Science.gov

Sample records for active lever responding

  1. Body Levers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiappetta, Eugene L.

    1987-01-01

    Explains how the muscle and bone arrangement of the human body can be used in teaching the principles of simple machines. Presents an activity that investigates the lever system of the forearm. Includes background information on levers and suggests questions for classroom discussion. (ML)

  2. Differential Acquisition of Lever Pressing in Inbred and Outbred Mice: Comparison of One-Lever and Two-Lever Procedures and Correlation with Differences in Locomotor Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKerchar, Todd L.; Zarcone, Troy J.; Fowler, Stephen C.

    2005-01-01

    Recent progress in mouse genetics has led to an increased interest in developing procedures for assessing mouse behavior, but relatively few of the behavioral procedures developed involve positively reinforced operant behavior. When operant methods are used, nose poking, not lever pressing, is the target response. In the current study differential…

  3. Shoulder Muscular Demand During Lever-Activated Vs Pushrim Wheelchair Propulsion in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Requejo, Philip Santos; Lee, Sharon E; Mulroy, Sara J; Haubert, Lisa Lighthall; Bontrager, Ernest L; Gronley, JoAnne K; Perry, Jacquelin

    2008-01-01

    Background/Objective: The high demand on the upper limbs during manual wheelchair (WC) use contributes to a high prevalence of shoulder pathology in people with spinal cord injury (SCI). Lever-activated (LEVER) WCs have been presented as a less demanding alternative mode of manual WC propulsion. The objective of this study was to evaluate the shoulder muscle electromyographic activity and propulsion characteristics in manual WC users with SCI propelling a standard pushrim (ST) and LEVER WC design. Methods: Twenty men with complete injuries (ASIA A or B) and tetraplegia (C6, n = 5; C7, n = 7) or paraplegia (n = 8) secondary to SCI propelled ST and LEVER WCs at 3 propulsion conditions on a stationary ergometer: self-selected free, self-selected fast, and simulated graded resistance. Average velocity, cycle distance, and cadence; median and peak electromyographic intensity; and duration of electromyography of anterior deltoid, pectoralis major, supraspinatus, and infraspinatus muscles were compared between LEVER and ST WC propulsion. Results: Significant decreases in pectoralis major and supraspinatus activity were recorded during LEVER compared with ST WC propulsion. However, anterior deltoid and infraspinatus intensities tended to increase during LEVER WC propulsion. Participants with tetraplegia had similar or greater anterior deltoid, pectoralis major, and infraspinatus activity for both ST and LEVER WC propulsion compared with the men with paraplegia. Conclusions: Use of the LEVER WC reduced and shifted the shoulder muscular demands in individuals with paraplegia and tetraplegia. Further studies are needed to determine the impact of LEVER WC propulsion on long-term shoulder function. PMID:19086715

  4. Acquisition of operant behavior in rats with delayed reinforcement: A retractable-lever procedure.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Andrew A; Johnson, Lyndsey E; Tate, Christopher; Chiang, Thomas; Byrne, Tom

    2015-02-01

    Experimentally naïve rats acquired lever pressing with delayed reinforcement when the immediate programmed consequence for lever pressing was the simultaneous retraction of two identical levers. Presses on one lever also produced access to sweetened condensed milk after a delay of 10s following retraction. Presses on the second lever resulted in retraction only. Lever retraction prevented the possibility of adventitious reinforcement of contacting the operanda during the reinforcement delays. Several measures indicated that the delayed reinforcers strengthened behavior. The majority of responses for all rats were on the lever that initiated reinforcer delivery. Responding for seven out of eight rats decreased during a subsequent extinction phase in which retraction was the only consequence arranged for lever pressing. Responding recovered rapidly when food reinforcement was available again. Furthermore, when contingencies on the two levers were switched, rats allocated their behavior accordingly, showing control by the delayed reinforcers. PMID:25464338

  5. Acquisition and Maintenance of Lever Pressing with Prolonged Exposure to Delayed Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vansickel, Andrea; White, Victoria; Byrne, Tom

    2004-01-01

    The present study investigated acquisition and extinction of free-operant responding when rats' lever presses produced sucrose pellets after resetting delays of 10 or 20 s. Presses on a second lever cancelled any scheduled food deliveries. Although previous research using 60-s delays failed to demonstrate maintenance of responding across repeated…

  6. Lever-press conditioning in the crab.

    PubMed

    Abramson, C I; Feinman, R D

    1990-08-01

    An operant chamber has been developed for studying lever-press conditioning in the green crab Carcinus maenas. In one series of experiments, animals were presented with a single bar and were reinforced with food for every bar press. Performance increased over time and high rates of responding were observed after 2 days of training. The response rate was always higher than that for a yoked (noncontingent) control group. When the contingencies were switched, the animals adjusted to the new conditions. Discrimination in the lever-press apparatus was demonstrated in a second experiment in which crabs had to choose between two bars, one (S+) caused food to be dispensed while the other (S-) was inactive. Experimental animals pressed the S+ bar at a significantly higher rate than the S- bar. When the contingencies associated with the lever were reversed, animals learned to switch to the correct bar by the second day. It was not necessary to reinforce every response: animals maintained high rates of responding on a schedule where every other response was reinforced. Animals used different methods of pressing the bar; the most common was extension of the claw, predominantly at the meropodite-carpopodite joint. PMID:2255730

  7. Lightweight Seat Lever Operation Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajulu, Sudhakar

    1999-01-01

    In 1999, a Shuttle crew member was unable to operate the backrest lever for the lightweight seat in microgravity. It is essential that crew members can adjust this backrest lever, which is titled forward during launch and then moved backward upon reaching orbit. This adjustment is needed to cushion the crew members during an inadvertent crash landing situation. JSCs Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) performed an evaluation of the seat controls and provided recommendations on whether the seat lever positions and operations should be modified. The original Shuttle seats were replaced with new lightweight seats whose controls were moved, with one control at the front and the other at the back. The ABF designed a 12-person experiment to investigate the amount of pull force exerted by suited subjects, when controls were placed in the front and back of the lightweight seat. Each subject was asked to perform the pull test at least three times for each combination of lever position and suit pressure conditions. The results showed that, in general, the subjects were able to pull on the lever at the back position with only about half the amount of force that they were able to exert on the lever at the front position. In addition, the results also showed that subjects wearing the pressurized suit were unable to reach the seat lever when it was located at the back. The pull forces on the front lever diminished about 50% when subjects wore pressurized suits. Based on these results from this study, it was recommended that the levers should not be located in the back position. Further investigation is needed to determine whether the levers at the front of the seat could be modified or adjusted to increase the leverage for crew members wearing pressurized launch/escape suits.

  8. Quick-Release Pin With Lever Action

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    Lever-action quick-release pin operated more easily. Mechanism operated with gloved hand. In modified version, lever added to handle to facilitate actuation. Lever action reduces actuation force. Lever-action pin operated by squeezing on any point of moveable ends of lever and handle together between thumb and forefinger or by simply grasping and squeezing handle and lever with entire hand in more natural grasp.

  9. Predicting Classroom Achievement from Active Responding on a Computer-Based Groupware System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Jongho; Deno, Stanley L.; Robinson, Steven L.; Marston, Douglas

    2000-01-01

    The predictive validity of active responding on a computer-based groupware system was examined with 48 second graders. Results showed that active responding correlated highly with initial and final performance measures and that active responding contributed significantly to predicting final performance when initial performance was controlled.…

  10. Characterization of radiation-induced performance decrement using a two-lever shock-avoidance task

    SciTech Connect

    Burghardt, W.F. Jr.; Hunt, W.A.

    1985-07-01

    Rats were trained to perform a task involving responses on two levers. Responding on an avoidance lever delayed the onset of electrical footshock for 20 sec and responding on a warning lever turned on a light for 60 sec. When the light was on, the task on the avoidance lever was changed from unsignaled shock avoidance to signaled shock avoidance by preceding the shocks with 5-sec warning tones. The animals preferred the signaled avoidance condition. After 100 Gy of /sup 60/Co irradiation, the animals were less able to avoid shock, an effect from which the animals recovered somewhat over 90 min. The response rate on the avoidance lever remained at or above control rates, while the response rate on the warning lever showed an initial increase, followed by a decrease below baseline. The data suggest that under these experimental conditions a subject will not respond appropriately to avoid shock or acquire cues that can facilitate the avoidance of shock. The effects, however, do not reflect an inability to perform the required movements but instead appear to reflect some characteristic of the task associated with a particular lever.

  11. Effects of muscimol, amphetamine, and DAMGO injected into the nucleus accumbens shell on food-reinforced lever pressing by undeprived rats

    PubMed Central

    Stratford, Thomas R.; Wirtshafter, David

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that large increases in food intake in nondeprived animals can be induced by injections of both the GABAA agonist muscimol and the μ-opioid agonist DAMGO into the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), while injections of the catecholamine agonist amphetamine have little effect. In the current study we examined whether injections of these drugs are able to increase food-reinforced lever pressing in nondeprived rats. Twelve subjects were trained to lever press on a continuous reinforcement schedule while food deprived and were then tested after being placed back on ad libitum feeding. Under these conditions, responding was markedly increased by injections of either muscimol or DAMGO, although the onset of the effects of the latter drug were delayed by 30–40 min In contrast, amphetamine injections failed to increase reinforced lever pressing, although they did enhance responding on a non-reinforced lever, presumably reflecting alterations in behavioral activation. These results demonstrate that stimulation of GABAA and μ-opioid receptors within the AcbSh is able to promote not only food intake, but also food-directed operant behavior. In contrast, stimulation of AcbSh dopamine receptors may enhance behavioral arousal, but does not appear to specifically potentiate behaviors directed towards food procurement. PMID:22366216

  12. 49 CFR 236.764 - Locking, lever operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Locking, lever operated. 236.764 Section 236.764... Locking, lever operated. The mechanical locking of an interlocking machine which is actuated by means of the lever....

  13. 49 CFR 236.764 - Locking, lever operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locking, lever operated. 236.764 Section 236.764... Locking, lever operated. The mechanical locking of an interlocking machine which is actuated by means of the lever....

  14. 49 CFR 236.764 - Locking, lever operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locking, lever operated. 236.764 Section 236.764... Locking, lever operated. The mechanical locking of an interlocking machine which is actuated by means of the lever....

  15. 49 CFR 236.764 - Locking, lever operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Locking, lever operated. 236.764 Section 236.764... Locking, lever operated. The mechanical locking of an interlocking machine which is actuated by means of the lever....

  16. 14. INTERIOR OF MAIN DECKNOTE LEVERS FROM CEILING CONTROLLED BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR OF MAIN DECK--NOTE LEVERS FROM CEILING CONTROLLED BY OPERATOR. LEFT HAND LEVER CONTROLLED THROTTLE, RIGHT HAND LEVER CONTROLLED SHOT GUN SWINGER. - Dredge CINCINNATI, Docked on Ohio River at foot of Lighthill Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  17. Human Serum-Specific Activation of Alternative Sigma Factors, the Stress Responders in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Tang-Siegel, Gaoyan; Bumgarner, Roger; Ruiz, Teresa; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Chen, Weizhen; Chen, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a known pathogen causing periodontal disease and infective endocarditis, is a survivor in the periodontal pocket and blood stream; both environments contain serum as a nutrient source. To screen for unknown virulence factors associated with this microorganism, A. actinomycetemcomitans was grown in serum-based media to simulate its in vivo environment. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed distinct growth phenotypes only in the presence of human serum, and they were grouped into high- and low-responder groups. High-responders comprised mainly serotype c strains, and showed an unusual growth phenomenon, featuring a second, rapid increase in turbidity after 9-h incubation that reached a final optical density 2- to 7-fold higher than low-responders. Upon further investigation, the second increase in turbidity was not caused by cell multiplication, but by cell death. Whole transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq identified 35 genes that were up-regulated by human serum, but not horse serum, in high-responders but not in low-responders, including prominently an alternative sigma factor rpoE (σE). A lacZ reporter construct driven by the 132-bp rpoE promoter sequence of A. actinomycetemcomitans responded dramatically to human serum within 90 min of incubation only when the construct was carried by a high responder strain. The rpoE promoter is 100% identical among high- and low-responder strains. Proteomic investigation showed potential interactions between human serum protein, e.g. apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The data clearly indicated a different activation process for rpoE in high- versus low-responder strains. This differential human serum-specific activation of rpoE, a putative extra-cytoplasmic stress responder and global regulator, suggests distinct in vivo adaptations among different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:27490177

  18. Human Serum-Specific Activation of Alternative Sigma Factors, the Stress Responders in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Tang-Siegel, Gaoyan; Bumgarner, Roger; Ruiz, Teresa; Kittichotirat, Weerayuth; Chen, Weizhen; Chen, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a known pathogen causing periodontal disease and infective endocarditis, is a survivor in the periodontal pocket and blood stream; both environments contain serum as a nutrient source. To screen for unknown virulence factors associated with this microorganism, A. actinomycetemcomitans was grown in serum-based media to simulate its in vivo environment. Different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans showed distinct growth phenotypes only in the presence of human serum, and they were grouped into high- and low-responder groups. High-responders comprised mainly serotype c strains, and showed an unusual growth phenomenon, featuring a second, rapid increase in turbidity after 9-h incubation that reached a final optical density 2- to 7-fold higher than low-responders. Upon further investigation, the second increase in turbidity was not caused by cell multiplication, but by cell death. Whole transcriptomic analysis via RNA-seq identified 35 genes that were up-regulated by human serum, but not horse serum, in high-responders but not in low-responders, including prominently an alternative sigma factor rpoE (σE). A lacZ reporter construct driven by the 132-bp rpoE promoter sequence of A. actinomycetemcomitans responded dramatically to human serum within 90 min of incubation only when the construct was carried by a high responder strain. The rpoE promoter is 100% identical among high- and low-responder strains. Proteomic investigation showed potential interactions between human serum protein, e.g. apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) and A. actinomycetemcomitans. The data clearly indicated a different activation process for rpoE in high- versus low-responder strains. This differential human serum-specific activation of rpoE, a putative extra-cytoplasmic stress responder and global regulator, suggests distinct in vivo adaptations among different strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:27490177

  19. Toward Development of a Fibromyalgia Responder Index and Disease Activity Score: OMERACT Module Update

    PubMed Central

    Mease, PJ; Clauw, DJ; Christensen, R; Crofford, L; Gendreau, M; Martin, SA; Simon, L; Strand, V; Williams, DA; Arnold, LM

    2012-01-01

    Following development of the core domain set for fibromyalgia (FM) in OMERACT 7–9, the FM working group has progressed toward the development of an FM responder index and a disease activity score based on these domains, utilizing outcome indices of these domains from archived randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in FM. Possible clinical domains that could be included in a responder index and disease activity score include: pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, cognitive dysfunction, mood disturbance, tenderness, stiffness, and functional impairment. Outcome measures for these domains demonstrate good to adequate psychometric properties, although measures of cognitive dysfunction need to be further developed. The approach used in the development of responder indices and disease activity scores for rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis represent heuristic models for our work, but FM is challenging in that there is no clear algorithm of treatment that defines disease activity based on treatment decisions, nor are there objective markers that define thresholds of severity or response to treatment. The process of developing candidate dichotomous responder definitions and continuous quantitative disease activity measures is described, as is participant discussion that transpired at OMERACT 10. Final results of this work will be published in a separate manuscript pending completion of analyses. PMID:21724721

  20. Manual shift control lever device and self-contained electronic control for transmissions

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, F.F.

    1986-09-09

    A unitized shift control lever device is described for the remote activation of an electrically controlled transmission comprising: a housing; a manually operable range selector lever pivotally supported in the housing for selective movements to predetermined operating positions respectively indicative of a required operating condition of an associated electrically controlled transmission; means in the housing providing a source of radiations; radiation controlled switching means for generating discrete control signals in response to the presence and non-presence of the radiations; means interposed in the radiation path between the source and the switching means operable in response to the movement of the range selector lever for selectively determining the presence or non-presence of the radiations with respect to the switching means at each range selector position of the lever; and electronic circuit control means having input connections for receiving the generated signals and output connections adapted for connection with electrically activated condition controlling devices on the transmission.

  1. The Lever oscillator for use in high resistance resonator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wessendorf, K.O.

    1993-07-01

    The Lever oscillator has been specifically designed for use with quartz resonator sensors. The use of quartz resonators as sensors is of particular interest and depending on the sensing environment, e.g., liquid, the oscillator design is both critical and difficult due to the wide dynamic range of resonator resistance possible due to damping of the resonator. Standard oscillator designs do not work well as sensor oscillators. An oscillator design will be presented that allows both frequency and loss (R{sub m}) of the resonator to be determined over a wide dynamic range of resonator loss. The Lever oscillator uses negative feedback in a differential amplifier configuration to actively and variably divide (or leverage) the resonator impedance such that the oscillator can maintain the phase and gain of the loop over a wide range of resonator resistance.

  2. Effect of Light/Dark Cycle on Wheel Running and Responding Reinforced by the Opportunity to Run Depends on Postsession Feeding Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belke, T. W.; Mondona, A. R.; Conrad, K. M.; Poirier, K. F.; Pickering, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    Do rats run and respond at a higher rate to run during the dark phase when they are typically more active? To answer this question, Long Evans rats were exposed to a response-initiated variable interval 30-s schedule of wheel-running reinforcement during light and dark cycles. Wheel-running and local lever-pressing rates increased modestly during…

  3. A Comparison of Active Student Responding Modalities in a General Psychology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zayac, Ryan M.; Ratkos, Thom; Frieder, Jessica E.; Paulk, Amber

    2016-01-01

    Research on teaching has shown that incorporating active student responding (ASR) into classroom instruction facilitates learning and should be considered best practice. Nevertheless, few published studies have examined ASR using a within-participant design across a semester. Using a counterbalanced alternating treatment design, a direct…

  4. Measuring How Muscles Function in Levers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, M. Edwin

    1996-01-01

    Presents an exercise that examines the lever systems that function in the chelae of the American lobster. Involves calculating the mechanical and distance advantages of the crusher and pincer chelae and estimating the actual forces generated by the contraction of the muscles and the magnitude of the forces transmitted around the fulcrum to the tip…

  5. Direct measurements of the coordination of lever arm swing and the catalytic cycle in myosin V

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Darshan V.; Muretta, Joseph M.; Swenson, Anja M.; Davis, Jonathon P.; Thomas, David D.; Yengo, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Myosins use a conserved structural mechanism to convert the energy from ATP hydrolysis into a large swing of the force-generating lever arm. The precise timing of the lever arm movement with respect to the steps in the actomyosin ATPase cycle has not been determined. We have developed a FRET system in myosin V that uses three donor–acceptor pairs to examine the kinetics of lever arm swing during the recovery and power stroke phases of the ATPase cycle. During the recovery stroke the lever arm swing is tightly coupled to priming the active site for ATP hydrolysis. The lever arm swing during the power stroke occurs in two steps, a fast step that occurs before phosphate release and a slow step that occurs before ADP release. Time-resolved FRET demonstrates a 20-Å change in distance between the pre- and postpower stroke states and shows that the lever arm is more dynamic in the postpower stroke state. Our results suggest myosin binding to actin in the ADP.Pi complex triggers a rapid power stroke that gates the release of phosphate, whereas a second slower power stroke may be important for mediating strain sensitivity. PMID:26553992

  6. DETAIL OF STANDARD INTERLOCKING MACHINE OPERATING LEVERS. LOCKING MECHANISM IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF STANDARD INTERLOCKING MACHINE OPERATING LEVERS. LOCKING MECHANISM IS BELOW FLOOR. BOXES BEHIND SOME LEVERS HOUSE ELECTRICAL CONTACTS FOR SIGNALS. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Z Tower, State Route 46, Keyser, Mineral County, WV

  7. Prior alcohol consumption does not impair go/no-go discrimination learning, but causes over-responding on go trials, in rats.

    PubMed

    Pickens, Charles L; Fisher, Hayley; Bright, Nicholas; Gallo, Mark; Ray, Madelyn H; Anji, Antje; Kumari, Meena

    2016-10-01

    Prior alcohol use is associated with impaired response inhibition in humans, including in laboratory go/no-go discrimination tasks. In two experiments, we determined whether chronic intermittent access to alcohol would alter go/no-go discrimination learning. Rats received 4-6 weeks of chronic intermittent access to 20% alcohol (alone or accompanied by saline or 1.5g/kg alcohol injections) or water. Rats then began discrimination training 4-5days after the end of the alcohol access. Each lever was available for 40s with one lever intermittently reinforced ("active lever") and the other lever non-reinforced ("inactive lever"). The rats given access to alcohol without concurrent alcohol injections drank ∼10g/kg/24-h on average during the last three weeks of alcohol access. The groups given alcohol injections (Alcohol+Injection groups) exhibited suppressed drinking, but the Alcohol+Injection groups exhibited higher blood alcohol spikes than all other alcohol groups (195 vs. 85-90mg/dl, respectively). We found no evidence for impaired go/no-go discrimination learning in either experiment. However, the alcohol access groups with moderate-to-high average alcohol consumption (>3g/kg/24-h) exhibited over-responding to the active lever compared to the water-only groups. One group given alcohol injections (Alcohol+Injection group) that exhibited very low voluntary drinking (<1g/kg/24-h) did not exhibit the over-responding effect, suggesting that the total 24-h alcohol dose matters more than short-lived blood alcohol spikes. Our findings are in accord with previous research showing that repeated alcohol withdrawal causes over-responding for responses that lead to limited reinforcement. Future work will determine the psychological and neurobiological basis of this behavioral change. PMID:27327103

  8. Power lever apparatus for a turbine engine

    SciTech Connect

    McCombs Jr., H. L.

    1985-05-21

    In a turbine engine having a compressor with a bleed valve and a variable geometry apparatus is responsive to an operational control member for regulating the flow rate of fuel supplied the turbine engine as a function of atmospheric pressure and the temperature of air supplied to the compressor corresponding to movement of a power lever by an operator to a desired operation of the turbine engine. The power lever has an indicator member fluidically connected to a follower member linked to the operational control member. The fluidic connection is responsive to operational parameters of the turbine engine and limits the rotational input to the follower member when the rate of fuel flow could cause stalling and the development of an unacceptable operating temperature or overspeed condition in the turbine engine.

  9. A randomized open trial assessing the feasibility of behavioral activation for pathological grief responding.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anthony; Sewell, M Todd; Garrison-Diehn, Christina; Rummel, Clair

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using behavioral activation to treat enduring postbereavement mental health difficulties using a two-arm, multiple baseline design comparing an immediate start group to a delayed start group at baseline, 12-, 24-, and 36-weeks postrandomization. Participants received 12-14 sessions of behavioral activation within a 12-week intervention period starting immediately after the first assessment or after 12weeks for the delayed start group. Prolonged grief, posttraumatic stress, and depression symptoms were assessed as outcomes. Compared with no treatment, behavioral activation was associated with large reductions in prolonged, complicated, or traumatic grief; posttraumatic stress disorder; and depression symptoms in the intent-to-treat analyses. Seventy percent of the completer sample at posttreatment and 75 percent at follow-up responded to treatment with 45 percent at posttreatment and 40 percent at follow-up being classified as evidencing high-end state functioning at 12-week follow-up. PMID:24094789

  10. Co-existence of classical and alternative activation programs in macrophages responding to Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Zhao, Yanlin; Shah, Suhagi; Fox, Barbara A.; Rommereim, Leah M.; Bzik, David J.; Yap, George S.

    2013-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages are critical for defense against intracellular pathogens while alternatively-activated M2 macrophages mediate tissue homeostasis and repair. Whether these distinct activation programs are mutually exclusive or can co-exist within the same cell is unclear. Here, we report the co-existence of these programs in Toxoplasma gondii-elicited inflammatory macrophages. This is independent of parasite expression of the virulence factor ROP16 and host cell expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6). Furthermore, this observation was recapitulated by IFN-γ and IL-4 treated bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These results highlight the multi-functionality of macrophages as they respond to diverse microbial and endogenous stimuli. PMID:24083945

  11. Co-existence of classical and alternative activation programs in macrophages responding to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Zhao, Yanlin; Shah, Suhagi; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Bzik, David J; Yap, George S

    2014-02-01

    Pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages are critical for defense against intracellular pathogens while alternatively-activated M2 macrophages mediate tissue homeostasis and repair. Whether these distinct activation programs are mutually exclusive or can co-exist within the same cell is unclear. Here, we report the co-existence of these programs in Toxoplasma gondii-elicited inflammatory macrophages. This is independent of parasite expression of the virulence factor ROP16 and host cell expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6). Furthermore, this observation was recapitulated by IFN-γ and IL-4 treated bone marrow-derived macrophages in vitro. These results highlight the multi-functionality of macrophages as they respond to diverse microbial and endogenous stimuli. PMID:24083945

  12. MEIS C termini harbor transcriptional activation domains that respond to cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Rastegar, Mojgan; Bodner, Caroline; Goh, Siew-Lee; Rambaldi, Isabel; Featherstone, Mark

    2005-03-18

    MEIS proteins form heteromeric DNA-binding complexes with PBX monomers and PBX.HOX heterodimers. We have shown previously that transcriptional activation by PBX.HOX is augmented by either protein kinase A (PKA) or the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). To examine the contribution of MEIS proteins to this response, we used the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to show that MEIS1 in addition to PBX1, HOXA1, and HOXB1 was recruited to a known PBX.HOX target, the Hoxb1 autoregulatory element following Hoxb1 transcriptional activation in P19 cells. Subsequent to TSA treatment, MEIS1 recruitment lagged behind that of HOX and PBX partners. MEIS1A also enhanced the transcriptional activation of a reporter construct bearing the Hoxb1 autoregulatory element after treatment with TSA. The MEIS1 homeodomain and protein-protein interaction with PBX contributed to this activity. We further mapped TSA-responsive and CREB-binding protein-dependent PKA-responsive transactivation domains to the MEIS1A and MEIS1B C termini. Fine mutation of the 56-residue MEIS1A C terminus revealed four discrete regions required for transcriptional activation function. All of the mutations impairing the response to TSA likewise reduced activation by PKA, implying a common mechanistic basis. C-terminal deletion of MEIS1 impaired transactivation without disrupting DNA binding or complex formation with HOX and PBX. Despite sequence similarity to MEIS and a shared ability to form heteromeric complexes with PBX and HOX partners, the PREP1 C terminus does not respond to TSA or PKA. Thus, MEIS C termini possess transcriptional regulatory domains that respond to cell signaling and confer functional differences between MEIS and PREP proteins. PMID:15654074

  13. Repeated Activation of a CS-US-Contingency Memory Results in Sustained Conditioned Responding.

    PubMed

    Joos, Els; Vansteenwegen, Debora; Vervliet, Bram; Hermans, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Individuals seem to differ in conditionability, i.e., the ease by which the contingent presentation of two stimuli will lead to a conditioned response. In contemporary learning theory, individual differences in the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders are, among others, explained by individual differences in temperamental variables (Mineka and Zinbarg, 2006). One such individual difference variable is how people process a learning experience when the conditioning stimuli are no longer present. Repeatedly thinking about the conditioning experience, as in worry or rumination, might prolong the initial (fear) reactions and as such, might leave certain individuals more vulnerable to developing an anxiety disorder. However, in human conditioning research, relatively little attention has been devoted to the processing of a memory trace after its initial acquisition, despite its potential influences on subsequent performance. Post-acquisition processing can be induced by mental reiteration of a conditioned stimulus-unconditioned stimulus (CS-US)-contingency. Using a human conditioned suppression paradigm, we investigated the effect of repeated activations of a CS-US-contingency memory on the level of conditioned responding at a later test. Results of three experiments showed more sustained responding to a "rehearsed" CS+ as compared to a "non-rehearsed" CS+. Moreover, the second experiment showed no effect of rehearsal when only the CS was rehearsed instead of the CS-US-contingency. The third experiment demonstrated that mental CS-US-rehearsal has the same effect regardless of whether it was cued by the CS and a verbal reference to the US or by a neutral signal, making the rehearsal "purely mental." In sum, it was demonstrated that post-acquisition activation of a CS-US-contingency memory can impact conditioned responding, underlining the importance of post-acquisition processes in conditioning. This might indicate that individuals who are more prone to mentally

  14. NK Cells Respond to Haptens by the Activation of Calcium Permeable Plasma Membrane Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grandclément, Camille; Pick, Horst; Vogel, Horst; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells mediate innate immunity to infected and transformed cells. Yet, NK cells can also mount hapten-specific recall responses thereby contributing to contact hypersensitivity (CHS). However, since NK cells lack antigen receptors that are used by the adaptive immune system to recognize haptens, it is not clear if NK cells respond directly to haptens and, if so, what mediates these responses. Here we show that among four haptens the two that are known to induce NK cell-dependent CHS trigger the rapid influx of extracellular Ca2+ into NK cells and lymphocyte cell lines. Thus lymphocytes can respond to haptens independent of antigen presentation and antigen receptors. We identify the Ca2+-permeable cation channel TRPC3 as a component of the lymphocyte response to one of these haptens. These data suggest that the response to the second hapten is based on a distinct mechanism, consistent with the capacity of NK cells to discriminate haptens. These findings raise the possibility that antigen-receptor independent activation of immune cells contributes to CHS. PMID:26963818

  15. A method for measurement of static lever arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xianglu; Qin, Shiqiao; Wang, Xingshu; Wu, Wei; Hu, Feng; Zheng, JiaXing

    2016-01-01

    Lever arm effect has to be considered in transfer alignment technology. Between static lever arm and dynamic lever arm, the former has larger amplitude, and it is the major error source in transfer alignment. How to measure and solve it become an important problem. This paper takes vehicle as a rigid body. Assume that static lever arm does not change in a short time, based on two inertial measurement units(IMU), data are measured and constituted several matrixes properly. After that, by using least square method, static lever arm is solved finally. Simulation experiments are implemented, results show that static lever arm can be solved effectively. Further study shows that, the precision of the method can be improved by preprocessing low pass filter.

  16. Periostin Responds to Mechanical Stress and Tension by Activating the MTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rosselli-Murai, Luciana K.; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Volk, Sarah L.; Murai, Marcelo J.; Rios, Hector F.; Squarize, Cristiane H.; Castilho, Rogerio M.

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge about Periostin biology has expanded from its recognized functions in embryogenesis and bone metabolism to its roles in tissue repair and remodeling and its clinical implications in cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that Periostin plays a critical role in the mechanism of wound healing; however, the paracrine effect of Periostin in epithelial cell biology is still poorly understood. We found that epithelial cells are capable of producing endogenous Periostin that, unlike mesenchymal cell, cannot be secreted. Epithelial cells responded to Periostin paracrine stimuli by enhancing cellular migration and proliferation and by activating the mTOR signaling pathway. Interestingly, biomechanical stimulation of epithelial cells, which simulates tension forces that occur during initial steps of tissue healing, induced Periostin production and mTOR activation. The molecular association of Periostin and mTOR signaling was further dissected by administering rapamycin, a selective pharmacological inhibitor of mTOR, and by disruption of Raptor and Rictor scaffold proteins implicated in the regulation of mTORC1 and mTORC2 complex assembly. Both strategies resulted in ablation of Periostin-induced mitogenic and migratory activity. These results indicate that Periostin-induced epithelial migration and proliferation requires mTOR signaling. Collectively, our findings identify Periostin as a mechanical stress responsive molecule that is primarily secreted by fibroblasts during wound healing and expressed endogenously in epithelial cells resulting in the control of cellular physiology through a mechanism mediated by the mTOR signaling cascade. PMID:24349533

  17. Acetylation of MnSOD directs enzymatic activity responding to cellular nutrient status or oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Ozkan; Park, Seong-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jiang, Haiyan; Coleman, Mitchell C; Spitz, Douglas R; Gius, David

    2011-02-01

    A fundamental observation in biology is that mitochondrial function, as measured by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), changes significantly with age, suggesting a potential mechanistic link between the cellular processes governing longevity and mitochondrial metabolism homeostasis. In addition, it is well established that altered ROS levels are observed in multiple age-related illnesses including carcinogenesis, neurodegenerative, fatty liver, insulin resistance, and cardiac disease, to name just a few. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is the primary mitochondrial ROS scavenging enzyme that converts superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, which is subsequently converted to water by catalase and other peroxidases. It has recently been shown that MnSOD enzymatic activity is regulated by the reversible acetylation of specific, evolutionarily conserved lysine(s) in the protein. These results, suggest for the first time, that the mitochondria contain bidirectional post-translational signaling networks, similar to that observed in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and that changes in lysine acetylation alter MnSOD enzymatic activity. In addition, these new results demonstrate that the mitochondrial anti-aging or fidelity / sensing protein, SIRT3, responds to changes in mitochondrial nutrient and/or redox status to alter the enzymatic activity of specific downstream targets, including MnSOD that adjusts and/or maintains ROS levels as well as metabolic homeostatic poise. PMID:21386137

  18. Visual avoidance in phobia: particularities in neural activity, autonomic responding, and cognitive risk evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Aue, Tatjana; Hoeppli, Marie-Eve; Piguet, Camille; Sterpenich, Virginie; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the neural mechanisms and the autonomic and cognitive responses associated with visual avoidance behavior in spider phobia. Spider phobic and control participants imagined visiting different forest locations with the possibility of encountering spiders, snakes, or birds (neutral reference category). In each experimental trial, participants saw a picture of a forest location followed by a picture of a spider, snake, or bird, and then rated their personal risk of encountering these animals in this context, as well as their fear. The greater the visual avoidance of spiders that a phobic participant demonstrated (as measured by eye tracking), the higher were her autonomic arousal and neural activity in the amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and precuneus at picture onset. Visual avoidance of spiders in phobics also went hand in hand with subsequently reduced cognitive risk of encounters. Control participants, in contrast, displayed a positive relationship between gaze duration toward spiders, on the one hand, and autonomic responding, as well as OFC, ACC, and precuneus activity, on the other hand. In addition, they showed reduced encounter risk estimates when they looked longer at the animal pictures. Our data are consistent with the idea that one reason for phobics to avoid phobic information may be grounded in heightened activity in the fear circuit, which signals potential threat. Because of the absence of alternative efficient regulation strategies, visual avoidance may then function to down-regulate cognitive risk evaluations for threatening information about the phobic stimuli. Control participants, in contrast, may be characterized by a different coping style, whereby paying visual attention to potentially threatening information may help them to actively down-regulate cognitive evaluations of risk. PMID:23754994

  19. How does lever length and the position of its axis of rotation influence human performance during lever wheelchair propulsion?

    PubMed

    Fiok, Krzysztof; Mróz, Anna

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate empirically how lever length and its axis of rotation position influences human performance during lever wheelchair propulsion. In order to fulfill this goal, a dedicated test stand allowing easy implementation of various lever positions was created. In the experiment, 10 young, healthy, male subjects performed 8 tests consisting of propulsion work with levers of different lengths and lever axis of rotation positions. During tests heart rate, oxygen consumption and EMG assessment of 6 muscles was carried out. Measurements of power output on the test stand were done as well. Together with oxygen consumption analysis, this allowed calculation of human work efficiency. The results show significant (p<0.05 and p<0.001) differences between lever configurations when comparing various parameters values. From the carried out experiments, the authors conclude that levers' length and their axis of rotation position significantly influence human performance during lever wheelchair propulsion. For the examined subjects, placing the levers' axis of rotation close behind the back wheels axis of rotation offered advantageous work conditions. PMID:26142018

  20. Simulation model of a lever-propelled wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Makoto; Ota, Yuki; Hase, Kazunori; Stefanov, Dimitar; Yamaguchi, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Wheelchair efficiency depends significantly on the individual adjustment of the wheelchair propulsion interface. Wheelchair prescription involves reconfiguring the wheelchair to optimize it for specific user characteristics. Wheelchair tuning procedure is a complicated task that is performed usually by experienced rehabilitation engineers. In this study, we report initial results from the development of a musculoskeletal model of the wheelchair lever propulsion. Such a model could be used for the development of new advanced wheelchair approaches that allow wheelchair designers and practitioners to explore virtually, on a computer, the effects of the intended settings of the lever-propulsion interface. To investigate the lever-propulsion process, we carried out wheelchair lever propulsion experiments where joint angle, lever angle and three-directional forces and moments applied to the lever were recorded during the execution of defined propulsion motions. Kinematic and dynamic features of lever propulsion motions were extracted from the recorded data to be used for the model development. Five healthy male adults took part in these initial experiments. The analysis of the collected kinematic and dynamic motion parameters showed that lever propulsion is realized by a cyclical three-dimensional motion of upper extremities and that joint torque for propulsion is maintained within a certain range. The synthesized propulsion model was verified by computer simulation where the measured lever-angles were compared with the angles generated by the developed model simulation. Joint torque amplitudes were used to impose the torque limitation to the model joints. The results evidenced that the developed model can simulate successfully basic lever propulsion tasks such as pushing and pulling the lever. PMID:25571588

  1. Lever-type two-cycle internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, E.C.; Wenzel, S.T.

    1991-06-25

    This patent describes a lever type internal combustion engine. It comprises power cylinders arranged in side-by-side opposed pairs and disposed in a first horizontal plane, each provided with a piston and a piston rod pivotally connected at an inner end with the piston, a crankshaft supported for rotation about an axis lying in a second horizontal plane disposed in spaced parallel relationship with and below the first horizontal plane, and a lever system whereby the power cylinder pistons drive the crankshaft, the lever system, one for each pair of opposed power cylinders, comprising an elongate level arm pivotally interconnected at a first end with the outer ends of the piston rods, means including guide members disposed below the crankshaft for constraining a second end of the lever arm for up and down movement in a direction perpendicular to the first and second horizontal planes, and means for operatively connecting the lever arm at a point intermediate its first and second ends to the crankshaft, whereby the lever arm functions as a lever of the second class between the piston rods and the crankshaft the constrained second end thereof functioning as the fulcrum therefor.

  2. BITERTANOL, A TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDE, INCREASES OPERANT RESPONDING BUT NOT MOTOR ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several recent reports indicate that triadimefon, a triazole fungicide, has effects on behavior that are similar to those of psychomotor stimulants. or example, both d-amphetamine and triadimefon increase rates and disrupt patterns of responding maintained under FI schedules of r...

  3. If Not You, Who? Responding to Emergencies in Physical Education and Physical Activity Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Matthew A.; Brewer, Joan D.; Shane, Shawna D.

    2013-01-01

    Injuries can occur anywhere and anytime in physical education. Physical educators should do all they can to prevent injuries from occurring and must be prepared for such an occurrence. Many physical educators have limited knowledge about how to respond to injury and emergency situations. The purpose of this article is to provide information for…

  4. 35. END VIEW, INTERIOR, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS, BERK SWITCH TOWER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. END VIEW, INTERIOR, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  5. 16. VIEW OF LEVER CONNECTED TO CHAIN (BRIDGE IN CLOSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW OF LEVER CONNECTED TO CHAIN (BRIDGE IN CLOSED POSITION), LOOKING WEST - Mystic River Drawbridge No. 7, Spanning Mystic River at Boston & Maine Railroad Eastern Route, Somerville, Middlesex County, MA

  6. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J.E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J.P.; Jarvis, S.P.

    2006-01-15

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity.

  7. Single Myosin Cross-Bridge Orientation in Cardiac Papillary Muscle Detects Lever-Arm Shear Strain in Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Thomas P.; Josephson, Matthew P.; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    Myosin motors transduce ATP free energy into mechanical work. Transduction models allocate specific functions to motor structural domains beginning with ATP hydrolysis in the active site and ending in a lever-arm rotating power-stroke. Myosin light chains, regulatory (RLC) and essential (ELC), bind IQ-domains on the lever-arm and track its movement. Strong evidence exists that light chains stabilize the lever-arm and that light chain mutation undermines stability. Human ventricular RLC tagged with photoactivatable GFP (HCRLC-PAGFP) replaces native RLC in porcine papillary muscle fibers, restores native contractility, and situates PAGFP for single molecule orientation tracking within the crowded fiber lattice. The spatial emission pattern from single photoactivated PAGFP tagged myosins was observed in z-stacks fitted simultaneously to maximize accuracy in estimated dipole orientation. Emitter dipole polar and azimuthal angle pair scatter plots identified an area where steric and molecular crowding constraints depopulated orientations unfavorable for actin interaction. Transitions between pre- and post-power-stroke states represent the lever-arm trajectory sampled by the data and quantify lever-arm shear strain in transduction at three tension levels. These data identify forces acting on myosin in the in situ fiber system due to crowding, steric hindrance, and actomyosin interaction. They induce lever-arm shear strain observed with single molecule orientation detection. A single myosin work histogram reveals discretized power-stroke substates reminiscent of the Huxley–Simmons model for myosin based contraction [Huxley and Simmons (1971) Nature 233, 533]. RLC or ELC mutation, should it impact lever-arm shear strain, will be detected as changes in single myosin shear strain or power-stroke substate distribution. PMID:21819137

  8. INCUBATION OF SACCHARIN CRAVING AND WITHIN-SESSION CHANGES IN RESPONDING FOR A CUE PREVIOUSLY ASSOCIATED WITH SACCHARIN

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, K.; Barnes, J.; Grimm, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Time-dependent increases in cue-induced sucrose seeking after forced abstinence have been described in rats with a history of sucrose self-administration, suggesting sucrose craving “incubates”. In the present study, we examined whether the incubation of craving generalizes to the artificial sweetener, saccharin. Thirty-one male Long-Evans rats lever pressed for 0.3% saccharin solution 1 h/day for 10 days. On either Day 1 or 30 of forced abstinence, rats responded for 1 h for presentation of a tone + light cue previously presented with every saccharin delivery during self-administration training. Rats responded more during this cue-reactivity test session following 30 vs. 1 day of forced abstinence (“incubation of craving”). This result is the first demonstration of the “incubation of saccharin craving” and suggests that a post-ingestive caloric consequence of self-administration is not a necessary condition for the development of incubation of sucrose craving. We also examined the time course (within-session decreases) of active-lever responding during the 1-h cue-reactivity test session. Rats in the Day 30 group responded more than rats in the Day 1 group from the beginning of the test session. In addition, within-session decreases in responding were shallower in slope in the Day 30 than the Day 1 group. These results indicate that “incubation of saccharin craving” enhances the persistence of seeking behavior. PMID:24161592

  9. Locomotor activity in a novel environment predicts both responding for a visual stimulus and self-administration of a low dose of methamphetamine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gancarz, Amy M.; San George, Michele A.; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Richards, Jerry B.

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence that visual stimuli used to signal drug delivery in self-administration procedures have primary reinforcing properties, and that drugs of abuse enhance the reinforcing properties of such stimuli. Here, we explored the relationships between locomotor activity, responding for a visual stimulus, and self-administration of methamphetamine (METH). Rats were classified as high or low responders based on activity levels in a novel locomotor chamber and were subsequently tested for responding to produce a visual stimulus followed by self-administration of a low dose of METH (0.025 mg/kg/infusion) paired with the visual stimulus. High responder rats responded more for the visual stimulus than low responder rats indicating that the visual stimulus was reinforcing and that operant responding for a visual stimulus has commonalities with locomotor activity in a novel environment. Similarly, high responder rats responded more for METH paired with a visual stimulus than low responder rats. Because of the reinforcing properties of the visual stimulus, it was not possible to determine if the rats were responding to produce the visual stimulus, METH or the combination. We speculate that responding to produce sensory reinforcers may be a measure of sensation seeking. These results indicate that visual stimuli have unconditioned reinforcing effects which may have a significant role in acquisition of drug self-administration, a role that is not yet well understood. PMID:21215305

  10. Effects of an Activity-Based Anorexia Procedure on Within-Session Changes in Nose-Poke Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aoyama, Kenjiro

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the effects of an activity-based anorexia (ABA) procedure on within-session changes in responding. In the ABA group (N = 8), rats were given a 60-min feeding session and allowed to run in a running wheel for the remainder of each day. During the daily 60-min feeding session, each nose-poke response was reinforced by a food…

  11. Creative Climate: A Leadership Lever for Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaksen, Scott G.; Akkermans, Hans J.

    2011-01-01

    The working atmosphere within an organization has an important influence on its level of innovative productivity. Organizational leaders influence innovative productivity as well as the climate for creativity and innovation. This exploratory study included 140 respondents from 103 different organizations, 31 industries, and 10 countries, all of…

  12. Biological Ocean Margins Program. Active Microbes Responding to Inputs from the Orinoco River Plume. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge E. Corredor

    2013-01-28

    The overall goal of the proposed work is to identify the active members of the heterotrophic community involved in C and N cycling in the perimeter of the Orinoco River Plume (ORP), assess their spatial distribution, quantify their metabolic activity, and correlate these parameters to plume properties such as salinity, organic matter content and phytoplankton biomass.

  13. Gear-shift lever having variable thickness walls

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.

    1988-01-03

    A one-piece elongated tubular transmission gear shift lever, is described comprising a tubular connector part at a first end of the gear shift lever, whereby the tubular connector part is adapted to be secured to a pivot means; a spherical part extending from the connector part, the connector part and the spherical part having a first wall thickness; a cylindrical part extending from the spherical part in a direction opposite the tubular connector part, the cylindrical part having a second wall thickness less than the first wall thickness; a tapered part extending from the cylindrical part; and a threaded part extending from the tapered part, the threaded part formed at a second end of the gear shift lever opposite the first end, whereby a gear shift knob may be attached.

  14. Effects of d-amphetamine and caffeine on schedule-controlled and schedule-induced responding.

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, D E

    1979-01-01

    The effects of d-amphetamine and caffeine were studied on rates and patterns of lever pressing and schedule-induced licking under fixed-interval schedules of food pellet presentation. In addition, the effects of caffeine were studied on lever pressing and licking under a multiple fixed-ratio fixed-interval schedule. Caffeine reduced mean overall rates of licking at lower doses than it reduced mean overall rates of pressing under the fixed-interval schedules, but the effects of caffeine on both licking and lever pressing depended largely on the control rate of responding. d-Amphetamine reduced mean overall rates of lever pressing and licking at about the same dose, but the effects of d-amphetamine also were a function of the control rate of responding. PMID:512573

  15. Hsp31, a member of the DJ-1 superfamily, is a multitasking stress responder with chaperone activity

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Kiran; Hazbun, Tony R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Among different types of protein aggregation, amyloids are a biochemically well characterized state of protein aggregation that are associated with a large number of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an insightful model to understand the underlying mechanism of protein aggregation. Many yeast molecular chaperones can modulate aggregation and misfolding of proteins including α-Syn and the Sup35 prion. Hsp31 is a homodimeric protein structurally similar to human DJ-1, a Parkinson's disease-linked protein, and both are members of the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily. An emerging view is that Hsp31 and its associated superfamily members each have divergent multitasking functions that have the common theme of responding and managing various types of cellular stress. Hsp31 has several biochemical activities including chaperone and detoxifying enzyme activities that modulate at various points of a stress pathway such as toxicity associated with protein misfolding. However, we have shown the protective role of Hsp31's chaperone activity can operate independent of detoxifying enzyme activities in preventing the early stages of protein aggregate formation and associated cellular toxicities. We provide additional data that collectively supports the multiple functional roles that can be accomplished independent of each other. We present data indicating Hsp31 purified from yeast is more active compared to expression and purification from E. coli suggesting that posttranslational modifications could be important for Hsp31 to be fully active. We also compare the similarities and differences in activities among paralogs of Hsp31 supporting a model in which this protein family has overlapping but diverging roles in responding to various sources of cellular stresses. PMID:27097320

  16. Hsp31, a member of the DJ-1 superfamily, is a multitasking stress responder with chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Kiran; Hazbun, Tony R

    2016-03-01

    Among different types of protein aggregation, amyloids are a biochemically well characterized state of protein aggregation that are associated with a large number of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an insightful model to understand the underlying mechanism of protein aggregation. Many yeast molecular chaperones can modulate aggregation and misfolding of proteins including α-Syn and the Sup35 prion. Hsp31 is a homodimeric protein structurally similar to human DJ-1, a Parkinson's disease-linked protein, and both are members of the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily. An emerging view is that Hsp31 and its associated superfamily members each have divergent multitasking functions that have the common theme of responding and managing various types of cellular stress. Hsp31 has several biochemical activities including chaperone and detoxifying enzyme activities that modulate at various points of a stress pathway such as toxicity associated with protein misfolding. However, we have shown the protective role of Hsp31's chaperone activity can operate independent of detoxifying enzyme activities in preventing the early stages of protein aggregate formation and associated cellular toxicities. We provide additional data that collectively supports the multiple functional roles that can be accomplished independent of each other. We present data indicating Hsp31 purified from yeast is more active compared to expression and purification from E. coli suggesting that posttranslational modifications could be important for Hsp31 to be fully active. We also compare the similarities and differences in activities among paralogs of Hsp31 supporting a model in which this protein family has overlapping but diverging roles in responding to various sources of cellular stresses. PMID:27097320

  17. What responders need to respond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eifried, Gary

    2004-12-01

    Developing equipment and instrumentation for use by first responders and HAZMAT professionals in a Homeland Defense role requires an understanding of the real needs of those responders. These needs are driven by the manner in which the incident response takes place and how the response actions occur over time. This paper describes a chemical terrorist incident, the response functions and related timelines, and the detection and identification needs during each phase. From this information, developers will be able to better understand requirements related to sensitivity, specificity, response time, weight, ruggedness, ease of use, and other design parameters.

  18. Responding to the Challenges of Active Citizenship through the Revised UK Early Years Foundation Stage Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Fiona S.

    2013-01-01

    The revised UK Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) now places a stronger emphasis on personal, social and emotional development (PSED) as one of its three prime areas. PSED has three characteristics of learning: active learning, creating and thinking critically, and playing and exploring. These aspects of the revised EYFS closely align with the…

  19. DETAIL OF TRACTION CABLE ENGAGEMENT DEVICE. SMALL, KNOBBED LEVER ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF TRACTION CABLE ENGAGEMENT DEVICE. SMALL, KNOBBED LEVER ON BUCKET HANGER WAS PULLED DOWN BY A CAMEL (FIXED CAM RAIL AT CENTER) AS BUCKET ROLLED PAST IT, CAUSING A CLAMP TO CLOSE AGAINST TRACTION CABLE. A SIMILAR CAMEL (NO LONGER EXTANT) DISENGAGED CLAMP ON RECEIVING SIDE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  20. 26. VIEW FROM EAST IN BRIDGE TENDER'S HOUSE, LEVERS FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. VIEW FROM EAST IN BRIDGE TENDER'S HOUSE, LEVERS FOR GASOLINE ENGINE OPERATION FOR BRIDGE AND THEIR CONNECTIONS TO CONTROL RODS ON DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF SWING-SPAN; new bridge located in background - Tipers Bridge, Spanning Great Wicomico River at State Route 200, Kilmarnock, Lancaster County, VA

  1. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, "LAWRENCE LEVERING BECKEL (BRIDGE BUILT BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, "LAWRENCE LEVERING BECKEL (BRIDGE BUILT BY HIM AND HIS FATHER, CHAS. N. BECKEL AT EASTON)," original ca. 1885, photographer unknown. Collection of Historic Bethlehem Inc., Bethlehem, PA, Negative Nos. 3550 or 4504. - Walnut Street Bridge, Formerly spanning Saucon Creek, Hellertown, Northampton County, PA

  2. 25. VIEW EAST IN BRIDGE TENDER'S HOUSE, (left) ORIGINAL LEVERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW EAST IN BRIDGE TENDER'S HOUSE, (left) ORIGINAL LEVERS FOR GASOLINE ENGINE OPERATION OF SWING-SPAN, (right) PANEL F ELECTRIC OPERATION OF GATES AND SWING-SPAN; new bridge located in background - Tipers Bridge, Spanning Great Wicomico River at State Route 200, Kilmarnock, Lancaster County, VA

  3. The Relationship between State Policy Levers and Student Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Jacob P. K.; Berry, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    To address conceptual and methodological shortcomings in the extant literature on student mobility, this study employs event history modeling to describe and explain how state policy levers, specifically state grant aid, relates to mobility and baccalaureate degree completion. We find that state grant aid reduces mobility, but less so than…

  4. 5. FLOOR 3; SHOWS BRAKE LEVER, BLOCK FORMERLY USED TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. FLOOR 3; SHOWS BRAKE LEVER, BLOCK FORMERLY USED TO RAISE IT AND HOOK WHICH KEPT IT IN THE 'OFF' POSITION; ALSO SEEN ARE THE LARGE BLOCKS SUSPENDED FROM THE CAP FRAME WHICH HOLD THE TRUCK WHEELS TO CENTER THE CAP - Hayground Windmill, Windmill Lane, East Hampton, Suffolk County, NY

  5. 49 CFR 236.764 - Locking, lever operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locking, lever operated. 236.764 Section 236.764 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING THE INSTALLATION, INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL...

