica supported nickel phosphides, Ni2P/SiO 2, was carried out. The parameters investigated were the phosphorus content and the weight loading of the active phase. The most active composition was found to have a starting synthesis Ni/P ratio close to 1/2, and the best loading of this sample on silica was observed to be 18 wt.%. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements were employed to determine the structures of the supported samples. The main phase before and after reaction was found to be Ni2P, but some sulfur was found to be retained after reaction. A comprehensive scrutiny of the HDN reaction mechanism was also made over the Ni2P/SiO2 sample (Ni/P = 1/2) by comparing the HDN activity of a series of piperidine derivatives of different structure. It was found that piperidine adsorption involved an alpha-H activation

  12. Working Group 5: Measurements technology and active experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E.; Barfield, J. N.; Faelthammar, C.-G.; Feynman, J.; Quinn, J. N.; Roberts, W.; Stone, N.; Taylor, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Technology issues identified by working groups 5 are listed. (1) New instruments are needed to upgrade the ability to measure plasma properties in space. (2) Facilities should be developed for conducting a broad range of plasma experiments in space. (3) The ability to predict plasma weather within magnetospheres should be improved and a capability to modify plasma weather developed. (4) Methods of control of plasma spacecraft and spacecraft plasma interference should be upgraded. (5) The space station laboratory facilities should be designed with attention to problems of flexibility to allow for future growth. These issues are discussed.

  13. Prevalence and Determinants of Physician Participation in Conducting Pharmaceutical-sponsored Clinical Trials and Lectures

    PubMed Central

    Ashar, Bimal H; Miller, Redonda G; Getz, Kelly J; Powe, Nell R

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND The relationship between physicians and the pharmaceutical industry is controversial because of the potential for conflicts of interest. However, little empirical evidence exists on the extent of physician participation in activities sponsored by pharmaceutical companies. OBJECTIVES To determine the prevalence of participation of internal medicine physicians in clinical trials and lectures sponsored by pharmaceutical companies and to describe factors that are associated with such participation. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We conducted a cross-sectional regional survey of 1,000 Maryland internal medicine physicians between February 2000 and January 2001 in order to measure the prevalence of physician participation in pharmaceutical-sponsored clinical trials and lectures. We also collected economic and demographic information to examine potential associations between physician characteristics and engagement in such activities. RESULTS Of 835 eligible physicians 444 (53%) responded, of whom 37% reported engaging in pharmaceutical-sponsored clinical trials and/or lectures to supplement their incomes. In our multivariable analysis, subspecialists versus generalist physicians (odds ratio [OR], 1.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14 to 2.99), physicians in private group-single specialty and academic practice versus physicians in solo practice (OR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.19 to 4.44 and OR, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.17 to 5.61, respectively), and physicians with higher versus lower annual incomes (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.44) had a greater odds of participation in these activities. Additionally, physicians dissatisfied with their income had a 140% greater odds of participation (OR, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.45 to 3.83) than those who were satisfied with their income. CONCLUSIONS A substantial number of internists engage in pharmaceutical industry-sponsored clinical trials and/or lectures in an effort to supplement their incomes. Physician dissatisfaction with income appears to

  14. Characterization of inhibitory mechanism and antifungal activity between group-1 and group-2 phytocystatins from taro (Colocasia esculenta).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Ming; Kumar, Senthil; Cheng, Yi-Sheng; Venkatagiri, Shripathi; Yang, Ai-Hwa; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2008-10-01

    Tarocystatin from Colocasia esculenta, a group-2 phytocystatin, is a defense protein against phytopathogenic nematodes and fungi. It is composed of a highly conserved N-terminal region, which is homological to group-1 cystatin, and a repetitive peptide at the C-terminus. The purified recombinant proteins of tarocystatin, such as full-length (FL), N-terminus (Nt) and C-terminus (Ct) peptides, were produced and their inhibitory activities against papain as well as their antifungal effects were investigated. Kinetic analysis revealed that FL peptide exhibited mixed type inhibition (K(ia) = 0.098 microM and K(ib) = 0.252 microM) and Nt peptide showed competitive inhibition (K(i) = 0.057 microM), whereas Ct peptide possessed weak papain activation properties. A shift in the inhibitory pattern from competitive inhibition of Nt peptide alone to mixed type inhibition of FL peptide implied that the Ct peptide has an regulatory effect on the function of FL peptide. Based on the inhibitory kinetics of FL (group-2) and Nt (group-1) peptides on papain activity, an inhibitory mechanism of group-2 phytocystatins and a regulatory mechanism of extended Ct peptide have each been proposed. By contrast, the antifungal activity of Nt peptide appeared to be greater than that of FL peptide, and the Ct peptide showed no effect on antifungal activity, indicating that the antifungal effect is not related to proteinase inhibitory activity. The results are valid for most phytocystatins with respect to the inhibitory mechanism against cysteine proteinase.

  15. Characterization of inhibitory mechanism and antifungal activity between group-1 and group-2 phytocystatins from taro (Colocasia esculenta).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Ming; Kumar, Senthil; Cheng, Yi-Sheng; Venkatagiri, Shripathi; Yang, Ai-Hwa; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2008-10-01

    Tarocystatin from Colocasia esculenta, a group-2 phytocystatin, is a defense protein against phytopathogenic nematodes and fungi. It is composed of a highly conserved N-terminal region, which is homological to group-1 cystatin, and a repetitive peptide at the C-terminus. The purified recombinant proteins of tarocystatin, such as full-length (FL), N-terminus (Nt) and C-terminus (Ct) peptides, were produced and their inhibitory activities against papain as well as their antifungal effects were investigated. Kinetic analysis revealed that FL peptide exhibited mixed type inhibition (K(ia) = 0.098 microM and K(ib) = 0.252 microM) and Nt peptide showed competitive inhibition (K(i) = 0.057 microM), whereas Ct peptide possessed weak papain activation properties. A shift in the inhibitory pattern from competitive inhibition of Nt peptide alone to mixed type inhibition of FL peptide implied that the Ct peptide has an regulatory effect on the function of FL peptide. Based on the inhibitory kinetics of FL (group-2) and Nt (group-1) peptides on papain activity, an inhibitory mechanism of group-2 phytocystatins and a regulatory mechanism of extended Ct peptide have each been proposed. By contrast, the antifungal activity of Nt peptide appeared to be greater than that of FL peptide, and the Ct peptide showed no effect on antifungal activity, indicating that the antifungal effect is not related to proteinase inhibitory activity. The results are valid for most phytocystatins with respect to the inhibitory mechanism against cysteine proteinase. PMID:18785929

  16. Learn before Lecture: A Strategy that Improves Learning Outcomes in a Large Introductory Biology Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moravec, Marin; Williams, Adrienne; Aguilar-Roca, Nancy; O'Dowd, Diane K.

    2010-01-01

    Actively engaging students in lecture has been shown to increase learning gains. To create time for active learning without displacing content we used two strategies for introducing material before class in a large introductory biology course. Four to five slides from 2007/8 were removed from each of three lectures in 2009 and the information…

  17. Contralateral delay activity tracks the influence of Gestalt grouping principles on active visual working memory representations.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Dwight J; Gözenman, Filiz; Arciniega, Hector; Berryhill, Marian E

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that factors influencing perception, such as Gestalt grouping cues, can influence the storage of information in visual working memory (VWM). In some cases, stationary cues, such as stimulus similarity, lead to superior VWM performance. However, the neural correlates underlying these benefits to VWM performance remain unclear. One neural index, the contralateral delay activity (CDA), is an event-related potential that shows increased amplitude according to the number of items held in VWM and asymptotes at an individual's VWM capacity limit. Here, we applied the CDA to determine whether previously reported behavioral benefits supplied by similarity, proximity, and uniform connectedness were reflected as a neural savings such that the CDA amplitude was reduced when these cues were present. We implemented VWM change-detection tasks with arrays including similarity and proximity (Experiment 1); uniform connectedness (Experiments 2a and 2b); and similarity/proximity and uniform connectedness (Experiment 3). The results indicated that when there was a behavioral benefit to VWM, this was echoed by a reduction in CDA amplitude, which suggests more efficient processing. However, not all perceptual grouping cues provided a VWM benefit in the same measure (e.g., accuracy) or of the same magnitude. We also found unexpected interactions between cues. We observed a mixed bag of effects, suggesting that these powerful perceptual grouping benefits are not as predictable in VWM. The current findings indicate that when grouping cues produce behavioral benefits, there is a parallel reduction in the neural resources required to maintain grouped items within VWM.

  18. Contralateral delay activity tracks the influence of Gestalt grouping principles on active visual working memory representations.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Dwight J; Gözenman, Filiz; Arciniega, Hector; Berryhill, Marian E

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that factors influencing perception, such as Gestalt grouping cues, can influence the storage of information in visual working memory (VWM). In some cases, stationary cues, such as stimulus similarity, lead to superior VWM performance. However, the neural correlates underlying these benefits to VWM performance remain unclear. One neural index, the contralateral delay activity (CDA), is an event-related potential that shows increased amplitude according to the number of items held in VWM and asymptotes at an individual's VWM capacity limit. Here, we applied the CDA to determine whether previously reported behavioral benefits supplied by similarity, proximity, and uniform connectedness were reflected as a neural savings such that the CDA amplitude was reduced when these cues were present. We implemented VWM change-detection tasks with arrays including similarity and proximity (Experiment 1); uniform connectedness (Experiments 2a and 2b); and similarity/proximity and uniform connectedness (Experiment 3). The results indicated that when there was a behavioral benefit to VWM, this was echoed by a reduction in CDA amplitude, which suggests more efficient processing. However, not all perceptual grouping cues provided a VWM benefit in the same measure (e.g., accuracy) or of the same magnitude. We also found unexpected interactions between cues. We observed a mixed bag of effects, suggesting that these powerful perceptual grouping benefits are not as predictable in VWM. The current findings indicate that when grouping cues produce behavioral benefits, there is a parallel reduction in the neural resources required to maintain grouped items within VWM. PMID:26018644

  19. Meta-Analysis of Group Learning Activities: Empirically Based Teaching Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomcho, Thomas J.; Foels, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Teaching researchers commonly employ group-based collaborative learning approaches in Teaching of Psychology teaching activities. However, the authors know relatively little about the effectiveness of group-based activities in relation to known psychological processes associated with group dynamics. Therefore, the authors conducted a meta-analytic…

  20. Engager and Avoider Behaviour in Types of Activities Performed by Out-of-Class Learning Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Louisa; Kember, David

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the out-of-class learning activities undertaken, at the students' volition, by groups of students. Data were gathered through 57 individual and 15 focus group interviews with university students in Hong Kong. Group activities reported included: copying, sharing material, consulting peers, consulting teachers, studying and…

  1. Current activities of the Atmospheric Composition Sub-Group of the CEOS Working Group on Calibration and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojkov, Bojan

    The Atmospheric Sub-Group of the CEOS Calibration and Validation Working Group (CEOS WGCV/ASCG) was established in November 2001 with mission to ensure accurate and traceable calibration of remotely-sensed atmospheric chemistry radiance data and validation of higher level products, for application to atmospheric chemistry and climate research. This working-group, consisting of 15 members from space agencies and other relevant agencies and organizations with broad experience in calibration, modeling, algorithm development and validation, meet on an annual basis to promote international collaboration and technical exchanges, encourage interactions between mission scientists and data users, recommend network validation sites, develop comprehensive validation methodologies involving ground-based and space-borne assets, and specify comprehensive and consistent multi-mission validation datasets. Recent activities of the ACSG, including the recent ground-based intercomparisons, the ongoing NASA-ESA-NDACC validation data sharing activities, and the planned multi-agency CO2 validation efforts, will be presented.

  2. Group average difference: a termination criterion for active contour.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Tong Kuan; Lim, Jun Hong; Poh, Chueh Loo

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a termination criterion for active contour that does not involve alteration of the energy functional. The criterion is based on the area difference of the contour during evolution. In this criterion, the evolution of the contour terminates when the area difference fluctuates around a constant. The termination criterion is tested using parametric gradient vector flow active contour with contour resampling and normal force selection. The usefulness of the criterion is shown through its trend, speed, accuracy, shape insensitivity, and insensitivity to contour resampling. The metric used in the proposed criterion demonstrated a steadily decreasing trend. For automatic implementation in which different shapes need to be segmented, the proposed criterion demonstrated almost 50% and 60% total time reduction while achieving similar accuracy as compared with the pixel movement-based method in the segmentation of synthetic and real medical images, respectively. Our results also show that the proposed termination criterion is insensitive to shape variation and contour resampling. The criterion also possesses potential to be used for other kinds of snakes.

  3. Superfluid phase transition with activated velocity fluctuations: Renormalization group approach.

    PubMed

    Dančo, Michal; Hnatič, Michal; Komarova, Marina V; Lučivjanský, Tomáš; Nalimov, Mikhail Yu

    2016-01-01

    A quantum field model that incorporates Bose-condensed systems near their phase transition into a superfluid phase and velocity fluctuations is proposed. The stochastic Navier-Stokes equation is used for a generation of the velocity fluctuations. As such this model generalizes model F of critical dynamics. The field-theoretic action is derived using the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism and path integral approach. The regime of equilibrium fluctuations is analyzed within the perturbative renormalization group method. The double (ε,δ)-expansion scheme is employed, where ε is a deviation from space dimension 4 and δ describes scaling of velocity fluctuations. The renormalization procedure is performed to the leading order. The main corollary gained from the analysis of the thermal equilibrium regime suggests that one-loop calculations of the presented models are not sufficient to make a definite conclusion about the stability of fixed points. We also show that critical exponents are drastically changed as a result of the turbulent background and critical fluctuations are in fact destroyed by the developed turbulence fluctuations. The scaling exponent of effective viscosity is calculated and agrees with expected value 4/3.

  4. Superfluid phase transition with activated velocity fluctuations: Renormalization group approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dančo, Michal; Hnatič, Michal; Komarova, Marina V.; Lučivjanský, Tomáš; Nalimov, Mikhail Yu.

    2016-01-01

    A quantum field model that incorporates Bose-condensed systems near their phase transition into a superfluid phase and velocity fluctuations is proposed. The stochastic Navier-Stokes equation is used for a generation of the velocity fluctuations. As such this model generalizes model F of critical dynamics. The field-theoretic action is derived using the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism and path integral approach. The regime of equilibrium fluctuations is analyzed within the perturbative renormalization group method. The double (ɛ ,δ ) -expansion scheme is employed, where ɛ is a deviation from space dimension 4 and δ describes scaling of velocity fluctuations. The renormalization procedure is performed to the leading order. The main corollary gained from the analysis of the thermal equilibrium regime suggests that one-loop calculations of the presented models are not sufficient to make a definite conclusion about the stability of fixed points. We also show that critical exponents are drastically changed as a result of the turbulent background and critical fluctuations are in fact destroyed by the developed turbulence fluctuations. The scaling exponent of effective viscosity is calculated and agrees with expected value 4 /3 .

  5. Superfluid phase transition with activated velocity fluctuations: Renormalization group approach.

    PubMed

    Dančo, Michal; Hnatič, Michal; Komarova, Marina V; Lučivjanský, Tomáš; Nalimov, Mikhail Yu

    2016-01-01

    A quantum field model that incorporates Bose-condensed systems near their phase transition into a superfluid phase and velocity fluctuations is proposed. The stochastic Navier-Stokes equation is used for a generation of the velocity fluctuations. As such this model generalizes model F of critical dynamics. The field-theoretic action is derived using the Martin-Siggia-Rose formalism and path integral approach. The regime of equilibrium fluctuations is analyzed within the perturbative renormalization group method. The double (ε,δ)-expansion scheme is employed, where ε is a deviation from space dimension 4 and δ describes scaling of velocity fluctuations. The renormalization procedure is performed to the leading order. The main corollary gained from the analysis of the thermal equilibrium regime suggests that one-loop calculations of the presented models are not sufficient to make a definite conclusion about the stability of fixed points. We also show that critical exponents are drastically changed as a result of the turbulent background and critical fluctuations are in fact destroyed by the developed turbulence fluctuations. The scaling exponent of effective viscosity is calculated and agrees with expected value 4/3. PMID:26871026

  6. Are You Still Who You Were? A Tale of Construction Lecturers, Changing Technologies and Conflicting Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Gallais, Tricia

    2009-01-01

    This paper illuminates a period of change in the lives of a group of 20 vocational lecturers as they find themselves challenged by both their own and others' categorisation of what and who they are. Such conflicting perspectives are made even starker by their management's introduction of technological innovation into the lecturers' traditional…

  7. Hospitable Gestures in the University Lecture: Analysing Derrida's Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruitenberg, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Based on archival research, this article analyses the pedagogical gestures in Derrida's (largely unpublished) lectures on hospitality (1995/96), with particular attention to the enactment of hospitality in these gestures. The motivation for this analysis is twofold. First, since the large-group university lecture has been widely critiqued as…

  8. Comparison of Internet versus Lecture Instructional Methods for Teaching Nursing Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Mary A.; Kimmick, James V.

    2000-01-01

    A group of 44 graduate nursing students were taught using the Internet and 53 via lectures. There were no significant differences in scores or satisfaction. However, Internet students were significantly more stimulated to learn; 73% attended at least 3 of 10 lectures although they were not required to. (SK)

  9. A Study of Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) over Classroom Lecture (CRL) at ICS Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaousar, Tayyeba; Choudhry, Bushra Naoreen; Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of CAI vs. classroom lecture for computer science at ICS level. The objectives were to compare the learning effects of two groups with classroom lecture and computer-assisted instruction studying the same curriculum and the effects of CAI and CRL in terms of cognitive development. Hypotheses of…

  10. The Effectiveness of Programed Instruction Versus the Lecture-Discussion Method of Teaching Basic Metallurgical Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockman, David Carl

    The purpose of this study was to compare the conventional lecture-discussion method and an illustrated programed textbook method when teaching a unit of instruction on the basic concepts of metallurgy. The control group used a portion of a conventional textbook accompanied by lecture, chalkboard illustration, and class discussion. The experimental…

  11. Evaluating the Use of Facebook to Increase Student Engagement and Understanding in Lecture-Based Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyson, Benjamin; Vickers, Kristin; Turtle, John; Cowan, Sara; Tassone, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    Both lecture delivery and Facebook use are ubiquitous aspects of higher education from staff and student points-of-view, respectively. An attempt was made to integrate the two by setting up a Facebook group and delivering contemporary news stories in preparation for in-lecture discussion in a large-scale (1,200 students across 5 sections)…

  12. Comparison of a Stimulus Equivalence Protocol and Traditional Lecture for Teaching Single-Subject Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Sadie; Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne; Garcia, Yors; Dunning, Johnna

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the effects of a computer-based stimulus equivalence protocol to a traditional lecture format in teaching single-subject experimental design concepts to undergraduate students. Participants were assigned to either an equivalence or a lecture group, and performance on a paper-and-pencil test that targeted relations among the…

  13. Words That Fascinate the Listener: Predicting Affective Ratings of On-Line Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weninger, Felix; Staudt, Pascal; Schuller, Björn

    2013-01-01

    In a large scale study on 843 transcripts of Technology, Entertainment and Design (TED) talks, the authors address the relation between word usage and categorical affective ratings of lectures by a large group of internet users. Users rated the lectures by assigning one or more predefined tags which relate to the affective state evoked in the…

  14. Lecture Absenteeism among Students in Higher Education: A Valuable Route to Understanding Student Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Sarah; Armstrong, Claire; Pearson, Jill

    2008-01-01

    The reasons associated with lecture absenteeism among student groups could shed significant light on student motivation levels and orientations in university settings. Paying attention to the rationales for lecture absence provided by students themselves could also help institutions to diagnose levels of student engagement and respond in…

  15. Group B Streptococcal Infection and Activation of Human Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stoner, Terri D.; Weston, Thomas A.; Trejo, JoAnn; Doran, Kelly S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is the leading cause of life-threatening meningitis in human newborns in industrialized countries. Meningitis results from neonatal infection that occurs when GBS leaves the bloodstream (bacteremia), crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and enters the central nervous system (CNS), where the bacteria contact the meninges. Although GBS is known to invade the BBB, subsequent interaction with astrocytes that physically associate with brain endothelium has not been well studied. Methodology/Principal Findings We hypothesize that human astrocytes play a unique role in GBS infection and contribute to the development of meningitis. To address this, we used a well- characterized human fetal astrocyte cell line, SVG-A, and examined GBS infection in vitro. We observed that all GBS strains of representative clinically dominant serotypes (Ia, Ib, III, and V) were able to adhere to and invade astrocytes. Cellular invasion was dependent on host actin cytoskeleton rearrangements, and was specific to GBS as Streptococcus gordonii failed to enter astrocytes. Analysis of isogenic mutant GBS strains deficient in various cell surface organelles showed that anchored LTA, serine-rich repeat protein (Srr1) and fibronectin binding (SfbA) proteins all contribute to host cell internalization. Wild-type GBS also displayed an ability to persist and survive within an intracellular compartment for at least 12 h following invasion. Moreover, GBS infection resulted in increased astrocyte transcription of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and VEGF. Conclusions/Significance This study has further characterized the interaction of GBS with human astrocytes, and has identified the importance of specific virulence factors in these interactions. Understanding the role of astrocytes during GBS infection will provide important information regarding BBB disruption and the development of neonatal meningitis. PMID:26030618

  16. BRAIN REWARD ACTIVITY TO MASKED IN-GROUP SMILING FACES PREDICTS FRIENDSHIP DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-Hao A.; Whalen, Paul J.; Freeman, Jonathan B.; Taylor, James M.; Heatherton, Todd F.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether neural responses in the ventral striatum (VS) to in-group facial expressions—presented without explicit awareness—could predict friendship patterns in newly arrived individuals from China six months later. Individuals who initially showed greater VS activity in response to in-group happy expressions during functional neuroimaging later made considerably more in-group friends, suggesting that VS activity might reflect reward processes that drive in-group approach behaviors. PMID:26185595

  17. ``Don't Lecture Me''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Often I will listen to public radio on long drives when I am alone. Recently I happened to catch a program called ``Don't Lecture Me'' and it really caught my attention for several reasons. First, the speakers were all notable leaders in Physics Education Research such as Joe Redish, David Hestenes, and Eric Mazur. (See this month's WebSights column.) These folks are among many who have devoted their energies to understanding how students learn physics and how teachers can design classroom instruction and interactions to best meet the needs of learners. Second, on this particular trip, I had just observed a teacher whose class was very teacher-centered as the teacher lectured most of the class period. As we discussed this later, she expressed concern that she had to cover the material and didn't feel that she could do it without lecturing.

  18. "Don't Lecture Me"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-11-01

    Often I will listen to public radio on long drives when I am alone. Recently I happened to catch a program called "Don't Lecture Me" and it really caught my attention for several reasons. First, the speakers were all notable leaders in Physics Education Research such as Joe Redish, David Hestenes, and Eric Mazur. (See this month's WebSights column.) These folks are among many who have devoted their energies to understanding how students learn physics and how teachers can design classroom instruction and interactions to best meet the needs of learners. Second, on this particular trip, I had just observed a teacher whose class was very teacher-centered as the teacher lectured most of the class period. As we discussed this later, she expressed concern that she had to cover the material and didn't feel that she could do it without lecturing.

  19. Don't Dump the Didactic Lecture; Fix It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Numerous articles have been published on the merits of active learning, and collectively they present a body of compelling evidence that these methods do enhance learning. In presenting arguments for active learning, it is often suggested that the traditional didactic lecture is more passive in nature and less effective as a teaching tool.…

  20. Module for Learning Integral Calculus with Maple: Lecturers' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awang, Tuan Salwani; Zakaria, Effandi

    2012-01-01

    Engineering technology students can attain a meaningful mathematics learning if they are allowed to actively participate in hands-on activities. However, the current dissemination of knowledge in the classroom still focuses on teacher-centered paradigm of teaching. A study to explore lecturers' views regarding a newly developed integral calculus…

  1. There is more to training than lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, N.E.; Bahrt, W.A.

    1991-02-01

    This presentation describes information that is useful in correlating on-the-job training with developing and delivering classroom training, which enhances the learning process. Greater emphasis is being placed on classroom training versus self-study in all facets of industry. The outcome is that classroom instruction is all-too-often delivered through direct lecture. This is probably the least effective method of providing quality training. Enhancements to the classroom learning environment are necessary--such as well-planned viewgraphs, flip charts, posters, mockups, videos, demonstration activities, an on-the-job training. Without this emphasis, all too often, classroom instruction is no more effective than self-study. Most classroom training lacks demonstration activities and/or on-the-job training interfaces. Remember what Confucius said: When I hear I forget, when I see I remember, when I do I understand.'' Therefore, it makes sense to involve students through demonstration activities and/or on-the-job training as an integral part of lesson design. We need to make a conscious effort to ensure trainees understand the instructions that are necessary to perform job functions. This requires, in many cases, a diversion from past practices. We must become innovative and involve the trainees in practical activities to avoid the dismal effects of the straight lecture format. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  2. Lecture-Capture Software and the Teaching of Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Eric C.

