Science.gov

Sample records for active limb sounding

  1. Calibration of the Shuttle Ozone Limb Sounding Experiment (SOLSE) and the Limb Ozone Retrieval Experiment (LORE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janz, S. J.; Hilsenrath, E.; McPeters, R.; Heath, D. F.; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The calibration and characterization of two new instruments designed to retrieve ozone profiles into the lower stratosphere will be presented. These instruments will fly as a single payload on the Space Shuttle Columbia currently scheduled to lift off July 11, 2002. The purpose of SOLSE (Shuttle Ozone Limb Sounding Experiment) and LORE (Limb Ozone Retrieval Experiment) is to provide a thorough test of the limb ozone retrieval technique, which is being employed on several satellite instruments currently deployed or planned for deployment in the near future. OSIRIS (Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System) and SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography) are already in orbit, while OMPS (the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite) is planned as the primary US ozone monitoring instrument in the next decade.. SOLSE is a Czerny-Turner spectrograph utilizing a 1k x 1k cooled CCD at the focal plane and covering the spectral range of 310-380 nm in the ultraviolet and 535-865 nm in the visible to near infrared. LORE is a 5 channel filter radiometer with center band wavelengths of 322, 350, 603, 675, and 1000 nm. The focus of this paper will be on measurements of the SOLSE spectrograph performance in the limb-viewing configuration including stray light rejection, spatial and spectral resolution and absolute radiometric response.

  2. The sound of activism.

    PubMed

    Sandstrom, B; Vetter, C

    2001-01-01

    ABSTRACT A longtime advocate for female empowerment and equality, Boden Sandstrom has worked for political change in many arenas. In the 1960s, she began a career as a librarian, but soon made activism her full-time job, working for feminist, leftist and socialist causes. In the 1970s, she found a way to turn her lifelong passion for music into a career as a sound engineer. Once established in that profession, she began donating her services to political events, marches, demonstrations, and rallies. After thirteen years of running her own company, called Woman Sound,Inc. (later City Sound Productions,Inc.), she turned to the study of ethnomusicology. She is now Program Manager and Lecturer for the Ethnomusicology Program at the University of Maryland, where she is also working on her doctorate in that subject. She continues to freelance as a sound engineer and serve as a technical producer for major events. PMID:24802836

  3. Divergent transcriptional activities determine limb identity

    PubMed Central

    Ouimette, Jean-François; Jolin, Marisol Lavertu; L'honoré, Aurore; Gifuni, Anthony; Drouin, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Limbs develop using a common genetic programme despite widely differing morphologies. This programme is modulated by limb-restricted regulators such as hindlimb (HL) transcription factors Pitx1 and Tbx4 and the forelimb (FL) Tbx5. Both Tbx factors have been implicated in limb patterning and growth, but their relative activities and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this paper, we show that Tbx4 and Tbx5 harbour conserved and divergent transcriptional regulatory domains that account for their roles in limb development. In particular, both factors share an activator domain and the ability to stimulate limb growth. However, we find that Tbx4 is the primary effector of HL identity for both skeletal and muscle development; this activity relies on a repressor domain that is inactivated by a human TBX4 small-patella syndrome mutation. We propose that limb identity is largely achieved by default in FL, whereas a specific repressor activity unique to Tbx4 determines HL identity. PMID:20975709

  4. Infrared Limb Sounding with Cassini CIRS: Optimal Viewing Strategy Using Horizon Nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Flasar, F. Michael

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate a question of science optimization during Cassini flybys of Titan. The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) makes limb during the closest approach period when the visible horizon circle is moving swiftly across the planet. We have sought to discover if any points on the horizon are preferred for limb sounding due to having minimum movement relative to the surface. By numerical calculation, backed by geometric analysis, we find that two limited regions on the horizon are continuously visible during the entire encounter. We term these "limb nodes" and show how they may be employed by CIRS to optimize science by minimizing the source of systematic error due to spatial smear. These conclusions are applicable to many similar scenarios of spacecraft limb sounding during hyperbolic flyby encounters.

  5. Synergy between middle infrared and millimeter-wave limb sounding of atmospheric temperature and minor constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, Ugo; Del Bianco, Samuele; Ceccherini, Simone; Gai, Marco; Dinelli, Bianca Maria; Castelli, Elisa; Oelhaf, Hermann; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Höpfner, Michael; Gerber, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Synergistic exploitation of redundant and complementary information from independent observations of the same target remains a major issue in atmospheric remote sounding and increasing attention is devoted to investigate optimized or innovative methods for the combination of two or more measured data sets. This paper focuses on the synergy between middle infrared and millimeter-wave limb sounding measurements of atmospheric composition and temperature and reports the results of a study conducted as part of the preparatory activities of the PREMIER (Process Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimeter-wave Emitted Radiation) mission candidate to the Core Missions of the European Space Agency (ESA) Earth Explorer 7. The activity was based on data acquired by the MIPAS-STR (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - STRatospheric aircraft) and MARSCHALS (Millimetre-wave Airborne Receivers for Spectroscopic CHaracterisation in Atmospheric Limb Sounding) instruments on-board the high-altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysica during the flight of the PremierEx (PREMIER Experiment) campaign on 10 March 2010 from Kiruna, Sweden, for observation of the Arctic upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The cloud coverage observed along the flight provided representative test cases to evaluate the synergy in three different scenarios: low clouds in the first part, no clouds in the central part and high tropospheric clouds at the end. The calculation of synergistic profiles of four atmospheric targets (i.e., O3, HNO3, H2O and temperature) was performed using a posteriori combination of individual retrieved profiles, i.e., Level 2 (L2) data rather than simultaneous inversion of observed radiances, i.e., Level 1 (L1) data. An innovative method of data fusion, based on the Measurement Space Solution (MSS) was applied along with the standard approach of inversion of MARSCHALS spectral radiances using MIPAS-STR retrieval products as a priori

  6. Synergy between middle infrared and millimetre-wave limb sounding of atmospheric temperature and minor constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, U.; Del Bianco, S.; Ceccherini, S.; Gai, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Castelli, E.; Oelhaf, H.; Woiwode, W.; Höpfner, M.; Gerber, D.

    2015-11-01

    Synergistic exploitation of redundant and complementary information from independent observations of the same target remains a major issue in atmospheric remote-sounding and increasing attention is devoted to investigate optimised or innovative methods for the combination of two or more measured data sets. This paper is focusing on the synergy between middle infrared and millimetre-wave limb sounding measurements of atmospheric composition and temperature and reports the results of a study conducted as part of the preparatory activities of the PREMIER (Process Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimetre wave Emitted Radiation) mission candidate to the Core Missions of ESA Earth Explorer 7. The activity was based on data acquired by the MIPAS-STR (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - STRatospheric aircraft) and MARSCHALS (Millimetre-wave Airborne Receivers for Spectroscopic CHaracterisation in Atmospheric Limb Sounding) instruments onboard the high altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysica during the flight of the PremierEx (PREMIER Experiment) campaign on 10 March 2010 from Kiruna, Sweden for observation of the Arctic upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The cloud coverage observed along the flight provided representative test cases to evaluate the synergy in three different scenarios: low clouds in the first part, no clouds in the central part and high tropospheric clouds at the end. The calculation of synergistic profiles of four atmospheric targets (i.e., O2, HNO3, H2O and temperature) was performed using a posteriori combination of individual retrieved profiles, i.e., Level 2 (L2) data rather than simultaneous inverse processing of observed radiances, i.e., Level 1 (L1) data. An innovative method of data fusion, based on the Measurement Space Solution (MSS) was applied along with the standard approach of inverse processing of MARSCHALS spectral radiances using MIPAS-STR retrieval products as a priori information (L1

  7. Active localization of virtual sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, Jack M.; Hebert, C.; Cicinelli, J. G.

    1991-06-01

    We describe a virtual sound display built around a 12 MHz 80286 microcomputer and special purpose analog hardware. The display implements most of the primary cues for sound localization in the ear-level plane. Static information about direction is conveyed by interaural time differences and, for frequencies above 1800 Hz, by head sound shadow (interaural intensity differences) and pinna sound shadow. Static information about distance is conveyed by variation in sound pressure (first power law) for all frequencies, by additional attenuation in the higher frequencies (simulating atmospheric absorption), and by the proportion of direct to reverberant sound. When the user actively locomotes, the changing angular position of the source occasioned by head rotations provides further information about direction and the changing angular velocity produced by head translations (motion parallax) provides further information about distance. Judging both from informal observations by users and from objective data obtained in an experiment on homing to virtual and real sounds, we conclude that simple displays such as this are effective in creating the perception of external sounds to which subjects can home with accuracy and ease.

  8. Active localization of virtual sounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, Jack M.; Hebert, C.; Cicinelli, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a virtual sound display built around a 12 MHz 80286 microcomputer and special purpose analog hardware. The display implements most of the primary cues for sound localization in the ear-level plane. Static information about direction is conveyed by interaural time differences and, for frequencies above 1800 Hz, by head sound shadow (interaural intensity differences) and pinna sound shadow. Static information about distance is conveyed by variation in sound pressure (first power law) for all frequencies, by additional attenuation in the higher frequencies (simulating atmospheric absorption), and by the proportion of direct to reverberant sound. When the user actively locomotes, the changing angular position of the source occasioned by head rotations provides further information about direction and the changing angular velocity produced by head translations (motion parallax) provides further information about distance. Judging both from informal observations by users and from objective data obtained in an experiment on homing to virtual and real sounds, we conclude that simple displays such as this are effective in creating the perception of external sounds to which subjects can home with accuracy and ease.

  9. Finite field of view effects on inversion of limb thermal emission observations. [balloon sounding of stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, M. M.; Guo, J.; Conrath, B. J.; Kunde, V. G.; Maguire, W. C.

    1985-01-01

    It is pointed out that the technique of thermal emission spectroscopy provides an effective means for remote sounding of stratospheric temperature structure and constituent distributions. One procedure for measuring the stratospheric infrared spectrum involves the conduction of observations along ray paths tangent to the stratospheric limb. Thermal emission limb tangent observations have certain advantages compared to other types of observations. The techniques for determining temperature and trace gas distributions from limb thermal emission radiances are based on the assumption that the bulk of opacity lies near the tangent point. Ideally, the field of view (FOV) of the observing instrument should be very small. The effect of a finite FOV is to reduce the spatial resolution of the retrieved temperature and constituent profiles. The present investigation is concerned with the effects of the FOV on the inversion of infrared thermal emission measurements for balloon platforms. Attention is given to a convenient method for determining the weighting functions.

  10. The Revised Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer Limb-Sounding Temperature Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnochie, T. H.; Smith, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) nadir-soundings have been used to derive atmospheric temperatures up to roughly 40 km [Conrath et al., JGR 105 2000, Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001], and MGS-TES limb soundings have been used to extend the atmospheric temperature data set to > 60 km in altitude [Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001]. The ~40 - ~65 km altitude range probed by the MGS-TES limb sounding is particularly important for capturing key dynamical features such as the warm winter polar mesosphere [e.g., Smith et al., JGR 106, 2001; McCleese et al., Nature Geoscience 1, 2008], and the response of thermal tides to dust opacity [e.g. Wilson and Hamilton, J. Atmos. Sci. 53, 1996]. Thus accurate and precise temperature profiles at these altitudes are particularly important for constraining global circulation models. They are also critical for interpreting observations of mesospheric condensate aerosols [e.g., Määttänen et al., Icarus 209, 2010; McConnochie et al., Icarus 210, 2010)]. We have revised the limb-sounding portion of the MGS-TES temperature retrievals to account for correlated noise components as well as a slowly variance radiance bias, both of which are significant contributions to TES limb-sounding radiances. See McConnochie and Smith [AGU Fall Meeting ,2011] for further discussion of these issues. We have reprocessed the complete limb-sounding temperature data set and will present an overview of its key features, focusing on the improvements and differences relative to the original version described by Smith et al. [JGR 106, 2001]. One important improvement is a decrease in the statistical uncertainty in individual retrievals at high altitudes. In the original version, uncertainties at the 1.5 Pascal levels increased from 5 - 10 K early in the mission (Mars Year 24) to 10 - 15 K in Mars Year 26 and 27. In the revised version, these uncertainties remain near 2 K throughout the data set. Considering averages of large numbers of

  11. A comprehensive observational filter for satellite infrared limb sounding of gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Q. T.; Kalisch, S.; Preusse, P.; Chun, H.-Y.; Eckermann, S. D.; Ern, M.; Riese, M.

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive observational filter for satellite infrared limb sounding of gravity waves. The filter considers instrument visibility and observation geometry with a high level of accuracy. It contains four main processes: visibility filter, projection of the wavelength on the tangent-point track, aliasing effect, and calculation of the observed vertical wavelength. The observation geometries of the SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) and HIRDLS (High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder) are mimicked. Gravity waves (GWs) simulated by coupling a convective GW source (CGWS) scheme and the gravity wave regional or global ray tracer (GROGRAT) are used as an example for applying the observational filter. Simulated spectra in terms of horizontal and vertical wave numbers (wavelengths) of gravity wave momentum flux (GWMF) are analyzed under the influence of the filter. We find that the most important processes, which have significant influence on the spectrum are: visibility filter (for both SABER and HIRDLS observation geometries), aliasing for SABER and projection on tangent-point track for HIRDLS. The vertical wavelength distribution is mainly affected by the retrieval as part of the "visibility filter" process. In addition, the short-horizontal-scale spectrum may be projected for some cases into a longer horizontal wavelength interval which originally was not populated. The filter largely reduces GWMF values of very short horizontal wavelength waves. The implications for interpreting observed data are discussed.

  12. A comprehensive observational filter for satellite infrared limb sounding of gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Q. T.; Kalisch, S.; Preusse, P.; Chun, H.-Y.; Eckermann, S. D.; Ern, M.; Riese, M.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive observational filter for satellite infrared limb sounding of gravity waves. The filter considers instrument visibility and observation geometry with a high level of accuracy. It contains four main processes: visibility filter, projection of the wavelength on the tangent-point track, aliasing effect, and calculation of the observed vertical wavelength. The observation geometries of the SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) and HIRDLS (High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder) are mimicked. Gravity waves (GWs) simulated by coupling a convective GW source (CGWS) scheme and the gravity wave regional or global ray tracer (GROGRAT) are used as an example for applying the observational filter. Simulated spectra in terms of horizontal and vertical wave numbers (wavelengths) of gravity wave momentum flux (GWMF) are analyzed under the influence of the filter. We find that the most important processes, which have significant influence on the spectrum are the visibility filter (for both SABER and HIRDLS observation geometries) and aliasing for SABER and projection on tangent-point track for HIRDLS. The vertical wavelength distribution is mainly affected by the retrieval as part of the "visibility filter" process. In addition, the short-horizontal-scale spectrum may be projected for some cases into a longer horizontal wavelength interval which originally was not populated. The filter largely reduces GWMF values of very short horizontal wavelength waves. The implications for interpreting observed data are discussed.

  13. A comprehensive observational filter for satellite infrared limb sounding of gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Thai; Kalisch, Silvio; Preusse, Peter; Chun, Hye Yeong; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Ern, Manfred; Riese, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Infrared limb sounding provides valuable observations for understanding the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. For the interpretation of gravity wave (GW) observations, the observational filter plays a crucial role. We describe a comprehensive observational filter for this technique. Both instrument visibility and observation geometry are considered in this filter with a high level of accuracy. Four main aspects that influence the GW spectrum are discussed thoroughly. They are: (1) visibility filter, (2) projection of the horizontal wavelength on the tangent-point track, (3) aliasing effect, and (4) calculation of the observed vertical wavelength. Gravity waves simulated by coupling a convective GW source (CGWS) scheme with the gravity wave regional or global ray tracer (GROGRAT) are used as an example for applying the observational filter. The observation geometries of the satellite instruments SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) and HIRDLS (High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder) are considered. The visibility filter is found to be the most important aspect: it strongly influences the GWMF spectrum for both instruments. The second important aspect is aliasing for SABER, and projection on tangent-point track for HIRDLS. It is shown that the retrieval (a part of the "visibility filter" process) significantly affects the vertical wavelength distribution. For some cases, the short-horizontal-scale spectrum might be projected towards longer horizontal wavelengths where the original spectrum was not located. Also, GWMF values at very short horizontal wavelengths were significantly decreased due to the observational filter. In addition, we discuss the interpretation of observed data using this observational filter, as well as its applicability to other types of instruments.

  14. Selection of sounding channels for the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, John J.; Edwards, David P.; Gille, John C.; Bailey, Paul L.

    1995-10-01

    We describe the scientific design work behind the selection of the IR spectral passbands for the 21 sounding channels of the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), which is scheduled to fly aboard the Earth Observing System chemistry platform at the beginning of the next century. At least one radiometer channel must be used for each gas that is being measured. Preferably the interfering contributions to the radiance by other gases in a channel should be small, but the principal requirements are that the desired emission be measured with high signal-to-noise ratio and that there be separate channels for the measurement of interfering species. However, more than one channel is required for providing full altitude coverage of those target gases such as CO2, H2O, and O3, which have emission bands whose centers become optically thick in the middle atmosphere. Further channels, in which gaseous absorption is low, are required for the characterization of aerosol effects. We describe the HIRDLS channels selected for each gas, with emphasis on signal-to-noise considerations and altitude coverage, the elimination of contaminating signal between channels, and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium processes for high-altitude sounding and space view definition.

  15. Twist1 activity thresholds define multiple functions in limb development

    PubMed Central

    Krawchuk, Dayana; Weiner, Shoshana J.; Chen, You-Tzung; Lu, Benson; Costantini, Frank; Behringer, Richard R.; Laufer, Ed

    2010-01-01

    Summary The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Twist1 is essential for normal limb development. Twist1−/− embryos die at midgestation. However, studies on early limb buds found that Twist1−/− mutant limb mesenchyme has an impaired response to FGF signaling from the apical ectodermal ridge, which disrupts the feedback loop between the mesenchyme and AER, and reduces and shifts anteriorly Shh expression in the zone of polarizing activity. We have combined Twist1 null, hypomorph and conditional alleles to generate a Twist1 allelic series that survives to birth. As Twist1 activity is reduced, limb skeletal defects progress from preaxial polydactyly to girdle reduction combined with hypoplasia, aplasia or mirror symmetry of all limb segments. With reduced Twist1 activity there is striking and progressive upregulation of ectopic Shh expression in the anterior of the limb, combined with an anterior shift in the posterior Shh domain, which is expressed at normal intensity, and loss of the posterior AER. Consequently limb outgrowth is initially impaired, before an ectopic anterior Shh domain expands the AER, promoting additional growth and repatterning. Reducing the dosage of FGF targets of the Etv gene family, which are known repressors of Shh expression in the anterior limb mesenchyme, strongly enhances the anterior skeletal phenotype. Conversely this and other phenotypes are suppressed by reducing the dosage of the Twist1 antagonist Hand2. Our data support a model whereby multiple Twist1 activity thresholds contribute to early limb bud patterning, and suggest how particular combinations of skeletal defects result from differing amounts of Twist1 activity. PMID:20732316

  16. The application of spaceborne GPS to atmospheric limb sounding and global change monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melbourne, W. G.; Davis, E. S.; Duncan, C. B.; Hajj, G. A.; Hardy, K. R.; Kursinski, E. R.; Meehan, T. K.; Young, L. E.; Yunck, T. P.

    1994-01-01

    This monograph is intended for readers with minimal background in radio science who seek a relatively comprehensive treatment of the mission and technical aspects of an Earth-orbiting radio occultation satellite. Part 1 (chapters 1-6) describes mission concepts and programmatic information; Part 2 (chapters 7-12) deals with the theoretical aspects of analyzing and interpreting radio occultation measurements. In this mission concept the navigation signals from a Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite that is being occulted by the Earth's limb are observed by a GPS flight receiver on board a low Earth orbiter (LEO) satellite. This technique can be used to recover profiles of the Earth's atmospheric refractivity, pressure, and temperature using small, dedicated, and relatively low-cost space systems. Chapter 2 summarizes the basic space system concepts of the limb-sounding technique and describes a low-cost strawman demonstration mission. Chapter 3 discusses some of the scientific benefits of using radio occultation on a suite of small satellites. Chapter 4 provides a more detailed discussion of several system elements in a radio occultation mission, including the launch system for small payloads, the LEO microsat, the GPS constellation, the GPS flight receiver payload, the mission operations ground control and data receiving system, the ground-based GPS global tracking network for precision orbit determination, and the central data processing and archive system. Chapter 5 addresses the various technology readiness questions that invariably arise. Chapter 6 discusses the overall costs of a demonstration mission such as GPS/MET (meteorological) proposed by the University Navstar Consortium (UNAVCO). Chapter 7 describes a geometrical optics approach to coplanar atmospheric occultation. Chapter 8 addresses major questions regarding accuracy of the occultation techniques. Chapter 9 describes some simulations that have been performed to evaluate the sensitivity of the

  17. The Retrieval of Ozone Profiles from Limb Scatter Measurements: Results from the Shuttle Ozone Limb Sounding Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard D.; Janz, Scott J.; Hilsenrath, Ernest; Brown, Tammy L.; Flittner, David E.; Heath, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    Two instruments were flown on shuttle flight STS-87 to test a new technique for inferring the ozone vertical profile using measurements of scattered sunlight from the Earth's limb. The instruments were an ultraviolet imaging spectrometer designed to measure ozone between 30 and 50 km, and a multi-filter imaging photometer that uses 600 nm radiances to measure ozone between 15 km and 35 km. Two orbits of limb data were obtained on December 2, 1997. For the scans analyzed the ozone profile was measured from 15 km to 50 km with approximately 3 km vertical resolution. Comparisons with a profile from an ozonesonde launched from Ascension Island showed agreement mostly within +/- 5%. The tropopause at 15 km was clearly detected.

  18. Looking at Ozone From a New Angle: Shuttle Ozone Limb Sounding Experiment-2 (SOLSE-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard; Hilsenrath, Ernest; Janz, Scott; Brown, Tammy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ozone layer above Earth is our planet's fragile sunscreen, protecting people, vegetation, and wildlife. NASA has been measuring ozone for more than 20 years by looking down, but SOLSE-2 will show that more information is available by looking at ozone from the side, at Earth's limb or atmospheric boundary. When the ozone layer is compromised, increased ultraviolet (UV) levels from the sun cause health problems ranging from severe sunburns to skin cancer and cataracts. A concerted global effort has been made to reduce or eliminate the production of chemicals that deplete ozone, but the ozone layer is not expected to recover for many decades because these chemicals can remain active in the atmosphere for up to 100 years. We know now that ozone monitoring needs to be focused in the lower stratosphere. The discovery of the ozone hole in 1985 demonstrated that very large changes in ozone were occurring in the lower stratosphere near 20 km, instead of the upper stratosphere as first expected, and where current ozone instruments are focused. Measuring ozone from a tangential perspective that is centered at the limb provides ozone profiles concentrated in the lower stratosphere. The first flight of SOLSE proved that this technique achieves the accuracy and coverage of traditional measurements, and surpasses the altitude resolution and depth of retrieval of conventional techniques. Results from the first flight convinced the science community to design the next generation ozone monitoring satellite based on SOLSE. The Ozone Mapping and Profiling Suite (OMPS) is currently being built for the NPOESS satellite. The primary objective of SOLSE-2 is to confirm the promising results of the first flight over a wider range of viewing conditions and spectral wavelengths. Sometimes a really hard problem can be solved when you look at it from a different angle! While scientists conduct research, protect yourself by observing the UV index and spend less unprotected time outdoors.

  19. Depression of osteoblastic activity in immobilized limbs of suckling rats.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, M; Rodan, G A; Thompson, D D

    1991-07-01

    Recently we characterized the immobilization-related osteopenia in adult rats and showed that it is caused by increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation (Weinreb et al. 1989 Bone 10:187). To assess the effect of age on disuse osteopenia, this study investigated the effects of immobilization on bone turnover in very young, suckling rats. The 15-day-old rats underwent unilateral hind limb immobilization by sciatic neurectomy; the contralateral limb was left intact and served as control. Experimental or sham-operated animals were killed after 0, 2, 4, or 12 days postsurgery. Dry, fat-free weight and ash weight were determined in both femora, and both tibiae were subjected to static and dynamic histomorphometry. Immobilization caused a progressive deficit in bone mass in the immobilized limb compared to the contralateral intact limb but did not affect femoral longitudinal growth. The total mineral content in the immobilized femora was 13.6% less than that in the intact limb by day 12. Concomitantly, tibial cancellous bone area and perimeter declined in the immobilized limb by 37.3 and 32.2%, respectively. This reduction in bone mass in the tibiae of immobilized limbs was associated with increased bone resorption, expressed as osteoclast perimeter, number of osteoclasts per mm surface, and number of osteoclasts per mm2 tissue area. Bone formation was reduced as a result of impaired osteoblast activity as evidenced by (1) decreased endocortical and trabecular mineral apposition rate; (2) reduced trabecular mineral formation rate; (3) decreased percentage of ash of the femoral dry weight; and (4) increased volume of unmineralized osteoid in the tibial metaphysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1950676

  20. Global and seasonal variations in three-dimensional gravity wave momentum flux from satellite limb-sounding temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. Joan

    2015-08-01

    Satellite limb-sounding methods provide the best global temperature data available for simultaneous measurement of gravity wave horizontal and vertical structures needed to estimate momentum flux and constrain wave effects on general circulation. Gravity waves vary in the three spatial dimensions and time, so the ideal measurement observes all three dimensions at high resolution nearly simultaneously. High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) measurements give near-simultaneous profiles in close proximity and at high vertical resolution, but these coincident profiles lie only along the plane of the measurement track. Here we combine HIRDLS and radio occultation data sets to obtain three-dimensional properties of gravity waves on a global scale as well as seasonal variations. The results show dramatic changes from previous estimates using either data set alone. Changes include much larger momentum fluxes and latitudinal variations in propagation direction that support an enhanced role for gravity wave forcing of middle atmosphere circulation.

  1. Pleiotropic patterning response to activation of Shh signaling in the limb Apical Ectodermal Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chi-Kuang Leo; Tsugane, Mizuyo H.; Scranton, Victoria; Kosher, Robert A.; Pierro, Louis J.; Upholt, William B.; Dealy, Caroline N.

    2012-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling in the limb plays a central role in coordination of limb patterning and outgrowth. Shh expression in the limb is limited to the cells of the Zone of Polarizing Activity (ZPA), located in posterior limb bud mesoderm. Shh is not expressed by limb ectoderm or AER, but recent studies suggest a role for AER-Shh signaling in limb patterning. Here, we have examined the effects of activation of Shh signaling in the AER. We find that targeted expression of Shh in the AER activates constitutive Shh signaling throughout the AER and subjacent limb mesoderm, and causes a range of limb patterning defects with progressive severity from mild polydactyly, to polysyndactyly with proximal defects, to severe oligodactyly with phocomelia and partial limb ventralization. Our studies emphasize the importance of control of the timing, level and location of Shh pathway signaling for limb AP, PD and DV patterning. PMID:21465622

  2. Forearm vascular responses to combined muscle metaboreceptor activation in the upper and lower limbs in humans.

    PubMed

    Tokizawa, Ken; Mizuno, Masaki; Muraoka, Isao

    2006-07-01

    Our previous studies showed that venous occlusion or passive stretch of the lower limb, assuming a mechanical stimulus, attenuates the vasoconstriction in the non-exercised forearm during postexercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI) of the upper limb. In this study, we investigated whether a metabolic stimulus to the lower limb induces a similar response. Eight subjects performed a 2 min static handgrip exercise at 30% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) followed by 3 min PEMI of the upper limb, concomitant with or without 2 min static ankle dorsiflexion at 30% MVC followed by 2 min PEMI of the lower limb. During PEMI of the upper limb alone, forearm blood flow (FBF) and forearm vascular conductance (FVC) in the non-exercised arm decreased significantly, whereas during combined PEMI of the upper and lower limbs, the decreases in FBF and FVC produced by PEMI of the upper limb was attenuated. Forearm blood flow and FVC were significantly greater during combined PEMI of the upper and lower limbs than during PEMI of the upper limb alone. When PEMI of the lower limb was released after combined PEMI of the upper and lower limbs (only PEMI of the upper limb was maintained continuously), the attenuated decreases in FBF and FVC observed during combined PEMI of the upper and lower limbs was not observed. Thus, forearm vascular responses differ when muscle metaboreceptors are activated in the upper limb and when there is combined activation of muscle metaboreceptors in both the upper and lower limbs. PMID:16644795

  3. Chlorine monoxide radical, ozone, and hydrogen peroxide: stratospheric measurements by microwave limb sounding

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, J.W.; Hardy, J.C.; Jarnot, R.F.; Pickett, H.M.

    1981-10-02

    Profiles of stratospheric ozone and chlorine monoxide radical (ClO) were obtained from balloon measurements of atmospheric limb thermal emission at millimeter wavelengths. The ClO measurements, important for assessing the predicted depletion of stratospheric ozone by chlorine from industrial sources, are in close agreement with present theory. The predicted decrease of ClO at sunset was measured. A tentative value for the stratospheric abundance of hydrogen peroxide was also determined.

  4. Chlorine monoxide radical, ozone, and hydrogen peroxide - Stratospheric measurements by microwave limb sounding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Hardy, J. C.; Jarnot, R. F.; Pickett, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    Profiles of stratospheric ozone and chlorine monoxide radical (ClO) have been obtained from balloon measurements of atmospheric limb thermal emission at millimeter wavelengths. The ClO measurements, important for assessing the predicted depletion of stratospheric ozone by chlorine from industrial sources, are in close agreement with present theory. The predicted decrease of ClO at sunset was measured. A tentative value for the stratospheric abundance of hydrogen peroxide was also determined.

  5. Brain activation during anticipation of sound sequences.

    PubMed

    Leaver, Amber M; Van Lare, Jennifer; Zielinski, Brandon; Halpern, Andrea R; Rauschecker, Josef P

    2009-02-25

    Music consists of sound sequences that require integration over time. As we become familiar with music, associations between notes, melodies, and entire symphonic movements become stronger and more complex. These associations can become so tight that, for example, hearing the end of one album track can elicit a robust image of the upcoming track while anticipating it in total silence. Here, we study this predictive "anticipatory imagery" at various stages throughout learning and investigate activity changes in corresponding neural structures using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Anticipatory imagery (in silence) for highly familiar naturalistic music was accompanied by pronounced activity in rostral prefrontal cortex (PFC) and premotor areas. Examining changes in the neural bases of anticipatory imagery during two stages of learning conditional associations between simple melodies, however, demonstrates the importance of fronto-striatal connections, consistent with a role of the basal ganglia in "training" frontal cortex (Pasupathy and Miller, 2005). Another striking change in neural resources during learning was a shift between caudal PFC earlier to rostral PFC later in learning. Our findings regarding musical anticipation and sound sequence learning are highly compatible with studies of motor sequence learning, suggesting common predictive mechanisms in both domains. PMID:19244522

  6. Unilateral hip osteoarthritis: Its effects on preoperative lower limb muscle activation and intramuscular coordination patterns.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Stief, Felix; Lenarz, Katharina; Froemel, Dara; Lutz, Frederick; Barker, John; Meurer, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to test if patients with unilateral hip osteoarthritis (OA) show greater muscle activity asymmetry between their affected and non-affected limbs than healthy controls between their left and right limbs. Seventeen patients with unilateral hip OA (7 females, 10 males) and 17 age-matched healthy controls (7 females, 10 males) participated in this study. Both groups performed instrumented gait analysis at comparable speeds. Muscle activity was recorded simultaneously for the tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), vastus lateralis (VL), semitendinosus (ST), tensor fasciae latae (TFL), and gluteus medius (GLM) muscles. In hip OA patients, EMG data showed greater activity of the TA muscle in the non-affected limb, and greater TFL muscle activity in the affected limb. Compared to healthy controls, greater asymmetries between paired limbs were observed for the TA and GM muscles. Finally, the TFL muscle of the affected limb contributed more to the total limb muscle activity than did the non-affected limb. The observed alterations in TA and GM muscle activity in hip OA patients may be due to the greater peak braking and peak vertical forces measured in the non-affected limb. Contrary to this, greater TLF muscle activity of the affected limb indicates the demands put on stabilizing the hip during stance phase. Further studies are necessary to test whether leg length discrepancy affects muscle activation alterations between the affected and non-affected limb in unilateral hip OA patients. PMID:26979904

  7. A switch from low to high Shh activity regulates establishment of limb progenitors and signaling centers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The patterning and growth of the embryonic vertebrate limb is dependent on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a morphogen that regulates the activity of Gli transcription factors. However, "Shh" expression is not observed during the first 12 hours of limb development. During this phase, the limb bud is prepatter...

  8. Limb venous distension evokes sympathetic activation via stimulation of the limb afferents in humans.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; McQuillan, Patrick M; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2012-08-15

    We have recently shown that a saline infusion in the veins of an arterially occluded human forearm evokes a systemic response with increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure. In this report, we examined whether this response was a reflex that was due to venous distension. Blood pressure (Finometer), heart rate, and MSNA (microneurography) were assessed in 14 young healthy subjects. In the saline trial (n = 14), 5% forearm volume normal saline was infused in an arterially occluded arm. To block afferents in the limb, 90 mg of lidocaine were added to the same volume of saline in six subjects during a separate visit. To examine whether interstitial perfusion of normal saline alone induced the responses, the same volume of albumin solution (5% concentration) was infused in 11 subjects in separate studies. Lidocaine abolished the MSNA and blood pressure responses seen with saline infusion. Moreover, compared with the saline infusion, an albumin infusion induced a larger (MSNA: Δ14.3 ± 2.7 vs. Δ8.5 ± 1.3 bursts/min, P < 0.01) and more sustained MSNA and blood pressure responses. These data suggest that venous distension activates afferent nerves and evokes a powerful systemic sympathoexcitatory reflex. We posit that the venous distension plays an important role in evoking the autonomic adjustments seen with postural stress in human subjects. PMID:22707559

  9. Visual Feedback of the Non-Moving Limb Improves Active Joint-Position Sense of the Impaired Limb in Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smorenburg, Ana R. P.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the active joint-position sense in children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP) and the effect of static visual feedback and static mirror visual feedback, of the non-moving limb, on the joint-position sense. Participants were asked to match the position of one upper limb with that of the contralateral limb. The task…

  10. Magnetic field measurements in and above a limb active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Judge

    2013-07-01

    We analyze spectropolarimetric data of a limb active region (NOAA 11302) obtained on September 22nd 2011 using the Facility Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). Stokes profiles including lines of Si I 1028.7 nm and He I 1083 nm were obtained in three scans over a 45"x75" area. Simultaneous narrow band Ca II K and G-band intensity data were acquired with a cadence of 5s at the DST. The He I data show not only typical active region polarization signatures, but also signatures in plumes -- cool post flare loops -- which extend many Mm into the corona across the visible limb. The plumes have remarkably uniform brightness, and the plume plasma is significantly Doppler shifted as it drains from the corona. Using carefully constructed observing and calibration sequences and applying Principal Component Analysis to remove instrumental artifacts, we achieved a polarization sensitivity approaching 0.02%. With this sensitivity we attempt to diagnose the vector magnetic fields and plasma properties of chromospheric and cool coronal material in and above NOAA 11302. Inversions using various radiative transfer models in the HAZEL code are remarkably consistent with the idea that plume spectra are formed in a simple, slab-like geometry, but that the ``disk'' spectra are formed under more traditional models (Milne-Eddington). The inverted magnetic data of He I lines are compared with photospheric inversions of DST Si I and Fe I data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.

  11. Artificial Limbs

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are missing an arm or leg, an artificial limb can sometimes replace it. The device, which ... activities such as walking, eating, or dressing. Some artificial limbs let you function nearly as well as ...

  12. Electromyographic activity of lower limbs to stop baseball batting.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Hiroki; Miura, Akito; Yoshie, Michiko; Kudo, Kazutoshi

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the muscle activation pattern of the lower limbs for the stopping motion of baseball batting by recording surface electromyography (EMG) from 8 muscles, the left and right rectus femoris (RF), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA), and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles. First, muscle activities for 'Swing' and 'Stopping' trials were examined in 10 skilled baseball players and 10 unskilled novices. Second, the characteristics of EMG activities for 'Stopping' were compared between the 2 groups. The peak latencies of EMG were significantly shorter in 'Stopping' than in 'Swing' at the right-TA, left-BF, and left-MG between both groups. The peak amplitudes of EMG activity were significantly larger in 'Swing' than in 'Stopping' at the right-TA, left-BF, and left-MG in both groups. In addition, the peak amplitudes of EMG activity for 'Stopping' were significantly larger in the players than in novices at the right-RF and right-TA. The characteristics of EMG activity clearly differed between 'Swing' and 'Stopping,' and between baseball players and nonplayers, indicating that evaluating the EMG activity in batting enables the understanding of proficiency. Our findings should help players, novices, and coaches to optimize batting performance. PMID:22614137

  13. Passive resting state and history of antagonist muscle activity shape active extensions in an insect limb.

    PubMed

    Ache, Jan M; Matheson, Thomas

    2012-05-01

    Limb movements can be driven by muscle contractions, external forces, or intrinsic passive forces. For lightweight limbs like those of insects or small vertebrates, passive forces can be large enough to overcome the effects of gravity and may even generate limb movements in the absence of active muscle contractions. Understanding the sources and actions of such forces is therefore important in understanding motor control. We describe passive properties of the femur-tibia joint of the locust hind leg. The resting angle is determined primarily by passive properties of the relatively large extensor tibiae muscle and is influenced by the history of activation of the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron. The resting angle is therefore better described as a history-dependent resting state. We selectively stimulated different flexor tibiae motor neurons to generate a range of isometric contractions of the flexor tibiae muscle and then stimulated the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron to elicit active tibial extensions. Residual forces in the flexor muscle have only a small effect on subsequent active extensions, but the effect is larger for distal than for proximal flexor motor neurons and varies with the strength of flexor activation. We conclude that passive properties of a lightweight limb make substantial and complex contributions to the resting state of the limb that must be taken into account in the patterning of neuronal control signals driving its active movements. Low variability in the effects of the passive forces may permit the nervous system to accurately predict their contributions to behavior. PMID:22357791

  14. Active control of transmitted sound in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompsett, Russell Harvey George

    The problem of noise from neighbours has increased dramatically over the last few years. Many of the noise complaints are due to the high level, low frequency noise from modern stereo equipment, and are often described in terms of the low frequency characteristics of the music; the repetitive, booming, bass beat. The objective of this research was to establish the feasibility of applying active noise control to alleviate this problem. The initial approach was to evaluate the possibility of exploiting the dominance of individual modes in the response of rooms at low frequency to effect global control. However, initial investigations using a modal model of the sound field revealed that this would be difficult due to the contribution of many acoustic modes excited off resonance. This conclusion was supported by measurements of acoustic room responses in typical buildings, illustrating a non-resonant characteristic. Consequently, attention was turned to the feasibility of using local active control systems to create zones of quiet by concentrating control at a specific location near the observers ears, for example in a seat headrest, or near the pillows of a bed. The lack of a reference signal in either approach requires the use of a feedback control strategy. With a typically non-resonant system, the predictability in the disturbance necessary for successful feedback control must be contained in the primary excitation, namely the music. Examples of different music styles were investigated and of those with the potential to be a nuisance surprisingly few were significantly more predictable than a random disturbance. As expected the most encouraging control performance simulations were found for modern dance music, with a strong repetitive beat. A real-time, local controller was demonstrated in the laboratory with such a disturbance signal and the properties of the quiet zone were measured. The subjective response when hearing the controller in operation was found to be

  15. Active sound attenuation across a double wall structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of achieving significant local and global sound attenuation across a flat double wall is demonstrated. It is also shown that sound can be prevented from entering the interior of a cabinlike environment. The approach used is unlike established active noise control techniques.

  16. Vision of the active limb impairs bimanual motor tracking in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Boisgontier, Matthieu P.; Van Halewyck, Florian; Corporaal, Sharissa H. A.; Willacker, Lina; Van Den Bergh, Veerle; Beets, Iseult A. M.; Levin, Oron; Swinnen, Stephan P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the intensive investigation of bimanual coordination, it remains unclear how directing vision toward either limb influences performance, and whether this influence is affected by age. To examine these questions, we assessed the performance of young and older adults on a bimanual tracking task in which they matched motor-driven movements of their right hand (passive limb) with their left hand (active limb) according to in-phase and anti-phase patterns. Performance in six visual conditions involving central vision, and/or peripheral vision of the active and/or passive limb was compared to performance in a no vision condition. Results indicated that directing central vision to the active limb consistently impaired performance, with higher impairment in older than young adults. Conversely, directing central vision to the passive limb improved performance in young adults, but less consistently in older adults. In conditions involving central vision of one limb and peripheral vision of the other limb, similar effects were found to those for conditions involving central vision of one limb only. Peripheral vision alone resulted in similar or impaired performance compared to the no vision (NV) condition. These results indicate that the locus of visual attention is critical for bimanual motor control in young and older adults, with older adults being either more impaired or less able to benefit from a given visual condition. PMID:25452727

  17. Brain Activity during Lower-Limb Movement with Manual Facilitation: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Patrícia Maria Duarte; Vieira, Ana Isabel Correia Matos de Ferreira; Canário, Nádia Isabel Silva; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; de Castro Caldas, Alexandre Lemos

    2015-01-01

    Brain activity knowledge of healthy subjects is an important reference in the context of motor control and reeducation. While the normal brain behavior for upper-limb motor control has been widely explored, the same is not true for lower-limb control. Also the effects that different stimuli can evoke on movement and respective brain activity are important in the context of motor potentialization and reeducation. For a better understanding of these processes, a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to collect data of 10 healthy subjects performing lower-limb multijoint functional movement under three stimuli: verbal stimulus, manual facilitation, and verbal + manual facilitation. Results showed that, with verbal stimulus, both lower limbs elicit bilateral cortical brain activation; with manual facilitation, only the left lower limb (LLL) elicits bilateral activation while the right lower limb (RLL) elicits contralateral activation; verbal + manual facilitation elicits bilateral activation for the LLL and contralateral activation for the RLL. Manual facilitation also elicits subcortical activation in white matter, the thalamus, pons, and cerebellum. Deactivations were also found for lower-limb movement. Manual facilitation is stimulus capable of generating brain activity in healthy subjects. Stimuli need to be specific for bilateral activation and regarding which brain areas we aim to activate. PMID:25722890

  18. Esrange activities: Sounding rockets, balloons and satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helger, A.

    1980-06-01

    The range facilities are described in detail for the prospective user, including instrumentation launch capabilities, support facilities, and costs. High performance sounding rockets such as Aries and Nike BB can now, thanks to guidance systems, be launched above 500 km allowing the exploration of higher regions and longer observation time. Microgravity experiments using sounding rockets are successfully carried out from the range. Land recovery is necessary in this case. Since 1978 Esrange has been operating a Landsat remote sensing satellite receiving station as part of ESA's ground station network, Earthnet. Additional installations for reception and processing of SPOT and Landsat (D) data are planned. A satellite tracking and control station is envisaged in the near future.

  19. A switch from low to high Shh activity regulates establishment of limb progenitors and signaling centers.

    PubMed

    Zhulyn, Olena; Li, Danyi; Deimling, Steven; Vakili, Niki Alizadeh; Mo, Rong; Puviindran, Vijitha; Chen, Miao-Hsueh; Chuang, Pao-Tien; Hopyan, Sevan; Hui, Chi-chung

    2014-04-28

    The patterning and growth of the embryonic vertebrate limb is dependent on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a morphogen that regulates the activity of Gli transcription factors. However, Shh expression is not observed during the first 12 hr of limb development. During this phase, the limb bud is prepatterned into anterior and posterior regions through the antagonistic actions of transcription factors Gli3 and Hand2. We demonstrate that precocious activation of Shh signaling during this early phase interferes with the Gli3-dependent specification of anterior progenitors, disturbing establishment of signaling centers and normal outgrowth of the limb. Our findings illustrate that limb development requires a sweet spot in the level and timing of pathway activation that allows for the Shh-dependent expansion of posterior progenitors without interfering with early prepatterning functions of Gli3/Gli3R or specification of anterior progenitors. PMID:24726283

  20. Active control of excessive sound emission on a mobile device.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se-Woon; Youn, Dae Hee; Park, Young-cheol; Lee, Gun-Woo

    2015-04-01

    During a phone conversation, loud vocal emission from the far-end to the near-end space can disturb nearby people. In this paper, the possibility of actively controlling such unwanted sound emission using a control source placed on the mobile device is investigated. Two different approaches are tested: Global control, minimizing the potential energy measured along a volumetric space surface, and local control, minimizing the squared sound pressure at a discrete point on the phone. From the test results, both approaches can reduce the unwanted sound emission by more than 6 dB in the frequency range up to 2 kHz. PMID:25920885

  1. Inaudible high-frequency sounds affect brain activity: hypersonic effect.

    PubMed

    Oohashi, T; Nishina, E; Honda, M; Yonekura, Y; Fuwamoto, Y; Kawai, N; Maekawa, T; Nakamura, S; Fukuyama, H; Shibasaki, H

    2000-06-01

    Although it is generally accepted that humans cannot perceive sounds in the frequency range above 20 kHz, the question of whether the existence of such "inaudible" high-frequency components may affect the acoustic perception of audible sounds remains unanswered. In this study, we used noninvasive physiological measurements of brain responses to provide evidence that sounds containing high-frequency components (HFCs) above the audible range significantly affect the brain activity of listeners. We used the gamelan music of Bali, which is extremely rich in HFCs with a nonstationary structure, as a natural sound source, dividing it into two components: an audible low-frequency component (LFC) below 22 kHz and an HFC above 22 kHz. Brain electrical activity and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured as markers of neuronal activity while subjects were exposed to sounds with various combinations of LFCs and HFCs. None of the subjects recognized the HFC as sound when it was presented alone. Nevertheless, the power spectra of the alpha frequency range of the spontaneous electroencephalogram (alpha-EEG) recorded from the occipital region increased with statistical significance when the subjects were exposed to sound containing both an HFC and an LFC, compared with an otherwise identical sound from which the HFC was removed (i.e., LFC alone). In contrast, compared with the baseline, no enhancement of alpha-EEG was evident when either an HFC or an LFC was presented separately. Positron emission tomography measurements revealed that, when an HFC and an LFC were presented together, the rCBF in the brain stem and the left thalamus increased significantly compared with a sound lacking the HFC above 22 kHz but that was otherwise identical. Simultaneous EEG measurements showed that the power of occipital alpha-EEGs correlated significantly with the rCBF in the left thalamus. Psychological evaluation indicated that the subjects felt the sound containing an HFC to be more

  2. New facilities for magnetotelluric sounding and electromagnetic sounding with active sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymovych, Y.; Rakhlin, L.; Tregubenko, V.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) sounding and investigations that use electromagnetic sounding with active sources (SAS) are wide spread in many branch of geophysics. The main goal of their application is Earth geoelectric cross-section parameters definition. For MT sounding it was possible to carry out it mostly till the time intervals less, than 10000 sec, that does not permitted to get the sections for the depth more than some first kilometres. Last years in LCISR the new generation of MT and facilities for deep electromagnetic sounding in ultra-low frequencies periods up to 200,000 sec were designed. It became possible after the development of highly stable devices for DC magnetic and telluric measurements. The long term stability of newly created magnetometers now is better than 0.5 nT per month and temperature stability about 0.1 nT/oC. For telluric currents measurements highly stable non-polarized electrodes with long term stability better than 60 mV per month, and temperature stability about 10 mV/oC were designed. Implementation of such facilities made it possible to realize the magnetotelluric sounding to the depth 400-600 km and the experimental results have good agreement with global magnetotelluric curve. Such MT stations (LEMI-404 model) were used in BEAR (Baltic Electromagnetic Array Research) and several others projects. Their use made it possible also to prove with very high probability the existence of low-depth astenosphere in Dnepre-Donetsk Basin (Ukraine). Now a batch of these MT stations is manufactured and used in Ukrainian magnetotelluric net. This net was intended firstly for investigation of electromagnetic earthquake precursors, but after its further development - for geoelectric section circular changes too. Recently two new MT stations are developed. First one low-frequency (DC 1 Hz) inexpensive station LEMI-411 which, having as high metrological parameters as the wide-band one, costs considerebly lower. Second one is multifunctional SAS station

  3. Active Noise Control Experiments using Sound Energy Flu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Uli

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the latest results concerning the active noise control approach using net flow of acoustic energy. The test set-up consists of two loudspeakers simulating the engine noise and two smaller loudspeakers which belong to the active noise system. The system is completed by two acceleration sensors and one microphone per loudspeaker. The microphones are located in the near sound field of the loudspeakers. The control algorithm including the update equation of the feed-forward controller is introduced. Numerical simulations are performed with a comparison to a state of the art method minimising the radiated sound power. The proposed approach is experimentally validated.