  6. SECOND FLOOR OF OPERATOR'S ROOM, WITH THROTTLE LEVER ABOVE TORQUE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SECOND FLOOR OF OPERATOR'S ROOM, WITH THROTTLE LEVER ABOVE TORQUE CONVERTER SWITCH, AT LEFT. MAGNETIC SOLENOID IS IN CENTER, HYDRAULIC BRAKE PUMP IS IN UPPER RIGHT, LOOKING WEST. - Mad River Glen, Single Chair Ski Lift, 62 Mad River Glen Resort Road, Fayston, Washington County, VT

  7. Time of supplemental feeding alters the effects of cocaine on lever pressing of rats.

    PubMed

    Ross, Linda; Schaal, David W

    2002-03-01

    The present experiment assessed the effects of cocaine on the lever pressing of 4 rats maintained during 15-min sessions by a fixed-ratio 50 schedule of food reinforcement. Across phases, supplemental food was provided either immediately or 2 hr after sessions. Two rats began the experiment in the delayed-feeding condition, and 2 began the experiment in the immediate-feeding condition. Rates of lever pressing of 2 rats sometimes decreased to low levels near the ends of sessions when supplemental feeding was provided immediately, but were consistently high throughout sessions when supplemental feeding was delayed. Cocaine (1.0 to 17.0 or 30.0 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 15 min prior to test sessions. In most cases, cocaine suppressed response rates at lower doses under immediate-feeding conditions. Decreases in overall response rates were correlated with dosedependent increases in the time rats spent not responding. It is suggested that delaying the time of postsession feeding increased response strength, as indicated by greater resistance to the rate-suppressive effects of cocaine. PMID:11936252

  8. Tomato Plant Proteins Actively Responding to Fungal Applications and Their Role in Cell Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Zoobia; Shafique, Sobiya; Ahmad, Aqeel; Shafique, Shazia; Yasin, Nasim A.; Ashraf, Yaseen; Ibrahim, Asma; Akram, Waheed; Noreen, Sibgha

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of protein induction in tomato plants has been investigated after the applications of pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungal species. Moreover, particular roles of the most active protein against biological applications were also determined using chromatographic techniques. Alternaria alternata and Penicillium oxalicum were applied as a pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungal species, respectively. Protein profile analysis revealed that a five protein species (i.e., protein 1, 6, 10, 12, and 13) possessed completely coupled interaction with non-pathogenic inducer application (P. oxalicum). However, three protein species (i.e., 10, 12, and 14) recorded a strong positive interaction with both fungal species. Protein 14 exhibited the maximum interaction with fungal applications, and its role in plant metabolism was studied after its identification as protein Q9M1W6. It was determined that protein Q1M1W6 was involved in guaiacyl lignin biosynthesis, and its inhibition increased the coumarin contents in tomato plants. Moreover, it was also observed that the protein Q9M1W6 takes significant part in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid and Indole acetic acid contents, which are defense and growth factors of tomato plants. The study will help investigators to design fundamental rules of plant proteins affecting cell physiology under the influence of external fungal applications. PMID:27445848

  9. Response Induction during the Acquisition and Maintenance of Lever Pressing with Delayed Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobar, Rogelio; Bruner, Carlos A.

    2007-01-01

    The acquisition of lever pressing by rats and the occurrence of unreinforced presses at a location different from that of the reinforced response were studied using different delays of reinforcement. An experimental chamber containing seven identical adjoining levers was used. Only presses on the central (operative) lever produced food pellets.…

  10. 49 CFR 236.340 - Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking between electrical and mechanical levers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... between electrical and mechanical levers. 236.340 Section 236.340 Transportation Other Regulations... Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking between electrical and mechanical levers. In electro-mechanical interlocking machine, locking between electric and mechanical levers shall be maintained so that...

  11. Effects of ketamine, a noncompetitive NMDA antagonist, on the acquisition of the lever-press response in rats.

    PubMed

    Pallarés, M A; Nadal, R A; Silvestre, J S; Ferré, N S

    1995-02-01

    We analyzed the effects of ketamine, a noncompetitive NMDA antagonist, on the acquisition of the lever-press response in the Skinner box and on motor performance both in the open field and in the inclined screen. Ninety-six adult male Wistar rats were assigned at random to eight different groups (n = 12). The first four groups received an acute intraperitoneal (IP) injection of: (a) physiological saline, (b) 4 mg/kg ketamine, (c) 8 mg/kg ketamine, or (d) 12 mg/kg ketamine, and the subjects were tested in a free lever-press response shaping in the Skinner box. The second four groups received the same substances and doses as the first four, but the subjects were tested for locomotor activity in an open field and tested immediately afterwards for motor performance in an 80 degrees inclined screen. Results showed that ketamine impaired the acquisition of the lever-press response in a dose-dependent manner, with no effects on ambulation in the open field nor on length of stay in the inclined screen. These results suggest that ketamine effects on the acquisition of the lever-press response cannot be attributed to a motor impairment, indicating a possible specific effect of ketamine on the associative learning acquisition. PMID:7716221

  12. Highly entangled photons and rapidly responding polarization qubit phase gates in a room-temperature active Raman gain medium

    SciTech Connect

    Hang Chao; Huang Guoxiang

    2010-11-15

    We present a scheme for obtaining entangled photons and quantum phase gates in a room-temperature four-state tripod-type atomic system with two-mode active Raman gain (ARG). We analyze the linear and nonlinear optical responses of this ARG system and show that the scheme is fundamentally different from those based on electromagnetically induced transparency and hence can avoid significant probe-field absorption as well as a temperature-related Doppler effect. We demonstrate that highly entangled photon pairs can be produced and rapidly responding polarization qubit phase gates can be constructed based on the unique features of the enhanced cross-phase-modulation and superluminal probe-field propagation of the system.

  13. A CD25− Positive Population of Activated B1 Cells Expresses LIFR and Responds to LIF

    PubMed Central

    Tumang, Joseph R.; Holodick, Nichol E.; Vizconde, Teresa C.; Kaku, Hiroaki; Francés, Rubén; Rothstein, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    B1 B cells defend against infectious microorganisms by spontaneous secretion of broadly reactive “natural” immunoglobulin that appears in the absence of immunization. Among many distinguishing characteristics, B1 B cells display evidence of activation that includes phosphorylated STAT3. In order to identify the origin of pSTAT3 we examined interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) expression on B1 cells. We found that some (about 1/5) B1a cells express the IL-2R α chain, CD25. Although lacking CD122 and unresponsive to IL-2, B1a cells marked by CD25 express increased levels of activated signaling intermediates, interruption of which results in diminished CD25. Further, CD25+ B1a cells contain most of the pSTAT3 found in the B1a population as a whole. Moreover, CD25+ B1a cells express leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR), and respond to LIF by upregulating pSTAT3. Together, these results define a new subset of B1a cells that is marked by activation-dependent CD25 expression, expresses substantial amounts of activated STAT3, and contains a functional LIFR. PMID:22566797

  14. Gain lever characterization in monolithically integrated diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocha, Michael; Bond, Tiziana; Welty, Rebecca; Vernon, Stephen; Kallman, Jeffrey; Behymer, Elaine

    2005-04-01

    Gain Lever, an effect for enhancing amplitude modulation (AM) efficiency in multisection laser diodes1, has been characterized in InGaAs DQW edge emitting lasers that are integrated with passive waveguides. Specifically designed structures which give a range of split ratios from 1:1 to 9:1 have been fabricated and measured to fully characterize the parameter space for operation in the gain lever mode. Additionally the experimental results are compared to a hybrid 3-D simulation involving effective index method (EIM) reduction to 2-D. Gains greater than 6 dB in the AM efficiency can be achieved within the appropriate operating range, but this gain drops rapidly as the parameter range is exceeded. High speed RF modulation with significant gain is, in principle, possible if proper biasing and modulation conditions are used. This phenomenon can also be useful for high-speed digital information transmission.

  15. Avoidance behavior: a free-operant lever-press avoidance task for the assessment of the effects of safety signals.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Anushka B P; Mar, Adam C; Urcelay, Gonzalo P; Dickinson, Anthony; Robbins, Trevor W

    2015-01-01

    This protocol details a free-operant avoidance paradigm that has been developed to evaluate the relative contribution of different sources of reinforcement of avoidance behavior that may play an important role in the development and maintenance of human anxiety disorders. The task enables the assessment of the effects of safety cues that signal a period free from danger on lever-press avoidance behavior. Avoidance behavior trained using this protocol has been shown to be sensitive to both behavioral and pharmacological manipulations and has been optimized so that it takes approximately 1 month for rats to perform at high levels of stable avoidance responding. PMID:25559006

  16. Deduction of upstream sequences of Xanthomonas campestris flagellar genes responding to transcription activation by FleQ

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, R.-M.; Yang, T.-C.; Yang, S.-H.; Tseng, Y.-H. . E-mail: yhtseng@chtai.ctc.edu.tw

    2005-10-07

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc), a close relative to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is the pathogen causing black rot in cruciferous plants. In P. aeruginosa, FleQ serves as a cognate activator of {sigma}{sup 54} in transcription from several {sigma}{sup 54}-dependent promoters of flagellar genes. These P. aeruginosa promoters have been analyzed for FleQ-binding sequences; however, no consensus was deduced. Xcc, although lacks fleSR, has a fleQ homologue residing among over 40 contiguously clustered flagellar genes. A fleQ mutant, Xc17fleQ, constructed by insertional mutation is deficient in FleQ protein, non-flagellated, and immobile. Transcriptional fusion assays on six putative {sigma}{sup 54}-dependent promoters of the flagellar genes, fliE, fliQ, fliL, flgG, flgB, and flhF, indicated that each of them is also FleQ dependent. Each of these promoters has a sequence with weak consensus to 5'-gaaacCCgccgCcgctTt-3', immediately upstream of the predicted {sigma}{sup 54}-binding site, with an imperfect inverted repeat containing a GC-rich center flanked by several A and T at 5'- and 3'-ends, respectively. Replacing this region in fliE promoter with a HindIII recognition sequence abolished the transcription, indicating that this region responds to transcription activation by FleQ.

  17. [Work physiological studies performed to optimate the lever propulsion and the seat position of a lever propelled wheelchair (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Engel, P; Neikes, M; Bennedik, K; Hildebrandt, G; Rode, F W

    1976-11-01

    Spiroergometric examination with defined work loads and permanent records of the common circulatory and metabolic values were carried out on a group of healthy adults and one wheelchair occupant, using a fixed wheelchair simulator with lever propulsion, which was connected to an ergometer. Comparative studies were performed in three different seat positions in relation to the lever, as well as six different lengths of the connecting rod. The best values were measured, under steadystate conditions, with increasing lengths of the connecting rod and posterior placement of the seat unit. The results are in agreement with the experience gained by other authors with respect to arm work, and show that the optimal efficiency of hand lever work is obtained in the anterior position. In this context it proved to be particularly advantageious from the ergonomic viewpoint, if, when bending forward, as necessitated by a long connecting rod, both the upper part of the body and the trunk musculature are employed. The practical consequences of the simulator tests on an adequate wheelchair design and wheelchair prescription are discussed. PMID:137501

  18. Analysis of the Competence to Respond to KNOTTED1 Activity in Arabidopsis Leaves Using a Steroid Induction System1

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Angela; Jackson, David; Ori, Naomi; Hake, Sarah

    2003-01-01

    Expression of KNOX (KNOTTED1-like homeobox) genes in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis is required for maintenance of a functional meristem, whereas exclusion of KNOX gene expression from leaf primordia is required for the elaboration of normal leaf morphology. We have constructed a steroid-inducible system to regulate both the amount and timing of KN1 (KNOTTED1) misexpression in Arabidopsis leaves. We demonstrate that lobed leaf morphology is produced in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that the amount of KN1 quantitatively affects the severity of lobing. The KN1-glucocorticoid receptor fusion protein is not detected in leaves in the absence of steroid induction, suggesting that it is only stable when associated with steroid in an active state. By using a second inducible fusion protein to mark exposure of leaf primordia to the steroid, we determined the stage of leaf development that produces lobed leaves in response to KN1. Primordia as old as plastochron 7 and as young as plastochron 2 were competent to respond to KN1. PMID:12692326

  19. Rapid acquisition of discrete-trial lever-press avoidance: effects of signal-shock interval1

    PubMed Central

    Berger, David F.; Brush, F. Robert

    1975-01-01

    Acquisition of discrete-trial lever-press avoidance learning was studied in three experiments. Experiment I compared a new training procedure, which produces rates of lever-press avoidance learning comparable to those obtained in shuttle boxes, with a “conventional”, less efficient training procedure. A factorial design was used to compare continuous versus intermittent shock and a long-variable versus a short-fixed signal-shock interval. Learning was best in the groups trained with the long and variable interval and poorest in those trained with the short and fixed interval. Type of shock had no effect. Experiment II separated the effects of duration from those of variability of the signal-shock interval. Fixed and variable intervals of 10 and 60 sec were tested and duration was the only significant factor. Experiment III addressed the effect of the differential opportunity to avoid provided by long signal-shock intervals by varying this interval from 10 to 60 sec in 10-sec steps. Only the 10-sec group showed slow acquisition relative to the others. Analysis of avoidance response latencies showed that the distributions for all groups were positively skewed and that skewness increased with increasing duration of the signal-shock interval. At intervals longer than 20 sec, the animals made progressively less use of their increased opportunity to respond. The data do not support the opportunity-to-respond interpretation of the effects of duration of signal-shock interval and suggest that some type of inhibitory process may block lever-press avoidance learning at intervals as short as 10 sec. The significance of these findings for species-specific defense reaction and preparedness theories was emphasized. PMID:16811875

  20. The Ranger First Responder Program and Tactical Emergency Casualty Care Implementation: A Whole-Community Approach to Reducing Mortality From Active Violent Incidents.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew D; Callaway, David W; Robertson, Josh N; Hardwick, Shane A; Bobko, Joshua P; Kotwal, Russ S

    2015-01-01

    Active violent incidents are dynamic and challenging situations that can produce a significant amount of preventable deaths. Lessons learned from the military?s experience in Afghanistan and Iraq through the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care and the 75th Ranger Regiment?s Ranger First Responder Program have helped create the Committee for Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (C-TECC) to address the uniqueness of similar wounding patterns and to end preventable deaths. We propose a whole-community approach to active violent incidents, using the C-TECC Trauma Chain of Survival and a tiered approach for training and responsibilities: the first care provider, nonmedical professional first responders, medical first responders, and physicians and trauma surgeons. The different tiers are critical early links in the Chain of Survival and this approach will have a significant impact on active violent incidents. PMID:26360353

  1. Effects of sucrose concentration and water deprivation on Pavlovian conditioning and responding for conditioned reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tabbara, Rayane I; Maddux, Jean-Marie N; Beharry, Priscilla F; Iannuzzi, Jessica; Chaudhri, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    An appetitive Pavlovian conditioned stimulus (CS) can predict an unconditioned stimulus (US) and acquire incentive salience. We tested the hypothesis that US intensity and motivational state of the subject would influence Pavlovian learning and impact the attribution of incentive salience to an appetitive Pavlovian CS. To this end, we examined the effects of sucrose concentration and water deprivation on the acquisition of Pavlovian conditioning and responding for a conditioned reinforcer. Male Long-Evans rats (Harlan; 220-240 g) receiving 3% (3S) or 20% (20S) sucrose were either non-water deprived or given water for 1 hr per day. During Pavlovian conditioning sessions, half the rats in each concentration and deprivation condition received a 10-s CS paired with 0.2 ml of sucrose (16 trials/session; 3.2 ml/session). The remainder received unpaired CS and US presentations. Entries into a port where sucrose was delivered were recorded. Next, responding for conditioned reinforcement was tested, wherein pressing an active lever produced the CS and pressing an inactive lever had no consequences. CS-elicited port entries increased, and latency to the first CS-elicited port entry decreased across sessions in paired groups. Water deprivation augmented these effects, whereas sucrose concentration had no significant impact on behavior. Responding for conditioned reinforcement was observed in the 20S water-deprived, paired group. Thus, water deprivation can facilitate the acquisition of Pavlovian conditioning, potentially by enhancing motivational state, and a high-intensity US and a high motivational state can interact to heighten the attribution of incentive salience to an appetitive Pavlovian CS. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26913541

  2. Theory and applications of optical fiber lever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuomo, F. W.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of optical fiber lever concepts is illustrated leading to several designs found useful in air and water applications. In particular, this technology has led to the development of underwater detectors of the pressure and pressure gradient kind. In addition, an optical microphone with features not found in condenser microphones has been utilized in the measurement of pressure fluctuations in high speed boundary layers requiring sensors of small size, extended bandwidth, wide dynamic range, and high temperature capability. Finally, similar concepts have been applied to the design of scale model acoustic arrays intended for acoustic imaging applications in the megahertz frequency range.

  3. Comparison of dynamic lever STM and noncontact AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggisberg, M.; Bammerlin, M.; Lüthi, R.; Loppacher, C.; Battiston, F.; Lü, J.; Baratoff, A.; Meyer, E.; Güntherodt, H.-J.

    We investigate interaction effects which occur in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) by performing local force spectroscopy with an oscillating tip while imaging Si(111)7×7 terraces in the dynamic lever STM mode (constant time-averaged current). It is found that true atomic resolution is achieved close to the minimum of the resonance frequency vs. distance curve and even closer to the sample. On the other hand true atomic resolution in noncontact AFM (constant frequency shift) is expected several nm away from this minimum, in the range where the frequency shift becomes more negative with decreasing distance.

  4. Two Essential Light Chains Regulate the MyoA Lever Arm To Promote Toxoplasma Gliding Motility

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Melanie J.; Alonso, Hernan; Enciso, Marta; Egarter, Saskia; Sheiner, Lilach; Meissner, Markus; Striepen, Boris; Smith, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Key to the virulence of apicomplexan parasites is their ability to move through tissue and to invade and egress from host cells. Apicomplexan motility requires the activity of the glideosome, a multicomponent molecular motor composed of a type XIV myosin, MyoA. Here we identify a novel glideosome component, essential light chain 2 (ELC2), and functionally characterize the two essential light chains (ELC1 and ELC2) of MyoA in Toxoplasma. We show that these proteins are functionally redundant but are important for invasion, egress, and motility. Molecular simulations of the MyoA lever arm identify a role for Ca2+ in promoting intermolecular contacts between the ELCs and the adjacent MLC1 light chain to stabilize this domain. Using point mutations predicted to ablate either the interaction with Ca2+ or the interface between the two light chains, we demonstrate their contribution to the quality, displacement, and speed of gliding Toxoplasma parasites. Our work therefore delineates the importance of the MyoA lever arm and highlights a mechanism by which this domain could be stabilized in order to promote invasion, egress, and gliding motility in apicomplexan parasites. PMID:26374117

  5. Electrical and Optical Gain Lever Effects in InGaAs Double Quantum Well Diode Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pocha, M D; Goddard, L L; Bond, T C; Nikolic, R J; Vernon, S P; Kallman, J S; Behymer, E M

    2007-01-03

    In multisection laser diodes, the amplitude or frequency modulation (AM or FM) efficiency can be improved using the gain lever effect. To study gain lever, InGaAs double quantum well (DQW) edge emitting lasers have been fabricated with integrated passive waveguides and dual sections providing a range of split ratios from 1:1 to 9:1. Both the electrical and the optical gain lever have been examined. An electrical gain lever with greater than 7 dB enhancement of AM efficiency was achieved within the range of appropriate DC biasing currents, but this gain dropped rapidly outside this range. We observed a 4 dB gain in the optical AM efficiency under non-ideal biasing conditions. This value agreed with the measured gain for the electrical AM efficiency under similar conditions. We also examined the gain lever effect under large signal modulation for digital logic switching applications. To get a useful gain lever for optical gain quenched logic, a long control section is needed to preserve the gain lever strength and a long interaction length between the input optical signal and the lasing field of the diode must be provided. The gain lever parameter space has been fully characterized and validated against numerical simulations of a semi-3D hybrid beam propagation method (BPM) model for the coupled electron-photon rate equation. We find that the optical gain lever can be treated using the electrical injection model, once the absorption in the sample is known.

  6. Responding To and Recovering From an Active Shooter Incident That Turns Into a Hostage Situation. Lessons Learned From School Crises and Emergencies, Volume 2, Issue 6, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Lessons Learned" is a series of publications that are a brief recounting of actual school emergencies and crises. This "Lessons Learned" issue focuses on an active shooter situation that escalated to a hostage situation that required multiple law enforcement agencies and other first responders and agencies to coordinate response and recovery…

  7. Bromocriptine increased operant responding for high fat food but decreased chow intake in both obesity-prone and resistant rats

    SciTech Connect

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Cho, J. Kim, R.; Michaelides, M.; Primeaux, S.; Bray, G.; Wang, G.-J.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-10-27

    Dopamine (DA) and DAD{sub 2} receptors (D2R) have been implicated in obesity and are thought to be involved in the rewarding properties of food. Osborne-Mendel (OM) rats are susceptible to diet induced obesity (DIO) while S5B/P (S5B) rats are resistant when given a high-fat diet. Here we hypothesized that the two strains would differ in high-fat food self-administration (FSA) and that the D2R agonist bromocriptine (BC) would differently affect their behavior. Ad-libitum fed OM and S5B/P rats were tested in a FSA operant chamber and were trained to lever press for high-fat food pellets under a fixed-ratio (FR1) and a progressive ratio (PR) schedule. After sixteen days of PR sessions, rats were treated with three different doses of BC (1, 10 and 20 mg/kg). No significant differences were found between the two strains in the number of active lever presses. BC treatment (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) increased the number of active lever presses (10 mg/kg having the strongest effect) whereas it decreased rat chow intake in the home cage with equivalent effects in both strains. These effects were not observed on the day of BC administration but on the day following its administration. Our results suggest that these two strains have similar motivation for procuring high fat food using this paradigm. BC increased operant responding for high-fat pellets but decreased chow intake in both strains, suggesting that D2R stimulation may have enhanced the motivational drive to procure the fatty food while correspondingly decreasing the intake of regular food. These findings suggest that susceptibility to dietary obesity (prior to the onset of obesity) may not affect operant motivation for a palatable high fat food and that differential susceptibility to obesity may be related to differential sensitivity to D2R stimulation.

  8. Repeated Cocaine Experience Facilitates Sucrose-Reinforced Operant Responding in Enriched and Isolated Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Emily D.; Gehrke, Brenda J.; Green, Thomas A.; Zentall, Thomas R.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether repeated cocaine exposure differentially affects sucrose-reinforced operant responding in rats raised in an enriched condition (EC) or an isolated condition (IC). Specifically, the performance of EC and IC rats pressing a lever for sucrose under a high fixed-ratio schedule (FR 30)…

  9. Effects of Post-Session Wheel Running on Within-Session Changes in Operant Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aoyama, Kenjiro

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the effects of post-session wheel running on within-session changes in operant responding. Lever-pressing by six rats was reinforced by a food pellet under a continuous reinforcement (CRF) schedule in 30-min sessions. Two different flavored food pellets were used as reinforcers. In the wheel conditions, 30-min operant-sessions…

  10. CMB cluster lensing: Cosmography with the longest lever arm

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Wayne; Holz, Daniel E.; Vale, Chris

    2007-12-15

    We discuss combining gravitational lensing of galaxies and the cosmic microwave background by clusters to measure cosmographic distance ratios, and hence dark energy parameters. Advantages to using the cosmic microwave background as the second source plane, instead of galaxies, include a well-determined source distance, a longer lever arm for distance ratios, typically up to an order of magnitude higher sensitivity to dark energy parameters, and a decreased sensitivity to photometric redshift accuracy of the lens and galaxy sources. Disadvantages include higher statistical errors, potential systematic errors, and the need for disparate surveys that overlap on the sky. Ongoing and planned surveys, such as the South Pole Telescope in conjunction with the Dark Energy Survey, can potentially reach the statistical sensitivity to make interesting consistency tests of the standard cosmological constant model. Future measurements that reach 1% or better precision in the convergences can provide sharp tests for future supernovae distance measurements.

  11. High-temperature fiber-optic lever microphone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Cuomo, Frank W.; Nguyen, Trung D.; Rizzi, Stephen A.; Clevenson, Sherman A.

    1995-01-01

    The design and construction of a fiber-optic lever microphone, capable of operating continuously at temperatures up to 538 C (1000 F) are described. The design is based on the theoretical sensitivities of each of the microphone system components, namely, a cartridge containing a stretched membrane, an optical fiber probe, and an optoelectronic amplifier. Laboratory calibrations include the pistonphone sensitivity and harmonic distortion at ambient temperature, and frequency response, background noise, and optical power transmission at both ambient and elevated temperatures. A field test in the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus at Langley Research Center, in which the microphone was subjected to overall sound-pressure levels in the range of 130-160 dB and at temperatures from ambient to 538 C, revealed good agreement with a standard probe microphone.

  12. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305 Section 1926.305 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305 Section 1926.305 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305 Section 1926.305 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305 Section 1926.305 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1)...

  16. 49 CFR 236.340 - Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking between electrical and mechanical levers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking... Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking between electrical and mechanical levers. In electro-mechanical interlocking machine, locking between electric and mechanical levers shall be maintained so that...

  17. 49 CFR 236.340 - Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking between electrical and mechanical levers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking... Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking between electrical and mechanical levers. In electro-mechanical interlocking machine, locking between electric and mechanical levers shall be maintained so that...

  18. 49 CFR 236.340 - Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking between electrical and mechanical levers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking... Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking between electrical and mechanical levers. In electro-mechanical interlocking machine, locking between electric and mechanical levers shall be maintained so that...

  19. 49 CFR 236.340 - Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking between electrical and mechanical levers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking... Electromechanical interlocking machine; locking between electrical and mechanical levers. In electro-mechanical interlocking machine, locking between electric and mechanical levers shall be maintained so that...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1) The... secured at once. (ii) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures shall be supplied with an...

  1. Reduced expression of IL-12 p35 by SJL/J macrophages responding to Theiler's virus infection is associated with constitutive activation of IRF-3

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlberg, Angela; Auble, Mark R.; Petro, Thomas M. . E-mail: tpetro@unmc.edu

    2006-09-30

    Macrophages responding to viral infections may contribute to autoimmune demyelinating diseases (ADD). Macrophages from ADD-susceptible SJL/J mice responding to Theiler's Virus (TMEV) infection, the TLR7 agonist loxoribine, or the TLR4 agonist-LPS expressed less IL-12 p35 but more IL-12/23 p40 and IFN-{beta} than macrophages from ADD-resistant B10.S mice. While expression of IRF-1 and -7 was similar between B10.S and SJL/J TMEV-infected macrophages, SJL/J but not B10.S macrophages exhibited constitutively active IRF-3. In contrast to overexpressed IRF-1, IRF-5, and IRF-7, which stimulated p35 promoter reporter activity, overexpressed IRF-3 repressed p35 promoter activity in response to TMEV infection, loxoribine, IFN-{gamma}/LPS, but not IFN-{gamma} alone. IRF-3 lessened but did not eliminate IRF-1-stimulated p35 promoter activity. Repression by IRF-3 required bp -172 to -122 of the p35 promoter. The data suggest that pre-activated IRF-3 is a major factor in the differences in IL-12 production between B10.S and SJL/J macrophages responding to TMEV.

  2. Preliminary study of lever-based optical driven micro-actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Li, Yi-Hsiung; Lin, Chin-Te; Chiang, Chia-Chin; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chung, Tien-Tung; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2012-04-01

    This study presents a novel type of optically driven lever-based micro-actuator fabricated using two-photon polymerization 3D-microfabrication technique. The lever is composed of a beam, an arch, and a sphere. First, optical tweezers is applied on the spheres to demonstrate the actuation of the lever. A spring is jointed at the lever for verifying the induced forces. Under the dragging by laser focusing, the lever simultaneously turns and results a torque like a mechanical arm. Then, the demonstration of a photo-driven micro-transducer with a mechanical arm and a gear is preformed. The experimental result indicates that our design enables precise manipulation of the mirco-actuator by optical tweezers at micron scale. This study provides a possibility for driving micron-sized structured mechanisms, such as connecting rods, valves. It is expected to contribute on the investigation of "Lab-on-a-chip".

  3. Preliminary study of lever-based optical driven micro-actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Li, Yi-Hsiung; Lin, Chin-Te; Chiang, Chia-Chin; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chung, Tien-Tung; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2011-11-01

    This study presents a novel type of optically driven lever-based micro-actuator fabricated using two-photon polymerization 3D-microfabrication technique. The lever is composed of a beam, an arch, and a sphere. First, optical tweezers is applied on the spheres to demonstrate the actuation of the lever. A spring is jointed at the lever for verifying the induced forces. Under the dragging by laser focusing, the lever simultaneously turns and results a torque like a mechanical arm. Then, the demonstration of a photo-driven micro-transducer with a mechanical arm and a gear is preformed. The experimental result indicates that our design enables precise manipulation of the mirco-actuator by optical tweezers at micron scale. This study provides a possibility for driving micron-sized structured mechanisms, such as connecting rods, valves. It is expected to contribute on the investigation of "Lab-on-a-chip".

  4. 77 FR 9890 - Solicitation of Input From Stakeholders Regarding the Smith-Lever 3(d) Children, Youth, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-21

    ...-Lever 3(d) Children, Youth, and Families at Risk Sustainable Community Projects AGENCY: National... section 3(d) of the Smith-Lever Act (7 U.S.C. 343(d)) to provide the opportunity for 1862 and 1890...

  5. Five Policy Levers To Meet The Value Challenge In Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Ryan; Darzi, Ara

    2015-09-01

    The burden of cancer on public finances is a serious concern for policy makers. More people are developing cancer, and as standards of care have risen, more are surviving and requiring longer-term care. Precision medicine promises better outcomes but demands commensurately higher payments for care. As both incidence and per case costs rise, we suggest that the task of expanding access to high-quality cancer care poses a "value challenge" that policies in many countries are inadequate to meet. Policy makers should respond with a new approach. We explore questions that policy makers will need to consider regarding objectives, barriers, and levers for policy development. We use transparency and accountability as cornerstones of a new approach to promote value-based decision making. Although barriers to advancing this agenda are formidable, we recommend that governments define common standards for value-based accounting; serve as information brokers for evidence development; pioneer value-based procurement of goods and services; engage in deliberative democracy in cancer care; and educate communities to facilitate knowledge sharing between communities of patients, their caretakers, and researchers. PMID:26355059

  6. 77 FR 4982 - Solicitation of Input From Stakeholders Regarding the Smith-Lever 3(d) Extension Integrated Pest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ...-Lever 3(d) Extension Integrated Pest Management Competitive Grants Program AGENCY: National Institute of...(d) of the Smith-Lever Act (7 U.S.C. 343(d)) to provide the ] opportunity for 1862 and 1890 Land... agency, CSREES, on October 6, 2008 and March 26, 2009 about the restructuring of the Smith-Lever 3(d)...

  7. Functional implications of the staminal lever mechanism in Salvia cyclostegia (Lamiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Claßen-Bockhoff, Regine; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Sun, Shan; Luo, Yan-Jiang; Li, Qing-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Flower morphology and inflorescence architecture affect pollinator foraging behaviour and thereby influence the process of pollination and the reproductive success of plants. This study explored possible ecological functions of the lever-like stamens and the floral design in Salvia cyclostegia. Methods Flower construction was experimentally manipulated by removing either the lower lever arms or the upper fertile thecae of the two stamens from a flower. The two types of manipulated individuals were intermixed with the control ones and randomly distributed in the population. Key Results Removing the sterile lower lever arms significantly reduced handling time per flower of the main pollinator, Bombus personatus. Interestingly, this manipulation did not increase the number of flowers probed per plant visit, but instead reduced it, i.e. shortened the visit sequence of the bumble-bees. Both loss of staminal lever function by removing lower lever arms and exclusion of self pollen by removing upper fertile thecae significantly reduced seed set per flower and seed set per plant. Both the manipulations interacted significantly with inflorescence size for the effect on female reproductive output. Conclusions Though the intact flowers demand a long handling time for pollinators, the reversible staminal lever is of advantage by promoting dispersal of pollen and thus the male function. The particular floral design in S. cyclostegia contributes to the floral constancy of B. personatus bumble-bees, with the lower lever arms acting as an optical cue for foraging cognition. PMID:21292677

  8. [Acquisition of a lever press behavior by mice in a water reinforcement situation].

    PubMed

    Kaneto, H; Nanri, M

    1984-11-01

    An operant chamber for mice, consisting of two adjacent compartments of W 130 X L 120 X H 150 mm, with a liquid dispenser which is operated by lever press was prepared. Using the apparatus, the applicability of mice for the study of learning of lever press behavior in a water reinforcement situation was investigated. Animals were deprived of water in the home cage and water was only supplied in the operant chamber by the lever press. A session of 15 min training was performed daily. By continuous reinforcement schedule, animals learned the lever pressing by 3 sessions. With these trained animals which attained more than 150 responses further experiments with a fixed ratio (FR) schedule was made, from FR 1 to FR 20. The best increase in responses was observed when the FR was regularly and gradually stepped up from 1 to 20 by every 5 sessions. Scopolamine, 1 mg/kg ip, significantly suppressed the lever press at FR 1 sessions, and the latency time until the first lever press was also prolonged significantly in these sessions. Thus, the applicability of mice for the study of learning of lever press behavior and the experimental schedules were established. PMID:6534036

  9. Three-axis lever actuator with flexure hinges for an optical disk system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chang-Soo; Kim, Soo-Hyun

    2002-10-01

    A three-axis lever actuator with a flexure hinge has been designed and fabricated. This actuator is driven by electromagnetic force based on a coil-magnet system and can be used as a high precision actuator and, especially as a pickup head actuator in optical disks. High precision and low sensitivity to external vibration are the major advantages of this lever actuator. An analysis model was found and compared to the finite element method. Dynamic characteristics of the three-axis lever actuator were measured. The results are in very close agreement to those predicted by the model and finite element analysis.

  10. Escalation of food-maintained responding and sensitivity to the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Goeders, James E.; Murnane, Kevin S.; Banks, Matthew L.; Fantegrossi, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Escalation of drug self-administration is a consequence of extended drug access and is thought to be specifically related to addiction, but few studies have investigated whether intake of non-drug reinforcers may also escalate with extended-access. The goal of these studies was to determine the effects of limited and extended-access to food reinforcers on behavioral and pharmacological endpoints in mice. In distinct groups, responding on a lever was maintained by liquid reinforcement, or nose-poke responses were maintained by sucrose pellets or liquid food in sessions lasting 1 hour (limited-access) or 10 hours (extended-access). The reinforcing strength of each food, as well as reinforcer-associated cues, was tested before and after extended-access using a progressive ratio (PR) schedule, and locomotor activity in response to novelty and increasing doses of cocaine was assessed in an open field setting in all animals after access to food reinforcers. Escalation of lever-pressing behavior reinforced by liquid food, but not nose-poke behavior reinforced by liquid food or sucrose pellets, was observed across successive extended-access sessions. A concomitant increase in the reinforcing strength of liquid food and its associated cues was apparent in mice that escalated their responding, but not in mice that did not escalate. Finally, extended reinforcer access leading to behavioral escalation was accompanied by an increased sensitivity to the psychostimulant effects of cocaine compared to limited-access. These findings indicate that behavioral escalation can develop as a consequence of extended-access to a non-drug reinforcer, although both the nature of the reinforcer (liquid versus solid food) and the topography of the operant response (lever versus nose-poke) modulate its development. These data also suggest that some of the behavioral and pharmacological corrolaries of behavioral escalation observed following extended-access to drug self-administration may not be

  11. The flexible approach hypothesis: unification of effort and cue-responding hypotheses for the role of nucleus accumbens dopamine in the activation of reward-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Saleem M

    2010-12-01

    Dopamine released in the nucleus accumbens is thought to contribute to the decision to exert effort to seek reward. This hypothesis is supported by findings that performance of tasks requiring higher levels of effort is more susceptible to disruption by manipulations that reduce accumbens dopamine function than tasks that require less effort. However, performance of some low-effort cue-responding tasks is highly dependent on accumbens dopamine. To reconcile these disparate results, we made detailed behavioral observations of rats performing various operant tasks and determined how injection of dopamine receptor antagonists into the accumbens influenced specific aspects of the animals' behavior. Strikingly, once animals began a chain of operant responses, the antagonists did not affect the ability to continue the chain until reward delivery. Instead, when rats left the operandum, the antagonists severely impaired the ability to return. We show that this impairment is specific to situations in which the animal must determine a new set of approach actions on each approach occasion; this behavior is called "flexible approach." Both high-effort operant tasks and some low-effort cue-responding tasks require dopamine receptor activation in the accumbens because animals pause their responding and explore the chamber, and accumbens dopamine is required to terminate these pauses with flexible approach to the operandum. The flexible approach hypothesis provides a unified framework for understanding the contribution of the accumbens and its dopamine projection to reward-seeking behavior. PMID:21147998

  12. Lever arm extension of myosin VI is unnecessary for the adjacent binding state

    PubMed Central

    Ikezaki, Keigo; Komori, Tomotaka; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Yanagida, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Myosin VI is a processive myosin that has a unique stepping motion, which includes three kinds of steps: a large forward step, a small forward step and a backward step. Recently, we proposed the parallel lever arms model to explain the adjacent binding state, which is necessary for the unique motion. In this model, both lever arms are directed the same direction. However, experimental evidence has not refuted the possibility that the adjacent binding state emerges from myosin VI folding its lever arm extension (LAE). To clarify this issue, we constructed a myosin VI/V chimera that replaces the myosin VI LAE with the IQ3-6 domains of the myosin V lever arm, which cannot fold, and performed single molecule imaging. Our chimera showed the same stepping patterns as myosin VI, indicating the LAE is not responsible for the adjacent binding state.

  13. 20. VIEW OF NEWER 7LEVER INTERLOCKING MACHINE IN FOREGROUND, NEXT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW OF NEWER 7-LEVER INTERLOCKING MACHINE IN FOREGROUND, NEXT TO ORIGINAL INTERLOCKING MACHINE, THIRD FLOOR - South Station Tower No. 1 & Interlocking System, Dewey Square, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  14. Discovery of a Good Responder Subtype of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Signatures Activated by Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Komatsuzaki, Rie; Komatsu, Masayuki; Chiwaki, Fumiko; Tamaoki, Masashi; Nishimura, Takao; Takahashi, Naoki; Oda, Ichiro; Tachimori, Yuji; Arao, Tokuzo; Nishio, Kazuto; Kitano, Shigehisa; Narumi, Kenta; Aoki, Kazunori; Fujii, Satoshi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Muto, Manabu; Yamada, Yasuhide; Sasaki, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is a less invasive therapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Five-year survival rate of locally advanced ESCC patients by definitive CRT were 37%. We previously reported that tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) activation signatures were preferentially found in long-term survivors. However, it is unknown whether the CTL activation is actually driven by CRT. We compared gene expression profiles among pre- and post-treatment biopsy specimens of 30 ESCC patients and 121 pre-treatment ESCC biopsy specimens. In the complete response (CR) cases, 999 overexpressed genes including at least 234 tumor-specific CTL-activation associated genes such as IFNG, PRF1, and GZMB, were found in post-treatment biopsy specimens. Clustering analysis using expression profiles of these 234 genes allowed us to distinguish the immune-activated cases, designating them as I-type, from other cases. However, despite the better CR rate in the I-type, overall survival was not significantly better in both these 30 cases and another 121 cases. Further comparative study identified a series of epithelial to mesenchymal transition-related genes overexpressed in the early relapse cases. Importantly, the clinical outcome of CDH2-negative cases in the I-type was significantly better than that of the CDH2-positive cases in the I-type. Furthermore, NK cells, which were activated by neutrophils-producing S100A8/S100A9, and CTLs were suggested to cooperatively enhance the effect of CRT in the CDH2-negative I-type. These results suggested that CTL gene activation may provide a prognostic advantage in ESCCs with epithelial characteristics. PMID:26625258

  15. The Effect of Active Student Responding during Computer-Assisted Instruction on Social Studies Learning by Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerome, Annamaria; Barbetta, Patricia M.

    2005-01-01

    An alternating treatments design with a best treatments phase was used to compare two active student response (ASR) conditions and one on-task (OT) condition on the acquisition and maintenance of social studies facts during computer-assisted instruction. Each week for six weeks, five students were provided daily computer-assisted instruction on 21…

  16. Post-translational control of nitrate reductase activity responding to light and photosynthesis evolved already in the early vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Nemie-Feyissa, Dugassa; Królicka, Adriana; Førland, Nina; Hansen, Margarita; Heidari, Behzad; Lillo, Cathrine

    2013-05-01

    Regulation of nitrate reductase (NR) by reversible phosphorylation at a conserved motif is well established in higher plants, and enables regulation of NR in response to rapid fluctuations in light intensity. This regulation is not conserved in algae NR, and we wished to test the evolutionary origin of the regulatory mechanism by physiological examination of ancient land plants. Especially a member of the lycophytes is of interest since their NR is candidate for regulation by reversible phosphorylation based on sequence analysis. We compared Selaginella kraussiana, a member of the lycophytes and earliest vascular plants, with the angiosperm Arabidopsis thaliana, and also tested the moss Physcomitrella patens. Interestingly, optimization of assay conditions revealed that S. kraussiana NR used NADH as an electron donor like A. thaliana, whereas P. patens NR activity depended on NADPH. Examination of light/darkness effects showed that S. kraussiana NR was rapidly regulated similar to A. thaliana NR when a differential (Mg(2+) contra EDTA) assay was used to reveal activity state of NR. This implies that already existing NR enzyme was post-translationally activated by light in both species. Light had a positive effect also on de novo synthesis of NR in S. kraussiana, which could be shown after the plants had been exposed to a prolonged dark period (7 days). Daily variations in NR activity were mainly caused by post-translational modifications. As for angiosperms, the post-translational light activation of NR in S. kraussiana was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1*1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosynthesis and stomata opening. Evolutionary, a post-translational control mechanism for NR have occurred before or in parallel with development of vascular tissue in land plants, and appears to be part of a complex mechanisms for coordination of CO2 and nitrogen metabolism in these plants. PMID:23395536

  17. Flowpath acceleration vs flowpath activation: how do hydrologic systems respond to dynamic inputs and changes in storage?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, Ciaran

    2016-04-01

    The response of catchments to rainfall or snowmelt can be understood in terms of the propagation and dissipation of a wave of fluid energy, and in terms of the translation of fluid parcels in space. The first determines the amount of flow in a stream, and the second determines the age composition of that streamflow. However, these are not distinct phenomena, but two aspects of the integrated catchment scale hydrologic response. Previous work has shown that catchment storage is the dominant state variable controlling both the magnitude of the flow response and the age composition of that flow response. Here, I will present a succinct framework that unifies the flow and transport properties of a watershed, and their relationship to storage. This framework further extends rank StorAge Selection (rSAS) function theory. The framework suggests that the hydrologic response of a watershed to inputs can be understood to consist of two modalities: flowpath acceleration and flowpath activation. In the first case, additional potential energy drives an acceleration of flowpaths, so that water of all ages moves more quickly toward the catchment outlet. In the second case, the additional new water moves toward the outlet along newly-activated flow paths without modifying the velocity of water previously in the watershed. Real hydrologic systems may exhibit some combination of both modalities across their age-ranked storage. The proposed framework allows the dominant modalities of a given hydrologic system to be explored with few a priori assumptions. Data from several hydrologic systems will be used to demonstrate the method, and gain insights into the sensitivity of catchment flow and transport in variable climatic conditions.

  18. Continuous, high-resolution biospeckle imaging reveals a discrete zone of activity at the root apex that responds to contact with obstacles

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, K. M.; Barreto, B.; Pasqual, M.; White, P. J.; Braga, R. A.; Dupuy, L. X.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Shining a laser onto biological material produces light speckles termed biospeckles. Patterns of biospeckle activity reflect changes in cell biochemistry, developmental processes and responses to the environment. The aim of this work was to develop methods to investigate the biospeckle activity in roots and to characterize the distribution of its intensity and response to thigmostimuli. Methods Biospeckle activity in roots of Zea mays, and also Jatropha curcas and Citrus limonia, was imaged live and in situ using a portable laser and a digital microscope with a spatial resolution of 10 μm per pixel and the ability to capture images every 0·080 s. A procedure incorporating a Fujii algorithm, image restoration using median and Gaussian filters, image segmentation using maximum-entropy threshold methods and the extraction of features using a tracing algorithm followed by spline fitting were developed to obtain quantitative information from images of biospeckle activity. A wavelet transform algorithm was used for spectral decomposition of biospeckle activity and generalized additive models were used to attribute statistical significance to changes in patterns of biospeckle activity. Key Results The intensity of biospeckle activity was greatest close to the root apex. Higher frequencies (3–6 Hz) contributed most to the total intensity of biospeckle activity. When a root encountered an obstacle, the intensity of biospeckle activity decreased abruptly throughout the root system. The response became attenuated with repeated thigmostimuli. Conclusions The data suggest that at least one component of root biospeckle activity resulted from a biological process, which is located in the zone of cell division and responds to thigmostimuli. However, neither individual cell division events nor root elongation is likely to be responsible for the patterns of biospeckle activity. PMID:24284818

  19. Soil Microbe Active Community Composition and Capability of Responding to Litter Addition after 12 Years of No Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Elizabeth; Yarwood, Rockie; Lajtha, Kate; Myrold, David

    2013-01-01

    One explanation given for the high microbial diversity found in soils is that they contain a large inactive biomass that is able to persist in soils for long periods of time. This persistent microbial fraction may help to buffer the functionality of the soil community during times of low nutrients by providing a reservoir of specialized functions that can be reactivated when conditions improve. A study was designed to test the hypothesis: in soils lacking fresh root or detrital inputs, microbial community composition may persist relatively unchanged. Upon addition of new inputs, this community will be stimulated to grow and break down litter similarly to control soils. Soils from two of the Detrital Input and Removal Treatments (DIRT) at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest, the no-input and control treatment plots, were used in a microcosm experiment where Douglas-fir needles were added to soils. After 3 and 151 days of incubation, soil microbial DNA and RNA was extracted and characterized using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and 454 pyrosequencing. The abundance of 16S and 28S gene copies and RNA copies did not vary with soil type or amendment; however, treatment differences were observed in the abundance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizing amoA gene abundance. Analysis of ∼110,000 bacterial sequences showed a significant change in the active (RNA-based) community between day 3 and day 151, but microbial composition was similar between soil types. These results show that even after 12 years of plant litter exclusion, the legacy of community composition was well buffered against a dramatic disturbance. PMID:23263952

  20. Inhibition of glycine transporter-1 reduces cue-induced nicotine-seeking, but does not promote extinction of conditioned nicotine cue responding in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cervo, Luigi; Di Clemente, Angelo; Orrù, Alessandro; Moro, Federico; Cassina, Chiara; Pich, Emilio Merlo; Corsi, Mauro; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo

    2013-09-01

    Pharmacological stimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAr) could enhance the outcome of cue-exposure therapy for smoking cessation. NMDAr stimulation can be achieved by increasing pharmacologically the synaptic levels of glycine, a necessary co-agonist. Here, we evaluate the effects of SSR504734, a selective inhibitor of glycine type I transporter (GlyT1) in an extinction-reinstatement procedure inducing robust and lasting nicotine-seeking behavior in rats. Male Wistar rats were trained to associate discriminative stimuli (S(D)s) with the availability of nicotine (0.03 mg/kg/65 μL/2 second/infusion) or sucrose (45-mg pellet) versus non-reward in two-lever operant cages. Reinforced response was followed by cue signaling 20-second time-out (CSs). Once the training criterion was met, rats underwent extinction of lever presses, in the absence of reinforcers, S(D) s and CSs. Re-exposure to nicotine or sucrose S(D+)/CS(+), but not non-reward S(D-)/CS(-), revived responding at the previously reinforced lever. Acute pre-treatment with SSR504734 (10 mg/kg i.p.) reduced nicotine-seeking but not sucrose-seeking behavior without influencing rats' locomotor activity. Sub-chronic treatment (10 mg/kg i.p. for 5 days) during daily exposure to S(D+)/CS(+) reduced nicotine-seeking; however, this effect was transient, with return to S(D+)/CS(+) responding at 72 hours. Full recovery to S(D+)/CS(+) responding was observed after 1 month suggesting that SSR504734 sub-acute treatment did not engage the long-term plasticity mechanisms probably involved in nicotine-seeking. In conclusion, GlyT1-inhibitors might offer a therapeutic opportunity for acute cue-controlled nicotine-seeking, but the lack of persistent effects of the sub-chronic treatment associated with nicotine cues exposure suggests that short-term administration of GlyT1-inhibitor SSR504734 is not sufficient to promote extinction of nicotine-cue conditioned responding. PMID:23490434

  1. Disinhibition by propranolol and chlordiazepoxide of nonrewarded lever-pressing in the rat is unaffected by dorsal noradrenergic bundle lesion.

    PubMed

    Salmon, P; Tsaltas, E; Gray, J A

    1989-03-01

    Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats received 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesions of the dorsal noradrenergic bundle and 10 others underwent control operations. The lesion depleted levels of noradrenaline in the hippocampus to 2% of those in the controls. All rats were then trained for 16 sessions to lever-press in a Skinner box on a variable interval 18 sec schedule of food-reinforcement, then for 42 days on a successive discrimination between periods of variable interval (VI 18 sec) food-reinforcement and periods of extinction. This report describes the effects of chlordiazepoxide (CDP; 5 mg/kg) and propranolol (5 and 10 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally in both groups on modified ABBA designs after this training. Both drugs increased the response rates in extinction periods. The effect of propranolol was similar at each dose and smaller than that of CDP. Although CDP and propranolol (5 mg/kg) increased variable interval response rates also, this could not account for the effect on extinction response rates. Responding did not differ between the lesioned and control animals and the effects of drugs were similar in each group. It is unlikely that CDP or propranolol release nonrewarded responding by disrupting transmission in the dorsal noradrenergic bundle. PMID:2725847

  2. Torque control in lingual orthodontics with lever arm mechanics: a case report.

    PubMed

    Aravind, M; Shivaprakash, G; Ramesh, G C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this report is to illustrate treatment mechanics for torque control in lingual mechanotherapy using a lever arm and transpalatal arch (TPA) tab system during en masse retraction of anterior teeth. An 18-year-old female with bimaxillary dentoalveolar proclination with crowding was treated with a lever arm-TPA tab system. The retraction tabs bent into the TPA placed across the maxillary second molars were used as anchorage. The retraction force on the maxillary anterior teeth was applied using lever arm hooks soldered between the lateral incisors and canines on a lingual mushroom archwire. By applying a retraction force to the lever arm hooks, the maxillary anterior teeth experienced greater palatal root movement as compared to the conventional retraction forces applied at the crown level. The tabs, placed high in the TPA, produced a distal tipping moment on the maxillary second molars, reinforcing their anchorage. The retraction force applied to the long lever arm hooks from the TPA tabs at the level of center of resistance (CRes) of anterior and posterior teeth is advantageous mainly in two aspects. First, it reinforces the anchorage, and second, it favors the palatal root movement of anterior teeth, thus obtaining better control over the torque during en masse retraction. PMID:23646329

  3. 75 FR 48921 - Administrative Guidance for Multistate Extension Activities and Integrated Research and Extension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... with these requirements. Section 105 of AREERA amended the Smith-Lever Act to require that a specified... 204 of AREERA amended the Hatch Act and Smith-Lever Act to require that a specified amount of... Smith- Lever Act funds on multistate extension activities and 25 percent on integrated research...