    2014-05-01

    Several companies now offer software that can record academic lectures and place them on password-protected course websites for future review by students. Using lecture-capture software offers several advantages for the instructor and the students, including: 1) The ability for students who miss class for legitimate reasons (e.g., participation in school-sanctioned extra-curricular activities, illness or family emergencies) to get lecture materials by logging into the class website. This provides these students with a more complete exposure to the material than simply copying a classmate's notes. 2) The instructor is able to direct students who miss class for legitimate reasons to the recorded lecture rather than needing to spend time going over the material with those students and that recap does not end up being rushed. 3) The ability to address course conflicts for graduating seniors by allowing them to take the lecture portion of the class via recorded lecture. 4) Students who desire more in-depth learning are able to go back to selected portions of previous lectures to review and reconsider a topic of discussion or to fill in vague sections of their notes. There are also potential disadvantages to the use of lecture-capture software, including: 1) decreased student attendance in class because they feel they can watch class later at a time of their own choosing, 2) additional time spent by the instructor dealing with the technology, and 3) problems with hardware or software during class time that prevents recording a given day's lecture. These problems can often be addressed or justified relatively easily. If problem 1 is of concern to an instructor it can be addressed by blocking online access to individual students who have a poor record of class attendance. In the case of problem 2, the extra time spent with the technology is often offset by a reduction in time answering questions from students who have missed class. Problem 3 does happen, but in the author

  3. The role of peer groups in male and female adolescents' task values and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Yli-Piipari, Sami; Jaakkola, Timo; Liukkonen, Jarmo; Kiuru, Noona; Watt, Anthony

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal study was to examine the role of peer groups and sex in adolescents' task values and physical activity. The participants were 330 Finnish Grade 6 students (173 girls, 157 boys), who responded to questionnaires that assessed physical education task values during the spring semester (Time 1). Students' physical activity was assessed one year later (Time 2). The results indicated that adolescent peer groups were moderately homogeneous in terms of task values toward physical education and physical activity. Girls' peer groups were more homogeneous than those of boys in regards to utility and attainment values. Furthermore, the results for both girls and boys showed that particularly intrinsic task value typical for the peer group predicted group members' physical activity. The findings highlight the important role of peer group membership as a determinant of future physical activity. PMID:21526593

  4. An Experiment on the Learning Effectiveness of Lectures and Recitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golub, E.; Cheng, S. L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a study comparing a combined system of lectures and problem sessions with a recitation class in engineering mechanics. No major differences were found in performance of students in either method. A significant difference in achievement was found with class size. The smaller the group the better the student performance." (Author/TS)

  5. Reciprocal Teaching of Lecture Comprehension Skills in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivey, Norman R.; Cuthbert, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the effects of a reciprocal teaching intervention designed to enhance the lecture comprehension skills of college students. Forty low-verbal ability students and 40 high-verbal ability students (as measured by SAT scores) were chosen for the study and randomly assigned to experimental or control groups. The experimental groups…

  6. Overcoming the Drawbacks of the Large Lecture Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geske, Joel

    1992-01-01

    Techniques developed to improve student participation and student evaluation in a large-group college course in advertising include role playing in talk-show-style discussions of controversial issues, breaks in lectures to play a trivia game, a three-minute writing assignment, teacher movement among students, and changes in testing policies and…

  7. Decisions, Decisions, Decisions: What Determines the Path Taken in Lectures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paterson, Judy; Thomas, Mike; Taylor, Steve

    2011-01-01

    A group of mathematicians and mathematics educators are collaborating in the fine-grained examination of selected "slices" of video recordings of lectures, drawing on Schoenfeld's Resources, Orientations and Goals framework of teaching-in-context. In the larger project, we are exploring ways in which this model can be extended to examine…

  8. Downloaded Lectures Have Been Shown to Produce Better Assessment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parslow, Graham R.

    2009-01-01

    With relevance to current students, the author has observed that when commuting by public transport, there is a near complete use of audio-visual devices by the "plugged-in" under 30 age group. New technology, new generation, and new allocations of time to work and study are combining to diminish lecture attendances. Some colleagues refuse to make…

  9. A Study of the Use of Twitter by Students for Lecture Engagement and Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiernan, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that student engagement with lectures, and participation in discussion and debate, greatly improve their learning and experience of University. The nature of some lectures means they can lack opportunities for interaction and active learning. For this reason it can be difficult for some students, especially students new to…

  10. Using Paper Presentation Breaks during Didactic Lectures Improves Learning of Physiology in Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghorbani, Ahmad; Ghazvini, Kiarash

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have emphasized the incorporation of active learning into classrooms to reinforce didactic lectures for physiology courses. This work aimed to determine if presenting classic papers during didactic lectures improves the learning of physiology among undergraduate students. Twenty-two students of health information technology were…

  11. An Interactive Lecture Notebook--Twelve Ways To Improve Students' Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stencel, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Describes a project known as the interactive lecture notebook in which students purchase an ordered copy of class notes in order to encourage better notetaking, save time and effort in lecture presentations, and involve students more actively in notetaking. Contains 16 references. (DDR)

  12. Managerial perceptions of mentor, lecturer practitioner and link tutor roles.

    PubMed

    Carnwell, Ros; Baker, Sally-Ann; Bellis, Mike; Murray, Ruth

    2007-11-01

    Educating pre-registration nurses in clinical practice is a global issue. Within different countries problems exist in educating and supervising students in clinical practice and various models of clinical education are employed. In Wales, United Kingdom, this responsibility is divided between mentors, lecturer practitioners and link tutors. This paper reports on the third phase of a three-phase study in Wales to explore differences between mentors, lecturer practitioners and link tutors, and how they work together to assist students to integrate theory and practice. Four focus group interviews of National Health Service managers and Higher Education managers (n=22) were conducted. Qualitative content analysis revealed four themes: role characteristics and competencies, role differences, role conflict, and future options. The findings suggest a theory-practice continuum along which mentors, lecturer practitioners and link tutors occupy different positions. The article explores these different positions and offers suggestions for future role development.

  13. Nominations sought for inaugural Gilbert F. White Lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Danica

    2012-04-01

    Nominations for the first Gilbert F. White Distinguished Lecture Award, sponsored by AGU's Natural Hazards Focus Group, are due 1 May. The lecture, established last year, will be given during the 2012 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, 3-7 December. The lecture is named for Gilbert F. White (1911-2006), an AGU Fellow who was internationally known for his significant contributions to natural hazards research. Some of White's most notable work involved the identification and classification of adjustment mechanisms for flooding in the United States, perceptions of natural hazards, and the importance of sound water management in contemporary society. White advocated, where feasible, adaptation to or accommodation of food hazards rather than the "structural" solutions (e.g., dams, levees, and foodwalls) that dominated policy in the early twentieth century

  14. A Lecturer's Optimal Time Allocation Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Gil S.; Spiegel, Uriel

    1996-01-01

    Lecturers are responsible for guiding their students outside the classroom. However, many students who can solve their problems independently often still seek lecturers' guidance, resulting in negative externalities. This paper examines the lecturer's attempts to minimize the negative effects of unnecessary guidance, focusing on the optimal time…

  15. Metaphor Use in Three UK University Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Graham; Littlemore, Jeannette; Koester, Almut

    2008-01-01

    It has been claimed in recent years that, on the one hand, metaphor occurs in UK university lectures in ways that are likely to confuse ESL learners (Littlemore 2001, 2003) and on the other hand that US lecturers use it in highly structured ways, particularly involving linked clusters, to help organize the lecture and indicate the opinions of the…

  16. Making the Continuing Medical Education Lecture Effective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, H. Liesel; Stoller, James K.; Hewson, Mariana G.; Longworth, David L.

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of responses from 1,221 participants in continuing medical education via lecture, and lecture enhanced with a computerized audience response system (ARS), indicated that more than 85% felt ARS facilitated teaching of clinical reasoning and facts and helped maintain their alertness. ARS-enhanced lectures received significantly higher…

  17. College Students' Perception of Lecturers Using Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamborini, Ron; Zillmann, Dolf

    1981-01-01

    Audio-taped lectures by male or female professors were produced in four versions: no humor; sexual humor; other-disparaging humor; and self-disparaging humor. Male and female students rated lecturers' intelligence and appeal. Intelligence ratings were unaffected by humor variations, but significant lecturer-student sex interactions were found on…

  18. Investigating Quality of Undergraduate Mathematics Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergsten, Christer

    2007-01-01

    The notion of quality in undergraduate mathematics lectures is examined by using theoretical notions and research results from the literature and empirical data from a case study on lecturing on limits of functions. A systemic triangular model is found to catch critical quality aspects of a mathematics lecture, consisting of mathematical…

  19. Legibility in the Lecture Hall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Albert A.; Thomason, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    Recommends black chalkboards, wet-washed before every lecture and advocates the use of Railroad Crayon chalk because its softness and larger size result in a wide high-intensity line. The resulting contrast improves the visibility of material written on chalkboards. (Source for the chalk is provided.) (JM)

  20. Teaching more by lecturing less.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jennifer K; Wood, William B

    2005-01-01

    We carried out an experiment to determine whether student learning gains in a large, traditionally taught, upper-division lecture course in developmental biology could be increased by partially changing to a more interactive classroom format. In two successive semesters, we presented the same course syllabus using different teaching styles: in fall 2003, the traditional lecture format; and in spring 2004, decreased lecturing and addition of student participation and cooperative problem solving during class time, including frequent in-class assessment of understanding. We used performance on pretests and posttests, and on homework problems to estimate and compare student learning gains between the two semesters. Our results indicated significantly higher learning gains and better conceptual understanding in the more interactive course. To assess reproducibility of these effects, we repeated the interactive course in spring 2005 with similar results. Our findings parallel results of similar teaching-style comparisons made in other disciplines. On the basis of this evidence, we propose a general model for teaching large biology courses that incorporates interactive engagement and cooperative work in place of some lecturing, while retaining course content by demanding greater student responsibility for learning outside of class.

  1. Lectures of Fermi liquid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, K.S.

    1993-07-01

    The Fermi liquid theory was first introduced by Landau in 1956 to provide a theoretical basis for the properties of strongly correlated Fermi systems. This theory has proven to be crucial for our understanding of a broad range of materials. These include liquid {sup 3}He, {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He mixtures, simple metals, heavy-fermions, and nuclear matter to name a few. In the high temperature superconductors questions have been raised regarding the applicability of Fermi liquid theory to the normal state behavior of these materials. I will not address this issue in these lectures. My focus will be to summarize the foundations of this theory and to explore the consequences. These lectures are in part a summary of the excellent review article by Baym and Pethick and the books by Pines and Nozieres and Baym and Pethick. They include as well a summary of some articles that I have authored and co-authored. In the main body of the lectures I will not make any additional references to the books or articles. In the absence of reading the original materials, my lectures should provide the essentials of a mini-course in Fermi liquid theory.

  2. Lectures of Fermi liquid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, K.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Fermi liquid theory was first introduced by Landau in 1956 to provide a theoretical basis for the properties of strongly correlated Fermi systems. This theory has proven to be crucial for our understanding of a broad range of materials. These include liquid [sup 3]He, [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He mixtures, simple metals, heavy-fermions, and nuclear matter to name a few. In the high temperature superconductors questions have been raised regarding the applicability of Fermi liquid theory to the normal state behavior of these materials. I will not address this issue in these lectures. My focus will be to summarize the foundations of this theory and to explore the consequences. These lectures are in part a summary of the excellent review article by Baym and Pethick and the books by Pines and Nozieres and Baym and Pethick. They include as well a summary of some articles that I have authored and co-authored. In the main body of the lectures I will not make any additional references to the books or articles. In the absence of reading the original materials, my lectures should provide the essentials of a mini-course in Fermi liquid theory.

  3. Teaching More by Lecturing Less

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jennifer K.; Wood, William B.

    2005-01-01

    We carried out an experiment to determine whether student learning gains in a large, traditionally taught, upper-division lecture course in developmental biology could be increased by partially changing to a more interactive classroom format. In two successive semesters, we presented the same course syllabus using different teaching styles: in…

  4. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  5. Independent and Small Group Activities for Social Studies in the Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Barbara; And Others

    A teachers' guide for social studies, this manual stresses geography curriculum and activities for the primary grades. It is suggested that a teacher work with one group while the other children work individually. Children first work independently for a team, and then progress to less structured small group activities. Positive reinforcement by…

  6. The Effect of Science Activities on Concept Acquisition of Age 5-6 Children Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogru, Mustafa; Seker, Fatih

    2012-01-01

    Present research aims to determine the effect of science activities on concept development of preschool period age 5-6 children groups. Parallel to research objective, qualitative research pattern has been the selected method. Study group comprises of collectively 48 children from 5-6 age group attending to a private education institution in city…

  7. Styles of Lecturing: A Study and Its Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, George; Bakhtar, Mali

    1988-01-01

    Investigation of 258 Great Britain college faculty's teaching method preferences indicated that most of the subjects preferred the lecture method, with five different types of lecture identified: oral lecturing; visual information giving; exemplary lecturing; eclectic lecturing; and amorphous talking. Lecturing styles were closely associated with…

  8. Similar barriers and facilitators to physical activity across different clinical groups experiencing lower limb spasticity.

    PubMed

    Hundza, Sandra; Quartly, Caroline; Kim, Jasmine M; Dunnett, James; Dobrinsky, Jill; Loots, Iris; Choy, Kim; Chow, Brayley; Hampshire, Alexis; Temple, Viviene A

    2016-07-01

    Purpose Given the importance of physical activity in maintaining health and wellness, an improved understanding of physical activity patterns across different clinical populations is required. This study examines the facilitators for, and barriers to, participation in physical activity across multiple contexts for three clinical groups with chronic lower limb spasticity (individuals with stroke, multiple sclerosis and incomplete spinal cord injury). Method This cross-sectional study employed quantitative measures for spasticity, ankle range of motion, pain, falls, cognition, mobility, and physical activity as well as qualitative semi-structured interviews. Results There were similar impairments in body functions and structures and limitations in activities across the clinical groups. These impairments and limitations negatively impacted participation in physical activity, which was low. Environmental and personal factors exacerbated or mitigated the limiting effects of body functions and structures and activities on physical activity in many areas of life. Conclusions In this population, participation in physical activity includes activities such as housework which are different than what is typically considered as physical activity. Further, the presence of similar barriers and facilitators across the groups suggests that support and services to promote valued forms of physical activity could be organised and delivered based on limitations in mobility and functioning rather than clinical diagnosis. Implications for rehabilitation Physical activity is of utmost importance in maintaining health and wellness in clinical populations. This research highlights the desired and actual physical activity for these populations can look different than what may traditionally be considered as physical activity (e.g. housework is not typically considered participation physical activity). Therefore, rehabilitation interventions need to be directly designed to enhance clients

  9. Group cognitive behavioural therapy and group recreational activity for adults with autism spectrum disorders: A preliminary randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This preliminary randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive behavioural therapy and recreational activity. Both interventions comprised 36 weekly 3-h sessions led by two therapists in groups of 6–8 patients. A total of 68 psychiatric patients with autism spectrum disorders participated in the study. Outcome measures were Quality of Life Inventory, Sense of Coherence Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and an exploratory analysis on measures of psychiatric health. Participants in both treatment conditions reported an increased quality of life at post-treatment (d = 0.39, p < 0.001), with no difference between interventions. No amelioration of psychiatric symptoms was observed. The dropout rate was lower with cognitive behavioural therapy than with recreational activity, and participants in cognitive behavioural therapy rated themselves as more generally improved, as well as more improved regarding expression of needs and understanding of difficulties. Both interventions appear to be promising treatment options for adults with autism spectrum disorder. The interventions’ similar efficacy may be due to the common elements, structure and group setting. Cognitive behavioural therapy may be additionally beneficial in terms of increasing specific skills and minimizing dropout. PMID:24089423

  10. Group cognitive behavioural therapy and group recreational activity for adults with autism spectrum disorders: a preliminary randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hesselmark, Eva; Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-08-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This preliminary randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive behavioural therapy and recreational activity. Both interventions comprised 36 weekly 3-h sessions led by two therapists in groups of 6-8 patients. A total of 68 psychiatric patients with autism spectrum disorders participated in the study. Outcome measures were Quality of Life Inventory, Sense of Coherence Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and an exploratory analysis on measures of psychiatric health. Participants in both treatment conditions reported an increased quality of life at post-treatment (d = 0.39, p < 0.001), with no difference between interventions. No amelioration of psychiatric symptoms was observed. The dropout rate was lower with cognitive behavioural therapy than with recreational activity, and participants in cognitive behavioural therapy rated themselves as more generally improved, as well as more improved regarding expression of needs and understanding of difficulties. Both interventions appear to be promising treatment options for adults with autism spectrum disorder. The interventions' similar efficacy may be due to the common elements, structure and group setting. Cognitive behavioural therapy may be additionally beneficial in terms of increasing specific skills and minimizing dropout.

  11. 402nd Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Burr

    2005-03-16

    "Genetically Modified Plants: What's the Fuss?" Burr explains that the risks presented by conventional plant improvement and gene-transfer technology have been reviewed by the National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Food & Drug Administration. These groups have concluded that gene-transfer technology poses no risk or danger above that present in conventional plant breeding.

  12. 402nd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Ben Burr

    2016-07-12

    "Genetically Modified Plants: What's the Fuss?" Burr explains that the risks presented by conventional plant improvement and gene-transfer technology have been reviewed by the National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Food & Drug Administration. These groups have concluded that gene-transfer technology poses no risk or danger above that present in conventional plant breeding.

  13. 419th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Richard Hahn

    2016-07-12

    The Last 20 Years in Neutrino Science." In this talk, Hahn reviews highlights of the last 20 years in neutrino science and discusses a few ideas for new precision neutrino experiments, some of which will involve collaborative efforts of his group in the Chemistry Department and colleagues in the Physics Department.

  14. Group II p21-activated kinases as therapeutic targets in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yang-Guang; Ning, Ke; Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    P21-activated kinases (PAKs) are central players in various oncogenic signaling pathways. The six PAK family members are classified into group I (PAK1-3) and group II (PAK4-6). Focus is currently shifting from group I PAKs to group II PAKs. Group II PAKs play important roles in many fundamental cellular processes, some of which have particular significance in the development and progression of cancer. Because of their important functions, group II PAKs have become popular potential drug target candidates. However, few group II PAKs inhibitors have been reported, and most do not exhibit satisfactory kinase selectivity and “drug-like” properties. Isoform- and kinase-selective PAK inhibitors remain to be developed. This review describes the biological activities of group II PAKs, the importance of group II PAKs in the development and progression of gastrointestinal cancer, and small-molecule inhibitors of group II PAKs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26811660

  15. Introducing Backstage--A Digital Backchannel for Large Class Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Alexander; Gehlen-Baum, Vera; Bry, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to report on the conception of a novel digital backchannel, Backstage, dedicated to large classes, aiming at empowering not only the audience but also the speaker, at promoting the awareness of both audience and speaker, and at promoting an active participation of students in the lecture. In learning settings with a large…

  16. How Much Do Our Students Learn by Attending Lectures?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sistek, Vladimir

    Considerations that affect the type of teaching method employed in undergraduate studies and medical schools are addressed, with attention to the current emphasis on the lecture method and alternative educational experiences that require students to be active, independent learners and problem solvers. Perceived academic priorities and the…

  17. Extending Student Discussions beyond Lecture Room Walls via Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahati, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    When face-to-face lecture sessions and classroom seminars are conducted during hours and days that are not convenient to students, the level of student active engagement and participation is considerably reduced. In this situation, the use of Social Networking Sites can be an alternative to get students much more engaged by taking the…

  18. The physical activity profiles of South Asian ethnic groups in England

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Prachi; Townsend, Nick; Shaw, Alison; Foster, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Background To identify what types of activity contribute to overall physical activity in South Asian ethnic groups and how these vary according to sex and age. We used the White British ethnic group as a comparison. Methods Self-reported physical activity was measured in the Health Survey for England 1999 and 2004, a nationally representative, cross-sectional survey that boosted ethnic minority samples in these years. We merged the two survey years and analysed data from 19 476 adults. The proportions of total physical activity achieved through walking, housework, sports and DIY activity were calculated. We stratified by sex and age group and used analysis of variances to examine differences between ethnic groups, adjusted for the socioeconomic status. Results There was a significant difference between ethnic groups for the contributions of all physical activity domains for those aged below 55 years, with the exception of walking. In women aged 16–34 years, there was no significant difference in the contribution of walking to total physical activity (p=0.38). In the 35–54 age group, Bangladeshi males have the highest proportion of total activity from walking (30%). In those aged over 55 years, the proportion of activity from sports was the lowest in all South Asian ethnic groups for both sexes. Conclusions UK South Asians are more active in some ways that differ, by age and sex, from White British, but are similarly active in other ways. These results can be used to develop targeted population level interventions for increasing physical activity levels in adult UK South Asian populations. PMID:26677257

  19. Chemical modification and structure-activity relationships of pyripyropenes. 1. Modification at the four hydroxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Obata, R; Sunazuka, T; Li, Z; Tian, Z; Harigaya, Y; Tabata, N; Tomoda, H; Omura, S

    1996-11-01

    Four hydroxyl groups of pyripyropenes have been modified and evaluated for their ability to inhibit microsomal acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in vitro and to lower cholesterol absorption in vivo in a cholesterol-fed hamster. 7-O-n-Valeryl derivative (8c) improved the in vitro ACAT inhibitory activity (IC50 = 13 nM) about 7 times better than pyripyropene A. Introduction of methanesulfonyl group at 11-hydroxyl group (17a) increased both in vitro activity (IC50 = 19 nM) and in vivo efficacy (ED50 = 10 mg/kg). PMID:8982343

  20. Kindergarten Quantum Mechanics: Lecture Notes

    SciTech Connect

    Coecke, Bob

    2006-01-04

    These lecture notes survey some joint work with Samson Abramsky as it was presented by me at several conferences in the summer of 2005. It concerns 'doing quantum mechanics using only pictures of lines, squares, triangles and diamonds'. This picture calculus can be seen as a very substantial extension of Dirac's notation, and has a purely algebraic counterpart in terms of so-called Strongly Compact Closed Categories (introduced by Abramsky and I which subsumes my Logic of Entanglement. For a survey on the 'what', the 'why' and the 'hows' I refer to a previous set of lecture notes. In a last section we provide some pointers to the body of technical literature on the subject.

  1. Measuring enjoyment of physical activity in older adults: invariance of the physical activity enjoyment scale (paces) across groups and time

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale (PACES) in a sample of older adults. Participants within two different exercise groups were assessed at two time points, 6 months apart. Group and longitudinal invariance was established for a novel, 8-item version of the PACES. The shortened, psychometrically sound measure provides researchers and practitioners an expedited and reliable instrument for assessing the enjoyment of physical activity. PMID:21951520

  2. Engagement in Digital Lecture Halls: A Study of Student Course Engagement and Mobile Device Use during Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witecki, Gwendolyn; Nonnecke, Blair

    2015-01-01

    Universities have experienced increases in technology ownership and usage amongst students entering undergraduate programs. Almost all students report owning a mobile phone and many students view laptops and tablets as educational tools, though they also report using them for nonacademic activities during lectures. We explored the relationship…

  3. TASI 2006 Lectures on Leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab /UC, Irvine

    2007-03-01

    The origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter of the Universe has been one of the great challenges in particle physics and cosmology. Leptogenesis as a mechanism for generating the cosmological baryon asymmetry of the Universe has gained significant interests ever since the advent of the evidence of non-zero neutrino masses. In these lectures presented at TASI 2006, I review various realizations of leptogenesis and allude to recent developments in this subject.