  4. Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capstick, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    1. The nature of sound; 2. Elasticity and vibrations; 3. Transverse waves; 4. Longitudinal waves; 5. Velocity of longitudinal waves; 6. Reflection and refraction. Doppler's principle; 7. Interference. Beats. Combination tones; 8. Resonance and forced vibrations; 9. Quality of musical notes; 10. Organ pipes; 11. Rods. Plates. Bells; 12. Acoustical measurements; 13. The phonograph, microphone and telephone; 14. Consonance; 15. Definition of intervals. Scales. Temperament; 16. Musical instruments; 17. Application of acoustical principles to military purposes; Questions; Answers to questions; Index.

  5. Temperatures and aerosol opacities of the Mars atmosphere at aphelion: Validation and inter-comparison of limb sounding profiles from MRO/MCS and MGS/TES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, James H.; McConnochie, Timothy H.; Kass, David M.; Kleinböhl, Armin; Schofield, John T.; Heavens, Nicholas G.; McCleese, Daniel J.; Benson, Jennifer; Hinson, David P.; Bandfield, Joshua L.

    2015-05-01

    We exploit the relative stability and repeatability of the Mars atmosphere at aphelion for an inter-comparison of Mars Global Surveyor/Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS/TES) and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter/Mars Climate Sounder (MRO/MCS) nighttime temperature profiles and aerosol opacity profiles in Mars years 25, 26, 29, 30, and 31. Cross-calibration of these datasets is important, as they together provide an extended climatology for this planetary atmosphere. As a standard of comparison we employ temperature profiles obtained by radio occultation methods during the MGS mission in Mars years 24, 25, and 26. We first compare both zonal mean TES limb sounding profiles and zonal mean MCS limb sounding profiles with zonal means of radio occultation temperature profiles for the same season (Ls = 70-80°) and latitudes (55-70°N). We employ a statistical z test for quantifying the degree of agreement of temperature profiles by pressure level. For pressures less than 610 Pa (altitudes > 3 km), the ensemble mean temperature difference between the radio occultation and TES limb sounding profiles found in these comparisons was 1.7 ± 0.7 K. The ensemble mean temperature difference between radio occultation and MCS profiles was 1.4 ± 1.0 K. These differences fall within the formal error estimates for both TES and MCS, validating the accuracy of the instruments and their respective retrieval algorithms. In the second phase of our investigation, we compare aphelion season zonal mean TES limb sounding temperature, water ice opacity, and dust opacity profiles with those obtained at the same latitudes in different years by MCS. The ensemble mean temperature difference found for three comparisons between TES and MCS zonal mean temperature profiles was 2.8 ± 2.1 K. MCS and TES temperatures between 610 Pa and 5 Pa from 55 to 70°N are largely in agreement (with differences < 2 K) when water ice aerosol opacities are comparable. Temperature differences increase when the opacities

  6. Annoyance resulting from intrusion of aircraft sounds upon various activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, W. J.; Shepherd, W. T.; Fletcher, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in which subjects were engaged in TV viewing, telephone listening, or reverie (no activity) for a 1/2-hour session. During the session, they were exposed to a series of recorded aircraft sounds at the rate of one flight every 2 minutes. Within each session, four levels of flyover noise, separated by dB increments, were presented several times in a Latin Square balanced sequence. The peak level of the noisiest flyover in any session was fixed at 95, 90, 85, 75, or 70 dBA. At the end of the test session, subjects recorded their responses to the aircraft sounds, using a bipolar scale which covered the range from very pleasant to extremely annoying. Responses to aircraft noises were found to be significantly affected by the particular activity in which the subjects were engaged. Not all subjects found the aircraft sounds to be annoying.

  7. The effects of prism glasses and intensive upper limb exercise on hemineglect, upper limb function, and activities of daily living in stroke patients: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Il; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, So-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of visual field with prism glasses, and intensive upper limb functional training on reduction of hemineglect and improvement in upper limb function and activities of daily living in three stroke patients with hemineglect. [Subjects] This study included three stroke patients hospitalized in a sanatorium. [Methods] Intervention treatment involving prism glass use for 12 hours and 30 minutes and paretic side upper limb training was conducted 5 days a week for 15 weeks. Three upper limb training tasks (hitting a balloon, passing through a ring, and reading a newspaper) were performed for 10 minutes each session, for a total of 30 minutes. Line by Section, Motor-Free Visual Perception Test-3 (MVPT-3), Manual Function Test (MFT), Box & Block Test (BBT), and Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) were conducted before and after intervention. [Results] Subjects’ hemineglect decreased and upper limb function on the paretic side improved after intervention, which enhanced activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Prism glass use and paretic upper limb functional training effectively ameliorated stroke patients’ hemineglect and improved upper limb function. Future research should focus on prism glasses that provide a wide visual field for use in patients with different conditions. PMID:26834386

  8. The effects of prism glasses and intensive upper limb exercise on hemineglect, upper limb function, and activities of daily living in stroke patients: a case series.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se-Il; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, So-Yeon

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of visual field with prism glasses, and intensive upper limb functional training on reduction of hemineglect and improvement in upper limb function and activities of daily living in three stroke patients with hemineglect. [Subjects] This study included three stroke patients hospitalized in a sanatorium. [Methods] Intervention treatment involving prism glass use for 12 hours and 30 minutes and paretic side upper limb training was conducted 5 days a week for 15 weeks. Three upper limb training tasks (hitting a balloon, passing through a ring, and reading a newspaper) were performed for 10 minutes each session, for a total of 30 minutes. Line by Section, Motor-Free Visual Perception Test-3 (MVPT-3), Manual Function Test (MFT), Box & Block Test (BBT), and Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) were conducted before and after intervention. [Results] Subjects' hemineglect decreased and upper limb function on the paretic side improved after intervention, which enhanced activities of daily living. [Conclusion] Prism glass use and paretic upper limb functional training effectively ameliorated stroke patients' hemineglect and improved upper limb function. Future research should focus on prism glasses that provide a wide visual field for use in patients with different conditions. PMID:26834386

  9. Visual feedback of the non-moving limb improves active joint-position sense of the impaired limb in Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Smorenburg, Ana R P; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J A; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the active joint-position sense in children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP) and the effect of static visual feedback and static mirror visual feedback, of the non-moving limb, on the joint-position sense. Participants were asked to match the position of one upper limb with that of the contralateral limb. The task was performed in three visual conditions: without visual feedback (no vision); with visual feedback of the non-moving limb (screen); and with visual feedback of the non-moving limb and its mirror reflection (mirror). In addition to the proprioceptive measure, a functional test [Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST)] was performed and the amount of spasticity was determined in order to examine their relation with proprioceptive ability. The accuracy of matching was significantly influenced by the distance that had to be covered by the matching limb; a larger distance resulted in a lower matching accuracy. Moreover it was demonstrated that static (mirror) visual feedback improved the matching accuracy. A clear relation between functionality, as measured by the QUEST, and active joint-position sense was not found. This might be explained by the availability of visual information during the performance of the QUEST. It is concluded that static visual feedback improves matching accuracy in children with SHCP and that the initial distance between the limbs is an influential factor which has to be taken into account when measuring joint-position sense. PMID:21306868

  10. Limb sounders tracking topographic gravity wave activity from the stratosphere to the ionosphere around midlatitude Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, P.; Torre, A.; Schmidt, T.; Llamedo, P.; Hierro, R.

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have shown that the surroundings of the highest Andes mountains at midlatitudes in the Southern Hemisphere exhibit gravity waves (GWs) generated by diverse sources which may traverse the troposphere and then penetrate the upper layers if conditions are favorable. There is a specific latitude band where that mountain range is nearly perfectly aligned with the north-south direction, which favors the generation of wavefronts parallel to this orientation. This fact may allow an optimization of procedures to identify topographic GW in some of the observations. We analyze data per season to the east and west of these Andes latitudes to find possible significant differences in GW activity between both sectors. GW effects generated by topography and convection are expected essentially on the eastern side. We use satellite data from two different limb sounding methods: the Global Positioning System radio occultation (RO) technique and the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry instrument, which are complementary with respect to the height intervals, in order to study the effects of GW from the stratosphere to the ionosphere. Activity becomes quantified by the GW average potential energy in the stratosphere and mesosphere and by the electron density variance content in the ionosphere. Consistent larger GW activity on the eastern sector is observed from the stratosphere to the ionosphere (night values). However, this fact remains statistically significant at the 90% significance level only during winter, when GWs generated by topography dominate the eastern sector. On the contrary, it is usually assumed that orographic GWs have nearly zero horizontal phase speed and will therefore probably be filtered at some height in the neutral atmosphere. However, this scheme relies on the assumption that the wind is uniform and constant. Our results also suggest that it is advisable to separate night and day cases to study GWs in the ionosphere, as

  11. Influence of sorption on sound propagation in granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Rodolfo; Umnova, Olga

    2016-08-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) has numerous applications due to its ability to adsorb and desorb gas molecules. Recently, it has been shown to exhibit unusually high low frequency sound absorption. This behavior is determined by both the multi-scale nature of the material, i.e., the existence of three scales of heterogeneities, and physical processes specific to micro- and nanometer-size pores, i.e., rarefaction and sorption effects. To account for these processes a model for sound propagation in GAC is developed in this work. A methodology for characterizing GAC which includes optical granulometry, flow resistivity measurements, and the derivation of the inner-particle model parameters from acoustical and non-acoustical measurements is also presented. The model agrees with measurements of normal incidence surface impedance and sound absorption coefficient on three different GAC samples. PMID:27586708

  12. Comparison of laterality index of upper and lower limb movement using brain activated fMRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harirchian, Mohammad Hossein; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Rezvanizadeh, Alireza; Bolandzadeh, Niousha

    2008-03-01

    Asymmetry of bilateral cerebral function, i.e. laterality, is an important phenomenon in many brain actions such as motor functions. This asymmetry maybe altered in some clinical conditions such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to delineate the laterality differences for upper and lower limbs in healthy subjects to compare this pattern with subjects suffering from MS in advance. Hence 9 Male healthy subjects underwent fMRI assessment, while they were asked to move their limbs in a predetermined pattern. The results showed that hands movement activates the brain with a significant lateralization in pre-motor cortex in comparison with lower limb. Also, dominant hands activate brain more lateralized than the non-dominant hand. In addition, Left basal ganglia were observed to be activated regardless of the hand used, While, These patterns of Brain activation was not detected in lower limbs. We hypothesize that this difference might be attributed to this point that hand is usually responsible for precise and fine voluntary movements, whereas lower limb joints are mainly responsible for locomotion, a function integrating voluntary and automatic bilateral movements.

  13. Passive Joint Forces Are Tuned to Limb Use in Insects and Drive Movements without Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ache, Jan M.; Matheson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Limb movements are generally driven by active muscular contractions working with and against passive forces arising in muscles and other structures. In relatively heavy limbs, the effects of gravity and inertia predominate, whereas in lighter limbs, passive forces intrinsic to the limb are of greater consequence. The roles of passive forces generated by muscles and tendons are well understood, but there has been little recognition that forces originating within joints themselves may also be important, and less still that these joint forces may be adapted through evolution to complement active muscle forces acting at the same joint. Results We examined the roles of passive joint forces in insect legs with different arrangements of antagonist muscles. We first show that passive forces modify actively generated movements of a joint across its working range, and that they can be sufficiently strong to generate completely passive movements that are faster than active movements observed in natural behaviors. We further demonstrate that some of these forces originate within the joint itself. In legs of different species adapted to different uses (walking, jumping), these passive joint forces complement the balance of strength of the antagonist muscles acting on the joint. We show that passive joint forces are stronger where they assist the weaker of two antagonist muscles. Conclusions In limbs where the dictates of a key behavior produce asymmetry in muscle forces, passive joint forces can be coadapted to provide the balance needed for the effective generation of other behaviors. PMID:23871240

  14. Sounding rocket activities of Japan in 2003 and 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Nobuaki; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Nonaka, Satoshi; Nakajima, Takashi; Takumi, Abe; Yuichi, Tsuda; Yamagami, Takamasa

    2005-08-01

    In October 2003, a new space agency, JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) was reorganized and started as a primary space agency to promote all space activities in Japan. The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) belonged to JAXA and continued to promote space science and technologies using unique scientific satellites, sounding rockets and balloons. This paper summarizes sounding rocket and ballooning activities of ISAS in the fiscal year of 2003 and 2004, associated with satellite launch programs. In this time period, three sounding rockets and nineteen balloons were launched by ISAS. One of the sounding rocket, S-310-35 was an international collaboration between Japan and Norway, which was launched from Andoya Rocket Range (ARR), Andenes, Norway, so as to study the upper atmospheric dynamics and energetics associated with the auroral energy in the polar lower thermosphere. Through the combination with the national researchers and the cooperation with international organizations, ISAS will keep its own flight opportunities and be able to obtain many new scientific findings.

  15. Active sound quality control of engine induced cavity noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Leopoldo P. R.; Janssens, Karl; Gajdatsy, Peter; Van der Auweraer, Herman; Varoto, Paulo S.; Sas, Paul; Desmet, Wim

    2009-02-01

    Active control solutions appear to be a feasible approach to cope with the steadily increasing requirements for noise reduction in the transportation industry. Active controllers tend to be designed with a target on the sound pressure level reduction. However, the perceived control efficiency for the occupants can be more accurately assessed if psychoacoustic metrics can be taken into account. Therefore, this paper aims to evaluate, numerically and experimentally, the effect of a feedback controller on the sound quality of a vehicle mockup excited with engine noise. The proposed simulation scheme is described and experimentally validated. The engine excitation is provided by a sound quality equivalent engine simulator, running on a real-time platform that delivers harmonic excitation in function of the driving condition. The controller performance is evaluated in terms of specific loudness and roughness. It is shown that the use of a quite simple control strategy, such as a velocity feedback, can result in satisfactory loudness reduction with slightly spread roughness, improving the overall perception of the engine sound.

  16. Manual of Suggested Activities for the Development of Sound Localization Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brothers, Roy J.; Huff, Roger A.

    The manual is intended to provide teachers of young blind children with activities to develop sound localization skills. Both group and individual activities are suggested for the following four categories: activities in which both child and sound are stationary, activities in which the child is stationary but the sound is moving, activities in…

  17. Epaxial and limb muscle activity during swimming and terrestrial stepping in the adult newt, Pleurodeles waltl.

    PubMed

    Delvolvé, I; Bem, T; Cabelguen, J M

    1997-08-01

    We have investigated the patterns of activation of epaxial musculature during both swimming and overground stepping in an adult newt (Pleurodeles waltl) with the use of electromyographic (EMG) recordings from different sites of the myomeric muscle dorsalis trunci along the body axis. The locomotor patterns of some limb muscles have also been investigated. During swimming, the epaxial myomeres are rhythmically active, with a strict alternation between opposite myomeres located at the same longitudinal site. The pattern of intersegmental coordination consists of three successively initiated waves of EMG activity passing posteriorly along the anterior trunk, the midtrunk, and the posterior trunk, respectively. Swimming is also characterized by a tonic activation of forelimb (dorsalis scapulae and extensor ulnae) and hindlimb (puboischiotibialis and puboischiofemoralis internus) muscles and a rhythmic activation of muscles (latissimus dorsi and caudofemoralis) acting both on limb and body axis. The latter matched the activation pattern of epaxial myomeres at the similar vertebral level. During overground stepping, the midtrunk myomeres express single synchronous bursts whereas the myomeres of the anterior trunk and those of the posterior trunk display a double bursting pattern in the form of two waves of EMG activity propagating in opposite directions. During overground stepping, the limb muscles and muscles acting on both limb and body axis were found to be rhythmically active and usually displayed a double bursting pattern. The main conclusion of this investigation is that the patterns of intersegmental coordination during both swimming and overground stepping in the adult newt are related to the presence of limbs and that they can be considered as hybrid lampreylike patterns. Thus it is hypothesized that, in newt, a chain of coupled segmental oscillatory networks, similar to that which constitutes the central pattern generator (CPG) for swimming in the lamprey, can

  18. Limb suction evoked during arterial occlusion causes systemic sympathetic activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Blaha, Cheryl; Herr, Michael D; Drew, Rachel C; Muller, Matthew D; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-09-01

    Venous saline infusions in an arterially occluded forearm evokes reflex increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that the application of suction to the human limbs would activate this venous distension reflex and raise sympathetic outflow. We placed airtight pressure tanks and applied 100 mmHg negative pressure to an arterially occluded limb (occlusion and suction, O&S) to induce tissue deformation without fluid translocation. BP, heart rate (HR), and MSNA were assessed in 19 healthy subjects during 2 min of arm or leg O&S. Occlusion without suction served as a control. During a separate visit, saline (5% forearm volume) was infused into veins of the arterially occluded arm (n = 13). The O&S increased limb circumference, MSNA burst rate (arm: Δ6.7 ± 0.7; leg: Δ6.8 ± 0.7 bursts/min), and total activity (arm: Δ199 ± 14; leg: Δ172 ± 22 units/min) and BP (arm: Δ4.3 ± 0.3; leg: Δ9.4 ± 1.4 mmHg) from the baseline. The MSNA and BP responses during arm O&S correlated with those during leg O&S. Occlusion alone had no effect on MSNA and BP. MSNA (r = 0.607) responses during arm O&S correlated with those evoked by the saline infusion into the arm. These correlations suggest that sympathetic activation during limb O&S is likely, at least partially, to be evoked via the venous distension reflex. These data suggest that suction of an occluded limb evokes sympathetic activation and that the limb venous distension reflex exists in arms and legs of normal humans. PMID:26136530

  19. Limb suction evoked during arterial occlusion causes systemic sympathetic activity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Blaha, Cheryl; Herr, Michael D.; Drew, Rachel C.; Muller, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Venous saline infusions in an arterially occluded forearm evokes reflex increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP). We hypothesized that the application of suction to the human limbs would activate this venous distension reflex and raise sympathetic outflow. We placed airtight pressure tanks and applied 100 mmHg negative pressure to an arterially occluded limb (occlusion and suction, O&S) to induce tissue deformation without fluid translocation. BP, heart rate (HR), and MSNA were assessed in 19 healthy subjects during 2 min of arm or leg O&S. Occlusion without suction served as a control. During a separate visit, saline (5% forearm volume) was infused into veins of the arterially occluded arm (n = 13). The O&S increased limb circumference, MSNA burst rate (arm: Δ6.7 ± 0.7; leg: Δ6.8 ± 0.7 bursts/min), and total activity (arm: Δ199 ± 14; leg: Δ172 ± 22 units/min) and BP (arm: Δ4.3 ± 0.3; leg: Δ9.4 ± 1.4 mmHg) from the baseline. The MSNA and BP responses during arm O&S correlated with those during leg O&S. Occlusion alone had no effect on MSNA and BP. MSNA (r = 0.607) responses during arm O&S correlated with those evoked by the saline infusion into the arm. These correlations suggest that sympathetic activation during limb O&S is likely, at least partially, to be evoked via the venous distension reflex. These data suggest that suction of an occluded limb evokes sympathetic activation and that the limb venous distension reflex exists in arms and legs of normal humans. PMID:26136530

  20. [Actuator placement for active sound and vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Two refereed journal publications and ten talks given at conferences, seminars, and colloquia resulted from research supported by NASA. They are itemized in this report. The two publications were entitled "Reactive Tabu and Search Sensor Selection in Active Structural Acoustic Control Problems" and "Quelling Cabin Noise in Turboprop Aircraft via Active Control." The conference presentations covered various aspects of actuator placement, including location problems, for active sound and vibration control of cylinders, of commuter jets, of propeller driven or turboprop aircraft, and for quelling aircraft cabin or interior noise.

  1. The muscle activation patterns of lower limb during stair climbing at different backpack load.

    PubMed

    Yali, Han; Aiguo, Song; Haitao, Gao; Songqing, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Stair climbing under backpack load condition is a challenging task. Understanding muscle activation patterns of lower limb during stair climbing with load furthers our understanding of the factors involved in joint pathology and the effects of treatment. At the same time, stair climbing under backpack load requires adjustments of muscle activations and increases joint moment compared to level walking, which with muscle activation patterns are altered as a result of using an assistive technology, such as a wearable exoskeleton leg for human walking power augmentation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze lower limb muscles during stair climbing under different backpack load. Nine healthy volunteers ascended a four-step staircase at different backpack load (0 kg, 10 kg, 20 kg, 30 kg). Electromyographic (EMG) signals were recorded from four lower limb muscles (gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, hamstring, rectus femoris). The results showed that muscle activation amplitudes of lower limb increase with increasing load during stair climbing, the maximum RMS of gastrocnemius are greater than tibialis anterior, hamstring and rectus femoris whether stair climbing or level walking under the same load condition. However, the maximum RMS of hamstring are smaller than gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior and rectus femoris. The study of muscle activation under different backpack load during stair climbing can be used to design biomechanism and explore intelligent control based on EMG for a wearable exoskeleton leg for human walking power augmentation. PMID:26899302

  2. Muscle activation patterns during walking from transtibial amputees recorded within the residual limb-prosthetic interface

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Powered lower limb prostheses could be more functional if they had access to feedforward control signals from the user’s nervous system. Myoelectric signals are one potential control source. The purpose of this study was to determine if muscle activation signals could be recorded from residual lower limb muscles within the prosthetic socket-limb interface during walking. Methods We recorded surface electromyography from three lower leg muscles (tibilias anterior, gastrocnemius medial head, gastrocnemius lateral head) and four upper leg muscles (vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and gluteus medius) of 12 unilateral transtibial amputee subjects and 12 non-amputee subjects during treadmill walking at 0.7, 1.0, 1.3, and 1.6 m/s. Muscle signals were recorded from the amputated leg of amputee subjects and the right leg of control subjects. For amputee subjects, lower leg muscle signals were recorded from within the limb-socket interface and from muscles above the knee. We quantified differences in the muscle activation profile between amputee and control groups during treadmill walking using cross-correlation analyses. We also assessed the step-to-step inter-subject variability of these profiles by calculating variance-to-signal ratios. Results We found that amputee subjects demonstrated reliable muscle recruitment signals from residual lower leg muscles recorded within the prosthetic socket during walking, which were locked to particular phases of the gait cycle. However, muscle activation profile variability was higher for amputee subjects than for control subjects. Conclusion Robotic lower limb prostheses could use myoelectric signals recorded from surface electrodes within the socket-limb interface to derive feedforward commands from the amputee’s nervous system. PMID:22882763

  3. Force irradiation effects during upper limb diagonal exercises on contralateral muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Rosa; Lopes, Alfredo Alexandre; Sousa, Andreia S P; Pereira, Soraia; Castro, Marcelo P

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the force irradiation effects of upper limb isometric diagonal exercises on shoulder muscle activities. Interactions among diagonal directions, contraction intensities (moderate and maximum) and sex were assessed. Thirty healthy subjects (11 males) performed isometric unilateral diagonal exercises based on proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation technique in an isokinetic dynamometer with their dominant upper limbs. The second diagonal for flexion and for extension were assessed while the participants performed their maximum isometric torque (MIT) and at 25% of their MIT. During the exercise the muscle activity of the medial deltoid, pectoralis major and upper trapezius in the non-dominant (non-exercised) upper limbs of the participants was recorded by surface electromyography. The highest muscle activity occurred in the upper trapezius during the diagonal for flexion (27% of maximum isometric voluntary contractions). Upper trapezius and pectoralis major were more active during the diagonal for flexion than diagonal for extension (p < 0.001), while similar values between both diagonals were observed for the medial deltoid (p > 0.05). In conclusion, we observed that force irradiation during upper limb diagonal exercises is affected by diagonal direction, contraction intensity and sex when performed by healthy participants. PMID:25592384

  4. Retrotransposon long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) is activated during salamander limb regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Kuo, Dwight; Nathanson, Jason; Satoh, Akira; Pao, Gerald M.; Yeo, Gene W.; Bryant, Susan V.; Voss, S. Randal; Gardiner, David M.; Hunter, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Salamanders possess an extraordinary capacity for tissue and organ regeneration when compared to mammals. In our effort to characterize the unique transcriptional fingerprint emerging during the early phase of salamander limb regeneration, we identified transcriptional activation of some germline-specific genes within the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) that is indicative of cellular reprogramming of differentiated cells into a germline-like state. In this work, we focus on one of these genes, the long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposon, which is usually active in germ cells and silent in most of the somatic tissues in other organisms. LINE-1 was found to be dramatically upregulated during regeneration. In addition, higher genomic LINE-1 content was also detected in the limb regenerate when compared to that before amputation indicating that LINE-1 retrotransposition is indeed active during regeneration. Active LINE-1 retrotransposition has been suggested to have a potentially deleterious impact on genomic integrity. Silencing of activated LINE-1 by small RNAs has been reported to be part of the machinery aiming to maintain genomic integrity. Indeed, we were able to identify putative LINE-1-related piRNAs in the limb blastema. Transposable element-related piRNAs have been identified frequently in the germline in other organisms. Thus, we present here a scenario in which a unique germline-like state is established during axolotl limb regeneration, and the re-activation of LINE-1 may serve as a marker for cellular dedifferentiation in the early-stage of limb regeneration. PMID:22913491

  5. Bioelectrical activity of limb muscles during cold shivering of stimulation of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmina, G. I.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of caloric and electric stimulation of the vestibular receptors on the EMG activity of limb muslces in anesthetized cats during cold induced shivering involved flexor muscles alone. Both types of stimulation suppressed bioelectrical activity more effectively in the ipsilateral muscles. The suppression of shivering activity seems to be due to the increased inhibitory effect of descending labyrinth pathways on the function of flexor motoneurons.

  6. Active and passive electromagnetic sounding on comets and moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przyklenk, Anita; Auster, Hans-Ulrich

    We want to present the method of electromagnetic sounding on small extraterrestrial bodies to determine interior structures of those. Our sensors are perfectly suited for rover or lander missions, because they do not weight much (sum of all devices is approximately 600g) and can be easily installed at the bottom of a rover or at lander feet. The aim is to measure the material-specific complex resistivity, which depends on the electrical resistivity and electrical permittivity, for various sounding depth. This penetration depth depends on the 2 different operating modes. In the active mode, that is the so called Capacitive Resistivity (CR) method, the sounding depth is around a few meters. The CR is a purely electrical field measurement and works with a 4 electrode array. 2 of them are transmitter electrodes. They inject AC signals with frequencies between 100 Hz and 100 kHz into the subsurface. Then 2 receiver electrodes pick up the generated potentials. And a 4-point impedance can be calculated that depends on the electrical parameters among others [Grard, 1990a and b] [Kuras, 2002]. The second operating mode is the passive one. In the so called magneto telluric method the penetration depth depends on electrical parameters and can be in range of several 100m to km. Here, for excitation natural magnetic field variations are used. The magnetic field components are measured with our Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) (flight heritage: Rosetta, Venus Express, Themis,…). Induced electrical field components are measured again with the CR electrode array. Then the electromagnetic impedance can be derived, which depends on electrical resistivity among others. In the end, we want to discuss advantages and disadvantages of investigations during space missions compared to surveys on earth. As examples we have a closer look at the jovian moon Ganymede, the earth moon and the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and consider the applicability of electromagnetic sounding on this objects

  7. Upper Limb Muscle and Brain Activity in Light Assembly Task on Different Load Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadry, Hilma Raimona; Dawal, Siti Zawiah Md.; Taha, Zahari

    2010-10-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of load on upper limb muscles and brain activities in light assembly task. The task was conducted at two levels of load (Low and high). Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to measure upper limb muscle activities of twenty subjects. Electroencephalography (EEG) was simultaneously recorded with EMG to record brain activities from Fz, Pz, O1 and O2 channels. The EMG Mean Power Frequency (MPF) of the right brachioradialis and the left upper trapezius activities were higher on the high-load task compared to low-load task. The EMG MPF values also decrease as time increases, that reflects muscle fatigue. Mean power of the EEG alpha bands for the Fz-Pz channels were found to be higher on the high-load task compared to low-load task, while for the O1-O2 channels, they were higher on the low-load task than on the high-load task. These results indicated that the load levels effect the upper limb muscle and brain activities. The high-load task will increase muscle activities on the right brachioradialis and the left upper tapezius muscles, and will increase the awareness and motivation of the subjects. Whilst the low-load task can generate drowsiness earlier. It signified that the longer the time and the more heavy of the task, the subjects will be more fatigue physically and mentally.

  8. Decoding upper limb residual muscle activity in severe chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Murguialday, Ander; García-Cossio, Eliana; Walter, Armin; Cho, Woosang; Broetz, Doris; Bogdan, Martin; Cohen, Leonardo G; Birbaumer, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Objective Stroke is a leading cause of long-term motor disability. Stroke patients with severe hand weakness do not profit from rehabilitative treatments. Recently, brain-controlled robotics and sequential functional electrical stimulation allowed some improvement. However, for such therapies to succeed, it is required to decode patients' intentions for different arm movements. Here, we evaluated whether residual muscle activity could be used to predict movements from paralyzed joints in severely impaired chronic stroke patients. Methods Muscle activity was recorded with surface-electromyography (EMG) in 41 patients, with severe hand weakness (Fugl-Meyer Assessment [FMA] hand subscores of 2.93 ± 2.7), in order to decode their intention to perform six different motions of the affected arm, required for voluntary muscle activity and to control neuroprostheses. Decoding of paretic and nonparetic muscle activity was performed using a feed-forward neural network classifier. The contribution of each muscle to the intended movement was determined. Results Decoding of up to six arm movements was accurate (>65%) in more than 97% of nonparetic and 46% of paretic muscles. Interpretation These results demonstrate that some level of neuronal innervation to the paretic muscle remains preserved and can be used to implement neurorehabilitative treatments in 46% of patients with severe paralysis and extensive cortical and/or subcortical lesions. Such decoding may allow these patients for the first time after stroke to control different motions of arm prostheses through muscle-triggered rehabilitative treatments. PMID:25642429

  9. Staying in dynamic balance on a prosthetic limb: A leg to stand on?

    PubMed

    Curtze, Carolin; Hof, At L; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2016-06-01

    With the loss of a lower limb, amputees lack the active muscle empowered control of the ankle that is important for balance control. We examined single-leg stance on prosthesis vs. sound limb balancing on narrow ridges in transtibial amputees. When balancing on the prosthetic limb, the lateral displacement of the center of pressure was reduced and was compensated by an increase in counter-rotation. We show that single-leg stance on a prosthetic limb can be compared to balancing on a narrow ridge. Standing on a prosthetic limb involves the same balance mechanisms as balancing on narrow ridges of 40-mm to 20-mm width. Yet, the ability to balance on a narrow ridge with the sound limb was only a weak predictor for an amputee's ability to stand on the prosthetic limb. Balancing in single-leg stance on a prosthetic limb is not a common activity. The ability to compensate with the sound limb may therefore be functionally more important than the ability to stay in dynamic balance on the prosthetic limb. PMID:27052518

  10. Comparison of stratospheric air parcel trajectories calculated from SSU and LIMS satellite data. [Stratospheric Sounding Unit/Limb Infrared Monitor of Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, J.

    1986-01-01

    Midstratospheric trajectories for February and March 1979 are calculated using geopotential analyses derived from limb infrared monitor of the stratosphere data. These trajectories are compared with the corresponding results using stratospheric sounding unit data. The trajectories are quasi-isentropic in that a radiation scheme is used to simply cross-isentrope flow. The results show that in disturbed conditions, quantitative agreement the trajectories, that is, within 25 great circle degrees (GCD) (one GCD about 110 km) may be valid for only 3 or 4 days, whereas during quiescent periods, quantitative agreement may last up to 10 days. By comparing trajectories calculated with different data some insight can be gained as to errors due to vertical resolution and horizontal resolution (due to infrequent sampling) in the analyzed geopotential height fields. For the disturbed trajectories described in this paper the horizontal resolution of the data was more important than vertical resolution; however, for the quiescent trajectories, which could be calculated accurately for a longer duration because of the absence of appreciable transients, the vertical resolution of the data was found to be more important than the horizontal resolution. It is speculated that these characteristics are also applicable to trajectories calculated during disturbed and quiescent periods in general. A review of some recently published trajectories shows that the qualitative conclusions of such works remains unaffected when the calculations are repeated using different data.

  11. Agency over a phantom limb and electromyographic activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Shu; Asai, Tomohisa; Kanayama, Noriaki; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Koyama, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Most patients, post-amputation, report the experience of a phantom limb. Some even sense voluntary movements when viewing a mirror image of the intact limb superimposed onto the phantom limb. While delayed visual feedback of an action is known to reduce a sense of agency, the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation (i.e., sense of controlling a phantom limb) has not been examined. Using a video-projection system, we examined the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation in an upper-limb amputee (male; left upper-limb amputation). He was instructed to view mirrored video images of his intact hand clasping and unclasping during a phantom limb movement. He then rated the intensity of the phantom motor sensation. Three types of hand movement images were presented as follows: synchronous, asynchronous with a 250-ms delay, and asynchronous with a 500-ms delay. Results showed that phantom motor sensation decreased when the image was delayed by 250 and 500 ms. However, when we instructed the patient to adjust the phase of phantom limb movement to that of the image with a 500-ms delay, phantom motor sensation increased. There was also a positive correlation between intensity of phantom motor sensation and electromyographic (EMG) activity on deltoids at the patient’s stump. These results suggest that phantom motor sensation and EMG activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony and top-down effects. PMID:25120449

  12. Agency over a phantom limb and electromyographic activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony: a case study.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Shu; Asai, Tomohisa; Kanayama, Noriaki; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Koyama, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Most patients, post-amputation, report the experience of a phantom limb. Some even sense voluntary movements when viewing a mirror image of the intact limb superimposed onto the phantom limb. While delayed visual feedback of an action is known to reduce a sense of agency, the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation (i.e., sense of controlling a phantom limb) has not been examined. Using a video-projection system, we examined the effect of delayed visual feedback on phantom motor sensation in an upper-limb amputee (male; left upper-limb amputation). He was instructed to view mirrored video images of his intact hand clasping and unclasping during a phantom limb movement. He then rated the intensity of the phantom motor sensation. Three types of hand movement images were presented as follows: synchronous, asynchronous with a 250-ms delay, and asynchronous with a 500-ms delay. Results showed that phantom motor sensation decreased when the image was delayed by 250 and 500 ms. However, when we instructed the patient to adjust the phase of phantom limb movement to that of the image with a 500-ms delay, phantom motor sensation increased. There was also a positive correlation between intensity of phantom motor sensation and electromyographic (EMG) activity on deltoids at the patient's stump. These results suggest that phantom motor sensation and EMG activity on the stump depend on visuomotor synchrony and top-down effects. PMID:25120449

  13. Limb and back muscle activity adaptations to tripedal locomotion in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Aniela; Anders, Alexandra; Nolte, Ingo; Schilling, Nadja

    2015-10-01

    Alterations in muscle recruitment are key to the functional plasticity of the mammalian locomotor system. One particularly challenging situation quadrupeds may face is when the functionality of a limb is reduced or lost. To better understand how mammals manage in such situations and which muscular adaptations they exhibit when locomoting on three legs, we recorded the activity patterns of two limb and one back extensor muscle in nine dogs using surface electromyography. We compared the timing and the level of recruitment before and after the loss of a hindlimb was simulated. Both the intensity and the timing of the activity changed significantly in the m. vastus lateralis of the remaining hindlimb, consistent with this limb bearing a greater proportion of the body weight as well as with previously reported kinematic changes. In accordance with the greater body weight supported by the forelimbs, the m. triceps brachii showed first and foremost an increased level of excitation. The very asymmetrical changes in the timing and the level of activity in the m. longissimus dorsi reflects the highly asymmetrical functional requirements imposed on the trunk and the pelvis when one hindlimb is no longer involved in the production of locomotor work while the other hindlimb partially compensates the loss. Integration of our electromyographical findings with kinetic and kinematic results illustrates that dogs exhibited a well-coordinated response to the functional requirements of tripedalism and underlines the importance of moment-to-moment modulation in muscular recruitment for the functional plasticity of the mammalian locomotor system. PMID:26200094

  14. Might as well jump: sound affects muscle activation in skateboarding.

    PubMed

    Cesari, Paola; Camponogara, Ivan; Papetti, Stefano; Rocchesso, Davide; Fontana, Federico

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to reveal the role of sound in action anticipation and performance, and to test whether the level of precision in action planning and execution is related to the level of sensorimotor skills and experience that listeners possess about a specific action. Individuals ranging from 18 to 75 years of age--some of them without any skills in skateboarding and others experts in this sport--were compared in their ability to anticipate and simulate a skateboarding jump by listening to the sound it produces. Only skaters were able to modulate the forces underfoot and to apply muscle synergies that closely resembled the ones that a skater would use if actually jumping on a skateboard. More importantly we showed that only skaters were able to plan the action by activating anticipatory postural adjustments about 200 ms after the jump event. We conclude that expert patterns are guided by auditory events that trigger proper anticipations of the corresponding patterns of movements. PMID:24619134

  15. Similar barriers and facilitators to physical activity across different clinical groups experiencing lower limb spasticity.

    PubMed

    Hundza, Sandra; Quartly, Caroline; Kim, Jasmine M; Dunnett, James; Dobrinsky, Jill; Loots, Iris; Choy, Kim; Chow, Brayley; Hampshire, Alexis; Temple, Viviene A

    2016-07-01

    Purpose Given the importance of physical activity in maintaining health and wellness, an improved understanding of physical activity patterns across different clinical populations is required. This study examines the facilitators for, and barriers to, participation in physical activity across multiple contexts for three clinical groups with chronic lower limb spasticity (individuals with stroke, multiple sclerosis and incomplete spinal cord injury). Method This cross-sectional study employed quantitative measures for spasticity, ankle range of motion, pain, falls, cognition, mobility, and physical activity as well as qualitative semi-structured interviews. Results There were similar impairments in body functions and structures and limitations in activities across the clinical groups. These impairments and limitations negatively impacted participation in physical activity, which was low. Environmental and personal factors exacerbated or mitigated the limiting effects of body functions and structures and activities on physical activity in many areas of life. Conclusions In this population, participation in physical activity includes activities such as housework which are different than what is typically considered as physical activity. Further, the presence of similar barriers and facilitators across the groups suggests that support and services to promote valued forms of physical activity could be organised and delivered based on limitations in mobility and functioning rather than clinical diagnosis. Implications for rehabilitation Physical activity is of utmost importance in maintaining health and wellness in clinical populations. This research highlights the desired and actual physical activity for these populations can look different than what may traditionally be considered as physical activity (e.g. housework is not typically considered participation physical activity). Therefore, rehabilitation interventions need to be directly designed to enhance clients

  16. Fundamental study of lower limb muscle activity using an angled whole body vibration exercise instrument.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Kang, Seung Rok; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    This research was performed to assess the effects of angled whole body vibration on muscle activity of the lower limbs, by examining adults in their twenties during squat exercises, taking into account two variables of exercise intensity (vibration frequency and gradient). Twenty healthy males in their twenties with previous experience of more than 6 month's weight training and no past medical history were included in this study. The experiment was performed by participating in squat exercises which consisted of 3 sets (1 set = 5 seconds x 3 repetitions of exercise), and the muscle activities of the Rectus Femoris, Vastus Lateralis, Vastus Medialis were measured with variation in the gradients of 0°, 10°, and 20°, and vibration frequencies of 20, 30, and 40 Hz. At 30 and 40 Hz, the vastus lateralis showed the highest change in muscle activity, while activity of the vastus medialis also increased significantly. Analysis of muscle activity according to the gradient showed a significant increase of the vastus lateralis at 20°, while the highest muscle activity at 20° was observed for the vastus medialis. In comparison of the change in lower limb muscle activity according to simultaneous stimulation, at a gradient of 10°, high activity was shown in muscle, while at 20°, high muscle activities were produced at 40 Hz in the vastus lateralis, 40 Hz in the rectus femoris, and both 30 and 40 Hz in the vastus medialis. PMID:25226944

  17. Ultraviolet observations of the structure and dynamics of an active region at the limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korendyke, C. M.; Dere, K. P.; Socker, D. G.; Brueckner, G. E.; Schmieder, B.

    1995-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of active region NOAA 7260 at the limb have been studied using ultraviolet spectra and spectroheliograms obtained during the eighth rocket flight of the Naval Research Laboratory's High Resolution Telescope an Spectrograph (HRTS). The instrument configuration included a narrow-bandpass spectroheliograph to observe the Sun in the lines of C IV lambda 550 and a tandem-Wadsworth mount spectrograph to record the profiles of chromospheric transition region and coronal lines in the 1850-2670 A region. The combination of high spatial resolution and high spectral purity C IV slit jaw images with ultraviolet emission-line spectra corresponding allows examination of a variety of active region phenomena. A time series of spectroheliograms shows large-scale loop systems composed of fine-scale threads with some extending up to 100 Mm above the limb. The proper motion of several supersonic features, including a surge were measured. The accelerated plasmas appear in several different geometries and environments. Spectrograph exposures were taken with the slit positioned at a range of altitudes above the limb and provide a direct comparison between coronal, transition region and chromospheric emission line profiles. The spectral profiles of chromospheric and transition region emission lines show line-of-sight velocities up to 70 km/s. These lower temperature, emission-line spectra show small-scale spatial and velocity variations which are correlated with the threadlike structures seen in C IV. Coronal lines of Fe XII show much lower velocities and no fine structure.

  18. 'Hybrid-PLEMO', rehabilitation system for upper limbs with active / passive force feedback mode.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Takehito; Jin, Ying; Fukushima, Kazuki; Akai, Hiroki; Furusho, Junji

    2008-01-01

    Several rehabilitation robots for upper limbs have been proposed so far, and clinical effectiveness was reported in several studies for the aged people or patients with stroke. However most of them have only 2-DOF for its active motion. It is important for designing a rehabilitation system which trains in the 3-DOF space because the upper limbs of humans works in 3-DOF space even expect for the wrist. We developed the quasi 3-DOF rehabilitation system which has 2-DOF force-feedback function in working plane but its working plane can be adjusted the inclination. And we named it Hybrid-PLEMO for it can be switched between active type and passive type. Hybrid-PLEMO is a compact, low-cost rehabilitation system for upper limbs with high safety by using ER brakes or ER actuators. Additionally, in Hybrid-PLEMO, we take direct-drive linkage mechanism by adding sub links. In this paper, we describe the mechanism and haptic control of Hybrid-PLEMO. PMID:19163078

  19. FTIR Limb-Sounding in the Arctic UTLS under Cloudy Conditions: The MIPAS-STR PSC Flights during RECONCILE and ESSenCe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woiwode, W.; Oelhaf, H.; Gulde, T.; Piesch, C.; Ebersoldt, A.; Orphal, J.

    2012-04-01

    The FTIR Limb-Sounder MIPAS-STR (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - STRatospheric Aircraft) was operated onboard the high-flying (~19 km) research aircraft M55-Geophysica during the RECONCILE (Reconciliation of essential process parameters for an enhanced predictability of arctic stratospheric ozone loss and its climate interactions) and the ESSenCe (ESa Sounder Campaign 2011) campaigns in arctic spring 2010 and early arctic winter 2011/2012. From the MIPAS-STR measurements, vertical profiles and spatially resolved vertical cross-sections of temperature, trace-gases (e.g. HNO3, O3, ClONO2, ClO, CFCs) and cloud-coverage are derived in the vertical range between 4 and 20 km. During some RECONCILE and ESSenCe flights, MIPAS-STR probed air-masses below and inside Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). This region is hardly accessible by satellite-borne and balloon-borne IR remote-sensing, since vertically extended and optical thick PSC clouds complicate or even hamper IR measurements in this altitude-range. In contrast, MIPAS-STR onboard the Geophysica aircraft sampled the lower boundary of extended PSC clouds and the area below, allowing for spatially resolved insights into the chemical properties of this region. We discuss our retrieval approach for spectra with low cloud indices (i.e. increased optical thickness in the IR) and show current results from cloud-affected measurements at tropospheric and stratospheric altitudes, with emphasis on denitrification processes and chlorine chemistry. The results support the candidate Earth Explorer 7 mission PREMIER (PRocess Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimetre-wave Emitted Radiation) with regard to the probing of the UTLS region under cloud-free and cloudy conditions with high spatial resolution, and gives a perspective of the capabilities of the new GLORIA (Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere) instrument, which has been developed at the KIT (Karlsruhe

  20. Analyzing Activities in the Course of Science Education, According to Activity Theory: The Case of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodoraki, Xarikleia; Plakitsi, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we analyze activities on the topic of sound, which are performed in the science education laboratory lessons in the third-year students of the Department of Early Childhood Education at the University of Ioannina. The analysis of the activities is based on one of the most modern learning theories of CHAT (Cultural Historical…

  1. Application of subharmonics for active sound design of electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Doo Young; Yoon, Kiseop; Seong, Yeolwan; Lee, Soogab

    2014-12-01

    The powertrain of electric vehicles generates an unfamiliar acoustical environment for customers. This paper seeks optimal interior sound for electric vehicles based on psychoacoustic knowledge and musical harmonic theory. The concept of inserting a virtual sound, which consists of the subharmonics of an existing high-frequency component, is suggested to improve sound quality. Subjective evaluation results indicate that the impression of interior sound can be enhanced in this manner. Increased appeal is achieved through two designed stimuli, which proves the effectiveness of the method proposed. PMID:25480088

  2. Revascularization of ischemic limbs after transplantation of human bone marrow cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Capoccia, Benjamin J.; Robson, Debra L.; Levac, Krysta D.; Maxwell, Dustin J.; Hohm, Sarah A.; Neelamkavil, Marian J.; Bell, Gillian I.; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Link, Daniel C.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Nolta, Jan A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of cell therapies to treat peripheral vascular disease has proven difficult because of the contribution of multiple cell types that coordinate revascularization. We characterized the vascular regenerative potential of transplanted human bone marrow (BM) cells purified by high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDHhi) activity, a progenitor cell function conserved between several lineages. BM ALDHhi cells were enriched for myelo-erythroid progenitors that produced multipotent hematopoietic reconstitution after transplantation and contained nonhematopoietic precursors that established colonies in mesenchymal-stromal and endothelial culture conditions. The regenerative capacity of human ALDHhi cells was assessed by intravenous transplantation into immune-deficient mice with limb ischemia induced by femoral artery ligation/transection. Compared with recipients injected with unpurified nucleated cells containing the equivalent of 2- to 4-fold more ALDHhi cells, mice transplanted with purified ALDHhi cells showed augmented recovery of perfusion and increased blood vessel density in ischemic limbs. ALDHhi cells transiently recruited to ischemic regions but did not significantly integrate into ischemic tissue, suggesting that transient ALDHhi cell engraftment stimulated endogenous revascularization. Thus, human BM ALDHhi cells represent a progenitor-enriched population of several cell lineages that improves perfusion in ischemic limbs after transplantation. These clinically relevant cells may prove useful in the treatment of critical ischemia in humans. PMID:19324906

  3. Temperature fluctuations in the lower limbs of young and elderly individuals during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vladimir V; Lin, David C

    2014-09-01

    Age-related deficiencies in thermoregulation diminish the capacity to defend against heat loss under conditions often encountered during activities of daily living (ADL). A potential consequence of these deficiencies is that elderly individuals could have colder lower limbs, which would exacerbate the age-related decline in plantarflexor contractile properties and compromise recovery from a tripping incident. Moreover, a common self-perception among the elderly is that their limbs are cold. However, this impression has never been documented, especially under ADL conditions. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that elderly individuals have lower plantarflexor temperatures than their younger counterparts. Skin temperatures above the plantarflexors of elderly and young individuals were continuously recorded during ADL in the winter months and compared under three conditions: quiescent indoor temperature, during a cold challenge, and the recovery period subsequent to the cold challenge. For quiescent indoor periods, differences in skin temperature between the two groups were not statistically significant. During cold exposures, both age and exposure duration were statistically significant factors related to the decrease in skin temperature, with the elderly group maintaining warmer temperatures. In the recovery period following short duration cold exposures, a statistically significant difference between the two groups for the decrease in skin temperature persisted for the first 9min of recovery. The results do not support the hypothesis that the lower limbs of elderly participants are colder. Higher limb temperatures observed in elderly participants were consistent with previous studies of age-related thermoregulatory changes, indicating that deficiencies in vasoconstriction are persistent in ADL. PMID:24909351

  4. Quadratic Optimization in the Problems of Active Control of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loncaric, J.; Tsynkov, S. V.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the problem of suppressing the unwanted component of a time-harmonic acoustic field (noise) on a predetermined region of interest. The suppression is rendered by active means, i.e., by introducing the additional acoustic sources called controls that generate the appropriate anti-sound. Previously, we have obtained general solutions for active controls in both continuous and discrete formulations of the problem. We have also obtained optimal solutions that minimize the overall absolute acoustic source strength of active control sources. These optimal solutions happen to be particular layers of monopoles on the perimeter of the protected region. Mathematically, minimization of acoustic source strength is equivalent to minimization in the sense of L(sub 1). By contrast. in the current paper we formulate and study optimization problems that involve quadratic functions of merit. Specifically, we minimize the L(sub 2) norm of the control sources, and we consider both the unconstrained and constrained minimization. The unconstrained L(sub 2) minimization is certainly the easiest problem to address numerically. On the other hand, the constrained approach allows one to analyze sophisticated geometries. In a special case, we call compare our finite-difference optimal solutions to the continuous optimal solutions obtained previously using a semi-analytic technique. We also show that the optima obtained in the sense of L(sub 2) differ drastically from those obtained in the sense of L(sub 1).