  4. Active Responding in Content Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davey, Beth

    1989-01-01

    Describes how Multiple Response Techniques (MRTs) can be used before, during, and after reading to help students better comprehend content material. Argues that MRTs enhance comprehension by engaging all students, focusing on students' strengths, training students in reflectivity and self-monitoring, and allowing the teacher quick evaluation of…

  5. The Lever Arm Effects a Mechanical Asymmetry of the Myosin-V-Actin Bond

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardt, J. Christof M.; Ökten, Zeynep; Rief, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Myosin-V is a two-headed molecular motor taking multiple ATP-dependent steps toward the plus end (forward) of actin filaments. At high mechanical loads, the motor processively steps toward the minus end (backward) even in the absence of ATP, whereas analogous forward steps cannot be induced. The detailed mechanism underlying this mechanical asymmetry is not known. We investigate the effect of force on individual single headed myosin-V constructs bound to actin in the absence of ATP. If pulled forward, the myosin-V head dissociates at forces twice as high than if pulled backward. Moreover, backward but not forward distances to the unbinding barrier are dependent on the lever arm length. This asymmetry of unbinding force distributions in a single headed myosin forms the basis of the two-headed asymmetry. Under load, the lever arm functions as a true lever in a mechanical sense. PMID:20338849

  6. Single-Lever Power Control for General Aviation Aircraft Promises Improved Efficiency and Simplified Pilot Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrave, Jeffrey L.

    1997-01-01

    General aviation research is leading to major advances in internal combustion engine control systems for single-engine, single-pilot aircraft. These advances promise to increase engine performance and fuel efficiency while substantially reducing pilot workload and increasing flight safety. One such advance is a single-lever power control (SLPC) system, a welcome departure from older, less user-friendly, multilever engine control systems. The benefits of using single-lever power controls for general aviation aircraft are improved flight safety through advanced engine diagnostics, simplified powerplant operations, increased time between overhauls, and cost-effective technology (extends fuel burn and reduces overhaul costs). The single-lever concept has proven to be so effective in preliminary studies that general aviation manufacturers are making plans to retrofit current aircraft with the technology and are incorporating it in designs for future aircraft.

  7. New Insights into the Functional Morphology of the Lever Mechanism of Salvia pratensis (Lamiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Reith, Martin; Baumann, Gisela; Claßen-Bockhoff, Regine; Speck, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The functional morphology of Salvia pratensis flowers was re-investigated, after new insights revealed that pollen dispensing is one of the main functions of the staminal lever. In particular, no detailed information was available regarding the process of pollen transfer and the forces arising between the pollen-bearing thecae and the pollinating bee's body. The assumption was made that these forces play a significant role in pollen dispensing. Methods The functional morphology of S. pratensis flowers and the interaction between flowers and bees (Apis mellifera) were studied by reconstructing stress and strains by using qualitative and semi-quantitative theoretical analysis. Flowers were manipulated to study the spatial arrangement of the filament and lever, and of the head and proboscis of the visiting bee inside the tube. Photographs and films of bee visits on flowers were used to analyse the interaction of pollinator and staminal lever. Key Results The spoon-shaped lower lever of S. pratensis has a small hole through which a bee introduces its proboscis into the corolla tube. Although mentioned for the first time by Kerner von Marilaun in 1891, presented here is the first drawing and the first photograph showing this interaction in detail. The analysis of the interaction of flower visitor and the lever mechanism revealed that the position of bees on different flowers is spatially very similar. Flower morphology constrains postures of legitimately nectar-probing bees within narrow bounds. A theoretical discussion on structural elements and force progression in the flower allows the principles of lightweight architecture in flower morphology to be recognized. Conclusions The staminal lever of S. pratensis is a pollen-dispensing device. It seems to influence the amount of pollen deposited on pollinators by determining the forces arising between the pollinator and the pollen. The relevant forces occur either during the first, dynamic phase or

  8. Myosin VI: an innovative motor that challenged the swinging lever arm hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2010-01-01

    The swinging crossbridge hypothesis states that energy from ATP hydrolysis is transduced to mechanical movement of the myosin head while bound to actin. The light chain-binding region of myosin is thought to act as a lever arm that amplifies movements near the catalytic site. This model has been challenged by findings that myosin VI takes larger steps along actin filaments than early interpretations of its structure seem to allow. We now know that myosin VI does indeed operate by an unusual ~ 180° lever arm swing and achieves its large step size using special structural features in its tail domain. PMID:20094053

  9. Dopamine D1 receptor activation improves PCP-induced performance disruption in the 5C-CPT by reducing inappropriate responding.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S A; Young, J W; Bate, S T; Neill, J C

    2016-03-01

    Attentional deficits contribute significantly to the functional disability of schizophrenia patients. The 5-choice continuous performance test (5C-CPT) measures attention in mice, rats, and humans, requiring the discrimination of trial types that either require a response or the inhibition of a response. The 5C-CPT, one version of human continuous performance tests (CPT), enables attentional testing in rodents in a manner consistent with humans. Augmenting the prefrontal cortical dopaminergic system has been proposed as a therapeutic target to attenuate the cognitive disturbances associated with schizophrenia. Using translational behavioural tasks in conjunction with inducing conditions relevant to schizophrenia pathophysiology enable the assessment of pro-attentive properties of compounds that augment dopaminergic activity. Here, using a repeated phencyclidine (PCP) treatment regimen and the 5C-CPT paradigm, we assess the pro-attentive properties of SKF 38393, a dopamine D1 receptor agonist, in rats. We show that repeated PCP treatment induces robust deficits in 5C-CPT performance indicative of impaired attention. Pre-treatment with SKF 38393 partially attenuates the PCP-induced deficits in 5C-CPT performance by reducing false alarm responding and increasing response accuracy. Impaired target detection was still evident in SKF 38393-treated rats however. Thus, augmentation of the dopamine D1 system improves PCP-induces deficits in 5C-CPT performance by selectively reducing aspects of inappropriate responding. These findings provide evidence to support the hypothesis that novel therapies targeting the dopamine D1 receptor system could improve aspects of attentional deficits in schizophrenia patients. PMID:26658514

  10. Ergonomic Evaluation of Space Shuttle Light-Weight Seat Lever Position and Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maida, J.; Rajulu, Sudhakar L.; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During a Shuttle flight in the early part of 1999, one of the crewmembers was unable to operate the backrest lever for the light-weight seat in microgravity. It is essential that the crewmembers are able to adjust this back-rest lever, which is titled forward 2 degrees from vertical during launch and then moved backwards to 10 degrees aft of vertical upon reaching orbit. This adjustment is needed to cushion the crewmembers during an inadvertent crash landing situation. The original Shuttle seats, which had seat controls located on the front left and right sides of the seat, were replaced recently with the new light-weight seats. The controls for these new, seats were moved to the night side with one control at the front and the other at the back. While it was uncertain whether the problem encountered was unique to that crewmember or not it was clear to the personnel responsible for maintaining the Shuttle seats that not knowing the cause of the problem posed a safety concern for NASA. Hence the Anthropometry and Biomechanics Facility (ABF) of the Johnson Space Center was requested to perform an evaluation of the seat controls and provide NASA with appropriate recommendations on whether the seat lever positions and operations should be modified. The ABF designed an experiment to investigate the amount of pull force exerted by subjects, wearing an unpressurized or pressurized crew launch escape suit, when controls were placed in the front and back (on the right side) of the light-weight seat. Single-axis load cells were attached to the seat levers, which measured the maximum static pull forces that were exerted by the subjects. Twelve subjects, six male and six female, participated in this study. Each subject was asked to perform the pull test at least three times for each combination of lever position and suit pressure conditions. The results from this study showed that as a whole (or in general), the subjects were able to pull on the lever at the back position with

  11. A Lever for Life: How I Lost 150 Pounds and Learned the Catalytic Power of School Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebner, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The quotation, attributed to the Greek mathematician Archimedes, about the power of levers to move the world has been quoted many times with slight variations, but usually the point is the same: "With the right lever, one can move the earth." However, the actual quotation attributed to Archimedes comes in the writings of another Greek…

  12. Expanded Lever Rule for Phase Volume Fraction Calculation of High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel in Thermal Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xuanwei; Huang, Jihua; Chen, Shuhai; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-06-01

    The principle of the lever rule on the dilatation curve and its application to the corresponding differential dilatation curve were introduced in a nonoverlapped two-phase continuous cooling process. The lever rule was further expanded in the case of an overlapped two-phase process. The application of the expanded lever rule was based on the approximate symmetry treatment on the differential dilatation curve, which shows reasonably both on the theoretical calculation and in the experimental results. High-strength low-alloy steels were thermal simulated with Gleeble 3500. The transformed phase volume fractions in different cooling processes were calculated by the expanded lever rule and metallography analysis. The results showed the expanded lever rule could calculate reliable phase volume fractions as metallography analysis.

  13. "Modernisation" and the Role of Policy Levers in the Learning and Skills Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steer, Richard; Spours, Ken; Hodgson, Ann; Finlay, Ian; Coffield, Frank; Edward, Sheila; Gregson, Maggie

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the changing use of policy levers in the English postcompulsory education and training system, often referred to as the learning and skills sector (LSS). Policy steering by governments has increased significantly in recent years, bringing with it the development of new forms of arms-length regulation. In the English context,…

  14. [Equivalent Lever Principle of Ossicular Chain and Amplitude Reduction Effect of Internal Ear Lymph].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Qin, Renjia

    2015-04-01

    This paper makes persuasive demonstrations on some problems about the human ear sound transmission principle in existing physiological textbooks and reference books, and puts forward the authors' view to make up for its literature. Exerting the knowledge of lever in physics and the acoustics theory, we come up with an equivalent simplified model of manubrium mallei which is to meet the requirements as the long arm of the lever. We also set up an equivalent simplified model of ossicular chain--a combination of levers of ossicular chain. We disassemble the model into two simple levers, and make full analysis and demonstration on them. Through the calculation and comparison of displacement amplitudes in both external auditory canal air and internal ear lymph, we may draw a conclusion that the key reason, which the sound displacement amplitude is to be decreased to adapt to the endurance limit of the basement membrane, is that the density and sound speed in lymph is much higher than those in the air. PMID:26211249

  15. Haptic Feedback and Students' Learning about Levers: Unraveling the Effect of Simulated Touch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiebe, Eric N.; Minogue, James; Jones, M. Gail; Cowley, Jennifer; Krebs, Denise

    2009-01-01

    While there has been extensive experimental research on haptics, less has been conducted on cross-modal interactions between visual and haptic perception and even less still on cross-modal applications in instructional settings. This study looks at a simulation on the principles of levers using both visual and haptic feedback: one group received…

  16. Mediation, Translation and Local Ecologies: Understanding the Impact of Policy Levers on FE Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spours, Ken; Coffield, Frank; Gregson, Maggie

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the views of managers and tutors on the role of policy "levers" on teaching, learning, and inclusion in colleges of Further Education (FE) in our research project, "The impact of policy on learning and inclusion in the Learning and Skills Sector (LSS)." Using data from five research visits conducted over two years in eight FE…

  17. Connection Levers: Supports for Building Teachers' Confidence and Commitment to Teach Mathematics and Statistics through Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makar, Katie

    2007-01-01

    Gaps between teaching practices and research recommendations have been well documented. One challenge for research is in understanding the processes and systems that promote a bridging of these gaps. A year-long study with four primary teachers documented ten support mechanisms, or connection levers, that the teachers raised as important for…

  18. In Vivo Orientation of Single Myosin Lever Arms in Zebrafish Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaojing; Ekker, Stephen C.; Shelden, Eric A.; Takubo, Naoko; Wang, Yihua; Burghardt, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac and skeletal myosin assembled in the muscle lattice power contraction by transducing ATP free energy into the mechanical work of moving actin. Myosin catalytic/lever-arm domains comprise the transduction/mechanical coupling machinery that move actin by lever-arm rotation. In vivo, myosin is crowded and constrained by the fiber lattice as side chains are mutated and otherwise modified under normal, diseased, or aging conditions that collectively define the native myosin environment. Single-myosin detection uniquely defines bottom-up characterization of myosin functionality. The marriage of in vivo and single-myosin detection to study zebrafish embryo models of human muscle disease is a multiscaled technology that allows one-to-one registration of a selected myosin molecular alteration with muscle filament-sarcomere-cell-fiber-tissue-organ- and organism level phenotypes. In vivo single-myosin lever-arm orientation was observed at superresolution using a photoactivatable-green-fluorescent-protein (PAGFP)-tagged myosin light chain expressed in zebrafish skeletal muscle. By simultaneous observation of multiphoton excitation fluorescence emission and second harmonic generation from myosin, we demonstrated tag specificity for the lever arm. Single-molecule detection used highly inclined parallel beam illumination and was verified by quantized photoactivation and photobleaching. Single-molecule emission patterns from relaxed muscle in vivo provided extensive superresolved dipole orientation constraints that were modeled using docking scenarios generated for the myosin (S1) and GFP crystal structures. The dipole orientation data provided sufficient constraints to estimate S1/GFP coordination. The S1/GFP coordination in vivo is rigid and the lever-arm orientation distribution is well-ordered in relaxed muscle. For comparison, single myosins in relaxed permeabilized porcine papillary muscle fibers indicated slightly differently oriented lever arms and rigid S1

  19. Enhancing Academic Engagement: Providing Opportunities for Responding and Influencing Students to Choose to Respond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Christopher H.; Pappas, Danielle N.; Davis, Kai A.

    2005-01-01

    Although educators often provide opportunities for students to engage in active academic responding, in many situations, students either cannot or will not respond. In the current article, we analyze the reasons students fail to respond. Practical procedures educators can use to prevent "can't do" problems are provided. "Won't do" problems are…

  20. Changes in the contents of metabolites and enzyme activities in rice plants responding to Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn infection: activation of glycolysis and connection to phenylpropanoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Mutuku, J Musembi; Nose, Akihiro

    2012-06-01

    Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn causes sheath blight disease in rice, and genetic resistance against it is the most desirable characteristic. Current improvement efforts are based on analysis of polygenic quantitative trait loci (QTLs), but interpretation is limited by the lack of information on the changes in metabolic pathways. Our previous studies linked activation of the glycolytic pathway to enhanced generation of lignin in the phenylpropanoid pathway. The current studies investigated the regulation of glycolysis by examining the time course of changes in enzymatic activities and metabolite contents. The results showed that the activities of all glycolytic enzymes as well as fructose-6-phosphate (F-6-P), fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-P(2)), dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP), 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG), phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and pyruvate contents increased. These results combined with our previous findings that the expression of phosphoglucomutase (PGM), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), enolase and pyruvate kinase (PK) increased after infection suggested that the additional establishment of glycolysis in the cytosol compartment occurred after infection. Further evidence for this was our recent findings that the increase in expression of the 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK) plastid isozyme Os06g05860 was accompanied by an increase in expression of three cytosolic PFK isozymes, i.e. Os01g09570, Os01g53680 and Os04g39420, as well as pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofrucokinase (PFP) isozymes Os08g25720 (α-subunit) and Os06g13810 (β-subunit) in infected rice plants of the resistant line. The results also showed that the reactions catalysed by PFK/PFP, aldolase, GAPDH + phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and PK in leaf sheaths of R. solani-infected rice plants were non-equilibrium reactions in vivo. This study showed that PGM, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), TPI and phosphoglycerate mutase (PGmu

  1. Responding to Children's Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to explore the issues that face primary school teachers when responding to children's drawings. Assessment in art and design is an ongoing concern for teachers with limited experience and confidence in the area and, although children's drawings continue to be a focus of much research, the question of what it is that teachers say…

  2. Experience and Responding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassman, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Responds to critiques of an article comparing Dewey and Vygotsky. The critiques argued that Dewey did not promote process over product in the classroom and that Dewey and Vygotsky are more similar than the original article suggested. Focuses on critiques regarding the process product relationship, concrete curriculum issues, student diversity, and…

  3. Responding to Misbehavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Kathryn; Forton, Mary Beth; Porter, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    As they learn to negotiate social expectations, children test limits, get carried away, forget, and make mistakes. In fact, having these experiences--and seeing how adults respond to them--is one way children learn about how to behave. Just as when they teach academics, teachers can use students' behavioral mistakes as opportunities for learning.…

  4. Responding to Tragedy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coopman, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author, a superintendent of Clark-Pleasant School Corporation in Whiteland, Indiana, relates how she and the school community responded to a car accident that killed two students. The author stresses the need to develop a comprehensive crisis plan. It is also important to be sensitive to the needs of family members who are…

  5. Effects of cocaine on fixed-interval responding reinforced by the opportunity to run.

    PubMed Central

    Belke, T W; Dunbar, M J

    2001-01-01

    Rate-dependent drug effects have been observed for operant responding maintained by food, water, heat, light onset, electrical brain stimulation, shock-stimulus termination, and shock presentation. The present study sought to determine if the effects of cocaine on lever pressing maintained by the opportunity to run could also be described as rate dependent. Seven male Wistar rats were trained to respond on levers for the opportunity to run in a wheel. The schedule of reinforcement was fixed-interval 60 s, and the reinforcing consequence was the opportunity to run for 60 s. On this schedule, overall rates of responding were low, usually below six presses per minute, and pauses frequently exceeded the 60-s interval. Despite these differences, an overall scalloped pattern of lever pressing was evident for each rat. Doses of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 mg/kg cocaine were administered 10 min prior to a session. Only at the 16 mg/kg dose did the responding of the majority of rats change in a manner suggestive of a rate-dependent drug effect. Specifically, lower response rates at the beginning of the intervals increased and higher rates at the end of the intervals decreased, as indicated by the fact that slopes from the regression of drug rates on control rates decreased. These data provide tentative support for the generalization of rate-dependent effects to operant responding maintained by wheel running. Differences in the baseline performance maintained by wheel running compared to those for food and water point to the need for further experimentation before this effect can be firmly established. PMID:11256868

  6. Effects of exposure to 56Fe particles or protons on fixed-ratio operant responding in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Buhler, Lynn L.; Joseph, James A.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Jenkins, Daniel G.

    2002-01-01

    On long-duration trips outside of the magnetosphere, astronauts will be exposed to protons and to heavy particles which can affect their performance of required tasks. It is essential to determine the range of behaviors that might be affected by exposure to these types of radiation in order to understand the nature of behavioral deficits and to develop effective countermeasures. The present experiment examined the ability of rats to make an operant response following exposure to protons (250 MeV, 4 Gy) or 56Fe particles (1 GeV/n, 1 or 2 Gy). Following irradiation, rats were trained to press a lever in order to obtain food reinforcement. They were then placed on an ascending fixed-ratio schedule from FR-1 (each lever press rewarded with a food pellet) through FR-35 (35 lever presses required for 1 food pellet). Rats exposed to 4 Gy of protons or 1 Gy of 56Fe particles responded similarly to controls, increasing their rate of responding as the ratio increased. However, rats exposed to 2 Gy of 56Fe particles failed to increase their rate of responding at ratios greater than FR-20, indicating that rats exposed to 2 Gy of 56Fe particles cannot respond appropriately to increasing work requirements.

  7. Active Autotrophic Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in Biofilm Enrichments from Simulated Creek Ecosystems at Two Ammonium Concentrations Respond to Temperature Manipulation▿†

    PubMed Central

    Avrahami, Sharon; Jia, Zhongjun; Neufeld, Josh D.; Murrell, J. Colin; Conrad, Ralf; Küsel, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    The first step of nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite, is important for reducing eutrophication in freshwater environments when coupled with anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) or denitrification. We analyzed active formerly biofilm-associated aerobic ammonia-oxidizing communities originating from Ammerbach (AS) and Leutra South (LS) stream water (683 ± 550 [mean ± standard deviation] and 16 ± 7 μM NH4+, respectively) that were developed in a flow-channel experiment and incubated under three temperature regimens. By stable-isotope probing using 13CO2, we found that members of the Bacteria and not Archaea were the functionally dominant autotrophic ammonia oxidizers at all temperatures under relatively high ammonium loads. The copy numbers of bacterial amoA genes in 13C-labeled DNA were lower at 30°C than at 13°C in both stream enrichment cultures. However, the community composition of the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the 13C-labeled DNA responded differently to temperature manipulation at two ammonium concentrations. In LS enrichments incubated at the in situ temperature (13°C), Nitrosomonas oligotropha-like sequences were retrieved with sequences from Nitrosospira AmoA cluster 4, while the proportion of Nitrosospira sequences increased at higher temperatures. In AS enrichments incubated at 13°C and 20°C, AmoA cluster 4 sequences were dominant; Nitrosomonas nitrosa-like sequences dominated at 30°C. Biofilm-associated AOB communities were affected differentially by temperature at two relatively high ammonium concentrations, implicating them in a potential role in governing contaminated freshwater AOB distributions. PMID:21890674

  8. The effects of exercise on cocaine self-administration, food-maintained responding, and locomotor activity in female rats: importance of the temporal relationship between physical activity and initial drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark A; Witte, Maryam A

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have reported that exercise decreases cocaine self-administration in rats with long-term access (8+ weeks) to activity wheels in the home cage. The purpose of this study was to (a) examine the importance of the temporal relationship between physical activity and initial drug exposure, (b) determine the effects of exercise on responding maintained by a nondrug reinforcer (i.e., food), and (c) investigate the effects of exercise on cocaine-induced increases in locomotor activity. To this end, female rats were obtained at weaning and divided into 4 groups: (a) EXE-SED rats were housed in exercise cages for 6 weeks and then transferred to sedentary cages after the first day of behavioral testing; (b) SED-EXE rats were housed in sedentary cages for 6 weeks and then transferred to exercise cages after the first day of behavioral testing; (c) SED-SED rats remained in sedentary cages for the duration of the study; and (d) EXE-EXE rats remained in exercise cages for the duration of the study. Relative to the sedentary group (SED-SED), exercise reduced cocaine self-administration in both groups with access to activity wheels after initial drug exposure (EXE-EXE, SED-EXE) but did not reduce cocaine self-administration in the group with access to activity wheels only before drug exposure (EXE-SED). Exercise also decreased the effects of cocaine on locomotor activity but did not reduce responding maintained by food. These data suggest that exercise may reduce cocaine use in drug-experienced individuals with no prior history of aerobic activity without decreasing other types of positively reinforced behaviors. PMID:22924703

  9. Responding to Mechanical Antigravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millis, Marc G.; Thomas, Nicholas E.

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experiences of the NASA Breakthrough Propulsion Physics Project, suggestions are offered for constructively responding to proposals that purport breakthrough propulsion using mechanical devices. Because of the relatively large number of unsolicited submissions received (about 1 per workday) and because many of these involve similar concepts, this report is offered to help the would-be submitters make genuine progress as well as to help reviewers respond to such submissions. Devices that use oscillating masses or gyroscope falsely appear to create net thrust through differential friction or by misinterpreting torques as linear forces. To cover both the possibility of an errant claim and a genuine discovery, reviews should require that submitters meet minimal thresholds of proof before engaging in further correspondence; such as achieving sustained deflection of a level-platform pendulum in the case of mechanical thrusters.

  10. Electrostatic charge sensor based on a micromachined resonator with dual micro-levers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jiuxuan; Ding, Hong; Xie, Jin

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an electrostatic charge sensor based on a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonator with dual micro-levers to improve sensitivity. The device comprises a double-ended tuning fork resonant element working at out-of-phase mode with a quality factor (Q) of about 4900 under operating pressure of 40 mTorr. The resonant frequency shifts in proportion to an axial force induced by charge additions and then transformed by dual micro-levers with an amplification factor over 8. The measured responsivity is 1.3 × 10 - 3 Hz / fC 2 , which matches well with the results from analytical models and finite element method. The sensitivity of the charge sensor is 21 fC under 4 ppm frequency fluctuation. Additionally, electrostatic spring softening and nonlinear feature of the resonator are also investigated.

  11. Characterizing piezoscanner hysteresis and creep using optical levers and a reference nanopositioning stage

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, H.; Regnier, S.

    2009-04-15

    A method using atomic force microscope (AFM) optical levers and a reference nanopositioning stage has been developed to characterize piezoscanner hysteresis and creep. The piezoscanner is fixed on a closed-loop nanopositioning stage, both of which have the same arrangement on each axis of the three spatial directions inside the AFM-based nanomanipulation system. In order to achieve characterization, the optical lever is used as a displacement sensor to measure the relative movement between the nanopositioning stage and the piezoscanner by lateral tracking a well-defined slope with the tapping mode of the AFM cantilever. This setup can be used to estimate a piezoscanner's voltage input with a reference displacement from the nanopositioning stage. The hysteresis and creep were accurately calibrated by the method presented, which use the current setup of the AFM-based nanomanipulation system without any modification or additional devices.

  12. Coupling of lever arm swing and biased Brownian motion in actomyosin.

    PubMed

    Nie, Qing-Miao; Togashi, Akio; Sasaki, Takeshi N; Takano, Mitsunori; Sasai, Masaki; Terada, Tomoki P

    2014-04-01

    An important unresolved problem associated with actomyosin motors is the role of Brownian motion in the process of force generation. On the basis of structural observations of myosins and actins, the widely held lever-arm hypothesis has been proposed, in which proteins are assumed to show sequential structural changes among observed and hypothesized structures to exert mechanical force. An alternative hypothesis, the Brownian motion hypothesis, has been supported by single-molecule experiments and emphasizes more on the roles of fluctuating protein movement. In this study, we address the long-standing controversy between the lever-arm hypothesis and the Brownian motion hypothesis through in silico observations of an actomyosin system. We study a system composed of myosin II and actin filament by calculating free-energy landscapes of actin-myosin interactions using the molecular dynamics method and by simulating transitions among dynamically changing free-energy landscapes using the Monte Carlo method. The results obtained by this combined multi-scale calculation show that myosin with inorganic phosphate (Pi) and ADP weakly binds to actin and that after releasing Pi and ADP, myosin moves along the actin filament toward the strong-binding site by exhibiting the biased Brownian motion, a behavior consistent with the observed single-molecular behavior of myosin. Conformational flexibility of loops at the actin-interface of myosin and the N-terminus of actin subunit is necessary for the distinct bias in the Brownian motion. Both the 5.5-11 nm displacement due to the biased Brownian motion and the 3-5 nm displacement due to lever-arm swing contribute to the net displacement of myosin. The calculated results further suggest that the recovery stroke of the lever arm plays an important role in enhancing the displacement of myosin through multiple cycles of ATP hydrolysis, suggesting a unified movement mechanism for various members of the myosin family. PMID:24762409

  13. Predicting bite force in mammals: two-dimensional versus three-dimensional lever models.

    PubMed

    Davis, J L; Santana, S E; Dumont, E R; Grosse, I R

    2010-06-01

    Bite force is a measure of whole-organism performance that is often used to investigate the relationships between performance, morphology and fitness. When in vivo measurements of bite force are unavailable, researchers often turn to lever models to predict bite forces. This study demonstrates that bite force predictions based on two-dimensional (2-D) lever models can be improved by including three-dimensional (3-D) geometry and realistic physiological cross-sectional areas derived from dissections. Widely used, the 2-D method does a reasonable job of predicting bite force. However, it does so by over predicting physiological cross-sectional areas for the masseter and pterygoid muscles and under predicting physiological cross-sectional areas for the temporalis muscle. We found that lever models that include the three dimensional structure of the skull and mandible and physiological cross-sectional areas calculated from dissected muscles provide the best predictions of bite force. Models that accurately represent the biting mechanics strengthen our understanding of which variables are functionally relevant and how they are relevant to feeding performance. PMID:20472771

  14. Theoretical model of adaptive fiber tip positioner based on flexible hinges and levers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yan-xing; Wang, Xiao-lin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2015-10-01

    In this manuscript, we establish a model and theoretically investigate the novel structure of AFTP designed by ourselves. We analyze each sub-structure of the new type of AFTP and firstly use the software of ANSYS to simulate the deformation of the flexible hinge under the external force. The result shows that the deformation of the flexible hinge is mainly from and almost linear to the middle part. Further, after considering the influence of the levers and piezoelectric actuators, we setup the theoretical model in which the displacement is only relative to the ratio of the lever R. With the optimal value of R, we can get the relative largest displacement of the end cap when the other parameters are confirmed. As the maximal voltage applied on the piezoelectric stacks actuators (PSA) is finite, the largest displacement of the end cap is restricted. Neglecting the influence of the effective friction force (Ff) of inner-system, the relationship between the largest displacement of the end cap and the ratio (R) is derived numerically. From the calculated results, we get the largest displacement is about 67 μm with R of 6.9. This work provides a reference for structure optimization of AFTP based on flexible hinges and levers.

  15. Perseverative instrumental and Pavlovian responding to conditioned stimuli in serotonin transporter knockout rats.

    PubMed

    Nonkes, Lourens J P; Homberg, Judith R

    2013-02-01

    Environmental stimuli can influence behavior via the process of Pavlovian conditioning. Recent genetic research suggests that some individuals are more sensitive to environmental stimuli for behavioral guidance than others. One important mediator of this effect is serotonin transporter (5-HTT) genetic variance, which increases sensitivity to Pavlovian conditioned stimuli through changes in the build-up of corticolimbic circuits. As these stimuli can have reinforcing effects on instrumental responding, we here investigated their effects on instrumental behavior in 5-HTT knockout rats and their wild-type counterparts by means of the signal attenuation paradigm. In this paradigm animals acquired a Pavlovian association between a stimulus and food reward, and subsequently they had to lever press in order to gain access to this food reward-associated stimulus. Thereafter, half of the animals underwent extinction training during which extinction of the primary Pavlovian association was induced via non-reinforced stimulus presentations, whereas the other half did not receive this training. During a final test session all animals were tested for instrumental responding for the non-reinforced Pavlovian conditioned stimulus, as well as instrumental and Pavlovian responding to the stimulus after an initial lever-press. No genotype differences were observed during the training and extinction sessions. However, during the test session 5-HTT knockout rats that had not received prior extinction training displayed excessive instrumental responding. This was specifically observed during presentation of the stimulus (induced by the first lever press) and was accompanied by an increased number of feeder visits after termination of the stimulus presentation. An additionally performed c-Fos immunohistochemistry study revealed that the behaviors in these animals were associated with abnormal c-Fos immunoreactivity in the orbitofrontal cortex and basolateral amygdala, regions important

  16. Clinical-biochemical correlates of migraine attacks in rizatriptan responders and non-responders.

    PubMed

    Sarchielli, P; Pini, L A; Zanchin, G; Alberti, A; Maggioni, F; Rossi, C; Floridi, A; Calabresi, P

    2006-03-01

    The present study was aimed at verifying the clinical characteristics of a typical attack in 20 migraine patients, 10 responders and 10 non-responders to rizatriptan, and at investigating any differences in the levels of neuropeptides of the trigeminovascular or parasympathetic systems [calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), neurokinin A (NKA) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) measured by radioimmunoassay methods in external jugular blood] between responders and non-responders. In all responders to rizatriptan, pain was unilateral, severe, and pulsating, and in five of them at least one sign suggestive of parasympathetic system activation was recorded. Five patients who were non-responders to rizatriptan referred bilateral and non-pulsating pain, even though severe in most of them. CGRP and NKA levels measured before rizatriptan administration were significantly higher in responders than in non-responders (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.002, respectively). In the five patients with autonomic signs among rizatriptan responders, detectable VIP levels were found at baseline. One hour after rizatriptan administration, a decrease in CGRP and NKA levels was evident in the external jugular venous blood of rizatriptan responders, and this corresponded to a significant pain relief and alleviation of accompanying symptoms. VIP levels were also significantly reduced at the same time in the five patients with autonomic signs. After rizatriptan administration, CGRP and NKA levels in non-responder patients showed less significant variations at all time points after rizatriptan administration compared with rizatriptan responders. The present study, although carried out on a limited number of patients, supports recent clinical evidence of increased trigeminal activation associated with a better triptan response in migraine patients accompanied by parasympathetic activation in a subgroup of patients with autonomic signs. In contrast, the poor response seems to be correlated with a

  17. Evaluation of Respondent-Driven Sampling

    PubMed Central

    McCreesh, Nicky; Frost, Simon; Seeley, Janet; Katongole, Joseph; Tarsh, Matilda Ndagire; Ndunguse, Richard; Jichi, Fatima; Lunel, Natasha L; Maher, Dermot; Johnston, Lisa G; Sonnenberg, Pam; Copas, Andrew J; Hayes, Richard J; White, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Background Respondent-driven sampling is a novel variant of link-tracing sampling for estimating the characteristics of hard-to-reach groups, such as HIV prevalence in sex-workers. Despite its use by leading health organizations, the performance of this method in realistic situations is still largely unknown. We evaluated respondent-driven sampling by comparing estimates from a respondent-driven sampling survey with total-population data. Methods Total-population data on age, tribe, religion, socioeconomic status, sexual activity and HIV status were available on a population of 2402 male household-heads from an open cohort in rural Uganda. A respondent-driven sampling (RDS) survey was carried out in this population, employing current methods of sampling (RDS sample) and statistical inference (RDS estimates). Analyses were carried out for the full RDS sample and then repeated for the first 250 recruits (small sample). Results We recruited 927 household-heads. Full and small RDS samples were largely representative of the total population, but both samples under-represented men who were younger, of higher socioeconomic status, and with unknown sexual activity and HIV status. Respondent-driven-sampling statistical-inference methods failed to reduce these biases. Only 31%-37% (depending on method and sample size) of RDS estimates were closer to the true population proportions than the RDS sample proportions. Only 50%-74% of respondent-driven-sampling bootstrap 95% confidence intervals included the population proportion. Conclusions Respondent-driven sampling produced a generally representative sample of this well-connected non-hidden population. However, current respondent-driven-sampling inference methods failed to reduce bias when it occurred. Whether the data required to remove bias and measure precision can be collected in a respondent-driven sampling survey is unresolved. Respondent-driven sampling should be regarded as a (potentially superior) form of convenience

  18. Sensing cantilever beam bending by the optical lever technique and its application to surface stress.

    PubMed

    Evans, Drew R; Craig, Vincent S J

    2006-03-23

    Cantilever beams, both microscopic and macroscopic, are used as sensors in a great variety of applications. An optical lever system is commonly employed to determine the deflection and thereby the profile of the cantilever under load. The sensitivity of the optical lever must be calibrated, and this is usually achieved by application of a known load or deflection to the free end of the cantilever. When the sensing operation involves a different type of load or a combination of types of loadings, the calibration and the deflection values derived from it become invalid. Here we develop a master equation that permits the true deflection of the cantilever to be obtained simply from the measurement of the apparent deflection for uniformly distributed loadings and end-moment loadings. These loadings are relevant to the uniform adsorption or application of material to the cantilever or the application of a surface stress to the cantilever and should assist experimentalists using the optical lever, such as in the atomic force microscope, to measure cantilever deflections in a great variety of sensing applications. We then apply this treatment to the experimental evaluation of surface stress. Three forms of Stoney's equation that relate the apparent deflection to the surface stress, which is valid for both macroscopic and microscopic experiments, are derived. Analysis of the errors arising from incorrect modeling of the loading conditions of the cantilever currently applied in experiments is also presented. It is shown that the reported literature values for surface stress in microscopic experiments are typically 9% smaller than their true value. For macroscopic experiments, we demonstrate that the added mass of the film or coating generally dominates the measured deflection and must be accounted for accurately if surface stress measurements are to be made. Further, the reported measurements generally use a form of Stoney's equation that is in error, resulting in an

  19. Evolution of levers and linkages in the feeding mechanisms of fishes.

    PubMed

    Westneat, Mark W

    2004-11-01

    The evolution of feeding mechanisms in the ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) is a compelling example of transformation in a musculoskeletal complex involving multiple skeletal elements and numerous muscles that power skull motion. Biomechanical models of jaw force and skull kinetics aid our understanding of these complex systems and enable broad comparison of feeding mechanics across taxa. Mechanical models characterize how muscles move skeletal elements by pulling bones around points of rotation in lever mechanisms, or by transmitting force through skeletal elements connected in a linkage. Previous work has focused on the feeding biomechanics of several lineages of fishes, but a broader survey of skull function in the context of quantitative models has not been attempted. This study begins such a survey by examining the diversity of mechanical design of the oral jaws in 35 species of ray-finned fishes with three main objectives: (1) analyze lower jaw lever models in a broad phylogenetic range of taxa, (2) identify the origin and evolutionary patterns of change in the linkage systems that power maxillary rotation and upper jaw protrusion, and (3) analyze patterns of change in feeding design in the context of actinopterygian phylogeny. The mandibular lever is present in virtually all actinopterygians, and the diversity in lower jaw closing force transmission capacity, with mechanical advantage ranging from 0.04 to 0.68, has important functional consequences. A four-bar linkage for maxillary rotation arose in the Amiiformes and persists in various forms in many teleost species. Novel mechanisms for upper jaw protrusion based on this linkage for maxillary rotation have evolved independently at least five times in teleosts. The widespread anterior jaws linkage for jaw protrusion in percomorph fishes arose initially in Zeiformes and subsequently radiated into a wide range of premaxillary protrusion capabilities. PMID:21676723

  20. Displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Gang; Cuomo, Frank W.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present the evaluation of the displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors in a general format to establish their dependence on fiber sizes, optoelectronic detector specifications, input power, and other relevant parameters. The formations for the normalized reflected optical power change are derived for the evaluation of the optimal sensor response, the linearity range, and the minimum detectable displacement. The theoretical models are verified by an experiment which determines sensor response, modulation index, reflected optical power change, and linear response range through dynamic measurement. The application of this theoretical model to the study of a fiber-optic microphone for acoustic pressure detection is considered.

  1. Long-Lever-Arm Manipulation Under Anesthesia With Resultant Traumatic Anterior Shoulder Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Roubal, Paul J; Placzek, Jeffrey D

    2016-08-01

    The patient was a 61-year-old woman who underwent long-lever manipulation under anesthesia (MUA) for adhesive capsulitis. Two weeks following MUA, the constellation of clinical findings raised concern for possible adverse outcomes. Radiographs were obtained, as well as subsequent magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans. Images revealed anterior shoulder dislocation with Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions, and an anterior rotator cuff tear. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):707. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0412. PMID:27477474

  2. Physical analysis of intravascular low-reation-lever laser irradiation therapy on improving the hemorheologic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoran; Lu, Jian; Wang, Yawei; Ni, Xiaowu

    1999-09-01

    Many clinical results showed that intravascular low-reaction- lever laser irradiation therapy (ILLLI) could improve the hemorheologic characteristics. The red blood cell (RBC) aggregation index, the blood viscosity and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were reduced significantly by treatment with ILLLI. In this paper, a physical process is proposed that laser makes the H-bond parted, which would give rise to a decrease in the RBC aggregation index. According to the principle of hemorheologic characteristics, the blood viscosity and the ESR reduce with the decrease in the RBC aggregation index.

  3. H∞ filter for flexure deformation and lever arm effect compensation in M/S INS integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xixiang; Xu, Xiaosu; Wang, Lihui; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Yiting

    2014-09-01

    On ship, especially on large ship, the flexure deformation between Master (M)/Slave (S) Inertial Navigation System (INS) is a key factor which determines the accuracy of the integrated system of M/S INS. In engineering this flexure deformation will be increased with the added ship size. In the M/S INS integrated system, the attitude error between MINS and SINS cannot really reflect the misalignment angle change of SINS due to the flexure deformation. At the same time, the flexure deformation will bring the change of the lever arm size, which further induces the uncertainty of lever arm velocity, resulting in the velocity matching error. To solve this problem, a H∞ algorithm is proposed, in which the attitude and velocity matching error caused by deformation is considered as measurement noise with limited energy, and measurement noise will be restrained by the robustness of H∞ filter. Based on the classical "attitude plus velocity" matching method, the progress of M/S INS information fusion is simulated and compared by using three kinds of schemes, which are known and unknown flexure deformation with standard Kalman filter, and unknown flexure deformation with H∞ filter, respectively. Simulation results indicate that H∞ filter can effectively improve the accuracy of information fusion when flexure deformation is unknown but non-ignorable

  4. Band stop vibration suppression using a passive X-shape structured lever-type isolation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunchuan; Jing, Xingjian; Chen, Zhaobo

    2016-02-01

    In the paper, band-stop vibration suppression property using a novel X-shape structured lever-type isolation system is studied. The geometrical nonlinear property of an X-shape supporting structure is used to improve the band-stop characteristics in the low frequency range of the lever-type vibration isolator. With the dynamics modeling of this hybrid structural system, it is shown that the proposed hybrid vibration system has very beneficial nonlinear stiffness and damping properties which are helpful to achieve much wider stop bandwidth. Theoretical results demonstrate that the anti-resonant frequencies, width and magnitude of the stop band can all be flexibly designed with structural parameters, and the parameters of the X-shape supporting structure are very critical for designing the band-stop frequency to achieve excellent low-frequency isolation performance. The results in the study provide a new approach to the design of the passive vibration suppression system in the low frequency region.

  5. Visualizing key hinges and a potential major source of compliance in the lever arm of myosin

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.H.; Robinson, H.; Senthil Kumar, V. S.; O'Neall-Hennessey, E.; Reshetnikova, L.; Nguyen-McCarty, M.; Szent-Gyorgyi, A. G.; Cohen, C.

    2011-01-04

    We have determined the 2.3-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of a myosin light chain domain, corresponding to one type found in sea scallop catch ('smooth') muscle. This structure reveals hinges that may function in the 'on' and 'off' states of myosin. The molecule adopts two different conformations about the heavy chain 'hook' and regulatory light chain (RLC) helix D. This conformational change results in extended and compressed forms of the lever arm whose lengths differ by 10 {angstrom}. The heavy chain hook and RLC helix D hinges could thus serve as a potential major and localized source of cross-bridge compliance during the contractile cycle. In addition, in one of the molecules of the crystal, part of the RLC N-terminal extension is seen in atomic detail and forms a one-turn alpha-helix that interacts with RLC helix D. This extension, whose sequence is highly variable in different myosins, may thus modulate the flexibility of the lever arm. Moreover, the relative proximity of the phosphorylation site to the helix D hinge suggests a potential role for conformational changes about this hinge in the transition between the on and off states of regulated myosins.

  6. Visualizing Key Hinges and a Potential Major Source of Compliance in the Lever Arm of Myosin

    SciTech Connect

    J Brown; V Senthil Kumar; E ONeall-Hennessey; L Reshetnikova; H Robinson; M Nguyen-McCarty; A Szent-Gyorgyi; C Cohen

    2011-12-31

    We have determined the 2.3-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of a myosin light chain domain, corresponding to one type found in sea scallop catch ('smooth') muscle. This structure reveals hinges that may function in the 'on' and 'off' states of myosin. The molecule adopts two different conformations about the heavy chain 'hook' and regulatory light chain (RLC) helix D. This conformational change results in extended and compressed forms of the lever arm whose lengths differ by 10 {angstrom}. The heavy chain hook and RLC helix D hinges could thus serve as a potential major and localized source of cross-bridge compliance during the contractile cycle. In addition, in one of the molecules of the crystal, part of the RLC N-terminal extension is seen in atomic detail and forms a one-turn alpha-helix that interacts with RLC helix D. This extension, whose sequence is highly variable in different myosins, may thus modulate the flexibility of the lever arm. Moreover, the relative proximity of the phosphorylation site to the helix D hinge suggests a potential role for conformational changes about this hinge in the transition between the on and off states of regulated myosins.

  7. Human antigen-presenting cells respond differently to gut-derived probiotic bacteria but mediate similar strain-dependent NK and T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Fink, Lisbeth N; Zeuthen, Louise H; Ferlazzo, Guido; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2007-12-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for homeostasis of the local and systemic immune system, and particularly strains of lactic acid bacteria and Escherichia coli have been shown to have balancing effects on inflammatory conditions such as allergy and inflammatory bowel disease. However, in vitro assessment of the immunomodulatory effects of distinct strains may depend strongly on the cell type used as a model. To select the most appropriate model for screening of beneficial bacteria in human cells, the response to strains of intestinal bacteria of three types of antigen-presenting cells (APC) was compared; blood myeloid dendritic cells (DC), monocyte-derived DC and monocytes, and the effector response of natural killer cells and naïve T cells was characterized. Maturation induced by gut-derived bacteria differed between APC, with blood DC and monocytes responding with the production of IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha to bacteria, which elicited mainly IL-10 in monocyte-derived DC. In contrast, comparable IFN-gamma production patterns were found in both natural killer cells and T cells induced by all bacteria-matured APC. An inhibitory effect of certain strains on this IFN-gamma production was also mediated by all types of APC. The most potent responses were induced by monocyte-derived DC, which thus constitute a sensitive screening model. PMID:17903206

  8. Active vs. Reactive Threat Responding is Associated with Differential c-Fos Expression in Specific Regions of Amygdala and Prefrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Raquel C. R.; Gupta, Nikita; Lazaro-Munoz, Gabriel; Sears, Robert M.; Kim, Soojeong; Moscarello, Justin M.; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    Active avoidance (AA) is an important paradigm for studying mechanisms of aversive instrumental learning, pathological anxiety, and active coping. Unfortunately, AA neurocircuits are poorly understood, partly because behavior is highly variable and reflects a competition between Pavlovian reactions and instrumental actions. Here we exploited the…

  9. Japanese respond to campaign.

    PubMed

    1994-08-01

    A unique campaign launched by JOICFP in August 1993 had by the end of June 1994 netted US $41,200 to support activities of the integrated Project (IP) in developing countries. Under the campaign, the public, institutions, organizations, and businesses have been sending in used prepaid cards for sale to collectors in Japan and abroad. Prepaid cards are widely used throughout Japan for phones, subways, railways and highways. Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) alone issues 20 million cards annually. The campaign, which has been widely featured in the media, has proved effective for drawing attention to JOICFP and to population and family planning issues. Gaining the understanding of the Japanese public about population issues has grown in importance since the government's announcement of the new Global Issues Initiative (GII). Word about the campaign was carried by radio, television, newspapers, and magazines nationwide. The number of cards sent in escalated with the attention. By the end of June, JOICFP had received around 700,000 cards, of which 550,000 have been exchanged for cash. The funds generated by the card sales have been allocated to support grassroots IP activities and encourage the self-reliance of projects in China, Ghana, Guatemala, Nepal, Tanzania, and Zambia. Responses to the campaign have come from individuals as well as local governments, hospitals, enterprises, and educational institutions. Many of these have initiated their own card-collection system and information-dissemination activities to support JOICFP. Over 5000 different organizations are now collaborating with JOICFP for the campaign, including Tenmaya Department Store in Okayama City. PMID:12288124

  10. How do Soil Microbial Enzyme Activities Respond to Changes in Temperature, Carbon, and Nutrient Additions across Gradients in Mineralogy and Nutrient Availability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleery, T.; Cusack, D. F.; Reed, S.; Wieder, W. R.; Taylor, P.; Cleveland, C. C.; Chadwick, O.; Vitousek, P.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial enzyme activities are the direct agents of organic matter decomposition, and thus play a crucial role in global carbon (C) cycling. Global change factors like warming and nutrient inputs to soils have the potential to alter the activities of these enzymes, with background site conditions likely driving responses. We hypothesized that enzyme activities in sites with high background nutrient and/or carbon availability would be less sensitive to nutrient additions than nutrient-poor sites. We also hypothesized that sites poor in background nutrients and/or carbon would show greater sensitivity to changes in temperature because of a less robust microbial community. To test our hypothesis we used laboratory temperature incubations combined with long- and short-term nutrient additions to assess changes in enzyme activities for 8 common soil enzymes that acquire nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C from organic matter. We collected mineral soils (0-10 cm depth) from 8 Hawaiian sites that provided maximum variation in nutrient availability and background soil C. Soils were sieved, pooled by site, and homogenized prior to a laboratory addition of a simple C (sucrose) plus N and/or P in full factorial design. The 8 soils were also incubated at 7 different temperatures from 4 - 40 degrees C. We found that temperature sensitivities varied significantly among the sites, and that the laboratory fertilizations altered enzyme activities. Across the 8 sites, laboratory sucrose+N additions nearly doubled P-acquisition enzyme activity (p < 0.05), with the strongest effect in a younger forest soil that was naturally low in N. Similarly, laboratory sucrose+N and sucrose+NP additions significantly increased N-acquiring enzyme activity (p < 0.05), with the strongest effect in a drier, nutrient poor and carbon poor soil. Carbon-acquiring enzyme activities were less responsive, but also increased significantly with additions of sucrose+N and sucrose+NP across sites, with the

  11. Design and performance of a sub-nanoradian resolution autocollimating optical lever

    SciTech Connect

    Cowsik, R.; Srinivasan, R.; Kasturirengan, S.; Kumar, A. Senthil; Wagoner, K.

    2007-03-15

    Precision goniometry using optics has the advantage that it does not impose much stress on the object of investigation and, as such, is adopted extensively in gravitational wave detection, in torsion balances investigating fundamental forces, in specialized studies of biological samples, and it has potential applications in condensed matter physics. In this article we present the considerations that go into designing optical levers and discuss the performance of the instrument we have constructed. We motivate the design by considering an idealized setup and the limitations to the angular resolution induced by statistical fluctuations of the photon count rate and diffraction at the apertures. The effects of digitization of the count rate and of the spatial location of the photons on the image plane motivating the actual design are discussed next. Based on these considerations, we have developed an autocollimating optical lever which has a very high resolution and dynamic range. An array of 110 slits, of 90 {mu}m width and a pitch of 182 {mu}m, is located in the focal plane of a field lens, of focal length 1000 mm, and is illuminated by a CCFL tube. This array is imaged back onto the focal plane after retroreflection from a mirror placed just beyond the lens. The image is recorded on a linear charge-coupled device array at the rate of 1000 images/s and is processed through a special algorithm to obtain the centroid. The instrument has a centroid stability of {approx}3x10{sup -10} rad Hz{sup -1/2} and a dynamic range of {approx}10{sup 7}.

  12. First Responders and Criticality Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie L. Putman; Douglas M. Minnema

    2005-11-01

    Nuclear criticality accident descriptions typically include, but do not focus on, information useful to first responders. We studied these accidents, noting characteristics to help (1) first responders prepare for such an event and (2) emergency drill planners develop appropriate simulations for training. We also provide recommendations to help people prepare for such events in the future.

  13. Exceptional Responders Initial Feasibility Results

    Cancer.gov

    A pilot study evaluating identification of cancer patients who respond to treatment that is ineffective in at least 90 percent of patients found that it was indeed able to confirm a majority of proposed patients as exceptional responders based on clinical

  14. Trying to Make a Lever Work at Ages 1 to 4: The Development of "Functions" (Logico-Mathematical Thinking)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamii, Constance; Miyakawa, Yoko; Kato, Tsuguhiko

    2007-01-01

    To find out if children could make functions before age 4, 73 children aged 1 to 4 were encouraged to imitate the use of a lever to make a beanbag fly up. Functions are mental relationships that preoperational children can make between 2 things at a time in a unidirectional way (Piaget, Grize, Szeminska, & Bang, 1968/1977). The child's…

  15. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Hiroki; Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri; Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru; Katayama, Eisaku; Wakabayashi, Takeyuki; Akimoto, Tsuyoshi; Sugi, Haruo

    2011-02-25

    Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made. PMID:21281603

  16. Collaboration of local government and experts responding to increase in environmental radiation level due to the nuclear disaster: focusing on their activities and latest radiological discussion.