  4. Empowering the crowd: faculty discourse strategies for facilitating student reasoning in large lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaree, Dedra

    2012-02-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) has restructured its introductory calculus-based sequence including reformed curriculum modeled after the Interactive Science Learning Environment (ISLE). ISLE is driven by an experimental cycle roughly summarized as: observe phenomena, find patterns and devise explanations, test explanations, develop a model, apply the model to new observations. In implementing ISLE at OSU we have chosen to focus on student scientific reasoning, specifically student ability to develop and test models, make explicit judgments on how to approach open-ended tasks, and take an authoritative role in knowledge development. In order to achieve these goals, the lecture course heavily utilizes social engagement. During large-lecture group work, emphasis is placed on facilitating student discourse about issues such as what systems to choose or how to define an open-ended problem. Instructional strategies are aimed at building off the group discourse to create a full-class community where knowledge is developed through collaboration with peers. We are achieving these goals along with an increase in measured student conceptual knowledge and traditional problem solving abilities, and no loss of content coverage. It is an ongoing effort to understand ``best'' instructional strategies and to facilitate new faculty when they teach the curriculum. Our research has focused on understanding how to facilitate activities that promote this form of discourse. We have quantitative analysis of engagement based on video data, qualitative analysis of dialogue from audio data, classroom observations by an external researcher, and survey data. In this session we share a subset of what we have learned about how to engage students in scientific reasoning discourse during large lecture, both at the group-work and full-class level.

  5. Role of the phenolic hydroxyl group in the biological activities of simplified analogue of aplysiatoxin with antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Yanagita, Ryo C; Kamachi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Keisuke; Murakami, Akira; Nakagawa, Yu; Tokuda, Harukuni; Nagai, Hiroshi; Irie, Kazuhiro

    2010-10-15

    The 18-deoxy derivative (3) of a simplified analogue (1) of aplysiatoxin with antiproliferative activity was synthesized to examine the role of the phenolic hydroxyl group at position 18 in the biological activities of 1. Compound 3 as well as 1 showed significant affinity for protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), and the antiproliferative activity of 3 was slightly higher than that of 1. However, the anti-tumor-promoting activity of 3 was less than that of 1 in vitro, suggesting that the phenolic hydroxyl group of 1 is necessary for the anti-tumor-promoting activity but not for the binding of PKCδ and antiproliferative activity. Moreover, PKC isozyme selectivity of 3 was similar to that of 1, suggesting non-PKC receptors for these compounds to play some roles in the anti-tumor-promoting activity of 1.

  6. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups

    PubMed Central

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  7. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-04-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in baryons and sketches a picture of baryons as bound-states with Borromean character. Planned experiments are capable of validating the perspectives outlined in these lectures.

  8. Comparative evaluation of active learning and the traditional lectures in physiology: a case study of 200 level medical laboratory students of Imo State Unversity, Owerri.

    PubMed

    Anyaehie, U S B; Nwobodo, Ed; Njoku, C J; Inah, G A

    2007-01-01

    Currently, understanding of physiology and disease patterns is undergoing a fundamental paradigm shift with attendant shift in education of health professionals worldwide towards active learning to encourage exploration of connections and their relationships. We introduced problem-based learning to physiology teaching of medial laboratory students to confirm worldwide reports that active learning environments offer better learning opportunities over the traditional methods which is the predominant teaching method in Nigerian universities. Our findings indicate that problem-based learning increases students' attendance/participation in classes and performance in examination. We recommend the integration of active learning into physiology curriculum of Nigerian Universities.

  9. Active Learning in the Classroom: The Use of Group Role Plays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitzerow, Phyllis

    1990-01-01

    Describes group role-playing activities that have been used to teach about education, criminology, and sex roles. Suggests that role play helps students to absorb and retain many of the insights about the issues involved. (DB)

  10. Carboxylate groups play a major role in antitumor activity of Ganoderma applanatum polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaobo; Zhao, Chen; Pan, Wei; Wang, Jinping; Wang, Weijun

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the structure difference between the polysaccharides isolated from fruit bodies (FGAP) and submerged fermentation system (SGAP) of Ganoderma applanatum was investigated by means of GPC, HPLC and IR, respectively. And their antitumor activities were evaluated against Sarcoma 180 in vivo. The results showed that FGAP and SGAP were typical polysaccharides with different molecular weights, monosaccharide components, and functional groups. Closely related to the distinct structures, FGAP exhibited a better antitumor activity than SGAP. Moreover, since FGAP contained carboxylate groups rather than SGAP, such groups were chemically introduced into SGAP (CSGAP) by carboxymethylation in order to identify their contribution to antitumor activity. The results demonstrated that the inhibition of CSGAP against Sarcoma 180 in vivo was significantly enhanced by comparison to the native SGAP and even higher than that of FGAP, suggesting that the carboxylate groups played a major role in antitumor activity of G. applanatum polysaccharide.

  11. The Relationship between Students' Small Group Activities, Time Spent on Self-Study, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamp, Rachelle J. A.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; van Berkel, Henk J. M.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the contributions students make to the problem-based tutorial group process as observed by their peers, self-study time and achievement. To that end, the Maastricht Peer Activity Rating Scale was administered to students participating in Problem-Based Learning tutorial groups.…

  12. DHPG Activation of Group 1 mGluRs in BLA Enhances Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudy, Jerry W.; Matus-Amat, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors are known to play an important role in both synaptic plasticity and memory. We show that activating these receptors prior to fear conditioning by infusing the group 1 mGluR agonist, (R.S.)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), into the basolateral region of the amygdala (BLA) of adult Sprague-Dawley rats…

  13. Need for Cognition and Active Information Search in Small Student Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curseu, Petru Lucian

    2011-01-01

    In a sample of 213 students organized in 44 groups this study tests the impact of need for cognition on active information search by using a multilevel analysis. The results show that group members with high need for cognition seek more advice in task related issues than those with low need for cognition and this pattern of information exchange is…

  14. 76 FR 72997 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... for additional language. The NPRM was published on January 12, 2011 (76 FR 2200), and the final rule... announcement of working group activities and status reports of December 7, 2010 (75 FR 76070). The 44th full..., 2006 (71 FR 50275), and was open for comment until October 23, 2006. The working group agreed...

  15. Student Active Learning Methods in Physical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, Robert J.; Kovac, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    We describe two strategies for implementing active learning in physical chemistry. One involves supplementing a traditional lecture course with heavily computer-based active-learning exercises carried out by cooperative groups in a department computer lab. The other uses cooperative learning almost exclusively, supplemented by occasional mini-lectures. Both approaches seemed to result in better student learning and a more positive attitude toward the subject. On the basis of our respective experiences using active learning techniques, we discuss some of the strengths of these techniques and some of the challenges we encountered using the active-learning approach in teaching physical chemistry.

  16. StatsCasts: screencasts for complementing lectures in statistics classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Peter K.; McDonald, Christine; Loch, Birgit

    2015-05-01

    Students who are studying introductory statistics units but are enrolled in non-statistics majors often struggle with the content, and do not stay engaged. Support structures are in place at many Australian universities to help these students. Most of these are face-to-face support centres that the students can visit during opening hours. To provide additional assistance to these students any time, and from anywhere, online media are increasingly used by students - either provided by support centres, or sought independently by students. Little research has been undertaken on the effectiveness of such resources to support student learning. This paper investigates whether students will embrace StatsCasts - short screen-capture videos on key statistical topics that students have struggled with in the past, with narrator explanation provided by the lecturer - as part of their learning strategy and if they will actively engage with the videos. Students enrolled in a large first-year statistics class at an Australian university who had been provided with StatsCasts responded to a survey at the end of the semester. Volunteering students also participated in a focus group to probe deeper into students' perceptions of and motivations for watching the videos. Analysis of the data shows that students do actively engage with the StatsCasts and they appear to become an important component of their study and revision strategy.

  17. Group cohesion and between session homework activities predict self-reported cognitive-behavioral skill use amongst participants of SMART Recovery groups.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Peter J; Deane, Frank P; Baker, Amanda L

    2015-04-01

    SMART Recovery groups are cognitive-behaviorally oriented mutual support groups for individuals with addictions. The aim of the study was to assess the extent to which the quality of group facilitation, group cohesion and the use of between session homework activities contribute to self-rated use of cognitive-behavioral skills amongst group participants. Participants attending SMART Recovery groups in Australia completed a cross sectional survey (N=124). The survey included measures of cognitive and behavioral skill utilization, group cohesion, quality of group facilitation and a rating of how frequently participants leave group meetings with an achievable between session homework plan. On average, participants had been attending SMART Recovery meetings for 9 months. Participants were most likely to attend SMART Recovery for problematic alcohol use. Regression analyses indicated that group cohesion significantly predicted use of cognitive restructuring, but that only provision of homework at the end of each group session predicted self-reported behavioral activation. Both group cohesion and leaving a group with an achievable homework plan predicted participant use of cognitive behavioral skills. The concrete actions associated with homework activities may facilitate behavioral activation. There is a need for longitudinal research to examine the relationship between the utilization of cognitive and behavioral skills and participant outcomes (e.g. substance use, mental health) for people attending SMART Recovery groups. PMID:25535099

  18. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (Ramp): Training Persons with Dementia to Serve as Group Activity Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Cameron J.; Skrajner, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Design and Methods: Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders'…

  19. Upper Elementary Boys' Participation during Group Singing Activities in Single-Sex and Coeducational Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzy, Zadda M.

    2010-01-01

    As boys in the upper elementary grades become increasingly influenced by peer pressure, many are less likely to participate in singing activities because singing is considered a "feminine" activity. The purpose of this research was to explore if there was an effect on upper elementary boys' level of participation during group singing activities…

  20. Taking It to the Classroom: Number Board Games as a Small Group Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramani, Geetha B.; Siegler, Robert S.; Hitti, Aline

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether a theoretically based number board game could be translated into a practical classroom activity that improves Head Start children's numerical knowledge. Playing the number board game as a small group learning activity promoted low-income children's number line estimation, magnitude comparison, numeral identification, and…

  1. What Do We Want Small Group Activities For? Voices from EFL Teachers in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kato, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the fundamental issue of why small group activities are utilized in the language learning classroom. Although these activities have gained popularity in the field of Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL), supported by a sound theoretical base, few studies have so far examined the reasons why language teachers are…

  2. 75 FR 49913 - Active Duty Service Determinations For Civilian or Contractual Groups

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Active Duty Service Determinations For Civilian or Contractual Groups SUMMARY: On... at Then `American Camp,' Now Named `Burma Camp,' Ghana' '' shall not be considered ``active...

  3. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  4. ACTIVITY IN GALACTIC NUCLEI OF COMPACT GROUP GALAXIES IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Jubee; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Lee, Gwang-Ho; Hwang, Ho Seong; Lee, Jong Chul E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-07-10

    We study the nuclear activity of galaxies in local compact groups. We use a spectroscopic sample of 238 galaxies in 58 compact groups from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7 to estimate the fraction of active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxies in compact groups, and to compare it with those in cluster and field regions. We use emission-line ratio diagrams to identify AGN host galaxies and find that the AGN fraction of compact group galaxies is 17%-42% depending on the AGN classification method. The AGN fraction in compact groups is not the highest among the galaxy environments. This trend remains even if we use several subsamples segregated by galaxy morphology and optical luminosity. The AGN fraction for early-type galaxies decreases with increasing galaxy number density, but the fraction for late-type galaxies changes little. We find no mid-infrared detected AGN host galaxies in our sample of compact groups using Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer data. These results suggest that the nuclear activity of compact group galaxies (mostly early types) is not strong because of lack of gas supply even though they may experience frequent galaxy-galaxy interactions and mergers that could trigger nuclear activity.

  5. The influence of sensor orientation on activity-based rate responsive pacing. Sensor Orientation Study Group.

    PubMed

    Theres, H; Philippon, F; Melzer, C; Combs, W; Prest-Berg, K

    1998-11-01

    Piezoelectric activity-based rate responsive pacemakers are commonly implanted with the sensor facing inward. This study was conducted to assess the safe and effective rate response of an activity-based rate responsive pacemaker implanted with the sensor facing outward. A comparison were made to a previously studied patient group with sensor facing inward. Patient and pacemaker data was collected at predischarge and 2-month follow-up. Two-minute hall walks in conjunction with programmer-assisted rate response assessment were utilized to standardize initial rate response parameter settings for both patient groups. At 2-month follow-up, sensor rate response to a stage 3 limited CAEP protocol was recorded. Adequate sensor rate response was achieved for both patient groups. No difference was noted in reported patient complications for both groups. A statistically significant difference in programmed rate response curve setting and activity threshold for the two groups was noted at 2-month follow-up. Adequate sensor rate response was achieved for a patient population implanted with an activity-based rate responsive pacemaker with sensor facing outward. In this orientation, one higher rate response curve setting and an activity threshold one value more sensitive were required on average when compared to the normal sensor orientation group. PMID:9826862

  6. [Cellulase and xylanase activities of Fusarium Lk:Fr. genus fungi of different trophic groups].

    PubMed

    Kurchenko, I M; Sokolova, O V; Zhdanova, N M; Iarynchyn, A M; Iovenko, O M

    2008-01-01

    A comparative analysis of cellulase and xylanase activities of 26 fungal strains of phytopathogenic, saprophytic and endophytic Fusarium species has been realized using the qualitative reactions. The rare of their linear growth on the media with carboxymethyl cellulose or xylane has been studied. It was shown that the fungi of genus Fusarium belonging to different trophic groups possessed low activities of investigated enzymes as a whole, but in endophytic strains their levels were lower than in phytopathogenic ones. At the same time the distinct strain dependence of cellulase and xylanase activities was fixed in the fungi of different trophic groups. As far as the cellulase and xylanase activities in phytopathogenic isolates varied from complete absence to high levels, and since the activity maximum for each of the investigated strains was observed in different growth terms the conclusion was made that the cellulase and xylanase activities could not be considered as possible markers of the fungal isolate pathogenicity on the strain level.

  7. The Nobel Prize Economics Lectures as a Teaching Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahka, William J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposes using some of the 26 Nobel Prize lectures as teaching tools in economics courses. Notes lectures are reprinted in economic journals. Lists titles of lectures from 1969 to 1988; identifies level of difficulty; and categorizes the lectures by subject field. Outlines George Stigler's 1982 Nobel lecture and gives suggestions for teaching. (NL)

  8. Mutualistic Benefits Generate an Unequal Distribution of Risky Activities Among Unrelated Group Members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukuk, Penelope F.; Ward, Seamus A.; Jozwiak, Amy

    Recent studies provide a new challenge to the adequacy of theories concerning the evolution of cooperation among nonrelatives: some individuals perform high-risk activities while others do not. We examined a communal hymenopteran species, Lasioglossum(Chilalictus)hemichalceum, to determine why group members engaged in demonstrably risky activities (foraging) tolerate the selfish behavior (remaining in the nest) of unrelated nestmates. Experimental removal of adult females indicated that their presence is required for the protection of brood from ant predators. Nonforagers ensure the continued presence of adults in the nest if the risk-taking foragers die, thereby safeguarding the survival of forager offspring. This results in an unequal distribution of risky activities within social groups in which avoidance of risky activities by some group members is ultimately beneficial to risk takers.

  9. Audio-Tutorial Versus Conventional Lecture-Laboratory Instruction in a University Animal Biology Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowsey, Robert E.

    The purpose of this study was to analyze two methods of instruction used in an animal biology course. One group of students, the experimental group, was taught using an audio-tutorial program, and another group, the control group, was taught using the conventional lecture-laboratory method. Pretest and posttest data were collected from achievement…

  10. Lecture Notes on Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevski, P S

    2010-06-28

    The Lecture Notes are primarily based on a sequence of lectures given by the author while been a Fulbright scholar at 'St. Kliment Ohridski' University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria during the winter semester of 2009-2010 academic year. The notes are somewhat expanded version of the actual one semester class he taught there. The material covered is slightly modified and adapted version of similar topics covered in the author's monograph 'Multilevel Block-Factorization Preconditioners' published in 2008 by Springer. The author tried to keep the notes as self-contained as possible. That is why the lecture notes begin with some basic introductory matrix-vector linear algebra, numerical PDEs (finite element) facts emphasizing the relations between functions in finite dimensional spaces and their coefficient vectors and respective norms. Then, some additional facts on the implementation of finite elements based on relation tables using the popular compressed sparse row (CSR) format are given. Also, typical condition number estimates of stiffness and mass matrices, the global matrix assembly from local element matrices are given as well. Finally, some basic introductory facts about stationary iterative methods, such as Gauss-Seidel and its symmetrized version are presented. The introductory material ends up with the smoothing property of the classical iterative methods and the main definition of two-grid iterative methods. From here on, the second part of the notes begins which deals with the various aspects of the principal TG and the numerous versions of the MG cycles. At the end, in part III, we briefly introduce algebraic versions of MG referred to as AMG, focusing on classes of AMG specialized for finite element matrices.

  11. Henry Norris Russell's Toronto Lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devorkin, D. H.

    1996-12-01

    In February 1924, at the invitation of C. A. Chant, Russell presented a set of 14 public lectures on the state of astronomy and astrophysics. Designed to be inspirational, they also reveal Russell's contemporary views on the state of astrophysics as well as his sense of proper practice in astronomy. During his visit, Russell was interviewed by local reporters who asked his opinion about building a large observatory, one of Chant's major projects. What Russell had to say about such ventures did not please Chant one bit.

  12. Issues in Lecturing in a Second Language: Lecturer's Behaviour and Students' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lindsay

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how Hong Kong Chinese engineering students with low English language proficiency manage to cope with their lectures given in English. An ethnographic case study approach was used with multiple sources of data triangulated to provide a picture of the lecture event from both the students' and the lecturer's perspectives. One of…

  13. Beyond Lecture Capture: What Teaching Staff Want from Web-Based Lecture Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germany, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    For the past decade, the primary use of recordings in higher education has been to make live lectures available to students for review (lecture capture). However, with the rise of podcasting and the increased focus on interaction as a means to engage students, current web-based lecture technologies (WBLT) are capable of much more than simply…

  14. Online Lecture Recordings and Lecture Attendance: Investigating Student Preferences in a Large First Year Psychology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Alexandra; Raju, Sadhana; Sharma, Manjula D.

    2016-01-01

    While blended learning has been around for some time, the interplay between lecture recordings, lecture attendance and grades needs further examination particularly for large cohorts of over 1,000 students in 500 seat lecture theatres. This paper reports on such an investigation with a cohort of 1,450 first year psychology students' who indicated…

  15. Egyptian Middle School Science Teachers' Attitudes toward a Lecture Method, Self-Concept, and Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harty, Harold; Salama, Galal

    1985-01-01

    Investigated attitudes toward lectures, self-concept, and locus of control of Egyptian middle school teachers with (N=40) and without (N=40) professional educational training. A set of more desirable attitudes toward lectures, higher self-concept, and greater internal locus of control were found in the group with professional training. (DH)

  16. Effects of Guided Inquiry versus Lecture Instruction on Final Grade Distribution in a One-Semester Organic and Biochemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Colleen J.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive guided-inquiry approach was used in a combined organic and biochemistry course for prenursing and predietetics students rather than lecture. To assess its effectiveness, exam grades and final course grades of students in three instructional techniques were compared. The three groups were the following: (i) lecture only, (ii)…

  17. The HyperSkript Authoring Environment--An Integrated Approach for Producing, Maintaining, and Using Multimedia Lecture Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennecke, Andreas; Selke, Harald

    Based on a technical infrastructure that supports face-to-face university teaching, an environment that enables small groups of lecturers to develop and maintain lecture material cooperatively was developed. In order to allow for a flexible use, only a few formal workshops are imposed on the users while cooperation is supported by easy-to-use…

  18. Predicted group II intron lineages E and F comprise catalytically active ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Vivien; Pirakitikulr, Nathan; Zhou, Katherine Ismei; Chillón, Isabel; Luo, Jerome; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2013-09-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing, retrotransposable ribozymes that contribute to gene expression and evolution in most organisms. The ongoing identification of new group II introns and recent bioinformatic analyses have suggested that there are novel lineages, which include the group IIE and IIF introns. Because the function and biochemical activity of group IIE and IIF introns have never been experimentally tested and because these introns appear to have features that distinguish them from other introns, we set out to determine if they were indeed self-splicing, catalytically active RNA molecules. To this end, we transcribed and studied a set of diverse group IIE and IIF introns, quantitatively characterizing their in vitro self-splicing reactivity, ionic requirements, and reaction products. In addition, we used mutational analysis to determine the relative role of the EBS-IBS 1 and 2 recognition elements during splicing by these introns. We show that group IIE and IIF introns are indeed distinct active intron families, with different reactivities and structures. We show that the group IIE introns self-splice exclusively through the hydrolytic pathway, while group IIF introns can also catalyze transesterifications. Intriguingly, we observe one group IIF intron that forms circular intron. Finally, despite an apparent EBS2-IBS2 duplex in the sequences of these introns, we find that this interaction plays no role during self-splicing in vitro. It is now clear that the group IIE and IIF introns are functional ribozymes, with distinctive properties that may be useful for biotechnological applications, and which may contribute to the biology of host organisms.

  19. Effect of cardiopulmonary C fibre activation on the firing activity of ventral respiratory group neurones in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C G; Bonham, A C

    1997-01-01

    1. Cardiopulmonary C fibre receptor stimulation elicits apnoea and rapid shallow breathing, but the effects on the firing activity of central respiratory neurones are not well understood. This study examined the responses of ventral respiratory group neurones: decrementing expiratory (Edec), augmenting expiratory (Eaug), and inspiratory (I) neurones during cardiopulmonary C fibre receptor-evoked apnoea and rapid shallow breathing. 2. Extracellular neuronal activity, phrenic nerve activity and arterial pressure were recorded in urethane-anaesthetized rats. Cardiopulmonary C fibre receptors were stimulated by right atrial injections of phenylbiguanide. Neurones were tested for antidromic activation from the contra- and ipsilateral ventral respiratory group (VRG), spinal cord and cervical vagus nerve. 3. Edec neurones discharged tonically during cardiopulmonary C fibre-evoked apnoea and rapid shallow breathing, displaying increased burst durations, number of impulses per burst, and mean impulse frequencies. Edec neurones recovered either with the phrenic nerve activity (25 s) or much later (3 min). 4. By contrast, the firing activity of Eaug and most I neurones was decreased, featuring decreased burst durations and number of impulses per burst and increased interburst intervals. Eaug activity recovered in approximately 3 min and inspiratory activity in approximately 1 min. 5. The results indicate that cardiopulmonary C fibre receptor stimulation causes tonic firing of Edec neurones and decreases in Eaug and I neuronal activity coincident with apnoea or rapid shallow breathing. PMID:9365917

  20. [Dr. Michiharu Matsuoka, founder of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto University, and his achievements. Part 4: Prof. M. Matsuoka's lecture to medical and civic communities].

    PubMed

    Hirotani, Hayato

    2010-03-01

    Dr. M. Matsuoka gave many lectures to physicians at the Postdoctoral Course Lectures sponsored by the Kyoto Eisei Kensasho (Kyoto Bacterial and Biochemical Laboratory) run by the Kyoto Medical Association, and the Postdoctoral Course Lectures of the Kyoto Medical School, Kyoto Imperial University. He was also invited to give lectures at several regional medical associations. He also was a speaker at the Kyoto Imperial University Extension course and he lectured at the Enryakuji Temple on Mt. Hiei, sponsored by a newspaper company. It is remarkable that these activities were carried out in addition to his other notable academic work previously reported.