  5. Radio-echo sounding of 'active' Antarctic subglacial lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegert, M. J.; Ross, N.; Blankenship, D. D.; Young, D. A.; Greenbaum, J. S.; Richter, T.; Rippin, D. M.; Le Brocq, A. M.; Wright, A.; Bingham, R.; Corr, H.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jordan, T. A.; Smith, B. E.; Payne, A. J.; Dowdeswell, J. A.; Bamber, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Repeat-pass satellite altimetry has revealed 124 discrete surface height changes across the Antarctic Ice Sheet, interpreted to be caused by subglacial lake discharges (surface lowering) and inputs (surface uplift). Few of these active lakes have been confirmed by radio-echo sounding (RES) despite several attempts, however. Over the last 5 years, major geophysical campaigns have acquired RES data from several 'active' lake sites, including the US-UK-Australian ICECAP programme in East Antactica and the UK survey of the Institute Ice Stream in West Antarctica. In the latter case, a targeted RES survey of one 'active' lake was undertaken. RES evidence of the subglacial bed beneath 'active' lakes in both East and West Antarctica will be presented, and the evidence for pooled subglacial water from these data will be assessed. Based on this assessment, the nature of 'active' subglacial lakes, and their associated hydrology and relationship with surrounding topography will be discussed, as will the likelihood of further 'active' lakes in Antarctica. Hydraulic potential map of the Byrd Glacier catchment with contours at 5 MPa intervals. Predicted subglacial flowpaths are shown in blue. Subglacial lakes known from previous geophysical surveys are shown as black triangles while the newly discovered 'Three-tier lakes' are shown in dashed black outline. Surface height change features within the Byrd subglacial catchment are shown in outline and are shaded to indicate whether they were rising or falling during the ICESat campaign. Those features are labelled in-line with the numbering system of Smith et al. (J. Glac. 2009).

  6. Out on a Limb: Investigating the Anatomy of Tree Limbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Edward L.

    2008-01-01

    The author presents several upper elementary science activities involving tree limbs that were collected after severe weather conditions. The activities involved 3rd-grade students arranging tree limb pieces in the correct order from the trunk to the tip of the limb, measuring the pieces, determining the age of a tree limb by its rings,…

  7. Muscle Activation Patterns When Passively Stretching Spastic Lower Limb Muscles of Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Bar-On, Lynn; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat

    2014-01-01

    The definition of spasticity as a velocity-dependent activation of the tonic stretch reflex during a stretch to a passive muscle is the most widely accepted. However, other mechanisms are also thought to contribute to pathological muscle activity and, in patients post-stroke and spinal cord injury can result in different activation patterns. In the lower-limbs of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) these distinct activation patterns have not yet been thoroughly explored. The aim of the study was to apply an instrumented assessment to quantify different muscle activation patterns in four lower-limb muscles of children with CP. Fifty-four children with CP were included (males/females n = 35/19; 10.8±3.8 yrs; bilateral/unilateral involvement n =  32/22; Gross Motor Functional Classification Score I–IV) of whom ten were retested to evaluate intra-rater reliability. With the subject relaxed, single-joint, sagittal-plane movements of the hip, knee, and ankle were performed to stretch the lower-limb muscles at three increasing velocities. Muscle activity and joint motion were synchronously recorded using inertial sensors and electromyography (EMG) from the adductors, medial hamstrings, rectus femoris, and gastrocnemius. Muscles were visually categorised into activation patterns using average, normalized root mean square EMG (RMS-EMG) compared across increasing position zones and velocities. Based on the visual categorisation, quantitative parameters were defined using stretch-reflex thresholds and normalized RMS-EMG. These parameters were compared between muscles with different activation patterns. All patterns were dominated by high velocity-dependent muscle activation, but in more than half, low velocity-dependent activation was also observed. Muscle activation patterns were found to be both muscle- and subject-specific (p<0.01). The intra-rater reliability of all quantitative parameters was moderate to good. Comparing RMS-EMG between incremental

  8. Motor area activity for action-related and nonaction-related sounds in a three-dimensional sound field reproduction system.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Koichiro; Ueno, Kanako; Shimada, Sotaro

    2015-03-25

    The motor cortical area is often activated to auditory stimuli in the human brain. In this study, we examined whether the motor area shows differential activation for action-related and nonaction-related sounds and whether it is susceptible to the quality of the sounds. A three-dimensional sound field recording and reproduction system based on the boundary surface control principle (BoSC system) was used for this purpose. We measured brain activity during hearing action-related or nonaction-related sounds with electroencephalography using mu rhythm suppression (mu-suppression) as an index of motor cortical activation. The results showed that mu-suppression was observed when the participant heard action-related sounds, but it was not evident when hearing nonaction-related sounds. Moreover, this suppression was significantly larger in the 3D sound field (62-ch loudspeaker condition), which generates a more realistic sound field, than in the 1-ch loudspeaker condition. Our results indicate that the motor area was indeed activated for action-related sounds and that its activation was enhanced with a 3D realistic sound field. We discuss our findings in relation to the mirror neuron system and the possibility of using its activity as an objective measure that reflects the subjective sense of reality in various virtual reality settings when interacting with others. PMID:25714418

  9. Alterations in lower limb multimuscle activation patterns during stair climbing in female total knee arthroplasty patients.

    PubMed

    Kuntze, G; von Tscharner, V; Hutchison, C; Ronsky, J L

    2015-11-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients commonly experience neuromuscular adaptations that may affect stair climbing competence. This study identified multimuscle pattern (MMP) changes in postoperative female TKA patients during stair climbing with a support vector machine (SVM). It was hypothesized that TKA patients adopt temporal and spectral muscle activation characteristics indicative of muscle atrophy and cocontraction strategies. Nineteen female subjects [10 unilateral sex-specific TKAs, 62.2 ± 8.6 yr, body mass index (BMI) 28.2 ± 5.4 kg/m(2); 9 healthy control subjects, 61.4 ± 7.4 yr, BMI 25.6 ± 2.4 kg/m(2)] were recruited. Surface electromyograms (EMGs) were obtained for seven lower limb muscles of the affected limb of TKA subjects and a randomly assigned limb for control subjects during stair climbing. Stance phase (±30%) EMG data were wavelet transformed and normalized to total power. Data across all muscles were combined to form MMPs and analyzed with a SVM. Statistical analysis was performed with binomial tests, independent group t-tests, or independent group Mann-Whitney U-tests in SPSS (P < 0.05). SVM results indicated significantly altered muscle activation patterns in the TKA group for biceps femoris (recognition rate 84.2%), semitendinosus (recognition rate 73.7%), gastrocnemius (recognition rate 68.4%), and tibialis anterior (recognition rate 68.4%). Further analysis identified no significant differences in spectral activation characteristics between groups. Temporal adaptations, indicative of cocontraction strategies, were, however, evident in TKA MMPs. This approach may provide a valuable tool for clinical neuromuscular function assessment and rehabilitation monitoring. PMID:26354313

  10. The virtual microphone technique in active sound field control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampropoulos, Iraklis E.; Shimizu, Yasushi

    2003-04-01

    Active Sound Field Control (AFC) has been proven very useful in reverberation enhancement applications in large rooms. However, feedback control is required in order to eliminate peaks in the frequency response of the system. The present research closely follows the studies of Shimizu in AFC, in which smoothing of the rooms transfer function is achieved by averaging the impulse responses of multiple microphones. ``The virtual or rotating microphone technique'' reduces the number of microphones in the aforementioned AFC technology, while still achieving the same acoustical effects in the room. After the impulse responses at previously specified pairs of microphone positions are measured, the ratio of transfer functions for every pair is calculated, thus yielding a constant K. Next, microphones are removed and their impulse responses are reproduced by processing the incoming signal of each pair through a convolver, where the computed K constants have been previously stored. Band limiting, windowing and time variance effects are critical factors, in order to reduce incoherence effects and yield reliable approximations of inverse filters and consequently calculations of K. The project is implemented in a church lacking low frequency reverberation for music and makes use of 2 physical and 2 virtual microphones.

  11. Issues in Humanoid Audition and Sound Source Localization by Active Audition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadai, Kazuhiro; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Kitano, Hiroaki

    In this paper, we present an active audition system which is implemented on the humanoid robot "SIG the humanoid". The audition system for highly intelligent humanoids localizes sound sources and recognizes auditory events in the auditory scene. Active audition reported in this paper enables SIG to track sources by integrating audition, vision, and motor movements. Given the multiple sound sources in the auditory scene, SIG actively moves its head to improve localization by aligning microphones orthogonal to the sound source and by capturing the possible sound sources by vision. However, such an active head movement inevitably creates motor noises.The system adaptively cancels motor noises using motor control signals and the cover acoustics. The experimental result demonstrates that active audition by integration of audition, vision, and motor control attains sound source tracking in variety of conditions.onditions.

  12. Activity-related sexual dimorphism in Alaskan foragers from Point Hope: Evidences from the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Gimeno, Pere; Galtés, Ignasi; Jordana, Xavier; Manyosa, Joan; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2015-01-01

    Ipiutak (100BCE-500CE) and Tigara (1200 - 1700CE) are two populations from Point Hope, Alaska. As commonly observed in forager communities, it may be expected males and females to have been involved in markedly different daily activities. Nevertheless, activity-related sexual dimorphism in these populations has been scarcely studied. Using humeral diaphyseal cross-sectional properties and forearm rotational efficiency, which are activity-dependent characteristics, we aim to assess differences between sexes and discuss what activities could have triggered them. Our results suggest that in Ipiutak males and females did not differ meaningfully in their cross-sectional properties. Conversely, in Tigara males had a greater rigidity of the entire humeral diaphysis than females, which suggests the existence of greater relative activity levels and more physically demanding tasks, possibly related to hunting activities. Concerning the differences between sexes in the forearm rotational efficiency, in Tigara females rotational efficiency in elbow flexion is maximal in a more supinated position than in males, which leads to an improvement of efficiency in those stages related to manipulation, and so improves the manipulative capacities of the upper limb. These differences in efficiency are caused by a more proximally oriented humeral medial epicondyle in females, which is thus confirmed to be a good feature to assess differences in labor. Therefore females in Tigara probably performed in a daily basis household activities, such as hide processing and other manipulative labors. In Ipiutak, the analysis of forearm rotational efficiency did not reveal differences between sexes. Overall, the results suggest that division of labor in Ipiutak was not as marked as in Tigara, where upper limb skeletal structure supports the idea that both sexes were involved in different daily activities. Nevertheless, the generalized lack of results in Ipiutak could be due to the small sample

  13. Complementary limb motion estimation for the control of active knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Vallery, Heike; Burgkart, Rainer; Hartmann, Cornelia; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Riener, Robert; Buss, Martin

    2011-02-01

    To restore walking after transfemoral amputation, various actuated exoprostheses have been developed, which control the knee torque actively or via variable damping. In both cases, an important issue is to find the appropriate control that enables user-dominated gait. Recently, we suggested a generic method to deduce intended motion of impaired or amputated limbs from residual human body motion. Based on interjoint coordination in physiological gait, statistical regression is used to estimate missing motion. In a pilot study, this complementary limb motion estimation (CLME) strategy is applied to control an active knee exoprosthesis. A motor-driven prosthetic knee with one degree of freedom has been realized, and one above-knee amputee has used it with CLME. Performed tasks are walking on a treadmill and alternating stair ascent and descent. The subject was able to walk on the treadmill at varying speeds, but needed assistance with the stairs, especially to descend. The promising results with CLME are compared with the subject's performance with her own prosthesis, the C-Leg from Otto Bock. PMID:21303189

  14. 75 FR 77047 - Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... Finance Activities AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for.... Title of Proposal: Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance... Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities describes the types of internal controls and...

  15. Relations among pure-tone sound stimuli, neural activity, and the loudness sensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Both the physiological and psychological responses to pure-tone sound stimuli are used to derive formulas which: (1) relate the loudness, loudness level, and sound-pressure level of pure tones; (2) apply continuously over most of the acoustic regime, including the loudness threshold; and (3) contain no undetermined coefficients. Some of the formulas are fundamental for calculating the loudness of any sound. Power-law formulas relating the pure-tone sound stimulus, neural activity, and loudness are derived from published data.

  16. Enhanced activation of motor execution networks using action observation combined with imagination of lower limb movements.

    PubMed

    Villiger, Michael; Estévez, Natalia; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kiper, Daniel; Kollias, Spyros S; Eng, Kynan; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    The combination of first-person observation and motor imagery, i.e. first-person observation of limbs with online motor imagination, is commonly used in interactive 3D computer gaming and in some movie scenes. These scenarios are designed to induce a cognitive process in which a subject imagines himself/herself acting as the agent in the displayed movement situation. Despite the ubiquity of this type of interaction and its therapeutic potential, its relationship to passive observation and imitation during observation has not been directly studied using an interactive paradigm. In the present study we show activation resulting from observation, coupled with online imagination and with online imitation of a goal-directed lower limb movement using functional MRI (fMRI) in a mixed block/event-related design. Healthy volunteers viewed a video (first-person perspective) of a foot kicking a ball. They were instructed to observe-only the action (O), observe and simultaneously imagine performing the action (O-MI), or imitate the action (O-IMIT). We found that when O-MI was compared to O, activation was enhanced in the ventralpremotor cortex bilaterally, left inferior parietal lobule and left insula. The O-MI and O-IMIT conditions shared many activation foci in motor relevant areas as confirmed by conjunction analysis. These results show that (i) combining observation with motor imagery (O-MI) enhances activation compared to observation-only (O) in the relevant foot motor network and in regions responsible for attention, for control of goal-directed movements and for the awareness of causing an action, and (ii) it is possible to extensively activate the motor execution network using O-MI, even in the absence of overt movement. Our results may have implications for the development of novel virtual reality interactions for neurorehabilitation interventions and other applications involving training of motor tasks. PMID:24015241

  17. Enhanced Activation of Motor Execution Networks Using Action Observation Combined with Imagination of Lower Limb Movements

    PubMed Central

    Villiger, Michael; Estévez, Natalia; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kiper, Daniel; Kollias, Spyros S.; Eng, Kynan; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    The combination of first-person observation and motor imagery, i.e. first-person observation of limbs with online motor imagination, is commonly used in interactive 3D computer gaming and in some movie scenes. These scenarios are designed to induce a cognitive process in which a subject imagines himself/herself acting as the agent in the displayed movement situation. Despite the ubiquity of this type of interaction and its therapeutic potential, its relationship to passive observation and imitation during observation has not been directly studied using an interactive paradigm. In the present study we show activation resulting from observation, coupled with online imagination and with online imitation of a goal-directed lower limb movement using functional MRI (fMRI) in a mixed block/event-related design. Healthy volunteers viewed a video (first-person perspective) of a foot kicking a ball. They were instructed to observe-only the action (O), observe and simultaneously imagine performing the action (O-MI), or imitate the action (O-IMIT). We found that when O-MI was compared to O, activation was enhanced in the ventralpremotor cortex bilaterally, left inferior parietal lobule and left insula. The O-MI and O-IMIT conditions shared many activation foci in motor relevant areas as confirmed by conjunction analysis. These results show that (i) combining observation with motor imagery (O-MI) enhances activation compared to observation-only (O) in the relevant foot motor network and in regions responsible for attention, for control of goal-directed movements and for the awareness of causing an action, and (ii) it is possible to extensively activate the motor execution network using O-MI, even in the absence of overt movement. Our results may have implications for the development of novel virtual reality interactions for neurorehabilitation interventions and other applications involving training of motor tasks. PMID:24015241

  18. Baseline Platelet Activation and Reactivity in Patients with Critical Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    de Borst, Gert Jan; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Roest, Mark; Moll, Frans L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) have a high risk to develop cardiovascular events (CVE). We hypothesized that in CLI patients platelets would display increased baseline activation and reactivity. Objectives We investigated baseline platelet activation and platelet reactivity in patients with CLI. Patients/Methods In this study baseline platelet activation and platelet reactivity in response to stimulation of all major platelet activation pathways were determined in 20 CLI patients (11 using aspirin and 9 using vitamin K-antagonists) included in the Juventas-trial (clinicaltrials.gov NCT00371371) and in 17 healthy controls. Platelet activation was quantified with flow cytometric measurement of platelet P-selectin expression and fibrinogen binding. Results CLI patients not using aspirin showed higher baseline platelet activation compared to healthy controls. Maximal reactivity to stimulation of the collagen and thrombin activation pathway was decreased in CLI patients compared to healthy controls. In line, attenuated platelet reactivity to stimulation of multiple activation pathways was associated with several traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Conclusions Baseline platelet activation was increased in CLI patients, whereas the reactivity of circulating platelets to several stimulatory agents is decreased. Reactivity of platelets was inversely correlated with cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:26148006

  19. Effects of indoor slippers on plantar pressure and lower limb EMG activity in older women.

    PubMed

    Yick, K L; Tse, L T; Lo, W T; Ng, S P; Yip, J

    2016-09-01

    Open-toe mule slippers are popular footwear worn at home especially by older women. However, their biomechanical effects are still poorly understood. The objective of this study is to therefore evaluate the physical properties of two typical types of open-toe mule slippers and the changes in plantar pressure and lower limb muscle activity of older women when wearing these slippers. Five walking trials have been carried out by ten healthy women. The results indicate that compared to barefoot, wearing slippers results in significant increases in the contact area of the mid-foot regions which lead to plantar pressure redistribution from metatarsal heads 2-3 and the lateral heel to the midfoot regions. However, there is no significant difference in the selected muscle activity across all conditions. The findings enhance our understanding of slipper features associated with changes in biomechanical measures thereby providing the basis of slipper designs for better foot protection and comfort. PMID:27184323

  20. The influence of colour and sound on neuronal activation during visual object naming

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Julia; Price, Cathy J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates how neuronal activation for naming photographs of objects is influenced by the addition of appropriate colour or sound. Behaviourally, both colour and sound are known to facilitate object recognition from visual form. However, previous functional imaging studies have shown inconsistent effects. For example, the addition of appropriate colour has been shown to reduce antero-medial temporal activation whereas the addition of sound has been shown to increase posterior superior temporal activation. Here we compared the effect of adding colour or sound cues in the same experiment. We found that the addition of either the appropriate colour or sound increased activation for naming photographs of objects in bilateral occipital regions and the right anterior fusiform. Moreover, the addition of colour reduced left antero-medial temporal activation but this effect was not observed for the addition of object sound. We propose that activation in bilateral occipital and right fusiform areas precedes the integration of visual form with either its colour or associated sound. In contrast, left antero-medial temporal activation is reduced because object recognition is facilitated after colour and form have been integrated. PMID:18789907

  1. Different categories of living and non-living sound-sources activate distinct cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Lauren R.; Frum, Chris; Puce, Aina; Walker, Nathan A.; Lewis, James W.

    2009-01-01

    With regard to hearing perception, it remains unclear as to whether, or the extent to which, different conceptual categories of real-world sounds and related categorical knowledge are differentially represented in the brain. Semantic knowledge representations are reported to include the major divisions of living versus non-living things, plus more specific categories including animals, tools, biological motion, faces, and places—categories typically defined by their characteristic visual features. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify brain regions showing preferential activity to four categories of action sounds, which included non-vocal human and animal actions (living), plus mechanical and environmental sound-producing actions (non-living). The results showed a striking antero-posterior division in cortical representations for sounds produced by living versus non-living sources. Additionally, there were several significant differences by category, depending on whether the task was category-specific (e.g. human or not) versus non-specific (detect end-of-sound). In general, (1) human-produced sounds yielded robust activation in the bilateral posterior superior temporal sulci independent of task. Task demands modulated activation of left-lateralized fronto-parietal regions, bilateral insular cortices, and subcortical regions previously implicated in observation-execution matching, consistent with “embodied” and mirror-neuron network representations subserving recognition. (2) Animal action sounds preferentially activated the bilateral posterior insulae. (3) Mechanical sounds activated the anterior superior temporal gyri and parahippocampal cortices. (4) Environmental sounds preferentially activated dorsal occipital and medial parietal cortices. Overall, this multi-level dissociation of networks for preferentially representing distinct sound-source categories provides novel support for grounded cognition models that may

  2. Performance of active feedforward control systems in non-ideal, synthesized diffuse sound fields.

    PubMed

    Misol, Malte; Bloch, Christian; Monner, Hans Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The acoustic performance of passive or active panel structures is usually tested in sound transmission loss facilities. A reverberant sending room, equipped with one or a number of independent sound sources, is used to generate a diffuse sound field excitation which acts as a disturbance source on the structure under investigation. The spatial correlation and coherence of such a synthesized non-ideal diffuse-sound-field excitation, however, might deviate significantly from the ideal case. This has consequences for the operation of an active feedforward control system which heavily relies on the acquisition of coherent disturbance source information. This work, therefore, evaluates the spatial correlation and coherence of ideal and non-ideal diffuse sound fields and considers the implications on the performance of a feedforward control system. The system under consideration is an aircraft-typical double panel system, equipped with an active sidewall panel (lining), which is realized in a transmission loss facility. Experimental results for different numbers of sound sources in the reverberation room are compared to simulation results of a comparable generic double panel system excited by an ideal diffuse sound field. It is shown that the number of statistically independent noise sources acting on the primary structure of the double panel system depends not only on the type of diffuse sound field but also on the sample lengths of the processed signals. The experimental results show that the number of reference sensors required for a defined control performance exhibits an inverse relationship to control filter length. PMID:25234987

  3. Activities of the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research in fluid dynamics, acoustics, automotive engineering, audiology, noise and vibration effects (on human beings), and structural response to noise and vibration was carried out. Aircraft noise, acoustics of flow duct systems and enclosures, acoustic modeling, sound propagation, and acoustic measurement techniques were studied. Auditory and vestibular functions and electrophysiology were investigated.

  4. Cortical Activation during Attention to Sound in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funabiki, Yasuko; Murai, Toshiya; Toichi, Motomi

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) can demonstrate hypersensitivity to sounds as well as a lack of awareness of them. Several functional imaging studies have suggested an abnormal response in the auditory cortex of such subjects, but it is not known whether these subjects have dysfunction in the auditory cortex or are simply not…

  5. Cochlear nerve activity after intense sound exposure in neonatal chicks.

    PubMed

    Saunders, J C; Doan, D E; Poje, C P; Fisher, K A

    1996-08-01

    1. Single-neuron behavior in the cochlear nerve of neonatal (3-day-old) chicks was examined after exposure to a 120-dB SPL pure tone (0.9 kHz) for 48 h. Exposed animals were tested after 0 days or 12 days of recovery. Nonexposed chicks, age-matched to the exposed animals, formed two control groups. 2. Spectral response plots were obtained from each cell. These plots described the neuron discharge rates in response to 1,767 tone burst stimuli, each with a unique frequency-intensity combination. The tone bursts were presented at frequencies between 0.1 and 4.5 kHz and for intensities between 0 and 100 dB SPL. From these plots the characteristic frequency (CF), CF threshold, and sharpness of tuning (Q10 dB) were derived for each cell. Frequency response-area functions at selected stimulus levels and rate-intensity functions at the CF were also constructed from the spectral response plots. In addition, spontaneous activity was determined. Data were obtained from 903 cells. 3. Neuron activity in the control cells revealed no differences between CF thresholds, Q10 dB, or spontaneous activity in the two age groups. However, age differences at all frequencies were noted in the rate-intensity functions. 4. A frequency-dependent loss in CF threshold was observed in the 0-day recovered cells. The threshold shift (relative to age-matched control cells) was 55-65 dB between 0.8 and 1.5 kHz, but only 10-15 dB between 0.1-0.4 kHz and 2.5-3.5 kHz. The exposed cells showed no loss in frequency selectivity (Q10 dB) at < 0.5 kHz, whereas above this frequency an increasing deterioration in tuning was noted. Spontaneous activity in the 0-day cells was suppressed across the entire range of CFs. The rate-intensity function of exposed cells had a steeper growth rate than that of control cells. 5. At 12 days of recovery, CF threshold, Q10 dB, and spontaneous activity all recovered to the levels exhibited by age-matched control cells. However, the rate-intensity function for cells with CFs

  6. Active control of sound radiation from a vibrating rectangular panel by sound sources and vibration inputs - An experimental comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Hansen, C. H.; Snyder, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Active control of sound radiation from a rectangular panel by two different methods has been experimentally studied and compared. In the first method a single control force applied directly to the structure is used with a single error microphone located in the radiated acoustic field. Global attenuation of radiated sound was observed to occur by two main mechanisms. For 'on-resonance' excitation, the control force had the effect of increasing the total panel input impedance presented to the nosie source, thus reducing all radiated sound. For 'off-resonance' excitation, the control force tends not significantly to modify the panel total response amplitude but rather to restructure the relative phases of the modes leading to a more complex vibration pattern and a decrease in radiation efficiency. For acoustic control, the second method, the number of acoustic sources required for global reduction was seen to increase with panel modal order. The mechanism in this case was that the acoustic sources tended to create an inverse pressure distribution at the panel surface and thus 'unload' the panel by reducing the panel radiation impedance. In general, control by structural inputs appears more effective than control by acoustic sources for structurally radiated noise.

  7. Muscular activity of lower limb muscles associated with working on inclined surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming-Lun; Kincl, Laurel; Lowe, Brian; Succop, Paul; Bhattacharya, Amit

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated effects of visual cues, muscular fatigue, task performance and experience of working on inclined surfaces on activity of postural muscles in the lower limbs associated with maintaining balance on three inclined surfaces—0°, 14° and 26°. Normalized electromyographic (NEMG) data were collected on 44 professional roofers bilaterally from the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialii anterior, and gastrocnemii medial muscle groups. The 50th and 95th percentile normalized EMG amplitudes were used as EMG variables. Results showed that inclination angle and task performance caused a significant increase in the NEMG amplitudes of all postural muscles. Visual cues were significantly associated with a decrease in the 95th percentile EMG amplitude for the right gastrocnemius medial and tibialis anterior. Fatigue was related to a significant decrease in the NEMG amplitude for the rectus femoris. Experience of working on inclined surfaces did not have a significant effect on the NEMG amplitude. PMID:25331562

  8. Physical activity barriers and enablers in older Veterans with lower-limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Littman, Alyson J; Boyko, Edward J; Thompson, Mary Lou; Haselkorn, Jodie K; Sangeorzan, Bruce J; Arterburn, David E

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the types of physical activities that older individuals with lower-limb loss perform, correlates of regular physical activity (PA), and barriers and facilitators to PA. We conducted an exploratory study in 158 older Veterans from the Pacific Northwest with a partial foot (35%), below-knee (39%) and above-knee (26%) amputation. Ninety-eight percent of survey respondents were male, on average 65 yr of age and 15 yr postamputation; 36% of amputations were trauma-related. The most commonly reported physical activities were muscle strengthening (42%), yard work and/or gardening (30%), and bicycling (11%). Forty-three percent were classified as physically active based on weekly moderate- and vigorous-intensity PA. History of vigorous preamputation PA was positively associated with being active, while low wealth and watching ≥5 h/d of television/videos were inversely associated. While pain- and resource-related barriers to PA were most frequently reported, only knowledge-related and interest/motivation-related barriers were inversely associated with being active. Family support and financial assistance to join a gym were the most commonly reported factors that would facilitate PA. To increase PA in the older amputee population, interventions should address motivational issues, knowledge gaps, and television watching; reduce financial barriers to exercising; and consider involving family members. PMID:25356624

  9. Neuromuscular Activity of Upper and Lower Limbs during two Backstroke Swimming Start Variants

    PubMed Central

    De Jesus, Karla; De Jesus, Kelly; Medeiros, Alexandre I. A.; Gonçalves, Pedro; Figueiredo, Pedro; Fernandes, Ricardo J.; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2015-01-01

    A proficient start is decisive in sprint competitive swimming events and requires swimmers’ to exert maximal forces in a short period to complete the task successfully. The aim of this study was to compare the electromyographic (EMG) activity in-between the backstroke start with feet positioned parallel and partially emerged performed with the hands on the highest horizontal and on the vertical handgrip at hands-off, take-off, flight and entry start phases. EMG comparisons between starting variants were supported by upper and lower limb joint angles at starting position and 15 m start time data. Following a four-week start training to familiarize participants with each start variant, 10 male competitive backstroke swimmers performed randomly six 15 m maximal trials, being three of each start variant. Surface EMG of Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Rectus Femoris, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis and Tibialis Anterior was recorded and processed using the time integral EMG (iEMG). Eight video cameras (four surface and four underwater) were used to determine backstroke start phases and joint angles at starting position. EMG, joint angles and temporal parameters have not evidenced changes due to the different handgrips. Nevertheless, clear differences were observed in both variants for upper and lower limb muscles activity among starting phases (e.g. Biceps Brachii at take-off vs. flight phase, 15.17% ± 2.76% and 22.38% ± 4.25%; 14.24% ± 7.11% and 25.90% ± 8.65%, for variant with hands horizontal and vertically positioned, respectively). It was concluded that different handgrips did not affect EMG, kinematics and temporal profile in backstroke start. Despite coaches might plan similar strength training for both start variants, further attention should be given on the selection of proper exercises to maximize the contribution of relevant muscles at different starting phases. Key points An effective swim start component (from the starting signal until the

  10. Neuromuscular Activity of Upper and Lower Limbs during two Backstroke Swimming Start Variants.

    PubMed

    De Jesus, Karla; De Jesus, Kelly; Medeiros, Alexandre I A; Gonçalves, Pedro; Figueiredo, Pedro; Fernandes, Ricardo J; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2015-09-01

    A proficient start is decisive in sprint competitive swimming events and requires swimmers' to exert maximal forces in a short period to complete the task successfully. The aim of this study was to compare the electromyographic (EMG) activity in-between the backstroke start with feet positioned parallel and partially emerged performed with the hands on the highest horizontal and on the vertical handgrip at hands-off, take-off, flight and entry start phases. EMG comparisons between starting variants were supported by upper and lower limb joint angles at starting position and 15 m start time data. Following a four-week start training to familiarize participants with each start variant, 10 male competitive backstroke swimmers performed randomly six 15 m maximal trials, being three of each start variant. Surface EMG of Biceps Brachii, Triceps Brachii, Rectus Femoris, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis and Tibialis Anterior was recorded and processed using the time integral EMG (iEMG). Eight video cameras (four surface and four underwater) were used to determine backstroke start phases and joint angles at starting position. EMG, joint angles and temporal parameters have not evidenced changes due to the different handgrips. Nevertheless, clear differences were observed in both variants for upper and lower limb muscles activity among starting phases (e.g. Biceps Brachii at take-off vs. flight phase, 15.17% ± 2.76% and 22.38% ± 4.25%; 14.24% ± 7.11% and 25.90% ± 8.65%, for variant with hands horizontal and vertically positioned, respectively). It was concluded that different handgrips did not affect EMG, kinematics and temporal profile in backstroke start. Despite coaches might plan similar strength training for both start variants, further attention should be given on the selection of proper exercises to maximize the contribution of relevant muscles at different starting phases. Key pointsAn effective swim start component (from the starting signal until the

  11. Foot posture influences the electromyographic activity of selected lower limb muscles during gait

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Some studies have found that flat-arched foot posture is related to altered lower limb muscle function compared to normal- or high-arched feet. However, the results from these studies were based on highly selected populations such as those with rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare lower limb muscle function of normal and flat-arched feet in people without pain or disease. Methods Sixty adults aged 18 to 47 years were recruited to this study. Of these, 30 had normal-arched feet (15 male and 15 female) and 30 had flat-arched feet (15 male and 15 female). Foot posture was classified using two clinical measurements (the arch index and navicular height) and four skeletal alignment measurements from weightbearing foot x-rays. Intramuscular fine-wire electrodes were inserted into tibialis posterior and peroneus longus under ultrasound guidance, and surface EMG activity was recorded from tibialis anterior and medial gastrocnemius while participants walked barefoot at their self-selected comfortable walking speed. Time of peak amplitude, peak and root mean square (RMS) amplitude were assessed from stance phase EMG data. Independent samples t-tests were performed to assess for significant differences between the normal- and flat-arched foot posture groups. Results During contact phase, the flat-arched group exhibited increased activity of tibialis anterior (peak amplitude; 65 versus 46% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction) and decreased activity of peroneus longus (peak amplitude; 24 versus 37% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction). During midstance/propulsion, the flat-arched group exhibited increased activity of tibialis posterior (peak amplitude; 86 versus 60% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction) and decreased activity of peroneus longus (RMS amplitude; 25 versus 39% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction). Effect sizes for these significant findings ranged from 0.48 to 1.3, representing moderate to

  12. Application of a modified gradient lease squares algorithm to an adaptive, actively quenched, sound field system

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, A.A.; Mal`tsev, A.A.; Medvedev, S.Yu.

    1995-04-01

    A modified least squares algorithm, preventing the overflow of the discharge grid of weight coefficients of an adaptive transverse filter and guaranteeing stable system operation, is suggested for the tuning of an adaptive system of an actively quenched sound field. Experimental results are provided for an adaptive filter with a modified algorithm in a system of several harmonic components of an actively quenched sound field.

  13. Active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment is performed to study the mechanisms of active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders via vibrational outputs. In the present method of control, a vibrational force input was used as the secondary control input to reduce the radiated acoustic field. For the frequencies considered, the active vibration technique provided good global reduction of interior sound even though only one actuator was used.

  14. Dynamic analysis of the upper limb during activities of daily living: comparison of methodologies.

    PubMed

    Masjedi, Milad; Duffell, Lynsey D

    2013-12-01

    Often researchers use kinematics and kinetics to evaluate the effect of limb pathology. The net forces and moments that cause motion depend on kinematics, body segment parameters and the external loads applied. This study aimed to evaluate the discrepancies caused by different methods and assumptions of kinetic analysis. Dynamic analysis was performed on 12 subjects with no known pathology while performing 12 activities of daily living. The recursive Newton-Euler method, along with two robotic models containing 7 and 14 degrees of freedom representing the upper limb, was used to calculate the net forces and moments across the shoulder. The data were calculated using different body segment parameter values from the literature and, in order to concentrate on the effects of kinematics only, these results were presented as both a percentage of the body weight and a novel technique using constant body segment parameter. The greatest net forces and moments on the glenohumeral joint were observed for lifting a 2-kg shopping bag task (forces: 60 ± 8 N and moments: 18 ± 2 N m) and the lowest was observed for drinking (forces: 40 ± 8 N and moments: 6 ± 1 N m). Overall, the results from different techniques (recursive Newton-Euler vs robotic 14 degrees of freedom) were similar, while the 7-DoF model showed less agreement. The use of different body segment parameter values resulted in a maximum increase of 25% in the glenohumeral moment. Following normalisation of the body segment parameter, dynamic parameters were found to have less variation. In order to focus on the effect of variation in movement in dynamic study, it is therefore necessary to normalise the body segment parameter. PMID:24006042

  15. V1 and V2b interneurons secure the alternating flexor-extensor motor activity mice require for limbed locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingming; Lanuza, Guillermo M.; Britz, Olivier; Wang, Zhi; Siembab, Valerie C.; Zhang, Ying; Velasquez, Tomoko; Alvarez, Francisco J.; Frank, Eric; Goulding, Martyn

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The reciprocal activation of flexor and extensor muscles constitutes the fundamental mechanism that tetrapod vertebrates use for locomotion and limb-driven reflex behaviors. This aspect of motor coordination is controlled by inhibitory neurons in the spinal cord; however, the identity of the spinal interneurons that serve this function is not known. Here we show that the production of an alternating flexor-extensor motor rhythm depends on the composite activities of two classes of ventrally-located inhibitory neurons, V1 and V2b interneurons (INs). Abrogating V1 and V2b IN-derived neurotransmission in the isolated spinal cord results in a synchronous pattern of L2 flexor-related and L5 extensor-related locomotor activity. Mice lacking V1 and V2b inhibition are unable to articulate their limb joints and display marked deficits in limb-driven reflex movements. Taken together, these findings identify V1- and V2b-derived neurons as the core interneuronal components of the limb central pattern generator (CPG) that coordinate flexor-extensor motor activity. PMID:24698273

  16. V1 and v2b interneurons secure the alternating flexor-extensor motor activity mice require for limbed locomotion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingming; Lanuza, Guillermo M; Britz, Olivier; Wang, Zhi; Siembab, Valerie C; Zhang, Ying; Velasquez, Tomoko; Alvarez, Francisco J; Frank, Eric; Goulding, Martyn

    2014-04-01

    Reciprocal activation of flexor and extensor muscles constitutes the fundamental mechanism that tetrapod vertebrates use for locomotion and limb-driven reflex behaviors. This aspect of motor coordination is controlled by inhibitory neurons in the spinal cord; however, the identity of the spinal interneurons that serve this function is not known. Here, we show that the production of an alternating flexor-extensor motor rhythm depends on the composite activities of two classes of ventrally located inhibitory neurons, V1 and V2b interneurons (INs). Abrogating V1 and V2b IN-derived neurotransmission in the isolated spinal cord results in a synchronous pattern of L2 flexor-related and L5 extensor-related locomotor activity. Mice lacking V1 and V2b inhibition are unable to articulate their limb joints and display marked deficits in limb-driven reflex movements. Taken together, these findings identify V1- and V2b-derived neurons as the core interneuronal components of the limb central pattern generator (CPG) that coordinate flexor-extensor motor activity. PMID:24698273

  17. Sounds elicit relative left frontal alpha activity in 2-month-old infants

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Xiaoqin; Xu, Lin; Li, Mingyan; Shao, Jie; Zhao, Zhengyan; Lamm, Connie; Fox, Nathan A.; Nelson, Charles A.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    As one kind of sounds, human voices are important for language acquisition and human-infant relations. Human voices have positive effects on infants, e.g., soothe infants and evoke an infant's smile. Increased left relative to right frontal alpha activity as assessed by the electroencephalogram (EEG) is considered to reflect approach-related emotions. In the present study, we recorded the EEG in thirty-eight 2-month-old infants during a baseline period and then while they listened to sounds, i.e., human voices. Infants displayed increased relative left frontal alpha activity in response to sounds compared to the baseline condition. These results suggest that sounds can elicit relative left frontal activity in young infants, and that this approach-related emotion presents early in life. PMID:25242501

  18. Robust Sounds of Activities of Daily Living Classification in Two-Channel Audio-Based Telemonitoring

    PubMed Central

    Ambikairajah, Eliathamby; Celler, Branko

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the area of home telemonitoring, the challenge of automatically detecting the sound signatures of activities of daily living of an elderly patient using nonintrusive and reliable methods remains. This paper investigates the classification of eight typical sounds of daily life from arbitrarily positioned two-microphone sensors under realistic noisy conditions. In particular, the role of several source separation and sound activity detection methods is considered. Evaluations on a new four-microphone database collected under four realistic noise conditions reveal that effective sound activity detection can produce significant gains in classification accuracy and that further gains can be made using source separation methods based on independent component analysis. Encouragingly, the results show that recognition accuracies in the range 70%–100% can be consistently obtained using different microphone-pair positions, under all but the most severe noise conditions. PMID:23710171

  19. Ultraviolet Observations of the Limb-Crossing of an Active Region on Sigma Geminorum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1984-07-01

    We propose to study, at high dispersion, the behavior of the ultraviolet emission line spectrum of the RS CVn-type binary Sigma Geminorum (KI III + ?) as an optically identified starspot group rotates over the limb of the K giant and onto the visible hemisphere. The scientific goal is to distinguish between the two most promising hypotheses to explain the significant changes that were observed in a pair of IUE SWP echelle images of Sigma Gem taken over consecutive days in May 1982: (1) a flare which occurred near the receding limb of the giant (or near disk center but accompanied by significant downflows of 10^5 K material); or (2) the rotation off of the visible hemisphere of a small-scale, but bright, active region associated with a previously identified optical starspot group. We feel that the behavior of similar systems, like II Peg, favors the second hypothesis. If so, a mechanism must operate in the cool, fast rotating giants to produce a significant spatial concentration of the decaying magnetic fields that are thought to be responsible for the enormously enhanced far-ultraviolet emissions of the RS CVn-type binaries. We believe that it is essential to understand why the "activity" on the cool giants can become so concentrated and intense. An important way to explore in detail the physical association of high excitation active regions with photospheric starspot groups is to use the technique of "Doppler, Imaging", developed by Vogt and collaborators to study the changing profiles of absorption features in the spectra of fast rotating late-type stars. We have applied the emission-line analog of the approach previously to the shortperiod RS CVn system, HR 1099, and propose to continue our work in the 7th-year of IUE with a study of Sigma Gem. In addition, we intend to search for the occurrence of flare activity in Si IV and C IV by monitoring the farultraviolet spectrum of a Gem at low dispersion. As a novel twist to the program, we intend to arrange

  20. Study on development of active-passive rehabilitation system for upper limbs: Hybrid-PLEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Jin, Y.; Fukushima, K.; Akai, H.; Furusho, J.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, many researchers have studied the potential of using robotics technology to assist and quantify the motor functions for neuron-rehabilitation. Some kinds of haptic devices have been developed and evaluated its efficiency with clinical tests, for example, upper limb training for patients with spasticity after stroke. Active-type (motor-driven) haptic devices can realize a lot of varieties of haptics. But they basically require high-cost safety system. On the other hand, passive-type (brake-based) haptic devices have inherent safety. However, the passive robot system has strong limitation on varieties of haptics. There are not sufficient evidences to clarify how the passive/active haptics effect to the rehabilitation of motor skills. In this paper, we developed an active-passive-switchable rehabilitation system with ER clutch/brake device named "Hybrid-PLEMO" in order to address these problems. In this paper, basic structures and haptic control methods of the Hybrid-PLEMO are described.

  1. Developmental changes in brain activation involved in the production of novel speech sounds in children.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Thyreau, Benjamin; Asano, Michiko; Asano, Kohei; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Jeong, Hyeonjeong; Sugiura, Motoaki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-08-01

    Older children are more successful at producing unfamiliar, non-native speech sounds than younger children during the initial stages of learning. To reveal the neuronal underpinning of the age-related increase in the accuracy of non-native speech production, we examined the developmental changes in activation involved in the production of novel speech sounds using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Healthy right-handed children (aged 6-18 years) were scanned while performing an overt repetition task and a perceptual task involving aurally presented non-native and native syllables. Productions of non-native speech sounds were recorded and evaluated by native speakers. The mouth regions in the bilateral primary sensorimotor areas were activated more significantly during the repetition task relative to the perceptual task. The hemodynamic response in the left inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis (IFG pOp) specific to non-native speech sound production (defined by prior hypothesis) increased with age. Additionally, the accuracy of non-native speech sound production increased with age. These results provide the first evidence of developmental changes in the neural processes underlying the production of novel speech sounds. Our data further suggest that the recruitment of the left IFG pOp during the production of novel speech sounds was possibly enhanced due to the maturation of the neuronal circuits needed for speech motor planning. This, in turn, would lead to improvement in the ability to immediately imitate non-native speech. PMID:24585739

  2. Limb Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... accidents and military combat Cancer Birth defects Some amputees have phantom pain, which is the feeling of ... problems, if you wear an artificial limb. Many amputees use an artificial limb. Learning how to use ...

  3. Range of Motion Requirements for Upper-Limb Activities of Daily Living

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Lisa Smurr; Cowley, Jeffrey; Wilken, Jason M.; Resnik, Linda

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We quantified the range of motion (ROM) required for eight upper-extremity activities of daily living (ADLs) in healthy participants. METHOD. Fifteen right-handed participants completed several bimanual and unilateral basic ADLs while joint kinematics were monitored using a motion capture system. Peak motions of the pelvis, trunk, shoulder, elbow, and wrist were quantified for each task. RESULTS. To complete all activities tested, participants needed a minimum ROM of −65°/0°/105° for humeral plane angle (horizontal abduction–adduction), 0°–108° for humeral elevation, −55°/0°/79° for humeral rotation, 0°–121° for elbow flexion, −53°/0°/13° for forearm rotation, −40°/0°/38° for wrist flexion–extension, and −28°/0°/38° for wrist ulnar–radial deviation. Peak trunk ROM was 23° lean, 32° axial rotation, and 59° flexion–extension. CONCLUSION. Full upper-limb kinematics were calculated for several ADLs. This methodology can be used in future studies as a basis for developing normative databases of upper-extremity motions and evaluating pathology in populations. PMID:26709433

  4. 75 FR 61857 - Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... Finance Activities AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for... Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities. OMB Number: 1550-0111. Form Number: N/A. Description: Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities describes...

  5. Low-frequency sound affects active micromechanics in the human inner ear.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Kathrin; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Grothe, Benedikt; Kössl, Manfred; Gürkov, Robert; Krause, Eike; Drexl, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common auditory pathologies, resulting from overstimulation of the human cochlea, an exquisitely sensitive micromechanical device. At very low frequencies (less than 250 Hz), however, the sensitivity of human hearing, and therefore the perceived loudness is poor. The perceived loudness is mediated by the inner hair cells of the cochlea which are driven very inadequately at low frequencies. To assess the impact of low-frequency (LF) sound, we exploited a by-product of the active amplification of sound outer hair cells (OHCs) perform, so-called spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. These are faint sounds produced by the inner ear that can be used to detect changes of cochlear physiology. We show that a short exposure to perceptually unobtrusive, LF sounds significantly affects OHCs: a 90 s, 80 dB(A) LF sound induced slow, concordant and positively correlated frequency and level oscillations of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions that lasted for about 2 min after LF sound offset. LF sounds, contrary to their unobtrusive perception, strongly stimulate the human cochlea and affect amplification processes in the most sensitive and important frequency range of human hearing. PMID:26064536

  6. Low-frequency sound affects active micromechanics in the human inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Kathrin; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Grothe, Benedikt; Kössl, Manfred; Gürkov, Robert; Krause, Eike; Drexl, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common auditory pathologies, resulting from overstimulation of the human cochlea, an exquisitely sensitive micromechanical device. At very low frequencies (less than 250 Hz), however, the sensitivity of human hearing, and therefore the perceived loudness is poor. The perceived loudness is mediated by the inner hair cells of the cochlea which are driven very inadequately at low frequencies. To assess the impact of low-frequency (LF) sound, we exploited a by-product of the active amplification of sound outer hair cells (OHCs) perform, so-called spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. These are faint sounds produced by the inner ear that can be used to detect changes of cochlear physiology. We show that a short exposure to perceptually unobtrusive, LF sounds significantly affects OHCs: a 90 s, 80 dB(A) LF sound induced slow, concordant and positively correlated frequency and level oscillations of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions that lasted for about 2 min after LF sound offset. LF sounds, contrary to their unobtrusive perception, strongly stimulate the human cochlea and affect amplification processes in the most sensitive and important frequency range of human hearing. PMID:26064536

  7. Adaptive wave field synthesis for active sound field reproduction: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain

    2008-04-01

    Sound field reproduction has applications in music reproduction, spatial audio, sound environment reproduction, and experimental acoustics. Sound field reproduction can be used to artificially reproduce the spatial character of natural hearing. The objective is then to reproduce a sound field in a real reproduction environment. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. The room response thus reduces the quality of the physical sound field reproduction by WFS. In recent research papers, adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) was defined as a potential solution to compensate for these quality reductions from which WFS objective performance suffers. In this paper, AWFS is experimentally investigated as an active sound field reproduction system with a limited number of reproduction error sensors to compensate for the response of the listening environment. Two digital signal processing algorithms for AWFS are used for comparison purposes, one of which is based on independent radiation mode control. AWFS performed propagating sound field reproduction better than WFS in three tested reproduction spaces (hemianechoic chamber, standard laboratory space, and reverberation chamber). PMID:18397007

  8. Mirrored, imagined and executed movements differentially activate sensorimotor cortex in amputees with and without phantom limb pain.