    PubMed

    Iimoto, T; Nunokawa, J; Fujii, H; Takashima, R; Hashimoto, M; Fukuhara, T; Yajima, T; Matsuzawa, H; Kurosawa, K; Yanagawa, Y; Someya, S

    2015-11-01

    Activities were introduced in Kashiwa city in the Tokyo metropolitan area to correspond to the elevated environmental radiation level after the disaster of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. These were based on a strong cooperation between local governments and experts. Ambient dose rate and radioactivity of foodstuff produced inside of the city have been monitored. Representative ambient dose rates around living environments have almost already become their original levels of the pre-accident because of the decontamination activity, natural washout and effective half-lives of radioactivity. The internal annual dose due to radioactive cesium under the policy of 'Local Production for Local Consumption' is estimated as extremely low comparing the variation range due to natural radioactivity. Systematic survey around a retention basin has been started. All of these latest monitoring data would be one of the core information for the policy making as well as a cost-benefit discussion and risk communication. PMID:25982790

  17. Falsification of matching theory's account of single-alternative responding: Herrnstein's k varies with sucrose concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Dallery, J; McDowell, J J; Lancaster, J S

    2000-01-01

    Eight rats pressed levers for varying concentrations of sucrose in water under eight variable-interval schedules that specified a wide range of reinforcement rate. Herrnstein's (1970) hyperbolic equation described the relation between reinforcement and responding well. Although the y asymptote, k, of the hyperbola appeared roughly constant over conditions that approximated conditions used by Heyman and Monaghan (1994), k varied when lower concentration solutions were included. Advances in matching theory that reflect asymmetries between response alternatives and insensitive responding were incorporated into Herrnstein's equation. After fitting the modified equation to the data, Herrnstein's k also increased. The results suggest that variation in k can be detected under a sufficiently wide range of reinforcer magnitudes, and they also suggest that matching theory's account of response strength is false. The results support qualitative predictions made by linear system theory. PMID:10682338

  18. Phosphorylation of serine residue modulates cotton Di19-1 and Di19-2 activities for responding to high salinity stress and abscisic acid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li-Xia; Nie, Xiao-Ying; Hu, Rong; Li, Gang; Xu, Wen-Liang; Li, Xue-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Di19 (drought-induced protein 19) family is a novel type of Cys2/His2 zinc-finger proteins. In this study, we demonstrated that cotton Di19-1 and Di19-2 (GhDi19-1/-2) proteins could be phosphorylated in vitro by the calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK). Mutation of Ser to Ala in N-terminus of GhDi19-1/-2 led to the altered subcellular localization of the two proteins, but the constitutively activated form (Ser was mutated to Asp) of GhDi19-1/-2 still showed the nuclear localization. GhDi19-1/-2 overexpression transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings displayed the hypersensitivity to high salinity and abscisic acid (ABA). However, Ser site-mutated GhDi19-1(S116A) and GhDi19-2(S114A), and Ser and Thr double sites-mutated GhDi19-1(S/T-A/A) and GhDi19-2(S/T-A/A) transgenic Arabidopsis did not show the salt- and ABA-hypersensitive phenotypes. In contrast, overexpression of Thr site-mutated GhDi19-1(T114A) and GhDi19-2(T112A) in Arabidopsis still resulted in salt- and ABA-hypersensitivity phenotypes, like GhDi19-1/-2 transgenic lines. Overexpression of GhDi19-1/-2 and their constitutively activated forms in Atcpk11 background could recover the salt- and ABA-insensitive phenotype of the mutant. Thus, our results demonstrated that Ser phosphorylation (not Thr phosphorylation) is crucial for functionally activating GhDi19-1/-2 in response to salt stress and ABA signaling during early plant development, and GhDi19-1/-2 proteins may be downstream targets of CDPKs in ABA signal pathway. PMID:26829353

  19. Emergency responders' critical infrared (ERCI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konsin, Larry S.

    2004-08-01

    Emergency Responders (Fire, Police, Medical, and Emergency Management) face a high risk of injury or death. Even before September 11, 2001, public and private organizations have been driven to better protect Emergency Responders through education, training and improved technology. Recent research on Emergency Responder safety, health risks, and personal protective requirements, shows infrared (IR) imaging as a critical need. Today"s Emergency Responders are increasingly challenged to do more, facing demands requiring technological assistance and/or solutions. Since the introduction of Fire Service IR imaging in the mid 1990s, applications have increased. Emergency response IR is no longer just seeing through smoke to find victims or the seat of a fire. Many more mission critical needs now exist across the broad spectrum of emergency response. At the same time, Emergency Responder injuries and deaths are increasing. The Office of Domestic Preparedness (ODP) has also recognized IR imaging as critical in protecting our communities -- and in preventing many of the injuries and deaths of Emergency Responders. Currently, only 25% of all fire departments (or less than 7% of individual firefighters) have IR imaging. Availability to Police, EMS and Emergency Management is even lower. Without ERCI, Emergency Responders and our communities are at risk.

  20. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Minoda, Hiroki; Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri; Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru; Katayama, Eisaku; Wakabayashi, Takeyuki; Akimoto, Tsuyoshi; Sugi, Haruo

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We succeeded in recording structural changes of hydrated myosin cross-bridges. {yields} We succeeded in position-marking the cross-bridges with site-directed antibodies. {yields} We recorded cross-bridge movement at different regions in individual cross-bridge. {yields} The movement was smallest at the cross-bridge-subfragment two boundary. {yields} The results provide evidence for the cross-bridge lever arm mechanism. -- Abstract: Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made.

  1. Reliable quantification of bite-force performance requires use of appropriate biting substrate and standardization of bite out-lever.

    PubMed

    Lappin, A Kristopher; Jones, Marc E H

    2014-12-15

    Bite-force performance is an ecologically important measure of whole-organism performance that shapes dietary breadth and feeding strategies and, in some taxa, determines reproductive success. It also is a metric that is crucial to testing and evaluating biomechanical models. We reviewed nearly 100 published studies of a range of taxa that incorporate direct in vivo measurements of bite force. Problematically, methods of data collection and processing vary considerably among studies. In particular, there is little consensus on the appropriate substrate to use on the biting surface of force transducers. In addition, the bite out-lever, defined as the distance from the fulcrum (i.e. jaw joint) to the position along the jawline at which the jaws engage the transducer, is rarely taken into account. We examined the effect of bite substrate and bite out-lever on bite-force estimates in a diverse sample of lizards. Results indicate that both variables have a significant impact on the accuracy of measurements. Maximum bite force is significantly greater using leather as the biting substrate compared with a metal substrate. Less-forceful bites on metal are likely due to inhibitory feedback from mechanoreceptors that prevent damage to the feeding apparatus. Standardization of bite out-lever affected which trial produced maximum performance for a given individual. Indeed, maximum bite force is usually underestimated without standardization because it is expected to be greatest at the minimum out-lever (i.e. back of the jaws), which in studies is rarely targeted with success. We assert that future studies should use a pliable substrate, such as leather, and use appropriate standardization for bite out-lever. PMID:25359934

  2. Responder Technology Alert (February 2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Jaki F.; Stein, Steven L.

    2015-04-10

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  3. Reducing effect of saikosaponin A, an active ingredient of Bupleurum falcatum, on alcohol self-administration in rats: Possible involvement of the GABAB receptor.

    PubMed

    Maccioni, Paola; Lorrai, Irene; Carai, Mauro A M; Riva, Antonella; Morazzoni, Paolo; Mugnaini, Claudia; Corelli, Federico; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Colombo, Giancarlo

    2016-05-16

    Recent studies demonstrated that treatment with saikosaponin A (SSA) - an active ingredient of the medicinal herb, Bupleurum falcatum L. - selectively suppressed, likely via a GABAB receptor-mediated mechanism, intravenous self-administration of morphine and cocaine in rats [Yoon et al., 2012; 2013]. The present study was designed to investigate whether the capacity of SSA to suppress morphine and cocaine self-administration extends to oral alcohol self-administration. To this end, selectively bred Sardinian alcohol-preferring (sP) rats were trained to lever-respond on a Fixed Ratio (FR) 4 (FR4) schedule of reinforcement for alcohol (15%, v/v) in daily 30-min sessions. Once responding had stabilized, rats were tested under the FR4 (measure of alcohol reinforcing properties) and Progressive Ratio (PR; measure of alcohol motivational properties) schedules of reinforcement. The possible involvement of the GABAB receptor system was investigated testing the effect of (a) pretreatment with the GABAB receptor antagonist, SCH50911, and (b) combined treatment with the positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor, GS39783. Treatment with SSA (0, 0.25, 0.5, and 1mg/kg, i.p.) markedly reduced lever-responding for alcohol, amount of self-administered alcohol, and breakpoint for alcohol (defined as the lowest response requirement not achieved in the PR experiment). Pretreatment with 2mg/kg SCH50911 (i.p.) resulted in a partial blockade of the reducing effect of 0.5mg/kg SSA on lever-responding for alcohol and amount of self-administered alcohol. Combination of per se ineffective doses of GS39783 (5mg/kg, i.g.) and SSA (0.1mg/kg, i.p.) reduced lever-responding for alcohol and amount of self-administered alcohol. These results (a) extend to alcohol self-administration the capacity of SSA to suppress morphine and cocaine self-administration in rats and (b) suggest that the GABAB receptor system is likely part of the neural substrate underlying the reducing effect of SSA on

  4. HIV testing experience and risk behavior among sexually active Black young adults: a CBPR-based study using respondent-driven sampling in Durham, North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    MacQueen, Kathleen M.; Chen, Mario; Jolly, David; Mueller, Monique P.; Okumu, Eunice; Eley, Natalie T.; Laws, Michelle; Isler, Malika Roman; Kalloo, Allison; Rogers, Randy C.

    2015-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic inclusive of men who have sex with men, heterosexual men, and women. As part of a community-based participatory research study we assessed HIV testing experience among sexually active 18 to 30 year old Black men and women in Durham, North Carolina. Of 508 participants, 173 (74%) men and 236 (86%; p=.0008) women reported ever being tested. Barriers to testing (e.g., perceived risk and stigma) were the same for men and women, but men fell behind mainly because a primary facilitator of testing---routine screening in clinical settings---was more effective at reaching women. Structural and behavioral risk factors associated with HIV infection were prevalent but did not predict HIV testing experience. Reduced access to health care services for low income Black young adults may exacerbate HIV testing barriers that already exist for men and undermine previous success rates in reaching women. PMID:25893817

  5. HIV Testing Experience and Risk Behavior Among Sexually Active Black Young Adults: A CBPR-Based Study Using Respondent-Driven Sampling in Durham, North Carolina.

    PubMed

    MacQueen, Kathleen M; Chen, Mario; Jolly, David; Mueller, Monique P; Okumu, Eunice; Eley, Natalie T; Laws, Michelle; Isler, Malika Roman; Kalloo, Allison; Rogers, Randy C

    2015-06-01

    African Americans are disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic inclusive of men who have sex with men, heterosexual men, and women. As part of a community-based participatory research study we assessed HIV testing experience among sexually active 18-30 year old Black men and women in Durham, NC. Of 508 participants, 173 (74 %) men and 236 (86 %; p = 0.0008) women reported ever being tested. Barriers to testing (e.g., perceived risk and stigma) were the same for men and women, but men fell behind mainly because a primary facilitator of testing-routine screening in clinical settings-was more effective at reaching women. Structural and behavioral risk factors associated with HIV infection were prevalent but did not predict HIV testing experience. Reduced access to health care services for low income Black young adults may exacerbate HIV testing barriers that already exist for men and undermine previous success rates in reaching women. PMID:25893817

  6. The temporal pattern of responding in conditioned bar-press suppression: The role of the context switch and training mode

    PubMed Central

    Jozefowiez, Jeremie; Witnauer, James E.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined at the temporal pattern of responding in a conditioned bar-press suppression task in rats. Rats were exposed to either a 30-s or a 120-s conditioned stimulus (CS) followed by a footshock. Training took place either while the rats were lever-pressing for water (online), or with the lever removed from the box (offline). They were then exposed to the CS while they were lever-pressing for water, either in the training context or in a different context. Bar-press suppression during the CS was constant across the duration of the CS during training, but was restricted to the initial portion of the CS at the time of testing, especially when subjects were tested in a different context. Those results replicate the reactive (as opposed to anticipatory) pattern observed in a lick suppression procedure by Jozefowiez, Witnauer, & Miller (2011) and indicate that a change in context at the time of testing might be critical for its expression. PMID:22178451

  7. Responding To Changes in the Decommissioning Plans for Demolition of a Former Active Handling Building at The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Establishment Winfrith

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.; Parkinson, S.J.; Cornell, R.M.; Staples, A.T.

    2006-07-01

    The full decommissioning of the former Active Handling Building A59 at Winfrith in Dorset is being carried out by RWE NUKEM Limited under contract from the site owners and nuclear site licence holder, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA). Following recent government changes, the United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) has now set up contracts with UKAEA for delivery of the site clean-up programme. The building contains two heavily shielded suites of caves originally used to carry out remote examination of irradiated nuclear fuel elements together with other supporting facilities. The original intention was to demolish the caves ahead of the building but after detailed consideration it was concluded that demolition of the building in advance of the caves was more operationally effective. As a result, the original decommissioning plan had to be reworked to reflect these changes. The paper briefly explains how this situation arose and the means by which the problems experienced were overcome by a complete revision to the decommissioning programme. The updated plan has been adopted by UKAEA and work is now proceeding apace to clear the building of redundant items, to complete decontamination of all remaining areas and facilities and to carry out detailed radiological surveys to confirm that the building structure is clean and ready for demolition. Both cave lines have been completely decontaminated to low residual levels of activity and are essentially ready for controlled demolition. This paper describes some of the significant tasks undertaken during the past year with particular reference to the decommissioning techniques that gave the greatest success and the limitations of others originally considered. Some of these processes were aimed at minimising the volume of low level waste (LLW) generated by using standard off-the-shelf equipment to remove contamination from {approx}5 Ton concrete blocks recovered from both cave line structures. A

  8. Factor Associated with Neutral Sphingomyelinase Activity Mediates Navigational Capacity of Leukocytes Responding to Wounds and Infection: Live Imaging Studies in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Boecke, Alexandra; Sieger, Dirk; Neacsu, Cristian Dan; Kashkar, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Factor associated with neutral sphingomyelinase activity (FAN) is an adaptor protein that specifically binds to the p55 receptor for TNF (TNF-RI). Our previous investigations demonstrated that FAN plays a role in TNF-induced actin reorganization by connecting the plasma membrane with actin cytoskeleton, suggesting that FAN may impact on cellular motility in response to TNF and in the context of immune inflammatory conditions. In this study, we used the translucent zebrafish larvae for in vivo analysis of leukocyte migration after morpholino knockdown of FAN. FAN-deficient zebrafish leukocytes were impaired in their migration toward tail fin wounds, leading to a reduced number of cells reaching the wound. Furthermore, FAN-deficient leukocytes show an impaired response to bacterial infections, suggesting that FAN is generally required for the directed chemotactic response of immune cells independent of the nature of the stimulus. Cell-tracking analysis up to 3 h after injury revealed that the reduced number of leukocytes is not due to a reduction in random motility or speed of movement. Leukocytes from FAN-deficient embryos protrude pseudopodia in all directions instead of having one clear leading edge. Our results suggest that FAN-deficient leukocytes exhibit an impaired navigational capacity, leading to a disrupted chemotactic response. PMID:22802420

  9. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) influences how retinal ganglion cell neurons respond to pressure-related stress

    PubMed Central

    Sappington, Rebecca M; Sidorova, Tatiana; Ward, Nicholas J; Chakravarthy, Rohini; Ho, Karen W; Calkins, David J

    2015-01-01

    Our recent studies implicate the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel as a mediator of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function and survival. With elevated pressure in the eye, TRPV1 increases in RGCs, supporting enhanced excitability, while Trpv1 -/- accelerates RGC degeneration in mice. Here we find TRPV1 localized in monkey and human RGCs, similar to rodents. Expression increases in RGCs exposed to acute changes in pressure. In retinal explants, contrary to our animal studies, both Trpv1 -/- and pharmacological antagonism of the channel prevented pressure-induced RGC apoptosis, as did chelation of extracellular Ca2+. Finally, while TRPV1 and TRPV4 co-localize in some RGC bodies and form a protein complex in the retina, expression of their mRNA is inversely related with increasing ocular pressure. We propose that TRPV1 activation by pressure-related insult in the eye initiates changes in expression that contribute to a Ca2+-dependent adaptive response to maintain excitatory signaling in RGCs. PMID:25713995

  10. Policy initiation and political levers in health policy: lessons from Ghana’s health insurance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the health policy formulation process over the years has focused on the content of policy to the neglect of context. This had led to several policy initiatives having a still birth or ineffective policy choices with sub-optimal outcomes when implemented. Sometimes, the difficulty has been finding congruence between different values and interests of the various stakeholders. How can policy initiators leverage the various subtle mechanisms that various players draw on to leverage their interests during policy formulation. This paper attempts to conceptualise these levers of policy formulation to enhance an understanding of this field of work based on lived experience. Methodology This is a qualitative participant observation case study based on retrospective recollection of the policy process and political levers involved in developing the Ghana National Health Insurance Scheme. The study uses a four-concept framework which is agenda setting, symbols manipulation, constituency preservation and coalition building to capture the various issues, negotiations and nuanced approaches used in arriving at desired outcomes. Results Technical experts, civil society, academicians and politicians all had significant influence on setting the health insurance agenda. Each of these various stakeholders carefully engaged in ways that preserved their constituency interests through explicit manoeuvres and subtle engagements. Where proposals lend themselves to various interpretations, stakeholders were quick to latch on the contentious issues to preserve their constituency and will manipulate the symbols that arise from the proposals to their advantage. Where interests are contested and the price of losing out will leave government worse off which will favour its political opponent, it will push for divergent interests outside parliamentary politics through intense negotiations to build coalitions so a particular policy may pass. Conclusions This paper has

  11. Stimulus-controlled responding for ethanol in AA and Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Hyytiä, P; Sinclair, J D

    1991-01-01

    A method for establishing stimulus control of ethanol responding was developed. After acquisition of lever pressing for oral ethanol, rats of the high-drinking AA (Alko, Alcohol) line and of the moderate-drinking Wistar strain were subjected to alternating 20-min alcohol access periods signaled by a stimulus light, and 40-min nonaccess periods with no light. Ethanol responding during access periods progressively increased and decreased during nonaccess. These changes were faster in the AAs than the Wistars, probably related to differential reinforcement from ethanol. In a second experiment, rats responding under stimulus control were given periods of alcohol deprivation of 3, 6, 12, and 24 h, indicated by a stimulus light. Deprivations shorter than 24 h increased the first-hour intake after renewed access by the AAs, but the Wistars showed no increase until after a 24-h deprivation. The results show stimulus control of ethanol responding and demonstrate the applicability of the procedure for causing ethanol responding to occur at a time chosen by the experimenter. PMID:2069738

  12. Practical design of the optical lever intracavity topology of gravitational-wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Danilishin, S. L.; Khalili, F. Ya.

    2006-01-15

    The quantum nondemolition (QND) intracavity topologies of gravitational-wave detectors proposed several years ago allow us, in principle, to obtain sensitivity significantly better than the standard quantum limit using relatively small amount of optical pumping power. In this article we consider an improved more practical version of the optical lever intracavity scheme. It differs from the original version by the symmetry which allows to suppress influence of the input light amplitude fluctuation. In addition, it provides the means to inject optical pumping inside the scheme without increase of optical losses. We consider also sensitivity limitations imposed by the local meter which is the key element of the intracavity topologies. Two variants of the local meter are analyzed, which are based on the spectral variation measurement and on the discrete sampling variation measurement, correspondingly. The former one, while can not be considered as a candidate for a practical implementation, allows, in principle, to obtain the best sensitivity and thus can be considered as an ideal 'asymptotic case' for all other schemes. The DSVM-based local meter can be considered as a realistic scheme but its sensitivity, unfortunately, is by far not so good just due to a couple of peculiar numeric factors specific for this scheme. From our point of view search of new methods of mechanical QND measurements probably based on improved DSVM scheme or which combine the local meter with the pondermotive squeezing technique, is necessary.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Liquid-propellant Laser Propulsion with a Horizontal Momentum Measuring Lever

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Bin; Li Long; Tang Zhiping; Cai Jian

    2010-05-06

    Thrust performance of Liquid-propellant laser propulsion (LLP) is seriously influenced by factors like laser parameters, choice of propellants and ablation materials. For the purpose of studying these influences, series of impulse measuring experiments for various propellants and ablation materials were conducted. The key device is a Horizontal Momentum Measuring Lever, which covers a C{sub m} measuring range from 10{sup 3} Ns/MJ to about 1.6x10{sup 4} Ns/MJ. A Nd:YAG laser was used as the laser source. From the result, it is found that laser energy density plays an important role on LLP efficiency, higher energy density leads to higher C{sub m} and I{sub sp}. Highest C{sub m} of about 10{sup 4} Ns/MJ with the I{sub sp} of 3.57s was achieved by focusing the laser to the average energy density of 8.83x10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2}. Besides of that, it is also found that when the energy density is certainly high, C{sub m} of LLP increases stably with the increase of the propellant thickness, which gives a potential way to further improve the thrust performance in LLP.

  14. The neck region of the myosin motor domain acts as a lever arm to generate movement.

    PubMed Central

    Uyeda, T Q; Abramson, P D; Spudich, J A

    1996-01-01

    The myosin head consists of a globular catalytic domain that binds actin and hydrolyzes ATP and a neck domain that consists of essential and regulatory light chains bound to a long alpha-helical portion of the heavy chain. The swinging neck-level model assumes that a swinging motion of the neck relative to the catalytic domain is the origin of movement. This model predicts that the step size, and consequently the sliding velocity, are linearly related to the length of the neck. We have tested this point by characterizing a series of mutant Dictyostelium myosins that have different neck lengths. The 2xELCBS mutant has an extra binding site for essential light chain. The delta RLCBS mutant myosin has an internal deletion that removes the regulatory light chain binding site. The delta BLCBS mutant lacks both light chain binding sites. Wild-type myosin and these mutant myosins were subjected to the sliding filament in vitro motility assay. As expected, mutants with shorter necks move slower than wild-type myosin in vitro. Most significantly, a mutant with a longer neck moves faster than the wild type, and the sliding velocities of these myosins are linearly related to the neck length, as predicted by the swinging neck-lever model. A simple extrapolation to zero speed predicts that the fulcrum point is in the vicinity of the SH1-SH2 region in the catalytic domain. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8633089

  15. Responding to Climate Change Interactive Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Matter, J. M.; Callahan, P.; Schlosser, P.

    2011-12-01

    While many institutions now have courses that teach climate from an earth or biological systems perspective, it is more challenging to address how to respond to climate change. Implementing adaptation and mitigation measures requires an interdisciplinary approach of involving stakeholders, identifying needs, resolving conflicts and taking action at levels ranging from local, to national and global. Through the upper level undergraduate course "Responding to Climate Change" taught at Barnard College and Columbia University, students engage in a variety of hands-on activities that help them navigate potential options. Activities include games, role play, case studies, scenario development, spatial planning, exploration of analogies, and conflict resolution exercises. Evaluation indicates that this interactive approach empowers students with scientific and technical knowledge, an understanding of how to deal with complexity, and optimism in their capacity to problem solve.

  16. A within-subject between-apparatus comparison of impulsive choice: T-maze and two-lever chamber.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Paul J; Kuhn, Robin; Reilly, Mark P

    2015-07-01

    Whereas intertemporal choice procedures are a common method for examining impulsive choice in nonhuman subjects, the apparatus used to implement this procedure varies across studies. The purpose of the present study was to compare impulsive choice between a two-lever chamber and a T-maze. In Experiment 1, rats chose between a smaller, immediate reinforcer and a larger, delayed reinforcer, first in a two-lever chamber and then in a T-maze. Delay to the larger reinforcer changed in an ascending and descending order (0-32 s) across sessions. Experiment 2 examined the same between-apparatus comparison but under steady-state conditions with the delay fixed at 32 s. In Experiment 1, choice for the larger, delayed reinforcer was generally higher in the T-maze than in the two-lever chamber. Similarly in Experiment 2, steady-state choice for the larger, delayed reinforcer was higher in the T-maze. Choice for the 32-s delayed reinforcer was also greater in Experiment 2 than in Experiment 1, suggesting that extended exposure to the delay is required for the T-maze to yield reliable impulsive choice data. While the reasons for the between-apparatus discrepancies are at present unknown, results from both experiments clearly demonstrate that the apparatus matters when assessing overall level and reliability of impulsive choice data. PMID:26080901

  17. Excessive lever pressing following post-training signal attenuation in rats: a possible animal model of obsessive compulsive disorder?

    PubMed

    Joel, D; Avisar, A

    2001-08-27

    This study aimed at developing a rat model of obsessive compulsive disorder based on the hypothesis that a deficient response feedback mechanism underlies obsessions and compulsions. Rats were trained to lever press for food, whose delivery was signaled by the presentation of a compound stimulus (light+tone). Subsequently, the classical contingency between the stimulus and food was extinguished (signal attenuation). Experiment 1 showed that this manipulation resulted in increased lever pressing during a subsequent extinction test, which was highly correlated with an increase in the number of trials on which the rat did not attempt to collect the food reward. This behavioral pattern was not evident in an extinction test not preceded by signal attenuation (Experiment 2), suggesting that the latter is a crucial factor in the development of this behavioral pattern. Excessive lever pressing was attenuated by the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg; Experiment 3), but not by the anxiolytic drug, diazepam (2 mg/kg; Experiment 4). Based on these results we propose that post-training signal attenuation may provide a rat model of obsessive compulsive disorder. PMID:11377731

  18. Lever-arm and mini-implant system for anterior torque control during retraction in lingual orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ryoon-Ki; Heo, Jung-Min; Ha, Young-Ki

    2005-01-01

    Anterior torque control during retraction is difficult to achieve with lingual orthodontic treatment. This article describes the use of a lever-arm and mini-implant system as absolute anchorage for controlled retraction of the anterior teeth during lingual orthodontic treatment and evaluates 2 protrusion cases treated with this system. Various clinical situations are discussed and analyzed from a biomechanical standpoint. Mini-implants are needed to control the point of force application in the posterior area and produce en masse retraction with no anchorage loss. When the length of the lever-arm is adjusted to the position of the mini-implant, the desired line of action of the retraction force with respect to the center of resistance of the anterior segment is selected. Controlled retraction of the anterior teeth was achieved with no loss of anchorage. The mini-implant, in conjunction with the lever-arm, is useful not only for absolute anchorage but also for anterior torque control during retraction in lingual orthodontic treatment. PMID:15747828

  19. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied – in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry – neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  20. Responding to Bullying: What Works?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Wendy; Pepler, Debra; Blais, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Children who are bullied are often told to "solve the problems themselves"; however, when bullying is repeated over time, it becomes increasingly difficult for victimized children to stop the torment because of their relative lack of power. We examine the ways in which children respond to bullying and their evaluations of the effectiveness of…

  1. Finding Respondents from Minority Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mier, Nelda; Medina, Alvaro A.; Bocanegra-Alonso, Anabel; Castillo-Ruiz, Octelina; Acosta-Gonzalez, Rosa I.; Ramirez, Jose A.

    2006-01-01

    The recruitment of respondents belonging to ethnic minorities poses important challenges in social and health research. This paper reflects on the enablers and barriers to recruitment that we encountered in our research work with persons belonging to ethnic minorities. Additionally, we applied the Matching Model of Recruitment, a theoretical…

  2. Responding to Hate at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching Tolerance, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Describes a publication from Teaching Tolerance that is designed to help schools prepare for and respond effectively to bias incidents so that they can become catalysts for positive change. Presents two of the guidelines: (1) create an unwelcome environment for hate speech and symbols; and (2) put the lid on graffiti and other vandalism. (SLD)

  3. Learning as Calling and Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jons, Lotta

    2014-01-01

    According to Martin Buber's philosophy of dialogue, our being-in-the-world is to be conceived of as an existential dialogue. Elsewhere, I have conceptualized the teacher-student-relation accordingly (see Jons 2008), as a matter of calling and responding. The conceptualization rests on a secularised notion of vocation, paving way for…

  4. 37 CFR 41.68 - Respondent's brief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Respondent's brief. 41.68... Respondent's brief. (a)(1) Respondent(s) in an appeal may once, within the time limit for filing set forth in § 41.66, file a respondent brief and serve the brief on all parties in accordance with § 1.903 of...

  5. Certified first responder: a comprehensive model for pediatric training.

    PubMed

    Markenson, D; Foltin, G; Tunik, M; Cooper, A; Treiber, M; Welborn, C; Clappin, J; Fitton, A; Giordano, L

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this document is to present a general approach to educating the First Responder in Emergency Pediatric Care. The First Responder is especially important in the emergency care of the sick or injured child. The majority of mortality and morbidity associated with pediatric emergencies is a result of airway and ventilatory compromise. In addition, most airway and ventilation problems can be corrected with only basic life support interventions that are within the scope of practice of the First Responder. As a result, it is of paramount importance to assure that the First Responder is adequately trained in the initial care of the pediatric patient. This document will review some of the key objectives and topics which the First Responder needs to understand in order to adequately care for children until further emergency care arrives. Templates for lesson plans and suggested activities for training the First Responder are also presented. PMID:9127426

  6. The effects of physical activity on impulsive choice: Influence of sensitivity to reinforcement amount and delay.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Justin C; Feinstein, Max A; Lacy, Ryan T; Smith, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Impulsive choice is a diagnostic feature and/or complicating factor for several psychological disorders and may be examined in the laboratory using delay-discounting procedures. Recent investigators have proposed using quantitative measures of analysis to examine the behavioral processes contributing to impulsive choice. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of physical activity (i.e., wheel running) on impulsive choice in a single-response, discrete-trial procedure using two quantitative methods of analysis. To this end, rats were assigned to physical activity or sedentary groups and trained to respond in a delay-discounting procedure. In this procedure, one lever always produced one food pellet immediately, whereas a second lever produced three food pellets after a 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80-s delay. Estimates of sensitivity to reinforcement amount and sensitivity to reinforcement delay were determined using (1) a simple linear analysis and (2) an analysis of logarithmically transformed response ratios. Both analyses revealed that physical activity decreased sensitivity to reinforcement amount and sensitivity to reinforcement delay. These findings indicate that (1) physical activity has significant but functionally opposing effects on the behavioral processes that contribute to impulsive choice and (2) both quantitative methods of analysis are appropriate for use in single-response, discrete-trial procedures. PMID:26964905

  7. Development of a theory-based instrument to identify barriers and levers to best hand hygiene practice among healthcare practitioners

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A theoretical approach to assessing the barriers and levers to evidence-based practice (EBP) with subsequent tailoring of theoretically informed strategies to address these may go some way to positively influencing the delay in implementing research findings into practice. Hand hygiene is one such example of EBP, chosen for this study due to its importance in preventing death through healthcare associated infections (HCAI). The development of an instrument to assess barriers and levers to hand hygiene and to allow the subsequent tailoring of theoretically informed implementation strategies is reported here. Methods A comprehensive list of barriers and levers to hand hygiene were categorised to the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) in a Delphi survey. These items formed the basis of an instrument that was tested to establish validity and reliability. The relationship between self-reported compliance with hand hygiene and barriers and levers to hand hygiene was also examined along with compliance according to where the barriers and levers fit within the domains of the TDF framework. Results A 33-item instrument that tested well for internal consistency (α = 0.84) and construct validity (χ2/df = 1.9 [p < 0.01], RMSEA = 0.05 and CFA = 0.84) was developed. The relationship between self-reported compliance with hand hygiene moderately correlated with barriers identified by participants (total barrier score) (r = 0.41, n = 276, p <0.001). The greater the number of barriers reported, the lower the level of compliance. A one-way between groups multivariate analysis of variance was performed to investigate differences between those adopting high or low compliance with hand hygiene. Compliance was highest for this sample of participants among practitioners with high levels of motivation, strong beliefs about capabilities, when there were positive social influences, when hand hygiene was central to participants’ sense of

  8. S-IV-B Aft Swing Arm Cam Lever Stop Strain Guage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) played a crucial role in the development of the huge Saturn rockets that delivered humans to the moon in the 1960s. Many unique facilities existed at MSFC for the development and testing of the Saturn rockets. Affectionately nicknamed 'The Arm Farm', the Random Motion/ Lift-Off Simulator was one of those unique facilities. This facility was developed to test the swing arm mechanisms that were used to hold the rocket in position until liftoff. The Arm Farm provided the capability of testing the detachment and reconnection of various arms under brutally realistic conditions. The 18-acre facility consisted of more than a half dozen arm test positions and one position for testing access arms used by the Apollo astronauts. Each test position had two elements: a vehicle simulator for duplicating motions during countdown and launch; and a section duplicating the launch tower. The vehicle simulator duplicated the portion of the vehicle skin that contained the umbilical connections and personnel access hatches. Driven by a hydraulic servo system, the vehicle simulator produced relative motion between the vehicle and tower. On the Arm Farm, extreme environmental conditions (such as a launch scrub during an approaching Florida thunderstorm) could be simulated. The dramatic scenes that the Marshall engineers and technicians created at the Arm Farm permitted the gathering of crucial technical and engineering data to ensure a successful real time launch from the Kennedy Space Center. This photo depicts a close up of the S-IV-B aft swing arm cam lever stop strain guage.

  9. Levers for Language Growth: Characteristics and Predictors of Language Trajectories between 4 and 7 Years

    PubMed Central

    McKean, Cristina; Eadie, Patricia; Bavin, Edith L.; Bretherton, Lesley; Cini, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence is required as to when and where to focus resources to achieve the greatest gains for children’s language development. Key to these decisions is the understanding of individual differences in children’s language trajectories and the predictors of those differences. To determine optimal timing we must understand if and when children’s relative language abilities become fixed. To determine where to focus effort we must identify mutable factors, that is those with the potential to be changed through interventions, which are associated with significant differences in children’s language scores and rate of progress. Methods Uniquely this study examined individual differences in language growth trajectories in a population sample of children between 4 and 7 years using the multilevel model for change. The influence of predictors, grouped with respect to their mutability and their proximity to the child (least-mutable, mutable-distal, mutable-proximal), were estimated. Results A significant degree of variability in rate of progress between 4 and 7 years was evident, much of which was systematically associated with mutable-proximal factors, that is, those factors with evidence that they are modifiable through interventions with the child or family, such as shared book reading, TV viewing and number of books in the home. Mutable-distal factors, such as family income, family literacy and neighbourhood disadvantage, hypothesised to be modifiable through social policy, were important predictors of language abilities at 4 years. Conclusions Potential levers for language interventions lie in the child’s home learning environment from birth to age 4. However, the role of a family’s material and cultural capital must not be ignored, nor should the potential for growth into the school years. Early Years services should acknowledge the effects of multiple, cascading and cumulative risks and seek to promote child language development through the

  10. Responding to the codependent employee.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R

    1992-06-01

    Codependence is an important human disorder that is disturbingly prevalent. When codependence is viewed as a psychological concept, it offers a useful framework for evaluating and responding to problematic behavior. While nursing the addicted and codependent patient and family is an emerging specialty that is helping address the national health care problem of addictions, until now the nursing literature has provided little assistance with the need to recognize codependency from a broad perspective in nursing management. This field offers important and unexplored terrain for the creative and scholarly nurse to assist in developing nursing knowledge. This article has summarized key information about the general problem of codependency and suggests how to apply this information to the setting of the nurse manager. When a nurse manager responds to codependent behavior with understanding and firm control, feelings of security for codependent individuals can be increased and optimum performance will be facilitated. PMID:10171014

  11. The emphasis given to evolution in state science standards: A lever for change in evolution education?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoog, Gerald; Bilica, Kimberly

    2002-07-01

    This study analyzed the science frameworks of 49 states and the District of Colombia to determine the emphasis given to evolution in these documents at the middle and secondary levels. These concepts were species evolve over time, speciation, diversity of life, descent with modification from common ancestry, evidence of evolution, natural selection, pace and direction of evolution, and human evolution. Collectively, the 50 science frameworks emphasized evolution in a manner that suggests that if the public's support for standards-based curricula is a reality, the study of evolution will be emphasized in an unprecedented manner in the nation's schools in the near future. However, all concepts were not emphasized equally in these documents. For example, human evolution was included in only seven documents. The word evolution is absent from some standards. Despite these negatives, recent actions to improve existing standards or to adopt new standards that emphasize evolution have occurred. The metaphor lever of change is often used in the context of school reform. This metaphor suggests a simple system where one change can result in a desired outcome. However, in classrooms where curriculum decisions evolve constantly, multiple factors interact and reinforce one another in response to both internal and external contingencies that emerge. Educational change can not be reduced to a simple linear cause/effect situation. The change process involved is nonlinear where what goes in is not proportional to what comes out because of feedback loops and other factors that complicate results. This nonlinearity is reflected in the varied responses of teachers to specific contingencies. Yet, systems can be changed and nudged towards a structure where desired outcomes will emerge. Judicial rulings indicating that the teaching of evolution cannot be prohibited or equal time for creationism mandated, improved coverage of evolution in secondary school biology textbooks, the negative

  12. Biodetection Technologies for First Responders

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Seiner, Derrick R.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Colburn, Heather A.; Straub, Tim M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2012-10-24

    In a white powder scenario, there are a large number of field-deployable assays that can be used to determine if the suspicious substance contains biological material and warrants further investigation. This report summarizes commercially available technologies that are considered hand portable and can be used by first responders in the field. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, nor do the authors endorse any of the technologies described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about available technologies to help end-users make informed decisions about biodetection technology procurement and use.

  13. 37 CFR 41.68 - Respondent's brief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respondent's brief. 41.68... Respondent's brief. (a)(1) Respondent(s) in an appeal may once, within the time limit for filing set forth in... title. (2) The brief must be signed by the party, or the party's duly authorized attorney or agent,...

  14. A seesaw-lever force-balancing suspension design for space and terrestrial gravity-gradient sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huafeng; Pike, W. T.; Dou, Guangbin

    2016-03-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of a seesaw-lever force-balancing suspension for a silicon gravity-gradient sensor, a gravity gradiometer, that is capable of operation over a range of gravity from 0 to 1 g. This allows for both air and space deployment after ground validation. An overall rationale for designing a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) gravity gradiometer is developed, indicating that a gravity gradiometer based on a torsion-balance, rather than a differential-accelerometer, provides the best approach. The fundamental micromachined element, a seesaw-lever force-balancing suspension, is designed with a low fundamental frequency for in-plane rotation to response gravity gradient but with good rejection of all cross-axis modes. During operation under 1 g, a gravitational force is axially loaded on two straight-beams that perform as a stiff fulcrum for the mass-connection lever without affecting sensitive in-plane rotational sensing. The dynamics of this suspension are analysed by both closed-form and finite element analysis, with good agreement between the two. The suspension has been fabricated using through-wafer deep reactive-ion etching and the dynamics verified both in air and vacuum. The sensitivity of a gravity gradiometer built around this suspension will be dominated by thermal noise, contributing in this case a noise floor of around 10 E /√{Hz } (1 E = 10-9/s2) in vacuum. Compared with previous conventional gravity gradiometers, this suspension allows a gradiometer of performance within an order of magnitude but greatly reduced volume and weight. Compared with previous MEMS gravity gradiometers, our design has the advantage of functionality under Earth gravity.

  15. Study of Lever-Arm Effect Using Embedded Photogrammetry and On-Board GPS Receiver on Uav for Metrological Mapping Purpose and Proposal of a Free Ground Measurements Calibration Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daakir, M.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.; Bosser, P.; Pichard, F.; Thom, C.; Rabot, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) on-board photogrammetry knows a significant growth due to the democratization of using drones in the civilian sector. Also, due to changes in regulations laws governing the rules of inclusion of a UAV in the airspace which become suitable for the development of professional activities. Fields of application of photogrammetry are diverse, for instance: architecture, geology, archaeology, mapping, industrial metrology, etc. Our research concerns the latter area. Vinci-Construction- Terrassement is a private company specialized in public earthworks that uses UAVs for metrology applications. This article deals with maximum accuracy one can achieve with a coupled camera and GPS receiver system for direct-georeferencing of Digital Surface Models (DSMs) without relying on Ground Control Points (GCPs) measurements. This article focuses specially on the lever-arm calibration part. This proposed calibration method is based on two steps: a first step involves the proper calibration for each sensor, i.e. to determine the position of the optical center of the camera and the GPS antenna phase center in a local coordinate system relative to the sensor. A second step concerns a 3d modeling of the UAV with embedded sensors through a photogrammetric acquisition. Processing this acquisition allows to determine the value of the lever-arm offset without using GCPs.

  16. Bubbles Responding to Ultrasound Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND) experiment was designed to improve understanding of how the shape and behavior of bubbles respond to ultrasound pressure. By understanding this behavior, it may be possible to counteract complications bubbles cause during materials processing on the ground. This 12-second sequence came from video downlinked from STS-94, July 5 1997, MET:3/19:15 (approximate). The BDND guest investigator was Gary Leal of the University of California, Santa Barbara. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced fluid dynamics experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (435KB, 13-second MPEG, screen 160 x 120 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300162.html.

  17. "Responding to Climate Change" Course: Research Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfirman, S. L.; Bowman, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The "Responding to Climate Change" Barnard/Columbia course integrates current research as well as hands-on research-based activities modified for a classroom environment. The course covers the major response themes of adaptation, mitigation and communication. In the spring of 2015 the course was oriented around Arctic and Antarctic case studies. Each week a different theme is addressed, such as the physical setting, changing ecosystems, governance issues, perspectives of residents and indigenous peoples, geoengineering, commercial interests, security, and health and developmental issues. Frequent guest lectures from thematic experts keep the course grounded in realities and present the students with cutting edge issues. Activities match the weekly theme, for example during the week on Arctic development, students engage with the marine spatial planning simulation Arctic SMARTIC (Strategic Management of Resources in Times of Change) based on research on Arctic sea ice trends and projections coupled with current and projected developmental interests of stakeholders. Created under the Polar Learning and Responding: PoLAR Climate Change Education Partnership (thepolarhub.org), a complete set of SMARTIC resources is available on line for use by others (http://www.camelclimatechange.org/view/article/175297/). The Responding to Climate Change course is designed to be current and respond to events. For the Arctic case study, students developed proposals for the US State Department as the upcoming Chair of the Arctic Council. Student evaluations indicated that they appreciated the opportunity to connect science with policy and presentation of preliminary proposals in a workshop format was valued as a way to develop and hone their ideas. An additional finding was that students were surprisingly tolerant of technical issues when guest lecturers were linked in via Skype, allowing interaction with thematic experts across the US. Students commented positively on this exposure to

  18. Design of a MEMS-based motion stage based on a lever mechanism for generating large displacements and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Sik; Shi, Hongliang; Dagalakis, Nicholas G.; Gupta, Satyandra K.

    2016-09-01

    Conventional miniaturized motion stages have a volume of 50–60 cm3 and a range of motion around 100 μm. Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based motion stages have been good alternatives in some applications for small footprint, micron-level accuracy, and a lower cost. However, existing MEMS-based motion stages are able to provide a force of μN level, small displacements (less than tens of microns), and need additional features for practical applications like a probe or a stage. In this paper, a single degree of freedom motion stage is designed and analyzed for a larger displacement, a larger output force, a smaller out-of-plane deformation, and a bigger moving stage for further applications. For these purposes, the presented motion stage is designed with a thermal actuator, folded springs, and a lever, and it is experimentally characterized. Furthermore, three different types of flexure joints are investigated to characterize their capabilities and suitability to serve as the revolute joint of the lever: a beam, a cartwheel, and a butterfly flexure. The presented motion stage has a moving stage of 15 mm  ×  15 mm and shows a maximum displacement over 80 μm, and out-of-plane deformation under a weight of 120 μN less than 2 μm. The force generated by the actuator is estimated to be 68.6 mN.

  19. Assessing respondent-driven sampling.

    PubMed

    Goel, Sharad; Salganik, Matthew J

    2010-04-13

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a network-based technique for estimating traits in hard-to-reach populations, for example, the prevalence of HIV among drug injectors. In recent years RDS has been used in more than 120 studies in more than 20 countries and by leading public health organizations, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. Despite the widespread use and growing popularity of RDS, there has been little empirical validation of the methodology. Here we investigate the performance of RDS by simulating sampling from 85 known, network populations. Across a variety of traits we find that RDS is substantially less accurate than generally acknowledged and that reported RDS confidence intervals are misleadingly narrow. Moreover, because we model a best-case scenario in which the theoretical RDS sampling assumptions hold exactly, it is unlikely that RDS performs any better in practice than in our simulations. Notably, the poor performance of RDS is driven not by the bias but by the high variance of estimates, a possibility that had been largely overlooked in the RDS literature. Given the consistency of our results across networks and our generous sampling conditions, we conclude that RDS as currently practiced may not be suitable for key aspects of public health surveillance where it is now extensively applied. PMID:20351258

  20. Assessing respondent-driven sampling

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Sharad; Salganik, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a network-based technique for estimating traits in hard-to-reach populations, for example, the prevalence of HIV among drug injectors. In recent years RDS has been used in more than 120 studies in more than 20 countries and by leading public health organizations, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. Despite the widespread use and growing popularity of RDS, there has been little empirical validation of the methodology. Here we investigate the performance of RDS by simulating sampling from 85 known, network populations. Across a variety of traits we find that RDS is substantially less accurate than generally acknowledged and that reported RDS confidence intervals are misleadingly narrow. Moreover, because we model a best-case scenario in which the theoretical RDS sampling assumptions hold exactly, it is unlikely that RDS performs any better in practice than in our simulations. Notably, the poor performance of RDS is driven not by the bias but by the high variance of estimates, a possibility that had been largely overlooked in the RDS literature. Given the consistency of our results across networks and our generous sampling conditions, we conclude that RDS as currently practiced may not be suitable for key aspects of public health surveillance where it is now extensively applied. PMID:20351258

  1. Basic and applied research on choice responding.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, W W; Mazur, J E

    1997-01-01

    Choice responding refers to the manner in which individuals allocate their time or responding among available response options. In this article, we first review basic investigations that have identified and examined variables that influence choice responding, such as response effort and reinforcement rate, immediacy, and quality. We then describe recent bridge and applied studies that illustrate how the results of basic research on choice responding can help to account for human behavior in natural environments and improve clinical assessments and interventions. PMID:9316255

  2. How tree roots respond to drought

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Ivano; Herzog, Claude; Dawes, Melissa A.; Arend, Matthias; Sperisen, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing climate change is characterized by increased temperatures and altered precipitation patterns. In addition, there has been an increase in both the frequency and intensity of extreme climatic events such as drought. Episodes of drought induce a series of interconnected effects, all of which have the potential to alter the carbon balance of forest ecosystems profoundly at different scales of plant organization and ecosystem functioning. During recent years, considerable progress has been made in the understanding of how aboveground parts of trees respond to drought and how these responses affect carbon assimilation. In contrast, processes of belowground parts are relatively underrepresented in research on climate change. In this review, we describe current knowledge about responses of tree roots to drought. Tree roots are capable of responding to drought through a variety of strategies that enable them to avoid and tolerate stress. Responses include root biomass adjustments, anatomical alterations, and physiological acclimations. The molecular mechanisms underlying these responses are characterized to some extent, and involve stress signaling and the induction of numerous genes, leading to the activation of tolerance pathways. In addition, mycorrhizas seem to play important protective roles. The current knowledge compiled in this review supports the view that tree roots are well equipped to withstand drought situations and maintain morphological and physiological functions as long as possible. Further, the reviewed literature demonstrates the important role of tree roots in the functioning of forest ecosystems and highlights the need for more research in this emerging field. PMID:26284083

  3. What Respondents Really Expect from Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolar, Tomaz; Kolar, Iztok

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of falling response rates in telephone surveys. To better understand and maintain respondent goodwill, concepts of psychological contract and respondent expectations are introduced and explored. Results of the qualitative study show that respondent expectations are not only socially contingent but also…

  4. Let's Get Personal: Responding to Creative Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Suzanne

    In hopes of discovering how to respond to her students' work in a way that heads them toward meaningful revision, a creative writing teacher singles out several categories of student fiction she has trouble responding to and pinpoints common shortcomings of students' early drafts, the way students respond to comments regarding revisions, and genre…

  5. Hydrogen Safety Training for First Responders

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, Linda L.

    2011-01-01

    The use of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies is emerging in the U.S. through vehicle demonstration programs and early deployments of fuel cells for onsite power generation, materials handling, and other applications. To help first responders prepare for hydrogen and fuel cell use in their communities, the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program has developed hydrogen safety training for first responders. A web-based awareness-level course, 'Introduction to Hydrogen Safety for First Responders,' launched in 2007, is available at http://hydrogen.pnl.gov/FirstResponders/. Approximately 17,000 first responders have accessed the online training.

  6. Imagination and dissociation in hypnotic responding.

    PubMed

    Bowers, K S

    1992-10-01

    A neodissociative model of mind is better equipped than a social-psychological model to deal with the complexities of hypnosis, and of human behavior generally. It recognizes, as Coe's (1992) model does not, that behavior can be more automatically activated than strategically enacted. In particular, Coe's emphasis on human behavior as purposeful and goal directed does not distinguish between goal-directed behavior that serves a purpose, and goal-directed behavior that is performed on purpose. It is this distinction that permits goal-directed behavior to be dissociated from a person's conscious plans and intentions. In addition to offering a critique of Coe's "limited process" view of hypnosis, 4 main points are made in the interest of developing a slightly modified, neodissociation view of hypnosis. First, it is argued that goal-directed fantasies are more limited in their ability to mediate hypnotic responding than is commonly appreciated; as well, they do not seem to account for the nonvolitional quality of hypnotic responding. Second, it is argued that hypnotic ability is not unidimensional, with compliance and social influence more apt to account for the low than for the high hypnotizable's responsiveness to suggestion. Third, compared to low hypnotizables, the hypnotic responsiveness of high hypnotizables seems more likely to result from dissociated control. In other words, for high hypnotizables, hypnotic suggestions may often directly activate subsystems of cognitive control. Consequently, the need for executive initiative and effort to produce hypnotically suggested behavior is minimized, and such responses are therefore experienced as nonvolitional. Fourth and finally, while goal-directed fantasies typically accompany hypnotically suggested responses, they are in many cases more a marker of dissociated control than a mediator of suggested effects. PMID:1468834

  7. Effects of d-amphetamine, WIN 35,428, pentobarbital and morphine on schedule-controlled responding in two inbred rat strains that differ in locomotor stimulatory effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Witkin, J.M.; Goldberg, S.R.