  1. Physical Activity and Depressive Symptoms in Four Ethnic Groups of Midlife Women

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Ham, Ok Kyung; Chee, Eunice; Chee, Wonshik

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the associations between physical activity and depression and the multiple contextual factors influencing these associations in four major ethnic-groups of midlife women in the U.S. This was a secondary analysis of the data from 542 midlife women. The instruments included questions on background characteristics and health and menopausal status; the Depression Index for Midlife Women; and the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey. The data were analyzed using chi-square tests, the ANOVA, twoway ANOVA, correlation analyses, and hierarchical multiple regression analyses. The women's depressive symptoms were negatively correlated with active living and sports/exercise physical activities whereas they were positively correlated with occupational physical activities (p < .01). Family income was the strongest predictor of their depressive symptoms. Increasing physical activity may improve midlife women's depressive symptoms, but the types of physical activity and multiple contextual factors need to be considered in intervention development. PMID:24879749

  2. Lecturing and Loving It: Applying the Information-Processing Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jonathan K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of lecturing, when done properly, in high schools. Describes the positive attributes of effective lecturers. Provides a human information-processing model applicable to the task of lecturing to students. (HB)

  3. Salivary alpha amylase activity in human beings of different age groups subjected to psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Gopal K; Upadhyay, Seema; Panna, Shradha M

    2014-10-01

    Salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) has been proposed as a sensitive non-invasive biomarker for stress-induced changes in the body that reflect the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Though several experiments have been conducted to determine the validity of this salivary component as a reliable stress marker in human subjects, the effect of stress induced changes on sAA level in different age groups is least studied. This article reports the activity of sAA in human subjects of different age groups subjected to psychological stress induced through stressful video clip. Differences in sAA level based on sex of different age groups under stress have also been studied. A total of 112 subjects consisting of both the male and female subjects, divided into two groups on basis of age were viewed a video clip of corneal transplant surgery as stressor. Activity of sAA from saliva samples of the stressed subjects were measured and compared with the activity of the samples collected from the subjects before viewing the clip. The age ranges of subjects were 18-25 and 40-60 years. The sAA level increased significantly in both the groups after viewing the stressful video. The increase was more pronounced in the younger subjects. The level of sAA was comparatively more in males than females in the respective groups. No significant change in sAA activity was observed after viewing the soothed video clip. Significant increase of sAA level in response to psychological stress suggests that it might act as a reliable sympathetic activity biochemical marker in different stages of human beings.

  4. Short latency activation of pyramidal tract cells by Group I afferent volleys in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Swett, John E.; Bourassa, Charles M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The contralateral bulbar pyramids were explored with low impedance micro-electrodes in cats anaesthetized with chloralose to reveal the effect of Group I afferent volleys (deep radial nerve of the forelimb) on pyramidal tract (Pt) cells. 2. Low rate (0·5/sec) stimulation of Group I afferents produced small responses (5-30 μV) in the bulbar pyramid which could be detected only with response averaging methods. The responses appeared with an initial latency of 7·0-11·2 msec and reached peak amplitude in 15·7 msec (mean latency). The pyramidal tract origin of the potential was demonstrated by its depression at stimulus rates above 1-2 sec and its disappearance at rates above 4/sec. 3. Recordings of neurones in the Group I cortical projection zone of the posterior sigmoid gyrus revealed that several types of cells, including Pt cells, were activated by Group I afferent volleys. 4. Pt cells responding to Group I afferent volleys frequently received convergent actions from low threshold cutaneous nerve volleys. 5. Averaged response recordings from electrodes positioned in the medial portions of the lateral funiculus of the spinal cord at the level of C2, revealed a response to Group I afferent volleys as early as 7·4 msec which possessed the same characteristics as the relayed response to Group I in the bulbar pyramids. Some Pt cells, activated by Group I volleys orthodromically, could also be antidromically activated by stimulation of the recording site in C2. 6. It was concluded that group I afferent volleys can influence, after short latencies, Pt and non-Pt cells and that some of these Pt cells gave rise to axons incorporated in the corticospinal tract. PMID:16992239

  5. Hyperbranched Aliphatic Polyester Modified Activated Carbon Particles with Homogenized Surface Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Liuxue

    The hyperbranched aliphatic polyester grafted activated carbon (HAPE-AC), was successfully prepared by the simple "one-pot" method. The surface functional groups of commercial activated carbon particles were homogenized to hydroxyl groups by being oxidized with nitric acid and then reduced with lithium tetrahydroaluminate (LiAlH4) at first. Secondly, the surface hydroxyl groups were used as the active sites for the solution polycondensation of the AB2 monomer, 2, 2-bis(hydroxymethyl)propionic acid (bis-MPA), with the catalysis of p-toluenesulfonic acid (p-TSA). The homogenization of the surface groups of the activated carbon particles and the graft polymerization of the hyperbranched aliphatic polyester were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) technique. The products were also characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The competitive adsorption properties of the products toward the heavy metal ions (Cu(II), Hg(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II)) also proved the translations of the surface groups.

  6. The 4'-hydroxyl group of resveratrol is functionally important for direct activation of PPARα.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Yoshie; Nakata, Rieko; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kubodera, Hideo; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Long-term moderate consumption of red wine is associated with a reduced risk of developing lifestyle-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Therefore, resveratrol, a constituent of grapes and various other plants, has attracted substantial interest. This study focused on one molecular target of resveratrol, the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα). Our previous study in mice showed that resveratrol-mediated protection of the brain against stroke requires activation of PPARα; however, the molecular mechanisms involved in this process remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the chemical basis of the resveratrol-mediated activation of PPARα by performing a docking mode simulation and examining the structure-activity relationships of various polyphenols. The results of experiments using the crystal structure of the PPARα ligand-binding domain and an analysis of the activation of PPARα by a resveratrol analog 4-phenylazophenol (4-PAP) in vivo indicate that the 4'-hydroxyl group of resveratrol is critical for the direct activation of PPARα. Activation of PPARα by 5 μM resveratrol was enhanced by rolipram, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE) and forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase. We also found that resveratrol has a higher PDE inhibitory activity (IC50 = 19 μM) than resveratrol analogs trans-4-hydroxystilbene and 4-PAP (IC50 = 27-28 μM), both of which has only 4'-hydroxyl group, indicating that this 4'-hydroxyl group of resveratrol is not sufficient for the inhibition of PDE. This result is consistent with that 10 μM resveratrol has a higher agonistic activity of PPARα than these analogs, suggesting that there is a feedforward activation loop of PPARα by resveratrol, which may be involved in the long-term effects of resveratrol in vivo. PMID:25798826

  7. Using activity-based costing to track resource use in group practices.

    PubMed

    Zeller, T L; Siegel, G; Kaciuba, G; Lau, A H

    1999-09-01

    Research shows that understanding how resources are consumed can help group practices control costs. An American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons study used an activity-based costing (ABC) system to measure how resources are consumed in providing medical services. Teams of accounting professors observed 18 diverse orthopedic surgery practices. The researchers identified 17 resource-consuming business processes performed by nonphysician office staff. They measured resource consumption by assigning costs to each process according to how much time is spent on related work activities. When group practices understand how their resources are being consumed, they can reduce costs and optimize revenues by making adjustments in how administrative and clinical staff work. PMID:11066706

  8. Magnetic Tilts and Polarity Separations in Sunspot Groups and Active Regions the Cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, S. I.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2006-08-01

    We present the analysis of magnetic tilts in active regions and sunspot groups for 1996-2005 that are automatically extracted from the Solar Feature Catalogues (http://solar.inf.brad.ac.uk ). We investigate the statistical variations of magnetic field tilt in sunspot groups and whole active regions, their longitudinal and latitudinal distributions, drifts and daily polarity separation during different phases of the solar cycle 23. The classification results are compared with the similar research for the previous cycles and the specifics on the cycle 23 is discussed in conjunction to the solar dynamo theory.

  9. Using activity-based costing to track resource use in group practices.

    PubMed

    Zeller, T L; Siegel, G; Kaciuba, G; Lau, A H

    1999-09-01

    Research shows that understanding how resources are consumed can help group practices control costs. An American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons study used an activity-based costing (ABC) system to measure how resources are consumed in providing medical services. Teams of accounting professors observed 18 diverse orthopedic surgery practices. The researchers identified 17 resource-consuming business processes performed by nonphysician office staff. They measured resource consumption by assigning costs to each process according to how much time is spent on related work activities. When group practices understand how their resources are being consumed, they can reduce costs and optimize revenues by making adjustments in how administrative and clinical staff work.

  10. The analysis of professional competencies of a lecturer in adult education.

    PubMed

    Žeravíková, Iveta; Tirpáková, Anna; Markechová, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we present the andragogical research project and evaluation of its results using nonparametric statistical methods and the semantic differential method. The presented research was realized in the years 2012-2013 in the dissertation of I. Žeravíková: Analysis of professional competencies of lecturer and creating his competence profile (Žeravíková 2013), and its purpose was based on the analysis of work activities of a lecturer to identify his most important professional competencies and to create a suggestion of competence profile of a lecturer in adult education. PMID:26069874

  11. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu

    ScienceCinema

    Wayne Hu

    2016-07-12

    Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  12. What Predicts Skill in Lecture Note Taking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peverly, Stephen T.; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Brown, Cindy; Sumowski, James; Alidoost, Moona; Garner, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    Despite the importance of good lecture notes to test performance, very little is known about the cognitive processes that underlie effective lecture note taking. The primary purpose of the 2 studies reported (a pilot study and Study 1) was to investigate 3 processes hypothesized to be significantly related to quality of notes: transcription…

  13. Man and His Environment. Octagon Lectures 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleyard, R. T., Ed.

    Utilizing the theme "Man and His Environment," the Octagon Lectures of 1969 were presented at the University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia. Problems arising from the imbalance between the ancient forces of nature and the new forces of human culture were dealt with by the lecturers. They revealed that the most important…

  14. The Art of the Lecture Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Lecturing hints, periodic table, mechanistic approach to predicting inorganic reaction products for substitution reactions, reaction rates, spectroscopy, and entropy role change in establishing position of equilibrium for vaporization of water and synthesis of ammonia were topics of lectures presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical…

  15. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Hu

    2009-03-02

    Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  16. Parker Lecturers Gather at Joint Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooker, Nancy

    2008-08-01

    Present and past Parker Lecturers, who are Bowie Lecturers of AGU's Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA) section, gathered at the Joint Assembly in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Eugene Parker's famous paper predicting the existence of the supersonic solar wind (see Figure 1).

  17. Circadian activity rhythm in pre-pubertal and pubertal marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) living in family groups.

    PubMed

    Melo, Paula R; Gonçalves, Bruno S B; Menezes, Alexandre A L; Azevedo, Carolina V M

    2016-03-01

    In marmosets, a phase advance was observed in activity onset in pubertal animals living in captivity under semi-natural conditions which had stronger correlation with the times of sunrise over the course of the year than the age of the animal. In order to evaluate the effect of puberty on the circadian activity rhythm in male and female marmosets living in family groups in controlled lighting conditions, the activity of 5 dyads of twins (4 ♀/♂ and 1 ♂/♂) and their respective parents was continuously monitored by actiwatches between the 4th and 12th months of age. The families were kept under LD 12:12 h with constant humidity and temperature. The onset of puberty was identified by monitoring fecal steroids. Juveniles showed higher totals of daily activity and differences in the daily distribution of activity in relation to parents, in which the bimodal profile was characterized by higher levels in evening activity in relation to morning activity. Regarding the phase, the activity onset and offset, occurred later in relation to parents. After entering puberty, the activity onset and offset occurred later and there was an increase in total daily activity. On the other hand, when assessing the effect of sex, only females showed a delay in the activity offset and an increase in total daily activity. Therefore, the circadian activity rhythm in marmosets has peculiar characteristics in the juvenile stage in relation to the total of daily activity, the onset and offset of the active phase, and the distribution of activity during this phase. Besides, the entering puberty was associated with a phase delay and increase on total daily activity, with differences between sexes, possibly due to hormonal influences and/or social modulation on rhythm. PMID:26724713

  18. Circadian activity rhythm in pre-pubertal and pubertal marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) living in family groups.

    PubMed

    Melo, Paula R; Gonçalves, Bruno S B; Menezes, Alexandre A L; Azevedo, Carolina V M

    2016-03-01

    In marmosets, a phase advance was observed in activity onset in pubertal animals living in captivity under semi-natural conditions which had stronger correlation with the times of sunrise over the course of the year than the age of the animal. In order to evaluate the effect of puberty on the circadian activity rhythm in male and female marmosets living in family groups in controlled lighting conditions, the activity of 5 dyads of twins (4 ♀/♂ and 1 ♂/♂) and their respective parents was continuously monitored by actiwatches between the 4th and 12th months of age. The families were kept under LD 12:12 h with constant humidity and temperature. The onset of puberty was identified by monitoring fecal steroids. Juveniles showed higher totals of daily activity and differences in the daily distribution of activity in relation to parents, in which the bimodal profile was characterized by higher levels in evening activity in relation to morning activity. Regarding the phase, the activity onset and offset, occurred later in relation to parents. After entering puberty, the activity onset and offset occurred later and there was an increase in total daily activity. On the other hand, when assessing the effect of sex, only females showed a delay in the activity offset and an increase in total daily activity. Therefore, the circadian activity rhythm in marmosets has peculiar characteristics in the juvenile stage in relation to the total of daily activity, the onset and offset of the active phase, and the distribution of activity during this phase. Besides, the entering puberty was associated with a phase delay and increase on total daily activity, with differences between sexes, possibly due to hormonal influences and/or social modulation on rhythm.

  19. Barriers for recess physical activity: a gender specific qualitative focus group exploration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many children, in particular girls, do not reach the recommended amount of daily physical activity. School recess provides an opportunity for both boys and girls to be physically active, but barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. This study explores gender differences in children’s perceptions of barriers to recess physical activity. Based on the socio-ecological model four types of environmental barriers were distinguished: natural, social, physical and organizational environment. Methods Data were collected through 17 focus groups (at 17 different schools) with in total 111 children (53 boys) from fourth grade, with a mean age of 10.4 years. The focus groups included an open group discussion, go-along group interviews, and a gender segregated post-it note activity. A content analysis of the post-it notes was used to rank the children’s perceived barriers. This was verified by a thematic analysis of transcripts from the open discussions and go-along interviews. Results The most frequently identified barriers for both boys and girls were weather, conflicts, lack of space, lack of play facilities and a newly-found barrier, use of electronic devices. While boys and girls identified the same barriers, there were both inter- and intra-gender differences in the perception of these barriers. Weather was a barrier for all children, apart from the most active boys. Conflicts were perceived as a barrier particularly by those boys who played ballgames. Girls said they would like to have more secluded areas added to the school playground, even in large schoolyards where lack of space was not a barrier. This aligned with girls’ requests for more “hanging-out” facilities, whereas boys primarily wanted activity promoting facilities. Conclusion Based on the results from this study, we recommend promoting recess physical activity through a combination of actions, addressing barriers within the natural, social, physical and

  20. Novel method for the preparation of polymethacrylates with nonlinear optically active side groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohriegl, Peter; Mueller, Harry; Nuyken, Oskar

    1993-01-01

    Because of their excellent optical properties, a variety of polymethacrylates with pendant NLO-chromophores has been prepared and investigated by different research groups. The method normally used for the synthesis of these polymers is the free radical polymerization of the corresponding methacrylates with NLO-active side groups. However, the NLO- chromophores, usually large conjugated molecules with an electron donor and an electron acceptor substituent, often contain a number of functional groups, e.g., nitro- or azo groups. These may act as retarders or inhibitors in a free radical polymerization. So in many cases the yields are not quantitative and the molecular weights are quite low. We present an alternative method for the preparation of polymethacrylates with pendant NLO-chromophores, the polymeranalogous esterification of poly(methacryloyl chloride). In a first step, reactive prepolymers are prepared by the free radical polymerization of methacryloyl chloride (MAC1) or by copolymerization of MAC1 with methyl methacrylate (MMA). These prepolymers are esterified using NLO-active side groups with a hydroxy-terminated spacer. Well defined, high molecular weight polymethacrylates with high dye contents can be prepared by this method. A copolymer with 19 mole% of azochromophores exhibits an electro-optical coefficient of 9 pm/V at 1300 mm after poling, whereas 19 pm/V (1500 nm) were measured for a polymer with 90 mole% of NLO active azobenzene side groups. In addition, the novel method provides easy access to some novel copolymers with both NLO-active azobenzene units and photocrosslinkable cinnamoyl groups.

  1. A method to quantify movement activity of groups of animals using automated image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianyu; Yu, Haizhen; Liu, Ying

    2009-07-01

    Most physiological and environmental changes are capable of inducing variations in animal behavior. The behavioral parameters have the possibility to be measured continuously in-situ by a non-invasive and non-contact approach, and have the potential to be used in the actual productions to predict stress conditions. Most vertebrates tend to live in groups, herds, flocks, shoals, bands, packs of conspecific individuals. Under culture conditions, the livestock or fish are in groups and interact on each other, so the aggregate behavior of the group should be studied rather than that of individuals. This paper presents a method to calculate the movement speed of a group of animal in a enclosure or a tank denoted by body length speed that correspond to group activity using computer vision technique. Frame sequences captured at special time interval were subtracted in pairs after image segmentation and identification. By labeling components caused by object movement in difference frame, the projected area caused by the movement of every object in the capture interval was calculated; this projected area was divided by the projected area of every object in the later frame to get body length moving distance of each object, and further could obtain the relative body length speed. The average speed of all object can well respond to the activity of the group. The group activity of a tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) school to high (2.65 mg/L) levels of unionized ammonia (UIA) concentration were quantified based on these methods. High UIA level condition elicited a marked increase in school activity at the first hour (P<0.05) exhibiting an avoidance reaction (trying to flee from high UIA condition), and then decreased gradually.

  2. [Preparation, characterization and adsorption performance of mesoporous activated carbon with acidic groups].

    PubMed

    Li, Kun-Quan; Li, Ye; Zheng, Zheng; Zhang, Yu-Xuan

    2013-06-01

    Mesoporous activated carbons containing acidic groups were prepared with cotton stalk based fiber as raw materials and H3PO4 as activating agent by one step carbonization method. Effects of impregnation ratio, carbonization temperature and heat preservation time on the yield, elemental composition, oxygen-containing acid functional groups and adsorptive capacity of activated carbon were studied. The adsorption capacity of the prepared activated carbon AC-01 for p-nitroaniline and Pb(II) was studied, and the adsorption mechanism was also suggested according to the equilibrium experimental results. The maximum yield of activated carbons prepared from cotton stalk fiber reached 35.5% when the maximum mesoporous volume and BET surface area were 1.39 cm3 x g(-1) and 1 731 m2 x g(-1), respectively. The activated carbon AC-01 prepared under a H3 PO4/precursor ratio of 3:2 and activated at 900 degrees C for 90 min had a total pore volume of 1.02 cm3 x g(-1), a micoporous ratio of 31%, and a mesoporous ratio of 65%. The pore diameter of the mesoporous activated carbon was mainly distributed in the range of 2-5 nm. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacities of Pb(II) and p-nitroaniline on cotton stalk fiber activated carbon were 123 mg x g(-1) and 427 mg x g(-1), respectively, which were both higher than those for commercial activated carbon fiber ACF-CK. The equilibrium adsorption experimental data showed that mesopore and oxygen-containing acid functional groups played an important role in the adsorption. PMID:23947073

  3. Menopausal symptoms and physical activity in multiethnic groups of midlife women: A secondary analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sun Ju; Chee, Wonshik; Im, Eun-Ok

    2013-01-01

    Aims To explore the effect of diverse types of women’s physical activity on menopausal symptoms among multiethnic groups of midlife women in the USA. Background Although physical activity is one of the most widely used non-pharmacological methods for managing menopausal symptoms, there is a paucity of clinical guidelines for women and healthcare providers because the relationship between physical activity and menopausal symptoms has been found inconsistent in previous studies. Design A secondary analysis of the data from a lager Internet survey study conducted in 2008 – 2010. Methods A total of 481 midlife women among four ethnic groups were selected from the original study. The data were collected using the Kaiser Physical Activity Survey and the Midlife Women’s Symptom Index. Bivariate correlation analyses and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the data. Results/Findings The household/caregiving activity index was positively associated with the prevalence scores of the psychological symptoms in both Non-Hispanic Asians and Non-Hispanic African Americans. The increased sports/exercise activity index was negatively associated with the severity scores of the physical symptoms in both Hispanics and Non-Hispanic Whites. The occupational activity index and the active living activity index significantly predicted the severity scores of the psychosomatic symptoms in Hispanics and Non-Hispanic African Americans, respectively. Conclusion Nurses who take care of multiethnic groups of midlife women who experience menopausal symptoms should be aware of diverse types of women’s physical activities within the cultural context. PMID:23171423

  4. Proceedings of the 1982 Annual Meeting. Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group (Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, June 3-7, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drost, Dale R., Ed.

    Papers from the 1982 annual meeting of the Canadian Mathematics Education Study Group are organized similarly to the meeting, presenting materials from the lectures, working groups, topic groups and panel groups. One lecture, by Davis, discussed a philosophy of computation in relation to computing. Vergnaud lectured on cognitive and developmental…

  5. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    DOE PAGES

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-01-19

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. Following previous methods in the literature, we test the ability of semi-empirical group contribution methods in Köhler theory to predict themore » effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. However, in our approach we also account for liquid–liquid phase boundaries to simulate phase-limited activation behavior. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of 2. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging test beds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger-scale models.« less

  6. Prediction of cloud condensation nuclei activity for organic compounds using functional group contribution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Ziemann, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of recent laboratory and field experiments demonstrate that organic aerosol composition evolves with time in the atmosphere, leading to changes in the influence of the organic fraction to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra. There is a need for tools that can realistically represent the evolution of CCN activity to better predict indirect effects of organic aerosol on clouds and climate. This work describes a model to predict the CCN activity of organic compounds from functional group composition. Following previous methods in the literature, we test the ability of semi-empirical group contribution methods in Köhler theory to predict the effective hygroscopicity parameter, kappa. However, in our approach we also account for liquid-liquid phase boundaries to simulate phase-limited activation behavior. Model evaluation against a selected database of published laboratory measurements demonstrates that kappa can be predicted within a factor of 2. Simulation of homologous series is used to identify the relative effectiveness of different functional groups in increasing the CCN activity of weakly functionalized organic compounds. Hydroxyl, carboxyl, aldehyde, hydroperoxide, carbonyl, and ether moieties promote CCN activity while methylene and nitrate moieties inhibit CCN activity. The model can be incorporated into scale-bridging test beds such as the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) to evaluate the evolution of kappa for a complex mix of organic compounds and to develop suitable parameterizations of CCN evolution for larger-scale models.

  7. Structure-activity relationships in aminosterol antibiotics: the effect of stereochemistry at the 7-OH group.

    PubMed

    Tessema, Tsemre-Dingel; Gassler, Frank; Shu, Youheng; Jones, Stephen; Selinsky, Barry S

    2013-06-01

    Squalamine and three aminosterol analogs have been shown to inhibit bacterial cell growth and induce lysis of large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles. The analogs differ in the identity of the polyamine attached at C3 of the sterol, and the stereochemistry of a hydroxyl substituent at C7. Analogs with a tetraammonium spermine polyamine are somewhat more active than analogs with a shorter trisammonium spermidine polyamine, and analogs with an axial (α) hydroxyl substituent at C7 are more active than analogs with the corresponding equatorial (β) hydroxyl group. There is some variability noted; the 7β-OH spermine analog is the most active compound against Escherichia coli, but the least effective against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Lytic activity correlates well with antimicrobial activity of the compounds, but the lytic activity varies with the phospholipid composition of the vesicles. PMID:23618624

  8. Enhancement of lactase activity in milk by reactive sulfhydryl groups induced by heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Guzmán, J; Cruz-Guerrero, A E; Rodríguez-Serrano, G; López-Munguía, A; Gómez-Ruiz, L; García-Garibay, M

    2002-10-01

    The effects of heat treatments of milk and whey prior to lactose hydrolysis with Kluyveromyces lactis beta-galactosidase were studied. It was observed that heat treatment of milk significantly increases lactase activity, with a maximum activity increase found when milk was heated at 55 degrees C. In whey from 55 up to 75 degrees C, beta-galactosidase activity decreased slightly. Nevertheless, heating whey at 85 degrees C for 30 min raised the rate of hydrolysis significantly. Electrophoretic patterns and UV spectra proved that the activity change correlated with milk protein denaturation, particularly that of beta-lactoglobulin. Heating whey permeate did not increase the enzyme activity as heating whole whey; but heating whey prior to ultrafiltration also resulted in enzyme activation. Measurement of free sulfhydryl (SH) groups in both whey and heated whey permeate showed that the liberation of free SH is highly correlated to the change of the activity. Furthermore, this activation can be reversed by oxidizing the reactive sulfhydryl groups, proving that the observed effect may be related to the release of free SH to the medium, rather than to the denaturation of a thermolabile protein inhibitor.