    PubMed

    Diers, Martin; Christmann, Christoph; Koeppe, Caroline; Ruf, Matthias; Flor, Herta

    2010-05-01

    Extended viewing of movements of the intact hand in a mirror as well as motor imagery has been shown to decrease pain in phantom pain patients. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the neural correlates of mirrored, imagined and executed hand movements in 14 upper extremity amputees - 7 with phantom limb pain (PLP) and 7 without phantom limb pain (non-PLP) and 9 healthy controls (HC). Executed movement activated the contralateral sensorimotor area in all three groups but ipsilateral cortex was only activated in the non-PLP and HC group. Mirrored movements activated the sensorimotor cortex contralateral to the hand seen in the mirror in the non-PLP and the HC but not in the PLP. Imagined movement activated the supplementary motor area in all groups and the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex in the non-PLP and HC but not in the PLP. Mirror- and movement-related activation in the bilateral sensorimotor cortex in the mirror movement condition and activation in the sensorimotor cortex ipsilateral to the moved hand in the executed movement condition were significantly negatively correlated with the magnitude of phantom limb pain in the amputee group. Further research must identify the causal mechanisms related to mirror treatment, imagined movements or movements of the other hand and associated changes in pain perception. PMID:20359825

  9. Fatigue-related firing of muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of ipsilateral but not contralateral lower limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; Fitzpatrick, Siobhan C; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2015-02-15

    During fatiguing upper limb exercise, maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents can limit voluntary drive to muscles within the same limb. It is not known if this effect occurs in the lower limb. We investigated the effects of group III/IV muscle afferent firing from fatigued ipsilateral and contralateral extensor muscles and ipsilateral flexor muscles of the knee on voluntary activation of the knee extensors. In three experiments, we examined voluntary activation of the knee extensors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by femoral nerve stimulation. Subjects attended on 2 days for each experiment. On one day a sphygmomanometer cuff occluded blood flow of the fatigued muscles to maintain firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min extensor contraction (experiment 1; n = 9), mean voluntary activation was lower with than without maintained ischemia (47 ± 19% vs. 87 ± 8%, respectively; P < 0.001). After a 2-min knee flexor maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) (experiment 2; n = 8), mean voluntary activation was also lower with than without ischemia (59 ± 21% vs. 79 ± 9%; P < 0.01). After the contralateral (left) MVC (experiment 3; n = 8), mean voluntary activation of the right leg was similar with or without ischemia (92 ± 6% vs. 93 ± 4%; P = 0.65). After fatiguing exercise, activity in group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation of the fatigued muscle and nonfatigued antagonist muscles in the same leg. However, group III/IV muscle afferents from the fatigued left leg had no effect on the unfatigued right leg. This suggests that any "crossover" of central fatigue in the lower limbs is not mediated by group III/IV muscle afferents. PMID:25525208

  10. Assisting People with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder by Actively Reducing Limb Hyperactive Behavior with a Gyration Air Mouse through a Controlled Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang

    2011-01-01

    The latest researches have adopted software technology turning the gyration air mouse into a high performance limb movement detector, and have assessed whether two persons with multiple disabilities would be able to control an environmental stimulation using limb movement. This study extends gyration air mouse functionality by actively reducing…

  11. Inhibition of PHOSPHO1 activity results in impaired skeletal mineralization during limb development of the chick

    PubMed Central

    MacRae, Vicky E.; Davey, Megan G.; McTeir, Lynn; Narisawa, Sonoko; Yadav, Manisha C.; Millan, Jose Luis; Farquharson, Colin.

    2010-01-01

    PHOSPHO1 is a bone specific phosphatase implicated in the initiation of inorganic phosphate generation for matrix mineralization. The control of mineralization is attributed to the actions of tissue-non specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). However, matrix vesicles (MVs) containing apatite crystals are present in patients with hypophosphatasia as well as TNAP null (Akp2-/-) mice. It is therefore likely that other phosphatases work with TNAP to regulate matrix mineralization. Although PHOSPHO1 and TNAP expression is associated with MVs, it is not known if PHOSPHO1 and TNAP are co-expressed during the early stages of limb development. Furthermore the functional in-vivo role of PHOSPHO1 in matrix mineralization has yet to be established. Here, we studied the temporal expression and functional role of PHOSPHO1 within chick limb bud mesenchymal micromass cultures and also in wild-type and talpid3 chick mutants. These mutants are characterized by defective hedgehog signalling and the absence of endochondral mineralization. The ability of in-vitro micromass cultures to differentiate and mineralize their matrix was temporally associated with increased expression of PHOSPHO1 and TNAP. Comparable changes in expression were noted in developing embryonic legs (developmental stages 23–36HH). Micromass cultures treated with lansoprazole, a small-molecule inhibitor of PHOSPHO1 activity, or FGF2, an inhibitor of chondrocyte differentiation, resulted in reduced alizarin red staining (P<0.05). FGF2 treatment also caused a reduction in PHOSPHO1 (P<0.001) and TNAP (P<0.001) expression. Expression analysis by whole mount RNA in-situ hybridization, correlated with qPCR micromass data and demonstrated the existence of a tightly regulated pattern of Phospho1 and Tnap expression which precedes mineralization. Treatment of developing embryos for 5-days with lansoprazole completely inhibited mineralization of all leg and wing long bones as assessed by alcian blue/alizarin red staining

  12. Sound-Induced Activity in Voice-Sensitive Cortex Predicts Voice Memory Ability

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Rebecca; Latinus, Marianne; Bestelmeyer, Patricia E. G.; Crabbe, Frances; Belin, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The “temporal voice areas” (TVAs; Belin et al., 2000) of the human brain show greater neuronal activity in response to human voices than to other categories of non-vocal sounds. However, a direct link between TVA activity and voice perception behavior has not yet been established. Here we show that a functional magnetic resonance imaging measure of activity in the TVAs predicts individual performance at a separately administered voice memory test. This relation holds when general sound memory ability is taken into account. These findings provide the first evidence that the TVAs are specifically involved in voice cognition. PMID:22485101

  13. Sound quality of low-frequency and car engine noises after active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, A.; Ferrer, M.; de Diego, M.; Piñero, G.; Garcia-Bonito, J. J.

    2003-08-01

    The ability of active noise control (ANC) systems to achieve a more pleasant sound has been evaluated by means of sound quality analysis of a real multi-channel active noise controller. Recordings of real car engine noises had been carried out using a Head acoustics TM binaural head simulator seated in a typical car seat, and these signals together with synthesized noise have been actively controlled in an enclosed room. The sound quality study has focused on the estimation of noise quality changes through the evaluation of the sense of comfort. Two methods have been developed: firstly, a predictive method based on psychoacoustic parameters (loudness, roughness, tonality and sharpness); and secondly, a subjective method using a jury test. Both results have been related to the spectral characteristics of the sounds before and after active control. It can be concluded from both analyses that ANC positively affects acoustic comfort. The engine noise mathematical comfort predictor is based on loudness and roughness (two psychoacoustic parameters directly influenced by ANC), and has satisfactorily predicted the improvements in the pleasantness of the sounds. As far as the subjective evaluation method is concerned, the jury test has showed that acoustic comfort is, in most cases, directly related to the sense of quietness. However, ANC has also been assessed negatively by the jury in the cases that it was unable to reduce the loudness, perhaps because of the low amplitudes of the original sounds. Finally, from what has been shown, it can be said that the subjective improvements strongly depends on the attenuation level achieved by the ANC system operation, as well as the spectral characteristics of the sounds before and after control.

  14. Active control of noise on the source side of a partition to increase its sound isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarabini, Marco; Roure, Alain; Pinhede, Cedric

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes a local active noise control system that virtually increases the sound isolation of a dividing wall by means of a secondary source array. With the proposed method, sound pressure on the source side of the partition is reduced using an array of loudspeakers that generates destructive interference on the wall surface, where an array of error microphones is placed. The reduction of sound pressure on the incident side of the wall is expected to decrease the sound radiated into the contiguous room. The method efficiency was experimentally verified by checking the insertion loss of the active noise control system; in order to investigate the possibility of using a large number of actuators, a decentralized FXLMS control algorithm was used. Active control performances and stability were tested with different array configurations, loudspeaker directivities and enclosure characteristics (sound source position and absorption coefficient). The influence of all these parameters was investigated with the factorial design of experiments. The main outcome of the experimental campaign was that the insertion loss produced by the secondary source array, in the 50-300 Hz frequency range, was close to 10 dB. In addition, the analysis of variance showed that the active noise control performance can be optimized with a proper choice of the directional characteristics of the secondary source and the distance between loudspeakers and error microphones.

  15. Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels using Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid passive/active noise control system utilizing constrained layer damping and model predictive feedback control is presented. This system is used to control the sound radiation of panels due to broadband disturbances. To facilitate the hybrid system design, a methodology for placement of constrained layer damping which targets selected modes based on their relative radiated sound power is developed. The placement methodology is utilized to determine two constrained layer damping configurations for experimental evaluation of a hybrid system. The first configuration targets the (4,1) panel mode which is not controllable by the piezoelectric control actuator, and the (2,3) and (5,2) panel modes. The second configuration targets the (1,1) and (3,1) modes. The experimental results demonstrate the improved reduction of radiated sound power using the hybrid passive/active control system as compared to the active control system alone.

  16. Human Activity Recognition from Environmental Background Sounds for Wireless Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yi; Nishimura, Jun; Kuroda, Tadahiro

    Sound feature extraction Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCC) and Vector Quantization (VQ) classification Linde-Buzo-Gray algorithm (LBG) algorithms are applied for recognizing the background sounds in the human daily activities. Applying these algorithms to twenty typical daily activity sounds, average recognition accuracy of 93.8% can be achieved. In these algorithms, how three parameters (i.e., Mel filters number, frame-to-frame overlap and LBG codebook cluster number) affect system's calculation burden and accuracy is also investigated. By adjusting these three parameters to an optimized combination, the multiplication and addition calculation burden can be reduced by 87.0% and 87.1% individually while maintaining the system's average accuracy rate at 92.5%. This is promising for future integration with other sensor (s) to fulfill daily activity recognition by using power aware Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) systems.

  17. Anticipated Effectiveness of Active Noise Control in Propeller Aircraft Interiors as Determined by Sound Quality Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted, using sound quality engineering practices, to determine the subjective effectiveness of hypothetical active noise control systems in a range of propeller aircraft. The two tests differed by the type of judgments made by the subjects: pair comparisons in the first test and numerical category scaling in the second. Although the results of the two tests were in general agreement that the hypothetical active control measures improved the interior noise environments, the pair comparison method appears to be more sensitive to subtle changes in the characteristics of the sounds which are related to passenger preference.

  18. A Sit-to-Stand Training Robot and Its Performance Evaluation: Dynamic Analysis in Lower Limb Rehabilitation Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Enguo; Inoue, Yoshio; Liu, Tao; Shibata, Kyoko

    In many countries in which the phenomenon of population aging is being experienced, motor function recovery activities have aroused much interest. In this paper, a sit-to-stand rehabilitation robot utilizing a double-rope system was developed, and the performance of the robot was evaluated by analyzing the dynamic parameters of human lower limbs. For the robot control program, an impedance control method with a training game was developed to increase the effectiveness and frequency of rehabilitation activities, and a calculation method was developed for evaluating the joint moments of hip, knee, and ankle. Test experiments were designed, and four subjects were requested to stand up from a chair with assistance from the rehabilitation robot. In the experiments, body segment rotational angles, trunk movement trajectories, rope tensile forces, ground reaction forces (GRF) and centers of pressure (COP) were measured by sensors, and the moments of ankle, knee and hip joint were real-time calculated using the sensor-measured data. The experiment results showed that the sit-to-stand rehabilitation robot with impedance control method could maintain the comfortable training postures of users, decrease the moments of limb joints, and enhance training effectiveness. Furthermore, the game control method could encourage collaboration between the brain and limbs, and allow for an increase in the frequency and intensity of rehabilitation activities.

  19. Effect of the Mandibular Orthopedic Repositioning Appliance on Trunk and Upper Limb Muscle Activation during Maximum Isometric Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yeol; Hong, Min-Ho; Park, Min-Chull; Choi, Sung-Min

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to measure the muscle activities of the trunk muscles and upper limb muscles during maximum isometric contraction when temporomandibular joint alignment was achieved with a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance in order provide basic data on the effects of mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance on the entire body. [Subjects] The present study was conducted with healthy Korean adults in their 20s (males=10, females=10). [Methods] An 8 channel surface electromyography system was used to measure the muscle activities of the upper limb muscles and neck muscles of the subjects during maximum isometric contraction with and without use of a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance. [Results] The maximum isometric contractions of the trunk and upper limb muscles when mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance were used were compared with those when no mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance was used. The results showed that the sternocleidomastoid muscle, cervical and lumbar erector spinae, upper trapezius, biceps, triceps, rectus abdominis and internal oblique and external oblique muscles all showed significant increases in maximum isometric contractions with a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance. [Conclusion] The use of a mandibular orthopedic repositioning appliance is considered to be a method for normal adults to improve the stability of the entire body with the improvement of the stability of the TMJ. The proximal improvement in stability improves of the proximal thereby improving not only muscle strength with increased muscle activation but also stability during exercises. PMID:24396194

  20. Active Outer Hair Cells Affect the Sound-Evoked Vibration of the Reticular Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that the organ of Corti uses active mechanisms to enhance its sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Two possible mechanisms have been identified, both capable of producing mechanical forces, which can alter the sound-evoked vibration of the hearing organ. However, little is known about the effect of these forces on the sound-evoked vibration pattern of the reticular lamina. Current injections into scala media were used to alter the amplitude of the active mechanisms in the apex of the guinea pig temporal bone. We used time-resolved confocal imaging to access the vibration pattern of individual outer hair cells. During positive current injection the the sound-evoked vibration of outer hair cell row three increased while row one showed a small decrease. Negative currents reversed the observed effect. We conclude that the outer hair cell mediated modification of reticular lamina vibration patterns could contribute to the inner hair cell stimulation.

  1. Activities report of the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research concerning fluid dynamics and acoustics; audiology and human effects; structures and machinery; and signal processing and control is summarized. Aircraft noise; underwater acoustics; silencers; biomechanics; noise measurement; hearing; structural dynamics; laser technology; automotive engineering; and active control are discussed.

  2. Control of sound radiation with active/adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research is discussed in the area of active structural acoustic control with active/adaptive structures. Progress in the areas of structural acoustics, actuators, sensors, and control approaches is presented. Considerable effort has been given to the interaction of these areas with each other due to the coupled nature of the problem. A discussion is presented on actuators bonded to or embedded in the structure itself. The actuators discussed are piezoceramic actuators and shape memory alloy actuators. The sensors discussed are optical fiber sensors, Nitinol fiber sensors, piezoceramics, and polyvinylidene fluoride sensors. The active control techniques considered are state feedback control techniques and least mean square adaptive algorithms. Results presented show that significant progress has been made towards controlling structurally radiated noise by active/adaptive means applied directly to the structure.

  3. Semi-Supervised Active Learning for Sound Classification in Hybrid Learning Environments.

    PubMed

    Han, Wenjing; Coutinho, Eduardo; Ruan, Huabin; Li, Haifeng; Schuller, Björn; Yu, Xiaojie; Zhu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Coping with scarcity of labeled data is a common problem in sound classification tasks. Approaches for classifying sounds are commonly based on supervised learning algorithms, which require labeled data which is often scarce and leads to models that do not generalize well. In this paper, we make an efficient combination of confidence-based Active Learning and Self-Training with the aim of minimizing the need for human annotation for sound classification model training. The proposed method pre-processes the instances that are ready for labeling by calculating their classifier confidence scores, and then delivers the candidates with lower scores to human annotators, and those with high scores are automatically labeled by the machine. We demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of this method in two practical scenarios: pool-based and stream-based processing. Extensive experimental results indicate that our approach requires significantly less labeled instances to reach the same performance in both scenarios compared to Passive Learning, Active Learning and Self-Training. A reduction of 52.2% in human labeled instances is achieved in both of the pool-based and stream-based scenarios on a sound classification task considering 16,930 sound instances. PMID:27627768

  4. Active control and sound synthesis--two different ways to investigate the influence of the modal parameters of a guitar on its sound.

    PubMed

    Benacchio, Simon; Mamou-Mani, Adrien; Chomette, Baptiste; Finel, Victor

    2016-03-01

    The vibrational behavior of musical instruments is usually studied using physical modeling and simulations. Recently, active control has proven its efficiency to experimentally modify the dynamical behavior of musical instruments. This approach could also be used as an experimental tool to systematically study fine physical phenomena. This paper proposes to use modal active control as an alternative to sound simulation to study the complex case of the coupling between classical guitar strings and soundboard. A comparison between modal active control and sound simulation investigates the advantages, the drawbacks, and the limits of these two approaches. PMID:27036278

  5. Prediction of prognosis of ALS: Importance of active denervation findings of the cervical-upper limb area and trunk area

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yoko; Nakatani, Eiji; Watanabe, Yasuhiro; Fukushima, Masanori; Nakashima, Kenji; Kannagi, Mari; Kanatani, Yasuhiro; Mizushima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease characterized by serious muscle atrophy and weakness. The purpose of this study was to find prognostic factors in patients with mild ALS using application forms for the Specified Disease Treatment Research Program in Japan. We classified ALS as mild, moderate and severe. The subjects consisted of 363 patients with mild ALS who underwent needle electromyography at registration and were followed for more than one year. Time to progression to severe ALS and time to deterioration of activities of daily living such as speech dysfunction, upper limb dysfunction, and walking disability were used as outcomes. Cox proportional hazards model analysis was performed to identify prognostic factors. Of the patients with initially mild ALS, 38.3% (139/363) had progressed severe ALS at the last follow-up. In multivariate analysis of time to progression to severe ALS, bulbar onset (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.68 [1.13–2.49], p = 0.010), tongue atrophy (1.69 [1.14–2.51], p = 0.009), dyspnea (1.57 [1.02–2.41], p = 0.042) and active denervation findings (ADFs) of the cervical-upper limb area (1.81 [1.25–2.63], p = 0.002) emerged as prognostic factors. Furthermore ADFs in the trunk area were prognostic factors for upper limb dysfunction and walking disability (1.72 [1.05–2.81], p = 0.031, and 1.97 [1.09–3.59], p = 0.026). In conclusion ADFs of the cervical-upper limb area and trunk area were prognostic factors in ALS patients. PMID:26668778

  6. Activities report of the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research in fluid dynamics and acoustics (noise and vibration control); audiology and human effects (audiotory communication and hearing conservation); structures and machinery (automotive design); and shock analysis is summarized. Underwater acoustics; active noise control; aircraft noise; wind turbine noise; laminar flow fans; helmet design; and the acoustics of flow ducts were studied.

  7. Sounds Like Fun: Activities for Developing Phonological Awareness, Revised Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Cecile Cyrul

    2009-01-01

    Kids love jokes--and teachers and SLPs love fast and easy ways to improve students' phonological awareness. That's why every elementary and middle-school SLP and educator needs this playful, effective activity book, packed with jokes and riddles that increase students' awareness of the phonemes that make up words. The perfect way to avoid "drill…

  8. Event-Related Beta EEG Changes During Active, Passive Movement and Functional Electrical Stimulation of the Lower Limb.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shuang; Yi, Weibo; Xu, Jiapeng; Qi, Hongzhi; Du, Jingang; Wang, Chunfang; He, Feng; Ming, Dong

    2016-02-01

    A number of electroencephalographic (EEG) studies have reported on event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS) during active movements, passive movements, and the movements induced by functional electrical stimulation (FES). However, the quantitative differences in ERD values and affected frequency bands associated with the lower limb have not been discussed. The goal of this paper was to quantitatively compare the ERD patterns during active movement, passive movement and FES-induced movement of the lower limb. 64-channel EEG signals were recorded to investigate the brain oscillatory patterns during active movement, passive movement and FES-induced movement of the lower limb in twelve healthy subjects. And passive movement and FES-induced movement were also performed in a hemiplegic stroke patient. For healthy subjects, FES-induced movement presented significantly higher characteristic frequency of central beta ERD while there was no significant difference in ERD values compared with active or passive movement. Meanwhile, beta ERD values of FES-induced movement were significantly correlated with those of active movement, and spatial distribution of beta ERD pattern for FES-induced movement was more correlated with that for active movement. In addition, the stroke patient presented central ERD patterns during FES-induced movement, while no ERD with similar frequencies could be found during passive movement. This work implies that the EEG oscillatory pattern under FES-induced movement tends more towards active movement instead of passive movement. The quantification of ERD patterns could be expected as a potential technique to evaluate the brain response during FES-induced movement. PMID:26441422

  9. Performances of Student Activism: Sound, Silence, Gender, and Dis/ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasque, Penny A.; Vargas, Juanita Gamez

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the various performances of activism by students through sound, silence, gender, and dis/ability and how these performances connect to social change efforts around issues such as human trafficking, homeless children, hunger, and children with varying abilities.

  10. Early Fishing Peoples of Puget Sound. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNutt, Nan

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  11. Active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders by multi-control forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    An unstiffened cylindrical model was used to study the control of sound transmission into aircraft cabins by the use of multi-control forces applied directly to the cylinder wall. External acoustic monopoles were located on each side of the cylinder to approximate the propeller noise source. This allowed the study of a dual control system utilizing multi-control forces in conjunction with synchrophasing of the twin acoustic monopole sources. For acoustic resonant conditions within the cavity, a spatially averaged noise reduction of approximately 30 dB was achieved using the active control system for both in-phase and out-of-phase monopoles; however, effective reduction of the sound field was dependent upon judiciously positioning the control forces for optimal control of the sound field.

  12. Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational force inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders is analytically and experimentally studied. The primary (noise) field in the cylinder model is generated by the coupled dynamic response of the shell under loading by a single exterior acoustic source. Control of the interior sound field is achieved by applying vibrational force inputs directly to the shell wall. Action of the point controllers serve to increase the input impedance of select structural modes of the shell which are well-coupled to the interior acoustic cavity, thus substantially reducing sound transmission into the cavity. Spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 30 dB are demonstrated for acoustic resonant conditions within the cavity. Twin controller configurations are presented which demonstrate the ability to independently control orthogonal modes of the interior acoustic space. Benefits and drawbacks of this new methodology for noise control are discussed and clearly demonstrated.

  13. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. II - Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, V. L.; Fuller, C. R.; Silcox, R. J.; Brown, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Actively controlled harmonic force inputs were applied experimentally to reduce the sound transmitted through an elastic circular plate. The control implementation used a time domain least mean square adaptive algorithm with two error sensors. The control forces were applied directly to the plate by point force vibration inputs, while the error information and performance were measured in the radiated acoustic field by microphones. Test cases were also performed in which the error sensors were accelerometers mounted on the plate. When accelerometers were used as error sensors, the controller performance was degraded; leading to the conclusion that minimizing plate motion does not necessarily lead to an associated decrease in radiated sound levels. In contrast, the results show excellent attenuation of the transmitted sound field when microphone error sensors were used. This result was consistent over a range of frequencies. In addition, the experimental results are compared to previously derived analytical results and the effect of using a point or global minimization scheme is discussed.

  14. Online coaching for a lower limb physical activity program for individuals at home with a history of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Kelechi, Teresa J; Green, Ashley; Dumas, Bonnie; Brotherton, Sandra S

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to test a structured home-based chair physical activity (PA) intervention, using a "live" coach on the feasibility of using the Internet to work with patients who had a history of leg ulcers. A 10- to 15-minute lower limb PA protocol using resistance tubing and foot pushing and peddling devices were used in the study while the coach watched patients perform the activities three times over a 7-day period. The Internet for "live" coaching was found to be feasible and patient-acceptable. PMID:21057229

  15. The contribution of high frequencies to human brain activity underlying horizontal localization of natural spatial sounds

    PubMed Central

    Leino, Sakari; May, Patrick JC; Alku, Paavo; Liikkanen, Lassi A; Tiitinen, Hannu

    2007-01-01

    Background In the field of auditory neuroscience, much research has focused on the neural processes underlying human sound localization. A recent magnetoencephalography (MEG) study investigated localization-related brain activity by measuring the N1m event-related response originating in the auditory cortex. It was found that the dynamic range of the right-hemispheric N1m response, defined as the mean difference in response magnitude between contralateral and ipsilateral stimulation, reflects cortical activity related to the discrimination of horizontal sound direction. Interestingly, the results also suggested that the presence of realistic spectral information within horizontally located spatial sounds resulted in a larger right-hemispheric N1m dynamic range. Spectral cues being predominant at high frequencies, the present study further investigated the issue by removing frequencies from the spatial stimuli with low-pass filtering. This resulted in a stepwise elimination of direction-specific spectral information. Interaural time and level differences were kept constant. The original, unfiltered stimuli were broadband noise signals presented from five frontal horizontal directions and binaurally recorded for eight human subjects with miniature microphones placed in each subject's ear canals. Stimuli were presented to the subjects during MEG registration and in a behavioral listening experiment. Results The dynamic range of the right-hemispheric N1m amplitude was not significantly affected even when all frequencies above 600 Hz were removed. The dynamic range of the left-hemispheric N1m response was significantly diminished by the removal of frequencies over 7.5 kHz. The subjects' behavioral sound direction discrimination was only affected by the removal of frequencies over 600 Hz. Conclusion In accord with previous psychophysical findings, the current results indicate that frontal horizontal sound localization and related right-hemispheric cortical processes are

  16. Comparing passive and active hearing: spectral analysis of transient sounds in bats.

    PubMed

    Goerlitz, Holger R; Hübner, Mathias; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2008-06-01

    In vision, colour constancy allows the evaluation of the colour of objects independent of the spectral composition of a light source. In the auditory system, comparable mechanisms have been described that allows the evaluation of the spectral shape of sounds independent of the spectral composition of ambient background sounds. For echolocating bats, the evaluation of spectral shape is vitally important both for the analysis of external sounds and the analysis of the echoes of self-generated sonar emissions. Here, we investigated how the echolocating bat Phyllostomus discolor evaluates the spectral shape of transient sounds both in passive hearing and in echolocation as a specialized mode of active hearing. Bats were trained to classify transients of different spectral shape as low- or highpass. We then assessed how the spectral shape of an ambient background noise influenced the spontaneous classification of the transients. In the passive-hearing condition, the bats spontaneously changed their classification boundary depending on the spectral shape of the background. In the echo-acoustic condition, the classification boundary did not change although the background- and spectral-shape manipulations were identical in the two conditions. These data show that auditory processing differs between passive and active hearing: echolocation represents an independent mode of active hearing with its own rules of auditory spectral analysis. PMID:18515714

  17. Context-Dependent Neural Activation: Internally and Externally Guided Rhythmic Lower Limb Movement in Individuals With and Without Neurodegenerative Disease.

    PubMed

    Hackney, Madeleine E; Lee, Ho Lim; Battisto, Jessica; Crosson, Bruce; McGregor, Keith M

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that has received considerable attention in allopathic medicine over the past decades. However, it is clear that, to date, pharmacological and surgical interventions do not fully address symptoms of PD and patients' quality of life. As both an alternative therapy and as an adjuvant to conventional approaches, several types of rhythmic movement (e.g., movement strategies, dance, tandem biking, and Tai Chi) have shown improvements to motor symptoms, lower limb control, and postural stability in people with PD (1-6). However, while these programs are increasing in number, still little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying motor improvements attained with such interventions. Studying limb motor control under task-specific contexts can help determine the mechanisms of rehabilitation effectiveness. Both internally guided (IG) and externally guided (EG) movement strategies have evidence to support their use in rehabilitative programs. However, there appears to be a degree of differentiation in the neural substrates involved in IG vs. EG designs. Because of the potential task-specific benefits of rhythmic training within a rehabilitative context, this report will consider the use of IG and EG movement strategies, and observations produced by functional magnetic resonance imaging and other imaging techniques. This review will present findings from lower limb imaging studies, under IG and EG conditions for populations with and without movement disorders. We will discuss how these studies might inform movement disorders rehabilitation (in the form of rhythmic, music-based movement training) and highlight research gaps. We believe better understanding of lower limb neural activity with respect to PD impairment during rhythmic IG and EG movement will facilitate the development of novel and effective therapeutic approaches to mobility limitations and postural instability. PMID:26696952

  18. Context-Dependent Neural Activation: Internally and Externally Guided Rhythmic Lower Limb Movement in Individuals With and Without Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hackney, Madeleine E.; Lee, Ho Lim; Battisto, Jessica; Crosson, Bruce; McGregor, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that has received considerable attention in allopathic medicine over the past decades. However, it is clear that, to date, pharmacological and surgical interventions do not fully address symptoms of PD and patients’ quality of life. As both an alternative therapy and as an adjuvant to conventional approaches, several types of rhythmic movement (e.g., movement strategies, dance, tandem biking, and Tai Chi) have shown improvements to motor symptoms, lower limb control, and postural stability in people with PD (1–6). However, while these programs are increasing in number, still little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying motor improvements attained with such interventions. Studying limb motor control under task-specific contexts can help determine the mechanisms of rehabilitation effectiveness. Both internally guided (IG) and externally guided (EG) movement strategies have evidence to support their use in rehabilitative programs. However, there appears to be a degree of differentiation in the neural substrates involved in IG vs. EG designs. Because of the potential task-specific benefits of rhythmic training within a rehabilitative context, this report will consider the use of IG and EG movement strategies, and observations produced by functional magnetic resonance imaging and other imaging techniques. This review will present findings from lower limb imaging studies, under IG and EG conditions for populations with and without movement disorders. We will discuss how these studies might inform movement disorders rehabilitation (in the form of rhythmic, music-based movement training) and highlight research gaps. We believe better understanding of lower limb neural activity with respect to PD impairment during rhythmic IG and EG movement will facilitate the development of novel and effective therapeutic approaches to mobility limitations and postural instability. PMID:26696952

  19. Impact of decline-board squat exercises and knee joint angles on the muscle activity of the lower limbs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong; Park, Jungseo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to investigate how squat exercises on a decline board and how the knee joint angles affect the muscle activity of the lower limbs. [Subjects] The subjects were 26 normal adults. [Methods] A Tumble Forms wedge device was used as the decline board, and the knee joint angles were measured with a goniometer. To examine the muscle activity of the biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, and tibialis anterior of the lower limbs, a comparison analysis with electromyography was conducted. [Results] The muscle activity of the biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, and tibialis anterior increased with increased knee joint angles, both for squat exercises on the decline board and on a flat floor. When the knee joint angle was 45°, 60°, and 90°, the muscle activity of the rectus femoris was significantly higher and that of the tibialis anterior was significantly lower during squat exercises on the decline board than on the flat floor. When the knee joint angle was 90°, the muscle activity of the gastrocnemius lateralis was significantly lower. [Conclusion] Squat exercises on a decline board are an effective intervention to increase the muscle activity of the rectus femoris with increased knee joint angles. PMID:26357447

  20. On the electric activity of superfluid helium at the excitation of first and second sound waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pashitskii, E. A. Gurin, A. A.

    2010-01-15

    We show that the electric activity of superfluid helium (HeII) observed in the experiments [3] during the excitation of standing second sound waves in an acoustic resonator can be described in terms of the phenomenological mechanism of the inertial polarization of atoms in a dielectric, in particular, in HeII, when the polarization field induced in the medium is proportional to the mechanical acceleration, by analogy with the Stewart-Tolman effect. The variable relative velocity w = v{sub n} - v{sub s} of the normal and superfluid HeII components that emerges in the second sound wave determines the mean group velocity of rotons, V{sub g} Almost-Equal-To w, with the density of the normal component related to their equilibrium number density in the temperature range 1.3 K {<=} T {<=} 2 K. Therefore, the acceleration of the 4He atoms involved in the formation of a roton excitation is proportional to the time derivative of the relative velocity.w. In this case, the linear local relations between the variable values of the electric induction, electric field strength, and polarization vector should be taken into account. As a result, the variable displacement current induced in the bulk of HeII and the corresponding potential difference do not depend on the anomalously low polarizability of liquid helium. This allows the ratio of the amplitudes of the temperature and potential oscillations in the second sound wave, which is almost independent of T in the above temperature range, consistent with experimental data to be obtained. At the same time, the absence of an electric response during the excitation of first sound waves in the linear regime is related to an insufficient power of the sound oscillations. Based on the experimental data on the excitation of first and second sounds, we have obtained estimates for the phenomenological coefficient of proportionality between the polarization vector and acceleration and for the drag coefficient of helium atoms by rotons in the

  1. Activation patterns of embryonic chick hind-limb muscles following blockade of activity and motoneurone cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Landmesser, L T; Szente, M

    1986-01-01

    Motoneurone cell death and spontaneous embryonic motility were blocked in chick embryos by daily in ovo injections of d-tubocurarine from stage 28-36 (E5-10). Isolated spinal cord-hind-limb preparations were prepared from these embryos and movement sequences in response to electrical stimulation of the thoracic cord were assessed, after drug wash-out, by electromyogram (e.m.g.) or muscle-nerve recordings. In embryos in which complete blockade of lumbar motoneurone cell death was later confirmed histologically, flexor and extensor motoneurone pools were found to be activated in alternating bursts as occurs in control embryos. Thus the development of the basic cord circuits responsible for these patterns of motoneurone activation does not require motoneurone cell death. Partial blockade of motoneurone cell death by guanosine 3',5'-phosphate (cyclic GMP) was also without effect on muscle activation patterns. In ovo injection of d-tubocurarine or alpha-bungarotoxin in doses sufficient to block embryonic motility was found to have a direct effect on the spinal cord, preventing the patterned activation of motoneurone pools in alternating bursts. Cords removed from treated embryos behaved similarly to cords in which these drugs were applied acutely in the bath. Minor changes in muscle activation patterns that occurred with chronic drug treatment were also observed in acutely treated cords and appear to be a direct and persistent effect of the drugs on cord circuits. It is possible to conclude that cholinergic circuits within the chick lumbar cord play a role in the normal patterned activation of flexor and extensor motoneurone pools. Systemically applied drugs can have access to these circuits, indicating a need for caution when interpreting the results of drugs applied in this manner to developing embryos. We also conclude that neither the activation of motoneurones in patterned bursts, nor the afferent feed-back from the movements that result, are required to form the

  2. Active Control of Turbulent Boundary Layer Induced Sound Radiation from Multiple Aircraft Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to experimentally investigate active structural acoustic control of turbulent boundary layer (TBL) induced sound radiation from multiple panels on an aircraft sidewall. One possible approach for controlling sound radiation from multiple panels is a multi-input/multi-output scheme which considers dynamic coupling between the panels. Unfortunately, this is difficult for more than a few panels, and is impractical for a typical aircraft which contains several hundred such panels. An alternative is to implement a large number of independent control systems. Results from the current work demonstrate the feasibility of reducing broadband radiation from multiple panels utilizing a single-input/single-output (SISO) controller per bay, and is the first known demonstration of active control of TBL induced sound radiation on more than two bays simultaneously. The paper compares sound reduction for fully coupled control of six panels versus independent control on each panel. An online adaptive control scheme for independent control is also demonstrated. This scheme will adjust for slow time varying dynamic systems such as fuselage response changes due to aircraft pressurization, etc.

  3. Aircraft panel with sensorless active sound power reduction capabilities through virtual mechanical impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Michau, M.; Micheau, P.; Berry, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with an active structural acoustic control approach to reduce the transmission of tonal noise in aircraft cabins. The focus is on the practical implementation of the virtual mechanical impedances method by using sensoriactuators instead of conventional control units composed of separate sensors and actuators. The experimental setup includes two sensoriactuators developed from the electrodynamic inertial exciter and distributed over an aircraft trim panel which is subject to a time-harmonic diffuse sound field. The target mechanical impedances are first defined by solving a linear optimization problem from sound power measurements before being applied to the test panel using a complex envelope controller. Measured data are compared to results obtained with sensor-actuator pairs consisting of an accelerometer and an inertial exciter, particularly as regards sound power reduction. It is shown that the two types of control unit provide similar performance, and that here virtual impedance control stands apart from conventional active damping. In particular, it is clear from this study that extra vibrational energy must be provided by the actuators for optimal sound power reduction, mainly due to the high structural damping in the aircraft trim panel. Concluding remarks on the benefits of using these electrodynamic sensoriactuators to control tonal disturbances are also provided.

  4. Actuator placement for active sound and vibration control of cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1995-01-01

    Active structural acoustic control is a method in which the control inputs (used to reduce interior noise) are applied directly to a vibrating structural acoustic system. The control concept modeled in this work is the application of in-plane force inputs to piezoceramic patches bonded to the wall of a vibrating cylinder. The cylinder is excited by an exterior noise source -- an acoustic monopole -- located near the outside of the cylinder wall. The goal is to determine the force inputs and sites for the piezoelectric actuators so that (1) the interior noise is effectively damped; (2) the level of vibration of the cylinder shell is not increased; and (3) the power requirements needed to drive the actuators are not excessive. We studied external monopole excitations at two frequencies. A cylinder resonance of 100 Hz, where the interior acoustic field is driven in multiple, off-resonance cylinder cavity modes, and a cylinder resonance of 200 Hz are characterized by both near and off-resonance cylinder vibration modes which couple effectively with a single, dominant, low-order acoustic cavity mode at resonance. Previous work has focused almost exclusively on meeting objective (1) and solving a complex least-squares problem to arrive at an optimal force vector for a given set of actuator sites. In addition, it has been noted that when the cavity mode couples with cylinder vibration modes (our 200 Hz case) control spillover may occur in higher order cylinder shell vibrational modes. How to determine the best set of actuator sites to meet objectives (1)-(3) is the main contribution of our research effort. The selection of the best set of actuator sites from a set of potential sites is done via two metaheuristics -- simulated annealing and tabu search. Each of these metaheuristics partitions the set of potential actuator sites into two disjoint sets: those that are selected to control the noise (on) and those that are not (off). Next, each metaheuristic attempts to

  5. Affection of Fundamental Brain Activity By Using Sounds For Patients With Prosodic Disorders: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Emiko; Katagiri, Yoshitada; Seki, Keiko; Kawamata, Toshio

    2011-06-01

    We present a neural model of the production of modulated speech streams in the brain, referred to as prosody, which indicates the limbic structure essential for producing prosody both linguistically and emotionally. This model suggests that activating the fundamental brain including monoamine neurons at the basal ganglia will potentially contribute to helping patients with prosodic disorders coming from functional defects of the fundamental brain to overcome their speech problem. To establish effective clinical treatment for such prosodic disorders, we examine how sounds affect the fundamental activity by using electroencephalographic measurements. Throughout examinations with various melodious sounds, we found that some melodies with lilting rhythms successfully give rise to the fast alpha rhythms at the electroencephalogram which reflect the fundamental brain activity without any negative feelings.

  6. Sulfoxide stimulation of chondrogenesis in limb mesenchyme is accompanied by an increase in type II collagen enhancer activity

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.E. Jr.; Higginbotham, J.D. )

    1991-05-01

    We have utilized a modification of the limb bud mesenchyme micromass culture system to screen compounds that might stimulate chondrogenesis. Two compounds in the sulfoxide family (methylphenylsulfoxide and p-chlorophenyl methyl sulfoxide) were stimulatory at 10(-2) M and 10(-3) M, respectively; whereas other sulfoxides and organic solvents were not active at these concentrations. In addition, specific growth factors (basic FGF, IGF-I, IGF-II) were not chondroinductive at concentrations that are active in other cell systems. Both sulfoxide compounds stimulated cartilage nodule formation, ({sup 35}S)sulfate incorporation, and activity of the regulatory sequences of the collagen II gene. In contrast, transforming growth factor beta-1 (10 ng/ml) stimulated sulfate incorporation but produced only a diffuse deposition of cartilage matrix and reduced the ability of the cells to utilize the regulatory sequences of the collagen II gene. The sulfoxides appear to promote the differentiation of limb bud cells to chondrocytes and thus exhibit chondroinductive activity.

  7. Control of a pneumatic power active lower-limb orthosis with filter-based iterative learning control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chia-En; Chen, Jian-Shiang

    2014-05-01

    A filter-based iterative learning control (FILC) scheme is developed in this paper, which consists in a proportional-derivative (PD) feedback controller and a feedforward filter. Moreover, based on two-dimensional system theory, the stability of the FILC system is proven. The design criteria for a wavelet transform filter (WTF) - chosen as the feedforward filter - and the PD feedback controller are also given. Finally, using a pneumatic power active lower-limb orthosis (PPALO) as the controlled plant, the wavelet-based iterative learning control (WILC) implementation and the orchestration of a trajectory tracking control simulation are given in detail and the overall tracking performance is validated.

  8. A multi-harmonic amplitude and relative-phase controller for active sound quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosquera-Sánchez, Jaime A.; de Oliveira, Leopoldo P. R.

    2014-04-01

    Current active sound quality control systems aim at dealing with the amplitude level of the primary disturbance, e.g. sound pressure, forces, velocities and/or accelerations, which implicitly leads to Loudness control, regardless of the spectral structure of the disturbance. As far as multi-harmonic disturbances are concerned, auditory Roughness, arguably the most related psychoacoustic metric with rumbling perception in passenger cars, can be tackled not merely by dealing with magnitudes but also with the relative-phase of the narrowband components. This paper presents an adaptive control scheme conceived for dealing with multi-harmonic disturbances, which features the independent amplitude and/or relative-phase control of the input periodic components and an improved robustness to impulsive events. The adaptive control scheme is based on a frequency-domain delayless implementation of the complex-domain, least mean squares algorithm, whereof its convergence process is improved by using a forgetting factor. The control capabilities are evaluated numerically for single- and multiple-harmonic disturbances, including realistic internal combustion engine sound contaminated with noise and by impulsive events. By using long transfer paths obtained from a real vehicle mock-up, sound pressure level reductions of 39 dBSPL and the ability to displacing the relative-phase of a number of narrowband components between [-π,π] are accomplished by the proposed control scheme. The assessment of the results by using Zwicker-Loudness and auditory Roughness models shows that the proposed adaptive algorithm is able to accomplish and stably preserve various sound quality targets, after completion of the robust convergence procedure, regardless of impulsive events that can occur during the system operation.

  9. Semi-active control of piezoelectric coating's underwater sound absorption by combining design of the shunt impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Li, Zhaohui; Huang, Aigen; Li, Qihu

    2015-10-01

    Piezoelectric shunt damping technology has been applied in the field of underwater sound absorption in recent years. In order to achieve broadband echo reduction, semi-active control of sound absorption of multi-layered piezoelectric coating by shunt damping is significant. In this paper, a practical method is proposed to control the underwater sound absorption coefficients of piezoelectric coating layers by combining design of the shunt impedance that allows certain sound absorption coefficients at setting frequencies. A one-dimensional electro-acoustic model of the piezoelectric coating and the backing is established based on the Mason equivalent circuit theory. First, the shunt impedance of the coating is derived under the constraint of sound absorption coefficient at one frequency. Then, taking the 1-3 piezoelectric composite coating as an example, the sound absorption properties of the coating shunted to the designed shunt impedance are investigated. Next, on the basis of that, an iterative method for two constrained frequencies and an optimizing algorithm for multiple constrained frequencies are provided for combining design of the shunt impedances. At last, an experimental sample with four piezoelectric material layers is manufactured, of which the sound absorption coefficients are measured in an impedance tube. The experimental results show good agreement with the finite element simulation results. It is proved that a serial R-L circuit can control the peak frequency, maximum and bandwidth of the sound absorption coefficient and the combining R-L circuits shunted to multiple layers can control the sound absorption coefficients at multiple frequencies.

  10. Active control of aircraft engine inlet noise using compact sound sources and distributed error sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Dungan, Mary E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An active noise control system using a compact sound source is effective to reduce aircraft engine duct noise. The fan noise from a turbofan engine is controlled using an adaptive filtered-x LMS algorithm. Single multi channel control systems are used to control the fan blade passage frequency (BPF) tone and the BPF tone and the first harmonic of the BPF tone for a plane wave excitation. A multi channel control system is used to control any spinning mode. The multi channel control system to control both fan tones and a high pressure compressor BPF tone simultaneously. In order to make active control of turbofan inlet noise a viable technology, a compact sound source is employed to generate the control field. This control field sound source consists of an array of identical thin, cylindrically curved panels with an inner radius of curvature corresponding to that of the engine inlet. These panels are flush mounted inside the inlet duct and sealed on all edges to prevent leakage around the panel and to minimize the aerodynamic losses created by the addition of the panels. Each panel is driven by one or more piezoelectric force transducers mounted on the surface of the panel. The response of the panel to excitation is maximized when it is driven at its resonance; therefore, the panel is designed such that its fundamental frequency is near the tone to be canceled, typically 2000-4000 Hz.

  11. Potential-based methodology for active sound control in three dimensional settings.

    PubMed

    Lim, H; Utyuzhnikov, S V; Lam, Y W; Kelly, L

    2014-09-01

    This paper extends a potential-based approach to active noise shielding with preservation of wanted sound in three-dimensional settings. The approach, which was described in a previous publication [Lim et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 129(2), 717-725 (2011)], provides several significant advantages over conventional noise control methods. Most significantly, the methodology does not require any information including the characterization of sources, impedance boundary conditions and surrounding medium, and that the methodology automatically differentiates between the wanted and unwanted sound components. The previous publication proved the concept in one-dimensional conditions. In this paper, the approach for more realistic conditions is studied by numerical simulation and experimental validation in three-dimensional cases. The results provide a guideline to the implementation of the active shielding method with practical three-dimensional conditions. Through numerical simulation it is demonstrated that while leaving the wanted sound unchanged, the developed approach offers selective volumetric noise cancellation within a targeted domain. In addition, the method is implemented in a three-dimensional experiment with a white noise source in a semi-anechoic chamber. The experimental study identifies practical difficulties and limitations in the use of the approach for real applications. PMID:25190385

  12. Active control of aircraft engine inlet noise using compact sound sources and distributed error sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Dungan, Mary E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control system using a compact sound source is effective to reduce aircraft engine duct noise. The fan noise from a turbofan engine is controlled using an adaptive filtered-x LMS algorithm. Single multi channel control systems are used to control the fan blade passage frequency (BPF) tone and the BPF tone and the first harmonic of the BPF tone for a plane wave excitation. A multi channel control system is used to control any spinning mode. The multi channel control system to control both fan tones and a high pressure compressor BPF tone simultaneously. In order to make active control of turbofan inlet noise a viable technology, a compact sound source is employed to generate the control field. This control field sound source consists of an array of identical thin, cylindrically curved panels with an inner radius of curvature corresponding to that of the engine inlet. These panels are flush mounted inside the inlet duct and sealed on all edges to prevent leakage around the panel and to minimize the aerodynamic losses created by the addition of the panels. Each panel is driven by one or more piezoelectric force transducers mounted on the surface of the panel. The response of the panel to excitation is maximized when it is driven at its resonance; therefore, the panel is designed such that its fundamental frequency is near the tone to be canceled, typically 2000-4000 Hz.