    1992-10-01

    Behavioral effects of d-amphetamine, the cocaine analog, WIN 35,428, morphine, and pentobarbital were compared in NBR/NIH and F344CR1BR rats. Either nose-poke or lever-press responding was maintained under 3-min fixed-interval schedules of food presentation. The effects of morphine, WIN 35,428 and pentobarbital depended upon the rat strain studied: morphine increased nose-poke responding in NBR but not F344 rats; significant strain x dose interactions were observed with WIN 35,428; and pentobarbital was more potent in decreasing nose-poke responding in NBR than in F344 rats. No strain differences were observed in the behavioral effects of d-amphetamine. There were also prominent differences in the effects of drugs that were related to the nature of the response requirement. In both rat strains, nose-poke responding was affected differently than lever-press responding by morphine, d-amphetamine, and WIN 35,428. Pentobarbital produced effects that were independent of the specified response topography. A global underlying difference in these rat strains cannot be identified at present to account for the diversity of findings. The behavioral effects of these drugs appear to be influenced by a host of interactive factors including the drug, strain of animal, the baseline response rate and physical dimensions of the response. PMID:11224148

  8. Staminal Evolution in the Genus Salvia (Lamiaceae): Molecular Phylogenetic Evidence for Multiple Origins of the Staminal Lever

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jay B.; Sytsma, Kenneth J.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The genus Salvia has traditionally included any member of the tribe Mentheae (Lamiaceae) with only two stamens and with each stamen expressing an elongate connective. The recent demonstration of the non-monophyly of the genus presents interesting implications for staminal evolution in the tribe Mentheae. In the context of a molecular phylogeny, the staminal morphology of the various lineages of Salvia and related genera is characterized and an evolutionary interpretation of staminal variation within the tribe Mentheae is presented. Methods Two molecular analyses are presented in order to investigate phylogenetic relationships in the tribe Mentheae and the genus Salvia. The first presents a tribal survey of the Mentheae and the second concentrates on Salvia and related genera. Schematic sketches are presented for the staminal morphology of each major lineage of Salvia and related genera. Key Results These analyses suggest an independent origin of the staminal elongate connective on at least three different occasions within the tribe Mentheae, each time with a distinct morphology. Each independent origin of the lever mechanism shows a similar progression of staminal change from slight elongation of the connective tissue separating two fertile thecae to abortion of the posterior thecae and fusion of adjacent posterior thecae. A monophyletic lineage within the Mentheae is characterized consisting of the genera Lepechinia, Melissa, Salvia, Dorystaechas, Meriandra, Zhumeria, Perovskia and Rosmarinus. Conclusions Based on these results the following are characterized: (1) the independent origin of the staminal lever mechanism on at least three different occasions in Salvia, (2) that Salvia is clearly polyphyletic, with five other genera intercalated within it, and (3) staminal evolution has proceeded in different ways in each of the three lineages of Salvia but has resulted in remarkably similar staminal morphologies. PMID:16926227

  9. Blockade of uptake for dopamine, but not norepinephrine or 5-HT, increases selection of high effort instrumental activity: Implications for treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms in psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Yohn, Samantha E; Errante, Emily E; Rosenbloom-Snow, Aaron; Somerville, Matthew; Rowland, Margaret; Tokarski, Kristin; Zafar, Nadia; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2016-10-01

    Deficits in behavioral activation, exertion of effort, and other psychomotor/motivational symptoms are frequently seen in people with depression and other disorders. Depressed people show a decision bias towards selection of low effort activities, and animal tests of effort-related decision making are being used as models of motivational dysfunctions seen in psychopathology. The present studies investigated the ability of drugs that block dopamine transport (DAT), norepinephrine transport (NET), and serotonin transport (SERT) to modulate work output in rats responding on a test of effort-related decision making (i.e., a progressive ratio (PROG)/chow feeding choice task). With this task, rats choose between working for a preferred food (high carbohydrate pellets) by lever pressing on a PROG schedule vs. obtaining a less preferred lab chow that is freely available in the chamber. The present studies focused on the effects of the selective DAT inhibitor GBR12909, the selective SERT inhibitor fluoxetine, and the selective NET inhibitors desipramine and atomoxetine. Acute and repeated administration of GBR12909 shifted choice behavior, increasing measures of PROG lever pressing but decreasing chow intake. In contrast, fluoxetine, desipramine and atomoxetine failed to increase lever pressing output, and actually decreased it at higher doses. In the behaviorally effective dose range, GBR12909 elevated extracellular dopamine levels in accumbens core as measured by microdialysis, but fluoxetine, desipramine and atomoxetine decreased extracellular dopamine. Thus, blockade of DAT increases selection of the high effort instrumental activity, while inhibition of SERT or NET does not. These results have implications for the use of monoamine uptake inhibitors for the treatment of effort-related psychiatric symptoms in humans. PMID:27329556

  10. Differential effects of clozapine and pimozide on fixed-ratio responding during repeated dosing.

    PubMed

    Wiley, J L; Compton, A D; Porter, J H

    1994-05-01

    Previous research has shown that the differential development of tolerance to the disruption of operant responding produced by repeated dosing with pimozide (PMZ) or clozapine (CLZ) can distinguish these two drugs. In the present study, the effects of PMZ (1 mg/kg) and CLZ (10 mg/kg) on response rate and response duration in rats lever pressing for food reward under a fixed-ratio 30 (FR-30) operant schedule were examined. PMZ suppressed response rates across all 10 days of drug dosing; CLZ produced an initial response rate decrease, with partial recovery (50%) occurring within the 10 day period. Similarly, PMZ produced an increase in response duration that persisted into the postdrug vehicle-injection period, while CLZ did not significantly change response duration. The prolonged suppression of FR responding produced by PMZ is similar to the lack of tolerance to this drug in other types of operant schedules. In contrast, CLZ's effects on response rate are schedule dependent. These results suggest that changes in response duration with repeated dosing may more reliably differentiate typical and atypical neuroleptics than do changes in response rate under FR schedules. PMID:8029297

  11. Methodology for Assessing Radiation Detectors Used by Emergency Responders

    SciTech Connect

    Piotr Wasiolek; April Simpson

    2008-03-01

    The threat of weapons of mass destruction terrorism resulted in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security deploying large quantities of radiation detectors throughout the emergency responder community. However, emergency responders specific needs were not always met by standard health physics instrumentation used in radiation facilities. Several American National Standards Institute standards were developed and approved to evaluate the technical capabilities of detection equipment. Establishing technical capability is a critical step, but it is equally important to emergency responders that the instruments are easy to operate and can withstand the rugged situations they encounter. The System Assessment and Validation for Emergency Responders (SAVER) Program (managed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Office of Grants and Training, Systems Support Division) focuses predominantly on the usability, ergonomics, readability, and other features of the detectors, rather than performance controlled by industry standards and the manufacturers. National Security Technologies, LLC, as a SAVER Technical Agent, conducts equipment evaluations using active emergency responders who are familiar with the detection equipment and knowledgeable of situations encountered in the field, which provides more relevant data to emergency responders.

  12. Parrotfish grazing ability: interspecific differences in relation to jaw-lever mechanics and relative weight of adductor mandibulae on an Okinawan coral reef

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Parrotfishes (family Labridae: Scarini) are regarded to have important roles for maintaining the ecosystem balance in coral reefs due to their removal of organic matter and calcic substrates by grazing. The purpose of the present study was to clarify the interspecific differences in grazing ability of five parrotfish species (Chlorurus sordidus, C. bowersi, Scarus rivulatus, S. niger and S. forsteni) in relation to interspecific differences in jaw-lever mechanics and the relative weight of the adductor mandibulae (muscles operating jaw closing). The grazing ability was calculated by using stomach contents (CaCO3 weight/organic matter weight) defined as the grazing ability index (GAI). There were significant interspecific differences in GAI (C. sordidus = C. bowersi > S. rivulatus > S. niger = S. forsteni). Teeth of C. sordidus and C. bowersi were protrusive-shape whereas teeth of S. rivulatus, S. niger and S. forsteni were flat-shape. C. sordidus and C. bowersihave jaw-lever mechanics producing a greater biting force and have a larger weight of adductor mandibulae. S. rivulatus has jaw-lever mechanics producing a greater biting force but a smaller weight of adductor mandibulae that produce an intermediate biting force. In contrast, S. niger and S. forsteni have jaw-lever mechanics producing a lesser biting force and have a smaller weight of adductor mandibulae. Feeding rates and foray size of S. rivulatus, S. niger and S. forsteni were greater than C. sordidus and C. bowersi. The degree in bioerosion (GAI × feeding rate) was the largest for S. rivulatusand the smallest for S. forsteni. The degree in bioerosion for C. sordidus was larger than S. niger whereas relatively equal between C. bowersi and S. niger. These results suggest that interspecific difference in GAI was explained by interspecific differences in teeth shape, jaw-lever mechanics and relative weight of adductor mandibulae. The interspecific difference in the degree of bioerosion suggests the

  13. Neural activity in monkey amygdala during performance of a multisensory operant task.

    PubMed

    Montes-Lourido, Pilar; Vicente, Ana F; Bermudez, Maria A; Gonzalez, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the potential involvement of monkey amygdala in the evaluation of value encoding of visual and auditive stimuli associated with reward or no reward. We recorded the activity of 93 extracellular neurons from the monkey right amygdala, while performing a multisensory operant task. The activity of 78 task-related neurons was studied. Of these, 13 neurons (16%) responded to the value of visual stimuli, 22 neurons (28%) responded after the presentation of visual stimuli, 22 neurons (28%) showed an inhibition around the lever-pressing and were classified as action related neurons and 22 neurons (28%) responded after reward delivery. These findings suggest that neurons in the amygdala play a role in encoding value and processing visual information, participate in motor regulation and are sensitive to reward. The activity of these neurons did not change in the evaluation of auditive stimuli. These data support the hypothesis that amygdala neurons are specific to each sensory modality and that different groups of amygdala neurons process visual and auditive information. PMID:26246438

  14. 37 CFR 41.68 - Respondent's brief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., file a respondent brief and serve the brief on all parties in accordance with § 1.903 of this title. (2... (b)(1)(ii) of this section. (x) Certificate of service. A certification that a copy of the respondent... non-compliance and given a non-extendable time period within which to file an amended brief....

  15. HOW PEOPLE RESPOND TO CONTINGENT VALUATION QUESTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the project is to understand better how individuals interpret and respond to contingent valuation (CV) questions. The research will address three issues: the reliability of the referendum questions format, the importance of reminding respondents about subst...

  16. DECONTAMINATION WIPES FOR FIRST RESPONDERS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The threat of chemical or biological (CB) attack is real, and there is a recognized need for improved technologies to better respond to these situations. During a CB emergency, first responder units are critical for handling the emergency, and then restoring the environment wh...

  17. Evaluation of the SMAP radiometer lever 2 pre-launch soil moisture algorithms using SMOS data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of the upcoming SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite mission include global measurements of soil moisture at 40 km, 10 km and 3 km resolutions with a 3-day revisit time at an accuracy of 0.04 m3/m3. The 40 km resolution soil moisture product is based primarily on the passiv...

  18. Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders

    SciTech Connect

    Valerie L. Putman

    2012-08-01

    This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

    This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

    For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

    INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

  19. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (January 2015)

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Jaki F.; Stein, Steven L.

    2015-02-01

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  20. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (December 2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Jaki F.; Stein, Steven L.

    2015-02-13

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  1. Enhancing the optical lever sensitivity of microcantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy via integrated low frequency paddles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda Shaik, Nurul; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Raman, Arvind

    2016-05-01

    A method is presented to enhance the optical lever sensitivity in dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) by nearly an order of magnitude over a wide frequency bandwidth. This is achieved by fabricating or releasing a paddle with a soft hinge close to the free end of the AFM microcantilever such that the paddle resonance frequency is well below the fundamental resonance frequency of the microcantilever. We show a significant increase in signal to noise ratio when cantilever motion is observed at the paddle for AFM systems that are not limited by thermal noise. Also, any effects due to the excitation of the second eigenmode were decoupled by locating the paddle at the node of the second eigenmode. We use these probes for higher harmonic imaging in amplitude modulated AFM (AM–AFM) on a standard polymer blend made of polystyrene and low density polyethylene. We demonstrate significantly improved contrast in higher harmonic images when observing cantilever motion at the paddle. Thus this microcantilever design can improve significantly conventional cantilever performance for dynamic AFM and is compatible with low-cost, high yield microfabrication processes.

  2. Enhancing the optical lever sensitivity of microcantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy via integrated low frequency paddles.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Nurul Huda; Reifenberger, Ronald G; Raman, Arvind

    2016-05-13

    A method is presented to enhance the optical lever sensitivity in dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) by nearly an order of magnitude over a wide frequency bandwidth. This is achieved by fabricating or releasing a paddle with a soft hinge close to the free end of the AFM microcantilever such that the paddle resonance frequency is well below the fundamental resonance frequency of the microcantilever. We show a significant increase in signal to noise ratio when cantilever motion is observed at the paddle for AFM systems that are not limited by thermal noise. Also, any effects due to the excitation of the second eigenmode were decoupled by locating the paddle at the node of the second eigenmode. We use these probes for higher harmonic imaging in amplitude modulated AFM (AM-AFM) on a standard polymer blend made of polystyrene and low density polyethylene. We demonstrate significantly improved contrast in higher harmonic images when observing cantilever motion at the paddle. Thus this microcantilever design can improve significantly conventional cantilever performance for dynamic AFM and is compatible with low-cost, high yield microfabrication processes. PMID:27040811

  3. Analysis of Cytokine Levers in Pleural Effusions of Tuberculous Pleurisy and Tuberculous Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan-Jie; Li, Fu-Gen; Chang, Xiu-Jun; Zhang, Tian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    The aim is to examine whether the interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-2, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) levels were different in pleural effusions of tuberculous pleurisy and tuberculous empyema. IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, PAI-1, and t-PA levels in pleural fluids of 40 patients with tuberculous pleurisy and 38 patients with tuberculous empyema were measured. The levels of IL-1β, PAI-1, and t-PA in the pleural effusions were different between tuberculous pleurisy and tuberculous empyema; it could be helpful to differentiate the two diseases. The levels of PAI-1, IL-1β were higher and t-PA, IL-6 were lower in pleural effusions of the patients with tuberculous empyema and who must undergo operation than the patients who could be treated with closed drainage and anti-TB chemotheraphy. These indications may be helpful to evaluate whether the patient needs the operation. PMID:27034588

  4. 34 CFR 85.1000 - Respondent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Definitions § 85.1000 Respondent. Respondent means a person against whom an agency has initiated a debarment or suspension action. Authority: E.O. 12549 (3 CFR, 1986 Comp., p. 189); E.O 12689 (3 CFR, 1989 Comp., p. 235); 20 U.S.C. 1082, 1094, 1221e-3 and 3474; and Sec. 2455, Pub. L. 103-355, 108 Stat. 3243...

  5. Chondrogenic Progenitor Cells Respond to Cartilage Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hyeonghun; Zheng, Hongjun; Yu, Yin; Jang, Keewoong; Walter, Morgan W.; Lehman, Abigail D.; Ding, Lei; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hypocellularity resulting from chondrocyte death in the aftermath of mechanical injury is thought to contribute to posttraumatic osteoarthritis. However, we observed that nonviable areas in cartilage injured by blunt impact were repopulated within 7–14 days by cells that appeared to migrate from the surrounding matrix. The aim of this study was to assess our hypothesis that the migrating cell population included chondrogenic progenitor cells that were drawn to injured cartilage by alarmins. Methods Osteochondral explants obtained from mature cattle were injured by blunt impact or scratching, resulting in localized chondrocyte death. Injured sites were serially imaged by confocal microscopy, and migrating cells were evaluated for chondrogenic progenitor characteristics. Chemotaxis assays were used to measure the responses to chemokines, injury-conditioned medium, dead cell debris, and high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB-1). Results Migrating cells were highly clonogenic and multipotent and expressed markers associated with chondrogenic progenitor cells. Compared with chondrocytes, these cells overexpressed genes involved in proliferation and migration and underexpressed cartilage matrix genes. They were more active than chondrocytes in chemotaxis assays and responded to cell lysates, conditioned medium, and HMGB-1. Glycyrrhizin, a chelator of HMGB-1 and a blocking antibody to receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), inhibited responses to cell debris and conditioned medium and reduced the numbers of migrating cells on injured explants. Conclusion Injuries that caused chondrocyte death stimulated the emergence and homing of chondrogenic progenitor cells, in part via HMGB-1 release and RAGE-mediated chemotaxis. Their repopulation of the matrix could promote the repair of chondral damage that might otherwise contribute to progressive cartilage loss. PMID:22777600

  6. Shallow-Lever Centers in Semiconductors - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammerlaan, C. A. J.; Pajot, B.

    1997-04-01

    Quantum Well Structures Grown by MBE * Shallow Centers in Heavily Doped Silicon Quantum Wells * Optically Detected Resonance Spectroscopy of III-V and II-VI Quantum Wells * Shallow Thermal Donor Defects in Silicon * Pressure Dependence of Se Absorption Lines in AlSb * Fine Structure in the Magnetic Resonance of Single Acceptors in Silicon * Far-Infrared Photoconductivity and Photoluminescence of Beryllium in Gallium Arsenide * Shift of Photoluminescence Peak in Highly Self-Compensated Ge-Doped GaAs * Electron-Phonon Coupling in a Delta-Doped n-i-p Structure in GaAs * Group-III and Group-II Quasi-Deep Impurities in Silicon Carbide: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance Studies * Resonance Acceptor States in Uniaxially Strained Semiconductors * Donor-Related Infrared-Absorption Spectra of GaAs-(Ga, Al)As Quantum Wells * Electrical Properties of Shallow Donor Centers Formed Due to Oxygen Interaction with Chemically Active Impurities in Heat-Treated Silicon * Fine Structure and Higher Lying Transitions of Er3+ in 4H and 6H SiC * Mechanism for the Enhanced Dissociation of C-H Complexes in GaAs * Bistability and Metastability of Hydrogen in Si * EPR of Aluminum-Aluminum Interstitial Pair in Silicon * Magnetic Order of Shallow Acceptor Centres in Semiconductors (InSb:Mn) * Luminescence and DLTS Study of Photonuclear Transmutation Doped (PND) Gallium Arsenide * Photoluminescence of Deformed Bulk Crystals of Si-Ge Alloy * Di-Oxygen Complex in Silicon: Some New Characteristic Features * Reactions of Interstitial Iron with Shallow Acceptors in Silicon * The 819.8 meV Photoluminescence Band in Copper Doped Silicon * Zeeman Spectroscopy of Aluminium in Germanium * Microscopic Studies of the Hydrogen Passivation in n-Type Silicon: A New Application of the 73As γ-e- PAC Technique * Shallow Donor Solubility Mechanism: Tellurium in GaAs * Energy Levels of Shallow Donor Pairs and Thermal Double Donors in Silicon * Boron Neutralization by Hydrogen in

  7. Shallow-Lever Centers in Semiconductors - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammerlaan, C. A. J.; Pajot, B.

    1997-04-01

    Quantum Well Structures Grown by MBE * Shallow Centers in Heavily Doped Silicon Quantum Wells * Optically Detected Resonance Spectroscopy of III-V and II-VI Quantum Wells * Shallow Thermal Donor Defects in Silicon * Pressure Dependence of Se Absorption Lines in AlSb * Fine Structure in the Magnetic Resonance of Single Acceptors in Silicon * Far-Infrared Photoconductivity and Photoluminescence of Beryllium in Gallium Arsenide * Shift of Photoluminescence Peak in Highly Self-Compensated Ge-Doped GaAs * Electron-Phonon Coupling in a Delta-Doped n-i-p Structure in GaAs * Group-III and Group-II Quasi-Deep Impurities in Silicon Carbide: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance Studies * Resonance Acceptor States in Uniaxially Strained Semiconductors * Donor-Related Infrared-Absorption Spectra of GaAs-(Ga, Al)As Quantum Wells * Electrical Properties of Shallow Donor Centers Formed Due to Oxygen Interaction with Chemically Active Impurities in Heat-Treated Silicon * Fine Structure and Higher Lying Transitions of Er3+ in 4H and 6H SiC * Mechanism for the Enhanced Dissociation of C-H Complexes in GaAs * Bistability and Metastability of Hydrogen in Si * EPR of Aluminum-Aluminum Interstitial Pair in Silicon * Magnetic Order of Shallow Acceptor Centres in Semiconductors (InSb:Mn) * Luminescence and DLTS Study of Photonuclear Transmutation Doped (PND) Gallium Arsenide * Photoluminescence of Deformed Bulk Crystals of Si-Ge Alloy * Di-Oxygen Complex in Silicon: Some New Characteristic Features * Reactions of Interstitial Iron with Shallow Acceptors in Silicon * The 819.8 meV Photoluminescence Band in Copper Doped Silicon * Zeeman Spectroscopy of Aluminium in Germanium * Microscopic Studies of the Hydrogen Passivation in n-Type Silicon: A New Application of the 73As γ-e- PAC Technique * Shallow Donor Solubility Mechanism: Tellurium in GaAs * Energy Levels of Shallow Donor Pairs and Thermal Double Donors in Silicon * Boron Neutralization by Hydrogen in

  8. Rifaximin has a Marginal Impact on Microbial Translocation, T-cell Activation and Inflammation in HIV-Positive Immune Non-responders to Antiretroviral Therapy – ACTG A5286

    PubMed Central

    Tenorio, Allan R.; Chan, Ellen S.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Macatangay, Bernard J. C.; Read, Sarah W.; Yesmin, Suria; Taiwo, Babafemi; Margolis, David M.; Jacobson, Jeffrey M.; Landay, Alan L.; Wilson, Cara C.; Mellors, John W.; Keshavarzian, Ali; Rodriguez, Benigno; Aziz, Mariam; Presti, Rachel; Deeks, Steven; Ebiasah, Ruth; Myers, Laurie; Borowski, LuAnn; Plants, Jill; Palm, David A.; Weibel, Derek; Putnam, Beverly; Lindsey, Elizabeth; Player, Amy; Albrecht, Mary; Kershaw, Andrea; Sax, Paul; Keenan, Cheryl; Walton, Patricia; Baum, Jane; Stroberg, Todd; Hughes, Valery; Coster, Laura; Kumar, Princy N.; Yin, Michael T.; Noel-Connor, Jolene; Tebas, Pablo; Thomas, Aleshia; Davis, Charles E.; Redfield, Robert R.; Sbrolla, Amy; Flynn, Teri; Davis, Traci; Whitely, Kim; Singh, Baljinder; Swaminathan, Shobha; McGregor, Donna; Palella, Frank; Aberg, Judith; Cavanagh, Karen; Santana Bagur, Jorge L.; Flores, Olga Méndez; Fritsche, Janice; Sha, Beverly; Slamowitz, Debbie; Valle, Sandra; Tashima, Karen; Patterson, Helen; Harber, Heather; Para, Michael; Eaton, Molly; Maddox, Dale; Currier, Judith; Cajahuaringa, Vanessa; Luetkemeyer, Annie; Dwyer, Jay; Fichtenbaum, Carl J.; Saemann, Michelle; Ray, Graham; Campbell, Thomas; Fischl, Margaret A.; Bolivar, Hector; Oakes, Jonathan; Chicurel-Bayard, Miriam; Tripoli, Christine; Weinman, D. Renee; Adams, Mary; Hurley, Christine; Dunaway, Shelia; Storey, Sheryl; Klebert, Michael; Royal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background. Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable antibiotic that decreases lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in cirrhotics, may decrease the elevated levels of microbial translocation, T-cell activation and inflammation in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive immune nonresponders to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods. HIV-positive adults receiving ART for ≥96 weeks with undetectable viremia for ≥48 weeks and CD4+ T-cell counts <350 cells/mm3 were randomized 2:1 to rifaximin versus no study treatment for 4 weeks. T-cell activation, LPS, and soluble CD14 were measured at baseline and at weeks 2, 4, and 8. Wilcoxon rank sum tests compared changes between arms. Results. Compared with no study treatment (n = 22), rifaximin (n = 43) use was associated with a significant difference between study arms in the change from baseline to week 4 for CD8+T-cell activation (median change, 0.0% with rifaximin vs +0.6% with no treatment; P = .03). This difference was driven by an increase in the no-study-treatment arm because there was no significant change within the rifaximin arm. Similarly, although there were significant differences between study arms in change from baseline to week 2 for LPS and soluble CD14, there were no significant changes within the rifaximin arm. Conclusions. In immune nonresponders to ART, rifaximin minimally affected microbial translocation and CD8+T-cell activation. Trial registration number. NCT01466595. PMID:25214516

  9. The levers of influence.

    PubMed

    Martin, W

    1999-01-01

    Physicians often determine the demand for health care services, as well as control the clinical processes aimed at improving health outcomes at the individual and population level. Given their important role in enhancing health status and improving the health care delivery system, it is critical that physician executives master the tools necessary to positively influence physician behavior. But changing behavior is far more complex than "doing it or not doing it." The Nike slogan "just do it" is motivating, but over-simplified. The roots of human change include: consciousness-raising, emotional arousal, commitment, helping relationships, self-reevaluation, reward, and environmental control. A model to effectively influence behavior is presented and includes setting clear expectations, measuring and monitoring performance, providing feedback, and rewarding and recognizing improvement. If all else fails, try discipline. This five-step approach is based on the science of human behavior and working with physicians in diverse settings, ranging from academic medical centers to small practices. PMID:10788108

  10. School Principals and Racism: Responding to Aveling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Claire; Mahoney, Caroline; Fox, Brandi; Halse, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study responds to Nado Aveling's call in "Anti-racism in Schools: A question of leadership?" ("Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education," 2007, 28(1), 69-85) for further investigation into racism in Australian schools. Aveling's interview study concluded that an overwhelming number of school principals…

  11. Helping Your Children Respond to Global Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFarge, Phyllis

    1992-01-01

    Discusses what it is like for children to grow up with an awareness that they live in a world in which unrestrained technological prowess has created vulnerabilities on a global scale. The article examines how parents and teachers can help their children cope with and respond to world issues. (SM)

  12. Modeling Socially Desirable Responding and Its Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Matthias; Buehner, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The impact of socially desirable responding or faking on noncognitive assessments remains an issue of strong debate. One of the main reasons for the controversy is the lack of a statistical method to model such response sets. This article introduces a new way to model faking based on the assumption that faking occurs due to an interaction between…

  13. Resurgence of Temporal Patterns of Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cancado, Carlos R. X.; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2011-01-01

    The resurgence of temporal patterns of key pecking by pigeons was investigated in two experiments. In Experiment 1, positively accelerated and linear patterns of responding were established on one key under a discrete-trial multiple fixed-interval variable-interval schedule. Subsequently, only responses on a second key produced reinforcers…

  14. Responding to Children Victimized by Their Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Amanda B.; Brock, Stephen E.; Chang, Yiping; O'Malley, Meagan D.

    2006-01-01

    Because victimization results from the dynamic interplay between the victim and his or her parents, peers, and teachers, responding to this problem should involve both direct and indirect interventions. This paper describes and reviews empirically supported direct interventions with victims, as well as indirect interventions with parents, peers,…

  15. Criticisms and Concerns: How Do You Respond?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Joy

    1994-01-01

    Montessorians respond to the following criticisms and concerns about Montessori education: (1) accessibility by all racial and socioeconomic groups; (2) evaluation of children's progress; (3) the noisiness of Montessori classrooms; (4) the inclusion or exclusion of humanities and physical education in Montessori curriculum; and (5) transition…

  16. Suspected Child Maltreatment: Recognize and Respond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemple, Kristen Mary; Kim, Hae Kyoung

    2011-01-01

    Early childhood educators spend extensive amounts of time with young children, so they are often the first adults to notice signs that a child may be abused or neglected. All educators are required by law to report suspected maltreatment, and can play an important role in preventing and responding to abuse and neglect of young children. What is…

  17. ASA24® Respondent Website Features

    Cancer.gov

    The ASA24 Respondent Website guides the participant through the completion of either a 24-hour recall for the previous day (from midnight-to-midnight or for the past 24-hours) or for a single or multiple day food record.

  18. Methods for Handling Missing Secondary Respondent Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Rebekah; Johnson, David

    2013-01-01

    Secondary respondent data are underutilized because researchers avoid using these data in the presence of substantial missing data. The authors reviewed, evaluated, and tested solutions to this problem. Five strategies of dealing with missing partner data were reviewed: (a) complete case analysis, (b) inverse probability weighting, (c) correction…

  19. Responding to Accountability Mandates. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outcalt, Charles; Rabin, Joel

    In recent years, community colleges have developed innovative assessment programs to respond to more explicit state guidelines and mandates for greater accountability. In California, for example, the State Assembly began requiring community colleges to address specific educational and fiscal performance issues in assessments in 1989, while…

  20. Responding for sucrose and wheel-running reinforcement: effects of sucrose concentration and wheel-running reinforcer duration.

    PubMed Central

    Belke, Terry W; Hancock, Stephanie D

    2003-01-01

    Six male albino rats were placed in running wheels and exposed to a fixed-interval 30-s schedule of lever pressing that produced either a drop of sucrose solution or the opportunity to run for a fixed duration as reinforcers. Each reinforcer type was signaled by a different stimulus. In Experiment 1, the duration of running was held constant at 15 s while the concentration of sucrose solution was varied across values of 0, 2.5. 5, 10, and 15%. As concentration decreased, postreinforcement pause duration increased and local rates decreased in the presence of the stimulus signaling sucrose. Consequently, the difference between responding in the presence of stimuli signaling wheel-running and sucrose reinforcers diminished, and at 2.5%, response functions for the two reinforcers were similar. In Experiment 2, the concentration of sucrose solution was held constant at 15% while the duration of the opportunity to run was first varied across values of 15, 45, and 90 s then subsequently across values of 5, 10, and 15 s. As run duration increased, postreinforcement pause duration in the presence of the wheel-running stimulus increased and local rates increased then decreased. In summary, inhibitory aftereffects of previous reinforcers occurred when both sucrose concentration and run duration varied; changes in responding were attributable to changes in the excitatory value of the stimuli signaling the two reinforcers. PMID:12822690

  1. 42 CFR 88.4 - Eligibility criteria-status as a WTC responder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Eligibility criteria-status as a WTC responder. 88.4 Section 88.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES WORLD TRADE CENTER HEALTH PROGRAM § 88.4 Eligibility criteria—status as a WTC responder....

  2. Think or Click? Student Preference for Overt vs. Covert Responding in Web-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggas, Amy M.; Hantula, Donald A.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates undergraduate student preference for overt vs. covert responding in a Web-based tutorial using a within-subject design. Explains covert question format, which requires passive thinking, and overt format, which requires active responding; and discusses results which show a preference for the overt format. (Author/LRW)

  3. To respond or not to respond, the recurring question in plant mechanosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc-Fournier, Nathalie; Martin, Ludovic; Lenne, Catherine; Decourteix, Mélanie

    2014-01-01

    In nature, terrestrial plants experience many kinds of external mechanical stimulation and respond by triggering a network of signaling events to acclimate their growth and development. Some environmental cues, especially wind, recur on time scales varying from seconds to days. Plants thus have to adapt their sensitivity to such stimulations to avoid constitutive activation of stress responses. The study of plant mechanosensing has been attracting more interest in the last two decades, but plant responses to repetitive mechanical stimulation have yet to be described in detail. In this mini review, alongside classic experiments we survey recent descriptions of the kinetics of plant responses to recurrent stimulation. The ability of plants to modulate their responses to recurrent stimulation at the molecular, cellular, or organ scale is also relevant to other abiotic stimuli. It is possible that plants reduce their responsiveness to environmental signals as a function of their recurrence, recovering full sensitivity several days later. Finally, putative mechanisms underlying mechanosensing regulation are discussed. PMID:25177327

  4. Operant and nonoperant vocal responding in the mynah: Complex schedule control and deprivation-induced responding

    PubMed Central

    Hake, D. F.; Mabry, J.

    1979-01-01

    Several recent studies have been concerned with operant responses that are also affected by nonoperant factors, (e.g., biological constraints, innate behavior patterns, respondent processes). The major reason for studying mynah vocal responding concerned the special relation of avian vocalizations to nonoperant emotional and reflexive systems. The research strategy was to evaluate operant and nonoperant control by comparing the schedule control obtained with the vocal response to that characteristic of the motor responses of other animals. We selected single, multiple, and chain schedules that ordinarily produce disparate response rates at predictable times. In multiple schedules with one component where vocal responding (“Awk”) was reinforced with food (fixed-ratio or fixed-interval schedule) and one where the absence of vocal responding was reinforced (differential reinforcement of other behavior), response rates never exceeded 15 responses per minute, but clear schedule differences developed in response rate and pause time. Nonoperant vocal responding was evident when responding endured across 50 extinction sessions at 25% to 40% of the rate during reinforcement. The “enduring extinction responding” was largely deprivation induced, because the operant-level of naive mynahs under food deprivation was comparable in magnitude, but without deprivation the operant level was much lower. Food deprivation can induce vocal responding, but the relatively precise schedule control indicated that operant contingencies predominate when they are introduced. PMID:16812153

  5. Responder individuality in red blood cell alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Körmöczi, Günther F; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2014-11-01

    Many different factors influence the propensity of transfusion recipients and pregnant women to form red blood cell alloantibodies (RBCA). RBCA may cause hemolytic transfusion reactions, hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn and may be a complication in transplantation medicine. Antigenic differences between responder and foreign erythrocytes may lead to such an immune answer, in part with suspected specific HLA class II associations. Biochemical and conformational characteristics of red blood cell (RBC) antigens, their dose (number of transfusions and pregnancies, absolute number of antigens per RBC) and the mode of exposure impact on RBCA rates. In addition, individual circumstances determine the risk to form RBCA. Responder individuality in terms of age, sex, severity of underlying disease, disease- or therapy-induced immunosuppression and inflammation are discussed with respect to influencing RBC alloimmunization. For particular high-risk patients, extended phenotype matching of transfusion and recipient efficiently decreases RBCA induction and associated clinical risks. PMID:25670932

  6. Protecting Respondent Confidentiality in Qualitative Research

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Karen

    2009-01-01

    For qualitative researchers, maintaining respondent confidentiality while presenting rich, detailed accounts of social life presents unique challenges. These challenges are not adequately addressed in the literature on research ethics and research methods. Using an example from a study of breast cancer survivors, I argue that by carefully considering the audience for one’s research and by re-envisioning the informed consent process, qualitative researchers can avoid confidentiality dilemmas that might otherwise lead them not to report rich, detailed data. PMID:19843971

  7. Preventing and responding to medical identity theft.

    PubMed

    Amori, Geraldine

    2008-01-01

    Medical identity theft is a crime with two victims: patients and providers. It is easy to commit and lucrative because healthcare record keeping and business interactions are complex and mainly electronic. Patients whose identity has been stolen are vulnerable to both medical error and financial loss. Providers may suffer both reputation loss and financial loss. There are steps to help prevent and to respond appropriately to medical identity theft. PMID:20200908

  8. Agriculture Emergencies: A Primer for First Responders

    PubMed Central

    Carabin, Hélène; Regens, James L.; Burden, Ray W.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several years, the primary focus of emergency preparedness has been on terrorism, and how a CBRNE event would directly affect human health. Limited emphasis has been placed on the direct (eg, zoonotic infections) and indirect (eg, mental health, financial loss) effects that an agricultural emergency event can have on human health outcomes, and how they relate to emergency preparedness. We critically reviewed the resources and information readily accessible to our target audience, emergency responders; the resources included military and civilian books, personal communications, internet sites, GAO reports, and peer-reviewed journals. Among more than 2,000 bioterrorism-related articles, we found 51 that addressed either agroterrorism and/or veterinary public health: 2 cross-sectional studies, 28 review papers, and 21 commentary papers. In order to properly respond to future agriculture emergencies, emergency response professionals need to understand the nature and implications of the event as well as their roles and responsibilities, but the availability of educational and training opportunities is limited. The results of our review are consistent with the hypothesis that more resources, education, and training opportunities should be available to responders as well as to producers, importers and shippers, international travelers, and the general public. Increased education and training will raise awareness among these groups of the relationship between animal and human health. PMID:19635003

  9. Agriculture emergencies: a primer for first responders.

    PubMed

    Gilpen, Johnnie L; Carabin, Hélène; Regens, James L; Burden, Ray W

    2009-06-01

    Over the past several years, the primary focus of emergency preparedness has been on terrorism, and how a CBRNE event would directly affect human health. Limited emphasis has been placed on the direct (eg, zoonotic infections) and indirect (eg, mental health, financial loss) effects that an agricultural emergency event can have on human health outcomes, and how they relate to emergency preparedness. We critically reviewed the resources and information readily accessible to our target audience, emergency responders; the resources included military and civilian books, personal communications, internet sites, GAO reports, and peer-reviewed journals. Among more than 2,000 bioterrorism-related articles, we found 51 that addressed either agroterrorism and/or veterinary public health: 2 cross-sectional studies, 28 review papers, and 21 commentary papers. In order to properly respond to future agriculture emergencies, emergency response professionals need to understand the nature and implications of the event as well as their roles and responsibilities, but the availability of educational and training opportunities is limited. The results of our review are consistent with the hypothesis that more resources, education, and training opportunities should be available to responders as well as to producers, importers and shippers, international travelers, and the general public. Increased education and training will raise awareness among these groups of the relationship between animal and human health. PMID:19635003

  10. Higher body weight patients on clopidogrel maintenance therapy have lower active metabolite concentrations, lower levels of platelet inhibition, and higher rates of poor responders than low body weight patients.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Henrik; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Ten Berg, Jurrien M; Bergmeijer, Thomas O; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Small, David S; Moser, Brian A; Zhou, Chunmei; Brown, Patricia; James, Stefan; Winters, Kenneth J; Erlinge, David

    2014-01-01

    Body weight is a predictor of clopidogrel response. However, no prospective studies have compared pharmacodynamic (PD) and pharmacokinetic (PK) data based on body weight. We compared PD and PK effects of clopidogrel 75 mg in low body weight (LBW, <60 kg) and higher body weight (HBW, ≥60 kg) patients with stable coronary artery disease. LBW (n = 34, 56.4 ± 3.7 kg) and HBW (n = 38, 84.7 ± 14.9 kg) aspirin-treated patients received clopidogrel 75 mg for 10-14 days. The area under the concentration-time curve of active metabolite (Clop-AM) calculated through the last quantifiable concentration up to 4 h postdose, AUC(0-tlast), was calculated by noncompartmental methods. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA) (maximum platelet aggregation and inhibition of platelet aggregation to 20 μM adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and residual platelet aggregation to 5 μM ADP), VerifyNow(®) P2Y12 reaction units (PRU), and vasodilator-associated stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation platelet reactivity index (VASP-PRI) were performed. Mean AUC(0-tlast) was lower in HBW than LBW patients: 12.8 versus 17.9 ng h/mL. HBW patients had higher platelet reactivity as measured by LTA (all p ≤ 0.01), PRU (207 ± 68 vs. 152 ± 57, p < 0.001), and VASP-PRI (56 ± 18 vs. 39 ± 17, p < 0.001). More HBW patients exhibited high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HPR) using PRU (35 vs. 9%) and VASP-PRI (65 vs. 27%). Body weight correlated with PRU and VASP-PRI (both p < 0.001), and inversely with log transformed AUC(0-tlast) (p < 0.001). In conclusion, HBW patients had lower levels of Clop-AM, and higher platelet reactivity and rates of HPR than LBW subjects, contributing to their suboptimal response to clopidogrel. PMID:24043374

  11. Rats' Memory for Time and Relational Responding in the Duration-Comparison Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santi, Angelo; Hoover, Claire; Simmons, Sabrina

    2011-01-01

    Rats were trained in a duration-comparison task to press one lever if the comparison duration ("c") was 1.2-s shorter than a standard duration ("s"), and another lever if c was 1.2-s longer than s. The interval between s and c duration was 1 s. The 10 duration pairs used during training controlled for the absolute duration of "c" and the total…

  12. Altered operant responding for motor reinforcement and the determination of benchmark doses following perinatal exposure to low-level 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.

    PubMed Central

    Markowski, V P; Zareba, G; Stern, S; Cox, C; Weiss, B

    2001-01-01

    Pregnant Holtzman rats were exposed to a single oral dose of 0, 20, 60, or 180 ng/kg 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on the 18th day of gestation. Their adult female offspring were trained to respond on a lever for brief opportunities to run in specially designed running wheels. Once they had begun responding on a fixed-ratio 1 (FR1) schedule of reinforcement, the fixed-ratio requirement for lever pressing was increased at five-session intervals to values of FR2, FR5, FR10, FR20, and FR30. We examined vaginal cytology after each behavior session to track estrous cyclicity. Under each of the FR values, perinatal TCDD exposure produced a significant dose-related reduction in the number of earned opportunities to run, the lever response rate, and the total number of revolutions in the wheel. Estrous cyclicity was not affected. Because of the consistent dose-response relationship at all FR values, we used the behavioral data to calculate benchmark doses based on displacements from modeled zero-dose performance of 1% (ED(01)) and 10% (ED(10)), as determined by a quadratic fit to the dose-response function. The mean ED(10) benchmark dose for earned run opportunities was 10.13 ng/kg with a 95% lower bound of 5.77 ng/kg. The corresponding ED(01) was 0.98 ng/kg with a 95% lower bound of 0.83 ng/kg. The mean ED(10) for total wheel revolutions was calculated as 7.32 ng/kg with a 95% lower bound of 5.41 ng/kg. The corresponding ED(01) was 0.71 ng/kg with a 95% lower bound of 0.60. These values should be viewed from the perspective of current human body burdens, whose average value, based on TCDD toxic equivalents, has been calculated as 13 ng/kg. PMID:11445517

  13. Diagnostics for Respondent-driven Sampling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a widely used method for sampling from hard-to-reach human populations, especially populations at higher risk for HIV. Data are collected through peer-referral over social networks. RDS has proven practical for data collection in many difficult settings and is widely used. Inference from RDS data requires many strong assumptions because the sampling design is partially beyond the control of the researcher and partially unobserved. We introduce diagnostic tools for most of these assumptions and apply them in 12 high risk populations. These diagnostics empower researchers to better understand their data and encourage future statistical research on RDS. PMID:27226702

  14. Liquid-Flow Controller Responds To Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, George B., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Mechanism controls flow of liquid in fuel-spraying head in combustion chamber responds nonlinearly to pressure of liquid. Shell of spraybar expands or contracts laterally as its internal pressure rises or falls, forcing collar down or up on entry tube. Area of window formed by slots in collar and entry tube thus increases or decreases. Drop in pressure through variable-area orifice increases much more with flow through orifice than does corresponding drop in pressure with flow through fixed-area orifice. In practical terms, lower pump pressure needed with variable orifice for given flow of liquid. Principle of operation applicable to spraying heads for other fluids.

  15. 15 CFR 904.107 - Joint and several respondents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint and several respondents. 904.107... PROCEDURES Civil Penalties § 904.107 Joint and several respondents. (a) A NOVA may assess a civil penalty against two or more respondents jointly and severally. Each joint and several respondent is liable for...

  16. 15 CFR 904.107 - Joint and several respondents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint and several respondents. 904.107... PROCEDURES Civil Penalties § 904.107 Joint and several respondents. (a) A NOVA may assess a civil penalty against two or more respondents jointly and severally. Each joint and several respondent is liable for...

  17. What information strategy responding to social needs should be?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kunihiko

    With the contemporary social phenomena that people think much of diversity of value, they are concerned with differentiation from others. Consumers' tendency to seek unique goods is common to all, giving impetus to makers' attitude that they try to produce varieties of goods but small amount for each. Consequently, life cycle of goods has become smaller than ever, and rapid and creative information gathering and utilization have become essential when makers produce goods responding to consumers' need. The author discusses how information strategy should be worked in the comprehensive business activities, and how information should be located as the powerful management resource.

  18. Effect of yohimbine on reinstatement of operant responding in rats is dependent on cue contingency but not food reward history

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Wei; Fiscella, Kimberly A.; Bacharach, Samuel Z.; Tanda, Gianluigi; Shaham, Yavin; Calu, Donna J.

    2014-01-01

    Yohimbine is an alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist that has been used in numerous studies as a pharmacological stressor in rodents, monkeys, and humans. Recently, yohimbine has become the most common stress manipulation in studies on reinstatement of drug and food seeking. However, the wide range of conditions under which yohimbine promotes reward seeking is significantly greater than that of stressors like intermittent footshock. Here we addressed two fundamental questions regarding yohimbine’s effect on reinstatement of reward seeking: (1) whether the drug’s effect on operant responding is dependent on previous reward history or cue contingency, and (2) whether yohimbine is aversive or rewarding under conditions typically used in reinstatement studies. We also used in vivo microdialysis to determine yohimbine’s effect on dopamine levels in nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We found that the magnitude of yohimbine-induced (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mg/kg) operant responding during the reinstatement tests was critically dependent on the contingency between lever-pressing and discrete tone-light cue delivery but not the previous history with food reward during training. We also found that yohimbine (2 mg/kg) did not cause conditioned place aversion. Finally, we found that yohimbine modestly increased dopamine levels in mPFC but not NAc. Results suggest that yohimbine’s effects on operant responding in reinstatement studies are likely independent of the history of contingent self-administration of food or drug rewards and may not be related to the commonly assumed stress-like effects of yohimbine. PMID:25065697

  19. Effect of yohimbine on reinstatement of operant responding in rats is dependent on cue contingency but not food reward history.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Wei; Fiscella, Kimberly A; Bacharach, Samuel Z; Tanda, Gianluigi; Shaham, Yavin; Calu, Donna J

    2015-07-01

    Yohimbine is an alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist that has been used in numerous studies as a pharmacological stressor in rodents, monkeys and humans. Recently, yohimbine has become the most common stress manipulation in studies on reinstatement of drug and food seeking. However, the wide range of conditions under which yohimbine promotes reward seeking is significantly greater than that of stressors like intermittent footshock. Here, we addressed two fundamental questions regarding yohimbine's effect on reinstatement of reward seeking: (1) whether the drug's effect on operant responding is dependent on previous reward history or cue contingency, and (2) whether yohimbine is aversive or rewarding under conditions typically used in reinstatement studies. We also used in vivo microdialysis to determine yohimbine's effect on dopamine levels in nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We found that the magnitude of yohimbine-induced (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mg/kg) operant responding during the reinstatement tests was critically dependent on the contingency between lever pressing and discrete tone-light cue delivery but not the previous history with food reward during training. We also found that yohimbine (2 mg/kg) did not cause conditioned place aversion. Finally, we found that yohimbine modestly increased dopamine levels in mPFC but not NAc. Results suggest that yohimbine's effects on operant responding in reinstatement studies are likely independent of the history of contingent self-administration of food or drug rewards and may not be related to the commonly assumed stress-like effects of yohimbine. PMID:25065697

  20. The effects of anorexic drugs on free-fed rats responding under a second-order FI15-min (FR10:S) schedule for high incentive foods.

    PubMed

    Evenden, John; Ko, Tracey

    2007-02-01

    Many similarities exist between the overconsumption of food, which results in obesity, and drug addiction. The present study investigated the effects of anorectic drugs on responding maintained by high incentive, but nutritionally unnecessary, food reinforcers using an FI15(fixed-ratio 10:S) schedule of reinforcement, similar to that used in studies on the incentive properties of drugs of abuse. Rats were trained to respond on a lever to gain access to two high incentive foods--chocolate chip cookies and cheese. Under the FI15(FR10:S) schedule, every 10th response (fixed-ratio 10) delivered a tone and light conditioned stimulus. The first ratio completed 15 min after the start of the session produced the conditioned stimulus and opened a door to give access to a piece of cookie. After 5 min to consume the high incentive food, a second 15-min interval was started, terminating in access to a second reinforcer, cheese. Once trained, the rats were given free access to laboratory chow in the home cage. They continued to work for the high incentive foods for a period of over 1 year, showing a pattern of responding appropriate to an FI(fixed-ratio) schedule. Naloxone (1.0 mg/kg), fenfluramine (1 and 2 mg/kg), D-amphetamine (0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg), and rimonabant (3 mg/kg) significantly reduced responding, especially in the second interval. In contrast, complete removal of the high incentive food from the test procedure did not immediately reduce the rate of responding, tending to increase it in the second of the intervals. Apparently, the drugs did not reduce responding by reducing the experienced magnitude of the high incentive food, but more probably by reducing the animals' motivation. PMID:17218798

  1. Smart physiological monitoring of first responders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Anurag; Kaiser, William; Tamminedi, Tejaswi; Yadegar, Jacob

    2009-05-01

    Today's state-of-the-art medical vests and shirts for health status monitoring are inflexible and expensive. The high cost and the lack of flexibility and integral-unity of the current vests are prohibiting factors for their use in first responder applications. The vests also lack an in-built intelligence to accurately determine the health status of the person wearing the vest. We present a hardware plus software solution for monitoring the health status of first responders in pressurized and adversarial missions. The technology consists of two main components. The first component is a physiological vest consisting of a suite of physiological sensors interfaced with energy management units designed to prolong the life of the sensors. The sensors communicate wirelessly with a personal server consisting of a Decision Support Software (DSS), which forms the second major component of our technology. The DSS (1) integrates the physiologic sensors readings for global assessment of the individual's health status; (2) recommends medical Alerts and Actions based on the fusion of the sensor readings; and (3) applies cognitive computation to personalize the medical vest to the specific physiologic and motion characteristics of the individual wearing the vest, in the theater of the operation or during exercise.

  2. Biodetection Technologies for First Responders: 2014 Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Colburn, Heather A.; Straub, Tim M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2014-03-28

    This report summarizes commercially-available, hand-portable technologies that can be used by first responders in the field. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, this report is meant to provide useful information about available technologies to help end-users make informed decisions about biodetection technology procurement and use. Information listed in this report is primarily vendor-provided; however, where possible it has been supplemented with additional information obtained from publications, reports, and websites. Manufacturers were given the chance to review summaries of their technologies from August through November 2013 to verify the accuracy of technical specifications, available references, and pricing.

  3. Hailey-hailey disease responding to thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Nanda, K Bala; Saldanha, Celia Soni; Jacintha, Martis; Kamath, Ganesh

    2014-03-01

    Familial benign chronic pemphigus or Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of recurrent blisters and erosions in the intertriginous areas. Various topical and systemic treatment options include corticosteroids, topical 5-fluorouracil, topical vitamin D analogs, topical zinc oxide, dapsone, psoralen plus ultraviolet A, systemic retinoids, cyclosporine, methotrexate, and photodynamic therapy. In recalcitrant cases, further options including, invasive methods such as grenz ray therapy, carbon dioxide laser abrasion, and erbium: YAG laser ablation, dermabrasion, electron beam therapy, botulinum toxin, and full-thickness excision of affected skin with repair by split-thickness grafting have been reported as useful in treatment of HHD. We describe a case of HHD who was treated with several treatment modalities including antibiotics, corticosteroids, and dapsone earlier and when presented to us had a severe recalcitrant disease. Thalidomide, as a modality of treatment has been successfully used in few cases earlier. Our patient responded well to thalidomide. PMID:24700941

  4. Hailey-Hailey Disease Responding to Thalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, K Bala; Saldanha, Celia Soni; Jacintha, Martis; Kamath, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Familial benign chronic pemphigus or Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the development of recurrent blisters and erosions in the intertriginous areas. Various topical and systemic treatment options include corticosteroids, topical 5-fluorouracil, topical vitamin D analogs, topical zinc oxide, dapsone, psoralen plus ultraviolet A, systemic retinoids, cyclosporine, methotrexate, and photodynamic therapy. In recalcitrant cases, further options including, invasive methods such as grenz ray therapy, carbon dioxide laser abrasion, and erbium: YAG laser ablation, dermabrasion, electron beam therapy, botulinum toxin, and full-thickness excision of affected skin with repair by split-thickness grafting have been reported as useful in treatment of HHD. We describe a case of HHD who was treated with several treatment modalities including antibiotics, corticosteroids, and dapsone earlier and when presented to us had a severe recalcitrant disease. Thalidomide, as a modality of treatment has been successfully used in few cases earlier. Our patient responded well to thalidomide. PMID:24700941

  5. Space-Dynamically Responding Ultrasonic Matrix System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guigne, Jacques; Yi, Hu Chun

    2008-01-01

    Space-Dynamically Responding Ultrasonic Matrix System (SpaceDRUMS) comprises a suite of hardware that enables containerless processing (samples of experimental materials can be processed without ever touching a container wall). Using a collection of 20 acoustic beam emitters, SpaceDRUMS can completely suspend a baseball-sized solid or liquid sample during combustion or heat-based synthesis. Because the samples never contact the container walls, materials can be produced in microgravity with an unparalleled quality of shape and composition. The ultimate goal of the SpaceDRUMS hardware is to assist with the development of advanced materials of a commercial quantity and quality, using the space-based experiments to guide development of manufacturing processes on Earth. T

  6. Responding to chemical attack. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bagley, R.W.

    1991-02-11

    In view of Iraq's stated intention of using chemical weapons in the Persian Gulf War, the Coalition forces must be prepared to respond. Iraq is capable of conducting such an attack. While the use of chemical weapons may not be militarily significant, the political effect of the use and the response to it may be very significant. Responses including the use of chemical and nuclear weapons are assessed in terms of their legality, political cost, and military effectiveness and found unacceptable. Reliance on diplomatic protests and on post-war criminal sanctions are judged ineffective. A response in the form of increased conventional attack on the Iraqi chemical infrastructure is recommended because that response will preserve the present Coalition, effectively counter the chemical attack, contribute to regional stability, and enhance the reputation of the United States for lawfulness and dependability.