  9. Physical activity and beverage consumption in preschoolers: focus groups with parents and teachers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Qualitative research is a method in which new ideas and strategies can be discovered. This qualitative study aimed to investigate parents’ and teachers’ opinions on physical activity and beverage consumption of preschool children. Through separate, independent focus groups, they expressed their perceptions on children’s current physical activity and beverage consumption levels, factors that influence and enhance these behaviours, and anticipated barriers to making changes. Methods Multi-cultural and multi-geographical focus groups were carried out in six European countries (Belgium, Bulgaria, Germany, Greece, Poland and Spain). In total, twenty-four focus groups with 122 parents and eighteen focus groups with 87 teachers were conducted between October 2010 and January 2011. Based on a semi-structured interview guide, questions on preschoolers’ physical activity (opinions on preschoolers’ physical activity, how to increase physical activity, facilitators and barriers of physical activity) and beverage consumption (rules and policies, factors influencing promotion of healthy drinking, recommendations for future intervention development) were asked. The information was analyzed using qualitative data analysis software (NVivo8). Results The focus group results indicated misperceptions of caregivers on preschoolers’ physical activity and beverage consumption levels. Caregivers perceived preschoolers as sufficiently active; they argue that children need to learn to sit still in preparation for primary school. At most preschools, children can drink only water. In some preschools sugar-sweetened beverages like chocolate milk or fruit juices, are also allowed. It was mentioned that sugar-sweetened beverages can be healthy due to mineral and vitamin content, although according to parents their daily intake is limited. These opinions resulted in low perceived needs to change behaviours. Conclusions Although previous research shows need of change in

  10. Effects of Active Versus Passive Group Music Therapy on Preadolescents with Emotional, Learning, and Behavioral Disorders.

    PubMed

    Montello; Coons

    1999-01-01

    This study attempted to compare the behavioral effects of active, rhythm-based group music therapy vs. those of passive, listening-based group music therapy on preadolescents with emotional, learning, and behavioral disorders. It was hypothesized that preadolescents who participated in active music therapy would more significantly improve target behaviors than those involved in passive music therapy. Achenbach's Teacher Report Form (TRF) was used to confirm changes among subjects in attention, motivation, and hostility as rated by homeroom teachers. Twelve music therapy sessions were conducted over a 4-month period with three different groups of subjects (n = 16), with two groups participating in active music therapy and the other receiving passive music therapy. Results indicate that subjects improved significantly after receiving both music therapy interventions. The most significant change in subjects was found on the aggression/hostility scale. These results suggest that group music therapy can facilitate the process of serf-expression in emotionally disturbed/learning disabled adolescents and provide a channel for transforming frustration, anger, and aggression into the experience of creativity and self-mastery. Discussion of results also includes recommendations for chousing one music therapy approach over another based on personality types and/or clinical diagnoses of subjects.

  11. Lactate dehydrogenase activity in Bacteroides fragilis group strains with induced resistance to metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Presečki Stanko, Aleksandra; Sóki, Jozsef; Varda Brkić, Dijana; Plečko, Vanda

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were to induce in vitro metronidazole resistance in nim-negative Bacteroides fragilis group strains and to determine the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity of the induced strains. A collection of B. fragilis group strains were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for metronidazole were determined by the agar dilution technique. The presence of nim genes was screened by PCR. A sample of 52 nim-negative metronidazole-susceptible strains were selected at random and were exposed to metronidazole in the resistance induction experiment. LDH activity was measured by spectrophotometry. Of the 52 selected strains, 12 (23.1%) acquired resistance to metronidazole. MICs ranged from 8mg/L to 96mg/L. Eight of the twelve induced strains displayed decreased LDH activity, whilst only one expressed a significant increase in LDH activity with LDH values of 49.1U/mg and 222.0U/mg, respectively. In conclusion, in vitro induction of metronidazole resistance could be selected in nim-negative B. fragilis group strains. A statistically significant decrease in LDH activity was in contrast to previous findings in which, underlying higher metronidazole MICs, an increase in LDH activity compensated for the decreased activity of pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR). These findings could be explained if the induction caused only physiological and not genetic changes. We believe that genetic mutations in the B. fragilis strain that demonstrated an emergent increase in LDH activity were responsible for the increased activity. PMID:27436459

  12. Use of a Wiki-Based Software to Manage Research Group Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ting; Vezenov, Dmitri V.; Simboli, Brian

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses use of the wiki software Confluence to organize research group activities and lab resources. Confluence can serve as an electronic lab notebook (ELN), as well as an information management and collaboration tool. The article provides a case study in how researchers can use wiki software in "home-grown" fashion to…

  13. When Talking Won't Work: Implementing Experiential Group Activities with Addicted Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Hirshhorn, Meredith A.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional talk therapy, particularly cognitive behavioral techniques, are often ineffective when working with addicted clients for many reasons. By tapping into the power of the group modality, experiential activities can serve as a powerful facilitator of insight and behavior change. The authors provide a brief review of the literature followed…

  14. Collaborative Activities Enabled by GroupScribbles (GS): An Exploratory Study of Learning Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looi, Chee-Kit; Chen, Wenli; Ng, Foo-Keong

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the findings of an exploratory cycle of a design-based research project and examines the learning effectiveness of collaborative activities that are supported by the GroupScribbles (GS) software technology in two Singapore primary science classrooms. The students had ten weeks of GS-based lessons in science, which were…

  15. Peer Interactions among Children with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities during Group Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijs, Sara; Penne, Anneleen; Vlaskamp, Carla; Maes, Bea

    2016-01-01

    Background: Children with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) meet other children with PIMD in day care centres or schools. This study explores the peer-directed behaviours of children with PIMD, the peer interaction-influencing behaviour of the direct support workers and the children's positioning. Method: Group activities for…

  16. Healthful Eating and Physical Activity in the Home Environment: Results from Multifamily Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Jerica M.; Arikian, Aimee; Doherty, William J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore multiple family members' perceptions of risk and protective factors for healthful eating and physical activity in the home. Design: Ten multifamily focus groups were conducted with 26 families. Setting and Participants: Community setting with primarily black and white families. Family members (n = 103) were aged 8 to 61…

  17. Children's Preferences for Group Musical Activities in Child Care Centres: A Cross-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a cross-cultural research study of children's preferences for group musical activities in child care centres. A total of 228 young children aged 4-5 years in seven child care centres in Hong Kong and in the Adelaide City of South Australia participated in the study. Both qualitative and quantitative data were collected via a…

  18. An Initial Description and Pilot of Group Behavioral Activation Therapy for Anxious and Depressed Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Brian C.; Colognori, Daniela; Weissman, Adam S.; Bannon, Katie

    2009-01-01

    Transdiagnostic approaches for treating multiple problems within a single protocol are novel but gaining support. This report describes initial efforts to adapt reconceptualized behavioral activation (e.g., Jacobson, Martell, & Dimidjian, 2001) to a group format suitable for young adolescents, plus add a powerful exposure component to accommodate…

  19. Osteoporosis Knowledge, Calcium Intake, and Weight-Bearing Physical Activity in Three Age Groups of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrio, Kate; Auld, Garry W.

    2002-01-01

    Determined the extent and integration of osteoporosis knowledge in three age groups of women, comparing knowledge to calcium intake and weight bearing physical activity (WBPA). Overall calcium intake was relatively high. There were no differences in knowledge, calcium intake, or WBPA by age, nor did knowledge predict calcium intake and WBPA. None…

  20. 75 FR 51525 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-20

    ... announcement of working group activities and status reports of January 29, 2010 (75 FR 4904). The 41st full... October 11, 2005. The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) was published on August 24, 2006 (71 FR 50275... published on February 1, 2008 (73 FR 6370). The Task Force met on October 17-18, 2007, and reached...

  1. Peer Groups and Substance Use: Examining the Direct and Interactive Effect of Leisure Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorlindsson, Thorolfur; Bernburg, Jon Gunnar

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships among adolescent leisure activities, peer behavior, and substance use. We suggest that peer group interaction can have a differential effect on adolescent deviant behavior depending on the type of leisure pattern adolescents engage in. We analyze data from a representative national sample of Icelandic…

  2. Information Activities and Appropriation in Teacher Trainees' Digital, Group-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanell, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports results from an ethnographic study of teacher trainees' information activities in digital, group-based learning and their relation to the interplay between use and appropriation of digital tools and the learning environment. Method: The participants in the present study are 249 pre-school teacher trainees in…

  3. 77 FR 24257 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... announcement of working group activities and status reports of November 28, 2011 (76 FR 72997). The 45th full... Rulemaking (NPRM) was published on August 24, 2006 (71 FR 50275), and was open for comment until October 23... emergency communication, emergency egress, and rescue access, was published on February 1, 2008 (73 FR...

  4. 77 FR 58608 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... announcement of working group activities and status reports of April 23, 2012 (77 FR 24257). The 46th full RSAC... published on August 24, 2006 (71 FR 50275), and was open for comment until October 23, 2006. The working... communication, emergency egress, and rescue access, was published on February 1, 2008 (73 FR 6370). The...

  5. 75 FR 76070 - Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC); Working Group Activity Update

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... announcement of working group activities and status reports of August 20, 2010 (75 FR 51525). The 42nd full... Rulemaking (NPRM) was published on August 24, 2006 (71 FR 50275), and was open for comment until October 23... emergency communication, emergency egress, and rescue access, was published on February 1, 2008 (73 FR...

  6. Bill Gates' Great-Great-Granddaughter's Honeymoon: An Astronomy Activity for Several Different Age Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    When students finish a unit or course on the planets these days, they are often overwhelmed with facts, comparisons, and images. A good culminating activity, to help them organize their thinking (and review), is to have them divide into small groups (travel agencies) and come up with their top ten solar system "tourist sights" for future space…

  7. Interrogating Surface Functional Group Heterogeneity of Activated Thermoplastics Using Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    ONeil, Colleen E; Jackson, Joshua M; Shim, Sang-Hee; Soper, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel approach for characterizing surfaces utilizing super-resolution fluorescence microscopy with subdiffraction limit spatial resolution. Thermoplastic surfaces were activated by UV/O3 or O2 plasma treatment under various conditions to generate pendant surface-confined carboxylic acids (-COOH). These surface functional groups were then labeled with a photoswitchable dye and interrogated using single-molecule, localization-based, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to elucidate the surface heterogeneity of these functional groups across the activated surface. Data indicated nonuniform distributions of these functional groups for both COC and PMMA thermoplastics with the degree of heterogeneity being dose dependent. In addition, COC demonstrated relative higher surface density of functional groups compared to PMMA for both UV/O3 and O2 plasma treatment. The spatial distribution of -COOH groups secured from super-resolution imaging were used to simulate nonuniform patterns of electroosmotic flow in thermoplastic nanochannels. Simulations were compared to single-particle tracking of fluorescent nanoparticles within thermoplastic nanoslits to demonstrate the effects of surface functional group heterogeneity on the electrokinetic transport process.

  8. Activities of the US-Japan Safety Monitor Joint Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Richard L. Savercool; Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-09-01

    This paper documents the activities of the US-Japan exchange in the area of personnel safety at magnetic and laser fusion experiments. A near-miss event with a visiting scientist to the US in 1992 was the impetus for forming the Joint Working Group on Fusion Safety. This exchnge has been under way for over ten years and has provided many safety insights for both US and Japanese facility personnel at national institutes and at universities. The background and activities of the Joint Working Group are described, including the facilities that have been visited for safety walkthroughs, the participants from both countries, and the main safety issues examined during visits. Based on these visits, some operational safety ideas to enhance experiment safety are given. The near-term future plans of the Safety Monitor Joint Working group are also discussed.

  9. Group intervention changes brain activity in bilingual language-impaired children.

    PubMed

    Pihko, Elina; Mickos, Annika; Kujala, Teija; Pihlgren, Annika; Westman, Martin; Alku, Paavo; Byring, Roger; Korkman, Marit

    2007-04-01

    This investigation assessed the effectiveness of a phonological intervention program on the brain functioning of bilingual Finnish 6- to 7-year-old preschool children diagnosed with specific language impairment (SLI). The intervention program was implemented by preschool teachers to small groups of children including children with SLI. A matched group of other bilingual children with SLI received a physical exercise program and served as a control group. Auditory evoked magnetic fields were measured before and after the intervention with an oddball paradigm. The brain activity recordings were followed by a behavioral discrimination test. Our results show that, in children with SLI, the positive intervention effect is reflected in plastic changes in the brain activity of the left and right auditory cortices.

  10. Communication: Active space decomposition with multiple sites: Density matrix renormalization group algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Shane M.; Shiozaki, Toru

    2014-12-07

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few μE{sub h} or less) with M = 128 in both cases. This rapid convergence is because the renormalization steps are used only for the interfragment electron correlation.

  11. Chloroplast Sulfhydryl Groups and the Light Activation of Fructose-1,6-Bisphosphatase 1

    PubMed Central

    Slovacek, Rudolf E.; Vaughn, Sharon

    1982-01-01

    Studies of isolated intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts reveal that most of the available sulfhydryl groups are associated with stromal protein as opposed to a thylakoid membrane fraction under non-denaturing conditions. Increases in sulfhydryl content of approximately 50% occurred with illumination and could be correlated kinetically with a reductive activation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase during CO2-assimilation. Inhibition of linear electron flow with 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea prevented light driven increases in both fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase activity and the relative sulfhydryl number. These results provide evidence for the operation of a reductive enzyme activating system in vivo. PMID:16662654

  12. Synthesis and hypoglycemic activity of 9-O-(lipophilic group substituted) berberine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanshan; Wang, Xiaohong; Yin, Weicheng; Liu, Zhenbao; Zhou, Mi; Xiao, Daipeng; Liu, Yanfei; Peng, Dongming

    2016-10-01

    A series of 9-O-(lipophilic group substituted) berberine derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their cytotoxicity and hypoglycemic activity against HepG2 cells. All the results indicated that most of the synthesized compounds exhibited lower cytotoxicity and a certain degree of hypoglycemic activity. Especially the compounds 5g and 5h displayed dramatically increased hypoglycemic activity compared with berberine, and the cytotoxicity maintained or even lower than berberine, indicating that they are potential candidates for new anti-type 2 diabetes mellitus drugs. PMID:27561717

  13. THE LINDA CRANE MEMORIAL LECTUR

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    At 90 years of age, the APTA may be facing some of the greatest national and global challenges of its history. Membership has grown from 238 in 1921 to over 70,000 in 2011, but the expansion of the APTA may be restrictive to individual participation. A leadership gap appears imminent in practice and education. Fostering every member to understand the APTA and its great work is essential to ensuring a profession that lives its core values and meets societal needs. The Linda Crane Memorial Lecture in 2011 celebrated a vision of the APTA's 100th birthday with every member serving as a “professional centenarian” who stewards the organization to continued greatness. PMID:21637394

  14. Supporting Survey Courses with Lecture-Tutorials and Backwards-Faded Scaffolded Inquiry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    In the course of learning science, it is generally accepted that successful science learning experiences should result in learners developing a meaningful understanding of the nature of science as inquiry where: (i) students are engaged in questions; (ii) students are designing plans to pursue data; and (iii) students are generating and defending conclusions based on evidence they have collected. Few of these learning targets can be effectively reached through a professor-centered, information download lecture. In response to national reform movements calling for professors to adopt teaching strategies and learning environments where non-science majors and future teachers can actively engage in scientific discourse, scholars with the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research have leveraged NSF DUE funding over the last decade to develop and systematically field-test two separate instructional approaches. The first of these is called Lecture-Tutorials (NSF 99077755 and NSF 9952232) . These are self-contained, classroom-ready, collaborative group activities. The materials are designed specifically to be easily integrated into the lecture course and directly address the needs of busy and heavily-loaded teaching faculty for effective, student-centered, classroom-ready materials that do not require a drastic course revision for implementation. Students are asked to reason about difficult concepts, while working in pairs, and to discuss their ideas openly. The second of these is a series of computer-mediated, inquiry learning experiences for non-science majoring undergraduates based upon an inquiry-oriented teaching approach framed by the notions of backwards faded-scaffolding as an overarching theme for instruction (NSF 1044482). Backwards faded-scaffolding is a strategy where the conventional and rigidly linear scientific method is turned on its head and students are first taught how to create conclusions based on evidence, then how experimental design

  15. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  16. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein`s mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  17. “Convivência” Groups: Building Active and Healthy Communities of Older Adults in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Tânia R. Bertoldo; d'Orsi, Eleonora; Schwingel, Andiara; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek J.

    2012-01-01

    In old age, social groups can be a crucial component for health and well-being. In 2009-2010, a follow-up survey was carried out in Florianópolis, Brazil to understand the impact of a variety of programs established since 2002 that were designed to enhance social activities among the older adult population. This study employed two surveys within the population of older adults in Florianópolis. The first survey interviewed a total of 875 older adults in 2002, and the second survey involved 1,705 older adults between 2009 and 2010. By 2010, many new programs were offered in the community and the enrollment of older adults in social programs followed similar trends. “Convivência” groups stood out as extremely popular social groups among this population. This paper discusses some of the potential outcomes associated with participation in “convivência” groups. PMID:22830022

  18. Townes Group Activities from 1983-2000: Personal Recollections of William Danchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, William C.

    2015-01-01

    I arrived in Berkeley in October 1983 as a post-doc, and my appointment was at the Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL). During that time the group was very large, with multiple activities led by Charlie himself and also by Senior Fellows such as John Lacy, Dan Jaffe, and Al Betz at the top of the hill at Space Sciences. Another significant contingent of the Townes group was housed in Birge Hall on campus, led by Reinhard Genzel when he was an Assistant Professor in the Physics Department. Although the group encompassed two separate locations, it functioned as one large group. Either we rode with Charlie up and down the hill, or (if we were concerned about our safety!) we took the bus.

  19. Activities of the OECD/NEA Expert Group on Assay Data for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gauld, Ian C; Rugama, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    Management of spent nuclear fuel is a key issue for many NEA member countries. In nuclear criticality safety, the decision of many countries to advance burnup credit as part of their licensing strategy has heightened recent interest in experimental data needed to validate computer codes used in burnup credit calculations. This paper discusses recent activities of an Expert Group on assay data, formed under the OECD/NEA/NSC/WPNCS (Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety) to help coordinate isotopic assay data activities and facilitate international collaboration between NEA member countries developing or implementing burnup credit methodologies. Recent activities of the Expert Group are described, focusing on the planned expansion of the Spent Fuel Isotopic Composition Database (SFCOMPO), and preparation of a state-of-the-art report on assay data that includes sections on recommended radiochemical analysis methods, techniques, and lessons learned from previous experiments.

  20. Enhanced Surfactant Adsorption on Activated Carbon through Manipulation of Surface Oxygen Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, John; Qu, Deyang; Foster, Michelle

    2012-02-01

    Passive energy storage is a necessary component for balancing the lifecycle budget with new forms of green energy. The work presented describes how surface oxygen groups (SOG) on granulated activated carbon have been manipulated using Nitric Acid in a controlled, stepwise fashion. The structure and surface functionality of the activated carbon samples were characterized using DRIFTS, Raman Spectroscopy and Porosimetry. Total surface area was found to increase proportionally with the removal of heteroatom material, exposing previously insulated active sites responsible for SOG attachment. Broad oxide peaks were deconvoluted and analyzed, allowing for absolute identification of evolving functionality at each oxidation stage. SOGs were maximized on the third oxidation cycle with the presence of conjugated aromatic, phenol, lactone, and carboxylic acid groups. FSN Zonyl nonionic was applied to all oxidized samples at various concentrations. Total adsorbed surfactant was quantified for each concentration / oxidation scheme using attenuated total reflection. The relative quantity and polarity of chemisorbed surfactant were qualitatively assessed for each equilibrium concentration.

  1. Antibacterials. Synthesis and structure-activity studies of 3-aryl-2-oxooxazolidines. 1. The "B" group.

    PubMed

    Gregory, W A; Brittelli, D R; Wang, C L; Wuonola, M A; McRipley, R J; Eustice, D C; Eberly, V S; Bartholomew, P T; Slee, A M; Forbes, M

    1989-08-01

    The synthesis and structure/activity studies of the effect of varying the "B" group in a series of oxazolidinone antibacterials (I) are described. Two synthetic routes were used: (1) alkylation of aniline with glycidol followed by dialkyl carbonate heterocyclization to afford I (A = H, B = OH), whose arene ring was further elaborated by using electrophilic aromatic substitution methodology; (2) cycloaddition of substituted aryl isocyanates with epoxides to give A and B with a variety of values. I with B = OH or Br were converted to other "B" functionalities by using SN2 methodology. Antibacterial evaluation of compounds I with A = acetyl, isopropyl, methylthio, methylsulfinyl, methylsulfonyl, and sulfonamido and a variety of different "B" groups against Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis concluded that the compounds with B = aminoacyl, and particularly acetamido, were the most active of those examined in each A series, possessing MICs in the range of 0.5-4 micrograms/mL for the most active compounds described.

  2. Video versus lecture: effective alternatives for orthodontic auxiliary training.

    PubMed

    Chen, M S; Horrocks, E N; Evans, R D

    1998-08-01

    Many studies have compared the relative effectiveness of visually-aided lectures and videotapes, but methodological flaws have prevented definitive comparison of the techniques. This study assessed the relative effectiveness of the two approaches for orthodontic auxiliary training. This study was a prospective, randomised trial, conducted at the Eastman Dental Hospital and Institute. Two groups of 16 dental auxiliaries, selected at random, studied identification and positioning of orthodontic brackets: one group attended a lecture accompanied by slides and the other viewed a video. Subjects bonded brackets onto acrylic teeth and the results were assessed by computerised image analysis. The subjects completed a questionnaire on their attitudes to the respective teaching methods. Results were assessed for accuracy of bracket placement and variations in type of auxiliary. There was no significant difference between the teaching methods except for bracket positioning where video was slightly better (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between the types of auxiliary. Generally, video teaching and lecturing were equally effective, with video achieving slightly better results. Both methods were effective at teaching bracket placement, and dental nurses and student hygienists proved equally adept at bracket positioning.

  3. Facilitating Learning in Large Lecture Classes: Testing the “Teaching Team” Approach to Peer Learning

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Sarah; Maas, Martha

    2010-01-01

    We tested the effect of voluntary peer-facilitated study groups on student learning in large introductory biology lecture classes. The peer facilitators (preceptors) were trained as part of a Teaching Team (faculty, graduate assistants, and preceptors) by faculty and Learning Center staff. Each preceptor offered one weekly study group to all students in the class. All individual study groups were similar in that they applied active-learning strategies to the class material, but they differed in the actual topics or questions discussed, which were chosen by the individual study groups. Study group participation was correlated with reduced failing grades and course dropout rates in both semesters, and participants scored better on the final exam and earned higher course grades than nonparticipants. In the spring semester the higher scores were clearly due to a significant study group effect beyond ability (grade point average). In contrast, the fall study groups had a small but nonsignificant effect after accounting for student ability. We discuss the differences between the two semesters and offer suggestions on how to implement teaching teams to optimize learning outcomes, including student feedback on study groups. PMID:21123696

  4. Facilitating learning in the community with lecturer-practitioner posts.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, B; Thomson, A M; Davies, S; Whittaker, K

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of the perspectives of their role of a group of community lecturer-practitioners and a community teacher, who referred to themselves as 'community facilitators'. A qualitative design was used and data were collected by semi-structured interviews. These were transcribed and content analysis was undertaken. All participants provided a liaison role between the college and the community practitioners, prepared students for their clinical experience and assisted in relating theory to practice. The participants described how they managed the role and how they supported each other. Developing small teams of facilitators may provide a bridge between teachers and practitioners and can serve as a basis for further study of the lecturer-practitioner role.