  13. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. I - Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of sound radiation from vibrating plates by oscillating forces applied directly to the structure is analytically studied. The model consists of a plane acoustic wave incident on a clamped elastic circular thin plate. Control is achieved by point forces, and quadratic optimization is used to calculate the optimal control gains necessary to minimize a cost function proportional to the radiated acoustic power (the transmitted field). The results show that global attenuation of broadband radiated sound levels for low to mid-range frequencies can be achieved with one or two control forces, irrespective of whether the system is on or off resonance. The efficiency of the control strategy is demonstrated to be related to the nature of the coupling between the plate modes of response and the radiated field.

  14. Improved training of neural networks for the nonlinear active control of sound and vibration.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, M; Paillard, B; Le Dinh, C T

    1999-01-01

    Active control of sound and vibration has been the subject of a lot of research in recent years, and examples of applications are now numerous. However, few practical implementations of nonlinear active controllers have been realized. Nonlinear active controllers may be required in cases where the actuators used in active control systems exhibit nonlinear characteristics, or in cases when the structure to be controlled exhibits a nonlinear behavior. A multilayer perceptron neural-network based control structure was previously introduced as a nonlinear active controller, with a training algorithm based on an extended backpropagation scheme. This paper introduces new heuristical training algorithms for the same neural-network control structure. The objective is to develop new algorithms with faster convergence speed (by using nonlinear recursive-least-squares algorithms) and/or lower computational loads (by using an alternative approach to compute the instantaneous gradient of the cost function). Experimental results of active sound control using a nonlinear actuator with linear and nonlinear controllers are presented. The results show that some of the new algorithms can greatly improve the learning rate of the neural-network control structure, and that for the considered experimental setup a neural-network controller can outperform linear controllers. PMID:18252535

  15. Spectroscopic study of a dark lane and a cool loop in a solar limb active region by Hinode/EIS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Imada, S.; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jin-Yi

    2014-01-10

    We investigated a cool loop and a dark lane over a limb active region on 2007 March 14 using the Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer. The cool loop is clearly seen in the spectral lines formed at the transition region temperature. The dark lane is characterized by an elongated faint structure in the coronal spectral lines and is rooted on a bright point. We examined their electron densities, Doppler velocities, and nonthermal velocities as a function of distance from the limb. We derived electron densities using the density sensitive line pairs of Mg VII, Si X, Fe XII, Fe XIII, and Fe XIV spectra. We also compared the observed density scale heights with the calculated scale heights from each peak formation temperatures of the spectral lines under the hydrostatic equilibrium. We noted that the observed density scale heights of the cool loop are consistent with the calculated heights, with the exception of one observed cooler temperature; we also found that the observed scale heights of the dark lane are much lower than their calculated scale heights. The nonthermal velocity in the cool loop slightly decreases along the loop, while nonthermal velocity in the dark lane sharply falls off with height. Such a decrease in the nonthermal velocity may be explained by wave damping near the solar surface or by turbulence due to magnetic reconnection near the bright point.

  16. Statistical mapping of sound-evoked activity in the mouse auditory midbrain using Mn-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Zou, Jing; Babb, James S; Johnson, Glyn; Sanes, Dan H; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2008-01-01

    Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) has been developed to image brain activity in small animals, including normal and genetically modified mice. Here, we report the use of a MEMRI-based statistical parametric mapping method to analyze sound-evoked activity in the mouse auditory midbrain, the inferior colliculus (IC). Acoustic stimuli with defined frequency and amplitude components were shown to activate and enhance neuronal ensembles in the IC. These IC activity patterns were analyzed quantitatively using voxel-based statistical comparisons between groups of mice with or without sound stimulation. Repetitive 40-kHz pure tone stimulation significantly enhanced ventral IC regions, which was confirmed in the statistical maps showing active regions whose volumes increased in direct proportion to the amplitude of the sound stimuli (65 dB, 77 dB, and 89 dB peak sound pressure level). The peak values of the activity-dependent MEMRI signal enhancement also increased from 7% to 20% for the sound amplitudes employed. These results demonstrate that MEMRI statistical mapping can be used to analyze both the 3D spatial patterns and the magnitude of activity evoked by sound stimuli carrying different energy. This represents a significant advance in the development of MEMRI for quantitative and unbiased analysis of brain function in the deep brain nuclei of mice. PMID:17919926

  17. Speed of sound estimation with active PZT element for thermal monitoring during ablation therapy: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the thermal dose during ablation therapy is instrumental to successfully removing the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. In the practical scenario, surgeons must be able to determine the ablation completeness in the tumor region. Various methods have been proposed to monitor it, one of which uses ultrasound since it is a common intraoperative imaging modality due to its non-invasive, cost-effective, and convenient natures. In our approach, we propose to use time of flight (ToF) information to estimate speed of sound changes. Accurate speed of sound estimation is crucial because it is directly correlated with temperature change and subsequent determination of ablation completeness. We divide the region of interest in a circular fashion with a variable radius from the ablator tip. We introduce the concept of effective speed of sound in each of the sub-regions. Our active PZT element control system facilitates this unique approach by allowing us to acquire one-way ToF information between the PZT element and each of the ultrasound elements. We performed a simulation and an experiment to verify feasibility of this method. The simulation result showed that we could compute the effective speed of sound within 0.02m/s error in our discrete model. We also perform a sensitivity analysis for this model. Most of the experimental results had less than 1% error. Simulation using a Gaussian continuous model with multiple PZT elements is also demonstrated. We simulate the effect of the element location one the optimization result.

  18. [Limb Scattering Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughman, Robert; Herman, Benjamin

    2001-01-01

    The primary purpose of this grant was to support analysis of the limb scattering data taken during the 1997 flight of the SOLSE (Shuttle Ozone Limb Sounding Experiment) and LORE (Limb Ozone Retrieval Experiment) instruments. Work was done to assess the performance of the retrieval algorithms for cloudy and clear sky cases in preparation for a poster presentation. The nadir-viewing data were also compared to coincident GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) data and to radiative transfer calculations. An algorithm similar to the TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) ozone retrieval algorithm was developed to infer the ozone column amount from the SOLSE nadir data. Comparison with coincident TOMS ozone column data confirmed that column ozone could be derived successfully from SOLSE nadir radiances, and also revealed significant changes in the SOLSE wavelength resolution and absolute radiometric calibration that were subsequently confirmed by comparing the post-flight instrument characterization to the pre-flight characterization, indicating a potentially useful method for monitoring instrument behavior in-flight.

  19. Prediction of upper limb muscle activity from motor cortical discharge during reaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeyer, Eric A.; Solla, Sara A.; Perreault, Eric J.; Miller, Lee E.

    2007-12-01

    Movement representation by the motor cortex (M1) has been a theoretical interest for many years, but in the past several years it has become a more practical question, with the advent of the brain-machine interface. An increasing number of groups have demonstrated the ability to predict a variety of kinematic signals on the basis of M1 recordings and to use these predictions to control the movement of a cursor or robotic limb. We, on the other hand, have undertaken the prediction of myoelectric (EMG) signals recorded from various muscles of the arm and hand during button pressing and prehension movements. We have shown that these signals can be predicted with accuracy that is similar to that of kinematic signals, despite their stochastic nature and greater bandwidth. The predictions were made using a subset of 12 or 16 neural signals selected in the order of each signal's unique, output-related information content. The accuracy of the resultant predictions remained stable through a typical experimental session. Accuracy remained above 80% of its initial level for most muscles even across periods as long as two weeks. We are exploring the use of these predictions as control signals for neuromuscular electrical stimulation in quadriplegic patients.

  20. Ghrelin Promotes Functional Angiogenesis in a Mouse Model of Critical Limb Ischemia Through Activation of Proangiogenic MicroRNAs.

    PubMed

    Katare, Rajesh; Rawal, Shruti; Munasinghe, Pujika Emani; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Fujii, Yutaka; Dixit, Parul; Umetani, Keiji; Kangawa, Kenji; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Schwenke, Daryl O

    2016-02-01

    Current therapeutic strategies for the treatment of critical limb ischemia (CLI) have only limited success. Recent in vitro evidence in the literature, using cell lines, proposes that the peptide hormone ghrelin may have angiogenic properties. In this study, we aim to investigate if ghrelin could promote postischemic angiogenesis in a mouse model of CLI and, further, identify the mechanistic pathway(s) that underpin ghrelin's proangiogenic properties. CLI was induced in male CD1 mice by femoral artery ligation. Animals were then randomized to receive either vehicle or acylated ghrelin (150 μg/kg sc) for 14 consecutive days. Subsequently, synchrotron radiation microangiography was used to assess hindlimb perfusion. Subsequent tissue samples were collected for molecular and histological analysis. Ghrelin treatment markedly improved limb perfusion by promoting the generation of new capillaries and arterioles (internal diameter less than 50 μm) within the ischemic hindlimb that were both structurally and functionally normal; evident by robust endothelium-dependent vasodilatory responses to acetylcholine. Molecular analysis revealed that ghrelin's angiogenic properties were linked to activation of prosurvival Akt/vascular endothelial growth factor/Bcl-2 signaling cascade, thus reducing the apoptotic cell death and subsequent fibrosis. Further, ghrelin treatment activated proangiogenic (miR-126 and miR-132) and antifibrotic (miR-30a) microRNAs (miRs) while inhibiting antiangiogenic (miR-92a and miR-206) miRs. Importantly, in vitro knockdown of key proangiogenic miRs (miR-126 and miR-132) inhibited the angiogenic potential of ghrelin. These results therefore suggest that clinical use of ghrelin for the early treatment of CLI may be a promising and potent inducer of reparative vascularization through modulation of key molecular factors. PMID:26672806

  1. Physical mechanisms of active control of sound transmission through rib stiffened double-panel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiyue; Chen, Kean; Ding, Shaohu; Yu, Haoxin

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical investigation on physical mechanisms of actively controlling sound transmission through a rib stiffened double-panel structure using point source in the cavity. The combined modal expansion and vibro-acoustic coupling methods are applied to establish the theoretical model of such active structure. Under the condition of minimizing radiated power of the radiating ribbed plate, the physical mechanisms are interpreted in detail from the point of view of modal couplings similar as that used in existed literatures. Results obtained demonstrate that the rule of sound energy transmission and the physical mechanisms for the rib stiffened double-panel structure are all changed, and affected by the coupling effects of the rib when compared with the analytical results obtained for unribbed double-panel case. By taking the coupling effects of the rib into considerations, the cavity modal suppression and rearrangement mechanisms obtained in existed investigations are modified and supplemented for the ribbed plate case, which gives a clear interpretation for the physical nature involved in the active rib stiffened double-panel structure.

  2. Sounding rockets and balloon activities and related research in Switzerland 2003-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogoli-Greuter, Marianne

    2005-08-01

    Two Swiss institutions involved since many years in this type of research have continued their activities in 2003-2005. The Institute of Applied Physics at the University of Bern is measuring water vapour and ozone constituents in the Earth atmosphere; the Atmospheric Chemistry Group of the Institute of Atmospheric Climate Science at the ETH in Zürich is evaluating data on ozone profile. The Space Biology Group at the ETH in Zürich has performed many investigations in the field of Life Sciences on different sounding rocket flights in the past, but had no experiment in 2003-2005. The group will resume its activity in the near future. The Physical Meteorological Observatory/World Radiation Center Davos is planning a balloon campaign to test a new absolute radiometer measuring total solar irradiance currently in development at the institute. Two new Swiss research teams - embedded in international teams - will become active in microgravity research on sounding rockets both in the field of Physical Sciences.

  3. Muscle activity in the lower limbs during push-down movement with a new active-exercise apparatus for the leg

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kenta; Kamada, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yukiyo; Aikawa, Shizu; Irie, Shun; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Sakane, Masataka; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lower-limb deep vein thrombosis is a complication of orthopedic surgery. A leg-exercise apparatus named “LEX” was developed as a novel active-exercise apparatus for deep vein thrombosis prevention. Muscle activity was evaluated to assess the effectiveness of exercise with LEX in the prevention. [Subjects] Eight healthy volunteers participated in this study. [Methods] Muscle activities were determined through electromyography during exercise with LEX [LEX (+)] and during active ankle movements [LEX (−)]. The end points were peak % maximum voluntary contraction and % integrated electromyogram of rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, and soleus. [Results] LEX (+) resulted in higher average values in all muscles except the tibialis anterior. Significant differences were noted in the peak of the biceps femoris and gastrocnemius and in the integrated electromyogram of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius, and soleus. The LEX (+)/LEX (−) ratio of the peak was 2.2 for the biceps femoris and 2.0 for the gastrocnemius . The integrated electromyogram was 1.8 for the gastrocnemius, 1.5 for the rectus femoris, 1.4 for the vastus lateralis, and 1.2 for the soleus. [Conclusion] Higher muscle activity was observed with LEX (+). LEX might be a good tool for increasing lower-limb blood flow and deep vein thrombosis prevention. PMID:27134410

  4. Muscle activity in the lower limbs during push-down movement with a new active-exercise apparatus for the leg.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenta; Kamada, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yukiyo; Aikawa, Shizu; Irie, Shun; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Sakane, Masataka; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] Lower-limb deep vein thrombosis is a complication of orthopedic surgery. A leg-exercise apparatus named "LEX" was developed as a novel active-exercise apparatus for deep vein thrombosis prevention. Muscle activity was evaluated to assess the effectiveness of exercise with LEX in the prevention. [Subjects] Eight healthy volunteers participated in this study. [Methods] Muscle activities were determined through electromyography during exercise with LEX [LEX (+)] and during active ankle movements [LEX (-)]. The end points were peak % maximum voluntary contraction and % integrated electromyogram of rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, and soleus. [Results] LEX (+) resulted in higher average values in all muscles except the tibialis anterior. Significant differences were noted in the peak of the biceps femoris and gastrocnemius and in the integrated electromyogram of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, gastrocnemius, and soleus. The LEX (+)/LEX (-) ratio of the peak was 2.2 for the biceps femoris and 2.0 for the gastrocnemius . The integrated electromyogram was 1.8 for the gastrocnemius, 1.5 for the rectus femoris, 1.4 for the vastus lateralis, and 1.2 for the soleus. [Conclusion] Higher muscle activity was observed with LEX (+). LEX might be a good tool for increasing lower-limb blood flow and deep vein thrombosis prevention. PMID:27134410

  5. Assessment of neuromuscular activation of the upper limbs in children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy during a dynamical task.

    PubMed

    Feltham, Max G; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J A; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2010-06-01

    This study compared the intensity, co-activity and frequency content of the electromyography (EMG) signals recorded bilaterally from six muscles of the upper limbs in children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy (SHCP) and typically developing (TD) children during a bilateral movement. It was found that children with SHCP executed the bimanual circular movement with higher intensities of mean neuromuscular activity in both arms compared to TD children. Furthermore, the movement was performed with longer phases of concentric and eccentric activity in children with SHCP, indicating more co-activation, especially in the more impaired arm. The EMG signals yielded a higher mean power frequency in all the muscles of the more impaired arm and the wrist and elbow flexors of the less impaired arm, which was interpreted as a relatively higher contribution of type II muscle fibres compared to TD children. These observations suggest that in children with SHCP bimanual coordination requires higher neuromuscular activation in the muscles of both arms. Furthermore, SHCP also seems to involve structural changes to the muscle properties, which differ between arms. PMID:19666231

  6. Cathepsin D and MMP-9 activity increase following a high intensity exercise in hind limb muscles of young rats.

    PubMed

    Carmeli, Eli; Haimovitz, Tal; Nemcovsky, E Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The influence of an intensive exercise regime on cathepsin D and MMP-9 activity in hind limb muscles was investigated. We hypothesized that high-intensity exercise would increase the number of these proteins, indicating their involvement in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced muscle injury. Muscle fibers from the gastrocnemius and soleus were used from young (6-mo-old) female rats (n = 6) who completed 10 consecutive days of treadmill running at high intensity (34 m min(-1) gradually up to 40 min per day), compared with nonrunning, age and sex-matched rats (n = 6). After a high-intensity exercise regime, cathepsin D activity significantly increased in the gastrocnemius (from 6.6 x 10(-3) to 10.7 x 10(-3) or 61% nM tyrosine x mg-1 protein x min-1) and the soleus (from 5.9 x 10(-3) to 8.9 x 10(-3) or 66%). The activity level of mRNA MMP-9, expressed as ng mg(-1) protein, increased in both muscles subjected to intensity running. The results of this study suggest that high-intensity running results in an elevation in the activity of lysosomal enzymes involved in matrix protein degradation. PMID:17569248

  7. Warm-up with weighted bat and adjustment of upper limb muscle activity in bat swinging under movement correction conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoichi; Ishii, Yasumitsu; Ikudome, Sachi; Nakamoto, Hiroki

    2014-02-01

    The effects of weighted bat warm-up on adjustment of upper limb muscle activity were investigated during baseball bat swinging under dynamic conditions that require a spatial and temporal adjustment of the swinging to hit a moving target. Seven male college baseball players participated in this study. Using a batting simulator, the task was to swing the standard bat coincident with the arrival timing and position of a moving target after three warm-up swings using a standard or weighted bat. There was no significant effect of weighted bat warm-up on muscle activity before impact associated with temporal or spatial movement corrections. However, lower inhibition of the extensor carpi ulnaris muscle activity was observed in a velocity-changed condition in the weighted bat warm-up, as compared to a standard bat warm-up. It is suggested that weighted bat warm-up decreases the adjustment ability associated with inhibition of muscle activation under movement correction conditions. PMID:24724516

  8. Is Two Better than One? Limb Activation Treatment Combined with Contralesional Arm Vibration to Ameliorate Signs of Left Neglect

    PubMed Central

    Pitteri, Marco; Arcara, Giorgio; Passarini, Laura; Meneghello, Francesca; Priftis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the effects of the Limb Activation Treatment (LAT) alone and in combination with the Contralateral Arm Vibration (CAV) on left neglect (LN) rehabilitation. We conceived them as techniques that both prompt the activation of the lesioned right hemisphere because of the activation (with the LAT as an active technique) and the stimulation (with the CAV as a passive technique) of the left hemibody. To test the effect of the simultaneous use of these two techniques (i.e., LAT and CAV) on visuo-spatial aspects of LN, we described the case of an LN patient (GR), who showed high intra-individual variability (IIV) in performance. Given the high IIV of GR, we used an ABAB repeated-measures design to better define the effectiveness of the combined application of LAT and CAV, as a function of time. The results showed an improvement of GR’s performance on the Bells test following the combined application of LAT and CAV, with respect to the application of LAT alone. We did not find, however, significant effects of treatment on two other LN tests (i.e., Line bisection and Picture scanning). We propose that the combined application of LAT and CAV can be beneficial for some aspects of LN. PMID:23966926

  9. Muscular Activity and Fatigue in Lower-Limb and Trunk Muscles during Different Sit-To-Stand Tests

    PubMed Central

    Roldán-Jiménez, Cristina; Bennett, Paul; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I.

    2015-01-01

    Sit-to-stand (STS) tests measure the ability to get up from a chair, reproducing an important component of daily living activity. As this functional task is essential for human independence, STS performance has been studied in the past decades using several methods, including electromyography. The aim of this study was to measure muscular activity and fatigue during different repetitions and speeds of STS tasks using surface electromyography in lower-limb and trunk muscles. This cross-sectional study recruited 30 healthy young adults. Average muscle activation, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction, muscle involvement in motion and fatigue were measured using surface electrodes placed on the medial gastrocnemius (MG), biceps femoris (BF), vastus medialis of the quadriceps (QM), the abdominal rectus (AR), erector spinae (ES), rectus femoris (RF), soleus (SO) and the tibialis anterior (TA). Five-repetition STS, 10-repetition STS and 30-second STS variants were performed. MG, BF, QM, ES and RF muscles showed differences in muscle activation, while QM, AR and ES muscles showed significant differences in MVC percentage. Also, significant differences in fatigue were found in QM muscle between different STS tests. There was no statistically significant fatigue in the BF, MG and SO muscles of the leg although there appeared to be a trend of increasing fatigue. These results could be useful in describing the functional movements of the STS test used in rehabilitation programs, notwithstanding that they were measured in healthy young subjects. PMID:26506612

  10. Identification of the affected lower limb and unaffected side motor functions as determinants of activities of daily living performance in stroke patients using partial correlation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Takaaki; Sato, Atsushi; Togashi, Yui; Kasahara, Ryuichi; Ohashi, Takuro; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Yamamoto, Yuichi; Otsuki, Koji

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the independent impact of the affected upper and lower limb, trunk, and unaffected side motor functions on activities of daily living in stroke patients using partial correlation analysis. [Subjects and Methods] This retrospective study included 77 stroke patients. Motor functions were assessed using the Stroke Impairment Assessment Set, and the activities of daily living performance was assessed using the Barthel index or Functional Independence Measure. Further, simple and partial correlation analyses were conducted between each motor function and activities of daily living parameter. [Results] Simple correlation analysis identified significant positive correlations for each pair. In contrast, partial correlation analysis only identified significant positive correlations between the affected lower limb or unaffected side functions and the Barthel index or Functional Independence Measure. This discrepancy between the two tests was explained by the significant interaction between the affected upper and lower limb functions and between the trunk and unaffected side functions. [Conclusion] The present study identified the affected lower limb and unaffected side motor functions as the major determinants of activities of daily living performance in stroke patients. These findings suggest that rehabilitation programs can be improved by targeting these areas. PMID:26311957

  11. The effects of task-oriented versus repetitive bilateral arm training on upper limb function and activities of daily living in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gui Bin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of task-oriented bilateral arm training and repetitive bilateral arm training on upper limb function and activities of daily living in stroke patients. [Subjects] Forty patients with hemiplegia resulting from stroke were divided into a task orientied bilateral arm training group (n=20) and a repetitive bilateral arm training group (n=20). [Methods] The task-oriented group underwent bilateral arm training with 5 functional tasks, and the repetitive group underwent bilateral arm training with rhythmin auditory cueing for 30 minutes/day, 5 times/week, for 12 weeks. [Results] The upper limb function and the ability to perform activities of daily living improved significantly in both groups. Although there were significant differences between the groups, the task-oriented group showed greater improvement in upper limb function and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] We recommend bilateral arm training as well as adding functional task training as a clinical intervention to improve upper limb function activities of daily living in patients with hemiplegia. PMID:26157217

  12. Angiotensin II stimulates superoxide production in the thick ascending limb by activating NOX4

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Nancy J.; Garvin, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) stimulates production of superoxide (O2−) by NADPH oxidase (NOX) in medullary thick ascending limbs (TALs). There are three isoforms of the catalytic subunit (NOX1, 2, and 4) known to be expressed in the kidney. We hypothesized that NOX2 mediates ANG II-induced O2− production by TALs. To test this, we measured NOX1, 2, and 4 mRNA and protein by RT-PCR and Western blot in TAL suspensions from rats and found three catalytic subunits expressed in the TAL. We measured O2− production using a lucigenin-based assay. To assess the contribution of NOX2, we measured ANG II-induced O2− production in wild-type and NOX2 knockout mice (KO). ANG II increased O2− production by 346 relative light units (RLU)/mg protein in the wild-type mice (n = 9; P < 0.0007 vs. control). In the knockout mice, ANG II increased O2− production by 290 RLU/mg protein (n = 9; P < 0.007 vs. control). This suggests that NOX2 does not contribute to ANG II-induced O2− production (P < 0.6 WT vs. KO). To test whether NOX4 mediates the effect of ANG II, we selectively decreased NOX4 expression in rats using an adenovirus that expresses NOX4 short hairpin (sh)RNA. Six to seven days after in vivo transduction of the kidney outer medulla, NOX4 mRNA was reduced by 77%, while NOX1 and NOX2 mRNA was unaffected. In control TALs, ANG II stimulated O2− production by 96%. In TALs transduced with NOX4 shRNA, ANG II-stimulated O2− production was not significantly different from the baseline. We concluded that NOX4 is the main catalytic isoform of NADPH oxidase that contributes to ANG II-stimulated O2− production by TALs. PMID:22875785

  13. Age-Specific Effects of Mirror-Muscle Activity on Cross-Limb Adaptations Under Mirror and Non-Mirror Visual Feedback Conditions.

    PubMed

    Reissig, Paola; Stöckel, Tino; Garry, Michael I; Summers, Jeffery J; Hinder, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Cross-limb transfer (CLT) describes the observation of bilateral performance gains due to unilateral motor practice. Previous research has suggested that CLT may be reduced, or absent, in older adults, possibly due to age-related structural and functional brain changes. Based on research showing increases in CLT due to the provision of mirror visual feedback (MVF) during task execution in young adults, our study aimed to investigate whether MVF can facilitate CLT in older adults, who are known to be more reliant on visual feedback for accurate motor performance. Participants (N = 53) engaged in a short-term training regime (300 movements) involving a ballistic finger task using their dominant hand, while being provided with either visual feedback of their active limb, or a mirror reflection of their active limb (superimposed over the quiescent limb). Performance in both limbs was examined before, during and following the unilateral training. Furthermore, we measured corticospinal excitability (using TMS) at these time points, and assessed muscle activity bilaterally during the task via EMG; these parameters were used to investigate the mechanisms mediating and predicting CLT. Training resulted in significant bilateral performance gains that did not differ as a result of age or visual feedback (both p > 0.1). Training also elicited bilateral increases in corticospinal excitability (p < 0.05). For younger adults, CLT was significantly predicted by performance gains in the trained hand (β = 0.47), whereas for older adults it was significantly predicted by mirror activity in the untrained hand during training (β = 0.60). The present study suggests that older adults are capable of exhibiting CLT to a similar degree to younger adults. The prominent role of mirror activity in the untrained hand for CLT in older adults indicates that bilateral cortical activity during unilateral motor tasks is a compensatory mechanism. In this particular task, MVF did not facilitate the

  14. Age-Specific Effects of Mirror-Muscle Activity on Cross-Limb Adaptations Under Mirror and Non-Mirror Visual Feedback Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reissig, Paola; Stöckel, Tino; Garry, Michael I.; Summers, Jeffery J.; Hinder, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-limb transfer (CLT) describes the observation of bilateral performance gains due to unilateral motor practice. Previous research has suggested that CLT may be reduced, or absent, in older adults, possibly due to age-related structural and functional brain changes. Based on research showing increases in CLT due to the provision of mirror visual feedback (MVF) during task execution in young adults, our study aimed to investigate whether MVF can facilitate CLT in older adults, who are known to be more reliant on visual feedback for accurate motor performance. Participants (N = 53) engaged in a short-term training regime (300 movements) involving a ballistic finger task using their dominant hand, while being provided with either visual feedback of their active limb, or a mirror reflection of their active limb (superimposed over the quiescent limb). Performance in both limbs was examined before, during and following the unilateral training. Furthermore, we measured corticospinal excitability (using TMS) at these time points, and assessed muscle activity bilaterally during the task via EMG; these parameters were used to investigate the mechanisms mediating and predicting CLT. Training resulted in significant bilateral performance gains that did not differ as a result of age or visual feedback (both p > 0.1). Training also elicited bilateral increases in corticospinal excitability (p < 0.05). For younger adults, CLT was significantly predicted by performance gains in the trained hand (β = 0.47), whereas for older adults it was significantly predicted by mirror activity in the untrained hand during training (β = 0.60). The present study suggests that older adults are capable of exhibiting CLT to a similar degree to younger adults. The prominent role of mirror activity in the untrained hand for CLT in older adults indicates that bilateral cortical activity during unilateral motor tasks is a compensatory mechanism. In this particular task, MVF did not facilitate the

  15. Historical Patterns and Drivers of Spatial Changes in Recreational Fishing Activity in Puget Sound, Washington.

    PubMed

    Beaudreau, Anne H; Whitney, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale fisheries are the primary users of many coastal fish stocks; yet, spatial and temporal patterns of recreational and subsistence fishing in coastal marine ecosystems are poorly documented. Knowledge about the spatial distribution of fishing activities can inform place-based management that balances species conservation with opportunities for recreation and subsistence. We used a participatory mapping approach to document changes in spatial fishing patterns of 80 boat-based recreational anglers from 1950 to 2010 in Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Hand-drawn fishing areas for salmon, rockfishes, flatfishes, and crabs were digitized and analyzed in a Geographic Information System. We found that recreational fishing has spanned the majority of Puget Sound since the 1950s, with the heaviest use limited to small areas of central and northern Puget Sound. People are still fishing in the same places they were decades ago, with relatively little change in specific locations despite widespread declines in salmon and bottomfish populations during the second half of the 20th century. While the location of core fishing areas remained consistent, the size of those areas and intensity of use changed over time. The size of fishing areas increased through the 2000s for salmon but declined after the 1970s and 1980s for rockfishes, flatfishes, and crabs. Our results suggest that the spatial extent of recreational bottomfishing increased after the 1960s, when the availability of motorized vessels and advanced fish-finding technologies allowed anglers to expand their scope beyond localized angling from piers and boathouses. Respondents offered a wide range of reasons for shifts in fishing areas over time, reflecting substantial individual variation in motivations and behaviors. Changes in fishing areas were most commonly attributed to changes in residence and declines in target species and least tied to fishery regulations, despite the implementation of at least 25 marine

  16. Historical Patterns and Drivers of Spatial Changes in Recreational Fishing Activity in Puget Sound, Washington

    PubMed Central

    Beaudreau, Anne H.; Whitney, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale fisheries are the primary users of many coastal fish stocks; yet, spatial and temporal patterns of recreational and subsistence fishing in coastal marine ecosystems are poorly documented. Knowledge about the spatial distribution of fishing activities can inform place-based management that balances species conservation with opportunities for recreation and subsistence. We used a participatory mapping approach to document changes in spatial fishing patterns of 80 boat-based recreational anglers from 1950 to 2010 in Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Hand-drawn fishing areas for salmon, rockfishes, flatfishes, and crabs were digitized and analyzed in a Geographic Information System. We found that recreational fishing has spanned the majority of Puget Sound since the 1950s, with the heaviest use limited to small areas of central and northern Puget Sound. People are still fishing in the same places they were decades ago, with relatively little change in specific locations despite widespread declines in salmon and bottomfish populations during the second half of the 20th century. While the location of core fishing areas remained consistent, the size of those areas and intensity of use changed over time. The size of fishing areas increased through the 2000s for salmon but declined after the 1970s and 1980s for rockfishes, flatfishes, and crabs. Our results suggest that the spatial extent of recreational bottomfishing increased after the 1960s, when the availability of motorized vessels and advanced fish-finding technologies allowed anglers to expand their scope beyond localized angling from piers and boathouses. Respondents offered a wide range of reasons for shifts in fishing areas over time, reflecting substantial individual variation in motivations and behaviors. Changes in fishing areas were most commonly attributed to changes in residence and declines in target species and least tied to fishery regulations, despite the implementation of at least 25 marine

  17. Auditory Attraction: Activation of visual cortex by music and sound in Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Cannistraci, Chris J.; Anderson, Adam; Kim, Chai-Youn; Eapen, Mariam; Gore, John C.; Blake, Randolph; Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a genetic neurodevelopmental disorder with a distinctive phenotype including cognitive-linguistic features, non-social anxiety, and a strong attraction to music. We performed functional MRI studies examining brain responses to musical and other types of auditory stimuli in young adults with WS and typically-developing controls. In Study 1, the WS group exhibited unforeseen activations of the visual cortex to musical stimuli, and it was this novel finding that became the focus of two subsequent studies. Using retinotopy, color localizers and additional sound conditions, we identified specific visual areas in WS subjects that were activated by both musical and non-musical auditory stimuli. The results, similar to synesthetic-like experiences, have implications for cross-modal sensory processing in typical and atypical neurodevelopment. PMID:20440382

  18. Electroacoustic absorbers: bridging the gap between shunt loudspeakers and active sound absorption.

    PubMed

    Lissek, Hervé; Boulandet, Romain; Fleury, Romain

    2011-05-01

    The acoustic impedance at the diaphragm of an electroacoustic transducer can be varied using a range of basic electrical control strategies, amongst which are electrical shunt circuits. These passive shunt techniques are compared to active acoustic feedback techniques for controlling the acoustic impedance of an electroacoustic transducer. The formulation of feedback-based acoustic impedance control reveals formal analogies with shunt strategies, and highlights an original method for synthesizing electric networks ("shunts") with positive or negative components, bridging the gap between passive and active acoustic impedance control. This paper describes the theory unifying all these passive and active acoustic impedance control strategies, introducing the concept of electroacoustic absorbers. The equivalence between shunts and active control is first formalized through the introduction of a one-degree-of-freedom acoustic resonator accounting for both electric shunts and acoustic feedbacks. Conversely, electric networks mimicking the performances of active feedback techniques are introduced, identifying shunts with active impedance control. Simulated acoustic performances are presented, with an emphasis on formal analogies between the different control techniques. Examples of electric shunts are proposed for active sound absorption. Experimental assessments are then presented, and the paper concludes with a general discussion on the concept and potential improvements. PMID:21568400

  19. Assessing Acoustic Sound Levels Associated with Active Source Seismic Surveys in Shallow Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Thode, A.; Diebold, J. B.; Webb, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    The potential effect of active source seismic research on marine mammal populations is a topic of increasing concern, and controversy surrounding such operations has begun to impact the planning and permitting of academic surveys [e.g., Malakoff, 2002 Science]. Although no causal relationship between marine mammal strandings and seismic exploration has been proven, any circumstantial evidence must be thoroughly investigated. A 2002 stranding of two beaked whales in the Gulf of California within 50 km of a R/V Ewing seismic survey has been a subject of concern for both marine seismologists and environmentalists. In order to better understand possible received levels for whales in the vicinity of these operations, modeling is combined with ground-truth calibration measurements. A wide-angle parabolic equation model, which is capable of including shear within the sediment and basement layers, is used to generate predictive models of low-frequency transmission loss within the Gulf of California. This work incorporates range-dependent bathymetry, sediment thickness, sound velocity structure and sub-bottom properties. Oceanic sounds speed profiles are derived from the U.S. Navy's seasonal GDEM model and sediment thicknesses are taken from NOAA's worldwide database. The spectral content of the Ewing's 20-airgun seismic array is constrained by field calibration in the spring of 2003 [Tolstoy et al., 2004 GRL], indicating peak energies at frequencies below a few hundred Hz, with energy spectral density showing an approximate power-law decrease at higher frequencies (being ~40 dB below peak at 1 kHz). Transmission loss is estimated along a series of radials extending from multiple positions along the ship's track, with the directivity of the array accounted for by phase-shifting point sources that are scaled by the cube root of the individual airgun volumes. This allows the time-space history of low-frequency received levels to be reconstructed within the Gulf of California

  20. National Report Switzerland: Sounding Rocket and Balloon Activities and Related Research in Switzerland 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    , particularly in 2014. In order to keep the stations attractive to researchers from all over the world, investment in infrastructure is necessary. New instruments were recently installed at the Jungfrau East Ridge, for example, that now allow for the recording of additional climate and environmental data. A short summary of a few Swiss projects within the framework of sounding rocket and balloon activities and related research performed between 2013 and 2015 is provided in the following paragraphs.

  1. Sound localization with communications headsets: comparison of passive and active systems.

    PubMed

    Abel, Sharon M; Tsang, Suzanne; Boyne, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that conventional hearing protectors interfere with sound localization. This research examines possible benefits from advanced communications devices. Horizontal plane sound localization was compared in normal-hearing males with the ears unoccluded and fitted with Peltor H10A passive attenuation earmuffs, Racal Slimgard II communications muffs in active noise reduction (ANR) and talk-through-circuitry (TTC) modes and Nacre QUIETPRO TM communications earplugs in off (passive attenuation) and push-to-talk (PTT) modes. Localization was assessed using an array of eight loudspeakers, two in each spatial quadrant. The stimulus was 75 dB SPL, 300-ms broadband noise. One block of 120 forced-choice loudspeaker identification trials was presented in each condition. Subjects responded using a laptop response box with a set of eight microswitches in the same configuration as the speaker array. A repeated measures ANOVA was applied to the dataset. The results reveal that the overall percent correct response was highest in the unoccluded condition (94%). A significant reduction of 24% was observed for the communications devices in TTC and PTT modes and a reduction of 49% for the passive muff and plug and muff with ANR. Disruption in performance was due to an increase in front-back reversal errors for mirror image spatial positions. The results support the conclusion that communications devices with advanced technologies are less detrimental to directional hearing than conventional, passive, limited amplification and ANR devices. PMID:18087116

  2. Frequencies of Inaudible High-Frequency Sounds Differentially Affect Brain Activity: Positive and Negative Hypersonic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10–13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC. PMID:24788141

  3. Measurement of energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activities by a sounding balloon and ground observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, T.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activity is observed at various places, such as the ground, high mountain areas, and artificial satellites. In order to investigate the radiation source and its energy distribution, we measured energetic radiation by a sounding balloon, and the ground observation. On the measurement inside/above the thundercloud, we conducted a sounding observation using a radiosonde mounted two GM tubes (for gamma-rays, and for beta/gamma-rays), in addition to meteorological instruments. The balloon passed through a region of strong echoes in a thundercloud shown by radar image, at which time an increase in counting rate of the GM tube about 2 orders of magnitude occurred at the altitude from 5 km to 7.5 km. Furthermore, the counting rate of two GM tubes indicated the tendency different depending on movement of a balloon. This result suggests that the ratio for the gamma-rays (energetic photons) of the beta-rays (energetic electrons) varies according to the place in the thundercloud. Furthermore, we carried out a ground observation of the energetic gamma rays during winter thunderstorm at a coastal area facing the Sea of Japan. Two types of the energetic radiation have been observed at this time. We report the outline of these measurements and analysis in the session of the AGU meeting.

  4. Frequencies of inaudible high-frequency sounds differentially affect brain activity: positive and negative hypersonic effects.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10-13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC. PMID:24788141

  5. Fatigue-related firing of distal muscle nociceptors reduces voluntary activation of proximal muscles of the same limb.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David S; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2014-02-15

    With fatiguing exercise, firing of group III/IV muscle afferents reduces voluntary activation and force of the exercised muscles. These afferents can also act across agonist/antagonist pairs, reducing voluntary activation and force in nonfatigued muscles. We hypothesized that maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents after a fatiguing adductor pollicis (AP) contraction would decrease voluntary activation and force of AP and ipsilateral elbow flexors. In two experiments (n = 10) we examined voluntary activation of AP and elbow flexors by measuring changes in superimposed twitches evoked by ulnar nerve stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex, respectively. Inflation of a sphygmomanometer cuff after a 2-min AP maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) blocked circulation of the hand for 2 min and maintained firing of group III/IV muscle afferents. After a 2-min AP MVC, maximal AP voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (56.2 ± 17.7% vs. 76.3 ± 14.6%; mean ± SD; P < 0.05) as was force (40.3 ± 12.8% vs. 57.1 ± 13.8% peak MVC; P < 0.05). Likewise, after a 2-min AP MVC, elbow flexion voluntary activation was lower with than without ischemia (88.3 ± 7.5% vs. 93.6 ± 3.9%; P < 0.05) as was torque (80.2 ± 4.6% vs. 86.6 ± 1.0% peak MVC; P < 0.05). Pain during ischemia was reported as Moderate to Very Strong. Postfatigue firing of group III/IV muscle afferents from the hand decreased voluntary drive and force of AP. Moreover, this effect decreased voluntary drive and torque of proximal unfatigued muscles, the elbow flexors. Fatigue-sensitive group III/IV muscle nociceptors act to limit voluntary drive not only to fatigued muscles but also to unfatigued muscles within the same limb. PMID:24356522

  6. Effect of head and limb orientation on trunk muscle activation during abdominal hollowing in chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP) have altered activations patterns of the anterior trunk musculature when performing the abdominal hollowing manœuvre (attempt to pull umbilicus inward and upward towards the spine). There is a subgroup of individuals with CLBP who have high neurocognitive and sensory motor deficits with associated primitive reflexes (PR). The objective of the study was to determine if orienting the head and extremities to positions, which mimic PR patterns would alter anterior trunk musculature activation during the hollowing manoeuvre. Methods This study compared surface electromyography (EMG) of bilateral rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and internal obliques (IO) of 11 individuals with CLBP and evident PR to 9 healthy controls during the hollowing manoeuvre in seven positions of the upper quarter. Results Using magnitude based inferences it was likely (>75%) that controls had a higher ratio of left IO:RA activation with supine (cervical neutral), asymmetrical tonic neck reflex (ATNR) left and right, right cervical rotation and cervical extension positions. A higher ratio of right IO:RA was detected in the cervical neutral and ATNR left position for the control group. The CLBP group were more likely to show higher activation of the left RA in the cervical neutral, ATNR left and right, right cervical rotation and cervical flexion positions as well as in the cervical neutral and cervical flexion position for the right RA. Conclusions Individuals with CLBP and PR manifested altered activation patterns during the hollowing maneuver compared to healthy controls and that altering cervical and upper extremity position can diminish the group differences. Altered cervical and limb positions can change the activation levels of the IO and EO in both groups. PMID:24558971

  7. Managing residual limb hyperhidrosis in wounded warriors.

    PubMed

    Pace, Sarah; Kentosh, Joshua

    2016-06-01

    Residual limb dermatologic problems are a common concern among young active traumatic amputee patients who strive to maintain an active lifestyle. Hyperhidrosis of residual limbs is a recognized inciting factor that often contributes to residual limb dermatoses and is driven by the design of the prosthetic liner covering the residual limb. Treatment of hyperhidrosis in this population presents a unique challenge. Several accepted treatments of hyperhidrosis can offer some relief but have been limited by lack of results or side-effect profiles. Microwave thermal ablation has presented an enticing potential for residual limb hyperhidrosis. PMID:27416083

  8. Visual Scanning Training, Limb Activation Treatment, and Prism Adaptation for Rehabilitating Left Neglect: Who is the Winner?

    PubMed Central

    Priftis, Konstantinos; Passarini, Laura; Pilosio, Cristina; Meneghello, Francesca; Pitteri, Marco

    2013-01-01

    We compared, for the first time, the overall and differential effects of three of the most widely used left neglect (LN) treatments: visual scanning training (VST), limb activation treatment (LAT), and prism adaptation (PA). Thirty-three LN patients were assigned in quasi-random order to the three groups (VST, LAT, or PA). Each patient received only one type of treatment. LN patients’ performance on everyday life tasks was assessed four times (over a period of 6 weeks): A1 and A2 (i.e., the two pre-treatment assessments); A3 and A4 (i.e., the two post-treatment assessments). LN patients in each of the three treatment conditions were treated for the same number of sessions (i.e., 20). The results showed that improvements were present in the majority of the tests assessing the peripersonal space in everyday life activities. Our findings were independent of unspecific factors and lasted for at least 2 weeks following the end of the treatments. There were no interactions, however, between LN treatments and assessments. We suggest that all three treatments can be considered as valid rehabilitation interventions for LN and could be employed for ameliorating LN signs. PMID:23847520

  9. Abdominal sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... sounds by listening to the abdomen with a stethoscope ( auscultation ). Most bowel sounds are normal. However, there ... sounds can sometimes be heard even without a stethoscope. Hyperactive bowel sounds mean there is an increase ...

  10. Knowledge About Sounds-Context-Specific Meaning Differently Activates Cortical Hemispheres, Auditory Cortical Fields, and Layers in House Mice.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Diana B; Schmidt, H Sabine; Ehret, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the auditory cortex (AC) by a given sound pattern is plastic, depending, in largely unknown ways, on the physiological state and the behavioral context of the receiving animal and on the receiver's experience with the sounds. Such plasticity can be inferred when house mouse mothers respond maternally to pup ultrasounds right after parturition and naïve females have to learn to respond. Here we use c-FOS immunocytochemistry to quantify highly activated neurons in the AC fields and layers of seven groups of mothers and naïve females who have different knowledge about and are differently motivated to respond to acoustic models of pup ultrasounds of different behavioral significance. Profiles of FOS-positive cells in the AC primary fields (AI, AAF), the ultrasonic field (UF), the secondary field (AII), and the dorsoposterior field (DP) suggest that activation reflects in AI, AAF, and UF the integration of sound properties with animal state-dependent factors, in the higher-order field AII the news value of a given sound in the behavioral context, and in the higher-order field DP the level of maternal motivation and, by left-hemisphere activation advantage, the recognition of the meaning of sounds in the given context. Anesthesia reduced activation in all fields, especially in cortical layers 2/3. Thus, plasticity in the AC is field-specific preparing different output of AC fields in the process of perception, recognition and responding to communication sounds. Further, the activation profiles of the auditory cortical fields suggest the differentiation between brains hormonally primed to know (mothers) and brains which acquired knowledge via implicit learning (naïve females). In this way, auditory cortical activation discriminates between instinctive (mothers) and learned (naïve females) cognition. PMID:27013959

  11. It's More Fun than It Sounds--Enhancing Science Concepts through Hands-on Activities for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guha, Smita

    2012-01-01

    To teach young children, teachers choose topics in science that children are curious about. Children's inquisitive nature is reflected through the activities as they make repetitive sounds to find the cause and effect relationship. Teachers can make best use of those invaluable moments by incorporating those activities into science lessons on…

  12. Earth Observing System/Advanced Microwave SoundingUnit-A (EOS/AMSU-A): Acquisition activities plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwantje, Robert

    1994-01-01

    This is the acquisition activities plan for the software to be used in the Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) system. This document is submitted in response to Contract NAS5-323 14 as CDRL 508. The procurement activities required to acquire software for the EOS/AMSU-A program are defined.

  13. Brain Activity Evaluation Using Oxy-Hb by Difference in the Strength of Sound Stimulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osawa, Takeru; Asano, Hirotoshi; Ide, Hideto

    We carried out a psychological study involving physiological measurements. We used the VAS to research the feeling. The physiological factor measured was the oxy-Hb. It was found that an auditory stimulus of 70[dB] is more uncomfortable than auditory stimulus of 50[dB]. Furthermore, the decrease in oxy-Hb was greater for the auditory stimulus of 70[dB] as compared to the auditory stimulus of 50[dB]. This tendency was found in the center of the forehead (ch22-ch25). There was a difference between the brain activity for the auditory stimulus of 70[dB] and that for the auditory stimulus of 50[dB]. It was also found that the sound level affects the comfort level of humans. It is necessary to obtain additional details on the effects from physiological index to psychological index in a future study.

  14. Low-Frequency Sound Field Control in a Reverberant Room with a Single Active Controller Source.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, John Drayton, Jr.

    The operation of a single active controller source in a reverberant room has been investigated. The system consists of a controlled transducer source and a near-source microphone, with electronics arranged as a closed feedback loop. The controller system responds to a single source placed arbitrarily in the room. A theoretical analysis is presented based on the two port model of the controller transducer interfaced to an equivalent description of the reverberant room. The room acoustic transfer impedances between the active controller, room exciter source, near controller pressure sensor, and an arbitrary point in the reverberant sound field are described by a Green's function model. To minimize resonant effects of the controller piston diaphragm, a second control feedback loop using a diaphragm mounted accelerometer was added to the pressure control loop. Examples of the controller system operation were drawn from a computer model. Experimental data were gathered in a test reverberation room at the Applied Research Laboratory of The Pennsylvania State University. This investigation has brought forth three factors which define the limits on wide band control loop gain. They are (i) the position of an accelerometer on the controller diaphragm, (ii) the spacing between the controller and pressure sensor microphone, and (iii) the first mode frequency and the Q of the controller diaphragm. These system and transducer constraints can introduce instability in the control system. The controller system operation in the room has been modeled as a lumped element ideal piston using a flow graph representation. Additional loops on the graph are used to represent non-ideal transducer aberrations, and to define the pressure at various points in the room. Four cases for controller operation have been defined based on the proximity of the room source, the pressure sensor, and the controller. Two of these are important for practical applications: (i) the sensor microphone and

  15. Proposal of Method for Control of Muscle Activation Level for Limbs during Motion and Application of this Method in Strength Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komada, Satoshi; Murakami, Yosuke; Hirai, Junji

    With an increase in the number of elderly people in our society, the need for equipments that ensure activities of daily living and that can be used in strength training for reducing the need for nursing care is increasing. In this paper, we propose a method for controlling the level of muscle activation for a particular muscle group without EMG sensors; the force exerted by the tips of the limbs during motion is used to control the level of muscle activation. The method is based on a musculoskeletal model for limbs called functionally different effective muscles of three antagonistic pairs of six muscles in 2D space. Hill's equation is incorporated in the method to consider force-velocity characteristics of muscles. EMG measurement results for two muscles under isokinetic contraction in the lower limbs of a subject show that difference between the achieved activation level and the desired activation level is less than the error of the output force distribution. Moreover, the control method is applied to strength training. A manipulator that can facilitate the isokinetic contraction with more than the desired activation level for a specific muscle group is developed.