  7. Hazard perception in emergency medical service responders.

    PubMed

    Johnston, K A; Scialfa, C T

    2016-10-01

    The perception of on-road hazards is critically important to emergency medical services (EMS) professionals, the patients they transport and the general public. This study compared hazard perception in EMS and civilian drivers of similar age and personal driving experience. Twenty-nine EMS professionals and 24 non-professional drivers were given a dynamic hazard perception test (HPT). The EMS group demonstrated an advantage in HPT that was independent of simple reaction time, another indication of the validity of the test. These results are also consistent with the view that professional driving experience results in changes in the ability to identify and respond to on-road hazards. Directions for future research include the development of a profession-specific hazard perception tool for both assessment and training purposes. PMID:27415813

  8. How to define responders in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Cyrus; Adachi, Jonathan D.; Bardin, Thomas; Berenbaum, Francis; Flamion, Bruno; Jonsson, Helgi; Kanis, John A.; Pelousse, Franz; Lems, Willem F.; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Reiter, Susanne; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Rizzoli, René; Bruyère, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a clinical syndrome of failure of the joint accompanied by varying degrees of joint pain, functional limitation, and reduced quality of life due to deterioration of articular cartilage and involvement of other joint structures. Scope Regulatory agencies require relevant clinical benefit on symptoms and structure modification for registration of a new therapy as a disease-modifying osteoarthritis drug (DMOAD). An international Working Group of the European Society on Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) and International Osteoporosis Foundation was convened to explore the current burden of osteoarthritis, review current regulatory guidelines for the conduct of clinical trials, and examine the concept of responder analyses for improving drug evaluation in osteoarthritis. Findings The ESCEO considers that the major challenges in DMOAD development are the absence of a precise definition of the disease, particularly in the early stages, and the lack of consensus on how to detect structural changes and link them to clinically meaningful endpoints. Responder criteria should help identify progression of disease and be clinically meaningful. The ideal criterion should be sensitive to change over time and should predict disease progression and outcomes such as joint replacement. Conclusion The ESCEO considers that, for knee osteoarthritis, clinical trial data indicate that radiographic joint space narrowing >0.5 mm over 2 or 3 years might be a reliable surrogate measure for total joint replacement. On-going research using techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and biochemical markers may allow the identification of these patients earlier in the disease process. PMID:23557069

  9. Bats Respond to Very Weak Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lan-Xiang; Pan, Yong-Xin; Metzner, Walter; Zhang, Jin-Shuo; Zhang, Bing-Fang

    2015-01-01

    How animals, including mammals, can respond to and utilize the direction and intensity of the Earth’s magnetic field for orientation and navigation is contentious. In this study, we experimentally tested whether the Chinese Noctule, Nyctalus plancyi (Vespertilionidae) can sense magnetic field strengths that were even lower than those of the present-day geomagnetic field. Such field strengths occurred during geomagnetic excursions or polarity reversals and thus may have played an important role in the evolution of a magnetic sense. We found that in a present-day local geomagnetic field, the bats showed a clear preference for positioning themselves at the magnetic north. As the field intensity decreased to only 1/5th of the natural intensity (i.e., 10 μT; the lowest field strength tested here), the bats still responded by positioning themselves at the magnetic north. When the field polarity was artificially reversed, the bats still preferred the new magnetic north, even at the lowest field strength tested (10 μT), despite the fact that the artificial field orientation was opposite to the natural geomagnetic field (P<0.05). Hence, N. plancyi is able to detect the direction of a magnetic field even at 1/5th of the present-day field strength. This high sensitivity to magnetic fields may explain how magnetic orientation could have evolved in bats even as the Earth’s magnetic field strength varied and the polarity reversed tens of times over the past fifty million years. PMID:25922944

  10. CB1 antagonism produces behaviors more consistent with satiety than reduced reward value in food-maintained responding in rats.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Emily E; Jagielo-Miller, Julia E; Vemuri, V Kiran; Makriyannis, Alexandros; McLaughlin, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 antagonists are widely known to reduce motivation for food, but it is not known whether they induce satiety or reduce reward value of food. It may therefore be necessary to compare effects of altered satiety and reward food value in the same appetitive task, and determine whether CB1 antagonism produces a behavior pattern similar to either, both, or neither. A fine-grained analysis of fixed-ratio 10 (FR10) responding for palatable food initially included number and duration of, and between, all lever presses and food tray entries in order to differentiate the pattern of suppression of prefeeding from that caused by reducing the reward value of the pellets with quinine. Discriminant function analysis then determined that these manipulations were best differentiated by effects on tray entries, pellet retrieval latencies, and time of the first response. At 0.5 mg/kg, AM 6527 produced similar effects to reducing reward value, but at 1.0 and 4.0 mg/kg, effects were more similar to those when animals were satiated. We conclude that AM 6527 both reduced reward value and enhanced satiety, but as dose increased, effects on satiety became much more prominent. These findings contribute to knowledge about the behavioral processes affected by CB1 antagonism. PMID:27005309

  11. Jaw Function in Smilodon fatalis: A Reevaluation of the Canine Shear-Bite and a Proposal for a New Forelimb-Powered Class 1 Lever Model

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jeffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    The jaw function of Smilodon fatalis has long been a source of debate. Although modern-day lions subdue large prey through the use of a suffocating throat bite, the dramatically elongated maxillary canines of S. fatalis suggest an alternative bite mechanism. The current literature favors a “canine shear-bite,” in which the depression of the cranium by the ventral neck flexors assists the mandibular adductors in closing the jaws. Although the model makes intuitive sense and appears to be supported by scientific data, the mechanical feasibility of “neck-powered” biting has not been experimentally demonstrated. In the present study, the computer-assisted manipulation of digitized images of a high-quality replica of an S. fatalis neck and skull shows that a rotation of the cranium by the ventral neck flexors will not result in jaw closure. Instead, the cranium and mandible rotate ventrally together (at the atlantooccipital joint), and the jaws remain in an open configuration. The only manner by which rotation of the cranium can simultaneously result in jaw closure is by an anterior rotation at the temporomandibular joint. Based on this finding, the author proposes a new Class 1 lever mechanism for S. fatalis jaw function. In this model, the mandible is immobilized against the neck of the prey and a dorsally directed force from the extension of the forelimbs rotates the cranium anteriorly at the temporomandibular joint. The maxillary canines pierce the prey’s neck and assist in clamping the ventral neck structures. The model is based on a maximum gape angle of approximately 90° and incorporates a secondary virtual point of rotation located slightly anteroventral to the temporomandibular joint. The Class 1 Lever Model is mechanically feasible, consistent with current data on S. fatalis anatomy and ecology, and may provide a basis for similar studies on other fossil taxa. PMID:25272032

  12. 76 FR 9039 - Emergency Responder Field Operations Guide

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Emergency Responder Field Operations Guide AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice of availability; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Federal Emergency Management Agency is requesting public comments on the Emergency Responder Field Operations...

  13. 33 CFR 20.1311 - Admissions by respondent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Supplementary Evidentiary Rules for Suspension and Revocation Hearings § 20.1311 Admissions by respondent. No person may testify regarding admissions made by the respondent during an investigation under 46 CFR...

  14. Improving Situational Awareness for First Responders via Mobile Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Bradley J.; Mah, Robert W.; Papasin, Richard; Del Mundo, Rommel; McIntosh, Dawn M.; Jorgensen, Charles

    2005-01-01

    This project looks to improve first responder situational awareness using tools and techniques of mobile computing. The prototype system combines wireless communication, real-time location determination, digital imaging, and three-dimensional graphics. Responder locations are tracked in an outdoor environment via GPS and uploaded to a central server via GPRS or an 802.11 network. Responders can also wirelessly share digital images and text reports, both with other responders and with the incident commander. A pre-built three dimensional graphics model of a particular emergency scene is used to visualize responder and report locations. Responders have a choice of information end points, ranging from programmable cellular phones to tablet computers. The system also employs location-aware computing to make responders aware of particular hazards as they approach them. The prototype was developed in conjunction with the NASA Ames Disaster Assistance and Rescue Team and has undergone field testing during responder exercise at NASA Ames.

  15. Improving Situational Awareness for First Responders via Mobile Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Bradley J.; Mah, Robert W.; Papasin, Richard; Del Mundo, Rommel; McIntosh, Dawn M.; Jorgensen, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This project looks to improve first responder incident command, and an appropriately managed flow of situational awareness using mobile computing techniques. The prototype system combines wireless communication, real-time location determination, digital imaging, and three-dimensional graphics. Responder locations are tracked in an outdoor environment via GPS and uploaded to a central server via GPRS or an 802. II network. Responders can also wireless share digital images and text reports, both with other responders and with the incident commander. A pre-built three dimensional graphics model of the emergency scene is used to visualize responder and report locations. Responders have a choice of information end points, ranging from programmable cellular phones to tablet computers. The system also employs location-aware computing to make responders aware of particular hazards as they approach them. The prototype was developed in conjunction with the NASA Ames Disaster Assistance and Rescue Team and has undergone field testing during responder exercises at NASA Ames.

  16. Electrophysiological Correlates of Emotional Responding in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Horan, William P.; Wynn, Jonathan K.; Kring, Ann M.; Simons, Robert F.; Green, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    People with schizophrenia consistently report normal levels of pleasant emotion when exposed to evocative stimuli, suggesting intact consummatory pleasure. However, little is known about the neural correlates and time course of emotion in schizophrenia. This study used a well-validated affective picture viewing task that elicits a characteristic pattern of Event Related Potentials (ERP) from early to later processing stages (i.e., P1, P2, P3, and Late Positive Potentials (LPP)). Thirty eight stabilized schizophrenia outpatients and 36 healthy controls viewed standardized pleasant, unpleasant, and neural pictures while ERPs were recorded, and subsequently rated their emotional responses to the stimuli. Patients and controls responded to the pictures similarly in terms of their valence ratings, as well as the initial ERP components (P1, P2, and P3). However, at the later LPP component (500 – 1000 ms), patients displayed diminished electrophysiological discrimination between pleasant versus neutral stimuli. This pattern suggests that patients demonstrate normal self-reported emotional experience and intact initial sensory processing of and resource allocation to emotional stimuli. However, they show a disruption in a later component associated with sustained attentional processing of emotional stimuli. PMID:20141239

  17. Software Assists in Responding to Anomalous Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark; Kronbert, F.; Weiner, A.; Morgan, T.; Stroozas, B.; Girouard, F.; Hopkins, A.; Wong, L.; Kneubuhl, J.; Malina, R.

    2004-01-01

    Fault Induced Document Retrieval Officer (FIDO) is a computer program that reduces the need for a large and costly team of engineers and/or technicians to monitor the state of a spacecraft and associated ground systems and respond to anomalies. FIDO includes artificial-intelligence components that imitate the reasoning of human experts with reference to a knowledge base of rules that represent failure modes and to a database of engineering documentation. These components act together to give an unskilled operator instantaneous expert assistance and access to information that can enable resolution of most anomalies, without the need for highly paid experts. FIDO provides a system state summary (a configurable engineering summary) and documentation for diagnosis of a potentially failing component that might have caused a given error message or anomaly. FIDO also enables high-level browsing of documentation by use of an interface indexed to the particular error message. The collection of available documents includes information on operations and associated procedures, engineering problem reports, documentation of components, and engineering drawings. FIDO also affords a capability for combining information on the state of ground systems with detailed, hierarchically-organized, hypertext- enabled documentation.

  18. Mi Segundo Libro de Maquinas Simples: Las Palancas. Escuela Intermedia Grados 7, 8 y 9 (My Second Book of Simple Machines: Levers. Intermediate School Grades 7, 8, and 9).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Patricio R.; Montalvo, Luis

    This is the second book in a five-book physical science series on simple machines. The books are designed for Spanish-speaking junior high school students. By suggesting experiments and posing questions concerning drawings in the book which illustrate the scientific principles, this book explains the workings of three types of levers. Resistance…

  19. Effects of oxytocin on aggressive responding in healthy adult men.

    PubMed

    Alcorn, Joseph L; Green, Charles E; Schmitz, Joy; Lane, Scott D

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the acute effects of oxytocin (OT) on human aggression using a well-established laboratory measure of state (reactive) aggression to test the hypothesis that OT would decrease the frequency of aggressive responding. In a within-subject design, 17 healthy male volunteers received placebo or 24 IU of intranasal OT. Aggression was measured using the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm at 30 min before and 30, 60, and 90 min after dose. Acute OT did not produce a significant main effect on aggressive behavior. OT attenuated the expected rise in diastolic blood pressure from morning to early afternoon observed under placebo, providing a possible indication of biological activity. Examination of individual differences showed that aggressive responding following OT dosing (but not placebo) was positively correlated with psychometric measures of interpersonal manipulation and anger (Pearson's r=0.57), indicating that higher scores on these antisocial personality traits were related to increased aggressive behavior following OT administration. These preliminary results stand in contrast to previous work on the prosocial effects of OT and highlight the need for further understanding of individual differences in aggression following OT administration. Such individual differences may have implications for the therapeutic use of OT in individuals with psychiatric disorders and dysfunctional social behavior. PMID:26241153

  20. A Simple Evacuation Modeling and Simulation Tool for First Responders

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Daniel B; Payne, Patricia W

    2015-01-01

    Although modeling and simulation of mass evacuations during a natural or man-made disaster is an on-going and vigorous area of study, tool adoption by front-line first responders is uneven. Some of the factors that account for this situation include cost and complexity of the software. For several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been actively developing the free Incident Management Preparedness and Coordination Toolkit (IMPACT) to address these issues. One of the components of IMPACT is a multi-agent simulation module for area-based and path-based evacuations. The user interface is designed so that anyone familiar with typical computer drawing tools can quickly author a geospatially-correct evacuation visualization suitable for table-top exercises. Since IMPACT is designed for use in the field where network communications may not be available, quick on-site evacuation alternatives can be evaluated to keep pace with a fluid threat situation. Realism is enhanced by incorporating collision avoidance into the simulation. Statistics are gathered as the simulation unfolds, including most importantly time-to-evacuate, to help first responders choose the best course of action.

  1. Life Threatening Idiopathic Recurrent Angioedema Responding to Cannabis

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Amit; Roy-Shapira, Aviel; Evgeni, Brotfain; Leonid, Koyfman; Borer, Abraham; Klein, Moti

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 27-year-old man with recurrent episodes of angioedema since he was 19, who responded well to treatment with medical grade cannabis. Initially, he responded to steroids and antihistamines, but several attempts to withdraw treatment resulted in recurrence. In the last few months before prescribing cannabis, the frequency and severity of the attacks worsened and included several presyncope events, associated with scrotal and neck swelling. No predisposing factors were identified, and extensive workup was negative. The patient reported that he was periodically using cannabis socially and that during these periods he was free of attacks. Recent data suggest that cannabis derivatives are involved in the control of mast cell activation. Consequently, we decided to try a course of inhaled cannabis as modulators of immune cell functions. The use of inhaled cannabis resulted in a complete response, and he has been free of symptoms for 2 years. An attempt to withhold the inhaled cannabis led to a recurrent attack within a week, and resuming cannabis maintained the remission, suggesting a cause and effect relationship. PMID:26257969

  2. Anxiolytic-like effects of leptin on fixed interval responding.

    PubMed

    Tyree, Susan M; Munn, Robert G K; McNaughton, Neil

    2016-09-01

    Leptin has been shown to affect energy homeostasis, learning and memory, and some models of anxiolytic action. However, leptin has produced inconsistent results in previous non-operant behavioural tests of anxiety. Here, we test the anxiolytic potential of leptin in an operant paradigm that has produced positive results across all classes of anxiolytic so far tested. Rats were tested in the Fixed Interval 60 Seconds (FI60) task following administration of 0/0.5/1.0mg/kg (i.p.) leptin or an active anxiolytic control of 5mg/kg (i.p.) chlordiazepoxide (CDP). By the end of the 14days of testing in the FI60 task, 0.5mg/kg leptin released suppressed responding in a manner similar to CDP, and 1.0mg/kg leptin produced a relative depression in responding, a similar outcome pattern to previously tested 5HT-agonist anxiolytics. This suggests that leptin behaves similarly to established serotonergic anxiolytics such as buspirone and fluoxetine; with the delay in development of effect during testing, and the inverted-U dose-response curve explaining the inconsistent behaviour of leptin in behavioural tests of anxiety, as this type of pattern is common to serotonergic anxiolytics. PMID:27180106

  3. Characterising the immune profile of the kidney biopsy at lupus nephritis flare differentiates early treatment responders from non-responders

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Samir V; Malvar, Ana; Song, Huijuan; Alberton, Valeria; Lococo, Bruno; Vance, Jay; Zhang, Jianying; Yu, Lianbo; Rovin, Brad H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The kidney biopsy is used to diagnose and guide initial therapy in patients with lupus nephritis (LN). Kidney histology does not correlate well with clinical measurements of kidney injury or predict how patients will respond to standard-of-care immunosuppression. We postulated that the gene expression profile of kidney tissue at the time of biopsy may differentiate patients who will from those who will not respond to treatment. Methods The expression of 511 immune-response genes was measured in kidney biopsies from 19 patients with proliferative LN and 4 normal controls. RNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded kidney biopsies done at flare. After induction therapy, 5 patients achieved a complete clinical response (CR), 10 had a partial response (PR) and 4 patients were non-responders (NRs). Transcript expression was compared with normal controls and between renal response groups. Results A principal component analysis showed that intrarenal transcript expression from normal kidney, CR biopsies and NR biopsies segregated from each other. The top genes responsible for CR clustering included several interferon pathway genes (STAT1, IRF1, IRF7, MX1, STAT2, JAK2), while complement genes (C1R, C1QB, C6, C9, C5, MASP2) were mainly responsible for NR clustering. Overall, 35 genes were uniquely expressed in NR compared with CR. Pathway analysis revealed that interferon signalling and complement activation pathways were upregulated in both groups, while BAFF, APRIL, nuclear factor-κB and interleukin-6 signalling were increased in CR but suppressed in NR. Conclusions These data suggest that molecular profiling of the kidney biopsy at LN flare may be useful in predicting treatment response to induction therapy. PMID:26629350

  4. 31 CFR 595.703 - Presentation responding to prepenalty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Presentation responding to prepenalty... Penalties § 595.703 Presentation responding to prepenalty notice. (a) Time within which to respond. The... presentation to the Director of the Office of Foreign Assets Control. (b) Form and contents of...

  5. 31 CFR 560.704 - Presentation responding to prepenalty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Presentation responding to prepenalty... Penalties § 560.704 Presentation responding to prepenalty notice. (a) Time within which to respond. The... presentation to the Director. (b) Form and contents of the written presentation. The written presentation...

  6. 31 CFR 575.703 - Presentation responding to prepenalty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Presentation responding to prepenalty... Penalties § 575.703 Presentation responding to prepenalty notice. (a) Time within which to respond. The... presentation to the Director. (b) Form and contents of written presentation. The written presentation need...

  7. 31 CFR 535.703 - Presentation responding to prepenalty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Presentation responding to prepenalty... Penalties § 535.703 Presentation responding to prepenalty notice. (a) Time within which to respond. The... presentation to the Director. (b) Form and contents of written presentation. The written presentation need...

  8. 19 CFR 162.78 - Presentations responding to prepenalty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Presentations responding to prepenalty notice. 162... Violations § 162.78 Presentations responding to prepenalty notice. (a) Time within which to respond. Unless a... notice to make a written and an oral presentation. The Fines, Penalties, and Forfeitures Officer...

  9. 77 FR 56622 - First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting... First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet). DATES: The meeting will be held on September 25, 2012... the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) as an independent authority within the...

  10. 78 FR 15357 - First Responder Network Authority Board Special Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Special.... ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting of the First Responder Network Authority. SUMMARY: The Board of the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) will hold a Special Meeting via telephone...

  11. 78 FR 57843 - First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... Washington, DC See First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting, Notice of Open Public Meetings, 77 FR... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting... (NTIA) will convene an open public meeting of the Board of the First Responder Network Authority...

  12. 78 FR 38014 - First Responder Network Authority Board Special Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Special.... ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting of the First Responder Network Authority. SUMMARY: The Board of the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) will hold a Special Meeting via telephone...

  13. 78 FR 26323 - First Responder Network Authority Board Special Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Special.... ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting of the First Responder Network Authority. SUMMARY: The Board of the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) will hold a Special Meeting via telephone...

  14. 78 FR 57621 - First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting...: Notice of special meeting of the First Responder Network Authority. SUMMARY: The Board of the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) will hold a Special Board meeting via teleconference on September...

  15. 78 FR 72666 - First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting...: Notice of Open Public Meeting of the First Responder Network Authority. SUMMARY: The Board of the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) will convene open public meetings of the Board Committees on...

  16. 78 FR 54241 - First Responder Network Authority Board Special Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-03

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Special.... ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting of the First Responder Network Authority. SUMMARY: The Board of the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) will hold a Special Meeting via telephone...

  17. 78 FR 63168 - First Responder Network Authority Board Special Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Special.... ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting of the First Responder Network Authority. SUMMARY: The Board of the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) will hold a Special Meeting via telephone...

  18. 39 CFR 962.11 - Respondent access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respondent access to information. 962.11 Section... RELATIVE TO THE PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT § 962.11 Respondent access to information. (a)(1) Except... § 962.6, the Respondent shall be entitled to obtain all exculpatory information in the possession of...

  19. Responding to Students' Learning Preferences in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewthwaite, Brian; Wiebe, Rick

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports on a teacher's and his students' responsiveness to a new tetrahedral-oriented (Mahaffy in J Chem Educ 83(1):49-55, 2006) curriculum requiring more discursive classroom practices in the teaching of chemistry. In this instrumental case study, we identify the intentions of this learner-centered curriculum and a teacher's development in response to this curriculum. We also explore the tensions this teacher experiences as students subsequently respond to his adjusted teaching. We use a Chemistry Teacher Inventory (Lewthwaite and Wiebe in Res Sci Educ 40(11):667-689, 2011; Lewthwaite and Wiebe in Can J Math Sci Technol Educ 12(1):36-61, 2012; Lewthwaite in Chem Educ Res Pract. doi:10.1039/C3RP00122A, 2014) to assist the teacher in monitoring how he teaches and how he would like to improve his teaching. We also use a student form of the instrument, the Chemistry Classroom Inventory and Classroom Observation Protocol (Lewthwaite and Wiebe 2011) to verify the teacher's teaching and perception of student preferences for his teaching especially in terms of the discursive processes the curriculum encourages. By so doing, the teacher is able to use both sets of data as a foundation for critical reflection and work towards resolution of the incongruence in data arising from students' preferred learning orientations and his teaching aspirations. Implications of this study in regards to the authority of students' voice in triggering teachers' pedagogical change and the adjustments in `teachering' and `studenting' required by such curricula are considered.

  20. Smart radio: spectrum access for first responders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvius, Mark D.; Ge, Feng; Young, Alex; MacKenzie, Allen B.; Bostian, Charles W.

    2008-04-01

    This paper details the Wireless at Virginia Tech Center for Wireless Telecommunications' (CWT) design and implementation of its Smart Radio (SR) communication platform. The CWT SR can identify available spectrum within a pre-defined band, rendezvous with an intended receiver, and transmit voice and data using a selected quality of service (QoS). This system builds upon previous cognitive technologies developed by CWT for the public safety community, with the goal of providing a prototype mobile communications package for military and public safety First Responders. A master control (MC) enables spectrum awareness by characterizing the radio environment with a power spectrum sensor and an innovative signal detection and classification module. The MC also enables spectrum and signal memory by storing sensor results in a knowledge database. By utilizing a family radio service (FRS) waveform database, the CWT SR can create a new communication link on any designated FRS channel frequency using FM, BPSK, QPSK, or 8PSK modulations. With FM, it supports analog voice communications with legacy hand-held FRS radios. With digital modulations, it supports IP data services, including a CWT developed CVSD-based VoIP protocol. The CWT SR coordinates spectrum sharing between analog primary users and digital secondary users by applying a simple but effective channel-change protocol. It also demonstrates a novel rendezvous protocol to facilitate the detection and initialization of communications links with neighboring SR nodes through the transmission of frequency-hopped rendezvous beacons. By leveraging the GNU Radio toolkit, writing key modules entirely in Python, and utilizing the USRP hardware front-end, the CWT SR provides a dynamic spectrum test bed for future smart and cognitive radio research.

  1. Yap1: a DNA damage responder in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Lori A; Degtyareva, Natalya; Doetsch, Paul W

    2012-04-01

    Activation of signaling pathways in response to genotoxic stress is crucial for cells to properly repair DNA damage. In response to DNA damage, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species increase. One important function of such a response could be to initiate signal transduction processes. We have employed the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae to delineate DNA damage sensing mechanisms. We report a novel, unanticipated role for the transcription factor Yap1 as a DNA damage responder, providing direct evidence that reactive oxygen species are an important component of the DNA damage signaling process. Our findings reveal an epistatic link between Yap1 and the DNA base excision repair pathway. Corruption of the Yap1-mediated DNA damage response influences cell survival and genomic stability in response to exposure to genotoxic agents. PMID:22433435

  2. The amplitude of the electroolfactogram in catfish correlates with the proportion of responding ORNs.

    PubMed

    Koce, A; Valentincic, T

    2000-01-01

    We recorded simultaneously the electrophysiological responses of the olfactory organ [the electroolfactogram (EOG)] and action potential activity of single olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) to amino acid stimuli in the brown bullhead catfish, Ameiurus nebulosus. To determine whether the amplitude of the EOG depends upon the number of responding ORNs, we tested two highly stimulatory (based on EOG recordings) amino acids [L-norvaline (L-nVal) and L-cysteine (L-Cys)], two amino acids of intermediate potency [L-arginine (L-Arg) and L-isoleucine (L-Ile)], and a poorly stimulatory amino acid [L-proline (L-Pro)]. Forty-nine percent of the spontaneously active, single ORNs tested (n=142) were either suppressed or excited by amino acid stimuli. Of the ORNs tested with specific amino acids, 61% responded to 1 mM L-nVal (n=49), 57% responded to 1 mM L-Cys (n=30), 45% responded to L-Arg (n=31) and 36% responded to L-Ile (n=22) with either suppression or excitation. Only one ORN responded with suppression to 10(-2) M L-Pro (n=10). These data suggest that the amplitude of the EOG in the brown bullhead catfish is correlated with the number of responsive ORNs (Spearman corr. coef. = 0.9; P<0.05). PMID:10653181

  3. Sympathetic neurons can produce and respond to interleukin 6

    PubMed Central

    März, Pia; Cheng, Jr-Gang; Gadient, Reto A.; Patterson, Paul H.; Stoyan, Tanja; Otten, Uwe; Rose-John, Stefan

    1998-01-01

    Neuronal expression of cytokines is an area of active investigation in the contexts of development, disease, and normal neural function. Although cultured rat sympathetic neurons respond very weakly to exogenous interleukin 6 (IL-6), we find that addition of soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) and IL-6 enhances neuronal survival in the absence of nerve growth factor. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against IL-6 block these effects. Addition of IL-6 and sIL-6R also induces a subset of neuropeptide and transmitter synthetic enzyme mRNAs identical to that demonstrated for leukemia inhibitory factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and oncostatin M. Both of these effects are duplicated by addition of a highly active fusion protein of sIL-6R and IL-6, covalently linked by a flexible peptide chain, which is designated H-IL-6. In addition, we show that sympathetic neurons produce IL-6. In situ hybridization indicates a neuronal localization of IL-6 mRNA in superior cervical ganglia, and bioactive IL-6 protein is detected in ganglion culture supernatants. Interestingly, the IL-6 produced by sympathetic neurons does not lead to survival of these cells in culture unless sIL-6R is added. Thus, sympathetic neurons can produce IL-6 and may respond to it in an autocrine/paracrine manner if sIL-6R is present. Moreover, the prior findings of sIL-6R in serum and inflammatory fluids now have added interest in the context of neuro–immune interactions. PMID:9501249

  4. Heat pump technology: Responding to new opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, V.D.; Creswick, F.A. ); Snelson, W.K. . Institute for Mechnical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides an update on advanced heat pump research and development activities in the United States and Canada. Under the general area of vapor compression technology a major need toward which these research programs are directed is the development of viable alternatives to HCFC-22 for heat pump and air-conditioning applications. The HCFC phaseout provides an opportunity to develop advanced refrigeration equipment for the new refrigerants which has higher energy efficiency than current heat pump systems. Programs are underway in both industry and government laboratories and are characterized by close collaboration between major manufacturers and government agencies to plan and execute the research. Under the general area of thermally activated heat pump technology, there are several cooperative early-commercialization activities being conducted on gas-fired heat pumps and chillers by government, HVAC industry, and gas utility organizations.

  5. Day Care Dilemma. Austin: A Community Responds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Dale B.

    1987-01-01

    The community of Austin, Texas has several programs for after school day care for students with disabilities, including: Extend-A-Care, where nondisabled peers participate in play and care activities with disabled children; summer camps for autistic children sponsored by the Parks and Recreation Department; and summer camps operated by the Easter…

  6. Using Indices of Fidelity to Intervention Core Components to Identify Program Active Ingredients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abry, Tashia; Hulleman, Chris S.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the active ingredients of an intervention--intervention-specific components serving as key levers of change--is crucial for unpacking the intervention black box. Measures of intervention fidelity can be used to identify specific active ingredients, yet such applications are rare. We illustrate how fidelity measures can be used to…

  7. The Educational Environment and Students' Responding Times as a Function of Students' Teacher-Perceived Academic Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greener, Jean W.; And Others

    The use of time in school, specifically the portion of time defined as active responding time, has been shown to correlate significantly with achievement. The comprehensive observational methodology of the academic engaged time studies provides the basis for systematically investigating student responding time and elements of the educational…

  8. CIRUN: Climate Information Responding to User Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busalacchi, A. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Earth System will experience real climate change over the next 50 years, exceeding the scope of natural climate variability. A paramount question facing society is how to adapt to this certainty of climate variability and change. In response, OSTP and NOAA are considering how comprehensive climate services would best inform decisions about adaptation. Similarly, NASA is considering the optimal configuration of the next generation of Earth, environmental, and climate observations to be deployed over the coming 10-20 years. Moreover, much of the added-value information for specific climate-related decisions will be provided by private, academic and non-governmental organizations. In this context, over the past several years the University of Maryland has established the CIRUN (Climate Information: Responding to User Needs) initiative to identify the nature of national needs for climate information and services from a decision support perspective. To date, CIRUN has brought together decisionmakers in a number of sectors to help understand their perspectives on climate with the goal of improving the usefulness of climate information, observations and prediction products to specific user communities. CIRUN began with a major workshop in October 2007 that convened 430 participants in agriculture, parks and recreation, terrestrial ecosystems, insurance/investment, energy, national security, state/local/municipal, water, human health, commerce and manufacturing, transportation, and coastal/marine sectors. Plenary speakers such as Norman Augustine, R. James Woolsey, James Mahoney, and former Senator Joseph Tydings, breakout panel sessions, and participants provided input based on the following: - How would you characterize the exposure or vulnerability to climate variability or change impacting your organization? - Does climate variability and/or change currently factor into your organization's objectives or operations? - Are any of your existing plans being affected by

  9. Who cares and who is careless? Insufficient effort responding as a reflection of respondent personality.

    PubMed

    Bowling, Nathan A; Huang, Jason L; Bragg, Caleb B; Khazon, Steve; Liu, Mengqiao; Blackmore, Caitlin E

    2016-08-01

    Insufficient effort responding (IER) to surveys, which occurs when respondents fail to carefully read questionnaire instructions or item content, has recently gained attention as a source of inaccuracy in self-report data (Huang, Curran, Keeney, Poposki, & DeShon, 2012; Johnson, 2005; Maniaci & Rogge, 2014; Meade & Craig, 2012). Whereas previous studies have focused on IER as a methodological nuisance, the current studies examined IER as a substantive variable. Specifically, we hypothesized that IER is a reflection of enduring individual differences. In Study 1, we found that IER displayed rank-order consistency over the course of 13 months; in Studies 2 and 3, we found that IER displayed rank-order consistency across multiple research situations; in Study 4, we found that acquaintance-reported conscientiousness, agreeableness, extraversion, and emotional stability were each negatively related to IER; and in Study 5, we found that IER was related to college grade point average and class absences. Together, these 5 studies suggest that IER is in part a manifestation of enduring individual differences. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26927958

  10. Emotional Risks to Respondents in Survey Research: Some Empirical Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Labott, Susan M.; Johnson, Timothy P.; Fendrich, Michael; Feeny, Norah C.

    2014-01-01

    Some survey research has documented distress in respondents with pre-existing emotional vulnerabilities, suggesting the possibility of harm. In this study, respondents were interviewed about a personally distressing event; mood, stress, and emotional reactions were assessed. Two days later, respondents participated in interventions to either enhance or alleviate the effects of the initial interview. Results indicated that distressing interviews increased stress and negative mood, although no adverse events occurred. Between the interviews, moods returned to baseline. Respondents who again discussed a distressing event reported moods more negative than those who discussed a neutral or a positive event. This study provides evidence that, among nonvulnerable survey respondents, interviews on distressing topics can result in negative moods and stress, but they do not harm respondents. PMID:24169422

  11. A tracking technology for security personnel and first responders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, Phillip; Barzilov, Alexander; Paschal, Jon; Hopper, Lindsay; Music, Abe; Morgan, Timothy; Moore, Ryan; Pinson, Dudley; Schultz, Frederick; Maston, Michael J.; Kowalik, Robert

    2005-05-01

    Northwest Nuclear, LLC (NWN), the Applied Physics Institute (API) at Western Kentucky University, and Crisis Prep Services, LLC (CPS) have developed a tracking technology for first responders and security personnel based upon the AeroScout system (a product of AeroScout, Inc.) and technologies developed independently by NWN, API, and CPS. These systems provide location information using 802.11XXX architecture by measuring the time of arrival of packets from a set of active radio frequency (RF) tags to a set of location receivers. The system can track and graphically display the location on maps, drawings, floor plans or photographs of tagged items on any 802.11-compliant devices (PDAs, laptops, computers, WiFi telephones) situated both outside and inside structures. This location information would be vital for tracking the location of first responders, security, and other emergency personnel during rescue operations; particularly, under adverse conditions (e.g., fires). NWN, API, and CPS have been improving the precision of the location measurement to an uncertainty of 20 cm or 8 inches (under certain conditions) and also developing algorithms to increase the accuracy. NWN and API personnel have developed: 1) special tags which indicate tampering or sudden movement and transmit briefly under these conditions, and 2) permanent and portable systems which can be deployed rapidly. Additional software created by Crisis Prep Services, LLC allows response force personnel to be tracked and located inside a building in real time as well as use the software and tags as a training and rehersal system. The location of each person is depicted on a drawing of the building and is displayed on a laptop computer or any other browser capable device.

  12. Habituation of salivation and motivated responding for food in children.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Leonard H; Saad, Frances G; Handley, Elizabeth A; Roemmich, James N; Hawk, Larry W; McSweeney, Frances K

    2003-12-01

    Repeated presentation of food cues results in habituation in adults, as demonstrated by a decrement in salivary responding that is reversed by presenting a new food cue in adults. Food reinforced behavior in animals shows the same pattern of responding, with a decrease in responding to obtain the food, followed by a recovery of responding when a new food is presented. The present study assessed whether children would show the same pattern of a decrement of food reinforced responding followed by recovery of responding when a new food is presented for both salivation and food reinforcement tasks. Subjects were assigned to one of two groups that differed in the trial that the new food stimulus was presented to ensure recovery was specific to the introduction of the new food stimulus. In the salivation task, subjects were provided repeated olfactory presentations of a cheeseburger with apple pie as the new food stimulus, while in the food reinforcement task subjects worked for the opportunity to consume a cheeseburger, followed by the opportunity to work for consumption of apple pie. Subjects in both groups showed a decrement in salivary and food reinforced responding to repeated food cues followed by immediate recovery of responding on the trial when a new food was presented. Subjects increased their energy intake by over 30% in the food reinforcement task when a new food was presented. These results are consistent with the general process theory of motivation that suggests that changes in food reinforced responding may be due in part to habituation. PMID:14637327

  13. An integrated command control and communications center for first responders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messner, Richard A.; Hludik, Frank; Vidacic, Dragan; Melnyk, Pavlo

    2005-05-01

    First responders to a major incident include many different agencies. These may include law enforcement officers, multiple fire departments, paramedics, HAZMAT response teams, and possibly even federal personnel such as FBI and FEMA. Often times multiple jurisdictions respond to the incident which causes interoperability issues with respect to communication and dissemination of time critical information. Accurate information from all responding sources needs to be rapidly collected and made available to the current on site responders as well as the follow-on responders who may just be arriving on scene. The creation of a common central database with a simple easy to use interface that is dynamically updated in real time would allow prompt and efficient information distribution between different jurisdictions. Such a system is paramount to the success of any response to a major incident. First responders typically arrive in mobile vehicles that are equipped with communications equipment. Although the first responders may make reports back to their specific home based command centers, the details of those reports are not typically available to other first responders who are not a part of that agencies infrastructure. Furthermore, the collection of information often occurs outside of the first responder vehicle and the details of the scene are normally either radioed from the field or written down and then disseminated after significant delay. Since first responders are not usually on the same communications channels, and the fact that there is normally a considerable amount of confusion during the first few hours on scene, it would be beneficial if there were a centralized location for the repository of time critical information which could be accessed by all the first responders in a common fashion without having to redesign or add significantly to each first responders hardware/software systems. Each first responder would then be able to provide information

  14. Assisted extraction of the energy level spacings and lever arms in direct current bias measurements of one-dimensional quantum wires, using an image recognition routine

    SciTech Connect

    Lesage, A. A. J. Smith, L. W. Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Smith, C. G.; Al-Taie, H.; Kelly, M. J.; See, P.

    2015-01-07

    A multiplexer technique is used to individually measure an array of 256 split gates on a single GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. This results in the generation of large volumes of data, which requires the development of automated data analysis routines. An algorithm is developed to find the spacing between discrete energy levels, which form due to transverse confinement from the split gate. The lever arm, which relates split gate voltage to energy, is also found from the measured data. This reduces the time spent on the analysis. Comparison with estimates obtained visually shows that the algorithm returns reliable results for subband spacing of split gates measured at 1.4 K. The routine is also used to assess direct current bias spectroscopy measurements at lower temperatures (50 mK). This technique is versatile and can be extended to other types of measurements. For example, it is used to extract the magnetic field at which Zeeman-split 1D subbands cross one another.

  15. Responding to the Consequences of Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Peter H.

    2011-01-01

    The talk addresses the scientific consensus concerning climate change, and outlines the many paths that are open to mitigate climate change and its effects on human activities. Diverse aspects of the changing water cycle on Earth are used to illustrate the reality climate change. These include melting snowpack, glaciers, and sea ice; changes in runoff; rising sea level; moving ecosystems, an more. Human forcing of climate change is then explained, including: greenhouse gasses, atmospheric aerosols, and changes in land use. Natural forcing effects are briefly discussed, including volcanoes and changes in the solar cycle. Returning to Earth's water cycle, the effects of climate-induced changes in water resources is presented. Examples include wildfires, floods and droughts, changes in the production and availability of food, and human social reactions to these effects. The lk then passes to a discussion of common human reactions to these forecasts of climate change effects, with a summary of recent research on the subject, plus several recent historical examples of large-scale changes in human behavior that affect the climate and ecosystems. Finally, in the face for needed action on climate, the many options for mitigation of climate change and adaptation to its effects are presented, with examples of the ability to take affordable, and profitable action at most all levels, from the local, through national.

  16. Vermont responds to its opioid crisis.

    PubMed

    Simpatico, Thomas A

    2015-11-01

    Vermont is one of the more forward-thinking states in the nation with a history of taking groundbreaking approaches to complex social issues. In his Jan 8, 2014 State of the State Address, Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin announced that Vermont was in the midst of an opioid addiction epidemic. Though Vermont had called attention to its opioid crisis, it soon became clear that many other states shared this problem. Economic modeling of expanded access to maintenance therapy with either methadone or buprenorphine is felt to have "high value" because the added health care costs of treatment are offset by reductions in other health care costs that occur when individuals with opioid dependence begin treatment. Moreover, when broader societal costs such as criminal activity and work productivity are included, maintenance treatment is estimated to produce substantial overall savings. Coordinated efforts between the Vermont Department of Health's Division of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs (ADAP) and the Department of Vermont Health Access (DVHA-Vermont Medicaid Authority) have resulted in the creation of the Care Alliance for Opioid Addiction (or Hub & Spoke model). Vermont intends to develop a reproducible and exportable model based on cost effective, outcomes driven public policy. PMID:25869219

  17. Blue whales respond to anthropogenic noise.

    PubMed

    Melcón, Mariana L; Cummins, Amanda J; Kerosky, Sara M; Roche, Lauren K; Wiggins, Sean M; Hildebrand, John A

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise may significantly impact exposed marine mammals. This work studied the vocalization response of endangered blue whales to anthropogenic noise sources in the mid-frequency range using passive acoustic monitoring in the Southern California Bight. Blue whales were less likely to produce calls when mid-frequency active sonar was present. This reduction was more pronounced when the sonar source was closer to the animal, at higher sound levels. The animals were equally likely to stop calling at any time of day, showing no diel pattern in their sensitivity to sonar. Conversely, the likelihood of whales emitting calls increased when ship sounds were nearby. Whales did not show a differential response to ship noise as a function of the time of the day either. These results demonstrate that anthropogenic noise, even at frequencies well above the blue whales' sound production range, has a strong probability of eliciting changes in vocal behavior. The long-term implications of disruption in call production to blue whale foraging and other behaviors are currently not well understood. PMID:22393434

  18. Drug versus sweet reward: greater attraction to and preference for sweet versus drug cues.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Heather B; Ahmed, Serge H

    2015-05-01

    Despite the unique ability of addictive drugs to directly activate brain reward circuits, recent evidence suggests that drugs induce reinforcing and incentive effects that are comparable to, or even lower than some nondrug rewards. In particular, when rats have a choice between pressing a lever associated with intravenous cocaine or heroin delivery and another lever associated with sweet water delivery, most respond on the latter. This outcome suggests that sweet water is more reinforcing and attractive than either drug. However, this outcome may also be due to the differential ability of sweet versus drug levers to elicit Pavlovian feeding-like conditioned responses that can cause involuntary lever pressing, such as pawing and biting the lever. To test this hypothesis, rats first underwent Pavlovian conditioning to associate one lever with sweet water (0.2% saccharin) and a different lever with intravenous cocaine (0.25 mg) or heroin (0.01 mg). Choice between these two levers was then assessed under two operant choice procedures: one that permitted the expression of Pavlovian-conditioned lever press responses during choice, the other not. During conditioning, Pavlovian-conditioned lever press responses were considerably higher on the sweet lever than on either drug lever, and slightly greater on the heroin lever than on the cocaine lever. Importantly, though these differences in Pavlovian-conditioned behavior predicted subsequent preference for sweet water during choice, they were not required for its expression. Overall, this study confirms that rats prefer the sweet lever because sweet water is more reinforcing and attractive than cocaine or heroin. PMID:24602027

  19. Graduate Medical Education as a Lever for Collaborative Change: One Institution's Experience with a Campuswide Patient Safety Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Vath, Richard J.; Musso, Mandi W.; Rabalais, Lauren S.; Dunbar, Alston; Hosea, Stephen; Johnson, Angela C.; Bolton, Michael; Rhynes, Vernon K.; Caffery, Terrell S.; Tynes, L. Lee; Mantzor, Savarra; Miller, Bahnsen; Calongne, Laurinda L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The 2013 closure of a public hospital in Baton Rouge, LA transformed graduate medical education (GME) at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center (OLOL). Administrators were tasked with incorporating residents into patient safety and quality improvement initiatives to fulfill regulatory obligations. This report outlines our experiences as we built these patient safety and quality improvement initiatives in a rapidly expanding independent academic medical center. Methods: We joined the Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers (AIAMC) to meet and learn from national peers. To fulfill the scholarly activity requirement of the AIAMC's National Initiative IV, we formed a multidisciplinary team to develop a patient safety education project. Prioritized monthly team meetings allowed for project successes to be celebrated and circulated within the organization. Results: The public-private partnership that more than quadrupled the historic size of GME at OLOL has, in the past 2 years, led to the development of an interdisciplinary team. This team has expanded to accommodate residency program leadership from across the campus. Our National Initiative IV project won a national award and inspired several follow-up initiatives. In addition, this work led to the formation of a Patient Safety and Clinical Quality Improvement fellowship that matched its first fellow in 2015. Conclusion: Through the commitment and support of hospital and medical education leaders, as well as a focus on promoting cultural change through scholarly activity, we were able to greatly expand patient safety and quality improvement efforts in our institution. PMID:27046411

  20. 29 CFR 458.56 - Service on respondent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Service on respondent. 458.56 Section 458.56 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STANDARDS OF CONDUCT... Prohibited Discipline § 458.56 Service on respondent. Upon the filing of a complaint, a copy of the...

  1. Music as a Catalyst for Responding to Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smelcer, John

    1999-01-01

    Describes an in-class exercise in which students listen to a piece of music (without lyrics), and then write about their responses. Notes that students learn that responding to literature is as natural as responding to music, and that they all have valid and unique reactions and connections to literature. (SR)

  2. Meta-Analysis and Inadequate Responders to Intervention: A Reply

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis by Tran, Sanchez, Arellano, and Swanson (2011) of the published RTI literature found that the magnitude of effect size (ES) between responders and low responders at posttest was significantly moderated by the pretest ES and the type of dependent measure administered, whereas no significant moderating effects were found in the mixed…

  3. The CODE RED Solution: biothreat response training for first responders.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Cassandra D; Egan, Christina; Cirino, Nick M

    2006-01-01

    The terrorist events of 2001 brought to light the need for a close working relationship between the first responder communities and the public health laboratories in New York State (NYS). Since 2002, the Wadsworth Center's Biodefense Laboratory (BDL) has been providing outreach training to first responders in New York, to enable them to respond safely, correctly, and confidently to biothreat events. A pocket trifold was developed, titled "CODE RED," which describes sampling protocols, risk analysis criteria, and important contact information for use during an emergency response to a potential bioterrorism situation. In addition, the BDL has provided training to more than 1,000 first responders in the basic knowledge of biothreat agents, routes of dissemination, sampling and decontamination methods, contamination control protocols, biothreat risk assessment, and legal chain of custody procedures. The training methods have been established for use by first responders wearing personal protective equipment (PPE). All states can benefit from highly trained first responders who are capable of efficient, safe, and effective biothreat response, resulting in increased safety of the first responders and laboratorians, as well as decreased turnaround times for laboratory results. The CODE RED trifold provides a working model for training first responders at the state and county levels for emergency biothreat response. PMID:17238823

  4. 31 CFR 585.703 - Presentation responding to prepenalty notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Presentation responding to prepenalty... SANCTIONS REGULATIONS Penalties § 585.703 Presentation responding to prepenalty notice. (a) Time within... to make a written presentation to the Director. (b) Form and contents of written presentation....

  5. 78 FR 5422 - First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ..., 2013 in Boulder, Colorado. 78 FR 2660 (Jan. 14, 2013). This Notice is intended to inform the public... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting... public meeting of the Board of the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) to be held on February...

  6. 78 FR 20619 - First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ..., in San Francisco, California, and that NTIA would publish a future notice for this meeting. 77 FR... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting... (NTIA) will convene an open public meeting of the Board of the First Responder Network Authority...

  7. 78 FR 72667 - First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... would publish a future notice for this meeting. 77 FR 67342 (Nov. 9, 2012). This notice provides an... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting...: Notice of Open Public Meeting of the First Responder Network Authority. SUMMARY: The Board of the...

  8. 77 FR 67342 - First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting... (NTIA) will convene open public meetings of the Board of the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet... a single nationwide, interoperable public safety broadband network. The FirstNet Board...

  9. 78 FR 2660 - First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Meeting... First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet). DATES: The meeting will be held on February 12, 2013, from... directs FirstNet to establish a nationwide, interoperable public safety broadband network. The...

  10. 39 CFR 958.11 - Respondent's access to information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respondent's access to information. 958.11 Section... § 958.11 Respondent's access to information. Except as provided in this section, after receiving the... Determining Official under 39 U.S.C. 3018, and all exculpatory information in the possession of...

  11. 49 CFR 630.7 - Failure to respond to questions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Failure to respond to questions. 630.7 Section 630.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.7 Failure to respond to...

  12. 49 CFR 630.7 - Failure to respond to questions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Failure to respond to questions. 630.7 Section 630.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.7 Failure to respond to...

  13. 49 CFR 630.7 - Failure to respond to questions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Failure to respond to questions. 630.7 Section 630.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.7 Failure to respond to...

  14. 49 CFR 630.7 - Failure to respond to questions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Failure to respond to questions. 630.7 Section 630.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.7 Failure to respond to...

  15. 49 CFR 630.7 - Failure to respond to questions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Failure to respond to questions. 630.7 Section 630.7 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION NATIONAL TRANSIT DATABASE § 630.7 Failure to respond to...

  16. Understanding and Responding to Adolescent Girls' Online Cruelty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokal, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Many school counsellors have identified "cyber-bullying" among adolescent girls as a growing concern. In order to respond to this issue, this article begins with a new model of cyber-communications from the unique perspective of adolescent girls. Next, it explores the limitations of responding to this model, based on current understandings of…

  17. Transforming Higher Education in the Information Age: Presidents Respond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslin, Richard D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    College presidents respond to an article by Richard Nolan challenging college and university presidents and chancellors to transform their campuses for survival and competitive advantage in the information age. Respondents include Richard D. Breslin, David M. Clarke, Joseph Cronin, Thomas Ehrlich, Donald N. Langenberg, Harold McAninch, and Donald…

  18. Training Law Enforcement Officials on Responding to Equine Calls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kathleen P.; Stauffer, Gary; Stauffer, Monte; Anderson, Doug; Biodrowski, Kristie

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of equine abuse/neglect cases is an ongoing issue. However, officials responding to equine cases are rarely experienced in handling horses. Therefore, workshops teaching basic horse husbandry were offered to better equip and prepare officials to respond to equine cases. Trainings consisted of both classroom and hands-on sessions.…

  19. EIA responds to Nature article on shale gas projections

    EIA Publications

    2014-01-01

    EIA has responded to a December 4, 2014 Nature article on projections of shale gas production made by EIA and by the Bureau of Economic Geology of the University of Texas at Austin (BEG/UT) with a letter to the editors of Nature. BEG/UT has also responded to the article in their own letter to the editor.

  20. Identifying Airborne Pathogens in Time to Respond

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-25

    Among the possible terrorist activities that might threaten national security is the release of an airborne pathogen such as anthrax. Because the potential damage to human health could be severe, experts consider 1 minute to be an operationally useful time limit for identifying the pathogen and taking action. Many commercial systems can identify airborne pathogenic microbes, but they take days or, at best, hours to produce results. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and other U.S. government agencies are interested in finding a faster approach. To answer this national need, a Livermore team, led by scientist Eric Gard, has developed the bioaerosol mass spectrometry (BAMS) system--the only instrument that can detect and identify spores at low concentrations in less than 1 minute. BAMS can successfully distinguish between two related but different spore species. It can also sort out a single spore from thousands of other particles--biological and nonbiological--with no false positives. The BAMS team won a 2005 R&D 100 Award for developing the system. Livermore's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program funded the biomedical aspects of the BAMS project, and the Department of Defense's Technical Support Working Group and Defense Advanced Research Project Agency funded the biodefense efforts. Developing a detection system that can analyze small samples so quickly has been challenging. Livermore engineer Vincent Riot, who worked on the BAMS project, explains, ''A typical spore weighs approximately one-trillionth of a gram and is dispersed in the atmosphere, which contains naturally occurring particles that could be present at concentrations thousands of times higher. Previous systems also had difficulty separating benign organisms from those that are pathogenic but very similar, which has resulted in false alarms''.