  5. Effect of group activities on health promotion for the community-dwelling elderly

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, Masako; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In Japan, the Integrated Community Care System aims to support residents to live as independently as possible at home. Koreisya-Kyoshitsu and Fureaiikiiki salons are two types of group activities for community-dwelling elderly. We investigated effective ways of conducting such activities. Methods: We analyzed 96 subjects from 8 salons and 354 subjects from 10 Koreisya-Kyoshitsu. Self-completed questionnaires included the following: attributes, the Motor Fitness Scale (MFS), revised Philadelphia Geriatric Center Morale Scale (PGCMS), Measurement of Psychological Independence (MPI), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and self-rated health status (SRH). Follow-up assessment was conducted 6 months later. Representatives from 8 salons and staff members from 10 Koreisya-Kyoshitsu answered an additional questionnaire on management. Results: In Koreisya-Kyoshitsu, physical performance (MFS) (p = 0.007) and subjective well-being (PGCMS) (p = 0.001) improved significantly, whereas psychological independence (MPI) deteriorated significantly (p = 0.015). The MFS scores significantly improved in the sub-group with a high number of sessions (7 or more) (p = 0.043), as well as in the non-volunteer sub-group (p = 0.004). The PGCMS scores significantly improved in the sub-group with a high number of sessions (p < 0.001). The MPI scores significantly deteriorated in the sub-group with a low frequency of sessions (6 or less) and in the non-volunteer sub-group (p = 0.013 and p = 0.010, respectively). In salons, the frequency of going out decreased significantly (p = 0.049). Functional status (IADL) significantly improved in the “twice or more a month” sub-group (p = 0.046), whereas it significantly deteriorated in the “once a month” sub-group (p = 0.004). The proportion of volunteers/organizers in Koreisya-Kyoshitsu (23.4%) was significantly lower than that in salons (39.6%). Conclusion: The frequency (number) of sessions, but not the volunteer

  6. Adult total wellness: group differences based on sitting time and physical activity level

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An increasing body of evidence associates a high level of sitting time with poor health outcomes. The benefits of moderate to vigorous-intensity physical activities to various aspects of health are now well documented; however, individuals may engage in moderate-intensity physical activity for at least 30 minutes on five or more days of the week and still exhibit a high level of sitting time. This purpose of this study was to examine differences in total wellness among adults relative to high/low levels of sitting time combined with insufficient/sufficient physical activity (PA). The construct of total wellness incorporates a holistic approach to the body, mind and spirit components of life, an approach which may be more encompassing than some definitions of health. Methods Data were obtained from 226 adult respondents (27 ± 6 years), including 116 (51%) males and 110 (49%) females. Total PA and total sitting time were assessed with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) (short-version). The Wellness Evaluation of Lifestyle Inventory was used to assess total wellness. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was utilised to assess the effects of the sitting time/physical activity group on total wellness. A covariate was included to partial out the effects of age, sex and work status (student or employed). Cross-tabulations were used to show associations between the IPAQ derived high/low levels of sitting time with insufficient/sufficient PA and the three total wellness groups (i.e. high level of wellness, moderate wellness and wellness development needed). Results The majority of the participants were located in the high total sitting time and sufficient PA group. There were statistical differences among the IPAQ groups for total wellness [F (2,220) = 32.5 (p <0.001)]. A Chi-square test revealed a significant difference in the distribution of the IPAQ categories within the classification of wellness [χ2 (N = 226) = 54.5, p < .001

  7. [THE DISCUSSION CONCERNING THE PLACE OF LECTURES AND COMPULSORY LECTURE ATTENDANCE IN MEDICAL EDUCATION].

    PubMed

    Reis, Shmuel

    2016-04-01

    Luder shows that there is a lack of correlation between lecture attendance in medical school and examination performance, and thus draws attention to a discourse concerning the place of lectures and lecture attendance enforcement in 2015 and beyond. The paper addresses 4 questions: First, what is the current place of the traditional lecture in the education of medical students? Second, are there alternatives to this format of teaching? Third, what are the educational consequences of mandating lecture attendance; and fourth, should there be such enforcement? The author discusses these questions and concludes that lectures should be used sparingly, after a careful evaluation that they have an added value over learning away from the classroom. Furthermore, that there are clear guidelines on how to make the traditional lecture enhanced and educationally effective, as well as alternatives such as the "flipped classroom", e-learning and more to lectures. In addition, that lectures frequently drive learning negatively and enforcing attendance in Israel entails serious unintended consequences such as a need to monitor attendance, and a host of disciplinary adverse reactions. Finally, that besides lecture efficiency and economy (when having added value) one reason to consider compulsory attendance, may be when poor attendance negatively influences teachers morale. PMID:27323539

  8. [THE DISCUSSION CONCERNING THE PLACE OF LECTURES AND COMPULSORY LECTURE ATTENDANCE IN MEDICAL EDUCATION].

    PubMed

    Reis, Shmuel

    2016-04-01

    Luder shows that there is a lack of correlation between lecture attendance in medical school and examination performance, and thus draws attention to a discourse concerning the place of lectures and lecture attendance enforcement in 2015 and beyond. The paper addresses 4 questions: First, what is the current place of the traditional lecture in the education of medical students? Second, are there alternatives to this format of teaching? Third, what are the educational consequences of mandating lecture attendance; and fourth, should there be such enforcement? The author discusses these questions and concludes that lectures should be used sparingly, after a careful evaluation that they have an added value over learning away from the classroom. Furthermore, that there are clear guidelines on how to make the traditional lecture enhanced and educationally effective, as well as alternatives such as the "flipped classroom", e-learning and more to lectures. In addition, that lectures frequently drive learning negatively and enforcing attendance in Israel entails serious unintended consequences such as a need to monitor attendance, and a host of disciplinary adverse reactions. Finally, that besides lecture efficiency and economy (when having added value) one reason to consider compulsory attendance, may be when poor attendance negatively influences teachers morale.

  9. Engagement of students with lectures in biochemistry and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elizabeth Ann; Hodgson, Yvonne; Macaulay, Janet Olwyn

    2012-01-01

    Academic staff at universities have become concerned about the decrease in student attendance at lectures and the implication of this on student achievement and learning. Few studies have measured actual lecture attendance in a coherent or comprehensive way. The aim of this study was to measure actual lecture attendance of students over two year levels enrolled in two separate science disciplines, biochemistry and pharmacology. The study further sought to determine the factors that influence lecture attendance. Attendance at lectures in four units of study was monitored over a 12-week semester. Attendance at lectures decreased over the semester and was lower at early morning lectures (8 A.M.; 9 A.M.). A questionnaire surveying students about their preparation for lectures, their compensation for missed lectures and the factors influencing their nonattendance was administered at the end of the semester. Students reported that the major factors influencing their attendance at lectures related to timetable issues and the quality of lecturing. If students missed lectures, the majority read the lecture notes and listened to the online recordings. The availability of online recordings of lectures was not a major influence on attendance at lectures. In three of the four units studied there was no correlation between self-reported lecture attendance and exam performance. The results of the study indicate that universities should dedicate more resources to timetabling and to supporting staff to improve the quality of their lectures.

  10. Detection of enzyme activities and their relation to serotypes of bovine and human group B streptococci.

    PubMed

    Ekin, Ismail Hakki; Gurturk, Kemal; Ilhan, Ziya; Arabaci, Cigdem; Gulaydin, Ozgul

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic properties of group B streptococci (GBS) serotypes from bovine milk and human routine vaginal specimens were investigated. Out of the 56 human and 66 bovine GBS, 35 and 30 could be classified serologically by a co-agglutination test with type-specific antisera, respectively. Hyaluronidase (HYAL), streptokinase (SK) and protease activities were detected using culture media. HYAL activity was observed mostly in typable human GBS, and serotypes Ia, Ic and II comprised 77.3% of the typable strains producing HYAL. Bovine GBS serotypes II, III and VII comprised 87.5% of typable bovine strains exhibiting HYAL activity. SK activity was detected only in three human GBS. Human GBS serotypes Ia, Ic, II, III, VII and almost all typable bovine GBS strains showed protease activity. β-D-glucosidase activity was frequently observed in human GBS, whereas N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity was mostly detected in non-typable GBS from humans. These results indicate that different GBS serotypes could vary in their virulence properties, and bovine and human GBS isolates could not be differentiated by their enzyme activities. Use of the culture media appeared to be a simple-to-apply and useful method for the detection of extracellular enzyme activity such as HYAL, protease and SK. PMID:26297151

  11. A group II-activated ascending tract of lumbosacral origin in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, P J; Riddell, J S

    1990-01-01

    1. Electrophysiological investigations have revealed a population of ascending tract neurones originating in the lumbosacral enlargement, with input from group II muscle afferents of the cat hindlimb. 2. Single-unit microelectrode recordings were made in the lateral funiculus at L6, from the axons of thirty-four ascending tract neurones. All of the axons were antidromically activated by stimulation of the ipsilateral lateral funiculus at Th13 and, whenever tested (eight units), at C1. 3. Conduction velocities of the axons, between the L6 and Th13 segment, ranged from 33 to 92 m s-1 (mean 61 m s-1). 4. All of the ascending tract neurones were discharged following electrical stimulation of muscle nerves at group II strength, but not by weaker stimuli in the group I range. Most of the investigated neurones were excited by group II afferents of more than one muscle nerve. In addition, a proportion of the units tested could also be discharged by cutaneous and by joint afferents. 5. Responses to natural stimuli were investigated in eighteen ascending tract neurones discharged by electrical stimulation of group II afferents in the gastrocnemius-soleus (GS) and plantaris (P1) nerves which were dissected free in continuity with their muscles. Seven units were spontaneously active. Eight units responded to isometric contraction of the GS/P1 muscles with a discharge occurring mainly on the falling phase of muscle tension. Nine units increased their discharge frequency in response to stretching of the muscles and five units responded to mechanically probing the muscles with a blunt instrument. 6. The final termination sites of this group of ascending tract neurones has yet to be determined. Initial attempts (three units) to antidromically activate the neurones from the cerebellum have been unsuccessful. Other likely areas of termination in the brain stem are considered. PMID:2213583

  12. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology

    PubMed Central

    Siegford, Janice M.; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K.; Daigle, Courtney L.; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G.; Hernandez, Carlos E.; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Tracking of individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. We describe several tracking systems that are currently in use for laying hens and review each, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suited, and relevant issues to fit the best technology for the intended purpose. Abstract Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns

  13. Development, Evaluation and Implementation of Chief Complaint Groupings to Activate Data Collection

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, L.; Hoffman, J.; Alessandrini, E.; Ballard, D. W.; Norris, R.; Tzimenatos, L.; Swietlik, M.; Tham, E.; Grundmeier, R. W.; Kuppermann, N.; Dayan, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Overuse of cranial computed tomography scans in children with blunt head trauma unnecessarily exposes them to radiation. The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) blunt head trauma prediction rules identify children who do not require a computed tomography scan. Electronic health record (EHR) based clinical decision support (CDS) may effectively implement these rules but must only be provided for appropriate patients in order to minimize excessive alerts. Objectives To develop, implement and evaluate site-specific groupings of chief complaints (CC) that accurately identify children with head trauma, in order to activate data collection in an EHR. Methods As part of a 13 site clinical trial comparing cranial computed tomography use before and after implementation of CDS, four PECARN sites centrally developed and locally implemented CC groupings to trigger a clinical trial alert (CTA) to facilitate the completion of an emergency department head trauma data collection template. We tested and chose CC groupings to attain high sensitivity while maintaining at least moderate specificity. Results Due to variability in CCs available, identical groupings across sites were not possible. We noted substantial variability in the sensitivity and specificity of seemingly similar CC groupings between sites. The implemented CC groupings had sensitivities greater than 90% with specificities between 75–89%. During the trial, formal testing and provider feedback led to tailoring of the CC groupings at some sites. Conclusions CC groupings can be successfully developed and implemented across multiple sites to accurately identify patients who should have a CTA triggered to facilitate EHR data collection. However, CC groupings will necessarily vary in order to attain high sensitivity and moderate-to-high specificity. In future trials, the balance between sensitivity and specificity should be considered based on the nature of the clinical condition

  14. The Effects of Numbered Heads Together with and without an Incentive Package on the Science Test Performance of a Diverse Group of Sixth Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maheady, Larry; Michielli-Pendl, Jean; Harper, Gregory F.; Mallette, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    A clear and consistent finding of educational research has been the importance of active student responding. During lectures and discussions, active responding most often takes the form of student responses to teacher questions. This whole group responding to questions, however, does not permit every student to respond and does not assure that all…

  15. Rh D blood group conversion using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Hyun O; Baek, Eun J; Kurita, Ryo; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Nakamura, Yukio; Kim, Hyongbum

    2015-06-16

    Group O D-negative blood cells are universal donors in transfusion medicine and methods for converting other blood groups into this universal donor group have been researched. However, conversion of D-positive cells into D-negative is yet to be achieved, although conversion of group A or B cells into O cells has been reported. The Rh D blood group is determined by the RHD gene, which encodes a 12-transmembrane domain protein. Here we convert Rh D-positive erythroid progenitor cells into D-negative cells using RHD-targeting transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). After transfection of TALEN-encoding plasmids, RHD-knockout clones are obtained. Erythroid-lineage cells differentiated from these knockout erythroid progenitor cells do not agglutinate in the presence of anti-D reagents and do not express D antigen, as assessed using flow cytometry. Our programmable nuclease-induced blood group conversion opens new avenues for compatible donor cell generation in transfusion medicine.

  16. Towards a common framework for assessing the activity and associations of groups who sexually abuse children

    PubMed Central

    Cockbain, Ella; Brayley, Helen; Sullivan, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Extensive social psychological research emphasises the importance of groups in shaping individuals’ thoughts and actions. Within the child sexual abuse (CSA) literature criminal organisation has been largely overlooked, with some key exceptions. This research was a novel collaboration between academia and the UK's Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP). Starting from the premise that the group is, in itself, a form of social situation affecting abuse, it offers the first systematic situational analysis of CSA groups. In-depth behavioural data from a small sample of convicted CSA group-offenders (n = 3) were analysed qualitatively to identify factors and processes underpinning CSA groups’ activities and associations: group formation, evolution, identity and resources. The results emphasise CSA groups’ variability, fluidity and dynamism. The foundations of a general framework are proposed for researching and assessing CSA groups and designing effective interventions. It is hoped that this work will stimulate discussion and development in this long-neglected area of CSA, helping to build a coherent knowledge-base. PMID:26494978

  17. The epidemiology of walking for exercise: implications for promoting activity among sedentary groups.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, P Z; Brackbill, R M; Heath, G W

    1995-01-01

    The relative contribution of walking to overall leisure-time physical activity participation rates was studied among respondents from the 45 states that participated in the 1990 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (n = 81,557). The percentages of low income, unemployed, and obese persons who engaged in leisure-time physical activity (range = 51.1% to 57.7%) were substantially lower than the percentage among the total adult population (70.3%). In contrast, the prevalence of walking for exercise among these sedentary groups (range = 32.5% to 35.9%) was similar to that among the total population (35.6%). Walking appears to be an acceptable, accessible exercise activity, especially among population subgroups with a low prevalence of leisure-time physical activity. PMID:7733433

  18. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in an Ethnically Diverse Group of South African School Children

    PubMed Central

    McVeigh, Joanne; Meiring, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined physical activity and inactivity levels in an urban South African setting across 12 years of formal schooling. This information is important for implementing strategies to curb increasing trends of physical inactivity and related negative consequences, especially in low to middle income countries facing multiple challenges on overburdened health care systems. We examined levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviour cross-sectionally over 12 school years from childhood to adolescence in Black, White and Indian boys and girls. The aim of our study was to describe gender and race related patterns of physical and sedentary activity levels in a sample of South African children and to determine whether there were associations between these variables and body mass status. Physical activity questionnaires, previously validated in a South African setting, were used to gather information about activity and sedentary behaviours among 767 Black, White and Indian children (5-18 years of age) across the 12 grades of formal schooling. Body mass and height were also measured. Time spent in moderate-vigorous physical activity declined over the school years for all race groups and was consistently lower for girls than boys (p = 0.03), while time spent in sedentary activity increased with increasing grade (p < 0.001) for boys and girls and across all race groups. Associations between physical activity and body mass were observed for White children (r = -0.22, p < 0.001), but not for Black and Indian children (p > 0.05) whereas time spent in sedentary activities was significantly and positively correlated with body mass across all race groups: Indian (r = 0.25, p < 0.001), White (r = 0.22, p < 0.001) and Black (r = 0.37, p = 0.001). The strength of the associations was similar for boys and girls. Black and Indian children were less physically active than their white peers (p < 0.05), and Black children also spent more time in sedentary activity (p < 0

  19. Antimalarial and Antileishmanial Activities of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with Triazole-Linked Cap Group

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vishal; Guerrant, William; Chen, Po C.; Gryder, Berkley; Benicewicz, Derek B.; Khan, Shabana I.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Oyelere, Adegboyega K.

    2009-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are endowed with plethora of biological functions including anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, and cognition-enhancing activities. Parsing the structure–activity relationship (SAR) for each disease condition is vital for long-term therapeutic applications of HDACi. We report in the present study specific cap group substitution patterns and spacer-group chain lengths that enhance the antimalarial and antileishmanial activity of aryltriazolylhydroxamates-based HDACi. We identified many compounds that are several folds selectively cytotoxic to the plasmodium parasites compared to standard HDACi. Also, a few of these compounds have antileishmanial activity that rivals that of miltefosine, the only currently available oral agent against visceral leishmaniasis. The anti-parasite properties of several of these compounds tracked well with their anti-HDAC activities. The results presented here provide further evidence on the suitability of HDAC inhibition as a viable therapeutic option to curb infections caused by apicomplexan protozoans and trypanosomatids. PMID:19914074

  20. Design, synthesis, and antifungal activities of novel triazole derivatives containing the benzyl group

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kehan; Huang, Lei; Xu, Zheng; Wang, Yanwei; Bai, Guojing; Wu, Qiuye; Wang, Xiaoyan; Yu, Shichong; Jiang, Yuanying

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies undertaken by our group, a series of 1-(1H-1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)-2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-3-substituted-2-propanols (1a–r), which were analogs of fluconazole, was designed and synthesized by click chemistry. In the study reported here, the in vitro antifungal activities of all the target compounds were evaluated against eight human pathogenic fungi. Compounds 1a, 1q, and 1r showed the more antifungal activity than the others. PMID:25792806

  1. Surveillance and maintenance activities of waste area groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.; Jones, R.G.

    1991-12-01

    Surveillance and maintenance (S M) of 75 sites were conductd by the Remedial Action Section for the Environmental Restoration Program for surplus facilities and sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals. S M activities on these sites were conducted from the end of their operating life until final facility disposal or site stabilization. The objectives of the Waste Area Grouping S M Program are met by maintaining a program of routine S M as well as by implementing interim corrective maintenance when deemed necessary as a result of site surveillance. This report briefly presents this program's activities and includes tables indicating tank levels and dry well data for FY 1991.

  2. Bis(ferrocenyl)polymethine cations. A prototype molecular wire with redox-active end groups

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, L.M.; Zhao, X.; Ding, Y.; Bottomley, L.A.

    1995-12-27

    We have previously provided evidence for solitonic behavior in polymethines using {alpha}{omega}-diphenylpolyenyl anions (DPN{sup -}, X = Ph) and {alpha}{omega}-dipyridocyanines (DPyN{sup +}, X = py-CH{sub 3}). We now extend this approach to molecular wires involving polymethines with redox-active end groups. In this communication, we report the synthesis and characterization of {alpha}{omega}-bis(ferrocenyl)polymethine cations (acronym DFcN{sup +}, X = C{sub 5}H{sub 5}) as part of our systematic investigation of solitonic behavior in molecules (`solitons in a box`). Ferrocene end groups provide stable, low-potential redox-active termini and allow strong coupling of the redox centers with the polyene chain. The first two members of this series (DFcL{sup +}, DFc3{sup +}) were generated according to literature methods. The remaining members were synthesized through conventional Wittig methodology. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Organocatalytic chemo- and regioselective oxyarylation of styrenes via a cascade reaction: remote activation of hydroxyl groups.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Chen; Jiang, Fei; Wang, Shu-Liang; Shi, Feng; Tu, Shu-Jiang

    2014-07-01

    The first organocatalytic oxyarylation of styrenes has been established through a cascade of vinylogous Michael addition/alkoxyl transfer reactions of o- or p-hydroxylstyrenes with quinone imine ketals. The process leads to a highly chemo- and regioselective oxyarylation of styrenes and provides access to m-alkylated anilines in generally high yields and excellent diastereoselectivity (up to 99% yield, >95:5 dr). An investigation of the reaction pathway revealed that the existence and position of the hydroxyl group of styrene played crucial roles in the cascade reaction, suggesting that the two reactants were simultaneously activated by binaphthyl-derived phosphoric acid via hydrogen bonding interactions and long-distance conjugative effects. In addition, the activating group of the hydroxyl functionality in the products can be easily removed or transformed, demonstrating the applicability and utility of this strategy in styrene oxyarylation and in the synthesis of styrene-based compounds.

  4. Syntheses and Characterization of Chiral Arm Liquid Crystals--Containing Active Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ying; Zhang, Fang-Di; He, Xiao-Zhi

    2016-05-01

    A new series of chiral two-arm dopant containg active group were first synthesized. Four precursors of C1~C4 were obtained at first and then were esterized separately with isosorbide and got four two-arm liquid crystals (MC1~MC4). The chemical structures and LC properties of the liquid crystalline molecule were measured by spectrum and thermal analysis techniques. XRD curves of MC1~MC4 samples only showed broad peaks at wide-angle, no sharp peak was seen for all the samples. The results showed that MC1~MC4 appeared cholesteric phase with oily streak texture or lined texture and finger print texture. Cholesteric phase was successfully induced by isosorbide. The different active group of two arm liquid crystal and chiral core had effects on their liquid crystalline properties.

  5. Chlorosulfonation of polystyrene substrates for bioanalytical assays: distribution of activated groups at the surface.

    PubMed

    del Prado, Anselmo; Briz, Nerea; Navarro, Rodrigo; Pérez, Mónica; Gallardo, Alberto; Reinecke, Helmut

    2012-12-01

    In this work the activation of transparent PS substrates by chlorosulfonation is described and their distribution in the subsurface region is analyzed. For this purpose XPS, FTIR-ATR and colorimetry have been used. It is shown that the electrophilic aromatic substitution of polystyrene in pure chlorosulfonic acid is extremely quick with complete surface coverage by chlorosulfonic groups achieved after only a 10 minute reaction time at -10 °C. It is further demonstrated that the reaction is very surface selective and that even after reaction times as long as 3 hours, the modification is limited to a layer with a thickness of less than one micron. The activated PS substrates can be further functionalized in a second step with carboxylic groups. Due to the excellent optical transparency that the samples maintain upon modification, the modified systems were successfully probed for use in ELISA assays.

  6. Default-Mode Network Activity Identified by Group Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Conghui; Zhuang, Jie; Peng, Danling; Yu, Guoliang; Yang, Yanhui

    Default-mode network activity refers to some regional increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal during baseline than cognitive tasks. Recent functional imaging studies have found co-activation in a distributed network of cortical regions, including ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PPC) that characterize the default mode of human brain. In this study, general linear model and group independent component analysis (ICA) were utilized to analyze the fMRI data obtained from two language tasks. Both methods yielded similar, but not identical results and detected a resting deactivation network at some midline regions including anterior and posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. Particularly, the group ICA method segregated functional elements into two separate maps and identified ventral cingulate component and fronto-parietal component. These results suggest that these two components might be linked to different mental function during "resting" baseline.

  7. Control of Surface Functional Groups on Pertechntate Sorption on Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Wang; H. Gao; R. Yeredla; H. Xu; M. Abrecht; G.D. Stasio

    2006-07-05

    {sup 99}Tc is highly soluble and poorly adsorbed by natural materials under oxidizing conditions, thus being of particular concern for radioactive waste disposal. Activated carbon can potentially be used as an adsorbent for removing Tc from aqueous solutions. We have tested six commercial activated carbon materials for their capabilities for sorption of pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The tested materials can be grouped into two distinct types: Type I materials have high sorption capabilities with the distribution coefficients (K{sub d}) varying from 9.5 x 10{sup 5} to 3.2 x 10{sup 3} mL/g as the pH changes from 4.5 to 9.5, whereas type II materials have relatively low sorption capabilities with K{sub d} remaining more or less constant (1.1 x 10{sup 3} - 1.8 x 10{sup 3} mL/g) over a similar pH range. The difference in sorption behavior between the two types of materials is attributed to the distribution of surface functional groups. The predominant surface groups are identified to be carboxylic and phenolic groups. The carboxylic group can be further divided into three subgroups A, B, and C in the order of increasing acidity. The high sorption capabilities of type I materials are found to be caused by the presence of a large fraction of carboxylic subgroups A and B, while the low sorption capabilities of type II materials are due to the exclusive presence of phenolic and carboxylic subgroup C. Therefore, the performance of activated carbon for removing TcO{sub 4}{sup -} can be improved by enhancing the formation of carboxylic subgroups A and B during material processing.