  16. Software safety analysis activities during software development phases of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Hui-Yin; Sherif, Joseph S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the MLS software safety analysis activities and documents the SSA results. The scope of this software safety effort is consistent with the MLS system safety definition and is concentrated on the software faults and hazards that may have impact on the personnel safety and the environment safety.

  17. Tactile, thermal, and electrical thresholds in patients with and without phantom limb pain after traumatic lower limb amputation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengai; Melton, Danielle H; Li, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine whether there is central sensitization in patients with phantom limb pain (PLP) after traumatic limb amputation. Methods Seventeen patients after unilateral lower limb amputation secondary to trauma were enrolled. Ten patients had chronic PLP, while the other seven patients had no PLP. Tactile-sensation threshold, cold- and warm-sensation thresholds, cold- and heat-pain thresholds, electrical-sensation threshold (EST), and electrical-pain threshold on the distal residual limb and the symmetrical site on the sound limb were measured in all tested patients. Their thresholds were compared within the PLP and non-PLP group, and between the groups. Results The novel findings included: 1) electrical-pain threshold was only decreased in the sound limb in the PLP group and there was no difference between two limbs in the non-PLP group, suggesting central sensitization in patients with PLP; and 2) EST was increased on the affected limb as compared to the sound limb within the PLP group, but there were no significant differences in EST between the PLP and non-PLP group. There were in general no significant differences in other tested thresholds within the groups and between groups. Conclusion Our results demonstrate central sensitization in the patients with PLP after traumatic limb amputation. PMID:25945065

  18. Immediate effects of the activation of the affected lower limb on the balance and trunk mobility of hemiplegic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-dong; Lee, Kyoung-bo; Roh, Hyo-lyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the activation of the affected lower limb on balance and the trunk hemiplegic mobility of stroke patients. [Subjects] The gait group (GG) consisted of 6 subjects with hemiplegia and the non-gait group (NGG) consisted of 6 hemiplegic subjects. [Methods] The subjects in both groups were given foot facilitation training once for 30 min. The Spinal Mouse was used to measure the spinal alignment and the Berg balance scale (BBS) and sensory tests were also performed. [Results] In the GG, the sacral hip in upright to flexion, the lumbar spine in upright to extension, and the sacral hip and lumbar spine in flexion to extension showed significant increases in their angles after the intervention. In addition, there was a significant increase in the angle of the lumbar spine during extension from an upright position in the NGG. The BBS scores of both groups also increased significantly. [Conclusion] The intervention resulted in improvements in the angle of anterior pelvic tilt in the GG, and subjects in the NGG showed more extension of the thorax, which was regarded as compensation to avoid falling forward when flexing from an upright position. However, when extending backward from an upright position, both groups tended to control balance by using more lumbar flexion to keep the center of mass (COM) within the base of support (BOS). Both groups had better BBS scores. PMID:26157262

  19. Corticospinal contributions to lower limb muscle activity during cycling in humans.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Hoffman, Ben W; Cresswell, Andrew G; Carroll, Timothy J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate corticospinal contributions to locomotor drive to leg muscles involved in cycling. We studied 1) if activation of inhibitory interneurons in the cortex via subthreshold transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) caused a suppression of EMG and 2) how the responses to stimulation of the motor cortex via TMS and cervicomedullary stimulation (CMS) were modulated across the locomotor cycle. TMS at intensities subthreshold for activation of the corticospinal tract elicited suppression of EMG for approximately one-half of the subjects and muscles during cycling, and in matched static contractions in vastus lateralis. There was also significant modulation in the size of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by TMS across the locomotor cycle (P < 0.001) that was strongly related to variation in background EMG in all muscles (r > 0.86; P < 0.05). When MEP and CMEP amplitudes were normalized to background EMG, they were relatively larger prior to the main EMG burst and smaller when background EMG was maximum. Since the pattern of modulation of normalized MEP and CMEP responses was similar, the data suggest that phase-dependent modulation of corticospinal responses during cycling in humans is driven mainly by spinal mechanisms. However, there were subtle differences in the degree to which normalized MEP and CMEP responses were facilitated prior to EMG burst, which might reflect small increases in cortical excitability prior to maximum muscle activation. The data demonstrate that the motor cortex contributes actively to locomotor drive, and that spinal factors dominate phase-dependent modulation of corticospinal excitability during cycling in humans. PMID:22013236

  20. PREMIER's imaging IR limb sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Stefan; Caron, Jerome; Bézy, Jean-Loup; Meynart, Roland; Langen, Jörg; Carnicero Dominguez, Bernardo; Bensi, Paolo; Silvestrin, Pierluigi

    2011-11-01

    The Imaging IR Limb Sounder (IRLS) is one of the two instruments planned on board of the candidate Earth Explorer Core Mission PREMIER. PREMIER stands for PRocess Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and Millimetrewave Emitted Radiation and is presently under feasibility study by ESA. Emerging from recent enhanced detector and processing technologies IRLS shall, next to a millimetre-wave limb sounder, explore the benefits of three-dimensional limb sounding with embedded cloud imaging capability. Such 3d imaging technology is expected to open a new era of limb sounding that will allow detailed studies of the link between atmospheric composition and climate, since it will map simultaneously fields of temperature and many trace gases in the mid/upper troposphere and stratosphere across a large vertical and horizontal field of view and with relatively high vertical and horizontal resolution. PREMIER shall fly in tandem formation looking backwards to METOP's swath and thereby explore the benefit of 3-dimensional information for meteorological/environmental analyses and climate forcing investigations. As currently planned and if implemented, IRLS will cover a total horizontal field of about 360 km and observe the limb at altitudes between 4 and 52 km. The vertical spatial sampling distance (SSD) will be well below 1 km. It will be run in two different exclusive modes to address scientific questions about atmospheric dynamics and chemistry at spectral samplings of ~1.2 cm-1 and ~0.2 cm-1, respectively. In such configuration IRLS will be composed of an imaging array with about 1800 macro pixels or sub-samples, thereby allowing cloud imaging and rejection at sufficient spatial resolution. We will present an overview of the instrument requirements as derived from the scientific requirements, the present status of the mission, and we will give an overview of the currently identified technology needs and instrument predevelopments.

  1. Phantom limbs and neural plasticity.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V S; Rogers-Ramachandran, D

    2000-03-01

    The study of phantom limbs has received tremendous impetus from recent studies linking changes in cortical topography with perceptual experience. Systematic psychophysical testing and functional imaging studies on patients with phantom limbs provide 2 unique opportunities. First, they allow us to demonstrate neural plasticity in the adult human brain. Second, by tracking perceptual changes (such as referred sensations) and changes in cortical topography in individual patients, we can begin to explore how the activity of sensory maps gives rise to conscious experience. Finally, phantom limbs also allow us to explore intersensory effects and the manner in which the brain constructs and updates a "body image" throughout life. PMID:10714655

  2. The Impact of Anthropogenic Activities on Ecosystems of Long Island Sound, N.Y.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauture, E.; McHugh, C. M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Kenna, T. C.

    2015-12-01

    Long Island Sound (LIS) is a tide-dominated estuary located along heavily populated regions on the eastern coast of the US. Western LIS has been impacted by heavy metals and is susceptible to hypoxic and anoxic conditions since the 1900's. As part of the Long Island Sound Cable Fund and the National Science Foundation programs, we surveyed the western and central regions of LIS in 2006 and 2013, respectively. From the R/V Hugh Sharp and the R/V Seawolf, we collected high-resolution subbottom profiles, multibeam bathymetry, sediment cores, and grabs in distinct sedimentary environments such as channels, terraces, and river mouths. The goal was to evaluate the impact of anthropogenic activities as they relate to physical processes and populated regions. Along western LIS, total organic carbon (TOC) and heavy metal concentrations are higher from the 1850s to the present, especially along locations of known high organic waste. Pre-industrial concentrations of TOC average 2.22% with maximum values of 4.75%. A similar trend is observed with heavy metals. For example, lead (Pb) increased from background levels of ~10 to 20 ppm to over 200 ppm. Benthic foraminifers seem to be influenced by these trends with changes in ecosystems. The dominant assemblage, Elphidium excavatum clavatum remains dominant with a slight decrease in their abundance during anthropogenic times. From ~1850's to the present Ammonia beccarii becomes more abundant. These shifts in foraminifer species to assemblages that tolerate low oxygen conditions reflect the increasing hypoxic conditions. In central LIS, surface sediments average TOC of 1.34% with highest values of 5.21% near the Housatonic River that drains industrialized portions of Connecticut, and lowest values of 0.073% near the Long Island coastline. Understanding the evolution of hypoxia as well as the sources of heavy metals can lead to important implications for restoration of marine ecosystems.

  3. Behavioural physical activity interventions in participants with lower-limb osteoarthritis: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Wilby; Kluzek, Stefan; Roberts, Nia; Richards, Justin; Arden, Nigel; Leeson, Paul; Newton, Julia; Foster, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    behavioural lifestyle interventions for lower limb osteoarthritis populations would benefit from consensus on methodology and outcome reporting. This includes use of validated physical activity reporting tools and planning for long-term follow-up. PMID:26260348

  4. Superior analgesic effect of an active distraction versus pleasant unfamiliar sounds and music: the influence of emotion and cognitive style.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Eduardo A Garza; Brattico, Elvira; Vase, Lene; Østergaard, Leif; Vuust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Listening to music has been found to reduce acute and chronic pain. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood; however, emotion and cognitive mechanisms have been suggested to influence the analgesic effect of music. In this study we investigated the influence of familiarity, emotional and cognitive features, and cognitive style on music-induced analgesia. Forty-eight healthy participants were divided into three groups (empathizers, systemizers and balanced) and received acute pain induced by heat while listening to different sounds. Participants listened to unfamiliar Mozart music rated with high valence and low arousal, unfamiliar environmental sounds with similar valence and arousal as the music, an active distraction task (mental arithmetic) and a control, and rated the pain. Data showed that the active distraction led to significantly less pain than did the music or sounds. Both unfamiliar music and sounds reduced pain significantly when compared to the control condition; however, music was no more effective than sound to reduce pain. Furthermore, we found correlations between pain and emotion ratings. Finally, systemizers reported less pain during the mental arithmetic compared with the other two groups. These findings suggest that familiarity may be key in the influence of the cognitive and emotional mechanisms of music-induced analgesia, and that cognitive styles may influence pain perception. PMID:22242169

  5. Inferring Meal Eating Activities in Real World Settings from Ambient Sounds: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomaz, Edison; Zhang, Cheng; Essa, Irfan; Abowd, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary self-monitoring has been shown to be an effective method for weight-loss, but it remains an onerous task despite recent advances in food journaling systems. Semi-automated food journaling can reduce the effort of logging, but often requires that eating activities be detected automatically. In this work we describe results from a feasibility study conducted in-the-wild where eating activities were inferred from ambient sounds captured with a wrist-mounted device; twenty participants wore the device during one day for an average of 5 hours while performing normal everyday activities. Our system was able to identify meal eating with an F-score of 79.8% in a person-dependent evaluation, and with 86.6% accuracy in a person-independent evaluation. Our approach is intended to be practical, leveraging off-the-shelf devices with audio sensing capabilities in contrast to systems for automated dietary assessment based on specialized sensors. PMID:25859566

  6. Phosphatase activity in the limb bones of monkeys (Lagothrix humboldti) with hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Jeffree, Grace M.

    1962-01-01

    The paper reports a study of the distribution of phosphatases in the femora of three specimens of Humboldt's woolly monkey (Lagothrix humboldti) suffering from chronic hyperparathyroidism. Bone structure ranged from the apparently normal to extreme osteitis fibrosa. Most marked changes were found in the distribution of alkaline phosphatase, which reached at least 10 times the normal levels in the bone of the second monkey in the series, dropping to levels still well above normal in that of the most severely affected animal. Very high concentrations were found in the deeper layers of hypertrophied growth cartilage and in the osteoblasts lining poorly calcified trabeculae, and high concentrations in the fibre bone of the third animal. Lack of mineralization and the development of osteitis fibrosa are thus associated with a marked increase in alkaline phosphatase activity. Osteoclasts reacted strongly for acid phosphatase but were negative for alkaline phosphatase. Acid phosphatase levels were comparatively high in fibre bone, but overall levels ranged from 1/20 to less than 1/100 those of alkaline phosphatase. Some slow staining for acid phosphatase probably represents residual activity at acid pH of the markedly increased alkaline phosphatase. There may be some association between a failure of mineralization and the presence of acid phosphatase in osteoclasts and osteoid. The aetiology of the monkeys' condition is discussed. It seems likely that the parathyroid hypertrophy and rachitic changes were caused by low blood calcium dependent on a low calcium diet and lack of vitamin D, in which the requirements of New World monkeys are reputedly high. Images PMID:14451521

  7. Comparison of lower limb muscle activation with ballet movements (releve and demi-plie) and general movements (heel rise and squat) in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ju; Kim, Joong-Hwi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to demonstrate therapeutic grounds for rehabilitation exercise approach by comparing and analyzing muscular activities of Ballet movements: the releve movement (RM) and the demi-plie movement (DM). [Methods] Four types of movements such as RM vs. heel rise (HM) and DM vs. squat movement (SM) were randomized and applied in 30 healthy male and female individuals while measuring 10-s lower limb muscular activities (gluteus maximus [GMa], gluteus medius [GMe], rectus femoris [RF], adductor longus [AL], medial gastrocnemius [MG], and lateral gastrocnemius [LG]) by using surface electromyography (EMG). [Results] Significant differences were found in GMa, GMe, AL and MG activities for DM and in all of the six muscles for RM, in particular when the two groups were compared (RM vs HM and DM vs SM). [Conclusion] The RM and DM have a greater effect on lower limb muscular force activities compared to HM and SM and could be recommended as clinical therapeutic exercises for lower limb muscle enhancement. PMID:26957762

  8. Comparison of lower limb muscle activation with ballet movements (releve and demi-plie) and general movements (heel rise and squat) in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ju; Kim, Joong-Hwi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to demonstrate therapeutic grounds for rehabilitation exercise approach by comparing and analyzing muscular activities of Ballet movements: the releve movement (RM) and the demi-plie movement (DM). [Methods] Four types of movements such as RM vs. heel rise (HM) and DM vs. squat movement (SM) were randomized and applied in 30 healthy male and female individuals while measuring 10-s lower limb muscular activities (gluteus maximus [GMa], gluteus medius [GMe], rectus femoris [RF], adductor longus [AL], medial gastrocnemius [MG], and lateral gastrocnemius [LG]) by using surface electromyography (EMG). [Results] Significant differences were found in GMa, GMe, AL and MG activities for DM and in all of the six muscles for RM, in particular when the two groups were compared (RM vs HM and DM vs SM). [Conclusion] The RM and DM have a greater effect on lower limb muscular force activities compared to HM and SM and could be recommended as clinical therapeutic exercises for lower limb muscle enhancement. PMID:26957762

  9. Effect of lower-limb joint models on subject-specific musculoskeletal models and simulations of daily motor activities.

    PubMed

    Valente, Giordano; Pitto, Lorenzo; Stagni, Rita; Taddei, Fulvia

    2015-12-16

    Understanding the validity of using musculoskeletal models is critical, making important to assess how model parameters affect predictions. In particular, assumptions on joint models can affect predictions from simulations of movement, and the identification of image-based joints is unavoidably affected by uncertainty that can decrease the benefits of increasing model complexity. We evaluated the effect of different lower-limb joint models on muscle and joint contact forces during four motor tasks, and assessed the sensitivity to the uncertainties in the identification of anatomical four-bar-linkage joints. Three MRI-based musculoskeletal models having different knee and ankle joint models were created and used for the purpose. Model predictions were compared against a baseline model including simpler and widely-adopted joints. In addition, a probabilistic analysis was performed by perturbing four-bar-linkage joint parameters according to their uncertainty. The differences between models depended on the motor task analyzed, and there could be marked differences at peak loading (up to 2.40 BW at the knee and 1.54 BW at the ankle), although they were rather small over the motor task cycles (up to 0.59 BW at the knee and 0.31 BW at the ankle). The model including more degrees of freedom showed more discrepancies in predicted muscle activations compared to measured muscle activity. Further, including image-based four-bar-linkages was robust to simulate walking, chair rise and stair ascent, but not stair descent (peak standard deviation of 2.66 BW), suggesting that joint model complexity should be set according to the imaging dataset available and the intended application, performing sensitivity analyses. PMID:26506255

  10. Not one extrastriate body area: Using anatomical landmarks, hMT+, and visual field maps to parcellate limb-selective activations in human lateral occipitotemporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Kevin S.; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2011-01-01

    The prevailing view of human lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LOTC) organization suggests a single area selective for images of the human body (extrastriate body area, EBA) that highly overlaps with the human motion-selective complex (hMT+). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging with higher resolution (1.5mm voxels) than past studies (3–4mm voxels), we examined the fine-scale spatial organization of these activations relative to each other, as well as to visual field maps in LOTC. Rather than one contiguous EBA highly overlapping hMT+, results indicate three limb-selective activations organized in a crescent surrounding hMT+: (1) an activation posterior to hMT+ on the lateral occipital sulcus/middle occipital gyrus (LOS/MOG) overlapping the lower vertical meridian shared between visual field maps LO-2 and TO-1, (2) an activation anterior to hMT+ on the middle temporal gyrus (MTG) consistently overlapping the lower vertical meridian of TO-2 and extending outside presently defined visual field maps, and (3) an activation inferior to hMT+ on the inferotemporal gyrus (ITG) overlapping the parafoveal representation of the TO cluster. This crescent organization of limb-selective activations surrounding hMT+ is reproducible over a span of three years and is consistent across different image types used for localization. Further, these regions exhibit differential position properties: preference for contralateral image presentation decreases and preference for foveal presentation increases from the limb-selective LOS to the MTG. Finally, the relationship between limb-selective activations and visual field maps extends to the dorsal stream where a posterior IPS activation overlaps V7. Overall, our measurements demonstrate a series of LOTC limb-selective activations that 1) have separate anatomical and functional boundaries, 2) overlap distinct visual field maps, and 3) illustrate differential position properties. These findings indicate that category selectivity

  11. An overview of possible and not-so-possible tasks for active control of sound and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Flotow, Andreas H.

    1991-05-01

    While such passive approaches to helicopter sound and vibration control as vibration isolation/acoustic blocking, damping/acoustic absorption, and tuned absorbers, can be actively implemented and enhanced, active control methods transcend these possibilities. A survey is presently conducted of the literature generated by active-control research in recent years, with a view to emerging opportunities that do not risk instability, excessive development and production costs, and undue complexity.

  12. Early olfactory-induced rhythmic limb activity in the newborn rat.

    PubMed

    Fady, J C; Jamon, M; Clarac, F

    1998-06-15

    Locomotor-like rhythmic movements without postural constraints were elicited in newborn rats aged from a few hours to five days, using an olfactory stimulus provided by bedding materials. The rats were held in a sling with the front and the hind legs hanging on each side. The step frequency increased between postnatal days 0 and 4 (P0-P4); the step period was around 1 s at P0 and decreased during the following days. This decrease was larger in the forelimbs (650 ms at P4) than in the hindlimbs (750 ms at P4) and was mainly due to a decrease in stance duration. Both ipsilateral and contralateral legs moved in an alternating pattern. Analysis of the regulation of this pattern when a 1:1 or a 1:2 inter-leg coordination (with double steps) occurred showed that both anterior and posterior locomotion pattern generators were coupled very early. Results are discussed in relation to the locomotor activities studied at this early stage of life in other behavioral situations (swimming and air stepping), and in relation to fictive locomotion induced in vitro. PMID:9693789

  13. A myocontrolled neuroprosthesis integrated with a passive exoskeleton to support upper limb activities.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini, Emilia; Ferrante, Simona; Schauer, Thomas; Klauer, Christian; Gaffuri, Marina; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2014-04-01

    This work aimed at designing a myocontrolled arm neuroprosthesis for both assistive and rehabilitative purposes. The performance of an adaptive linear prediction filter and a high-pass filter to estimate the volitional EMG was evaluated on healthy subjects (N=10) and neurological patients (N=8) during dynamic hybrid biceps contractions. A significant effect of filter (p=0.017 for healthy; p<0.001 for patients) was obtained. The post hoc analysis revealed that for both groups only the adaptive filter was able to reliably detect the presence of a small volitional contribution. An on/off non-linear controller integrated with an exoskeleton for weight support was developed. The controller allowed the patient to activate/deactivate the stimulation intensity based on the residual EMG estimated by the adaptive filter. Two healthy subjects and 3 people with Spinal Cord Injury were asked to flex the elbow while tracking a trapezoidal target with and without myocontrolled-NMES support. Both healthy subjects and patients easily understood how to use the controller in a single session. Two patients reduced their tracking error by more than 60% with NMES support, while the last patient obtained a tracking error always comparable to the healthy subjects performance (<4°). This study proposes a reliable and feasible solution to combine NMES with voluntary effort. PMID:24529798

  14. Listening to an Audio Drama Activates Two Processing Networks, One for All Sounds, Another Exclusively for Speech

    PubMed Central

    Boldt, Robert; Malinen, Sanna; Seppä, Mika; Tikka, Pia; Savolainen, Petri; Hari, Riitta; Carlson, Synnöve

    2013-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown considerable intersubject synchronization of brain activity when subjects watch the same movie or listen to the same story. Here we investigated the across-subjects similarity of brain responses to speech and non-speech sounds in a continuous audio drama designed for blind people. Thirteen healthy adults listened for ∼19 min to the audio drama while their brain activity was measured with 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). An intersubject-correlation (ISC) map, computed across the whole experiment to assess the stimulus-driven extrinsic brain network, indicated statistically significant ISC in temporal, frontal and parietal cortices, cingulate cortex, and amygdala. Group-level independent component (IC) analysis was used to parcel out the brain signals into functionally coupled networks, and the dependence of the ICs on external stimuli was tested by comparing them with the ISC map. This procedure revealed four extrinsic ICs of which two–covering non-overlapping areas of the auditory cortex–were modulated by both speech and non-speech sounds. The two other extrinsic ICs, one left-hemisphere-lateralized and the other right-hemisphere-lateralized, were speech-related and comprised the superior and middle temporal gyri, temporal poles, and the left angular and inferior orbital gyri. In areas of low ISC four ICs that were defined intrinsic fluctuated similarly as the time-courses of either the speech-sound-related or all-sounds-related extrinsic ICs. These ICs included the superior temporal gyrus, the anterior insula, and the frontal, parietal and midline occipital cortices. Taken together, substantial intersubject synchronization of cortical activity was observed in subjects listening to an audio drama, with results suggesting that speech is processed in two separate networks, one dedicated to the processing of speech sounds and the other to both speech and non-speech sounds. PMID:23734202

  15. Brain activation is related to smoothness of upper limb movements after stroke.

    PubMed

    Buma, Floor E; van Kordelaar, Joost; Raemaekers, Matthijs; van Wegen, Erwin E H; Ramsey, Nick F; Kwakkel, Gert

    2016-07-01

    It is unclear whether additionally recruited sensorimotor areas in the ipsilesional and contralesional hemisphere and the cerebellum can compensate for lost neuronal functions after stroke. The objective of this study was to investigate how increased recruitment of secondary sensorimotor areas is associated with quality of motor control after stroke. In seventeen patients (three females, fourteen males; age: 59.9 ± 12.6 years), cortical activation levels were determined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 12 regions of interest during a finger flexion-extension task in weeks 6 and 29 after stroke. At the same time points and by using 3D kinematics, the quality of motor control was assessed by smoothness of the grasp aperture during a reach-to-grasp task, quantified by normalized jerk. Ipsilesional premotor cortex, insula and cerebellum, as well as the contralesional supplementary motor area, insula and cerebellum, correlated significantly and positively with the normalized jerk of grasp aperture at week 6 after stroke. A positive trend towards this correlation was observed in week 29. This study suggests that recruitment of secondary motor areas at 6 weeks after stroke is highly associated with increased jerk during reaching and grasping. As jerk represents the change in acceleration, the recruitment of additional sensorimotor areas seems to reflect a type of control in which deviations from an optimal movement pattern are continuously corrected. This relationship suggests that additional recruitment of sensorimotor areas after stroke may not correspond to restitution of motor function, but more likely to adaptive motor learning strategies to compensate for motor impairments. PMID:26979435

  16. Coronal Radio Sounding Experiments with Mars Express: Scintillation Spectra during Low Solar Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Rudash, V. K.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Paetzold, M.; Tellmann, S.

    2010-03-25

    Coronal radio sounding observations were carried out with the radio science experiment MaRS on the ESA spacecraft Mars Express during the period from 25 August to 22 October 2004. Differential frequency and log-amplitude fluctuations of the dual-frequency signals were recorded during a period of low solar activity. The data are applicable to low heliographic latitudes, i.e. to slow solar wind. The mean frequency fluctuation and power law index of the frequency fluctuation temporal spectra are determined as a function of heliocentric distance. The radial dependence of the frequency fluctuation spectral index alpha reflects the previously documented flattening of the scintillation power spectra in the solar wind acceleration region. Temporal spectra of S-band and X-band normalized log-amplitude fluctuations were investigated over the range of fluctuation frequencies 0.01 Hzactivity. Ranging measurements are presented and compared with frequency and log-amplitude scintillation data. Evidence for a weak increase in the fractional electron density turbulence level is obtained in the range 10-40 solar radii.

  17. Influence of mental practice on upper limb muscle activity and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, JuHyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effects of mental practice on muscle activity of the upper extremity and performance of daily activities in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] In this research, mental practice was conducted by 2 chronic hemiplegic stroke patients. Mental practice was conducted 30 minutes a day, 5 times a week, for 2 weeks. Evaluation was conducted 4 times before and after intervention. Muscle activity was measured using a surface electromyogram test, and the Modified Barthel Index was used to measure changes in the ability to carry out daily activities. [Results] Both the muscle activity of the upper extremity and capability to perform daily activities showed improved outcomes after mental practice was conducted. [Conclusion] Through this research, mental practice was proven to be effective in improving the muscle activity of upper extremity and capability to perform daily activities in chronic hemiplegic stroke patients. PMID:27134412

  18. Intracortical circuits amplify sound-evoked activity in primary auditory cortex following systemic injection of salicylate in the rat.

    PubMed

    Stolzberg, Daniel; Chrostowski, Michael; Salvi, Richard J; Allman, Brian L

    2012-07-01

    A high dose of sodium salicylate temporarily induces tinnitus, mild hearing loss, and possibly hyperacusis in humans and other animals. Salicylate has well-established effects on cochlear function, primarily resulting in the moderate reduction of auditory input to the brain. Despite decreased peripheral sensitivity and output, salicylate induces a paradoxical enhancement of the sound-evoked field potential at the level of the primary auditory cortex (A1). Previous electrophysiologic studies have begun to characterize changes in thalamorecipient layers of A1; however, A1 is a complex neural circuit with recurrent intracortical connections. To describe the effects of acute systemic salicylate treatment on both thalamic and intracortical sound-driven activity across layers of A1, we applied current-source density (CSD) analysis to field potentials sampled across cortical layers in the anesthetized rat. CSD maps were normally characterized by a large, short-latency, monosynaptic, thalamically driven sink in granular layers followed by a lower amplitude, longer latency, polysynaptic, intracortically driven sink in supragranular layers. Following systemic administration of salicylate, there was a near doubling of both granular and supragranular sink amplitudes at higher sound levels. The supragranular sink amplitude input/output function changed from becoming asymptotic at approximately 50 dB to sharply nonasymptotic, often dominating the granular sink amplitude at higher sound levels. The supragranular sink also exhibited a significant decrease in peak latency, reflecting an acceleration of intracortical processing of the sound-evoked response. Additionally, multiunit (MU) activity was altered by salicylate; the normally onset/sustained MU response type was transformed into a primarily onset response type in granular and infragranular layers. The results from CSD analysis indicate that salicylate significantly enhances sound-driven response via intracortical circuits

  19. Active Control of Sound Field Using State-Space Model and Feedback Control Theory: a Numerical Simulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhen

    Active sound filed control techniques have received growing attention since they provide alternative solutions to low-frequency sound control, where the conventional passive methods have not been very successful. They have wide industrial and military applications such as noise reduction, room acoustics design, acoustic measurements, underwater acoustic camouflage, etc. An appropriate model of an acoustical system serves as the basis of control law synthesis and active control system design. A classical system model describes the dynamics of an acoustic system in a view of input/output relation through transfer functions. On the other hand, a time-domain based state-space model equivalently describes the system dynamics in terms of internal system variables and provides a direct physical insight of active control of sound. Furthermore, based on a state-space model, one can take advantage of modern control analysis and synthesis tools to design an optimal control system for broadband, global sound absorption. This thesis explores state-space feedback control in unbounded acoustic systems. State-space models are developed for unbounded one-dimensional acoustic systems using a finite-difference method with special boundary treatments. State feedback control algorithms including state estimations are developed using optimal control theory (LQG). Numerical simulation results of the closed-loop system responses demonstrate the optimal performance of active control systems considering the trade-off between the high reflection reduction and limited sensing/actuating power. Two numerical examples, an active underwater sound absorbing coating system, and an active noise control system in a duct, are studied. For the active underwater sound absorbing system, a feedback control system involving two sensors and one actuator is designed. Numerical simulation of the closed-loop response indicates a substantial and broadband reflection (echo) reduction for this design. A variety

  20. Breath sounds

    MedlinePlus

    The lung sounds are best heard with a stethoscope. This is called auscultation. Normal lung sounds occur ... the bottom of the rib cage. Using a stethoscope, the doctor may hear normal breathing sounds, decreased ...

  1. Numerical investigation of sound transmission through double wall cylinders with respect to active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, T. J.; Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.

    Market pressure for more fuel efficient air travel has led to increased use of turboprop and higher bypass turbofan engines. The low frequency components of propeller, jet and boundary layer noise are difficult to attenuate with conventional passive techniques. Weight and geometric restrictions for sound absorbing meterials limit the amount and type of treatment that may be applied. An active noise control (ANC) method is providing to be an attractive alternative. The approach taken in this paper uses a numerical finite/boundary element method (FEM/BEM) that may be easilty adapted to arbitrary geometries. A double walled cylinder is modeled using commercially available software. The outer shell is modeled as an aluminum cylinder, similar to that of aircraft skins. The inner shell is modeled as a composite material representative of a lightweight, stiff trim panel. Two different inner shell materials are used. The first is representative of current trim structure, the second a much stiffer composite. The primary source is generated by an exterior acoustic monopole. Control fields are generated using normal force inputs to the inner cylindrical shell. A linear least mean square (LMS) algorithm is used to determine amplitudes of control forces that minimize the interior acoustic field. Coupling of acoustic and structural modes and noise reductions are discussed for each of the inner shell materials.

  2. Numerical investigation of sound transmission through double wall cylinders with respect to active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, T. J.; Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.

    1993-01-01

    Market pressure for more fuel efficient air travel has led to increased use of turboprop and higher bypass turbofan engines. The low frequency components of propeller, jet and boundary layer noise are difficult to attenuate with conventional passive techniques. Weight and geometric restrictions for sound absorbing meterials limit the amount and type of treatment that may be applied. An active noise control (ANC) method is providing to be an attractive alternative. The approach taken in this paper uses a numerical finite/boundary element method (FEM/BEM) that may be easilty adapted to arbitrary geometries. A double walled cylinder is modeled using commercially available software. The outer shell is modeled as an aluminum cylinder, similar to that of aircraft skins. The inner shell is modeled as a composite material representative of a lightweight, stiff trim panel. Two different inner shell materials are used. The first is representative of current trim structure, the second a much stiffer composite. The primary source is generated by an exterior acoustic monopole. Control fields are generated using normal force inputs to the inner cylindrical shell. A linear least mean square (LMS) algorithm is used to determine amplitudes of control forces that minimize the interior acoustic field. Coupling of acoustic and structural modes and noise reductions are discussed for each of the inner shell materials.

  3. Effects of Active and Passive Hearing Protection Devices on Sound Source Localization, Speech Recognition, and Tone Detection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Andrew D; Beemer, Brianne T; Greene, Nathaniel T; Argo, Theodore; Meegan, G Douglas; Tollin, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Hearing protection devices (HPDs) such as earplugs offer to mitigate noise exposure and reduce the incidence of hearing loss among persons frequently exposed to intense sound. However, distortions of spatial acoustic information and reduced audibility of low-intensity sounds caused by many existing HPDs can make their use untenable in high-risk (e.g., military or law enforcement) environments where auditory situational awareness is imperative. Here we assessed (1) sound source localization accuracy using a head-turning paradigm, (2) speech-in-noise recognition using a modified version of the QuickSIN test, and (3) tone detection thresholds using a two-alternative forced-choice task. Subjects were 10 young normal-hearing males. Four different HPDs were tested (two active, two passive), including two new and previously untested devices. Relative to unoccluded (control) performance, all tested HPDs significantly degraded performance across tasks, although one active HPD slightly improved high-frequency tone detection thresholds and did not degrade speech recognition. Behavioral data were examined with respect to head-related transfer functions measured using a binaural manikin with and without tested HPDs in place. Data reinforce previous reports that HPDs significantly compromise a variety of auditory perceptual facilities, particularly sound localization due to distortions of high-frequency spectral cues that are important for the avoidance of front-back confusions. PMID:26313145

  4. Effects of Active and Passive Hearing Protection Devices on Sound Source Localization, Speech Recognition, and Tone Detection

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew D.; Beemer, Brianne T.; Greene, Nathaniel T.; Argo, Theodore; Meegan, G. Douglas; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Hearing protection devices (HPDs) such as earplugs offer to mitigate noise exposure and reduce the incidence of hearing loss among persons frequently exposed to intense sound. However, distortions of spatial acoustic information and reduced audibility of low-intensity sounds caused by many existing HPDs can make their use untenable in high-risk (e.g., military or law enforcement) environments where auditory situational awareness is imperative. Here we assessed (1) sound source localization accuracy using a head-turning paradigm, (2) speech-in-noise recognition using a modified version of the QuickSIN test, and (3) tone detection thresholds using a two-alternative forced-choice task. Subjects were 10 young normal-hearing males. Four different HPDs were tested (two active, two passive), including two new and previously untested devices. Relative to unoccluded (control) performance, all tested HPDs significantly degraded performance across tasks, although one active HPD slightly improved high-frequency tone detection thresholds and did not degrade speech recognition. Behavioral data were examined with respect to head-related transfer functions measured using a binaural manikin with and without tested HPDs in place. Data reinforce previous reports that HPDs significantly compromise a variety of auditory perceptual facilities, particularly sound localization due to distortions of high-frequency spectral cues that are important for the avoidance of front-back confusions. PMID:26313145

  5. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    reduction of bluff-body noise. Xiaoyu Wang and Xiaofeng Sun discuss the interaction of fan stator and acoustic treatments using the transfer element method. S Saito and his colleagues in JAXA report the development of active devices for reducing helicopter noise. The paper by A Tamura and M Tsutahara proposes a brand new methodology for aerodynamic sound by applying the lattice Boltzmann finite difference method. As the method solves the fluctuation of air density directly, it has the advantage of not requiring modeling of the sound generation. M A Langthjem and M Nakano solve the hole-tone feedback cycle in jet flow by a numerical method. Y Ogami and S Akishita propose the application of a line-vortex method to the three-dimensional separated flow from a bluff body. I hope that a second issue on aerodynamic sound will be published in FDR in the not too distant future.

  6. Potential explanation of limb combination performance differences for two-limb coordination tasks

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Kento; Muraoka, Tetsuro; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Rhythmic two-limb coordinated movements in the sagittal plane are variable and inaccurate when the movements are in the opposite direction as compared with those in the same direction (directional constraint). The magnitude of directional constraint depends on the particular limb combination. It is prominent in ipsilateral hand-foot coordination, but minimal in bimanual hand coordination. The reason for such differences remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the possible mechanisms underlying the production of the difference that depend on limb combination. Subjects performed two-limb rhythmic coordinated movements either in the same or in the opposite direction for three separate limb combinations (bilateral hands, contralateral hand and foot, and ipsilateral hand and foot). For each combination two different tasks were performed. In the first condition, subjects actively moved two limbs (active condition). Second, subjects actively moved one limb in coordination with a passively moved limb (passive condition). In the active condition, the directional constraint was dependent upon the limb combination, as reported in previous studies; the directional constraint was quite prominent in ipsilateral combinations, intermediate in contralateral combinations, and minimal for bilateral combination. However, differences in the directional constraint did not depend on limb combination for any combination in the passive conditions which apparently utilized closed-loop control. In other word, the difference depending on limb combination disappeared when control strategies become uniformly closed-loop. Thus, we speculate that the control strategy utilized depends on limb combination in the active condition. Additionally, different mechanisms other than closed-loop control also would have influence depending on the particular limb combination. This may result in differences in performance depending upon the limb combination. PMID:25713327

  7. Protease-Activated Receptor (PAR)2, but Not PAR1, Is Involved in Collateral Formation and Anti-Inflammatory Monocyte Polarization in a Mouse Hind Limb Ischemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Nossent, Anne Yael; van Oeveren-Rietdijk, Annemarie M.; de Vries, Margreet R.; Spek, C. Arnold; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Hamming, Jaap F.; de Boer, Hetty C.; Versteeg, Henri H.; Quax, Paul H. A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims In collateral development (i.e. arteriogenesis), mononuclear cells are important and exist as a heterogeneous population consisting of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory/repair-associated cells. Protease-activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR2 are G-protein-coupled receptors that are both expressed by mononuclear cells and are involved in pro-inflammatory reactions, while PAR2 also plays a role in repair-associated responses. Here, we investigated the physiological role of PAR1 and PAR2 in arteriogenesis in a murine hind limb ischemia model. Methods and Results PAR1-deficient (PAR1-/-), PAR2-deficient (PAR2-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent femoral artery ligation. Laser Doppler measurements revealed reduced post-ischemic blood flow recovery in PAR2-/- hind limbs when compared to WT, while PAR1-/- mice were not affected. Upon ischemia, reduced numbers of smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive collaterals and CD31-positive capillaries were found in PAR2-/- mice when compared to WT mice, whereas these parameters in PAR1-/- mice did not differ from WT mice. The pool of circulating repair-associated (Ly6C-low) monocytes and the number of repair-associated (CD206-positive) macrophages surrounding collaterals in the hind limbs were increased in WT and PAR1-/- mice, but unaffected in PAR2-/- mice. The number of repair-associated macrophages in PAR2-/- hind limbs correlated with CD11b- and CD115-expression on the circulating monocytes in these animals, suggesting that monocyte extravasation and M-CSF-dependent differentiation into repair-associated cells are hampered. Conclusion PAR2, but not PAR1, is involved in arteriogenesis and promotes the repair-associated response in ischemic tissues. Therefore, PAR2 potentially forms a new pro-arteriogenic target in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. PMID:23637930

  8. Hair cells use active zones with different voltage dependence of Ca2+ influx to decompose sounds into complementary neural codes.

    PubMed

    Ohn, Tzu-Lun; Rutherford, Mark A; Jing, Zhizi; Jung, Sangyong; Duque-Afonso, Carlos J; Hoch, Gerhard; Picher, Maria Magdalena; Scharinger, Anja; Strenzke, Nicola; Moser, Tobias

    2016-08-01

    For sounds of a given frequency, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) with different thresholds and dynamic ranges collectively encode the wide range of audible sound pressures. Heterogeneity of synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and SGNs is an attractive candidate mechanism for generating complementary neural codes covering the entire dynamic range. Here, we quantified active zone (AZ) properties as a function of AZ position within mouse IHCs by combining patch clamp and imaging of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx and by immunohistochemistry. We report substantial AZ heterogeneity whereby the voltage of half-maximal activation of Ca(2+) influx ranged over ∼20 mV. Ca(2+) influx at AZs facing away from the ganglion activated at weaker depolarizations. Estimates of AZ size and Ca(2+) channel number were correlated and larger when AZs faced the ganglion. Disruption of the deafness gene GIPC3 in mice shifted the activation of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx to more hyperpolarized potentials and increased the spontaneous SGN discharge. Moreover, Gipc3 disruption enhanced Ca(2+) influx and exocytosis in IHCs, reversed the spatial gradient of maximal Ca(2+) influx in IHCs, and increased the maximal firing rate of SGNs at sound onset. We propose that IHCs diversify Ca(2+) channel properties among AZs and thereby contribute to decomposing auditory information into complementary representations in SGNs. PMID:27462107

  9. Sound Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Leanne, Ed.; And Others

    Sound symbolism is the study of the relationship between the sound of an utterance and its meaning. In this interdisciplinary collection of new studies, 24 leading scholars discuss the role of sound symbolism in a theory of language. Contributions and authors include the following: "Sound-Symbolic Processes" (Leanne Hinton, Johanna Nichols, John…

  10. Vocalisation Repertoire of Female Bluefin Gurnard (Chelidonichthys kumu) in Captivity: Sound Structure, Context and Vocal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Craig A.; Ghazali, Shahriman M.; Montgomery, John C.; Jeffs, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    Fish vocalisation is often a major component of underwater soundscapes. Therefore, interpretation of these soundscapes requires an understanding of the vocalisation characteristics of common soniferous fish species. This study of captive female bluefin gurnard, Chelidonichthys kumu, aims to formally characterise their vocalisation sounds and daily pattern of sound production. Four types of sound were produced and characterised, twice as many as previously reported in this species. These sounds fit two aural categories; grunt and growl, the mean peak frequencies for which ranged between 129 to 215 Hz. This species vocalized throughout the 24 hour period at an average rate of (18.5 ± 2.0 sounds fish-1 h-1) with an increase in vocalization rate at dawn and dusk. Competitive feeding did not elevate vocalisation as has been found in other gurnard species. Bluefin gurnard are common in coastal waters of New Zealand, Australia and Japan and, given their vocalization rate, are likely to be significant contributors to ambient underwater soundscape in these areas. PMID:26890124

  11. Vocalisation Repertoire of Female Bluefin Gurnard (Chelidonichthys kumu) in Captivity: Sound Structure, Context and Vocal Activity.

    PubMed

    Radford, Craig A; Ghazali, Shahriman M; Montgomery, John C; Jeffs, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    Fish vocalisation is often a major component of underwater soundscapes. Therefore, interpretation of these soundscapes requires an understanding of the vocalisation characteristics of common soniferous fish species. This study of captive female bluefin gurnard, Chelidonichthys kumu, aims to formally characterise their vocalisation sounds and daily pattern of sound production. Four types of sound were produced and characterised, twice as many as previously reported in this species. These sounds fit two aural categories; grunt and growl, the mean peak frequencies for which ranged between 129 to 215 Hz. This species vocalized throughout the 24 hour period at an average rate of (18.5 ± 2.0 sounds fish-1 h-1) with an increase in vocalization rate at dawn and dusk. Competitive feeding did not elevate vocalisation as has been found in other gurnard species. Bluefin gurnard are common in coastal waters of New Zealand, Australia and Japan and, given their vocalization rate, are likely to be significant contributors to ambient underwater soundscape in these areas. PMID:26890124

  12. Auditory learning through active engagement with sound: biological impact of community music lessons in at-risk children

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Nina; Slater, Jessica; Thompson, Elaine C.; Hornickel, Jane; Strait, Dana L.; Nicol, Trent; White-Schwoch, Travis

    2014-01-01

    The young nervous system is primed for sensory learning, facilitating the acquisition of language and communication skills. Social and linguistic impoverishment can limit these learning opportunities, eventually leading to language-related challenges such as poor reading. Music training offers a promising auditory learning strategy by directing attention to meaningful acoustic elements of the soundscape. In light of evidence that music training improves auditory skills and their neural substrates, there are increasing efforts to enact community-based programs to provide music instruction to at-risk children. Harmony Project is a community foundation that has provided free music instruction to over 1000 children from Los Angeles gang-reduction zones over the past decade. We conducted an independent evaluation of biological effects of participating in Harmony Project by following a cohort of children for 1 year. Here we focus on a comparison between students who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training vs. students who took music appreciation classes. All children began with an introductory music appreciation class, but midway through the year half of the children transitioned to the instrumental training. After the year of training, the children who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training had faster and more robust neural processing of speech than the children who stayed in the music appreciation class, observed in neural responses to a speech sound /d/. The neurophysiological measures found to be enhanced in the instrumentally-trained children have been previously linked to reading ability, suggesting a gain in neural processes important for literacy stemming from active auditory learning. Despite intrinsic constraints on our study imposed by a community setting, these findings speak to the potential of active engagement with sound (i.e., music-making) to engender experience-dependent neuroplasticity and may inform the

  13. Auditory learning through active engagement with sound: biological impact of community music lessons in at-risk children.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Nina; Slater, Jessica; Thompson, Elaine C; Hornickel, Jane; Strait, Dana L; Nicol, Trent; White-Schwoch, Travis

    2014-01-01

    The young nervous system is primed for sensory learning, facilitating the acquisition of language and communication skills. Social and linguistic impoverishment can limit these learning opportunities, eventually leading to language-related challenges such as poor reading. Music training offers a promising auditory learning strategy by directing attention to meaningful acoustic elements of the soundscape. In light of evidence that music training improves auditory skills and their neural substrates, there are increasing efforts to enact community-based programs to provide music instruction to at-risk children. Harmony Project is a community foundation that has provided free music instruction to over 1000 children from Los Angeles gang-reduction zones over the past decade. We conducted an independent evaluation of biological effects of participating in Harmony Project by following a cohort of children for 1 year. Here we focus on a comparison between students who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training vs. students who took music appreciation classes. All children began with an introductory music appreciation class, but midway through the year half of the children transitioned to the instrumental training. After the year of training, the children who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training had faster and more robust neural processing of speech than the children who stayed in the music appreciation class, observed in neural responses to a speech sound /d/. The neurophysiological measures found to be enhanced in the instrumentally-trained children have been previously linked to reading ability, suggesting a gain in neural processes important for literacy stemming from active auditory learning. Despite intrinsic constraints on our study imposed by a community setting, these findings speak to the potential of active engagement with sound (i.e., music-making) to engender experience-dependent neuroplasticity and may inform the

  14. Limb Prosthetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... For example, some go skydiving, climb mountains, run marathons, complete triathlons, participate fully in sports, or return ... only for activities at home or for a marathon, the prosthesis can provide profound psychologic benefits. How ...

  15. Critical Limb Ischemia: Reporting Outcomes and Quality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The impetus to pursue quality in limb salvage is high in the current economic environment. This has been spurred on by the diffusion of multiple technologies, the lack of well-defined cost-effectiveness benchmarks, and the paucity of process and structure benchmarks. Furthermore, no national database exists to capture current activity and trends, and lead structure and process changes that could analyze outcomes and improve standards in peripheral interventions for limb salvage. This manuscript examines the challenges in measuring outcomes and quality in limb salvage and explores the components necessary for ensuring quality in limb salvage interventions. PMID:23342183

  16. LIMB PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report covers basic and applied studies concerned with three Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) process objectives: (1) avoiding degradation of collection efficiency in the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) during LIMB, (2) achieving satisfactory sulfur dioxide (SO2)...

  17. Phantom limb pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... limb is still there. This is called phantom sensation. It may feel: Tingly Prickly Numb Hot or ... your missing limb is getting shorter (telescoping) These sensations slowly get weaker and weaker. You should also ...

  18. Sound science-A simple and robust hands-on loudspeaker activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Molly; Stonick, Virginia

    1999-09-01

    This article describes a simple and very robust loudspeaker, comprising nothing more than a cream-cheese tub with lid, a screw, a magnet, wire, and tape. When plugged into a boom-box speaker output, it generates "high-fidelity" sound and much student enthusiasm.