  1. Agreement among response to intervention criteria for identifying responder status.

    PubMed

    Barth, Amy E; Stuebing, Karla K; Anthony, Jason L; Denton, Carolyn A; Mathes, Patricia G; Fletcher, Jack M; Francis, David J

    2008-09-01

    In order to better understand the extent to which operationalizations of response to intervention (RTI) overlap and agree in identifying adequate and inadequate responders, an existing database of 399 first grade students was evaluated in relation to cut-points, measures, and methods frequently cited for the identification of inadequate responders to instruction. A series of 543 2x2 measures of association (808 total comparisons) were computed to address the agreement of different operationalizations of RTI. The results indicate that agreement is generally poor and that different methods tend to identify different students as inadequate responders, although agreement for identifying adequate responders is higher. Approaches to the assessment of responder status must use multiple criteria and avoid formulaic decision making. PMID:19081758

  2. Responding changes systematically within sessions during conditioning procedures.

    PubMed Central

    McSweeney, F K; Roll, J M

    1993-01-01

    When the procedure is held constant within an experimental session, responding often changes systematically within that session. Many of these within-session changes in responding cannot be dismissed as learning curves or by-products of satiation. They have been observed in studies of positive reinforcement, avoidance, punishment, extinction, discrimination, delayed matching to sample, concept formation, maze and alley running, and laboratory analogues of foraging, as well as in the unconditioned substrates of conditioned behavior. When aversive stimuli are used, responding usually increases early in the session. When positive reinforcers are used, responding changes in a variety of ways, including increasing, decreasing, and bitonic functions. Both strong and minimal reinforcement procedures produce within-session decreases in positively reinforced behavior. Within-session changes in responding have substantial theoretical and methodological implications for research in conditioning. PMID:8283153

  3. Differential reinforcement and stimulus control of not responding1

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, John A.

    1968-01-01

    Pigeons were trained to respond with equal variable-interval reinforcement in the presence of a white key and also a white key with a vertical line. They were then trained not to respond to the vertical line by extinguishing the response or by reinforcing its non-occurrence at various frequencies. During training, the rate of key-pecking in the presence of the white key, maintained by a constant variable-interval schedule of reinforcement, depended on the frequency of reinforcement in the presence of the line. When lines of different orientations were presented in a generalization test, birds trained with extinction responded more to other orientations than to the vertical line, whereas those trained with high frequencies of reinforcement for not responding tended to respond equally at all line orientations. Intermediate frequencies of reinforcement gave mixed results. PMID:16811319

  4. 43 CFR 9.9 - How does the Secretary receive and respond to comments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to comments? 9.9 Section 9.9 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 9.9 How does the Secretary receive and respond to comments? (a) The Secretary follows the procedures in § 9.10 if: (1) A state office...

  5. Who Defines "Democratic Leadership?": Three High School Principals Respond to Site-Based Reforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouillette, Liane

    1997-01-01

    Focuses on behaviors and activities of three high school principals as they respond to district's decision to implement a shared decision-making model designed to give teachers and parents a larger voice. Describes these administrators' varying responses, along with varied ways democratic leadership was multilaterally defined in each school by…

  6. Increased behavioral output but intact goal-directed and habitual responding for food reward following early-life social deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Lomanowska, Anna M; Kraemer, Gary W

    2014-09-01

    Early-life social adversity, such as child neglect and institutionalized rearing, is associated with later-life difficulties of inhibitory control that may reflect altered attribution of salience to external stimuli. Studies in rats demonstrate that early-life social deprivation results in enhanced responsiveness to reward stimuli and conditioned reward cues. This study examined whether these effects are related to fundamental changes in appetitive conditioning processes involving instrumental goal-directed and habitual responding for food reward. Rats were reared either by the mother (maternal rearing; MR) or in complete isolation from the mother and litter (artificial rearing; AR) and tested as adults in two appetitive conditioning tasks. AR and MR rats did not differ in the amount of goal-directed effort they exerted to obtain food reward on progressive ratio schedules of reinforcement. AR and MR rats also did not differ in the shift from goal-directed to habitual responding on a random interval schedule and they were equally sensitive to changes in reward value. The major difference between AR and MR rats was that AR rats exhibited more non-instrumental responses (empty food magazine entries, ineffective lever presses). Thus, early-life social deprivation of rats through AR affects the expression of unreinforced extraneous behaviors when motivational requirements are high, but does not affect conditioned goal-directed and habitual responding to reward. The findings have implications for understanding what aspects of responsiveness to external stimuli may be selectively affected in disorders of inhibition associated with early-life social adversity. PMID:24906193

  7. Prevent, Counter, and Respond - A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear Threats (FY 2016-FY2020)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    NNSA’s second core mission is reducing global nuclear dangers by preventing the acquisition of nuclear weapons or weapons-usable materials, countering efforts to acquire such weapons or materials, and responding to nuclear or radiological incidents. In 2015, NNSA reorganized its nonproliferation activities based on core competencies and realigned its counterterrorism and counterproliferation functions to more efficiently address both current and emerging threats and challenges. The reorganization accompanied the March 2015 release of the first ever Prevent, Counter, and Respond – A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear Threats. This report, which NNSA will update annually, highlights key nuclear threat trends and describes NNSA’s integrated threat reduction strategy.

  8. Heartbeat and Economic Decisions: Observing Mental Stress among Proposers and Responders in the Ultimatum Bargaining Game

    PubMed Central

    Dulleck, Uwe; Schaffner, Markus; Torgler, Benno

    2014-01-01

    The ultimatum bargaining game (UBG), a widely used method in experimental economics, clearly demonstrates that motives other than pure monetary reward play a role in human economic decision making. In this study, we explore the behaviour and physiological reactions of both responders and proposers in an ultimatum bargaining game using heart rate variability (HRV), a small and nonintrusive technology that allows observation of both sides of an interaction in a normal experimental economics laboratory environment. We find that low offers by a proposer cause signs of mental stress in both the proposer and the responder; that is, both exhibit high ratios of low to high frequency activity in the HRV spectrum. PMID:25247817

  9. Impaired leukocyte influx in cervix of postterm women not responding to prostaglandin priming

    PubMed Central

    Sahlin, Lena; Stjernholm-Vladic, Ylva; Roos, Nathalie; Masironi, Britt; Ekman-Ordeberg, Gunvor

    2008-01-01

    Background Prolonged pregnancies are associated with increased rate of maternal and fetal complications. Post term women could be divided into at least two subgroups, one where parturition is possible to induce by prostaglandins and one where it is not. Our aim was to study parameters in cervical biopsies in women with spontaneous delivery at term (controls) and compare to those that are successfully induced post term (responders), and those that are not induced (non-responders), by local prostaglandin treatment. Methods Stromal parameters examined in this study were the accumulation of leukocytes (CD45, CD68), mRNAs and/or proteins for the extracellular matrix degrading enzymes (matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-8 and MMP-9), their inhibitors (tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2), interleukin-8 (IL-8), the platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R), syndecan-1 and estrogen binding receptors (estrogen receptor (ER)α, ERβ and G-coupled protein receptor (GPR) 30) as well as the proliferation marker Ki-67. Results The influx of leukocytes as assessed by CD45 was strongest in the responders, thereafter in the controls and significantly lower in the non-responders. IL-8, PAF-R and MMP-9, all predominantly expressed in leukocytes, showed significantly reduced immunostaining in the group of non-responders, while ERα and GPR30 were more abundant in the non-responders, as compared to the controls. Conclusion The impaired leukocyte influx, as reflected by the reduced number of CD45 positive cells as well as decreased immunostaining of IL-8, PAF-R and MMP-9 in the non-responders, could be one explanation of the failed ripening of the cervix in post term women. If the decreased leukocyte influx is a primary explanation to absent ripening or secondary, as a result of other factors, is yet to be established. PMID:18764934

  10. Mutuality and the social regulation of neural threat responding

    PubMed Central

    Coan, James A.; Kasle, Shelley; Jackson, Alice; Schaefer, Hillary S.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the presence of a caring relational partner can attenuate neural responses to threat. Here we report reanalyzed data from Coan, Schaefer, and Davidson (2006), investigating the role of relational mutuality in the neural response to threat. Mutuality reflects the degree to which couple members show mutual interest in the sharing of internal feelings, thoughts, aspirations, and joys – a vital form of responsiveness in attachment relationships. We predicted that wives who were high (versus low) in perceived mutuality, and who attended the study session with their husbands, would show reduced neural threat reactivity in response to mild electric shocks. We also explored whether this effect would depend on physical contact (handholding). As predicted, we observed that higher mutuality scores corresponded with decreased neural threat responding in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and supplementary motor cortex. These effects were independent of hand-holding condition. These findings suggest that higher perceived mutuality corresponds with decreased self-regulatory effort and attenuated preparatory motor activity in response to threat cues, even in the absence of direct physical contact with social resources. PMID:23547803

  11. Exploring community resilience in workforce communities of first responders serving Katrina survivors.

    PubMed

    Wyche, Karen Fraser; Pfefferbaum, Rose L; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Norris, Fran H; Wisnieski, Deborah; Younger, Hayden

    2011-01-01

    Community resilience activities were assessed in workplace teams that became first responders for Hurricane Katrina survivors. Community resilience was assessed by a survey, focus groups, and key informant interviews. On the survey, 90 first responders ranked their team's disaster response performance as high on community resilience activities. The same participants, interviewed in 11 focus groups and 3 key informant interviews, discussed how their teams engaged in community resilience activities to strengthen their ability to deliver services. Specifically, their resilient behaviors were characterized by: shared organizational identity, purpose, and values; mutual support and trust; role flexibility; active problem solving; self-reflection; shared leadership; and skill building. The implications for research, policy, practice, and education of professionals are discussed. PMID:21219272

  12. Schedule-induced mirror responding in the pigeon1

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Perrin S.; Looney, Thomas A.

    1973-01-01

    Two pigeons that were previously exposed to a multiple schedule of reinforcement in the presence of a stuffed and a live pigeon, and two of three naive pigeons, responded on a mirror during exposure to multiple fixed-ratio, fixed-ratio schedules of reinforcement for key pecking. Both the topography and temporal pattern of mirror responding were comparable to schedule-induced “attack” on live and stuffed targets. Rate of target responding was reduced when either the mirror was covered with paper or when the multiple schedule was removed. A reversal in the relationship between reinforcement schedules and discriminative stimuli demonstrated that mirror responding was controlled by the stimulus correlated with the higher fixed-ratio schedule. With one component of the multiple schedule held constant at fixed ratio 25 and the ratio requirement of the other component varying from 25 to 150, there was an inverted U-shaped relationship between rate of mirror responding and fixed-ratio schedule in the varied component. As in Flory's study (1969b) there was an inverted U-shaped relationship between target responding and inter-food intervals. The combined results of these studies suggest that the relationship between rate of target responding and reinforcement schedules is controlled primarily by the inter-food intervals resulting from the schedules. PMID:16811671

  13. Olfaction in the Queensland fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni. I: Identification of olfactory receptor neuron types responding to environmental odors.

    PubMed

    Hull, C D; Cribb, B W

    2001-05-01

    The electroantennogram method was used to investigate the number of distinct olfactory receptor neuron types responding to a range of behaviorally active volatile chemicals in gravid Queensland fruit flies, Bactrocera tryoni. Three receptor neuron types were identified. One type responds to methyl butyrate, 2-butanone, farnesene, and carbon dioxide; a second to ethanol; and a third to n-butyric acid and ammonia. The receptor neuron type responding to methyl butyrate, 2-butanone, farnesene, and carbon dioxide consists of three subtypes. The presence of a limited number of receptor neuron types responding to a diverse set of chemicals and the reception of carbon dioxide by a receptor neuron type that responds to other odorants are novel aspects of the peripheral olfactory discrimination process. PMID:11471941

  14. Sport: The Liveliest Art. Diamonds Are a Publisher's Best Friend: The Baseball Mystique and Scholarly Publishing; "Take Me Out to the Ball Game...." The Importance of Archiving Sporting Activities; Telling the Story: Museums and Libraries Partner To Make Sport History Live; "I'm Not Surfing. This is My Job"; Sideline: Webliography of General Sports Sites: The Big Four; Public Libraries Step Up to the Plate: Knowing and Responding to the Needs of Our Rapidly Changing Communities; Sideline: Sports Fiction; Ten Best Sport Titles...in My Public Library, in My Media Center, in My High School Library, in My Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Steve; Wise, Suzanne; Koonts, Russell S.; Sumner, Jim; Meier, James R.; Gonzalez, Lena; Ruszczyk, James R.; Fiedler, Stephanie; Mayo, Kim P.; Holmes, Gerald

    2001-01-01

    Eight articles in this section focus on sports: the baseball mystique and scholarly publishing; importance of archiving sporting activities; museums and libraries partner to make sport history live; online resources for sports information; Webliography of general sports sites; public libraries responding to changing needs; sports fiction; and "ten…

  15. Responder Technology Alert Monthly (Oct-Nov 2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Jaki F.; Stein, Steven L.

    2015-01-21

    As part of technology foraging for the Responder Technology Alliance, established by the Department of Homeland Science and Technologies First Responders Group, this report summarizes technologies that are relevant in the area of “wearables,” with the potential for use by first responders. The content was collected over the previous month(s) and reproduced from a general Internet search using the term wearables. Additional information is available at the websites provided. This report is not meant to be an exhaustive list nor an endorsement of any technology described herein. Rather, it is meant to provide useful information about current developments in the areas wearable technology.

  16. The Proton Pump Inhibitor Non-Responder: A Clinical Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Zilla H; Henderson, Emily E; Maradey-Romerao, Carla; George, Nina; Fass, Ronnie; Lacy, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent chronic condition where in stomach contents reflux into the esophagus causing symptoms, esophageal injury, and subsequent complications. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) remain the mainstay of therapy for acid suppression. Despite their efficacy, significant proportions of GERD patients are either partial or non-responders to PPI therapy. Patients should be assessed for mechanisms that can lead to PPI failure and may require further evaluation to investigate for alternative causes. This monograph will outline a diagnostic approach to the PPI non-responder, review mechanisms associated with PPI failure, and discuss therapeutic options for those who fail to respond to PPI therapy. PMID:26270485

  17. Spatial Coding as a Function of Handedness and Responding Hand: Theoretical and Methodological Implications.

    PubMed

    Arend, Isabel; Weiss, Peter H; Timpert, David C; Fink, Gereon R; Henik, Avishai

    2016-01-01

    The Simon effect shows that choice reactions are faster if the location of the stimulus and the response correspond, even when stimulus location is task-irrelevant. The Simon effect raises the question of what factors influence spatial coding. Until now, the effects of handedness, responding hand, and visual field were addressed in separate studies that used bimanual and unimanual tasks, providing inconclusive results. Here we aimed to close this empirical gap by looking at the effects of these variables in the same study. We used a unimanual version of a Simon task with four groups of participants: left-handed and right-handed, responding with the dominant or nondominant hand. Our results show that the Simon effect is substantially reduced in the field of the responding hand for all groups of participants, except for left-handed individuals responding with the left-hand. These findings highlight the importance of attention mechanisms in stimulus-response coding. They reflect that stimulus-response interference is influenced by hierarchical activation of response units. At a practical level, these findings call for a number of methodological considerations (e.g., handedness, responding hand, and visual field) when using stimulus-response conflict to address spatial coding and cognitive control functions in neurological populations. PMID:27031523

  18. Cognitive Reactivity, Dysfunctional Attitudes, and Depressive Relapse and Recurrence in Cognitive Therapy Responders

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Robin B.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Borman, Patricia D.; Dunlap, Lauren; Segal, Zindel V.; Kidner, Cindy L.; Friedman, Edward S.; Thase, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunctional attitudes can foreshadow depressive relapse/recurrence. Priming mood, through induction paradigms, is hypothesized to activate dysfunctional attitudes. Cognitive reactivity (CR) refers to mood-linked increases in dysfunctional attitudes after priming. Here we explored the extent to which CR as well as residual, unprimed, dysfunctional attitudes predicted depressive relapse/recurrence among depressed patients who responded to acute phase cognitive therapy (CT). Consenting adults, aged 18–70, with recurrent major depressive disorder (n = 523) participated in a two-site randomized controlled trial examining the durability of continuation phase treatments. Patients received 16–20 sessions of CT. Among the 245 incompletely remitted responders, 213 agreed to undergo a mood induction paradigm. After 8 months of continuation phase treatments, participants were followed an additional 24 months. Although the mood induction significantly lowered mood in 80% of responders, the expected CR was not evident. By contrast, higher unprimed dysfunctional attitudes following CT did predict relapse/recurrence over 20 and 32 months post randomization. The findings of this large longitudinal study of incompletely remitted CT responders challenge the notion that it is necessary to prime mood in order to maximize dysfunctional attitudes’ prediction of relapse and/or recurrence. While findings cannot be generalized beyond CT responders, they emphasize the clinical importance of reducing dysfunctional attitudes in preventing depression. PMID:22445946

  19. Spatial Coding as a Function of Handedness and Responding Hand: Theoretical and Methodological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Arend, Isabel; Weiss, Peter H.; Timpert, David C.; Fink, Gereon R.; Henik, Avishai

    2016-01-01

    The Simon effect shows that choice reactions are faster if the location of the stimulus and the response correspond, even when stimulus location is task-irrelevant. The Simon effect raises the question of what factors influence spatial coding. Until now, the effects of handedness, responding hand, and visual field were addressed in separate studies that used bimanual and unimanual tasks, providing inconclusive results. Here we aimed to close this empirical gap by looking at the effects of these variables in the same study. We used a unimanual version of a Simon task with four groups of participants: left-handed and right-handed, responding with the dominant or nondominant hand. Our results show that the Simon effect is substantially reduced in the field of the responding hand for all groups of participants, except for left-handed individuals responding with the left-hand. These findings highlight the importance of attention mechanisms in stimulus-response coding. They reflect that stimulus-response interference is influenced by hierarchical activation of response units. At a practical level, these findings call for a number of methodological considerations (e.g., handedness, responding hand, and visual field) when using stimulus-response conflict to address spatial coding and cognitive control functions in neurological populations. PMID:27031523

  20. Why do asthmatic subjects respond so strongly to inhaled adenosine?

    PubMed

    Meade, C J; Dumont, I; Worrall, L

    2001-08-01

    Bronchospasm induced by adenosine is blocked by representatives of all the major classes of drugs used in the treatment of asthma. Understanding the mechanism of this bronchospasm may help understand the way these drugs work. Clinical studies have suggested involvement of neural pathways, mast-like cells and mediators such as histamine, serotonin and lipoxygenase products. There is a strong link between responsiveness to adenosine and eosinophilia. In different animal models A1, A2b and A3 adenosine receptor subclasses have all been implicated in inducing bronchospasm. whilst occupation of the A2a receptor generally has no, or the opposite effect. At least two different mechanisms, both involving neural pathways, exist. One, involving the adenosine A1 receptor, functions in mast cell depleted animals; the other requires interaction with a population of mast-like cells activated over A2b or A3 receptors. Not only histamine but also serotonin and lipoxygenase products released from the mast-like cells are potential mediators. In animal models good reactivity to adenosine receptor agonists is generally only found when the animals are first sensitized and exposed to allergen in ways likely to induce an allergic inflammation. An exception is the BDE rat, which reacts to adenosine receptor agonists such as APNEA or NECA even without allergen exposure. This rat strain does however show evidence of spontaneous eosinophilic inflammation in the lung even without immunization. As mast cells both release adenosine and respond to adenosine, adenosine provides a non-specific method of amplifying specific signals resulting from IgE/antigen interaction. This mechanism may not only have a pathological significance in asthma; it may be part of a normal bodily defense response that in asthmatic subjects is inappropriately activated. PMID:11521747

  1. NIH exceptional responders to cancer therapy study launched

    Cancer.gov

    The Exceptional Responders Initiative, a study to investigate the molecular factors of tumors associated with exceptional treatment responses of cancer patients to drug therapies, was launched today by NCI. Scientists will attempt to identify the molecula

  2. Some 9/11 First Responders Suffer Severe Sinus Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... responded on the third day, when rain reduced air pollution levels, the study found. Firefighters who worked at ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Air Pollution Occupational Health Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health ...

  3. Astronaut Sally Ride responds to question from interviewer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Astronaut Sally K. Ride, mission specialist for STS-7, responds to a question from an interviewer during a taping session for ABC's Night Line. Dr. Ride is in the shuttle mockup and integration laboratory.

  4. Aging with HIV: Responding to an Emerging Challenge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stay Connected You are here Home Aging with HIV: Responding to an emerging challenge September 30, 2013 ... with HIV. New frontiers in medical management of HIV/AIDS Several NIA and NIH-wide initiatives support ...

  5. Co-responding Police-Mental Health Programs: A Review.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, G K; Cusi, A; Kirst, M; O'Campo, P; Nakhost, A; Stergiopoulos, V

    2015-09-01

    Co-responding police-mental health programs are increasingly used to respond to 'Emotionally Disturbed Persons' in the community; however, there is limited understanding of program effectiveness and the mechanisms that promote program success. The academic and gray literature on co-responding police-mental health programs was reviewed. This review synthesized evidence of outcomes along seven dimensions, and the available evidence was further reviewed to identify potential mechanisms of program success. Co-responding police-mental health programs were found to have strong linkages with community services and reduce pressure on the justice system, but there is limited evidence on other impacts. The relevance of these findings for practitioners and the major challenges of this program model are discussed, and future research directions are identified. PMID:25239523

  6. Emergency First Responders' Experience with Colorimetric Detection Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Sandra L. Fox; Keith A. Daum; Carla J. Miller; Marnie M. Cortez

    2007-10-01

    Nationwide, first responders from state and federal support teams respond to hazardous materials incidents, industrial chemical spills, and potential weapons of mass destruction (WMD) attacks. Although first responders have sophisticated chemical, biological, radiological, and explosive detectors available for assessment of the incident scene, simple colorimetric detectors have a role in response actions. The large number of colorimetric chemical detection methods available on the market can make the selection of the proper methods difficult. Although each detector has unique aspects to provide qualitative or quantitative data about the unknown chemicals present, not all detectors provide consistent, accurate, and reliable results. Included here, in a consumer-report-style format, we provide “boots on the ground” information directly from first responders about how well colorimetric chemical detection methods meet their needs in the field and how they procure these methods.

  7. 28 CFR 115.364 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  8. 28 CFR 115.164 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  9. 28 CFR 115.364 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  10. 28 CFR 115.164 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  11. 28 CFR 115.364 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  12. 28 CFR 115.164 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that still... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  13. 28 CFR 115.264 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating; and (4) If the abuse occurred within a time period that... clothes, urinating, defecating, smoking, drinking, or eating. (b) If the first staff responder is not...

  14. Project Responder: technology needs for local emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beakley, Guy; Garwin, Thomas; Pollard, Neal A.; Singley, George T., III; Tuohy, Robert V.; Lupo, Jasper

    2003-09-01

    Since April 2001, the Oklahoma City National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism has funded an effort by Hicks &Associates, Inc. and the Terrorism Research Center, Inc., aimed ultimately at improving local, state, and federal emergency responders" capabilities for mitigating the effects of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or explosive/ incendiary (CBRNE) terrorism. This effort, titled "Project Responder," began by developing an understanding of how state and local responders view their current capabilities, shortfalls, and needs. This paper discusses some of the results of this first phase of the effort that has resulted in a comprehensive report titled "Emergency Responders" Needs, Goals, and Priorities." This paper addresses two of the capabilities from that report which we believe are of most interest to this conference. There are ten other capabilities discussed in the report, which may also be of interest.

  15. Lever-Arm Pin Puller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Malcolm

    1994-01-01

    Mechanism holds retaining pins in place except when actuated to release pins quickly. Mechanism is integral part of cover designed to be removed with simple downward motion of hand. Before removal, mechanism secures cover in place. After removal, mechanism holds retaining pins for reuse.

  16. An extraorally activated expansion appliance for cleft palate infants.

    PubMed

    Latham, R A; Kusy, R P; Georgiade, N G

    1976-07-01

    A new lever-action expansion appliance is described which is designed specifically for use in infants with cleft lip and palate. An extraoral control knob allows for easy activation, while the important anterior cleft areas are left clear for premaxillary repositioning and clinical assessment. Activation is registered by a positive clicking sound. Rapid expansion is made possible by the design of the appliance which is retained by stainless steel pins. PMID:780004

  17. Effect of Naltrexone During Extinction of Alcohol-Reinforced Responding and During Repeated Cue-Conditioned Reinstatement Sessions in a Cue Exposure Style Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Keith L.; Schimmel, Jasmine S.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of alcohol-related cues to promote craving can be attenuated independently by giving the opioid antagonist naltrexone (NTX) or by subjecting alcohol-dependent patients to a cue exposure treatment. The effects of cue exposure treatment may be enhanced if conducted in the presence of NTX. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if NTX given during extinction of responding for alcohol in rats would alter cue-conditioned reinstatement of responding and to determine if NTX, paired with repeated cue-conditioned reinstatement, would reduce subsequent cue-conditioned reinstatement or reacquisition of self-administration in the absence of NTX. Rats lever-pressed for alcohol in the presence of an olfactory cue. Visual and auditory stimuli were presented during alcohol delivery. In the first experiment, rats were injected with saline or 3 mg/kg NTX prior to extinction sessions followed by cue-conditioned reinstatement tests. In the second experiment, extinction was followed by cue-conditioned reinstatement sessions presented twice per week. The rats received saline or NTX (3 and 10 mg/kg) prior to several sessions. All rats received reinstatement tests with and without a pretreatment of NTX followed by reacquisition of alcohol self-administration. NTX had no effect on responding during extinction or on subsequent cue-conditioned reinstatement. Only 10 mg/kg NTX reduced responding during the twice weekly reinstatement sessions. The twice weekly NTX treatment had no effect on subsequent cue-conditioned reinstatement in the absence of NTX. Reacquisition of responding for alcohol was reduced in the group receiving saline during repeated reinstatement sessions while this effect was blocked in the NTX group. These findings support the notion that NTX given during a brief abstinence period (i.e., extinction) has minimal effects on future sensitivity to alcohol cues and alcohol consumption. NTX given during repeated alcohol cue exposure does not alter the

  18. Predictability of Operant Behavior of Rats by Prefrontal Multiple Unit Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Sei-Etsu; Akema, Tatsuo; Izaki, Yoshinori

    To investigate the possibility of a brain computer interface (BCI) constructed using activities of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), we analyzed PFC multiple unit activities (MUAs) during a delayed reinforcement (DRF) lever press task in rats. In the DRF task, each trial consisted of two lever press responses (R1, R2): R1 as the trial initiation, R2 as a pre-conditioned response to a stimulus (buzzer) for a reward. Between R1 and the buzzer, rats were required to inhibit the lever press (waiting phase). The trial was evaluated as incorrect if rats pressed the lever during the waiting phase. Results show that the mean firing rate (MFR) was significantly lower around the time of R1 compared with the pre-trial time in correct trials, although no significant changes were found in incorrect trials. From a neuroengineering perspective, the MFR of each single trial was calculated. Most correct trials showed decreasing MFR around the time of R1. The PFC MUA might be useful for BCI.

  19. Making the Sour Sweet? Upcoming Food-Pellet Reinforcement Produces Positive Induction When Rats Press a Lever for Unsweetened Lemon Juice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Nurnberger, Jeri T.; Austin, David P.; Wright, Carol L.

    2006-01-01

    Research has suggested that rats increase their response rate for a low-valued reinforcer when a high-valued reinforcer will soon be available (i.e., positive induction) because the value of the low-valued substance has increased. The present study tested if such a procedure could be used to increase rats' responding for a non-reinforcing food.…

  20. Problem Implementation as a Lever for Change: An Experimental Study of the Effects of a Professional Development Program on Students' Mathematics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santagata, Rossella; Kersting, Nicole; Givvin, Karen B.; Stigler, James W.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates, through an experimental design, the effectiveness of a professional development program on teacher knowledge and practices and on student learning. The program consisted of a series of video-based modules designed to respond to needs of U.S. teachers, as highlighted by findings from the 1999 Third International Mathematics…

  1. Adolescent fertility programs: responding to the needs of today's youth.

    PubMed

    Galang, M L; Jamias, E G; Silayan-go, A

    1983-01-01

    The 1983 conference on Adolescent Fertility Management in Asia and the Pacific provided a forum for sharing information and experiences. The project was designed to stimulate interest in and strengthen existing programs on adolescent fertility in participating countries, i.e., Bangladesh, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Nepal, Philippines, Sri lanka, and Thailand. Specifically, the conference sought to identify adolescent fertility problems and share experiences in managing adolescent fertility programs, identify gaps in the development and implementation of adolescent fertility programs and projects, and formulate plans to meet the adolescent fertility needs of the participating countries. Capsule presentations of the experiences of the participating countries are presented. Focus is on the projects they have undertaken and proposed activities. In Bangladesh Jatio Tarum Sangha, the national youth organization, seeks to get youth involved in family planning activities through information/education/motivation programs and community development projects. Fiji proposes to establish a youth center to be operated by the Ministry of Health to reduce the incidence of unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases in adolescents and to make them more aware of sex-related health problems and the importance of responsible sex. India's Family Planning Association has initiated population education programs for youth. Several projects have been launched in Jakarta to cope with adolescent fertility problems including the adolescent health project, the Consultation Center for Adolescents, and the university-based family health project. The Family Planning Association of Nepal has completed some major programs under its youth project. The Philippines' proposed youth centers are planned to respond to the fertility related needs and problems of Filipino adolescents. Innovations of the center are: the operation of several youth-serving government and private agencies under 1 roof

  2. Fast Responding Voltage Regulator and Dynamic VAR Compensator

    SciTech Connect

    Divan, Deepak; Moghe, Rohit; Tholomier, Damien

    2014-12-31

    The objectives of this project were to develop a dynamic VAR compensator (DVC) for voltage regulation through VAR support to demonstrate the ability to achieve greater levels of voltage control on electricity distribution networks, and faster response compared to existing grid technology. The goal of the project was to develop a prototype Fast Dynamic VAR Compensator (Fast DVC) hardware device, and this was achieved. In addition to developing the dynamic VAR compensator device, Varentec in partnership with researchers at North Carolina State University (NCSU) successfully met the objectives to model the potential positive impact of such DVCs on representative power networks. This modeling activity validated the ability of distributed dynamic VAR compensators to provide fast voltage regulation and reactive power control required to respond to grid disturbances under high penetration of fluctuating and intermittent distributed energy resources (DERs) through extensive simulation studies. Specifically the following tasks were set to be accomplished: 1) Development of dynamic VAR compensator to support dynamic voltage variations on the grid through VAR control 2) Extensive testing of the DVC in the lab environment 3) Present the operational DVC device to the DOE at Varentec’s lab 4) Formulation of a detailed specification sheet, unit assembly document, test setup document, unit bring-up plan, and test plan 5) Extensive simulations of the DVC in a system with high PV penetration. Understanding the operation with many DVC on a single distribution system 6) Creation and submittal of quarterly and final reports conveying the design documents, unit performance data, modeling simulation charts and diagrams, and summary explanations of the satisfaction of program goals. This report details the various efforts that led to the development of the Fast DVC as well as the modeling & simulation results. The report begins with the introduction in Section II which outlines the

  3. Intermittent punishment of human responding maintained by intermittent reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Scobie, S R; Kaufman, A

    1969-01-01

    To determine the effects of variable-interval shock punishment on behavior maintained by variable-interval and variable-ratio reinforcement, human subjects' key-pressing behavior was reinforced with money on a four-component multiple schedule. Components 1 and 2 were variable-interval 30-sec, and Components 3 and 4 were variable-ratio 210. After responding was stabilized, response-contingent electric shock was scheduled on a variable-interval 10-sec schedule during the second and fourth components of each cycle. Subjects instructed as to the reinforcement contingencies showed gradually increasing suppression of variable-interval responding at increasing shock intensities and either very high or very low rates of variable-ratio responding at higher intensities. Minimally instructed subjects showed suppression at higher shock intensities, but no clear differential suppression as a function of reinforcement schedule. Recovery from initial suppression was observed within sessions. PMID:16811334

  4. Musical hallucinations responding to a further increase of carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Saeko; Terao, Takeshi; Hatano, Koji; Ishii, Nobuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman outpatient with mild cognitive impairment, parasomnia and depressive state with musical hallucinations failed to respond to 400 mg/day of valproate. Once she was admitted to a university hospital, her musical hallucinations partially responded to 1 mg/day of clonazepam and sufficiently improved on 100 mg/day of carbamazepine. Two months after discharge, however, her musical hallucinations recurred probably as a consequence of psychological stress. The increase of carbamazepine from 100 to 200 mg/day completely remitted her musical hallucinations. This case suggests that musical hallucinations respond in a dose-dependent manner to increasing carbamazepine, and that gradual titration from small doses of carbamazepine is required because optimal doses appear to be smaller than those required for epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Further studies are warranted to determine the therapeutic levels of carbamazepine for musical hallucinations. PMID:25253486

  5. Internal and external motivation to respond without sexism.

    PubMed

    Klonis, Suzanne C; Plant, E Ashby; Devine, Patricia G

    2005-09-01

    Based on Plant and Devine's (1998) measures of Internal and External Motivation to Respond Without Prejudice toward Blacks, new scales were developed to assess Internal and External Motivation to Respond Without Sexism (IMS-S and EMS-S, respectively). The scales possess good psychometric properties. Providing evidence of convergent and discriminant validity, the IMS-S was strongly related to measures of sexism yet unrelated to measures of social evaluation. The EMS-S was modestly related to both sexism and social evaluative concerns. Providing evidence of predictive validity, participants who were either internally or externally motivated to respond without sexism rated sexist jokes more negatively in a situation discouraging sexism compared to participants low in both sources of motivation. However, only high IMS-S participants rated the jokes negatively whether the situation encouraged or discouraged sexism and whether their response was public or private. Implications for understanding the similarities and differences between sexism and racism are discussed. PMID:16055643

  6. Which depressed patients respond to ECT? The Nottingham results.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, D; Gill, D; Gregory, S; Shawcross, C

    1995-04-01

    The Nottingham electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) trial was designed with a simulated treatment group to test prospectively the power of delusions or agitation to predict response. The response of patients without retardation and without delusions was examined retrospectively as well because of doubts over the usefulness of ECT for this subgroup. Deluded/nondeluded and agitated/nonagitated subtypes responded significantly to real treatment. Neither delusions nor agitation predicted greater treatment response. Patients without retardation, with or without delusions responded to real ECT, supporting the continuing prescription of ECT for these patients as well. PMID:7790678

  7. The meaning of occupational stress items to survey respondents.

    PubMed

    Jex, S M; Beehr, T A; Roberts, C K

    1992-10-01

    This study tested the effect of using the word stress in the measurement of self-reported occupational stressors and strains. Employees from two organizations responded to a questionnaire that included specific occupational stressors, strains, and 16 items in which the word stress was used. Survey respondents tended to interpret the word stress to refer both to employees' strains or reactions to the work environment and to job stressors or elements of the environment itself. Implications of these findings for occupational stress research are discussed. PMID:1429346

  8. Assessment of Respondent Acceptability for Preference Measures in Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franic, Duska M.; Bothe, Anne K.; Bramlett, Robin E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of using one or more of four standard economic preference measures to assess health-related quality of life in stuttering, by assessing respondents' views of the acceptability of those measures. Method and results: A graphic positioning scale approach was used with 80 adults to assess four variables previously…

  9. Responding to Critical Incidents: A Resource Guide for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    This resource guide is intended to assist schools in developing protocols for responding to critical incidents. It focuses on proactive plans to deal with the traumatic aftereffects of a critical incident which affects some or all of the members of a school community. The guide outlines a generic protocol which includes steps to be undertaken in…

  10. Timely Completion of Paperwork: Are Some Residents Consistently Late Responders?

    PubMed Central

    Metheny, William P.

    2014-01-01

    Background One element of competence in professionalism entails the timely completion of paperwork. Early identification of residents who are consistently late in completing their assignments might be the first step in helping them change this habit. Objective This study sought to determine if program coordinators' ratings of residents' response habits to completing assignments were associated with existing measures of resident response times tracked by the institution. Methods Program coordinators rated residents as early, mid, or late responders based on their experience with them. We compared coordinators' ratings with the response time of these same residents in returning orientation materials to the institution, completing a patient safety survey and duty hour logs, and providing their required countersignature on telephone and verbal orders. A total of 196 residents enrolled at this institution were eligible for this comparison in the 2012–2013 academic year. Results Program coordinators rated 23% (40 of 177) of the residents as late responders. These ratings were significantly associated with the response time of residents in returning orientation materials and the completed patient safety survey. Residents identified as late responders were 2.45 times (confidence interval, 1.09 ± 5.64) more likely to have delinquent medical records. Conclusions This exploratory study suggests that residents who are late responders can be identified as early as orientation and that they likely maintain this response habit in completing assignments throughout residency. To address this professionalism issue, programs should track and counsel residents on their timeliness in completing paperwork. PMID:24949137

  11. Responding to a Fiscal Crisis: A Data-Driven Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banta, Trudy W.; Busby, A. Katherine; Kahn, Susan; Black, Karen E.; Johnson, James N.

    2007-01-01

    The Division of Planning and Institutional Improvement (PAII) at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis provides for the campus data for academic planning and management, assessment and evaluation services, and progress reports on mission-critical goals. To respond to a forecast fiscal crisis and support long-range planning for the…

  12. Apple root, bark and leaf genes responding to water deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants respond to environmental stress conditions by altering the expression of suites of genes, many of which are associated with defense. Perennial plants, including woody shrubs and trees, have to deal with numerous cycles of environmental extremes in order to survive. We are using apple as a m...

  13. Effectively Responding to Public Scrutiny When Communicating Climate Science.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huertas, A.; Halpern, M.

    2014-12-01

    Climate researchers face regular scrutiny of their work from groups outside academia. In recent years, interest groups that oppose climate policy have targeted scientists with hate-mail campaigns, invasive document requests, hostile questioning and legal threats. In their day-to-day work, scientists struggle to respond to heated discussions about their research, whether from online commentators, opinion columnists, or special interest groups. Based on decades of experience and interviews with scientists, the Union of Concerned Scientists has developed a guide for communicating science amid heightened scrutiny. Building on the information contained in the UCS guide, this presentation will discuss best practices for climate researchers, including suggestions for when scrutiny can be ignored or when it deserves a response and methods for responding that can uphold scientific integrity while also protecting an individual researcher's reputation and ability to publicly communicate. Examples include scientists who have responded to bloggers criticizing their research, advocacy groups demanding their personal emails and policymakers targeting them with personal attacks. In understanding how to respond to scrutiny, scientists can bolster their own ability to communicate and curtail the chilling effect that scrutiny can have on other scientists conducting public enegagement.

  14. Resources for Responding to Doomsday 2012: An Annotated Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Educators at all levels and in all settings are getting questions these days about the approaching "end of the world" catastrophes supposedly coming in December 2012. This resource guide provides a selection of useful resources for responding to student and public questions in this arena. The latest internet myth to gain traction is the notion…

  15. Measurement of Respondent Burden: Study Design and Early Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankel, Joanne

    This is an experimental 2-phase study which focuses upon perceived respondent burden (PRB), that is, upon negative feelings which may be experienced by people who participate in household surveys. For phase 1 of the study, whose results are reported here, the effects of two variables-- interview length and interview effort--upon PRB were assessed.…

  16. ASA24® Instructions for Study Staff & Respondents

    Cancer.gov

    The following documents have been created by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as resources for study staff and Respondents. Each resource is available as a ready-to-use PDF as well as in Word format to allow users to adapt the content as desired.

  17. 17 CFR 200.113 - Opportunity to respond; interception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Opportunity to respond; interception. 200.113 Section 200.113 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Code of Behavior Governing Ex...

  18. 17 CFR 200.113 - Opportunity to respond; interception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Opportunity to respond; interception. 200.113 Section 200.113 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Code of Behavior Governing Ex...

  19. Training Emergency Responders: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. An Instructor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Science Associates, Inc., Reston, VA.

    This manual was developed to help instructors train police and emergency medical technicians, who often are the first persons to arrive at the scene of a death (first responders), to serve families who lose a child to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The manual begins with an introduction that discusses the purpose of the training and…

  20. Responding to Suicidal Calls: Does Trait Anxiety Hinder or Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Marceline Moulin; Range, Lillian M.

    2005-01-01

    To see if trait anxiety and suicidality interfered with the ability to respond to suicidal crisis calls, 279 undergraduates completed measures of trait anxiety and suicidality in the past week, and the revised Suicide Intervention Response Inventory (SIRI-2). Unexpectedly, trait anxiety (but not suicidality) correlated with better SIRI-2 scores.…

  1. Life After Traumatic Injury: How the Body Responds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Traumatic Injury: How the Body Responds Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Life After Traumatic Injury: How the ... Threatening Bacterial Infection Remains Mysterious This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  2. Apple root, bark and leaf genes responding to water deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants respond to environmental stress conditions by altering the expression of suites of genes, many of which are associated with defense. Perennial plants, including woody shrubs and trees, have to deal with numerous cycles of environmental extremes in order to survive. We are using apple (Malus...

  3. Supporting Children's Counterfactual Thinking with Alternative Modes of Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Sarah R.; Carroll, Daniel J.; Brunsdon, Victoria E. A.; Gryg, Charlotte K.

    2011-01-01

    To speculate about counterfactual worlds, children need to ignore what they know to be true about the real world. Prior studies yielding individual differences data suggested that counterfactual thinking may be related to overcoming prepotent responses. In two experiments, we manipulated how 3- to 5-year-olds responded to counterfactual…

  4. Meta-Analysis and Inadequate Responders to Intervention: A Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuebing, Karla K.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Hughes, Lisa C.

    2012-01-01

    In a recently published meta-analysis, Tran, Sanchez, Arellano, and Swanson (2011) synthesized 13 studies that permitted assessment of characteristics of children who were adequate and inadequate responders to instruction. The authors indicated that "[t]he central question addressed in this review is whether individual differences in…

  5. Responding to Individual Differences in Inclusive Classrooms in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kraayenoord, Christina E.; Waterworth, David; Brady, Trish

    2014-01-01

    Responding to individual differences in classrooms in which there is increasing diversity is one of the challenges of inclusive education in Australia. The linking of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and assistive technologies (ATs) is one way in which this challenge can be addressed. This article describes an initiative, known as…

  6. Speaking the Language. Tulsa Junior College Responds to Workforce Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susie

    1993-01-01

    Three programs at Tulsa Junior College respond to labor force needs: (1) Aviation Education Alliance, an articulated program among universities, two-year colleges, and vocational schools; (2) International Language Center, teaching languages specific to the needs of client companies; and (3) Tulsa Training Center, focusing on workplace literacy…

  7. Mobilizing Community Strength: New York Art Therapists Respond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Barbara Ann; Berberian, Marygrace; Brigmon, La Shae V.; Gonzalez, Susan Natacha; Koepfer, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    After the World Trade Center terrorist attacks on 9/11/01, New York's art therapy community found itself faced with difficult political, professional, and emotional challenges. As volunteerism across this country responded to the need for assistance, many New York art therapists were on the front lines of a wounded and frightened city while…

  8. African Americans Respond Poorly to Hepatitis C Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black Issues in Higher Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    African Americans have a significantly lower response rate to treatment for chronic hepatitis C than non-Hispanic Whites, according to a new study led by Duke University Medical Center researchers. Some African Americans--19 percent--did respond to the drug combination of peginterferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. But in non-Hispanic Whites with the…

  9. Variational Pragmatics and "Responding to Thanks"--Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieswanger, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In 2005, Klaus P. Schneider published a fascinating article with the title "'No problem, you're welcome, anytime': Responding to thanks in Ireland, England, and the U.S.A." Adopting the then emerging and now established framework of variational pragmatics, Schneider's pioneering paper presents the results of a study on differences…

  10. Poetic Voices: Writing, Reading, and Responding to Poetry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandre, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    "Poetic Voices: Writing, Reading, and Responding to Poetry" was the title of the 2011 Master Class in Children's Literature. Woven into this session were the insights of poets Joyce Sidman and Pat Mora who shared their creative processes and the voices that inspire their poetry. In addition, Barbara Kiefer provided advice regarding how to connect…

  11. Evaluation of the Recognizing and Responding to Suicide Risk Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Jodi Michelle; Osteen, Philip; Jones, Andrea; Berman, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Changes in attitudes, confidence, and practice behaviors were assessed among 452 clinicians who completed the training, Recognizing and Responding to Suicide Risk, and who work with clients at risk for suicide. Data were collected at three time points. Scores on measures of attitudes toward suicide prevention and confidence to work with clients at…

  12. 22 CFR 1304.5 - Responsibility for responding to requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... their order of receipt. (2) The FOIA Officer may use multi-track processing in responding to requests... and complex requests. Requests in each track are then processed according to paragraph (d)(1) of this section in their respective track. (3) The FOIA Officer may provide requesters in the slower track...

  13. Responding to the Needs of the Homeless and Hungry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American National Red Cross, Washington, DC.

    This report describes the Hotels-Motels in Partnership Program, a human services resource sponsored by the Red Cross and other organizations to respond to housing needs of the homeless, disaster victims, and others in need of emergency assistance. The partnership program involves several hundred businesses in more than 240 communities. Since its…

  14. 76 FR 68828 - Pipeline Safety: Emergency Responder Forum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ...'s complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477) or... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Safety: Emergency Responder Forum AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Forum....

  15. Relational Responding Modulates and Reverses Affective Ratings in Evaluative Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molet, Mikael; Macquet, Benjamin; Charley, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Three experiments explored relational responding in evaluative conditioning. In Experiment 1, the participants were trained with a computer task to make relational responses by putting CSs of different sizes in boxes in order of size. Subsequently they were instructed that these different sized CSs represented different intensities of hypothetical…

  16. 17 CFR 200.113 - Opportunity to respond; interception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Opportunity to respond; interception. 200.113 Section 200.113 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Code of Behavior Governing Ex...

  17. 17 CFR 200.113 - Opportunity to respond; interception.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Opportunity to respond; interception. 200.113 Section 200.113 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Code of Behavior Governing Ex...

  18. First Responders: Community Colleges on the Front Line of Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Although homeland security has gained prominence as a national focus and investment, it is clear that much of the most effective preparation must begin at local, state, and regional levels. This report reveals that an astonishing number of community colleges offer degree and certificate programs for first responders--law enforcement officers,…

  19. Plant Reproduction: AMOR Enables Males to Respond to Female Signals.

    PubMed

    Dresselhaus, Thomas; Coimbra, Silvia

    2016-04-25

    The pollen tube of flowering plants undertakes a long journey to transport two sperm cells for double fertilization. New work on pollen tube guidance has identified an arabinogalactan-derived ovular factor that primes tubes to respond to female gametophyte-secreted attraction signals. PMID:27115687

  20. Transfer of Aversive Respondent Elicitation in Accordance with Equivalence Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valverde, Miguel Rodriguez; Luciano, Carmen; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the transfer of aversively conditioned respondent elicitation through equivalence classes, using skin conductance as the measure of conditioning. The first experiment is an attempt to replicate Experiment 1 in Dougher, Augustson, Markham, Greenway, and Wulfert (1994), with different temporal parameters in the…

  1. 76 FR 18716 - Manoj Bhayana, Respondent; Final Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... extended by successive Presidential Notices, the most recent being that of August 12, 2010 (75 FR 50,681... Amendments, 75 FR 33,682 (June 15, 2010). Thus, Respondent should disregard Attachment B of the RDO...-20 (2000), as amended by the Notice on August 13, 2009 (74 FR 41,325 (Aug. 14, 2009)). \\11\\ The...

  2. Understanding and Responding to Violence in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genser, Lillian, Ed.

    Presented are proceedings from a 1976 conference entitled "Understanding and Responding to Violence in Young Children" which was attended by over 600 students, teachers, child care workers, and parents. Following an introduction by L. Genser are entries with the following titles and authors: "The Course of the Development of Violence in Young…

  3. Responding Proactively to the Politics of Language Arts Bashing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanacore, Joseph

    The education profession as well as the public do not need exposure to more one-sided opinions about the need for academic preschools, about how to generate higher standards, about how poorly United States schools perform as compared to schools in other industrialized nations, and about other potentially volatile issues. In responding to the…

  4. Authors' Rejoinder to Respondents (Shulman, Steinberg, & Piquero, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Males, Mike A.; Brown, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Respondents, in "A Mistaken Account of the Age-Crime Curve: Response to Males and Brown," dispute our finding that virtually all of the discrepancy in violent crime rates between adolescents/emerging adults versus older adults is explained not by young age per se but by higher poverty levels among the young. Our rejoinder argues that…

  5. How the Brain Responds to "Any": An MEG Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesan, Graciela; Johnson, Blake W.; Crain, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The word "any" may appear in some sentences, but not in others. For example, "any" is permitted in sentences that contain the word "nobody", as in "Nobody ate any fruit". However, in a minimally different context "any" seems strikingly anomalous: *"Everybody ate any fruit". The aim of the present study was to investigate how the brain responds to…

  6. Managing resistant depression. When patients do not respond to therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Warneke, L.

    1993-01-01

    Many factors can influence outcome in the management of depressive illness, a major public health problem with significant associated mortality and morbidity. Two-thirds of patients will respond to antidepressants. The remainder can be treated in other ways. Only about 7% of patients are absolutely treatment resistant, and even they can be helped. PMID:8495142

  7. Responding to Student Unrest: A Guide for Administrators and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, James; Miller, William

    The aim of this essay is to help educators understand, respond to, and survive student militancy. The author analyzes the problem of student unrest; discusses programs for reducing militancy; and explains why student involvement is necessary and how it helps accomplish the purposes of education, stimulates interest, and reduces dropouts and…

  8. 28 CFR 115.64 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Staff first responder duties. 115.64 Section 115.64 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Official Response Following An Inmate Report §...

  9. 28 CFR 115.64 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Staff first responder duties. 115.64 Section 115.64 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Official Response Following An Inmate Report §...

  10. 28 CFR 115.64 - Staff first responder duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Staff first responder duties. 115.64 Section 115.64 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Official Response Following An Inmate Report §...

  11. Practice and Perception of First Aid Among Lay First Responders in a Southern District of India

    PubMed Central

    Pallavisarji, Uthkarsh; Gururaj, Gopalkrishna; Girish, Rao Nagaraja

    2013-01-01

    Background Injuries rank among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and are steadily increasing in developing countries like India. However, it is often possible to minimize injury and crash consequences by providing effective pre-hospital services promptly. In most low-and middle-income countries (LMICs), transportation of road traffic victims, is usually provided by relatives, taxi drivers, truck drivers, police officers and other motorists who are often untrained. Objectives The current study was conducted to understand the current practice and perception of first aid among lay first responders in a rural southern district of India. Materials and Methods The current cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in the southern district of Tumkur in India within three months from January to March 2011 and covered the population including all police, ambulance personnel, taxi drivers, bus and auto drivers, and primary and middle school teachers within the study area. Results Nearly 60% of the responders had witnessed more than two emergencies in the previous six months and 55% had actively participated in helping the injured person. The nature of the help was mainly by calling for an ambulance (41.5%), transporting the injured (19.7%) and consoling the victim (14.9%). Majority (78.1%) of the responders informed that they had run to the victim (42.4%) or had called for an ambulance. The predominant reason for not providing help was often the ‘fear of legal complications’ (30%) that would follow later. Significant number (81.4%) of respondents reported that they did not have adequate skills to manage an emergency and were willing to acquire knowledge and skills in first aid to help victims. Conclusions Regular and periodical community-based first aid training programs for first care responders will help to provide care and improve outcomes for injured persons. PMID:24396770

  12. 78 FR 55064 - First Responder Network Authority Board Special Review Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration First Responder Network Authority Board Special.... Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Public Meeting of the First Responder Network Authority Special Review Committee. SUMMARY: The First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) Board Special ]...