  8. Transatlantic Consensus Group on active surveillance and focal therapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Hashim U.; Akin, Oguz; Coleman, Jonathan A.; Crane, Sarah; Emberton, Mark; Goldenberg, Larry; Hricak, Hedvig; Kattan, Mike W.; Kurhanewicz, John; Moore, Caroline M.; Parker, Chris; Polascik, Thomas J.; Scardino, Peter; van As, Nicholas; Villers, Arnauld

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To reach consensus on key issues for clinical practice and future research in active surveillance and focal therapy in managing localized prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS A group of expert urologists, oncologists, radiologists, pathologists and computer scientists from North America and Europe met to discuss issues in patient population, interventions, comparators and outcome measures to use in both tissue-preserving strategies of active surveillance and focal therapy. Break-out sessions were formed to provide agreement or highlight areas of disagreement on individual topics which were then collated by a writing group into statements that formed the basis of this report and agreed upon by the whole Transatlantic Consensus Group. RESULTS The Transatlantic group propose that emerging diagnostic tools such as precision imaging and transperineal prostate mapping biopsy can improve prostate cancer care. These tools should be integrated into prostate cancer management and research so that better risk stratification and more effective treatment allocation can be applied. The group envisaged a process of care in which active surveillance, focal therapy, and radical treatments lie on a continuum of complementary therapies for men with a range of disease grades and burdens, rather than being applied in the mutually exclusive and competitive way they are now. CONCLUSION The changing landscape of prostate cancer epidemiology requires the medical community to re-evaluate the entire prostate cancer diagnostic and treatment pathway in order to minimize harms resulting from over-diagnosis and over-treatment. Precise risk stratification at every point in this pathway is required alongside paradigm shifts in our thinking about what constitutes cancer in the prostate. PMID:22077593

  9. Control of pertechnetate sorption on activated carbon by surface functional groups.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifeng; Gao, Huizhen; Yeredla, Rakesh; Xu, Huifang; Abrecht, Mike

    2007-01-15

    The isotope 99Tc is highly soluble and poorly adsorbed by natural materials under oxidizing conditions, thus being of particular concern for radioactive waste disposal. Activated carbon can potentially be used as an adsorbent for removing Tc from aqueous solutions. We have tested six commercial activated carbon materials for their capabilities for sorption of pertechnetate (TcO4-). The tested materials can be grouped into two distinct types: Type I materials have high sorption capabilities with the distribution coefficients (Kd) varying from 9.5 x 10(5) to 3.2 x 10(3) ml/g as the pH changes from 4.5 to 9.5, whereas type II materials have relatively low sorption capabilities with Kd remaining more or less constant (1.1 x 10(3)-1.8 x 10(3) ml/g) over a similar pH range. The difference in sorption behavior between the two types of materials is attributed to the distribution of surface functional groups. The predominant surface groups are identified as carboxylic and phenolic groups. The carboxylic group can be further divided into three subgroups, A, B, and C, in the order of increasing acidity. The high sorption capabilities of type I materials are found to be caused by the presence of a large fraction of carboxylic subgroups A and B, while the low sorption capabilities of type II materials are due to the exclusive presence of phenolic and carboxylic subgroup C. Therefore, the performance of activated carbon for removing TcO4- can be improved by enhancing the formation of carboxylic subgroups A and B during materials processing.

  10. The functional importance of blood group-active molecules in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Anstee, D J

    2011-01-01

    Antigens of 23 of the 30 human blood group systems are defined by the amino acid sequence of red cell membrane proteins. The antigens of DI, RH, RHAG, MNS, GE and CO systems are carried on blood group-active proteins (Band 3, D and CE polypeptides, RhAG, Glycophorins A and B, Glycophorins C and D and Aquaporin 1, respectively) which are expressed at high levels (>200,000 copies/red cell). These major proteins contribute to essential red cell functions either directly as membrane transporters and by providing linkage to the underlying red cell skeleton or by facilitating the membrane assembly of the protein complexes involved in these processes. The proteins expressing antigens of the remaining 17 blood group systems are much less abundant (<20,000 copies/red cell) and their functional importance for the circulating red cell is largely unknown. Human gene knock-outs (null phenotypes) have been described for many of these minor blood group-active proteins, but only absence of Kx glycoprotein has been clearly linked with pathology directly related to the function of circulating red cells. Recent evidence suggesting the normal quality control system for glycoprotein synthesis is altered during the latter stages of red cell production raises the possibility that many of these low abundance blood group-active proteins are vestigial. In sickle cell disease and polycythaemia vera, elevated Lutheran glycoprotein expression may contribute to pathology. Dyserythropoiesis with reduced antigen expression can result from mutations in the erythroid transcription factors GATA-1 and EKLF.

  11. Learning from Lecture: Investigations of Study Strategies Involving Note Taking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Matre, Nicholas H.; And Others

    Two experiments were conducted with college students as subjects in an effort to determine the note taking strategy most effective for learning from lecture. In one experiment students listened to a lecture while engaging in either parallel or distributed note taking. The information density of the lecture and the lecture presentation speed were…

  12. Break Up Your Lectures: Or Christaller Sliced Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Graham; Jenkins, Alan

    1984-01-01

    Described is a method of lecturing in which the lecture period is divided into a number of segments. Only some segments involve the lecturer talking. In others students discuss topics or complete exercises. An example of such a lecture on aspects of Christaller's central place theory is described. (Author/RM)

  13. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding is that…

  14. Michael Faraday: Prince of lecturers in Victorian England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Boon Leong; Lim, Jeanette B. S.

    2001-01-01

    In this note, we focus on Faraday as a lecturer/teacher. We trace his development as a lecturer/teacher and highlight his approaches in popular-science lecturing and in teaching chemistry to military cadets. We appraise his success and conclude with an account of his poignant last lecture.

  15. Factors Shaping Mathematics Lecturers' Service Teaching in Different Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingolbali, E.; Ozmantar, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we focus on university lecturers' approaches to the service teaching and factors that influence their approaches. We present data obtained from the interviews with 19 mathematics and three physics lecturers along with the observations of two mathematics lecturers' calculus courses. The findings show that lecturers' approaches to…

  16. Evaluation of doctors’ performance as facilitators in basic medical science lecture classes in a new Malaysian medical school

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Salwani; Salam, Abdus; Alattraqchi, Ahmed G; Annamalai, Lakshmi; Chockalingam, Annamalai; Elena, Wan Putri; Rahman, Nor Iza A; Abubakar, Abdullahi Rabiu; Haque, Mainul

    2015-01-01

    Background Didactic lecture is the oldest and most commonly used method of teaching. In addition, it is considered one of the most efficient ways to disseminate theories, ideas, and facts. Many critics feel that lectures are an obsolete method to use when students need to perform hands-on activities, which is an everyday need in the study of medicine. This study evaluates students’ perceptions regarding lecture quality in a new medical school. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted of the medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin. The study population was 468 preclinical medical students from years 1 and 2 of academic year 2012–2013. Data were collected using a validated instrument. There were six different sections of questions using a 5-point Likert scale. The data were then compiled and analyzed, using SPSS version 20. Results The response rate was 73%. Among 341 respondents, 30% were male and 70% were female. Eighty-five percent of respondents agree or strongly agree that the lectures had met the criteria with regard to organization of lecture materials. Similarly, 97% of students agree or strongly agree that lecturers maintained adequate voices and gestures. Conclusion Medical students are quite satisfied with the lecture classes and the lectures. However, further research is required to identify student-centered teaching and learning methods to promote active learning. PMID:25878516

  17. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Group Recreational Activity for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesselmark, Eva; Plenty, Stephanie; Bejerot, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Although adults with autism spectrum disorder are an increasingly identified patient population, few treatment options are available. This "preliminary" randomized controlled open trial with a parallel design developed two group interventions for adults with autism spectrum disorders and intelligence within the normal range: cognitive…

  18. Inhibition of mammillary body neurons by direct activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    The mammillary body is an important neural component of limbic circuitry implicated in learning and memory. Excitatory and inhibitory inputs, primarily mediated by glutamate and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), respectively, converge and integrate in this region, before sending information to the thalamus. One potentially overlooked mechanism for inhibition of mammillary body neurons is through direct activation of Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Here, whole-cell patch clamp recordings of in vitro slice preparations containing the mammillary body nuclei of the mouse were employed to record responses to bath application of pharmacological agents to isolate the direct effect of activating Group II mGluRs. Application of the Group II mGluR specific agonist, APDC, resulted in a hyperpolarization of the membrane potential in mammillary body neurons, likely resulting from the opening of a potassium conductance. These data suggest that glutamatergic inputs to the mammillary body may be attenuated via Group II mGluRs and implicates a functional role for these receptors in memory-related circuits and broadly throughout the central nervous system. PMID:27390777

  19. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology.

    PubMed

    Siegford, Janice M; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K; Daigle, Courtney L; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Hernandez, Carlos E; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J

    2016-02-02

    Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns with selecting focal birds.

  20. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology.

    PubMed

    Siegford, Janice M; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K; Daigle, Courtney L; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Hernandez, Carlos E; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns with selecting focal birds. PMID:26848693

  1. Active Learning Strategies for Introductory Light and Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokoloff, David R.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that traditional approaches are ineffective in teaching physics concepts, including light and optics concepts. A major focus of the work of the Activity Based Physics Group has been on the development of active learning curricula like RealTime Physics (RTP) labs and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). Among…

  2. Making lectures memorable: A cognitive perspective.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Azam; Babar, Shazia

    2016-08-01

    Lectures have been a cornerstone of medical education since the introduction of a discipline based curricular model more than two hundred years ago. Recently this instructional strategy has come under criticism because of its reliance on passive learning. There are still many medical schools that cover content predominantly through lectures due to its feasibility. With the introduction of the flipped classrooms, lectures have been given a new lease of life. Improving cognitive imprinting during lectures would enhance retrieval and promote long term storage. Simplifying the content reduces the cognitive load of the information being received and makes it more meaningful hence more memorable. To make learning memorable, rehearsal should be built into the sessions. With the exponential increase in online learning, the need for online learning technologies will require a generation of a large amount of asynchronous video content which should ideally be truly meaningful and memorable, and inspirational to our students. PMID:27524541

  3. Charles Ichoku Maniac Lecture, July 25, 2016

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA climate scientist Charles Ichoku presented a Maniac lecture entitled, "Reminiscences of a scientist's journey from Nawfia to NASA." Born in a small town in Nigeria, Charles traced his captivat...

  4. Reconsidering the lecture in modern veterinary education.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Michelangelo; Lygo-Baker, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Those teaching in the higher-education environment are now increasingly meeting with larger cohorts of students. The result is additional pressure on the resources available and on the teacher and learners. Against this backdrop, discussions and reflections took place between a practitioner, within a UK veterinary school, and an educational researcher with extensive experience in observing teaching in veterinary medicine. The result was an examination of the lecture as a method of teaching to consider how to resolve identified challenges. The focus of much of the literature is on technical aspects of teaching and learning, reverting to a range of tips to resolve particular issues recognized in large-group settings. We suggest that while these tips are useful, they will only take a practitioner so far. To be able to make a genuine connection to learners and help them connect directly to the discipline, we need to take account of the emotional aspects of our role as teachers, without which, delivery of knowledge may be undermined.

  5. Lysis of typhus-group rickettsia-infected targets by lymphokine activated killers

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, M.; Dasch, G.A.

    1986-03-01

    The authors recently described a subset of OKT8, OKT3-positive lymphocytes from typhus-group rickettsia immune individuals which were capable of lysing autologous PHA-blasts or Epstein-Barr virus transformed B cells (LCL) infected with typhus-group rickettsiae. In order to determine if killing by these effectors was HLA-restricted, they stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from typhus-group rickettsia immune individuals in vitro with typhus-group rickettsia-derived antigen for one week and then measured lysis of autologous LCL or HLA-mismatched LCL in a 4-6 hour Cr/sup 51/-release assay. There was significant lysis of both the autologous and the HLA-mismatched infected targets as compared to the corresponding uninfected targets. Since this suggested that the effectors were lymphokine activated killers (LAK) rather than cytotoxic T lymphocytes, they then tested this hypothesis by stimulating PBMC from both immune and non-immune individuals in vitro for one week with purified interleukin 2 and measuring lysis of infected, autologous LCL. PBMC thus treated, from both immune and non-immune individuals, were capable of significantly lysing autologous, infected LCL as compared to the non-infected control. They therefore conclude that targets infected with typhus-group rickettsiae are susceptible to lysis to LAK.

  6. Authoring Software to Make Online Lecture Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozono, Kazutake; Teramoto, Akemi; Akiyama, Hidenori

    An authoring software for online lecture contents has been developed. Various multimedia such as HTML, SMIL and Real System are integrated in this software, which is named EzClassMaker. Professors who are not familiar to the information technology can make the online lecture content including the sound and movies, and place the content on Leaning Management System by using this software. Only the microcomputer with this software and a microphone (or a movie camera) is requested to make the content.

  7. IOP SCHOOLS LECTURE: Particles and the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmus, Peter

    1999-03-01

    Physics Education is pleased to publish the written version of the 1998/9 Institute of Physics Schools and Colleges lecture given by Professor Peter Kalmus. This lecture is currently touring around the UK. Professor Kalmus was featured in our `People in physics' columns in the July 1998 issue of the journal (page 266) and a list of the venues for the event appeared in the News section of the November issue (page 339).

  8. Lectures on probability and statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, G.P.

    1984-09-01

    These notes are based on a set of statistics lectures delivered at Imperial College to the first-year postgraduate students in High Energy Physics. They are designed for the professional experimental scientist. We begin with the fundamentals of probability theory, in which one makes statements about the set of possible outcomes of an experiment, based upon a complete a priori understanding of the experiment. For example, in a roll of a set of (fair) dice, one understands a priori that any given side of each die is equally likely to turn up. From that, we can calculate the probability of any specified outcome. We finish with the inverse problem, statistics. Here, one begins with a set of actual data (e.g., the outcomes of a number of rolls of the dice), and attempts to make inferences about the state of nature which gave those data (e.g., the likelihood of seeing any given side of any given die turn up). This is a much more difficult problem, of course, and one's solutions often turn out to be unsatisfactory in one respect or another.

  9. Synthesis, algal inhibition activities and QSAR studies of novel gramine compounds containing ester functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xia; Yu, Liangmin; Jiang, Xiaohui; Xia, Shuwei; Zhao, Haizhou

    2009-05-01

    2,5,6-Tribromo-1-methylgramine (TBG), isolated from bryozoan Zoobotryon pellucidum was shown to be very efficient in preventing recruitment of larval settlement. In order to improve the compatibility of TBG and its analogues with other ingredients in antifouling paints, structural modification of TBG was focused mainly on halogen substitution and N-substitution. Two halogen-substitute gramines and their derivatives which contain ester functional groups at N-position of gramines were synthesized. Algal inhibition activities of the synthesized compounds against algae Nitzschia closterium were evaluated and the Median Effective Concentration (EC50) range was 1.06-6.74 μg ml-1. Compounds that had a long chain ester group exhibited extremely high antifouling activity. Quantitive Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) studies with multiple linear regression analysis were applied to find correlation between different calculated molecular descriptors and biological activity of the synthesized compounds. The results show that the toxicity (log (1/EC50)) is correlated well with the partition coefficient log P. Thus, these products have potential function as antifouling agents.

  10. Stimulation of endocannabinoid formation in brain slice cultures through activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang-Mook; Mangieri, Regina; Stapleton, Christopher; Kim, Janet; Fegley, Darren; Wallace, Matthew; Mackie, Ken; Piomelli, Daniele

    2005-11-01

    Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors drives the endocannabinoid system to cause both short- and long-term changes of synaptic strength in the striatum, hippocampus, and other brain areas. Although there is strong electrophysiological evidence for a role of endocannabinoid release in mGlu receptor-dependent plasticity, the identity of the endocannabinoid transmitter mediating this phenomenon remains undefined. In this study, we show that activation of group I mGlu receptors triggers the biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), but not anandamide, in primary cultures of corticostriatal and hippocampal slices prepared from early postnatal rat brain. Pharmacological studies suggest that 2-AG biosynthesis is initiated by activation of mGlu5 receptors, is catalyzed by phospholipase C (PLC) and 1,2-diacylglycerol lipase (DGL) activities, and is dependent on intracellular Ca2+ ions. Realtime polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining analyses indicate that DGL-beta is the predominant DGL isoform expressed in corticostriatal and hippocampal slices and that this enzyme is highly expressed in striatal neurons, where it is colocalized with PLC-beta1. The results suggest that 2-AG is a primary endocannabinoid mediator of mGlu receptor-dependent neuronal plasticity.

  11. Recognition of human-vehicle interactions in group activities via multi-attributed semantic message generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Vinayak; Shirkhodaie, Amir

    2015-05-01

    Improved Situational awareness is a vital ongoing research effort for the U.S. Homeland Security for the past recent years. Many outdoor anomalous activities involve vehicles as their primary source of transportation to and from the scene where a plot is executed. Analysis of dynamics of Human-Vehicle Interaction (HVI) helps to identify correlated patterns of activities representing potential threats. The objective of this paper is bi-folded. Primarily, we discuss a method for temporal HVI events detection and verification for generation of HVI hypotheses. To effectively recognize HVI events, a Multi-attribute Vehicle Detection and Identification technique (MVDI) for detection and classification of stationary vehicles is presented. Secondly, we describe a method for identification of pertinent anomalous behaviors through analysis of state transitions between two successively detected events. Finally, we present a technique for generation of HVI semantic messages and present our experimental results to demonstrate the effectiveness of semantic messages for discovery of HVI in group activities.

  12. Tobacco Assessment in Actively Accruing National Cancer Institute Cooperative Group Program Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Erica N.; Torres, Essie; Toll, Benjamin A.; Cummings, K. Michael; Gritz, Ellen R.; Hyland, Andrew; Herbst, Roy S.; Marshall, James R.; Warren, Graham W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Substantial evidence suggests that tobacco use has adverse effects on cancer treatment outcomes; however, routine assessment of tobacco use has not been fully incorporated into standard clinical oncology practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tobacco use assessment in patients enrolled onto actively accruing cancer clinical trials. Methods Protocols and forms for 155 actively accruing trials in the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Clinical Trials Cooperative Group Program were evaluated for tobacco use assessment at enrollment and follow-up by using a structured coding instrument. Results Of the 155 clinical trials reviewed, 45 (29%) assessed any form of tobacco use at enrollment, but only 34 (21.9%) assessed current cigarette use. Only seven trials (4.5%) assessed any form of tobacco use during follow-up. Secondhand smoke exposure was captured in 2.6% of trials at enrollment and 0.6% during follow-up. None of the trials assessed nicotine dependence or interest in quitting at any point during enrollment or treatment. Tobacco status assessment was higher in lung/head and neck trials as well as phase III trials, but there was no difference according to year of starting accrual or cooperative group. Conclusion Most actively accruing cooperative group clinical trials do not assess tobacco use, and there is no observable trend in improvement over the past 8 years. Failure to incorporate standardized tobacco assessments into NCI-funded Cooperative Group Clinical Trials will limit the ability to provide evidence-based cessation support and will limit the ability to accurately understand the precise effect of tobacco use on cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:22689794

  13. A New Calibrated Sunspot Group Series Since 1749: Statistics of Active Day Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, I. G.; Kovaltsov, G. A.; Lockwood, M.; Mursula, K.; Owens, M.; Solanki, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Although sunspot-number series have existed since the mid-nineteenth century, they are still the subject of intense debate, with the largest uncertainty being related to the "calibration" of the visual acuity of individual observers in the past. A daisy-chain regression method is usually applied to inter-calibrate the observers, which may lead to significant bias and error accumulation. Here we present a novel method for calibrating the visual acuity of the key observers to the reference data set of Royal Greenwich Observatory sunspot groups for the period 1900 - 1976, using the statistics of the active-day fraction. For each observer we independently evaluate their observational thresholds [ SS] defined such that the observer is assumed to miss all of the groups with an area smaller than SS and report all the groups larger than SS. Next, using a Monte-Carlo method, we construct a correction matrix for each observer from the reference data set. The correction matrices are significantly non-linear and cannot be approximated by a linear regression or proportionality. We emphasize that corrections based on a linear proportionality between annually averaged data lead to serious biases and distortions of the data. The correction matrices are applied to the original sunspot-group records reported by the observers for each day, and finally the composite corrected series is produced for the period since 1748. The corrected series is provided as supplementary material in electronic form and displays secular minima around 1800 (Dalton Minimum) and 1900 (Gleissberg Minimum), as well as the Modern Grand Maximum of activity in the second half of the twentieth century. The uniqueness of the grand maximum is confirmed for the last 250 years. We show that the adoption of a linear relationship between the data of Wolf and Wolfer results in grossly inflated group numbers in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in some reconstructions.

  14. Osteoporosis knowledge, calcium intake, and weight-bearing physical activity in three age groups of women.

    PubMed

    Terrio, Kate; Auld, Garry W

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent and integration of osteoporosis knowledge in three age groups of women and compare knowledge to calcium intake and weight-bearing physical activity (WBPA). In this cross-sectional study, knowledge, calcium intake and WBPA were assessed using probe interviews, a food frequency and an activity questionnaire, respectively. Seventy-five white women were separated into three groups: young (25-35 years), middle aged (36-46 years) and postmenopausal (50+ years). Concept maps were used to assess knowledge (concepts, integration and misconceptions). Calcium intakes from diet, supplements and fortified orange juice were estimated as were minutes of daily WBPA. Analysis of covariance was used to compare knowledge, calcium intake and WBPA by age group. Covariates included education, family history, physical problems making exercise difficult, and lactose intolerance. Chi square analysis was used to determine differences in these covariates across age groups. Correlations and regression analysis were used to determine relationships between knowledge and behaviors. Knowledge scores averaged 32-44 points (183 possible). Average calcium intake in all groups exceeded the Dietary Reference Intake's recommended Adequate Intake but 20-24% consumed less than 60% of the AI. Housework, walking at work, and standing at home and work accounted for 90% of WBPA. Knowledge about osteoporosis was limited and not associated with age, WBPA or calcium intake. Calcium intake and WBPA were not associated with age. Practitioners need to provide explicit information on osteoporosis and risk reducing behaviors to women of all ages. PMID:12238730

  15. Physics Lectures and Laboratories. A Model To Improve Preservice Elementary Science Teacher Development. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresser, Miles

    A group of scientists and science educators has developed and pilot tested an integrated physical science program designed for preservice elementary school teachers. This document includes the syllabus and class materials for the Physics block of the physical science courses developed by the group. Included are diagrams, lecture notes, homework…

  16. Immediate Achievement and Retention in Audio-Tutorial Versus Conventional Lecture-Laboratory Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowsey, Robert E.; Mason, William H.

    1975-01-01

    Concludes that the group taught by the audio-tutorial method made significantly higher scores than did the lecture-laboratory group on both (1) achievement tests and (2) a retention test administered 11 weeks after the termination of the college Animal Biology course. (MLH)

  17. An Analysis of Student Characteristics and Behaviour in Relation to Absence from Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawon, Krystyna; Pembroke, Michael; Wille, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Concern has been expressed in the literature that student absenteeism from lectures is undesirable as it may have adverse consequences for academic performance. The aim of this study was to examine whether there are identifiable groups of low-attendance students who display characteristic behaviours that are more typical than any other group.…

  18. Facilitating Learning in Large Lecture Classes: Testing the "Teaching Team" Approach to Peer Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F.; Lang, Sarah; Maas, Martha

    2010-01-01

    We tested the effect of voluntary peer-facilitated study groups on student learning in large introductory biology lecture classes. The peer facilitators (preceptors) were trained as part of a Teaching Team (faculty, graduate assistants, and preceptors) by faculty and Learning Center staff. Each preceptor offered one weekly study group to all…

  19. [Functional groups in the alpha-galactosidase active site in Cladosporium cladosporioides].