  19. Generalized acoustic energy density based active noise control in single frequency diffuse sound fields.

    PubMed

    Xu, Buye; Sommerfeldt, Scott D

    2014-09-01

    In a diffuse sound field, prior research has established that a secondary source can theoretically achieve perfect cancellation at an error microphone in the far field of the secondary source. However, the sound pressure level is generally only reduced in a small zone around the error sensor, and at a distance half of a wavelength away from the error sensor, the averaged sound pressure level will be increased by more than 10 dB. Recently an acoustic energy quantity, referred to as the generalized acoustic energy density (GED), has been introduced. The GED is obtained by using a weighting factor in the formulation of total acoustic energy density. Different values of the weighting factor can be chosen for different applications. When minimizing the GED at the error sensor, one can adjust the weighting factor to increase the spatial extent of the "quiet zone" and to achieve a desired balance between the degree of attenuation in the quiet zone and the total energy added into the sound field. PMID:25190386

  20. Convergence in Reflex Pathways from Multiple Cutaneous Nerves Innervating the Foot Depends upon the Number of Rhythmically Active Limbs during Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A.; Hundza, Sandra R.; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Neural output from the locomotor system for each arm and leg influences the spinal motoneuronal pools directly and indirectly through interneuronal (IN) reflex networks. While well documented in other species, less is known about the functions and features of convergence in common IN reflex system from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions during remote arm and leg movement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to use spatial facilitation to examine possible convergence in common reflex pathways during rhythmic locomotor limb movements. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked in ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle by stimulating (in random order) the sural nerve (SUR), the distal tibial nerve (TIB), and combined simultaneous stimulation of both nerves (TIB&SUR). Reflexes were evoked while participants performed rhythmic stepping and arm swinging movement with both arms and the leg contralateral to stimulation (ARM&LEG), with just arm movement (ARM) and with just contralateral leg movement (LEG). Stimulation intensities were just below threshold for evoking early latency (<80 ms to peak) reflexes. For each stimulus condition, rectified EMG signals were averaged while participants held static contractions in the stationary (stimulated) leg. During ARM&LEG movement, amplitudes of cutaneous reflexes evoked by combined TIB&SUR stimulation were significantly larger than simple mathematical summation of the amplitudes evoked by SUR or TIB alone. Interestingly, this extra facilitation seen during combined nerve stimulation was significantly reduced when performing ARM or LEG compared to ARM&LEG. We conclude that locomotor rhythmic limb movement induces excitation of common IN reflex pathways from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions. Importantly, activity in this pathway is most facilitated during ARM&LEG movement. These results suggest that transmission in IN reflex pathways is weighted according to the number of limbs directly engaged

  1. Effects of wearing gumboots and leather lace-up boots on lower limb muscle activity when walking on simulated underground coal mine surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Jessica A; Riddiford-Harland, Diane L; Steele, Julie R

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of wearing two standard underground coal mining work boots (a gumboot and a leather lace-up boot) on lower limb muscle activity when participants walked across simulated underground coal mining surfaces. Quadriceps (rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis) and hamstring (biceps femoris, semitendinosus) muscle activity were recorded as twenty male participants walked at a self-selected pace around a circuit while wearing each boot type. The circuit consisted of level, inclined and declined surfaces composed of rocky gravel and hard dirt. Walking in a leather lace-up boot, compared to a gumboot, resulted in increased vastus lateralis and increased biceps femoris muscle activity when walking on sloped surfaces. Increased muscle activity appears to be acting as a slip and/or trip prevention strategy in response to challenging surfaces and changing boot features. PMID:25766420

  2. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    The second part of a three-part series, this article describes sound measurement, effects, and indoor learning activities. Thirty elementary school activities are described with appropriate grade levels specified. (Author/CS)

  3. Congenital limb deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, William R; Coulter, Colleen P; Schmitz, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Congenital limb deficiency disorders (LDDs) are birth defects characterized by the aplasia or hypoplasia of bones of the limbs. Limb deficiencies are classified as transverse, those due to intrauterine disruptions of previously normal limbs, or longitudinal, those that are isolated or associated with certain syndromes as well as chromosomal anomalies. Consultation with a medical geneticist is advisable. Long-term care should occur in a specialized limb deficiency center with expertise in orthopedics, prosthetics, and occupational and physical therapy and provide emotional support and contact with other families. With appropriate care, most children with LDDs can lead productive lives. PMID:26042905

  4. Abdominal sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... during sleep. They also occur normally for a short time after the use of certain medicines and after abdominal surgery. Decreased or absent bowel sounds often indicate constipation. Increased ( hyperactive ) bowel sounds ...

  5. Development and reliability testing of the Comprehensive High-Level Activity Mobility Predictor (CHAMP) in male servicemembers with traumatic lower-limb loss.

    PubMed

    Gailey, Robert S; Gaunaurd, Ignacio A; Raya, Michele A; Roach, Kathryn E; Linberg, Alison A; Campbell, Stuart M; Jayne, Daniel M; Scoville, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The opportunity for wounded servicemembers (SMs) to return to high-level activity and return to duty has improved with advances in surgery, rehabilitation, and prosthetic technology. As a result, there is now a need for a high-level mobility outcome measure to assess progress toward high-level mobility during and after rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to develop and determine the reliability of a new outcome measure called the Comprehensive High-Level Activity Mobility Predictor (CHAMP). The CHAMP consists of the Single Limb Stance, Edgren Side Step Test, T-Test, and Illinois Agility Test. CHAMP reliability was determined for SMs with lower-limb loss (LLL) (interrater: n = 118; test-retest: n = 111) and without LLL ( n = 97). A linear system was developed to combine the CHAMP items and produce a composite score that ranges from 0 to 40, with higher scores indicating better performance. Interrater and test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient values for the CHAMP were 1.0 and 0.97, respectively. A CHAMP score equal to or greater than 33 points is within the range for SMs without LLL. The CHAMP was found to be a safe and reliable measure of high-level mobility in SMs with traumatic LLL. PMID:24301428

  6. Modeling the Transmission of Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Introduces a functional model of sound transmission through solids and gases. Describes procedures of an activity to model how sound travels faster through solid materials than gases. Use dominoes to represent the particles of solids and gases. (KHR)

  7. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    Part one of a three-part series about noise pollution and its effects on humans. This section presents the background information for teachers who are preparing a unit on sound. The next issues will offer learning activities for measuring the effects of sound and some references. (SA)

  8. Effects of anthropogenic sound on digging behavior, metabolism, Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ATPase activity, and metabolism-related gene expression of the bivalve Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Zhao, Xinguo; Liu, Saixi; Shi, Wei; Han, Yu; Guo, Cheng; Jiang, Jingang; Wan, Haibo; Shen, Tiedong; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic sound has increased significantly in the past decade. However, only a few studies to date have investigated its effects on marine bivalves, with little known about the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms. In the present study, the effects of different types, frequencies, and intensities of anthropogenic sounds on the digging behavior of razor clams (Sinonovacula constricta) were investigated. The results showed that variations in sound intensity induced deeper digging. Furthermore, anthropogenic sound exposure led to an alteration in the O:N ratios and the expression of ten metabolism-related genes from the glycolysis, fatty acid biosynthesis, tryptophan metabolism, and Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle (TCA cycle) pathways. Expression of all genes under investigation was induced upon exposure to anthropogenic sound at ~80 dB re 1 μPa and repressed at ~100 dB re 1 μPa sound. In addition, the activity of Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-ATPase in the feet tissues, which is directly related to muscular contraction and subsequently to digging behavior, was also found to be affected by anthropogenic sound intensity. The findings suggest that sound may be perceived by bivalves as changes in the water particle motion and lead to the subsequent reactions detected in razor clams. PMID:27063002

  9. Effects of anthropogenic sound on digging behavior, metabolism, Ca2+/Mg2+ ATPase activity, and metabolism-related gene expression of the bivalve Sinonovacula constricta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chao; Zhao, Xinguo; Liu, Saixi; Shi, Wei; Han, Yu; Guo, Cheng; Jiang, Jingang; Wan, Haibo; Shen, Tiedong; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic sound has increased significantly in the past decade. However, only a few studies to date have investigated its effects on marine bivalves, with little known about the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms. In the present study, the effects of different types, frequencies, and intensities of anthropogenic sounds on the digging behavior of razor clams (Sinonovacula constricta) were investigated. The results showed that variations in sound intensity induced deeper digging. Furthermore, anthropogenic sound exposure led to an alteration in the O:N ratios and the expression of ten metabolism-related genes from the glycolysis, fatty acid biosynthesis, tryptophan metabolism, and Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle (TCA cycle) pathways. Expression of all genes under investigation was induced upon exposure to anthropogenic sound at ~80 dB re 1 μPa and repressed at ~100 dB re 1 μPa sound. In addition, the activity of Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase in the feet tissues, which is directly related to muscular contraction and subsequently to digging behavior, was also found to be affected by anthropogenic sound intensity. The findings suggest that sound may be perceived by bivalves as changes in the water particle motion and lead to the subsequent reactions detected in razor clams.

  10. Effects of anthropogenic sound on digging behavior, metabolism, Ca2+/Mg2+ ATPase activity, and metabolism-related gene expression of the bivalve Sinonovacula constricta

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chao; Zhao, Xinguo; Liu, Saixi; Shi, Wei; Han, Yu; Guo, Cheng; Jiang, Jingang; Wan, Haibo; Shen, Tiedong; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic sound has increased significantly in the past decade. However, only a few studies to date have investigated its effects on marine bivalves, with little known about the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms. In the present study, the effects of different types, frequencies, and intensities of anthropogenic sounds on the digging behavior of razor clams (Sinonovacula constricta) were investigated. The results showed that variations in sound intensity induced deeper digging. Furthermore, anthropogenic sound exposure led to an alteration in the O:N ratios and the expression of ten metabolism-related genes from the glycolysis, fatty acid biosynthesis, tryptophan metabolism, and Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle (TCA cycle) pathways. Expression of all genes under investigation was induced upon exposure to anthropogenic sound at ~80 dB re 1 μPa and repressed at ~100 dB re 1 μPa sound. In addition, the activity of Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase in the feet tissues, which is directly related to muscular contraction and subsequently to digging behavior, was also found to be affected by anthropogenic sound intensity. The findings suggest that sound may be perceived by bivalves as changes in the water particle motion and lead to the subsequent reactions detected in razor clams. PMID:27063002

  11. Physiographic and land cover attributes of the Puget Lowland and the active streamflow gaging network, Puget Sound Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Christopher; Sevier, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Geospatial information for the active streamflow gaging network in the Puget Sound Basin was compiled to support regional monitoring of stormwater effects to small streams. The compilation includes drainage area boundaries and physiographic and land use attributes that affect hydrologic processes. Three types of boundaries were used to tabulate attributes: Puget Sound Watershed Characterization analysis units (AU); the drainage area of active streamflow gages; and the catchments of Regional Stream Monitoring Program (RSMP) sites. The active streamflow gaging network generally includes sites that represent the ranges of attributes for lowland AUs, although there are few sites with low elevations (less than 60 meters), low precipitation (less than 1 meter year), or high stream density (greater than 5 kilometers per square kilometers). The active streamflow gaging network can serve to provide streamflow information in some AUs and RSMP sites, particularly where the streamflow gage measures streamflow generated from a part of the AU or that drains to the RSMP site, and that part of the AU or RSMP site is a significant fraction of the drainage area of the streamgage. The maximum fraction of each AU or RSMP catchment upstream of a streamflow gage and the maximum fraction of any one gaged basin in an AU or RSMP along with corresponding codes are provided in the attribute tables.

  12. Electroacupuncture pretreatment prevents cognitive impairment induced by limb ischemia-reperfusion via inhibition of microglial activation and attenuation of oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Zhou, Jun; Li, Jun; Yang, Shi-Bin; Mo, Li-Qun; Hu, Jie-Hui; Yuan, Wan-Li

    2012-01-13

    Limb ischemia-reperfusion (LI/R) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, critical trauma survivors can present cognitive impairment. Cognitive function, survival rate, oxidative stress and neuronal health were examined to elucidate (1) the magnitude of cognitive effects of prolonged reperfusion, (2) potential players in the mechanistic pathway mediating such effects, and (3) possible benefits of electroacupuncture (EA) pretreatment at Baihui (GV20), Yanglingquan (GB34), Taichong (LR3), Zusanli (ST36) and Xuehai (SP10) acupoints. LI/R was induced in rats by placing a rubber tourniquet on each hind limb for 3h, and the animals were evaluated periodically for 7d after LI/R. Rats subjected to LI/R had significantly lower survival rates, and displayed evidence of brain injury and cognitive dysfunction (as determined by the Morris water maze test) 1d and 3d after reperfusion compared to sham-operated controls. LI/R also resulted in higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA), microglial activation, and decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity within Cornu Ammonis area 1 (CA1) of the hippocampus. Depressed survival rates, microglial activation, oxidative damage, and histological changes, as well as cognitive dysfunction were partially or fully attenuated in rats that received 14d of EA prior to LI/R. These findings indicate that LI/R can result in cognitive dysfunction related to activated microglia and elevated oxidative stress, and that EA has neuroprotective potential mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of microglial activation and attenuation of oxidative stress. PMID:22129788

  13. Development of Activity-Related Muscle Fatigue during Robot-Mediated Upper Limb Rehabilitation Training in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis: A Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Robot-assisted rehabilitation facilitates high-intensity training of the impaired upper limb in neurological rehabilitation. It has been clinically observed that persons with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) have difficulties in sustaining the training intensity during a session due to the development of activity-related muscle fatigue. An experimental observational pilot study was conducted to examine whether or not the muscle fatigue develops in MS patients during one session of robot-assisted training within a virtual learning environment. Six MS patients with upper limb impairment (motricity index ranging from 50 to 91/100) and six healthy persons completed five training bouts of three minutes each performing lifting tasks, while EMG signals of anterior deltoid and lower trapezius muscles were measured and their subjective perceptions on muscle fatigue were registered. Decreased performance and higher subjective fatigue perception were present in the MS group. Increased mean EMG amplitudes and subjective perception levels on muscle fatigue were observed in both groups. Muscle fatigue development during 15′ training has been demonstrated in the arm of MS patients, which influences the sustainability of training intensity in MS patients. To optimize the training performance, adaptivity based on the detection of MS patient's muscle fatigue could be provided by means of training program adjustment. PMID:26090229

  14. Cortical regions activated by the subjective sense of perceptual coherence of environmental sounds: a proposal for a neuroscience of intuition.

    PubMed

    Volz, Kirsten G; Rübsamen, Rudolf; von Cramon, D Yves

    2008-09-01

    According to the Oxford English Dictionary, intuition is "the ability to understand or know something immediately, without conscious reasoning." In other words, people continuously, without conscious attention, recognize patterns in the stream of sensations that impinge upon them. The result is a vague perception of coherence, which subsequently biases thought and behavior accordingly. Within the visual domain, research using paradigms with difficult recognition has suggested that the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) serves as a fast detector and predictor of potential content that utilizes coarse facets of the input. To investigate whether the OFC is crucial in biasing task-specific processing, and hence subserves intuitive judgments in various modalities, we used a difficult-recognition paradigm in the auditory domain. Participants were presented with short sequences of distorted, nonverbal, environmental sounds and had to perform a sound categorization task. Imaging results revealed rostral medial OFC activation for such auditory intuitive coherence judgments. By means of a conjunction analysis between the present results and those from a previous study on visual intuitive coherence judgments, the rostral medial OFC was shown to be activated via both modalities. We conclude that rostral OFC activation during intuitive coherence judgments subserves the detection of potential content on the basis of only coarse facets of the input. PMID:18814468

  15. Global navigation satellite sounding of the atmosphere and GNSS altimetry : prospects for geosciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, Tom P.; Hajj, George A.

    2003-01-01

    The vast illuminating power of the Global Positioning System (GPS), which transformed space geodesy in the 199Os, is now serving to probe the earth's fluid envelope in unique ways. Three distinct techniques have emerged: ground-based sensing of the integrated atmospheric moisture; space-based profiling of atmospheric refractivity, pressure, temperature, moisture, and other properties by active limb sounding; and surface (ocean and ice) altimetry and scatterometry with reflected signals detected from space. Ground-based GPS moisture sensing is already in provisional use for numerical weather prediction. Limb sounding, while less mature, offers a bevy of attractions, including high accuracy, stability, and vertical resolution; all-weather operation; and exceptionally low cost. GPS bistatic radar, r 'reflectometry,' is the least advanced but shows promise for a number of niche applications.

  16. Slow Movements of Bio-Inspired Limbs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babikian, Sarine; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.; Kanso, Eva

    2016-05-01

    Slow and accurate finger and limb movements are essential to daily activities, but the underlying mechanics is relatively unexplored. Here, we develop a mathematical framework to examine slow movements of tendon-driven limbs that are produced by modulating the tendons' stiffness parameters. Slow limb movements are driftless in the sense that movement stops when actuations stop. We demonstrate, in the context of a planar tendon-driven system representing a finger, that the control of stiffness suffices to produce stable and accurate limb postures and quasi-static (slow) transitions among them. We prove, however, that stable postures are achievable only when tendons are pretensioned, i.e., they cannot become slack. Our results further indicate that a non-smoothness in slow movements arises because the precision with which individual stiffnesses need to be altered changes substantially throughout the limb's motion.

  17. National Report Germany: Sounding Rocket and Balloon Research Activities Supported by the German Space Programme in 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, R.; Gritzner, C.; Friedrichs, D.

    2015-09-01

    Mainly sounding rockets but also stratospheric balloons have played a crucial role in implementing the German Space Programme since many years. Research activities were conducted in the fields of Microgravity Research, Space Science, Earth Observation, Space Technology Development, and Education. Currently, the mesosphere and ionosphere of the Earth and the photosphere and chromosphere of the Sun are in the focus of German research activities in the field of Space Science. Microgravity related topics are studied in the disciplines of Life and Physical Sciences during ballistic TEXUS and MAPHEUS rocket flights. A lot of student activities are currently supported by the agencies SNSB and DLR under the auspices of the Swedish-German programme REXUS/BEXUS.

  18. Influence of complementing a robotic upper limb rehabilitation system with video games on the engagement of the participants: a study focusing on muscle activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Chong; Rusák, Zoltán; Horváth, Imre; Ji, Linhong

    2014-12-01

    Efficacious stroke rehabilitation depends not only on patients' medical treatment but also on their motivation and engagement during rehabilitation exercises. Although traditional rehabilitation exercises are often mundane, technology-assisted upper-limb robotic training can provide engaging and task-oriented training in a natural environment. The factors that influence engagement, however, are not fully understood. This paper therefore studies the relationship between engagement and muscle activities as well as the influencing factors of engagement. To this end, an experiment was conducted using a robotic upper limb rehabilitation system with healthy individuals in three training exercises: (a) a traditional exercise, which is typically used for training the grasping function, (b) a tracking exercise, currently used in robot-assisted stroke patient rehabilitation for fine motor movement, and (c) a video game exercise, which is a proliferating approach of robot-assisted rehabilitation enabling high-level active engagement of stroke patients. These exercises differ not only in the characteristics of the motion that they use but also in their method of triggering engagement. To measure the level of engagement, we used facial expressions, motion analysis of the arm movements, and electromyography. The results show that (a) the video game exercise could engage the participants for a longer period than the other two exercises, (b) the engagement level decreased when the participants became too familiar with the exercises, and (c) analysis of normalized root mean square in electromyographic data indicated that muscle activities were more intense when the participants are engaged. This study shows that several sub-factors on engagement, such as versatility of feedback, cognitive tasks, and competitiveness, may influence engagement more than the others. To maintain a high level of engagement, the rehabilitation system needs to be adaptive, providing different exercises to

  19. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  20. Human amygdala activation by the sound produced during dental treatment: A fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Kun-Che; Hong, Hsiang-Hsi; Kuo, Song-Bor; Wu, Chung-De; Wai, Yau-Yau; Chen, Yi-Fen; Peng, Ying-Chin

    2015-01-01

    During dental treatments, patients may experience negative emotions associated with the procedure. This study was conducted with the aim of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to visualize cerebral cortical stimulation among dental patients in response to auditory stimuli produced by ultrasonic scaling and power suction equipment. Subjects (n = 7) aged 23-35 years were recruited for this study. All were right-handed and underwent clinical pure-tone audiometry testing to reveal a normal hearing threshold below 20 dB hearing level (HL). As part of the study, subjects initially underwent a dental calculus removal treatment. During the treatment, subjects were exposed to ultrasonic auditory stimuli originating from the scaling handpiece and salivary suction instruments. After dental treatment, subjects were imaged with fMRI while being exposed to recordings of the noise from the same dental instrument so that cerebral cortical stimulation in response to aversive auditory stimulation could be observed. The independent sample confirmatory t-test was used. Subjects also showed stimulation in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, indicating that the ultrasonic auditory stimuli elicited an unpleasant response in the subjects. Patients experienced unpleasant sensations caused by contact stimuli in the treatment procedure. In addition, this study has demonstrated that aversive auditory stimuli such as sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece also cause aversive emotions. This study was indicated by observed stimulation of the auditory cortex as well as the amygdala, indicating that noise from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece was perceived as an aversive auditory stimulus by the subjects. Subjects can experience unpleasant sensations caused by the sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece based on their auditory stimuli. PMID:26356376

  1. Human amygdala activation by the sound produced during dental treatment: A fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Kun-Che; Hong, Hsiang-Hsi; Kuo, Song-Bor; Wu, Chung-De; Wai, Yau-Yau; Chen, Yi-Fen; Peng, Ying-Chin

    2015-01-01

    During dental treatments, patients may experience negative emotions associated with the procedure. This study was conducted with the aim of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to visualize cerebral cortical stimulation among dental patients in response to auditory stimuli produced by ultrasonic scaling and power suction equipment. Subjects (n = 7) aged 23-35 years were recruited for this study. All were right-handed and underwent clinical pure-tone audiometry testing to reveal a normal hearing threshold below 20 dB hearing level (HL). As part of the study, subjects initially underwent a dental calculus removal treatment. During the treatment, subjects were exposed to ultrasonic auditory stimuli originating from the scaling handpiece and salivary suction instruments. After dental treatment, subjects were imaged with fMRI while being exposed to recordings of the noise from the same dental instrument so that cerebral cortical stimulation in response to aversive auditory stimulation could be observed. The independent sample confirmatory t-test was used. Subjects also showed stimulation in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, indicating that the ultrasonic auditory stimuli elicited an unpleasant response in the subjects. Patients experienced unpleasant sensations caused by contact stimuli in the treatment procedure. In addition, this study has demonstrated that aversive auditory stimuli such as sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece also cause aversive emotions. This study was indicated by observed stimulation of the auditory cortex as well as the amygdala, indicating that noise from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece was perceived as an aversive auditory stimulus by the subjects. Subjects can experience unpleasant sensations caused by the sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece based on their auditory stimuli. PMID:26356376

  2. Prevalence of Hypertension in HIV/AIDS Patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) Compared with HAART-Naïve Patients at the Limbe Regional Hospital, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Dimala, Christian Akem; Atashili, Julius; Mbuagbaw, Josephine C.; Wilfred, Akam; Monekosso, Gottlieb L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has greatly reduced the morbidity and mortality of HIV/AIDS patients but has also been associated with increased metabolic complications and cardiovascular diseases. Data on the association between HAART and hypertension (HTN) in Africa are scarce. Objectives Primarily to compare the prevalence of HTN in HIV/AIDS patients on HAART and HAART-naïve patients in Limbe, Cameroon; and secondarily to assess other socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with HTN in this population. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Limbe Regional Hospital HIV treatment center between April and June 2013, involving 200 HIV/AIDS patients (100 on first-line HAART regimens for at least 12 months matched by age and sex to 100 HAART-naïve patients). HTN was defined as a systolic blood pressure (BP) ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg. Results The prevalence of HTN in patients on HAART was twice (38%; 95% CI: 28.5–48.3) that of the HAART-naïve patients (19%; 95% CI, 11.8–28.1), p = 0.003. In multivariate analyses adjusted for age, gender, smoking, family history of HTN, and BMI-defined overweight, HAART was associated with HTN, the adjusted odds ratio of the HAART-treated versus HAART-naïve group was 2.20 (95% CI: 1.07–4.52), p = 0.032. HTN was associated with older age and male gender, in the HAART group and with BMI-defined overweight in the HAART-naïve group. Conclusion The prevalence of hypertension in HIV/AIDS patients in Limbe stands out to be elevated, higher in patients on HAART compared to those not on treatment. Blood pressure and cardiovascular risk factors should be routinely monitored. Other factors such as diet, weight control and physical exercise should also be considered. PMID:26862763

  3. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  4. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Mitigation Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  5. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  6. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-15

    The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

  7. The Effects of Inclination (Up and Down) of the Treadmill on the Electromyogram Activities of the Forelimb and Hind limb Muscles at a Walk and a Trot in Thoroughbred Horses

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; MATSUI, Akira; MUKAI, Kazutaka; OHMURA, Hajime; HIRAGA, Atsushi; AIDA, Hiroko

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is important to know the effects of the inclination of a slope on the activity of each muscle, because training by running on a sloped track is commonly used for Thoroughbred racehorses. The effects of incline (from −6 to +6%) on the forelimbs and hind limbs during walking and trotting on a treadmill were evaluated by an integrated electromyogram (iEMG). The muscle activities in the forelimbs (5 horses) and hind limbs (4 horses) were measured separately. Two stainless steel wires were inserted into each of the brachiocephalicus (Bc), biceps brachii (BB), splenius (Sp), and pectoralis descendens (PD) in the forelimb experiment and into the longissimus dorsi (LD), vastus lateralis (VL), gluteus medius (GM), and biceps femoris (BF) in the hind limb experiment. The EMG recordings were taken at a sampling rate of 1,000 Hz. At a walk, the iEMG values for the forelimb were not significantly different under any of the inclinations. In the hind limb, the iEMG values for the GM and BF significantly decreased as the inclination decreased. At a trot, the iEMG values for the Bc in the forelimb significantly decreased as the inclination of the treadmill decreased. In the hind limb, the iEMG values for the LD, GM, and BF significantly decreased as the inclination decreased. Uphill exercise increased the iEMG values for the Bc, LD, GM, and BF, while downhill exercise resulted in little increase in the iEMG values. It was concluded that the effects of inclination on the muscle activities were larger for the uphill exercises, and for the hind limb muscles compared with the forelimb muscles. PMID:25558180

  8. The Effects of Inclination (Up and Down) of the Treadmill on the Electromyogram Activities of the Forelimb and Hind limb Muscles at a Walk and a Trot in Thoroughbred Horses.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Matsui, Akira; Mukai, Kazutaka; Ohmura, Hajime; Hiraga, Atsushi; Aida, Hiroko

    2014-01-01

    It is important to know the effects of the inclination of a slope on the activity of each muscle, because training by running on a sloped track is commonly used for Thoroughbred racehorses. The effects of incline (from -6 to +6%) on the forelimbs and hind limbs during walking and trotting on a treadmill were evaluated by an integrated electromyogram (iEMG). The muscle activities in the forelimbs (5 horses) and hind limbs (4 horses) were measured separately. Two stainless steel wires were inserted into each of the brachiocephalicus (Bc), biceps brachii (BB), splenius (Sp), and pectoralis descendens (PD) in the forelimb experiment and into the longissimus dorsi (LD), vastus lateralis (VL), gluteus medius (GM), and biceps femoris (BF) in the hind limb experiment. The EMG recordings were taken at a sampling rate of 1,000 Hz. At a walk, the iEMG values for the forelimb were not significantly different under any of the inclinations. In the hind limb, the iEMG values for the GM and BF significantly decreased as the inclination decreased. At a trot, the iEMG values for the Bc in the forelimb significantly decreased as the inclination of the treadmill decreased. In the hind limb, the iEMG values for the LD, GM, and BF significantly decreased as the inclination decreased. Uphill exercise increased the iEMG values for the Bc, LD, GM, and BF, while downhill exercise resulted in little increase in the iEMG values. It was concluded that the effects of inclination on the muscle activities were larger for the uphill exercises, and for the hind limb muscles compared with the forelimb muscles. PMID:25558180

  9. Sounds of marine seeps: a study of bubble activity near a rigid boundary.

    PubMed

    Maksimov, A O; Burov, B A; Salomatin, A S; Chernykh, D V

    2014-09-01

    A passive acoustic method for detecting environmentally dangerous gas leaks from pipelines and methane naturally leaking from the seabed has been investigated. Gas escape involves the formation and release of bubbles of different sizes. Each bubble emits a sound at a specific frequency. Determination of the bubble radius from the frequency of its signature passive acoustic emission by use of so-called Minnaert formula has a restricted area of applicability near the seabed. The point is that the inertial mass and the damping constant of the birthing bubble are markedly different from those of a free bubble. The theoretical model for the bubble volume oscillations near the seabed has been proposed and an analytical solution has been derived. It was shown that the bispherical coordinates provide separation of variables and are more suitable for analysis of the volume oscillations of these constrained bubbles. Explicit formulas have been derived, which describe the dependence of the bubble emission near a rigid wall on its size and the separation distance between the bubble and the boundary. PMID:25190382

  10. Assisting Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Actively Reduces Limb Hyperactive Behavior with a Nintendo Wii Remote Controller through Controlling Environmental Stimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Yeh, Jui-Chi; Shih, Ching-Tien; Chang, Man-Ling

    2011-01-01

    The latest studies have adopted software technology which turns the Wii Remote Controller into a high-performance limb action detector, we assessed whether two persons with multiple disabilities would be able to control an environmental stimulus through limb action. This study extends the functionality of the Wii Remote Controller to the…

  11. A small-conductance Cl- channel in the mouse thick ascending limb that is activated by ATP and protein kinase A.

    PubMed Central

    Guinamard, R; Chraïbi, A; Teulon, J

    1995-01-01

    1. Chloride channels were identified in the basolateral membrane of isolated cortical thick ascending limbs (CTALs) of the mouse nephron by the patch-clamp technique. A channel with a conductance of 45 pS, previously shown to be Cl- selective, was detected in 21% of cell-attached patches when CTAL fragments were pre-incubated with 10 mumol l-4 forskolin for at least 15 min. The same channel was found in only 8.5% of cell-attached patches formed on unstimulated tubules. 2. Another channel with a smaller conductance (7-9 pS) was found in 42.8% of cell-attached patches and 57% of inside-out patches in unstimulated CTAL tubules, but in 82-87% of patches from forskolin-treated tubules. 3. The small channels was Cl- selective (Cl(-)-to-Na+ permeability ratio, PCl/PNa = 9.8) with the permeability sequence: NO3- > Br- > Cl- > F- > gluconate. Channel activity decreased (Br-) or disappeared (NO3-) at negative voltages. At 140 mmol l-1, I- completely inhibited channel activity at all voltages, but a PI/PCl ratio of 1.6 was estimated using a low I- concentration (10 mmol l-1). 4. Internal adenosine triphosphate (ATP) increased normalized current (nPo) in 48% of inside-out patches containing Cl- channels from unstimulated tubules and in 63% of patches from forskolin-treated CTAL tubules. The non-hydrolysable ATP analogue, adenosine 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) did not increase channel activity. 5. Adding the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A to the bath in the presence of ATP increased the activity of the small channel in 58% of inside-out patches from unstimulated tubules, but it had no effect on the 45 pS channel. 6. The Cl- channel blockers 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamine)-benzoic acid (NPPB), 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) or glibenclamide, all at 0.1 mmol l-1, and diphenylamine-2-carboxylic acid (DPC), at 1 mmol l-1, inhibited the small channel activity by 80-100% in inside-out patches. 7. These results indicate that two Cl

  12. Does the sound of a barking dog activate its corresponding visual form? An fMRI investigation of modality-specific semantic access.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Jamie; Garcia, Amanda; Binney, Richard J

    2016-08-01

    Much remains to be learned about the neural architecture underlying word meaning. Fully distributed models of semantic memory predict that the sound of a barking dog will conjointly engage a network of distributed sensorimotor spokes. An alternative framework holds that modality-specific features additionally converge within transmodal hubs. Participants underwent functional MRI while covertly naming familiar objects versus newly learned novel objects from only one of their constituent semantic features (visual form, characteristic sound, or point-light motion representation). Relative to the novel object baseline, familiar concepts elicited greater activation within association regions specific to the presentation modality. Furthermore, visual form elicited activation within high-level auditory association cortex. Conversely, environmental sounds elicited activation in regions proximal to visual association cortex. Both conditions commonly engaged a putative hub region within lateral anterior temporal cortex. These results support hybrid semantic models in which local hubs and distributed spokes are dually engaged in service of semantic memory. PMID:27289210

  13. p75NTR-dependent activation of NF-κB regulates microRNA-503 transcription and pericyte–endothelial crosstalk in diabetes after limb ischaemia

    PubMed Central

    Caporali, Andrea; Meloni, Marco; Nailor, Audrey; Mitić, Tijana; Shantikumar, Saran; Riu, Federica; Sala-Newby, Graciela B.; Rose, Lorraine; Besnier, Marie; Katare, Rajesh; Voellenkle, Christine; Verkade, Paul; Martelli, Fabio; Madeddu, Paolo; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-01-01

    The communication between vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes in the microvasculature is fundamental for vascular growth and homeostasis; however, these processes are disrupted by diabetes. Here we show that modulation of p75NTR expression in ECs exposed to high glucose activates transcription of miR-503, which negatively affects pericyte function. p75NTR activates NF-κB to bind the miR-503 promoter and upregulate miR-503 expression in ECs. NF-κB further induces activation of Rho kinase and shedding of endothelial microparticles carrying miR-503, which transfer miR-503 from ECs to vascular pericytes. The integrin-mediated uptake of miR-503 in the recipient pericytes reduces expression of EFNB2 and VEGFA, resulting in impaired migration and proliferation. We confirm operation of the above mechanisms in mouse models of diabetes, in which EC-derived miR-503 reduces pericyte coverage of capillaries, increased permeability and impaired post-ischaemic angiogenesis in limb muscles. Collectively, our data demonstrate that miR-503 regulates pericyte–endothelial crosstalk in microvascular diabetic complications. PMID:26268439

  14. LIMB demonstration project extension

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-21

    The purpose of the DOE limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension is to extend the data base on LIMB technology and to expand DOE's list of Clean Coal Technologies by demonstrating the Coolside process as part of the project. The main objectives of this project are: to demonstrate the general applicability of LIMB technology by testing 3 coals and 4 sorbents (total of 12 coal/sorbent combinations) at the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant; and to demonstrate that Coolside is a viable technology for improving precipitator performance and reducing sulfur dioxide emissions while acceptable operability is maintained. Progress is reported. 3 figs.

  15. Effects of Listening to Music versus Environmental Sounds in Passive and Active Situations on Levels of Pain and Fatigue in Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Mercadíe, Lolita; Mick, Gérard; Guétin, Stéphane; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    In fibromyalgia, pain symptoms such as hyperalgesia and allodynia are associated with fatigue. Mechanisms underlying such symptoms can be modulated by listening to pleasant music. We expected that listening to music, because of its emotional impact, would have a greater modulating effect on the perception of pain and fatigue in patients with fibromyalgia than listening to nonmusical sounds. To investigate this hypothesis, we carried out a 4-week study in which patients with fibromyalgia listened to either preselected musical pieces or environmental sounds when they experienced pain in active (while carrying out a physical activity) or passive (at rest) situations. Concomitant changes of pain and fatigue levels were evaluated. When patients listened to music or environmental sounds at rest, pain and fatigue levels were significantly reduced after 20 minutes of listening, with no difference of effect magnitude between the two stimuli. This improvement persisted 10 minutes after the end of the listening session. In active situations, pain did not increase in presence of the two stimuli. Contrary to our expectations, music and environmental sounds produced a similar relieving effect on pain and fatigue, with no benefit gained by listening to pleasant music over environmental sounds. PMID:26163741

  16. A Benthic Invertebrate Survey of Jun Jaegyu Volcano: An active undersea volcano in Antarctic Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinones, G.; Brachfeld, S.; Gorring, M.; Prezant, R. S.; Domack, E.

    2005-12-01

    Jun Jaegyu volcano, an Antarctic submarine volcano, was dredged in May 2004 during cruise 04-04 of the RV Laurence M. Gould to determine rock, sediment composition and marine macroinvertebrate diversity. The objectives of this study are to examine the benthic assemblages and biodiversity present on a young volcano. The volcano is located on the continental shelf of the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula, where recent changes in surface temperature and ice shelf stability have been observed. This volcano was originally swath-mapped during cruise 01-07 of the Research Vessel-Ice Breaker Nathaniel B. Palmer. During LMG04-04 we also studied the volcano using a SCUD video camera, and performed temperature surveys along the flanks and crest. Both the video and the dredge indicate a seafloor surface heavily colonized by benthic organisms. Indications of fairly recent lava flows are given by the absence of marine life on regions of the volcano. The recovered dredge material was sieved, and a total of thirty-three invertebrates were extracted. The compilation of invertebrate community data can subsequently be compared to other benthic invertebrate studies conducted along the peninsula, which can determine the regional similarity of communities over time, their relationship to environmental change and health, if any, and their relationship to geologic processes in Antarctic Sound. Twenty-two rock samples, all slightly weathered and half bearing encrusted organisms, were also analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Except for one conglomerate sample, all are alkali basalts and share similar elemental compositions with fresh, unweathered samples from the volcano. Two of the encrusted basalt samples have significantly different compositions than the rest. We speculate this difference could be due to water loss during sample preparation, loss of organic carbon trapped within the vesicles of the samples and/or elemental uptake by the

  17. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water. PMID:23389344

  18. Breath sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rales can be further described as moist, dry, fine, and coarse. Rhonchi. Sounds that resemble snoring. They ... notice them. The following tests may be done: Analysis of a sputum sample ( sputum culture , sputum Gram ...

  19. [Phantom limb pains].

    PubMed

    Giraux, Pascal

    2015-03-01

    With the radical experience of an amputation, the adaptation of body image is often incomplete. Some people experience phantom body perceptions, often painful and difficult to treat, after the amputation of a limb. PMID:26145132

  20. Spectral analysis of ionospheric disturbances in the phase delay and radio signal amplitude at limb paths according to the COSMIC data in periods of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmakov, A. V.; Gorbunov, M. E.

    2016-07-01

    Based on more than 4500 sessions of radio transillumination of Earth's atmosphere along the satellite-atmosphere-satellite path obtained in the COSMIC experiment, the distribution along latitude and over local time of the spatial spectra of variations in the ionospheric phase delay and signal amplitude has been analyzed. The spatial spectra have been calculated for two height ranges, i.e., 60-80 and 80-100 km. In the phase signal spectrum within the height range 80-100 km, the second maximum in the vicinity of a frequency of 7-8 rad/km is clearly seen. Its diurnal and latitudinal behavior and its decrease towards high latitudes in both hemispheres can also be seen. In the height range of 60-80 km, this maximum is hardly observed. Although solar flares can lead to substantial local changes in the electron concentration, no substantial difference in the behavior of the spectral densities of the amplitude and phase delay at long limb paths was observed within these two height ranges on days of active and quiet sun. The latter fact makes it possible to develop a united algorithm of optimal ionospheric correction of the radio occultation data independent of solar activity.

  1. The Sounds of Sentences: Differentiating the Influence of Physical Sound, Sound Imagery, and Linguistically Implied Sounds on Physical Sound Processing.

    PubMed

    Dudschig, Carolin; Mackenzie, Ian Grant; Strozyk, Jessica; Kaup, Barbara; Leuthold, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Both the imagery literature and grounded models of language comprehension emphasize the tight coupling of high-level cognitive processes, such as forming a mental image of something or language understanding, and low-level sensorimotor processes in the brain. In an electrophysiological study, imagery and language processes were directly compared and the sensory associations of processing linguistically implied sounds or imagined sounds were investigated. Participants read sentences describing auditory events (e.g., "The dog barks"), heard a physical (environmental) sound, or had to imagine such a sound. We examined the influence of the 3 sound conditions (linguistic, physical, imagery) on subsequent physical sound processing. Event-related potential (ERP) difference waveforms indicated that in all 3 conditions, prime compatibility influenced physical sound processing. The earliest compatibility effect was observed in the physical condition, starting in the 80-110 ms time interval with a negative maximum over occipital electrode sites. In contrast, the linguistic and the imagery condition elicited compatibility effects starting in the 180-220 ms time window with a maximum over central electrode sites. In line with the ERPs, the analysis of the oscillatory activity showed that compatibility influenced early theta and alpha band power changes in the physical, but not in the linguistic and imagery, condition. These dissociations were further confirmed by dipole localization results showing a clear separation between the source of the compatibility effect in the physical sound condition (superior temporal area) and the source of the compatibility effect triggered by the linguistically implied sounds or the imagined sounds (inferior temporal area). Implications for grounded models of language understanding are discussed. PMID:27473463

  2. Xenopus Limb bud morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Samuel R; Beck, Caroline W

    2016-03-01

    Xenopus laevis, the South African clawed frog, is a well-established model organism for the study of developmental biology and regeneration due to its many advantages for both classical and molecular studies of patterning and morphogenesis. While contemporary studies of limb development tend to focus on models developed from the study of chicken and mouse embryos, there are also many classical studies of limb development in frogs. These include both fate and specification maps, that, due to their age, are perhaps not as widely known or cited as they should be. This has led to some inevitable misinterpretations- for example, it is often said that Xenopus limb buds have no apical ectodermal ridge, a morphological signalling centre located at the distal dorsal/ventral epithelial boundary and known to regulate limb bud outgrowth. These studies are valuable both from an evolutionary perspective, because amphibians diverged early from the amniote lineage, and from a developmental perspective, as amphibian limbs are capable of regeneration. Here, we describe Xenopus limb morphogenesis with reference to both classical and molecular studies, to create a clearer picture of what we know, and what is still mysterious, about this process. PMID:26404044

  3. Distinct temporal spike and local field potential activities in the thalamic parafascicular nucleus of parkinsonian rats during rest and limb movement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Qu, Qingyang; He, Tingting; Li, Min; Song, Zhimin; Chen, Feiyu; Zhang, Xiao; Xie, Jinlu; Geng, Xiwen; Yang, Maoquan; Wang, Xiusong; Lei, Chengdong; Hou, Yabing

    2016-08-25

    Several studies have suggested that the thalamic centromedian-parafascicular (CM/PF or the PF in rodents) is implicated in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, inconsistent changes in the neuronal firing rate and pattern have been reported in parkinsonian animals. To investigate the impact of a dopaminergic cell lesion on PF extracellular discharge in behaving rats, the PF neural activities in the spike and local field potential (LFP) were recorded in unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA) lesioned and neurologically intact control rats during rest and limb movement. During rest, the two PF neuronal subtypes was less spontaneously active, with no difference in the spike firing rates between the control and lesioned rats; only the lesioned rats reshaped their spike firing pattern. Furthermore, the simultaneously recorded LFP in the lesioned rats exhibited a significant increase in power at 12-35 and 35-70Hz and a decrease in power at 0.7-12Hz. During the execution of a voluntary movement, two subtypes of PF neurons were identified by a rapid increase in the discharge activity in both the control and lesioned rats. However, dopamine lesioning was associated with a decrease in neuronal spiking fire rate and reshaping in the firing pattern in the PF. The simultaneously recorded LFP activity exhibited a significant increase in power at 12-35Hz and a decrease in power at 0.7-12Hz compared with the control rats. These findings indicate that 6-OHDA induces modifications in PF spike and LFP activities in rats during rest and movement and suggest that PF dysfunction may be an important contributor to the pathophysiology of parkinsonian motor impairment. PMID:27238892

  4. Field validation of sound mitigation models and air pollutant emission testing in support of missile motor disposal activities.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Palmer, Glenn R; Kordich, Micheal M; Pollet, Dean A; Jensen, James A; Lindsay, Mitchell H

    2005-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense approved activities conducted at the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) include both operational readiness test firing of intercontinental ballistic missile motors as well as the destruction of obsolete or otherwise unusable intercontinental ballistic missile motors through open burn/open detonation (OB/ OD). Within the Utah Division of Air Quality, these activities have been identified as having the potential to generate unacceptable noise levels, as well as significant amounts of hazardous air pollutants. Hill Air Force Base, UT, has completed a series of field tests at the UTTR in which sound-monitoring surveillance of OB/OD activities was conducted to validate the Sound Intensity Prediction System (SIPS) model. Using results generated by the SIPS model to support the decision to detonate, the UTTR successfully disposed of missile motors having an aggregate net explosive weight (NEW) of 56,500 lbs without generating adverse noise levels within populated areas. These results suggest that, under appropriate conditions, missile motors of even larger NEW may be detonated without exceeding regulatory noise limits. In conjunction with collecting noise monitoring data, air quality data was collected to support the development of air emission factors for both static missile motor firings and OB/OD activities. Through the installation of 15 ground-based air samplers, the generation of combustion fixed gases, hazardous air pollutants, and chlorides were monitored during the 56,500-lb NEW detonation event. Comparison of field measurements to predictions generated from the U.S. Navy's energetic combustion pollutant formation model, POLU4WN, indicated that, as the detonation fireball expanded from ground zero, organic compounds as well as carbon monoxide continued to oxidize as the hot gases reacted with ambient air. Hazardous air pollutant analysis of air samplers confirmed the presence of chloromethane, benzene, toluene, 1,2-propadiene, and

  5. Sound Guard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Lubrication technology originally developed for a series of NASA satellites has produced a commercial product for protecting the sound fidelity of phonograph records. Called Sound Guard, the preservative is a spray-on fluid that deposits a microscopically thin protective coating which reduces friction and prevents the hard diamond stylus from wearing away the softer vinyl material of the disc. It is marketed by the Consumer Products Division of Ball Corporation, Muncie, Indiana. The lubricant technology on which Sound Guard is based originated with NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO), an Earth-orbiting satellite designed and built by Ball Brothers Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado, also a division of Ball Corporation. Ball Brothers engineers found a problem early in the OSO program: known lubricants were unsuitable for use on satellite moving parts that would be exposed to the vacuum of space for several months. So the company conducted research on the properties of materials needed for long life in space and developed new lubricants. They worked successfully on seven OSO flights and attracted considerable attention among other aerospace contractors. Ball Brothers now supplies its "Vac Kote" lubricants and coatings to both aerospace and non-aerospace industries and the company has produced several hundred variations of the original technology. Ball Corporation expanded its product line to include consumer products, of which Sound Guard is one of the most recent. In addition to protecting record grooves, Sound Guard's anti-static quality also retards particle accumulation on the stylus. During comparison study by a leading U.S. electronic laboratory, a record not treated by Sound Guard had to be cleaned after 50 plays and the stylus had collected a considerable number of small vinyl particles. The Sound Guard-treated disc was still clean after 100 plays, as was its stylus.

  6. Hydrogen Sulfide Levels and Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) Activity Are Attenuated in the Setting of Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI)

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Kazi N; Polhemus, David J; Donnarumma, Erminia; Brewster, Luke P; Lefer, David J

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystathionine γ-lyase, cystathionine β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase are endogenous enzymatic sources of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Functions of H2S are mediated by several targets including ion channels and signaling proteins. Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 is responsible for the expression of antioxidant response element–regulated genes and is known to be upregulated by H2S. We examined the levels of H2S, H2S-producing enzymes, and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 activation status in skeletal muscle obtained from critical limb ischemia (CLI) patients. Methods and Results Gastrocnemius tissues were attained postamputation from human CLI and healthy control patients. We found mRNA and protein levels of cystathionine γ-lyase, cystathionine β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase were significantly decreased in skeletal muscle of CLI patients as compared to control. H2S and sulfane sulfur levels were significantly decreased in skeletal muscle of CLI patients. We also observed significant reductions in nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 activation as well as antioxidant proteins, such as Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in skeletal muscle of CLI patients. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, such as malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl formation, were significantly increased in skeletal muscle of CLI patients as compared to healthy controls. Conclusions The data demonstrate that H2S bioavailability and nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 activation are both attenuated in CLI tissues concomitant with significantly increased oxidative stress. Reductions in the activity of H2S-producing enzymes may contribute to the pathogenesis of CLI. PMID:25977470

  7. Variation in the emission rate of sounds in a captive group of false killer whales Pseudorca crassidens during feedings: possible food anticipatory vocal activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platto, Sara; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong

    2015-11-01

    This study examines whether a group of captive false killer whales (Pseudorca crassidens ) showed variations in the vocal rate around feeding times. The high level of motivation to express appetitive behaviors in captive animals may lead them to respond with changes of the behavioral activities during the time prior to food deliveries which are referred to as food anticipatory activity. False killer whales at Qingdao Polar Ocean World (Qingdao, China) showed significant variations of the rates of both the total sounds and sound classes (whistles, clicks, and burst pulses) around feedings. Precisely, from the Transition interval that recorded the lowest vocalization rate (3.40 s/m/d), the whales increased their acoustic emissions upon trainers' arrival (13.08 s/m/d). The high rate was maintained or intensified throughout the food delivery (25.12 s/m/d), and then reduced immediately after the animals were fed (9.91 s/m/d). These changes in the false killer whales sound production rates around feeding times supports the hypothesis of the presence of a food anticipatory vocal activity. Although sound rates may not give detailed information regarding referential aspects of the animal communication it might still shed light about the arousal levels of the individuals during different social or environmental conditions. Further experiments should be performed to assess if variations of the time of feeding routines may affect the vocal activity of cetaceans in captivity as well as their welfare.