  13. Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ligands

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Noah D; Garruss, Alexander S; Moretti, Rocco; Chan, Sum; Arbing, Mark A; Cascio, Duilio; Rogers, Jameson K; Isaacs, Farren J; Kosuri, Sriram; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Church, George M; Raman, Srivatsan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic regulatory proteins inducible by small molecules are useful synthetic biology tools as sensors and switches. Bacterial allosteric transcription factors (aTFs) are a major class of regulatory proteins, but few aTFs have been redesigned to respond to new effectors beyond natural aTF-inducer pairs. Altering inducer specificity in these proteins is difficult because substitutions that affect inducer binding may also disrupt allostery. We engineered an aTF, the Escherichia coli lac repressor, LacI, to respond to one of four new inducer molecules: fucose, gentiobiose, lactitol or sucralose. Using computational protein design, single-residue saturation mutagenesis or random mutagenesis, along with multiplex assembly, we identified new variants comparable in specificity and induction to wild-type LacI with its inducer, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The ability to create designer aTFs will enable applications including dynamic control of cell metabolism, cell biology and synthetic gene circuits. PMID:26689263

  14. Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ligands.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Noah D; Garruss, Alexander S; Moretti, Rocco; Chan, Sum; Arbing, Mark A; Cascio, Duilio; Rogers, Jameson K; Isaacs, Farren J; Kosuri, Sriram; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Church, George M; Raman, Srivatsan

    2016-02-01

    Genetic regulatory proteins inducible by small molecules are useful synthetic biology tools as sensors and switches. Bacterial allosteric transcription factors (aTFs) are a major class of regulatory proteins, but few aTFs have been redesigned to respond to new effectors beyond natural aTF-inducer pairs. Altering inducer specificity in these proteins is difficult because substitutions that affect inducer binding may also disrupt allostery. We engineered an aTF, the Escherichia coli lac repressor, LacI, to respond to one of four new inducer molecules: fucose, gentiobiose, lactitol and sucralose. Using computational protein design, single-residue saturation mutagenesis or random mutagenesis, along with multiplex assembly, we identified new variants comparable in specificity and induction to wild-type LacI with its inducer, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The ability to create designer aTFs will enable applications including dynamic control of cell metabolism, cell biology and synthetic gene circuits. PMID:26689263

  15. Changing first responder tactics through the use of advanced technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettles, William E.; Trotter, Stephen

    1998-12-01

    The authors will first analyze current tactics used by emergency personnel when responding to 'standard' emergencies involving transportation systems. Next, the vulnerabilities and the consequences of a terrorist attack on a transportation system. Next the vulnerabilities and the consequences of a terrorist attack on a transportation system in which weapons of mass destruction are employed will be explored. The unique problems associated with the site of an emergency where chemical, nuclear, or biological agents have been employed will be investigated. The use of available or next-ready technologies in the areas of detection devices, personal protective clothing, and decontamination equipment will be examined. Combining this information, we will seek to prove the hypothesis that without the use of new technologies a change in first responder tactics is impossible. However, with the use of advanced technologies we will illustrate how new tactics can produce safe, more effective emergency responses.

  16. An alternative framework for responding to the amphibian crisis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, Erin L.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Volumes of data illustrate the severity of the crisis affecting amphibians, where > 32% of amphibians worldwide are threatened with declining populations. Although there have been isolated victories, the current approach to the issue is unsuccessful. We suggest that a radically different approach, something akin to human emergency response management (i.e. the Incident Command System), is one alternative to addressing the inertia and lack of cohesion in responding to amphibian issues. We acknowledge existing efforts and the useful research that has been conducted, but we suggest that a change is warranted and that the identification of a new amphibian chytrid provides the impetus for such a change. Our goal is to recognize that without a centralized effort we (collectively) are likely to fail in responding to this challenge.

  17. Correlates of cyberbullying and how school nurses can respond.

    PubMed

    Van Ouytsel, Joris; Walrave, Michel; Vandebosch, Heidi

    2015-05-01

    Cyberbullying is one of many online risks that affect an increasing number of children and teenagers. This form of abuse often occurs under the radar of adults as it usually takes place outside of school and away from adult supervision. Moreover, bystanders and victims are often reluctant to report what they have experienced. School nurses might be among the first to witness the real-life consequences of this virtual behavior, as involvement in cyberbullying is often correlated with psychological and behavioral problems. For this reason, school nurses should know how to recognize the warning signs so that they can respond and intervene appropriately. This article provides a discussion of what cyberbullying is and a summary of research on factors associated with cyberbullying, in terms of both victimization and perpetration. It also provides school nurses with evidence-based strategies for responding effectively. PMID:25870099

  18. Characteristics of the traumatic stressors experienced by rural first responders.

    PubMed

    Regambal, Marci J; Alden, Lynn E; Wagner, Shannon L; Harder, Henry G; Koch, William J; Fung, Klint; Parsons, Carly

    2015-08-01

    First responders routinely experience work-related events that meet the definition of a traumatic stressor. Despite the high exposure to traumatic events, prevalence rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are relatively low. This discrepancy points to the potential value of identifying factors that distinguish those traumatic stressors that produce ongoing traumatic stress symptoms from those that do not. The present study surveyed 181 first responders from rural settings. A repeated-measures design was used to compare characteristics of traumatic stressors that were or were not associated with ongoing PTSD symptoms. A factor analysis revealed that distressing events were characterized by chaos and resource limitations. Consistent with contemporary models, two mediational analyses revealed that each event characteristic predicted peritraumatic dissociation and posttraumatic cognitions, which in turn predicted PTSD symptoms. Moreover, the effect of each event characteristic on PTSD symptoms was partially mediated by these cognitive processes. PMID:26188614

  19. Neural Circuits Underlying Crying and Cry Responding in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John D.

    2007-01-01

    Crying is a universal vocalization in human infants, as well as in the infants of other mammals. Little is known about the neural structures underlying cry production, or the circuitry that mediates a caregiver’s response to cry sounds. In this review, the specific structures known or suspected to be involved in this circuit are identified, along with neurochemical systems and hormones for which evidence suggests a role in responding to infants and infant cries. In addition, evidence that crying elicits parental responses in different mammals is presented. An argument is made for including ‘crying’ as a functional category in the vocal repertoire of all mammalian infants (and the adults of some species). The prevailing neural model for crying production considers forebrain structures to be dispensable. However, evidence for the anterior cingulate gyrus in cry production, and this structure along with the amygdala and some other forebrain areas in responding to cries is presented. PMID:17363076

  20. Apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Wilde, Tyson; Barlow, Jonathan S.

    2010-04-13

    A method of responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a bore hole comprises detecting the anomalous change in downhole pressure, sending a signal along the segmented electromagnetic transmission path, receiving the signal, and performing a automated response. The anomalous change in downhole pressure is detected at a first location along a segmented electromagnetic transmission path, and the segmented electromagnetic transmission path is integrated into the tool string. The signal is received by at least one receiver in communication with the segmented electromagnetic transmission path. The automated response is performed along the tool string. Disclosed is an apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a downhole tool string, comprising a segmented electromagnetic transmission path connecting one or more receivers and at least one pressure sensor.

  1. EMEDs and SPEARR teams: United States Air Force ready responders.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Patricia A; Droege, Leslie; Carlisle, Mary T

    2003-06-01

    The right mix and unique talents of the medical personnel brought together by chance are undoubtedly the basis for the accomplishments of the EMEDs deployed to support Operation Houston and Operation Enduring Freedom, whereas creativity and flexibility definitely remain the keys to the success of these missions. It is with great confidence that we can proudly say, "Yes, we are ready to respond when called upon to provide the highest quality care for humanitarian missions and for our deployed military personnel." PMID:12755186

  2. NARAC Dispersion Model Product Integration With RadResponder

    SciTech Connect

    Aluzzi, Fernando

    2015-09-30

    Work on enhanced cooperation and interoperability of Nuclear Incident Response Teams (NIRT) is a joint effort between DHS/FEMA, DOE/NNSA and EPA. One such effort was the integration between the RadResponder Network, a resource sponsored by FEMA for the management of radiological data during an emergency, and the National Atmospheric Advisory Center (NARAC), a DOE/NNSA modeling resource whose predictions are used to aid radiological emergency preparedness and response. Working together under a FEMA-sponsored project these two radiological response assets developed a capability to read and display plume model prediction results from the NARAC computer system in the RadResponder software tool. As a result of this effort, RadResponder users have been provided with NARAC modeling predictions of contamination areas, radiological dose levels, and protective action areas (e.g., areas warranting worker protection or sheltering/evacuation) to help guide protective action decisions and field monitoring surveys, and gain key situation awareness following a radiological/nuclear accident or incident (e.g., nuclear power plant accident, radiological dispersal device incident, or improvised nuclear detonation incident). This document describes the details of this integration effort.

  3. Challenges for Early Responders to a Nuclear / Radiological Terrorism Incident

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.A.; Stearns, L.J.; Davie, A.D.; Day, E.

    2007-07-01

    Even in the best of circumstances, most municipalities would face severe challenges in providing effective incident response to a large scale radiation release caused by nuclear terrorism or accident. Compounding obvious complexities, the effectiveness of first and early responders to a radiological emergency may also be hampered by an insufficient distribution of radiation detection and monitoring equipment, local policies concerning triage and field decontamination of critical victims, malfunctioning communications, inadequate inter-agency agility, and the psychological 'fear' impact on early responders. This paper examines several issues impeding the early response to nuclear terrorism incidents with specific consideration given to the on-going and forward-thinking preparedness efforts currently being developed in the Sacramento, California region. Specific recommendations are provided addressing hot zone protocols, radiation detection and monitoring equipment, hasty patient packaging techniques, vertically and horizontally integrated pre-event training, mitigating psychological fear, and protocols for the effective 'hand-off' from first responders to subsequent early response-recovery teams. (authors)

  4. Socially desirable responding on the web: investigating the candor hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Risko, Evan F; Quilty, Lena C; Oakman, Jonathan M

    2006-12-01

    The investigation presented here explores the hypothesis that participants are less likely to respond in a socially desirable fashion on self-report questionnaires completed on the Web relative to those completed in the laboratory--the candor hypothesis. A battery of social desirability questionnaires (i.e., Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding [Paulhaus, 1984], Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale [Crowne & Marlowe, 1964], Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised Lie Scale [Eysenck & Eysenck, 1994]) was administered to 3 groups: 2 groups consisted of undergraduate participants who were randomly assigned to complete the measures either in the laboratory (n = 60) or on the Web (n = 60), and 1 group consisted of self-selected participants who visited our experimental Web page and completed the measures online (n = 284). This design allowed us to assess the role of Web administration while controlling for differences in sample type, an oft-neglected issue in the Web literature. Results do not support the claim that administering self-report measures over the Web results in a decrease in socially desirable responding. Furthermore, these findings highlight the problems associated with confounding sample and medium. Implications for the use of Web as a research tool are discussed. PMID:17134335

  5. Regularities in responding during performance of a complex choice task.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Eduardo; Orduña, Vladimir

    2015-12-01

    Systematic variations in the rate and temporal patterns of responding under a multiple concurrent-chains schedule were quantified using recurrence metrics and self-organizing maps to assess whether individual rats showed consistent or idiosyncratic patterns. The results indicated that (1) the temporal regularity of response patterns varied as a function of number of training sessions, time on task, magnitude of reinforcement, and reinforcement contingencies; (2) individuals showed heterogeneous, stereotyped patterns of responding, despite similarities in matching behavior; (3) the specific trajectories of behavioral variation shown by individuals were less evident in group-level analyses; and (4) reinforcement contingencies within terminal links strongly modulated response patterns within initial links. Temporal regularity in responding was most evident for responses that led to minimally delayed reinforcers of larger magnitude. Models of response production and selection that take into account the time between individual responses, probabilities of transitions between response options, periodicity within response sequences, and individual differences in response dynamics can clarify the mechanisms that drive behavioral adjustments during operant conditioning. PMID:26077440

  6. Aid and Innovation: How Federal Financial Aid Policy Impacts Student Success and How States Can Respond. Policy Bulletin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichert, Katrina

    2012-01-01

    From Washington to Connecticut, Arkansas to Indiana, state policymakers and community college leaders are focused on building completion pathways to ensure that more students succeed in postsecondary education and make smooth transitions to careers. Financial aid is both an effective and a necessary policy lever to promote this goal. Not only do…

  7. The burden of research on trauma for respondents: a prospective and comparative study on respondents evaluations and predictors.

    PubMed

    van der Velden, Peter G; Bosmans, Mark W G; Scherpenzeel, Annette C

    2013-01-01

    The possible burden of participating in trauma research is an important topic for Ethical Committees (EC's), Review Boards (RB's) and researchers. However, to what extent research on trauma is more burdensome than non-trauma research is unknown. Little is known about which factors explain respondents evaluations on the burden: to what extent are they trauma-related or dependent on other factors such as personality and how respondents evaluate research in general? Data of a large probability based multi-wave internet panel, with surveys on politics and values, personality and health in 2009 and 2011, and a survey on trauma in 2012 provided the unique opportunity to address these questions. Results among respondents confronted with these events in the past 2 years (N = 950) showed that questions on trauma were significantly and systematically evaluated as less pleasant (enjoyed less), more difficult, but also stimulated respondents to think about things more than almost all previous non-trauma surveys. Yet, the computed effect sizes indicated that the differences were (very) small and often meaningless. No differences were found between users and non-users of mental services, in contrast to posttraumatic stress symptoms. Evaluations of the burden of previous surveys in 2011 on politics and values, personality and health most strongly, systematically and independently predicted the burden of questions on trauma, and not posttraumatic stress symptoms, event-related coping self-efficacy and personality factors. For instance, multiple linear regression analyses showed that 30% of the variance of how (un)pleasant questions on trauma and life-events were evaluated, was explained by how (un)pleasant the 3 surveys in 2011 were evaluated, in contrast to posttraumatic stress symptoms (not significant) and coping self-efficacy (5%). Findings question why EC's, RB's and researchers should be more critical of the possible burden of trauma research than of the possible burden of

  8. THE THYROID HORMONE TRANSPORTER, MCT8, SELECTIVELY RESPONDS TO THYROID HORMONE INSUFFICIENCY IN THE DEVELOPMENT RAT BRAIN.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for normal brain development. Therefore, it is not surprising that a variety of adaptive mechanisms are activated in response to TH insufficiency. However, not all brain regions respond in the same fashion to TH insufficiency. This observation...

  9. Influences of task concreteness upon transitive responding in humans.

    PubMed

    Siemann, M; Delius, J D

    1996-01-01

    The derivation of the conclusion "Anna is bigger than Mary" from the premises "Anna is bigger than Paul" and "Mary is smaller than Paul" is considered an instance of transitive deduction. For a non-verbal presentation, the premise statements were here transformed into a multiple operant discrimination task. Adult subjects were trained with overlapping pairs of a six-member stimulus series A+B-, A+C-, C+D-, D+E-, E+F-; +: choice rewarded, -: choice penalized). A computer game-type presentation that hid the actual problem structure from the subjects was employed. The effects of varying the presentation style of the task on the objective performance and the structure awareness of subjects were investigated. A first experiment used random polygons as stimuli and the relations between them were only signalled by the above reinforcement allocations. In a second experiment the stimuli were cartoon figures additionally involved in a dominance hierarchy that was suggested graphically. A third experiment used named items that were related through visible size differences in addition to the reinforcement allocations but was otherwise like an experiment using an abstract format reported by Werner et al. (1992). In all experiments a similar proportion of subjects responded transitively when subsequently tested with the pairs BD, BE and CE by preferentially choosing stimulus B or C. Each subject subsequently filled in a questionnaire, completed a stimulus ordering exercise, and was interviewed to find out whether they were explicitly aware of the stimulus hierarchy underlying each of the tasks. Although the proportion of subjects revealing an explicit transitive responding increased together with the concreteness of the stimuli and their relations across the experiments, the objective performance in terms of choice accuracy did not vary. The accuracy performance on tests could be accurately simulated with a modification of a simple conditioning model. It is concluded that an

  10. Respondent driven sampling of wheelchair users: A lack of traction?

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, John A.; Schluter, Philip J.; Hay-Smith, E. Jean C.; Snell, Deborah L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Internationally, wheelchair users are an emerging demographic phenomenon, due to their increased prevalence and rapidly increasing life-span. While having significant healthcare implications, basic robust epidemiological information about wheelchair users is often lacking due, in part, to this population’s ‘hidden’ nature. Increasingly popular in epidemiological research, Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) provides a mechanism for generating unbiased population-based estimates for hard-to-reach populations, overcoming biases inherent within other sampling methods. This paper reports the first published study to employ RDS amongst wheelchair users. Methods: Between October 2015 and January 2016, a short, successfully piloted, internet-based national survey was initiated. Twenty seeds from diverse organisations were invited to complete the survey then circulate it to peers within their networks following a well-defined protocol. A predetermined reminder protocol was triggered when seeds or their peers failed to respond. All participants were entered into a draw for an iPad. Results: Overall, 19 people participated (nine women); 12 initial seeds, followed by seven second-wave participants arising from four seeds . Completion time for the survey ranged between 7 and 36 minutes. Despite repeated reminders, no further people were recruited. Discussion: While New Zealand wheelchair user numbers are unknown, an estimated 14% of people have physical impairments that limited mobility. The 19 respondents generated from adopting the RDS methodology here thus represents a negligible fraction of wheelchair users in New Zealand, and an insufficient number to ensure equilibrium required for unbiased analyses. While successful in other hard-to-reach populations, applying RDS methodology to wheelchair users requires further consideration. Formative research exploring areas of network characteristics, acceptability of RDS, appropriate incentive options, and seed

  11. The human cost of being a 'first responder'.

    PubMed

    Rabjohn, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    It is curious that among all the literature published on emergency planning and business continuity, the impact on those individuals tasked with dealing with the human cost of disasters is rarely considered. Emergency service personnel are certainly considered a vital component of any response; heroes when outcomes are successful, valiant when they do their best but fail, and occasionally incompetent when the media think it makes a good story. This paper argues that human suffering carries a cost for both responders and society. PMID:23615066

  12. Effects of risperidone, clozapine and the 5-HT6 antagonist GSK-742457 on PCP-induced deficits in reversal learning in the two-lever operant task in male Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, N M W J; van Drimmelen, M; Kops, M; van Elk, J; Wetering, M Middelveld-van de; Schwienbacher, I

    2013-05-01

    Reasoning and problem solving deficits have been reported in schizophrenic patients. In the present study, we have tested rats in a two-lever reversal learning task in a Skinner box to model these deficits. In other studies using the Skinner box, atypical antipsychotics fully reversed phencyclidine (PCP)-induced impairments in reversal learning which is in contrast to clinical observations where antipsychotics lack the ability to fully reverse cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Therefore, it can be argued that the outcome of these tests may lack predictive value. In the present study, after training on a spatial discrimination between two levers, rats were exposed to a reversal of the previously learned stimulus-response contingency during 5 days. We first investigated the effects of sub-chronic treatment with the non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists dizocilpine (MK-801) and PCP on reversal learning and extinction in male Sprague Dawley rats. Subsequently, we studied the effects of different PCP treatment regimes. Then, we investigated whether the atypical antipsychotics risperidone and clozapine and the 5-hydroxytryptamine6 (5-HT6) antagonist GSK-742457 could reverse the PCP-induced deficits. All drugs were administered subcutaneously (s.c.). MK-801 did not impair reversal learning, while PCP (1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg) induced a clear deficit in reversal learning. Both compounds, however, disrupted extinction at all tested doses. Risperidone and clozapine were both ineffective in significantly ameliorating the PCP-induced deficit in reversal learning which fits well with the clinical observations. The lowest dose of clozapine (1.25 mg/kg) had an intermediate effect in ameliorating the deficit in reversal learning induced by PCP (not different from control or PCP-treated rats). The lowest dose of GSK-742457 (0.63 mg/kg) fully reversed the PCP-induced deficits while the higher dose (5.0 mg/kg) had an intermediate effect. PMID:23384714

  13. Activity Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerpelman, Larry C.; Weiner, Michael J.

    This twenty-four item scale assesses students' actual and desired political-social activism in terms of physical participation, communication activities, and information-gathering activities. About ten minutes are required to complete the instrument. The scale is divided into two subscales. The first twelve items (ACT-A) question respondents on…

  14. A Role for Science in Responding to Health Crises.

    PubMed

    Colf, Leremy A; Brothers, Reginald; Murata, Christina E

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate plays a role in public health that extends beyond biodefense. These responsibilities were exercised as part of the 2014-16 Ebola outbreak, leading to productive and beneficial contributions to the international public health response and improved operations in the United States. However, we and others have identified numerous areas for improvement. Based on our successes and lessons learned, we propose a number of ways that DHS, the interagency, and academia can act now to ensure improved responses to future public health crises. These include pre-developing scientific capabilities to respond agnostically to threats, and disease-specific master question lists to organize and inform initial efforts. We are generating DHS-specific playbooks and tools for anticipating future needs and capturing requests from DHS components and our national and international partners, where efforts will also be used to refine and exercise communication and information-sharing practices. These experiences and improvement efforts have encouraged discussions on the role of science in developing government policy, specifically responding to public health crises. We propose specific considerations for both scientists and government decision makers to ensure that the best available science is incorporated into policy and operational decisions to facilitate highly effective responses to future health crises. PMID:27482881

  15. A Role for Science in Responding to Health Crises

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Reginald; Murata, Christina E.

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate plays a role in public health that extends beyond biodefense. These responsibilities were exercised as part of the 2014-16 Ebola outbreak, leading to productive and beneficial contributions to the international public health response and improved operations in the United States. However, we and others have identified numerous areas for improvement. Based on our successes and lessons learned, we propose a number of ways that DHS, the interagency, and academia can act now to ensure improved responses to future public health crises. These include pre-developing scientific capabilities to respond agnostically to threats, and disease-specific master question lists to organize and inform initial efforts. We are generating DHS-specific playbooks and tools for anticipating future needs and capturing requests from DHS components and our national and international partners, where efforts will also be used to refine and exercise communication and information-sharing practices. These experiences and improvement efforts have encouraged discussions on the role of science in developing government policy, specifically responding to public health crises. We propose specific considerations for both scientists and government decision makers to ensure that the best available science is incorporated into policy and operational decisions to facilitate highly effective responses to future health crises. PMID:27482881

  16. CALIBRATION OF OBSERVATIONAL MEASUREMENT OF RATE OF RESPONDING

    PubMed Central

    Mudford, Oliver C; Zeleny, Jason R; Fisher, Wayne W; Klum, Molly E; Owen, Todd M

    2011-01-01

    The quality of measurement systems used in almost all natural sciences other than behavior analysis is usually evaluated through calibration study rather than relying on interobserver agreement. We demonstrated some of the basic features of calibration using observer-measured rates of free-operant responding from 10 scripted 10-min calibration samples on video. Five novice and 5 experienced observers recorded (on laptop computers) response samples with a priori determined response rates ranging from 0 to 8 responses per minute. Observer records were then compared with these predetermined reference values using linear regression and related graphical depiction. Results indicated that all of the observers recorded rates that were accurate to within ±0.4 responses per minute and 5 were accurate to within ±0.1 responses per minute, indicating that continuous recording of responding on computers can be highly accurate and precise. Additional research is recommended to investigate conditions that affect the quality of direct observational measurement of behavior. PMID:21941386

  17. First aid skill retention of first responders within the workplace

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent literature states that many necessary skills of CPR and first aid are forgotten shortly after certification. The purpose of this study was to determine the skill and knowledge decay in first aid in those who are paid to respond to emergency situations within a workplace. Methods Using a choking victim scenario, the sequence and accuracy of events were observed and recorded in 257 participants paid to act as first responders in large industrial or service industry settings. A multiple choice exam was also written to determine knowledge retention. Results First aid knowledge was higher in those who were trained at a higher level, and did not significantly decline over time. Those who had renewed their certificate one or more times performed better than those who had learned the information only once. During the choking scenario many skills were performed poorly, regardless of days since last training, such as hand placement and abdominal thrusts. Compressions following the victim becoming unconscious also showed classic signs of skill deterioration after 30 days. Conclusions As many skills deteriorate rapidly over the course of the first 90 days, changing frequency of certification is not necessarily the most obvious choice to increase retention of skill and knowledge. Alternatively, methods of regularly "refreshing" a skill should be explored that could be delivered at a high frequency - such as every 90 days. PMID:21303536

  18. Please respond ASAP: workplace telepressure and employee recovery.

    PubMed

    Barber, Larissa K; Santuzzi, Alecia M

    2015-04-01

    Organizations rely heavily on asynchronous message-based technologies (e.g., e-mail) for the purposes of work-related communications. These technologies are primary means of knowledge transfer and building social networks. As a by-product, workers might feel varying levels of preoccupations with and urges for responding quickly to messages from clients, coworkers, or supervisors--an experience we label as workplace telepressure. This experience can lead to fast response times and thus faster decisions and other outcomes initially. However, research from the stress and recovery literature suggests that the defining features of workplace telepressure interfere with needed work recovery time and stress-related outcomes. The present set of studies defined and validated a new scale to measure telepressure. Study 1 tested an initial pool of items and found some support for a single-factor structure after problematic items were removed. As expected, public self-consciousness, techno-overload, and response expectations were moderately associated with telepressure in Study 1. Study 2 demonstrated that workplace telepressure was distinct from other personal (job involvement, affective commitment) and work environment (general and ICT work demands) factors and also predicted burnout (physical and cognitive), absenteeism, sleep quality, and e-mail responding beyond those factors. Implications for future research and workplace practices are discussed. PMID:25365629

  19. Language Generativity, Response Generalization, and Derived Relational Responding

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ian; McElwee, John; Ming, Siri

    2013-01-01

    Language generativity can be described as the ability to produce sentences never before said, and to understand sentences never before heard. One process often cited as underlying language generativity is response generalization. However, though the latter seems to promise a technical understanding of the former at a process level, an investigation of definitions and approaches to the term “response generalization” that appear in the literature suggests that it does not do so. We argue that a more promising candidate for the role of key process underlying language generativity is derived relational responding. We introduce the latter concept and describe empirical research showing its connection with language. We subsequently present a relational frame theory (RFT) conceptualization of derived relations as contextually controlled generalized relational responding. We then review a series of recent studies on derived manding in developmentally delayed children and adults that arguably demonstrate the applied utility of a derived relations-based approach with respect to the phenomenon of generative language. PMID:23814374

  20. Primary innate immune cells respond efficiently to polymeric peptidoglycan but not to peptidoglycan monomers1

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Janaki K.; Coggeshall, K. Mark

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall of bacteria induces pro-inflammatory cytokines in monocytes and neutrophils in human blood. The nature of the stimulating component of bacterial cell walls is not well understood. We have previously shown polymeric peptidoglycan (PGN2) has this activity, and the cytokine response requires PGN internalization and trafficking to lysosomes. Here, we demonstrate that peptidoglycan monomers like muramyl dipeptide and soluble peptidoglycan fail to induce robust cytokine production in immune cells although they activate the NOD proteins in transfected cell models. We further show that lysosomal extracts from immune cells degrade intact peptidoglycan into simpler products and that the lysosomal digestion products activate the NOD proteins. We conclude that naïve innate immune cells recognize PGN in its polymeric form rather than monomers such as muramyl dipeptide and require PGN lysosomal hydrolysis to respond. These findings offer new opportunities in the treatment of sepsis, especially sepsis arising from Gram-positive organisms. PMID:21357534

  1. A Staphylococcus aureus regulatory system that responds to host heme and modulates virulence

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Victor J.; Stauff, Devin L.; Pishchany, Gleb; Bezbradica, Jelena S.; Gordy, Laura E.; Iturregui, Juan; Anderson, Kelsi L.; Dunman, Paul M.; Joyce, Sebastian; Skaar, Eric P.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium responsible for tremendous morbidity and mortality worldwide, exists as a harmless commensal organism in approximately 25% of the human population. Identifying the molecular machinery that is activated upon infection is central to understanding staphylococcal pathogenesis. We describe here the Heme-Sensor System (HssRS) that responds to heme exposure and activates expression of the Heme Regulated Transporter (HrtAB). The coordinated activities of HssRS and HrtAB maintain intracellular heme homeostasis and modulate S. aureus virulence. Inactivation of the Hss or Hrt systems leads to increased virulence in a vertebrate infection model, a phenotype that is associated with an inhibited innate immune response. Genomic analyses have identified orthologous Hss and Hrt systems in Bacillus anthracis, Listeria monocytogenes, and Enterococcus faecalis, suggesting a conserved regulatory system by which Gram positive pathogens sense heme as a molecular marker of internal host tissue and modulate virulence. PMID:18005689

  2. Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor and human leukocyte antigen-C genotypes in rheumatoid arthritis primary responders and non-responders to anti-TNF-α therapy.

    PubMed

    McGeough, Cathy M; Berrar, Daniel; Wright, Gary; Mathews, Clare; Gilmore, Paula; Cunningham, Rodat T; Bjourson, Anthony J

    2012-06-01

    The identification of patients who will respond to anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF-α) therapy will improve the efficacy, safety, and economic impact of these agents. We investigated whether killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genes are related to response to anti-TNF-α therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Sixty-four RA patients and 100 healthy controls were genotyped for 16 KIR genes and human leukocyte antigen-C (HLA-C) group 1/2 using polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP). Each patient received anti-TNF-α therapy (adalimumab, etanercept, or infliximab), and clinical responses were evaluated after 3 months using the disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28). We investigated the correlations between the carriership of KIR genes, HLA-C group 1/2 genes, and clinical data with response to therapy. Patients responding to therapy showed a significantly higher frequency of KIR2DS2/KIR2DL2 (67.7% R vs. 33.3% NR; P = 0.012). A positive clinical outcome was associated with an activating KIR-HLA genotype; KIR2DS2 (+) HLA-C group 1/2 homozygous. Inversely, non-response was associated with the relatively inhibitory KIR2DS2 (-) HLA-C group 1/2 heterozygous genotype. The KIR and HLA-C genotype of an RA patient may provide predictive information for response to anti-TNF-α therapy. PMID:21373785

  3. Evaluation of animal models of obsessive-compulsive disorder: correlation with phasic dopamine neuron activity.

    PubMed

    Sesia, Thibaut; Bizup, Brandon; Grace, Anthony A

    2013-07-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a psychiatric condition defined by intrusive thoughts (obsessions) associated with compensatory and repetitive behaviour (compulsions). However, advancement in our understanding of this disorder has been hampered by the absence of effective animal models and correspondingly analysis of the physiological changes that may be present in these models. To address this, we have evaluated two current rodent models of OCD; repeated injection of dopamine D2 agonist quinpirole and repeated adolescent injection of the tricyclic agent clomipramine in combination with a behavioural paradigm designed to produce compulsive lever pressing. These results were then compared with their relative impact on the state of activity of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system using extracellular recoding of spontaneously active dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The clomipramine model failed to exacerbate compulsive lever pressing and VTA dopamine neurons in clomipramine-treated rats had mildly diminished bursting activity. In contrast, quinpirole-treated animals showed significant increases in compulsive lever pressing, which was concurrent with a substantial diminution of bursting activity of VTA dopamine neurons. Therefore, VTA dopamine activity correlated with the behavioural response in these models. Taken together, these data support the view that compulsive behaviours likely reflect, at least in part, a disruption of the dopaminergic system, more specifically by a decrease in baseline phasic dopamine signalling mediated by burst firing of dopamine neurons. PMID:23360787

  4. Operant Responding for Sucrose by Rats Bred for High or Low Saccharin Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Gosnell, Blake A.; Mitra, Anaya; Avant, Ross A.; Anker, Justin J.; Carroll, Marilyn E.; Levine, Allen S.

    2010-01-01

    The use of rats differing in the intake of sweet substances has highlighted some interesting parallels between taste preferences and drug self-administration. For example, rats selectively bred to consume high (HiS) or low (LoS) amounts of a 0.1% saccharin solution (when compared to water consumption), show corresponding differences across several measures of cocaine self-administration (HiS > LoS). In this study, we measured whether the two strains also differ when response requirements are imposed for obtaining a sucrose reinforcer. Male HiS and LoS rats were measured for operant responding for sucrose pellets under fixed-ratio (FR) schedules of 1, 3, 5 and 10 and under a progressive-ratio (PR) schedule, during which the response requirement for each successive pellet increased exponentially. The effect of systemic naltrexone (0.3. 1 and 3 mg/kg) on PR responding for sucrose pellets was also tested. Under all FR and PR schedules, the numbers of pellets obtained by the LoS rats were significantly lower than those obtained by the HiS rats. Although the LoS weighed more than the HiS rats, this difference does not appear to explain differences in operant behavior. No strain differences in the effect of naltrexone were observed; the 3 mg/kg dose reduced the number of pellets obtained in both strains. Measures of locomotor activity taken prior to operant trials suggest that the differences in responding were not due to differences in general activity levels. These studies provide further characterization of the HiS and LoS rat lines by demonstrating that motivation to consume sucrose in greater in HiS than in LoS rats. PMID:20096717

  5. Assessing and responding to infant mental health needs.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Judy

    2013-09-01

    Early recognition of mental health problems in maltreated infants, coupled with tailored support to aid recovery, has the potential to offer significant benefits to a population whose needs have perhaps remained hidden in the past. All forms of maltreatment may adversely affect infant mental health, but perhaps none more so than emotional neglect. Universal contact with families with young children makes health visitors ideally placed to provide early support to this vulnerable group, but such practice requires considerable knowledge and understanding. This paper examines how emotional neglect can impact on an infant's mental health and explores how health visitors can assess and respond effectively to this key health need. Throughout, the term 'infant' is used to describe children from birth to age three. PMID:24133942

  6. Livedoid Vasculopathy with Hyperhomocysteinemia Responding to Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Rahul; Sharma, Aseem; Vasudevan, Biju; Sridhar, Jandhyala; Deo, Rajeev; Mohanty, CS

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old male presented to the dermatology department with complaints of multiple ulcers over both legs of 6 years duration. The ulcers had a waxing and waning course with present exacerbation of lesions since 1 month. Dermatological examination revealed multiple ulcers distributed in a reticular pattern over medial and lateral aspects of both lower legs, extensor aspect of both ankles and dorsum of both feet. Multiple interspersed atrophic porcelain white scars were also present. Investigations revealed raised serum homocysteine levels. A skin biopsy from the ulcers showed features of livedoid vasculopathy. Following recurrence of lesions after oral corticosteroid therapy, the patient was given a course of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the ulcers to which he responded very well. This case is being presented for the novel option of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in livedoid vasculopathy, which by itself is rarely reported in this part of the world. PMID:26538741

  7. Respondents, Operants, and Emergents: Toward an Integrated Perspective on Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Daune M.; Washburn, David A.; Hillix, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A triarchic organization of behavior, building on Skinner's description of respondents and operants, is proposed by introducing a third class of behavior called 'emergents.' Emergents are new responses, never specifically reinforced, that require operations more complex than association. Some of these operations occur naturally only in animals above a minimum level of brain complexity, and are developed in an interaction between treatment and organismic variables. (Here complexity is defined in terms of relative levels of hierarchical integration made possible both by the amount of brain, afforded both by brain-body allometric relationships and by encephalization, and, also, the elaboration of dendritic and synaptic connections within the cortex and connections between various parts/regions of the brain.) Examples of emergents are discussed to advance this triarchic view, of behavior. The prime example is language. This triarchic view reflects both the common goals and the cumulative nature of psychological science.

  8. Radar detection of drones responding to honeybee queen pheromone.

    PubMed

    Loper, G M; Wolf, W W; Taylor, O R

    1993-09-01

    The response of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) drones to queen pheromone(s) (either natural from a mated queen, or synthetic from a lure) was recorded using an X-band, ground-based radar. The distribution of drones (insect targets on the radar screen) changed from a scattered distribution to a line concentration (downwind) when the pheromone was released. Displacement within the line concentration was toward the pheromone. This response was seen as far as 800±15 m downwind from a lure with 10 mg of synthetic 9-oxodec-trans-2-enoic acid (9-ODA) and as far as 420±15 m from a mated queen. These studies demonstrate that queen pheromone can be detected by drones at much greater distances than previously believed and illustrate how X-band radar may be used to establish the distances at which insects of similar or larger size respond to pheromones. PMID:24249369

  9. Lysosomal Adaptation: How the Lysosome Responds to External Cues

    PubMed Central

    Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the importance of the lysosome in cell metabolism and organism physiology goes far beyond the simple disposal of cellular garbage. This dynamic organelle is situated at the crossroad of the most important cellular pathways and is involved in sensing, signaling, and transcriptional mechanisms that respond to environmental cues, such as nutrients. Two main mediators of these lysosomal adaptation mechanisms are the mTORC1 kinase complex and the transcription factor EB (TFEB). These two factors are linked in a lysosome-to-nucleus signaling pathway that provides the lysosome with the ability to adapt to extracellular cues and control its own biogenesis. Modulation of lysosomal function by acting on TFEB has a profound impact on cellular clearance and energy metabolism and is a promising therapeutic target for a large variety of disease conditions. PMID:24799353

  10. Responding to Prenatal Disclosure of Past Sexual Abuse

    PubMed Central

    White, Amina

    2014-01-01

    The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that physicians elicit a sexual abuse and rape trauma history for every patient. Yet in practice, physicians may still struggle to understand how best to obtain this history and what clinical obligations arise when a physician inquires and a woman discloses a remote history of childhood or adult sexual trauma during the course of her prenatal care. This commentary offers a practical strategy for responding to sexual trauma disclosure by developing a tailored obstetric care plan for avoiding re-traumatization in labor. In this way, obstetricians may avoid causing harm and begin to meet the unique obstetric and psychological needs of sexual trauma survivors during pregnancy and delivery. PMID:24807334

  11. Misery loves company: mood-congruent emotional responding to music.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Patrick G; Schellenberg, E Glenn; Griffith, Andrew T

    2011-10-01

    We examined emotional responding to music after mood induction. On each trial, listeners heard a 30-s music excerpt and rated how much they liked it, whether it sounded happy or sad, and how familiar it was. When the excerpts sounded unambiguously happy or sad (Experiment 1), the typical preference for happy-sounding music was eliminated after inducing a sad mood. When the excerpts sounded ambiguous with respect to happiness and sadness (Experiment 2), listeners perceived more sadness after inducing a sad mood. Sad moods had no influence on familiarity ratings (Experiments 1 and 2). These findings imply that "misery loves company." Listeners in a sad mood fail to show the typical preference for happy-sounding music, and they perceive more sadness in music that is ambiguous with respect to mood. PMID:21639629

  12. Accuracy of discrimination, rate of responding, and resistance to change.

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, John A; Milo, Jessica; Odum, Amy L; Shahan, Timothy A

    2003-01-01

    Pigeons were trained on multiple schedules in which responding on a center key produced matching-to-sample trials according to the same variable-interval 30-s schedules in both components. Matching trials consisted of a vertical or tilted line sample on the center key followed by vertical and tilted comparisons on the side keys. Correct responses to comparison stimuli were reinforced with probability .80 in the rich component and .20 in the lean component. Baseline response rates and matching accuracies generally were higher in the rich component, consistent with previous research. When performance was disrupted by prefeeding, response-independent food during intercomponent intervals, intrusion of a delay between sample and comparison stimuli, or extinction, both response rates and matching accuracies generally decreased. Proportions of baseline response rate were greater in the rich component for all disrupters except delay, which had relatively small and inconsistent effects on response rate. By contrast, delay had large and consistent effects on matching accuracy, and proportions of baseline matching accuracy were greater in the rich component for all four disrupters. The dissociation of response rate and accuracy with delay reflects the localized impact of delay on matching performance. The similarity of the data for response rate and accuracy with prefeeding, response-independent food, and extinction shows that matching performance, like response rate, is more resistant to change in a rich than in a lean component. This result extends resistance to change analyses from the frequency of response emission to the degree of stimulus control, and suggests that the strength of discriminating, like the strength of responding, is positively related to rate of reinforcement. PMID:12908760

  13. Hospital-wide first-responder automated external defibrillator programme: 1 year experience.

    PubMed

    Hanefeld, Christoph; Lichte, Carolin; Mentges-Schröter, Ina; Sirtl, Clemens; Mügge, Andreas

    2005-08-01

    The first year experience with a hospital-wide first-responder automated external defibrillator (AED) programme implemented in a 683-bed University Hospital is reported. Throughout the hospital, 14 "AED access spots" were identified which could be easily reached from all wards and diagnostic rooms within 30s. AEDs were installed (Lifepak 500; Medtronik PhysioControl Corp., Redmond, USA, equipped with a Biolog 3000i portable ECG monitor; Micromedical Industries Ltd., Labrador, Australia). Within 3 months, 120 medical officers, 750 nurses, and 50 administrative or technical staff underwent a 2h training programme. An AED was applied and activated by nurses/medical staff before the cardiac arrest team arrived in 27 of 33 cases (81.8%) of witnessed cardiac arrest. The median time from onset of the emergency call to the activation of the AED (record of ECG) was on average 2.1 min (range 1.0--4.5 min). In 18 of 27 cases in which the AED was installed promptly, the primary arrest rhythm was either VT or VF, and the AED delivered a shock. For this subgroup, the rate of return of spontaneous circulation and the rate of discharge at home were 88.9 and 55.6%, respectively. This encourages us to extend the concept of first-responder AED-defibrillation throughout our hospital. PMID:16053941

  14. Tracing explosives in soil with transcriptional regulators of Pseudomonas putida evolved for responding to nitrotoluenes

    PubMed Central

    Garmendia, Junkal; De Las Heras, Aitor; Galvão, Teca Calcagno; De Lorenzo, Víctor

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although different biological approaches for detection of anti‐personnel mines and other unexploded ordnance (UXO) have been entertained, none of them has been rigorously documented thus far in the scientific literature. The industrial 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) habitually employed in the manufacturing of mines is at all times tainted with a small but significant proportion of the more volatile 2,4 dinitrotoluene (2,4 DNT) and other nitroaromatic compounds. By using mutation‐prone PCR and DNA sequence shuffling we have evolved in vitro and selected in vivo variants of the effector recognition domain of the toluene‐responsive XylR regulator of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida that responds to mono‐, bi‐ and trinitro substituted toluenes. Re‐introduction of such variants in P. putida settled the transcriptional activity of the cognate promoters (Po and Pu) as a function of the presence of nitrotoluenes in the medium. When strains bearing transcriptional fusions to reporters with an optical output (luxAB, GFP) were spread on soil spotted with nitrotoluenes, the signal triggered by promoter activation allowed localization of the target compounds on the soil surface. Our data provide a proof of concept that non‐natural transcription factors evolved to respond to nitroaromatics can be engineered in soil bacteria and inoculated on a target site to pinpoint the presence of explosives. This approach thus opens new ways to tackle this gigantic humanitarian problem. PMID:21261843

  15. Development of Human Anti-Murine T-cell Receptor Antibodies in Both Responding and Non-responding Patients Enrolled in TCR Gene Therapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Jeremy L.; Theoret, Marc R.; Zheng, Zhili; Lamers, Cor; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Immune responses to gene-modified cells are a concern in the field of human gene therapy as they may impede effective treatment. We conducted two clinical trials in which cancer patients were treated with lymphocytes genetically engineered to express murine T cell receptors (mTCR) specific for tumor-associated antigens p53 and gp100. Experimental Design Twenty-six patients treated with autologous lymphocytes expressing mTCR had blood and serum samples available for analysis. Patient sera were assayed for development of a humoral immune response. Adoptive cell transfer characteristics were analyzed to identify correlates to immune response. Results Six of 26 (23%) patients post-treatment sera exhibited specific binding of human anti-mTCR antibodies to lymphocytes transduced with the mTCR. Antibody development was found in both responding and non-responding patients. Three of these six patients post-treatment sera mediated a 60 – 99% inhibition of mTCR activity as measured by a reduction in antigen-specific IFN-γ release. Detailed analysis of post-treatment serum revealed that antibody binding was beta chain specific in one patient whereas it was alpha chain specific in another. Conclusions A subset of patients treated with mTCR engineered T-cells developed antibodies directed to the mTCR variable regions and not to the constant region domains common to all mTCR. Overall, the development of a host immune response was not associated with the level of transduced cell persistence or response to therapy. In summary, patients treated with mTCR can develop an immune response to gene-modified cells in a minority of cases, but this may not affect clinical outcome. PMID:21138872

  16. Rapid communication: experimental evidence that juvenile pelagic jacks (Carangidae) respond behaviorally to DMSP.

    PubMed

    Debose, Jennifer L; Nevitt, Gabrielle A; Dittman, Andrew H

    2010-03-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is produced by marine algae and released during foraging activity by zooplankton and fish. Pelagic fishes depend on patchily distributed foraging opportunities, and DMSP may be an important signaling molecule for these events. We have previously shown that the abundance of carangid jacks is positively associated with elevated DMSP levels over coral reefs in the Gulf of Mexico, suggesting that these fishes may use spatial and temporal variation in DMSP to locate foraging opportunities. Here, we extend this work by demonstrating that juveniles of two species of pelagic jack, crevalle jack, Caranx hippos, and bluefin trevally, C. melampygus, detect and respond to DMSP in a flow-through tank in the laboratory. Juveniles of these species showed elevated swimming activity in response to ecologically relevant concentrations of DMSP (10(-9) M). These results provide further evidence that this chemical may serve as a chemosensory cue for carangid species. PMID:20177745

  17. Mode of action and pharmacogenomic biomarkers for exceptional responders to didemnin B

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Malia B.; McMillan, Elizabeth A.; Rosales, Tracy I.; Kim, Hyun Seok; Ou, Yi-Hung; Toombs, Jason E.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Minden, Mark D.; MacMillan, John B.; White, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Modern cancer treatment employs many effective chemotherapeutic agents originally discovered from natural sources. However, a significant challenge currently confronting clinical application is balancing systemic toxicity risk with therapeutic benefit. The cyclic depsipeptide didemnin B has demonstrated impressive anti-cancer activity in preclinical models. Clinical use has been approved but is limited by sparse patient responses combined with toxicity risk and an unclear mechanism of action. From a broad-scale effort to match antineoplastic natural products to their cellular activities, we found that didemnin B selectively induces rapid and wholesale apoptosis through dual inhibition of PPT1 and EEF1A1. Furthermore, empirical discovery of a small panel of exceptional responders to didemnin B allowed generation of a regularized regression model to extract a sparse-feature genetic biomarker capable of predicting sensitivity to didemnin B. This may facilitate patient selection that could enhance and expand therapeutic application of didemnin B against neoplastic disease. PMID:25867045

  18. Effects of sex and remifentanil dose on rats' acquisition of responding for a remifentanil-conditioned reinforcer.

    PubMed

    Bertz, Jeremiah W; Jackson, Emily L; Barron, Davina R; Woods, James H

    2016-04-01

    Opioid-conditioned reinforcement is thought to exacerbate opioid abuse and dependence. Sex/gender can influence opioid abuse behaviors, but the effects of sex/gender on opioid-conditioned reinforcement, specifically, are unclear. In this study, we compared new-response acquisition with opioid-conditioned reinforcement in male and female rats. First, separate groups received response-independent remifentanil injections (0.0-32.0 μg/kg, intravenous) and presentations of a light-noise stimulus. In the experimental groups, injections and stimulus presentations always co-occurred [paired Pavlovian conditioning (PAV)]; in the control groups, the two occurred independently of each other (random PAV). Next, in the instrumental acquisition (ACQ) sessions, two novel nose-poke manipulanda were introduced. All animals (regardless of sex, dose, and PAV type) could respond in the active nose-poke, which produced the stimulus alone, or in the inactive nose-poke. Both males and females dose-dependently acquired nose-poke responding (active>inactive) after paired PAV, but not after random PAV. Therefore, the stimulus was a conditioned reinforcer. We identified three sex differences. First, only females acquired responding after paired PAV with 32.0 μg/kg remifentanil. Second, using a progressive ratio schedule for ACQ, both sexes acquired responding, but females made significantly more active responses. Third, when a single session of PAV was conducted, only males acquired responding. Thus, rats' sex interacts with pharmacological and environmental factors to determine opioid-conditioned reinforcement. PMID:26580131

  19. Corneal dry-responsive neurons in the spinal trigeminal nucleus respond to innocuous cooling in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kurose, Masayuki; Meng, Ian D

    2013-05-01

    Corneal primary afferent neurons that respond to drying of the ocular surface have been previously characterized and found to respond to innocuous cooling, menthol, and hyperosmotic stimuli. The purpose of the present study was to examine the receptive field properties of second-order neurons in the trigeminal nucleus that respond to drying of the ocular surface. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings were performed in anesthetized rats, and dry-responsive corneal units were isolated in the brain stem at the transition zone between the spinal trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and subnucleus interpolaris. Corneal units were characterized according to their responses to changes in temperature (cooling and heating), hyperosmotic artificial tears, menthol, and low pH. All dry-responsive neurons (n = 18) responded to cooling of the ocular surface. In addition, these neurons responded to hyperosmotic stimuli and menthol application to the cornea. One-half of the neurons were activated by low pH, and these acid-sensitive neurons were also activated by noxious heat. Furthermore, neurons that were activated by low pH had a significantly lower response to cooling and menthol. These results indicate that dry-responsive neurons recorded in the trigeminal nucleus receive input from cold, sensitive primary afferent neurons, with a subset of these neurons receiving input from corneal primary afferent neurons sensitive to acid and noxious heat. It is proposed that acid-insensitive corneal neurons represent a labeled line for lacrimation in response to evaporation of tears from the ocular surface, whereas acid-sensitive neurons are involved in tearing, elicited by damaging or potentially damaging stimuli. PMID:23446686

  20. What is wrong with non-respondents? Alcohol-, drug- and smoking related mortality and morbidity in a 12-year follow up study of respondents and non-respondents in the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Anne Illemann; Ekholm, Ola; Gray, Linsay; Glümer, Charlotte; Juel, Knud

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim Response rates in health surveys have diminished over the last two decades, making it difficult to obtain reliable information on health and health-related risk factors in different population groups. This study compared cause-specific mortality and morbidity among survey respondents and different types of non-respondents to estimate alcohol-, drug- and smoking related mortality and morbidity among non-respondents. Design Prospective follow-up study of respondents and non-respondents in two cross-sectional health surveys. Setting Denmark. Participants A total sample of 39,540 Danish citizens aged 16 or older. Measurements Register-based information on cause-specific mortality and morbidity at the individual level was obtained for respondents (n=28,072) and different types of non-respondents (refusals n=8,954; illness/disabled n=731, uncontactable n=1,593). Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine differences in alcohol-, drug- and smoking-related mortality and morbidity, respectively, in a 12 year follow-up period. Findings Overall, non-response was associated with a significantly increased hazard ratio of 1.56 (95% CI: 1.36–1.78) for alcohol-related morbidity, 1.88 (95% CI: 1.38–2.57) for alcohol-related mortality, 1.55 (95% CI: 1.27–1.88) for drug-related morbidity, 3.04 (95% CI: 1.57–5.89) for drug-related mortality and 1.15 (95% CI: 1.03–1.29) for smoking-related morbidity. The hazard ratio for smoking-related mortality also tended to be higher among non-respondents compared with respondents although no significant association was evident (HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.95-1.36). Uncontactable and ill/disabled non-respondents generally had a higher hazard ratio of alcohol-, drug- and smoking related mortality and morbidity compared with refusal non-respondents. Conclusion Health survey non-respondents in Denmark have an increased hazard ratio of alcohol-, drug-, and smoking-related mortality and morbidity compared with respondents