    PubMed

    Malanchuk, V M; Buglova, T T; Varbanets, L D; Zakharova, I Ia

    2000-01-01

    The activity of alpha-galactosidase isolated from culture fluid of micromycete Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fres.) de Vries 16,038 has been studied as affected by cations, anions and specific chemical reagents (p-chlormercurybenzoate (p-ChMB), iodacetamide, N-ethylmaleimide, L-cysteine, dithiotreitol, beta-mercaptoethanol, EDTA, o-phenanthroline, sodium azide). It has been established that Ag+ ions inhibited competitively alpha-galactosidase at pH 4.0 and 6.0, the inhibition constants (Ki) made 3.6 x 10(-5) M and 4.3 x 10(-6) M, respectively. Galactose in concentration of 1 mM to 5 mM preserved the enzyme from the negative effect of Ag+ ions, while L-cysteine did not manifest the protective effect. Ions of Hg2+ p-ChMB inhibited noncompetitively the activity of alpha-galactosidase, Ki for Hg2+ and p-ChMB made 5.7 x 10(-7) M and 4.7 x 10(-6) M, respectively. Preincubation with galactose does not preserve alpha-galactosidase from the inhibiting effect of Ag+ and p-ChMB, but th[not readable: see text] compounds (L-cysteine, dithiotreitol, beta-mercaptoethanol) restore the enzyme activity. Participation of histidine imidazole group in the catalytic action is supposed on the basis of the inhibitory and kinetic analysis. Sulphydryl groups do not take part in the catalysis but play an important role in supporting the active conformation of the protein molecule. The groups containing the atoms of metals are absent in the alpha-galactosidase molecule.

  20. [Windmill principle versus clockwork principle--tradition and interaction in academic lectures. A. N. S. A. Radiologica].

    PubMed

    Leppek, R; Jussen, M; Berthold, D; Sulzer, J; Klose, K J

    1996-08-01

    In reply to depersonalization of teaching, students hiding behind anonymity and their decreasing effective presence in campus life, academic teaching has to become practice-oriented, attractive and at least more effective. The traditional teacher-based lecture competes with student-centered and issue-related academic events like problem-based learning, thus, concerning student-teacher interaction. The model of a clockwork represents the components of a traditional lecture. The model of a windmill is suitable for explaining synergistic effects in scope and experience during an interaction concerned lecture. An example of student-teacher interaction and students' activation even in a preclinical course of lectures on anatomy and radiology is given. A high response and acceptance of the lecture is assured by structure-and process-oriented features.

  1. Role of allyl group in the hydroxyl and peroxyl radical scavenging activity of S-allylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Perla D; Alvarez-Idaboy, J Raúl; Aguilar-González, Adriana; Lira-Rocha, Alfonso; Jung-Cook, Helgi; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Galano, Annia

    2011-11-17

    S-Allylcysteine (SAC) is the most abundant compound in aged garlic extracts, and its antioxidant properties have been demonstrated. It is known that SAC is able to scavenge different reactive species including hydroxyl radical (•OH), although its potential ability to scavenge peroxyl radical (ROO•) has not been explored. In this work the ability of SAC to scavenge ROO• was evaluated, as well as the role of the allyl group (-S-CH(2)-CH═CH(2)) in its free radical scavenging activity. Two derived compounds of SAC were prepared: S-benzylcysteine (SBC) and S-propylcysteine (SPC). Their abilities to scavenge •OH and ROO• were measured. A computational analysis was performed to elucidate the mechanism by which these compounds scavenge •OH and ROO•. SAC was able to scavenge •OH and ROO•, in a concentration-dependent way. Such activity was significantly ameliorated when the allyl group was replaced by benzyl or propyl groups. It was shown for the first time that SAC is able to scavenge ROO•.

  2. Group planarian sudden mortality: Is the threshold around global geomagnetic activity ≥K6?

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Nirosha J; Karbowski, Lukasz M; Mekers, William Ft; Persinger, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Sudden deaths in groups of animals have been observed by field and laboratory biologists. We have measured mortalities in large group-housed planarian during the infrequent periods of very intense geomagnetic activity. In 13 separate episodes over the last 5 y we have observed the sudden death in our laboratory of hundreds of planarian if their density was about 1 worm per cc and the global geomagnetic activity was K≥6 the day before or the day of the observation of the mortality. Such mortality never occurred in other conditions or days. Both estimates of the "magnetic moment" of a planarian in magnetic fields above this threshold of sustained magnetic flux density as well as the magnetic energy within the planarian volume predict values that could affect phenomenon associated with the total numbers of pH-dependent charges within each worm. These conditions could affect the Levin-Burr bioelectrical signals and networks that affect patterning information and sustainability in whole living systems. The establishment of a central reservoir for the report of these transient events might allow Life Scientists to more fully appreciate the impact of these pervasive global stimuli upon dense groups of animals. PMID:27066174

  3. Youth Group Engagement in Noncompliant Communities During Supplemental Immunization Activities in Kaduna, Nigeria, in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Audu; Mkanda, Pascal; Manneh, Fadinding; Korir, Charles; Warigon, Charity; Gali, Emmanuel; Banda, Richard; Umeh, Gregory; Nsubuga, Peter; Chevez, Ana; Vaz, Rui G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. One of the major challenges being faced in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative program is persistent refusal of oral polio vaccine (OPV) and harassment of vaccination team members by youths. The objective of the study was to describe the strategy of collaborating with recognized youth groups to reduce team harassment during vaccination campaigns and improve vaccination coverage in noncompliant communities. Methods. We assessed data from polio vaccination activities in OPV-refusing communities in the Igabi and Zaria local government areas (LGAs) of Kaduna State in Nigeria. We evaluated the following factors to determine trends: enhanced independent monitoring data on the proportion of children missed by vaccination activities (hereafter, “missed children”), lot quality assurance surveys, and vaccination team harassment. Results. The proportion of missed children decreased in both LGAs after the intervention. In Igabi LGA and Zaria LGA, the lowest proportions of missed children before and after the intervention decreased from 7% to 2% and from 5% to 1%, respectively. Lot quality assurance survey trends showed an improvement in immunization coverage 1 year after youth groups' engagement in both LGAs. Conclusions. Systematic engagement of youth groups has a great future in polio interruption as we approach the endgame strategy for polio eradication. It promises to be a veritable innovation in reaching chronically missed children in OPV-refusing communities. PMID:26609003

  4. Cycles of activity, group composition, and diet of Lemur mongoz mongoz Linnaeus 1766 in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Sussman, R W; Tattersall, I

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary study of the ecology and behavior of Lemur mongoz mongoz was carried out in the northwest of Madagascar. The animals were observed for approximately 250 h in July till August, 1973, and for 50 h in June, 1974. L.m.mongoz has been reported to be diurnal and to live in groups of 6-8 individuals. However, we found the animals to be nocturnal and that groups contained an adult male, an adult female and their offspring (groups numbering from 2 to 4 individuals). L.m.mongoz is thus the only species of the genus Lemur studied to date that is active exclusively at night and that lives in family groups. L.m.mongoz was also found to have a very specialized diet. During our study, it was observed to feed on only five species of plant and mainly on the nectar-producing parts (flowers and nectaries) of four of these species. It spent most of its feeding time licking nectar from the flowers of the kapok tree, Ceiba pentandra, and is probably a major pollinator of this tree in Madagascar. In Africa and South and Central America, the kapok tree is usually bat-pollinated. A dietary preference for nectar, although common among bats, has not previously been observed in primates.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of ordered macroporous silicas functionalized with organosulfur groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Quanzhou Liao Jufang; Yin Qiang; Li Yuguang

    2008-05-06

    Hybrid three-dimensionally ordered macroporous (3DOM) SiO{sub 2}-SO{sub 3}H materials with different S/Si ratio have been prepared by colloidal crystal templating method. The process involved preparation of 3DOM SiO{sub 2}-SH materials by co-condensation of (3-mercaptopropyl)triethoxysilane and tetraethoxysilane via sol-gel transformation, and following oxidation of -SH group to -SO{sub 3}H group by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infra-red spectrometer (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and nitrogen adsorption measurement. SEM observation shows that the macropores are highly ordered with a typical 'surface-templated' structure. The surface area of 3DOM SiO{sub 2}-SH material is 25.1 m{sup 2}/g and SiO{sub 2}-SO{sub 3}H material is 18.6 m{sup 2}/g. Catalytic activity test shows that 3DOM SiO{sub 2}-SO{sub 3}H materials possess a high activity for the esterification of acetic acid and n-butanol, and the activity is increased with the amount of sulfur in the materials. This study provided significant results for developing new application of 3DOM materials.

  6. Amination of activated carbon for enhancing phenol adsorption: Effect of nitrogen-containing functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo; Chen, Honglin; Qin, Hangdao; Feng, Yujun

    2014-02-01

    To study the contribution of different nitrogen-containing functional groups to enhancement of phenol adsorption, the aminated activated carbons (AC) were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, XPS, Boehm titration, and pH drift method and tested for adsorption behaviors of phenol. Adsorption isotherm fitting revealed that the Langmuir model was preferred for the aminated ACs. The adsorption capacity per unit surface area (qm/SSABET) was linearly correlated with the amount of pyridinic and pyrrolic N, which suggested that these two functional groups played a critical role in phenol adsorption. The enhancement of adsorption capacity was attributed to the strengthened π-π dispersion between phenol and basal plane of AC by pyridinic, pyrrolic N. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and intraparticle diffusion was one of the rate-controlling steps in the adsorption process.

  7. PREFACE: Lectures from the European RTN Winter School on Strings, Supergravity and Gauge Fields, Barcelona, 12-16 January 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Jorge G.

    2005-04-01

    This issue of Classical and Quantum Gravity contains the proceedings of the RTN European Winter School on Strings, Supergravity and Gauge Fields, which was held at the University of Barcelona, Spain, between 12-16 January 2004. The School was part of the RTN programme The Quantum Structure of Spacetime and the Geometric Nature of Fundamental Interactions of the European Union. It was attended by 181 registered participants. The lectures contain a pedagogical introduction to topics in string theory which are currently under active investigation. They were targeted mainly at students near the end of their PhD, and young postdocs and researchers. The topics were carefully selected to cover phenomenological aspects of string theory, covered by the lectures by A Uranga (Intersecting Brane Worlds) and U Danielsson (String Theory and Cosmology), as well as more fundamental and theoretical issues, covered by N Nekrasov (Non-perturbative Aspects of Supersymmetric Gauge Theories), P Townsend (Branes in Field Theory, not included in these proceedings) and Jaume Gomis (Tachyon Condensation: Towards Time Dependent Backgrounds and Holography). We must thank the lecturers for their admirable exposition of these interesting subjects. We hope that the readers of these proceedings receive these lectures with the same enthusiasm as they were received by all students and physicists that attended the School. Following the tradition of the RTN schools there were, in addition to the lectures, five workgroups on more specialized subjects, which aimed to discuss scientific problems of general interest to our network, facilitate communication between the various groups and, hopefully, help start new collaborations. They were Integrable Structures of the Gauge/String Correspondence led by G Arutyunov and B Stefanski Closed Timelike Curves in Supergravity and String Theory led by N Drukker and L Maoz Black Objects in Higher Dimensional General Relativity and Supergravity led by H Elvang and T

  8. Catalytic Ester–Amide Exchange Using Group (IV) Metal Alkoxide–Activator Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chong; Lee, Jonathan P.; Lobkovsky, Emil; Porco, John A.

    2005-01-01

    A process for preparation of amides from unactivated esters and amines has been developed using a catalytic system comprised of group (IV) metal alkoxides in conjunction with additives including 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole (HOAt). In general, ester–amide exchange proceeds using a variety of structurally diverse esters and amines without azeotropic reflux to remove the alcohol byproduct. Initial mechanistic studies on the Zr(Ot-Bu)4–HOAt system revealed that the active catalyst is a novel, dimeric zirconium complex as determined by X-ray crystallography. PMID:16011366

  9. Income, health and nutrition activities: examples from women's groups in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, G

    1987-01-01

    The accomplishments of 4 Kenyan women's groups, sponsored by seed grants of $2000-5000 from Center for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA) since 1982, are summarized. CEDPA provides professional management training and coordinates alumni groups, as well as grants for community projects in family planning, health and community development. Forty women from Ngamani started a project to sell floormats, raised vegetables, received a grant to raise poultry, and opened a nutrition clinic. In Kibuyuni women use profits from chickens, goats and vegetables, and milling grain to build a primary school, a health dispensary and a general store. With CEDPA funds, they stocked the store and furnished the clinic. Proceeds pay a health worker's salary. They have sponsored another women's group, which is building a bakery and managing dairy cows. The Makiwo women's group, with money from their craft business, built a multi-purpose community center for health, family planning services and reading classes. A CEDPA grant funded a charcoal business and a profitable water system built by the women, providing a salaried health educator. A women's group in Chonyi began raising cattle. A CEDPA graduate helped them to set a goal to reduce infant mortality. They started a training class for young mothers in techniques of nutrition, home economics, family planning and hygiene, such as growing vegetables an building latrines. Evaluation has shown that successful projects are based on previous work, strong links with other organizations, and entail a long-term process. Women's organizations can deliver results with some training, supervision and technical assistance, but minimal cost.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of acid-base bifunctional materials through protection of amino groups

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Yanqiu; Liu, Heng; Yu, Xiaofang; Guan, Jingqi; Kan, Qiubin

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acid-base bifunctional material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized through protection of amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} catalyst containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties. -- Abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, transmission electron micrographs (TEM), back titration, {sup 13}C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 29}Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR were employed to characterize the synthesized materials. The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation reaction between acetone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. Compared with monofunctional catalysts of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15 and SBA-15-NH{sub 2}, the bifunctional sample of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity for the aldol condensation.

  11. The AWM-SIAM Sonia Kovalesvky Lecture - 3 part Lecture Series

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, Suzanne; Lewis, Jennifer

    2003-06-03

    The Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) in cooperation with the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) and with funding from the Department of Energy initiated a new lecture series. The purpose of the lecture series is to increase the visibility of women who have made significant contributions in applied or computational mathematics. The AWM-SIAM Sonia Kovalevsky Lecture is presented at the SIAM Annual Meeting which is a national conference. The lecturer is a woman who has made distinguished contributions in applied or computational mathematics. The lecturer is determined by the Selection Committee which consists of two members of AWM and two members of SIAM, appointed by the presidents of these organizations. The committee may solicit nominations from other members of the scientific and engineering community. The lectureship may be awarded to any woman in the scientific or engineering community.

  12. Soft Skills: An Important Asset Acquired from Organizing Regional Student Group Activities

    PubMed Central

    de Ridder, Jeroen; Meysman, Pieter; Oluwagbemi, Olugbenga; Abeel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Contributing to a student organization, such as the International Society for Computational Biology Student Council (ISCB-SC) and its Regional Student Group (RSG) program, takes time and energy. Both are scarce commodities, especially when you are trying to find your place in the world of computational biology as a graduate student. It comes as no surprise that organizing ISCB-SC-related activities sometimes interferes with day-to-day research and shakes up your priority list. However, we unanimously agree that the rewards, both in the short as well as the long term, make the time spent on these extracurricular activities more than worth it. In this article, we will explain what makes this so worthwhile: soft skills. PMID:24992198

  13. Soft skills: an important asset acquired from organizing regional student group activities.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, Jeroen; Meysman, Pieter; Oluwagbemi, Olugbenga; Abeel, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Contributing to a student organization, such as the International Society for Computational Biology Student Council (ISCB-SC) and its Regional Student Group (RSG) program, takes time and energy. Both are scarce commodities, especially when you are trying to find your place in the world of computational biology as a graduate student. It comes as no surprise that organizing ISCB-SC-related activities sometimes interferes with day-to-day research and shakes up your priority list. However, we unanimously agree that the rewards, both in the short as well as the long term, make the time spent on these extracurricular activities more than worth it. In this article, we will explain what makes this so worthwhile: soft skills. PMID:24992198

  14. Soft skills: an important asset acquired from organizing regional student group activities.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, Jeroen; Meysman, Pieter; Oluwagbemi, Olugbenga; Abeel, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Contributing to a student organization, such as the International Society for Computational Biology Student Council (ISCB-SC) and its Regional Student Group (RSG) program, takes time and energy. Both are scarce commodities, especially when you are trying to find your place in the world of computational biology as a graduate student. It comes as no surprise that organizing ISCB-SC-related activities sometimes interferes with day-to-day research and shakes up your priority list. However, we unanimously agree that the rewards, both in the short as well as the long term, make the time spent on these extracurricular activities more than worth it. In this article, we will explain what makes this so worthwhile: soft skills.

  15. Cytotoxic Activity of Pyrovalerone Derivatives, an Emerging Group of Psychostimulant Designer Cathinones.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszak, Jakub; Andrzejczak, Dariusz; Woldan-Tambor, Agata; Zawilska, Jolanta B

    2016-08-01

    The growing popularity of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) has aroused the concerns of public health specialists. The pyrovalerone derivatives are a branch of synthetic cathinones, a very popular group of psychostimulant NPS. Despite numerous case reports of fatal intoxications, little is known about the cytotoxicity of these substances. Therefore, this study was aimed to evaluate the toxic properties of pyrovalerone, its highly prevalent derivative 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (3,4-MDPV) with its two major metabolites (catechol-MDPV and methylcatechol-MDPV) and the structural isomer 2,3-MDPV, together with newer members of the group, i.e., α-pyrrolidinovalerothiophenone (α-PVT) and α-pyrrolidinooctanophenone (PV9), using model human cell lines for neurons (SH-SY5Y), hepatocytes (Hep G2), and upper airway epithelium (RPMI 2650). We found that the first generation pyrovalerones (pyrovalerone, 3,4-MDPV, and 2,3-MDPV) produced a modest decrease of mitochondrial activity in the three examined cell lines, but were active in lower concentrations than methamphetamine used as a reference psychostimulant compound. Since catechol-MDPV displayed greater toxic potential than the parent compound, we suggest that the toxicity of 3,4-MDPV could be attributed to activity of this metabolite. Strikingly, the two new generation pyrovalerones, α-PVT and PV9, seem to be the most potent cytotoxic compounds: both induced highly pronounced mitochondrial dysfunction; the latter also demonstrated significant damage to cell membranes. The reported in vitro toxic activity of pyrovalerone cathinones against different cell types reinforces existing concerns regarding the health risks associated with the intake of these drugs. PMID:27295059

  16. Density-matrix renormalization group algorithm with multi-level active space.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingjin; Wen, Jing; Ma, Haibo

    2015-07-21

    The density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method, which can deal with a large active space composed of tens of orbitals, is nowadays widely used as an efficient addition to traditional complete active space (CAS)-based approaches. In this paper, we present the DMRG algorithm with a multi-level (ML) control of the active space based on chemical intuition-based hierarchical orbital ordering, which is called as ML-DMRG with its self-consistent field (SCF) variant ML-DMRG-SCF. Ground and excited state calculations of H2O, N2, indole, and Cr2 with comparisons to DMRG references using fixed number of kept states (M) illustrate that ML-type DMRG calculations can obtain noticeable efficiency gains. It is also shown that the orbital re-ordering based on hierarchical multiple active subspaces may be beneficial for reducing computational time for not only ML-DMRG calculations but also DMRG ones with fixed M values. PMID:26203012

  17. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices?

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Lesley J.; Joyce, Domino A.

    2015-01-01

    Audience response systems (‘clickers’) are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost) can be overcome using students’ personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using questionnaires, we compare student perceptions of clicker and smartphone based polling systems. We find that students prefer interactive lectures generally, but those that used their own device preferred those lectures over lectures using clickers. However, device users were more likely to report using their devices for other purposes (checking email, social media etc.) when they were available to answer polling questions. These students did not feel that this distracted them from the lecture, instead, concerns over the use of smartphones centred around increased battery usage and inclusivity for students without access to suitable technology. Our results suggest that students generally preferred to use their own devices over clickers, and that this may be a sensible way to overcome some of the limitations associated with clickers, although issues surrounding levels of distraction and the implications for retention and recall of information need further investigation. PMID:26594327

  18. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices?

    PubMed

    Morrell, Lesley J; Joyce, Domino A

    2015-01-01

    Audience response systems ('clickers') are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost) can be overcome using students' personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using questionnaires, we compare student perceptions of clicker and smartphone based polling systems. We find that students prefer interactive lectures generally, but those that used their own device preferred those lectures over lectures using clickers. However, device users were more likely to report using their devices for other purposes (checking email, social media etc.) when they were available to answer polling questions. These students did not feel that this distracted them from the lecture, instead, concerns over the use of smartphones centred around increased battery usage and inclusivity for students without access to suitable technology. Our results suggest that students generally preferred to use their own devices over clickers, and that this may be a sensible way to overcome some of the limitations associated with clickers, although issues surrounding levels of distraction and the implications for retention and recall of information need further investigation. PMID:26594327

  19. The role of beaded activated carbon's surface oxygen groups on irreversible adsorption of organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the contribution of surface oxygen groups to irreversible adsorption (aka heel formation) during cyclic adsorption/regeneration of organic vapors commonly found in industrial systems, including vehicle-painting operations. For this purpose, three chemically modified activated carbon samples, including two oxygen-deficient (hydrogen-treated and heat-treated) and one oxygen-rich sample (nitric acid-treated) were prepared. The samples were tested for 5 adsorption/regeneration cycles using a mixture of nine organic compounds. For the different samples, mass balance cumulative heel was 14 and 20% higher for oxygen functionalized and hydrogen-treated samples, respectively, relative to heat-treated sample. Thermal analysis results showed heel formation due to physisorption for the oxygen-deficient samples, and weakened physisorption combined with chemisorption for the oxygen-rich sample. Chemisorption was attributed to consumption of surface oxygen groups by adsorbed species, resulting in formation of high boiling point oxidation byproducts or bonding between the adsorbates and the surface groups. Pore size distributions indicated that different pore sizes contributed to heel formation - narrow micropores (<7Å) in the oxygen-deficient samples and midsize micropores (7-12Å) in the oxygen-rich sample. The results from this study help explain the heel formation mechanism and how it relates to chemically tailored adsorbent materials. PMID:27295065

  20. A pilot study of ambulatory masticatory muscle activities in TMJD diagnostic groups

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, LR; Gonzalez, YM; Liu, H; Marx, DB; Gallo, LM; Nickel, JC

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine differences in masticatory muscle usage between TMJD diagnostic groups. Setting and Sample Population Seventy-one informed and consented subjects (27 men; 44 women) participated at the University at Buffalo. Material and Methods Research Diagnostic Criteria and imaging data were used to categorize subjects according to presence/absence (+/−) of TMJ disc placement (DD) and chronic pain (P) (+DD+P, n=18; +DD-P, n =14; −DD-P, n=39). EMG/bite-force calibrations determined subject-specific masseter and temporalis muscle activities per 20 N bite-force (T20N, μV). Over 3 days and nights subjects collected EMG recordings. Duty factors (DFs, % of recording time) were determined based on threshold intervals (5–9, 10–24, 25–49, 50–79, ≥80%T20N). ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer post-hoc tests identified (i) diagnostic group differences in T20N, and (ii) effects of diagnostic group, gender, time, and interval, and on muscle DFs. Results Mean (±standard error) temporalis T20N in +DD+P subjects was significantly higher (71.4±8.8 μV) than masseter T20N in these subjects (19.6±8.8 μV; P=0.001) and in −DD-P subjects (25.3±6.0 μV, P=0.0007). Masseter DFs at 5–9%T20N were significantly higher in +DD-P women (3.48%) than +DD-P men (0.85%) and women and men in both other diagnostic groups (all P<0.03); and in +DD+P women (2.00%) compared to −DD-P men (0.83%; P=0.029). Night-time DFs at 5–9%T20N in +DD-P women (1.97%) were significantly higher than in −DD-P men (0.47%) and women (0.24%; all P<0.01). Conclusions Between-group differences were found in masticatory muscle activities in both laboratory and natural environmental settings. PMID:25865543