  8. Comparison of muscular activities in the abdomen and lower limbs while performing sit-up and leg-raise.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kanghoon; Lee, Taesik

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the muscle activities of sit-up and leg-raise. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were healthy students in their 20s. For electromyography of sit-ups and leg-raises in the supine position, 5 muscle groups of the abdomen were selected for the attachment of sensors: the upper and lower rectus abdominis, external oblique, rectus femoris, and the iliopsoas. SPSS 20.0 was used for the statistical analysis. One-way ANOVA with repeated measures of all factors was performed to verify the statistical significance of the measurements taken for the muscle activities and follow-up verification was made with the Bonferroni post hoc test. [Results] Sit-up and leg raise showed a significant difference. The eccentric sit-up exercise elicited a significant increase in the activation of the abdominal muscle. The leg raise and eccentric sit-up exercises elicited significant increases in the activation of hip flexor muscle. [Conclusion] The eccentric sit-up had the most outstanding effect on the abdominal muscles involved in stability of the trunk. PMID:27065536

  9. A mobile system for the multifrequency Doppler sounding of the modified ionosphere in active experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagno, Iu. D.; Kim, V. Iu.; Namazov, S. A.; Panchenko, V. N.; Khar'kov, I. P.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents a description of a mobile multichannel Doppler system designed for shipboard studies of the modified ionosphere. The system was used for the diagnostics of the modified ionosphere in active experiments carried out in equatorial and low-latitude regions using the MR-20 geophysical rockets as well as in satellite experiments in the framework of the CRRES project. The data processing method is discussed, and experimental data are presented.

  10. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This article is the last of a three-part series dealing with sound measurement, effects, pollution, and indoor/door learning activities. This section focuses on outdoor activities and equipment that students can make to assist them in data collection. (Author/SA)

  11. Effects of multiple congruent cues on concurrent sound segregation during passive and active listening: an event-related potential (ERP) study.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Zsuzsanna; Winkler, István; Szalárdy, Orsolya; Bendixen, Alexandra

    2014-07-01

    In two experiments, we assessed the effects of combining different cues of concurrent sound segregation on the object-related negativity (ORN) and the P400 event-related potential components. Participants were presented with sequences of complex tones, half of which contained some manipulation: one or two harmonic partials were mistuned, delayed, or presented from a different location than the rest. In separate conditions, one, two, or three of these manipulations were combined. Participants watched a silent movie (passive listening) or reported after each tone whether they perceived one or two concurrent sounds (active listening). ORN was found in almost all conditions except for location difference alone during passive listening. Combining several cues or manipulating more than one partial consistently led to sub-additive effects on the ORN amplitude. These results support the view that ORN reflects a combined, feature-unspecific assessment of the auditory system regarding the contribution of two sources to the incoming sound. PMID:24816158

  12. Coronal magnetic structures observing campaign. I - Simultaneous microwave and soft X-ray observations of active regions at the solar limb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, N.; White, S. M.; Kundu, M. R.; Gopalswamy, N.; Holman, G. D.; Brosius, J. W.; Schmelz, J. T.; Saba, J. L. R.; Strong, K. T.

    1991-06-01

    Using simultaneous microwave and soft X-ray measurements made with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 6 and 20 cm and the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) aboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), we have studied two active regions near the solar limb. These observations were taken as part of the Coronal Magnetic Structures Observing Campaign (CoMStOC), a collaboration designed to study the magnetic field in the solar corona. The images in soft X-rays and at 20 cm wavelength are similar: both show peaks above the active regions and extended bridge of emission 200,000 km long connecting the two regions. The brightness temperature of the 20 cm emission is lower than that predicted from the X-ray emitting material, however; it can be attributed to free-free emission in cooler (<106 K) plasma not visible to XRP, with an optical depth ˜1. The 6 cm emission is concentrated at lower altitudes and in a ˜160,000 km long bundle of loops in the northern active region. Comparison of the 6 cm map with the potential magnetic field lines computed from photospheric magnetic fields (measured 2 days earlier) indicates that the 6 cm emission is associated with fields of less than ˜200 G. Such fields would be too weak to attribute the observed 6 cm emission to gyroresonance radiation. Analysis of the 6 cm loop bundle indicates that it is strongly asymmetric, with the magnetic field in the northern leg ˜2 times stronger than in the southern leg; the 6 cm emission most likely arises from a combination of hot ( ≥ 2 × 106 K) and cool plasmas, while the 20 cm emission becomes optically thick in the cooler (˜9 × 103 K) plasma. We estimate an Alfvén speed ˜7000 km s-1 and ratio of electron gyrofrequency to plasma frequency ˜1.0 in the northern leg of the 6 cm loop.

  13. Ionospheric and Geomagnetic Activity Investigated Using Oblique Sounding Comparisons With an HF Radio Propagation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudegg, D.; Layoun, M.; Hutchinson, S.

    2008-12-01

    Oblique HF sounder paths over ~2000km have been operating between New Zealand and Australia for a number of years. The maximum observed frequencies (MOF) are compared with predictions from the climatological HF radio skywave propagation model used by IPS. Variations from predicted median (MUF),lower (OWF) and upper decile frequencies may be interpreted in terms of ionospheric and geomagnetic activity and the effectiveness of parameterisation of ionospheric support for HF by the T-index examined. Closely spaced multiple paths provide opportunities to investigate small scale F2 layer structures.

  14. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  15. Geophysical Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, E.

    1998-01-01

    Of the many geophysical remote-sensing techniques available today, a few are suitable for the water ice-rich, layered material expected at the north martian ice cap. Radio echo sounding has been used for several decades to determine ice thickness and internal structure. Selection of operating frequency is a tradeoff between signal attenuation (which typically increases with frequency and ice temperature) and resolution (which is proportional to wavelength). Antenna configuration and size will be additional considerations for a mission to Mars. Several configurations for ice-penetrating radar systems are discussed: these include orbiter-borne sounders, sounding antennas trailed by balloons and penetrators, and lander-borne systems. Lander-borne systems could include short-wave systems capable of resolving fine structure and layering in the upper meters beneath the lander. Spread-spectrum and deconvolution techniques can be used to increase the depth capability of a radar system. If soundings over several locations are available (e.g., with balloons, rovers, or panning short-wave systems), then it will be easier to resolve internal layering, variations in basal reflection coefficient (from which material properties may be inferred), and the geometry of nonhorizontal features. Sonic sounding has a long history in oil and gas exploration. It is, however, unlikely that large explosive charges, or even swept-frequency techniques such as Vibroseis, would be suitable for a Polar lander -- these systems are capable of penetrating several kilometers of material at frequencies of 10-200 Hz, but the energy required to generate the sound waves is large and potentially destructive. The use of audio-frequency and ultrasonic sound generated by piezoelectric crystals is discussed as a possible method to explore layering and fine features in the upper meters of the ice cap. Appropriate choice of transducer(s) will permit operation over a range of fixed or modulated frequencies

  16. The Sound of Silence: Activating Silent Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in Marine Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Reen, F Jerry; Romano, Stefano; Dobson, Alan D W; O'Gara, Fergal

    2015-08-01

    Unlocking the rich harvest of marine microbial ecosystems has the potential to both safeguard the existence of our species for the future, while also presenting significant lifestyle benefits for commercial gain. However, while significant advances have been made in the field of marine biodiscovery, leading to the introduction of new classes of therapeutics for clinical medicine, cosmetics and industrial products, much of what this natural ecosystem has to offer is locked in, and essentially hidden from our screening methods. Releasing this silent potential represents a significant technological challenge, the key to which is a comprehensive understanding of what controls these systems. Heterologous expression systems have been successful in awakening a number of these cryptic marine biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). However, this approach is limited by the typically large size of the encoding sequences. More recently, focus has shifted to the regulatory proteins associated with each BGC, many of which are signal responsive raising the possibility of exogenous activation. Abundant among these are the LysR-type family of transcriptional regulators, which are known to control production of microbial aromatic systems. Although the environmental signals that activate these regulatory systems remain unknown, it offers the exciting possibility of evoking mimic molecules and synthetic expression systems to drive production of potentially novel natural products in microorganisms. Success in this field has the potential to provide a quantum leap forward in medical and industrial bio-product development. To achieve these new endpoints, it is clear that the integrated efforts of bioinformaticians and natural product chemists will be required as we strive to uncover new and potentially unique structures from silent or cryptic marine gene clusters. PMID:26264003

  17. The Sound of Silence: Activating Silent Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in Marine Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Reen, F. Jerry; Romano, Stefano; Dobson, Alan D.W.; O’Gara, Fergal

    2015-01-01

    Unlocking the rich harvest of marine microbial ecosystems has the potential to both safeguard the existence of our species for the future, while also presenting significant lifestyle benefits for commercial gain. However, while significant advances have been made in the field of marine biodiscovery, leading to the introduction of new classes of therapeutics for clinical medicine, cosmetics and industrial products, much of what this natural ecosystem has to offer is locked in, and essentially hidden from our screening methods. Releasing this silent potential represents a significant technological challenge, the key to which is a comprehensive understanding of what controls these systems. Heterologous expression systems have been successful in awakening a number of these cryptic marine biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). However, this approach is limited by the typically large size of the encoding sequences. More recently, focus has shifted to the regulatory proteins associated with each BGC, many of which are signal responsive raising the possibility of exogenous activation. Abundant among these are the LysR-type family of transcriptional regulators, which are known to control production of microbial aromatic systems. Although the environmental signals that activate these regulatory systems remain unknown, it offers the exciting possibility of evoking mimic molecules and synthetic expression systems to drive production of potentially novel natural products in microorganisms. Success in this field has the potential to provide a quantum leap forward in medical and industrial bio-product development. To achieve these new endpoints, it is clear that the integrated efforts of bioinformaticians and natural product chemists will be required as we strive to uncover new and potentially unique structures from silent or cryptic marine gene clusters. PMID:26264003

  18. Progressive upper limb prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Lake, Chris; Dodson, Robert

    2006-02-01

    The field of upper extremity prosthetics is a constantly changing arena as researchers and prosthetists strive to bridge the gap between prosthetic reality and upper limb physiology. With the further development of implantable neurologic sensing devices and targeted muscle innervation (discussed elsewhere in this issue), the challenge of limited input to control vast outputs promises to become a historical footnote in the future annals of upper limb prosthetics. Soon multidextrous terminal devices, such as that found in the iLimb system(Touch EMAS, Inc., Edinburgh, UK), will be a clinical reality (Fig. 22). Successful prosthetic care depends on good communication and cooperation among the surgeon, the amputee, the rehabilitation team, and the scientists harnessing the power of technology to solve real-life challenges. If the progress to date is any indication, amputees of the future will find their dreams limited only by their imagination. PMID:16517345

  19. Structural sensing of interior sound for active control of noise in structural-acoustic cavities.

    PubMed

    Bagha, Ashok K; Modak, S V

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a method for structural sensing of acoustic potential energy for active control of noise in a structural-acoustic cavity. The sensing strategy aims at global control and works with a fewer number of sensors. It is based on the established concept of radiation modes and hence does not add too many states to the order of the system. Acoustic potential energy is sensed using a combination of a Kalman filter and a frequency weighting filter with the structural response measurements as the inputs. The use of Kalman filter also makes the system robust against measurement noise. The formulation of the strategy is presented using finite element models of the system including that of sensors and actuators so that it can be easily applied to practical systems. The sensing strategy is numerically evaluated in the framework of Linear Quadratic Gaussian based feedback control of interior noise in a rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate with single and multiple pairs of piezoelectric sensor-actuator patches when broadband disturbances act on the plate. The performance is compared with an "acoustic filter" that models the complete transfer function from the structure to the acoustic domain. The sensing performance is also compared with a direct estimation strategy. PMID:26233001

  20. A caveolin-3 mutant that causes limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C disrupts Src localization and activity and induces apoptosis in skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    Smythe, Gayle M; Eby, Joshua C; Disatnik, Marie-Helene; Rando, Thomas A

    2003-12-01

    Caveolins are membrane proteins that are the major coat proteins of caveolae, specialized lipid rafts in the plasma membrane that serve as scaffolding sites for many signaling complexes. Among the many signaling molecules associated with caveolins are the Src tyrosine kinases, whose activation regulates numerous cellular functions including the balance between cell survival and cell death. Several mutations in the muscle-specific caveolin, caveolin-3, lead to a form of autosomal dominant muscular dystrophy referred to as limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1C (LGMD-1C). One of these mutations (here termed the 'TFT mutation') results in a deletion of a tripeptide (DeltaTFT(63-65)) that affects the scaffolding and oligomerization domains of caveolin-3. This mutation causes a 90-95% loss of caveolin-3 protein levels and reduced formation of caveolae in skeletal muscle fibers. However, the effects of this mutation on the specific biochemical processes and cellular functions associated with caveolae have not been elucidated. We demonstrate that the TFT caveolin-3 mutation in post-mitotic skeletal myotubes causes severely reduced localization of caveolin-3 to the plasma membrane and to lipid rafts, and significantly inhibits caveolar function. The TFT mutation reduced the binding of Src to caveolin-3, diminished targeting of Src to lipid rafts, and caused abnormal perinuclear accumulation of Src. Along with these alterations of Src localization and targeting, there was elevated Src activation in myotubes expressing the TFT mutation and an increased incidence of apoptosis in those cells compared with control myotubes. The results of this study demonstrate that caveolin-3 mutations associated with LGMD-1C disrupt normal cellular signal transduction pathways associated with caveolae and cause apoptosis in muscle cells, all of which may reflect pathogenetic pathways that lead to muscle degeneration in these disorders. PMID:14600260

  1. Limb salvage surgery.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Dinesh

    2013-05-01

    The threat of lower limb loss is seen commonly in severe crush injury, cancer ablation, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease and neuropathy. The primary goal of limb salvage is to restore and maintain stability and ambulation. Reconstructive strategies differ in each condition such as: Meticulous debridement and early coverage in trauma, replacing lost functional units in cancer ablation, improving vascularity in ischaemic leg and providing stable walking surface for trophic ulcer. The decision to salvage the critically injured limb is multifactorial and should be individualised along with laid down definitive indications. Early cover remains the standard of care, delayed wound coverage not necessarily affect the final outcome. Limb salvage is more cost-effective than amputations in a long run. Limb salvage is the choice of procedure over amputation in 95% of limb sarcoma without affecting the survival. Compound flaps with different tissue components, skeletal reconstruction; tendon transfer/reconstruction helps to restore function. Adjuvant radiation alters tissue characters and calls for modification in reconstructive plan. Neuropathic ulcers are wide and deep often complicated by osteomyelitis. Free flap reconstruction aids in faster healing and provides superior surface for offloading. Diabetic wounds are primarily due to neuropathy and leads to six-fold increase in ulcerations. Control of infections, aggressive debridement and vascular cover are the mainstay of management. Endovascular procedures are gaining importance and have reduced extent of surgery and increased amputation free survival period. Though the standard approach remains utilising best option in the reconstruction ladder, the recent trend shows running down the ladder of reconstruction with newer reliable local flaps and negative wound pressure therapy. PMID:24501463

  2. Abnormal cortical sensorimotor activity during "Target" sound detection in subjects with acute acoustic trauma sequelae: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Job, Agnès; Pons, Yoann; Lamalle, Laurent; Jaillard, Assia; Buck, Karl; Segebarth, Christoph; Delon-Martin, Chantal

    2012-03-01

    The most common consequences of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) are hearing loss at frequencies above 3 kHz and tinnitus. In this study, we have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to visualize neuronal activation patterns in military adults with AAT and various tinnitus sequelae during an auditory "oddball" attention task. AAT subjects displayed overactivities principally during reflex of target sound detection, in sensorimotor areas and in emotion-related areas such as the insula, anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex, in premotor area, in cross-modal sensory associative areas, and, interestingly, in a region of the Rolandic operculum that has recently been shown to be involved in tympanic movements due to air pressure. We propose further investigations of this brain area and fine middle ear investigations, because our results might suggest a model in which AAT tinnitus may arise as a proprioceptive illusion caused by abnormal excitability of middle-ear muscle spindles possibly link with the acoustic reflex and associated with emotional and sensorimotor disturbances. PMID:22574285

  3. Sound Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Poor classroom acoustics are impairing students' hearing and their ability to learn. However, technology has come up with a solution: tools that focus voices in a way that minimizes intrusive ambient noise and gets to the intended receiver--not merely amplifying the sound, but also clarifying and directing it. One provider of classroom audio…

  4. Cellular proliferation in the skin of X-rayed newt limbs (with a note on x-ray-induced limb regression)

    SciTech Connect

    Wertz, R.L.

    1982-07-01

    Left hind limbs, including the pelvis, of adult newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) were locally irradiated with a dose of x-rays that inhibited regeneration (2,000 R). This x-ray dose and other doses (700-2,000 R) capable of inhibiting limb regeneration also cause limb regression prior to amputation. Before limb regression occurred, there was a latent period of 3 to 6 weeks. Limb regression was characterized by necrotic wasting and resorption of distal elements. The degree of loss was variable and dependent upon dosage. After this further degenerative changes were not noted. Proliferation of epidermal cells was examined 4 days after irradiation prior to limb regression or after x-ray-induced degeneration of the limbs had ended. Proliferative activity in x-rayed limbs was also compared at various stages of contralateral control limb regeneration. Limbs examined after x-ray-induced limb regression had ended showed levels of (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA comparable to normal epidermis. In contrast, limbs examined 4 days after irradiation had lower levels of DNA synthesis (P much less than 0.01). Amputation of limbs in both groups caused an increase in DNA synthesis (P much less than 0.01). Histological examination showed that cellular proliferation was associated primarily with the epidermis. These results indicate that epidermal cell proliferation was not resistant to x-rays. However, levels of normal cell division were observed after amputation of after cessation of x-ray-induced limb regression.

  5. Active tectonics of the Seattle fault and central Puget sound, Washington - Implications for earthquake hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Dadisman, S.V.; Childs, J. R.; Stanley, W.D.

    1999-01-01

    We use an extensive network of marine high-resolution and conventional industry seismic-reflection data to constrain the location, shallow structure, and displacement rates of the Seattle fault zone and crosscutting high-angle faults in the Puget Lowland of western Washington. Analysis of seismic profiles extending 50 km across the Puget Lowland from Lake Washington to Hood Canal indicates that the west-trending Seattle fault comprises a broad (4-6 km) zone of three or more south-dipping reverse faults. Quaternary sediment has been folded and faulted along all faults in the zone but is clearly most pronounced along fault A, the northernmost fault, which forms the boundary between the Seattle uplift and Seattle basin. Analysis of growth strata deposited across fault A indicate minimum Quaternary slip rates of about 0.6 mm/yr. Slip rates across the entire zone are estimated to be 0.7-1.1 mm/yr. The Seattle fault is cut into two main segments by an active, north-trending, high-angle, strike-slip fault zone with cumulative dextral displacement of about 2.4 km. Faults in this zone truncate and warp reflections in Tertiary and Quaternary strata and locally coincide with bathymetric lineaments. Cumulative slip rates on these faults may exceed 0.2 mm/yr. Assuming no other crosscutting faults, this north-trending fault zone divides the Seattle fault into 30-40-km-long western and eastern segments. Although this geometry could limit the area ruptured in some Seattle fault earthquakes, a large event ca. A.D. 900 appears to have involved both segments. Regional seismic-hazard assessments must (1) incorporate new information on fault length, geometry, and displacement rates on the Seattle fault, and (2) consider the hazard presented by the previously unrecognized, north-trending fault zone.

  6. Prevention and Treatment of Lower Limb Deep Vein Thrombosis after Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation: Results of a Prospective active controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan; Zhang, Bao-jian; Zhang, Bao-ku; Ma, Jun; Liu, Xu-zheng; Jiang, Shu-bin

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a prospective, single-center, active controlled study from July 2013 to January 2015, in Chinese patients with rapid ventricular arrhythmia who had received radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) treatment to determine formation of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (LDVT) post RFCA procedure, and evaluated the effect of rivaroxaban on LDVT. Patients with asymptomatic pulmonary thromboembolism who had not received any other anticoagulant and had received no more than 36 hours of treatment with unfractionated heparin were included. Post RFCA procedure, patients received either rivaroxaban (10 mg/d for 14 days beginning 2–3 hours post-operation; n = 86) or aspirin (100 mg/d for 3 months beginning 2–3 hours post-operation; n = 90). The primary outcome was a composite of LDVT occurrence, change in diameter of femoral veins, and safety outcomes that were analyzed based on major or minor bleeding events. In addition, blood flow velocity was determined. No complete occlusive thrombus or bleeding events were reported with either of the group. The lower incidence rate of non-occluded thrombus in rivaroxaban (5.8%) compared to the aspirin group (16.7%) indicates rivaroxaban may be administered post-RFCA to prevent and treat femoral venous thrombosis in a secure and effective way with a faster inset of action than standard aspirin therapy. PMID:27329582

  7. Hind Limb Unloading Model Alters Nuclear Factor kappa B and Activator Protein-1 Signaling in Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Vani, Vani; Renard, Renard; Vera, Vera; Wilosn, Wilosn; Ramesh, Govindarajan

    Microgravity induces inflammatory response and also modulates immune functions, which may increase oxidative stress. Exposure to the microgravity environment induces adverse neurological effects. However, there is little research exploring the etiology of neurological effects of exposure to this environment. To explore this area we evaluated changes in Nuclear Factor kappa B, Activator Protein 1, MAPP kinase and N terminal c-Jun kinase in mouse brain exposed to a simulated microgravity environment using the hindlimb unloading model. BALB/c male mice were randomly assigned to hindlimb unloading group (n=12) and control group (n=12) to simulate a microgravity environment, for 7 days. Changes observed in NF-κB, AP- 1 DNA binding, MAPKK and N terminal c-Jun kinase were measured using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and western blot analysis and compared to unexposed brain regions. Hindlimb unloading exposed mice showed significant increases in generated NF-κB, AP-1, MAPKK and Kinase in all regions of the brain exposed to hindlimb unloading as compared to the control brain regions. Results suggest that exposure to simulated microgravity can induce expression of certain transcription factors and protein kinases. This work was supported by funding from NASA NCC 9-165. 504b030414000600080000002100828abc13fa0000001c020000130000005b436f6e74656e745f54797065735d2e78

  8. Development of an exercise testing protocol for patients with a lower limb amputation: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vestering, Myrthe M; Schoppen, Tanneke; Dekker, Rienk; Wempe, Johan; Geertzen, Jan H B

    2005-09-01

    Due to a decrease in physical activity, lower limb amputees experience a decline in physical fitness. This causes problems in walking with a prosthesis because energy expenditure in walking with a prosthesis is much higher than in walking with two sound legs. Exercise training may therefore increase the functional walking ability of these patients. To generate a safe and effective aerobic training program, exercise testing of amputees is recommended. The objectives of this study were to develop a maximal exercise testing protocol for lower limb amputees and to compare two different testing methods: combined arm-leg ergometry and arm ergometry. The protocols were tested in five amputee patients. Combined ergometry elicited a higher oxygen uptake and heart rate than arm ergometry. Electrocardiography during combined ergometry was easier to read. Combined ergometry was judged most comfortable by the amputees. The exercise testing protocol was useful in lower limb amputees to determine their maximal aerobic capacity and their main exercise limitation. Future exercise training programs may be based on this testing protocol. Combined arm-leg ergometry is appropriate for unilateral amputees without significant claudication of the remaining leg. Continuous arm ergometry is suitable for unilateral amputees with significant claudication of the remaining limb or bilateral amputees. PMID:16046917

  9. Accessories to Limb Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Han, Yanchao; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-05-23

    In a recent issue of Nature, Nacu et al. (2016) identified FGF and HH ligands as interacting molecular influences that are necessary and sufficient to induce the formation of supernumerary limbs from blastemal tissue in axolotl salamanders. PMID:27219058

  10. Artificial limb connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Connection simplifies and eases donning and removing artificial limb; eliminates harnesses and clamps; and reduces skin pressures by allowing bone to carry all tensile and part of compressive loads between prosthesis and stump. Because connection is modular, it is easily modified to suit individual needs.

  11. Effects of Intravenous and Catheter Directed Thrombolytic Therapy with Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator (Alteplase) in Non-Traumatic Acute Limb Ischemia; A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saroukhani, Abbas; Ravari, Hassan; Pezeshki Rad, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous and catheter directed thrombolysis by recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (Alteplase) in the patients with non-traumatic acute limb ischemia (ALI). Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial being performed between 2009 and 2011 in Mashhad University of Medical Sciences. We included those patients who were<75 years, with symptoms of less than 14 days duration, ALI of grade IIa and IIb (according to Rutherford classification) and absence of distal run off. Baseline assessment of peripheral circulation performed in all the patients. Patients were randomly assigned to undergo intravenous (n=18) or catheter directed thrombolysis (n=20) with Alteplase. The primary endpoint of the study was improvement of clinical status measured by Rutherford classification, ankle brachial index (ABI), visual analogue scale (VAS) score measured at 1, 3 and 6 months. The secondary endpoint of the study was complete or near complete recanalization of the occluded artery. Results: A total number of 38 patients with mean age of 54.13±13.5 years were included in the study. There were 23 (60.5%) men and 15 (39.5%) women among the patients. Overall 3 (7.9%) patients had upper and 35 (92.1%) lower extremity ischemia. There was no significant difference between two study groups. None of the patients experienced major therapeutic side effects. Both ABI and VAS score improved in patients who have received first dose of t-PA within 24-hourof ALI. There was no significant difference between two study groups regarding the 6-month clinical grade (p=0.088), VAS score (p=0.316) and ABI (p=0.360). The angiographic improvement was significantly higher in CDT group (p<0.001). Conclusion: Intravenous and catheter directed thrombolysis with t-PA is a safe and effective method in treatment of acute arteriolar ischemia of extremities. However there both intravenous thrombolysis and CDT are comparable regarding the clinical outcome. PMID

  12. Early hominin limb proportions.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Brian G; Aiello, Leslie C; Wood, Bernard A

    2002-10-01

    Recent analyses and new fossil discoveries suggest that the evolution of hominin limb length proportions is complex, with evolutionary reversals and a decoupling of proportions within and between limbs. This study takes into account intraspecific variation to test whether or not the limb proportions of four early hominin associated skeletons (AL 288-1, OH 62, BOU-VP-12/1, and KNM-WT 15000) can be considered to be significantly different from one another. Exact randomization methods were used to compare the differences between pairs of fossil skeletons to the differences observed between all possible pairs of individuals within large samples of Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus, and Homo sapiens. Although the difference in humerofemoral proportions between OH 62 and AL 288-1 does not exceed variation in the extant samples, it is rare. When humerofemoral midshaft circumferences are compared, the difference between OH 62 and AL 288-1 is fairly common in extant species. This, in combination with error associated with the limb lengths estimates, suggests that it may be premature to consider H. (or Australopithecus) habilis as having more apelike limb proportions than those in A. afarensis. The humerofemoral index of BOU-VP-12/1 differs significantly from both OH 62 and AL 288-1, but not from KNM-WT 15000. Published length estimates, if correct, suggest that the relative forearm length of BOU-VP-12/1 is unique among hominins, exceeding those of the African apes and resembling the proportions in Pongo. Evidence that A. afarensis exhibited a less apelike upper:lower limb design than A. africanus (and possibly H. habilis) suggests that, if A. afarensis is broadly ancestral to A. africanus, the latter did not simply inherit primitive morphology associated with arboreality, but is derived in this regard. The fact that the limb proportions of OH 62 (and possibly KNM-ER 3735) are no more human like than those of AL 288-1 underscores the primitive body design of H

  13. Applications of Sound Spectrum Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    The physics of sound is often studied in introductory physics class experiments involving a tube of resonating air. In typical setups, pistons control the length of a cylindrical space or a microphone is moved within a tube. While these activities are useful and can be made very quantitative, they don't directly demonstrate the sounds that are…

  14. Exploring Sound with Insects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Meyer, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Differences in insect morphology and movement during singing provide a fascinating opportunity for students to investigate insects while learning about the characteristics of sound. In the activities described here, students use a free online computer software program to explore the songs of the major singing insects and experiment with making…

  15. Sounds Like Fun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Linda M.

    1991-01-01

    Presents hands-on science activities that help students learn the concepts of hearing and sound while allowing students to practice science process skills. Students investigate the use of alternative phonograph speakers and needles and apply the knowledge learned to the construction of one-string banjos. (MDH)

  16. A Synchrony-Dependent Influence of Sounds on Activity in Visual Cortex Measured Using Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS)

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Ian M.; Hartley, Douglas E. H.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from human neuroimaging and animal electrophysiological studies suggests that signals from different sensory modalities interact early in cortical processing, including in primary sensory cortices. The present study aimed to test whether functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), an emerging, non-invasive neuroimaging technique, is capable of measuring such multisensory interactions. Specifically, we tested for a modulatory influence of sounds on activity in visual cortex, while varying the temporal synchrony between trains of transient auditory and visual events. Related fMRI studies have consistently reported enhanced activation in response to synchronous compared to asynchronous audiovisual stimulation. Unexpectedly, we found that synchronous sounds significantly reduced the fNIRS response from visual cortex, compared both to asynchronous sounds and to a visual-only baseline. It is possible that this suppressive effect of synchronous sounds reflects the use of an efficacious visual stimulus, chosen for consistency with previous fNIRS studies. Discrepant results may also be explained by differences between studies in how attention was deployed to the auditory and visual modalities. The presence and relative timing of sounds did not significantly affect performance in a simultaneously conducted behavioral task, although the data were suggestive of a positive relationship between the strength of the fNIRS response from visual cortex and the accuracy of visual target detection. Overall, the present findings indicate that fNIRS is capable of measuring multisensory cortical interactions. In multisensory research, fNIRS can offer complementary information to the more established neuroimaging modalities, and may prove advantageous for testing in naturalistic environments and with infant and clinical populations. PMID:25826284

  17. Hybrid Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels with Constrained Layer Damping and Model Predictive Feedback Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2000-01-01

    make the controller adaptive. For example, a mathematical model of the plant could be periodically updated as the plant changes, and the feedback gains recomputed from the updated model. To be practical, this approach requires a simple plant model that can be updated quickly with reasonable computational requirements. A recent paper by the authors discussed one way to simplify a feedback controller, by reducing the number of actuators and sensors needed for good performance. The work was done on a tensioned aircraft-style panel excited on one side by TBL flow in a low speed wind tunnel. Actuation was provided by a piezoelectric (PZT) actuator mounted on the center of the panel. For sensing, the responses of four accelerometers, positioned to approximate the response of the first radiation mode of the panel, were summed and fed back through the controller. This single input-single output topology was found to have nearly the same noise reduction performance as a controller with fifteen accelerometers and three PZT patches. This paper extends the previous results by looking at how constrained layer damping (CLD) on a panel can be used to enhance the performance of the feedback controller thus providing a more robust and efficient hybrid active/passive system. The eventual goal is to use the CLD to reduce sound radiation at high frequencies, then implement a very simple, reduced order, low sample rate adaptive controller to attenuate sound radiation at low frequencies. Additionally this added damping smoothes phase transitions over the bandwidth which promotes robustness to natural frequency shifts. Experiments were conducted in a transmission loss facility on a clamped-clamped aluminum panel driven on one side by a loudspeaker. A generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm, which is suited to online adaptation of its parameters, was used in single input-single output and multiple input-single output configurations. Because this was a preliminary look at the potential

  18. Experimental Simulation of Active Control With On-line System Identification on Sound Transmission Through an Elastic Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An adaptive control algorithm with on-line system identification capability has been developed. One of the great advantages of this scheme is that an additional system identification mechanism such as an additional uncorrelated random signal generator as the source of system identification is not required. A time-varying plate-cavity system is used to demonstrate the control performance of this algorithm. The time-varying system consists of a stainless-steel plate which is bolted down on a rigid cavity opening where the cavity depth was changed with respect to time. For a given externally located harmonic sound excitation, the system identification and the control are simultaneously executed to minimize the transmitted sound in the cavity. The control performance of the algorithm is examined for two cases. First, all the water was drained, the external disturbance frequency is swept with 1 Hz/sec. The result shows an excellent frequency tracking capability with cavity internal sound suppression of 40 dB. For the second case, the water level is initially empty and then raised to 3/20 full in 60 seconds while the external sound excitation is fixed with a frequency. Hence, the cavity resonant frequency decreases and passes the external sound excitation frequency. The algorithm shows 40 dB transmitted noise suppression without compromising the system identification tracking capability.

  19. Sound preferences in urban open public spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2003-10-01

    This paper studies people's perception of sound, based on an intensive questionnaire survey in fourteen urban open public spaces of five European countries. The questionnaire includes identification of recognized sounds, classification of sound preference, and indication of wanted and unwanted sounds. The results indicate three facets to people's sound preferences. First, people generally prefer natural and culture-related sounds rather than artificial sounds. Vehicle sounds and construction sounds are regarded as the most unpopular, whereas sounds from human activities are normally rated as neutral. Second, cultural background and long-term environmental experience play an important role in people's judgment of sound preference. People from a similar environment may show a similar tendency on their sound preferences, which can be defined as macro-preference. Third, personal differences, such as age and gender, further influence people's sound preference, which can be defined as micro-preference. For example, with increasing age, a higher percentage of people are favorable to, or tolerate, sounds relating to nature, culture or human activities. Male and female exhibit only slight differences. [Work supported by the European Commission.

  20. Mechanoadaptation of developing limbs: shaking a leg

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, A S; McGonnell, I M; Pitsillides, A A

    2014-01-01

    The proportion of total limb length taken up by the individual skeletal elements (limb proportionality), varies widely between species. These diverse skeletal forms have evolved to allow for a range of limb uses and they first emerge as the embryo develops, to achieve the characteristic skeletal architecture of each species. During this time, the developing skeleton experiences mechanical loading as a result of embryonic muscle contraction. The possibility that adaptation to such mechanical input may allow embryos to coordinate the appearance of skeletal design with their expanding range of movements has so far received little attention. This is surprising, given the critical role exerted by embryo movement in normal skeletal development; stage-specific in ovo immobilisation of embryonic chicks results in joint contractures and a reduction in longitudinal bone growth in the limbs. Epigenetic mechanisms allow for selective activation of genes in response to environmental signals, resulting in the production of phenotypic complexity in morphogenesis; mechanical loading of bone during movement appears to be one such signal. It may be that ‘mechanosensitive’ genes under regulation of mechanical input adjust proportionality along the bone's proximo-distal axis, introducing a level of phenotypic plasticity. If this hypothesis is upheld, species with more elongated distal limb elements will have a greater dependence on mechanical input for the differences in their growth, and mechanosensitive bone growth in the embryo may have evolved as an additional source of phenotypic diversity during skeletal development. PMID:24635640

  1. Regeneration inducers in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akira; Mitogawa, Kazumasa; Makanae, Aki

    2015-08-01

    Limb regeneration ability, which can be observed in amphibians, has been investigated as a representative phenomenon of organ regeneration. Recently, an alternative experimental system called the accessory limb model was developed to investigate early regulation of amphibian limb regeneration. The accessory limb model contributed to identification of limb regeneration inducers in urodele amphibians. Furthermore, the accessory limb model may be applied to other species to explore universality of regeneration mechanisms. This review aims to connect the insights recently gained to emboss universality of regeneration mechanisms among species. The defined molecules (BMP7 (or2) + FGF2 + FGF8) can transform skin wound healing to organ (limb) regeneration responses. The same molecules can initiate regeneration responses in some species. PMID:26100345

  2. Offshore Dredger Sounds: Source Levels, Sound Maps, and Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Christ A F; Ainslie, Michael A; Heinis, Floor; Janmaat, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The underwater sound produced during construction of the Port of Rotterdam harbor extension (Maasvlakte 2) was measured, with emphasis on the contribution of the trailing suction hopper dredgers during their various activities: dredging, transport, and discharge of sediment. Measured source levels of the dredgers, estimated source levels of other shipping, and time-dependent position data from a vessel-tracking system were used as input for a propagation model to generate dynamic sound maps. Various scenarios were studied to assess the risk of possible effects of the sound from dredging activities on marine fauna, specifically on porpoises, seals, and fish. PMID:26610959

  3. Functional Brain Activation Differences in School-Age Children with Speech Sound Errors: Speech and Print Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jonathan L.; Felsenfeld, Susan; Frost, Stephen J.; Mencl, W. Einar; Fulbright, Robert K.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Landi, Nicole; Seki, Ayumi; Pugh, Kenneth R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine neural response to spoken and printed language in children with speech sound errors (SSE). Method: Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to compare processing of auditorily and visually presented words and pseudowords in 17 children with SSE, ages 8;6[years;months] through 10;10, with 17 matched controls. Results: When…

  4. Sound Sequence Discrimination Learning Motivated by Reward Requires Dopaminergic D2 Receptor Activation in the Rat Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudoh, Masaharu; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2006-01-01

    We have previously reported that sound sequence discrimination learning requires cholinergic inputs to the auditory cortex (AC) in rats. In that study, reward was used for motivating discrimination behavior in rats. Therefore, dopaminergic inputs mediating reward signals may have an important role in the learning. We tested the possibility in the…

  5. Glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in muscles from immobilized limbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, W. F.; Watson, P. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Defects in glucose metabolism in muscles of immobilized limbs of mice were related to alterations in insulin binding, insulin responsiveness, glucose supply, and insulin activation of glycogen synthase. These were tested by in vitro methodology. A significant lessening in the insulin-induced maximal response of 2-deoxyglucose uptake into the mouse soleus muscle occurred between the 3rd and 8th h of limb immobilization, suggesting a decreased insulin responsiveness. Lack of change in the specific binding of insulin to muscles of 24-h immobilized limbs indicates that a change in insulin receptor number did not play a role in the failure of insulin to stimulate glucose metabolism. Its inability to stimulate glycogen synthesis in muscle from immobilized limbs is due, in part, to a lack of glucose supply to glycogen synthesis and also to the ineffectiveness of insulin to increase the percentage of glycogen synthase in its active form in muscles from 24-h immobilized limbs.

  6. Analysis of active control with on-line system identification on sound transmission through an elastic plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshigoe, Shozo; Teagle, Allen; Tsay, Ching-Hsu

    1995-05-01

    An adaptive control algorithm with on-line system identification capability has been developed. One of the great advantages of this scheme is that an additional system identification mechanism such as an additional uncorrelated random signal generator as the source of system identification [Eriksson and Allie, Acoust. Soc. Am. 85, 797 - 802 (1989)] is not required. A time varying plate-cavity system is used to demonstrate the control performance of this algorithm. The time varying plate-cavity system is used to demonstrate the control performance of this algorithm. The time varying system consists of a stainless steel plate which is simply supported on a rigid cavity where the cavity temperature can depend on time. For a given externally located harmonic sound excitation, the system identification and the control are simultaneously executed to minimize the transmitted sound in the cavity. The control performance of the algorithm is examined for two cases. Keeping the cavity temperature constant for the first case, the external disturbance frequency is swept with 2 Hz/second from below to above a resonance frequency of the plate-cavity system. The simulation shows an excellent frequency tracking capability with cavity internal sound suppression of 40 dB. For the second case, the cavity temperature is lowered to a half of its original value in 60 seconds while the external sound excitation is fixed with a frequency. Hence, the cavity resonant frequency decreased and passes the external sound excitation frequency. The algorithm shows 40 dB transmitted noise suppression without compromising the system identification tracking capability.

  7. Radiometric sounding system

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, C.D.; Anderson, G.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Shaw, W.J.

    1995-04-01

    Vertical profiles of solar and terrestrial radiative fluxes are key research needs for global climate change research. These fluxes are expected to change as radiatively active trace gases are emitted to the earth`s atmosphere as a consequence of energy production and industrial and other human activities. Models suggest that changes in the concentration of such gases will lead to radiative flux divergences that will produce global warming of the earth`s atmosphere. Direct measurements of the vertical variation of solar and terrestrial radiative fluxes that lead to these flux divergences have been largely unavailable because of the expense of making such measurements from airplanes. These measurements are needed to improve existing atmospheric radiative transfer models, especially under the cloudy conditions where the models have not been adequately tested. A tethered-balloon-borne Radiometric Sounding System has been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide an inexpensive means of making routine vertical soundings of radiative fluxes in the earth`s atmospheric boundary layer to altitudes up to 1500 m above ground level. Such vertical soundings would supplement measurements being made from aircraft and towers. The key technical challenge in the design of the Radiometric Sounding System is to develop a means of keeping the radiometers horizontal while the balloon ascends and descends in a turbulent atmospheric environment. This problem has been addressed by stabilizing a triangular radiometer-carrying platform that is carried on the tetherline of a balloon sounding system. The platform, carried 30 m or more below the balloon to reduce the balloon`s effect on the radiometric measurements, is leveled by two automatic control loops that activate motors, gears and pulleys when the platform is off-level. The sensitivity of the automatic control loops to oscillatory motions of various frequencies and amplitudes can be adjusted using filters.

  8. Sonic hedgehog: restricted expression and limb dysmorphologies.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert E; Heaney, Simon J H; Lettice, Laura A

    2003-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog, SHH, is required for patterning the limb. The array of skeletal elements that compose the hands and feet, and the ordered arrangement of these bones to form the pattern of fingers and toes are dependent on SHH. The mechanism of action of SHH in the limb is not fully understood; however, an aspect that appears to be important is the localized, asymmetric expression of Shh. Shh is expressed in the posterior margin of the limb bud in a region defined as the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA). Analysis of mouse mutants which have polydactyly (extra toes) shows that asymmetric expression of Shh is lost due to the appearance of an ectopic domain of expression in the anterior limb margin. One such polydactylous mouse mutant, sasquatch (Ssq), maps to the corresponding chromosomal region of the human condition pre-axial polydactyly (PPD) and thus represents a model for this condition. The mutation responsible for Ssq is located 1 Mb away from the Shh gene; however, the mutation disrupts a long-range cis-acting regulator of Shh expression. By inference, human pre-axial polydactyly results from a similar disruption of Shh expression. Other human congenital abnormalities also map near the pre-axial polydactyly locus, suggesting a major chromosomal region for limb dysmorphologies. The distinct phenotypes range from loss of all bones of the hands and feet to syndactyly of the soft tissue and fusion of the digits. We discuss the role played by Shh expression in mouse mutant phenotypes and the human limb dysmorphologies. PMID:12587915

  9. Sonic hedgehog: restricted expression and limb dysmorphologies

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert E; Heaney, Simon JH; Lettice, Laura A

    2003-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog, SHH, is required for patterning the limb. The array of skeletal elements that compose the hands and feet, and the ordered arrangement of these bones to form the pattern of fingers and toes are dependent on SHH. The mechanism of action of SHH in the limb is not fully understood; however, an aspect that appears to be important is the localized, asymmetric expression of Shh. Shh is expressed in the posterior margin of the limb bud in a region defined as the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA). Analysis of mouse mutants which have polydactyly (extra toes) shows that asymmetric expression of Shh is lost due to the appearance of an ectopic domain of expression in the anterior limb margin. One such polydactylous mouse mutant, sasquatch (Ssq), maps to the corresponding chromosomal region of the human condition pre-axial polydactyly (PPD) and thus represents a model for this condition. The mutation responsible for Ssq is located 1 Mb away from the Shh gene; however, the mutation disrupts a long-range cis-acting regulator of Shh expression. By inference, human pre-axial polydactyly results from a similar disruption of Shh expression. Other human congenital abnormalities also map near the pre-axial polydactyly locus, suggesting a major chromosomal region for limb dysmorphologies. The distinct phenotypes range from loss of all bones of the hands and feet to syndactyly of the soft tissue and fusion of the digits. We discuss the role played by Shh expression in mouse mutant phenotypes and the human limb dysmorphologies. PMID:12587915

  10. [Therapy of phantom limb pain].

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Andreas; Zenz, Michael; Maier, Christoph

    2009-03-01

    About 80 % of all extremity amputations suffer from phantom limb pain following the operation. In this context, it is important to differentiate between painful phantom limb sensations, non-painful phantom limb sensations and residual limb pain. The pathophysiology of phantom limb pain is not fully understood. Current research findings ascribe a major pathophysiological role to cortical changes as well as a disturbed body perception. Peripheral and spinal mechanisms appear less relevant in the development of phantom limb pain. An essential part of the therapy is the pharmacological treatment with antidepressants, anticonvulsives and opioids. Another significant aspect of therapy is senso-motory training, important to mention here would be mirror therapy, lateralisation and motor imaging. In case of an elective amputation, an epidural or axiliar plexus catheter should be considered prior to the amputation. The perioperative treatment with ketamine is debated. PMID:19266417

  11. A New ERA in Global Temperature Monitoring with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy W.; Braswell, William D.; Christy, John R.

    1999-01-01

    The launch of the first Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) on the NOAA-15 spacecraft on 13 May 1998 marked a significant advance in our ability to monitor global temperatures. Compared to the Microwave Sounding Units (MSU) flying since 1978 on the TIROS-N series of NOAA polar orbiters, the AMSU offers better horizontal, vertical, and radiometric resolutions. It will allow routine monitoring of 1 1 (mostly) separate layers, compared to 2 or 3 with the MSU, including layers in the middle and upper stratosphere (2.5 hPa) where increasing carbon dioxide concentrations should be causing a cooling rate of about 1 deg. C per decade. More precise limb corrections combined with low noise will allow identification of subtle spatial temperature patterns associated with global cyclone activity.

  12. Limb lengthening in achondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chilbule, Sanjay K; Dutt, Vivek; Madhuri, Vrisha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stature lengthening in skeletal dysplasia is a contentious issue. Specific guidelines regarding the age and sequence of surgery, methods and extent of lengthening at each stage are not uniform around the world. Despite the need for multiple surgeries, with their attendant complications, parents demanding stature lengthening are not rare, due to the social bias and psychological effects experienced by these patients. This study describes the outcome and complications of extensive stature lengthening performed at our center. Materials and Methods: Eight achondroplasic and one hypochondroplasic patient underwent bilateral transverse lengthening for tibiae, humeri and femora. Tibia lengthening was carried out using a ring fixator and bifocal corticotomy, while a monolateral pediatric limb reconstruction system with unifocal corticotomy was used for the femur and humerus. Lengthening of each bone segment, height gain, healing index and complications were assessed. Subgroup analysis was carried out to assess the effect of age and bone segment on the healing index. Results: Nine patients aged five to 25 years (mean age 10.2 years) underwent limb lengthening procedures for 18 tibiae, 10 femora and 8 humeri. Four patients underwent bilateral lengthening of all three segments. The mean length gain for the tibia, femur and humerus was 15.4 cm (100.7%), 9.9 cm (52.8%) and 9.6 cm (77.9%), respectively. Healing index was 25.7, 25.6 and 20.6 days/cm, respectively, for the tibia, femur and humerus. An average of 33.3% height gain was attained. Lengthening of both tibia and femur added to projected height achieved as the 3rd percentile of standard height in three out of four patients. In all, 33 complications were encountered (0.9 complications per segment). Healing index was not affected by age or bone segment. Conclusion: Extensive limb lengthening (more than 50% over initial length) carries significant risk and should be undertaken only after due consideration. PMID

  13. Method of sound synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Miner, Nadine E.; Caudell, Thomas P.

    2004-06-08

    A sound synthesis method for modeling and synthesizing dynamic, parameterized sounds. The sound synthesis method yields perceptually convincing sounds and provides flexibility through model parameterization. By manipulating model parameters, a variety of related, but perceptually different sounds can be generated. The result is subtle changes in sounds, in addition to synthesis of a variety of sounds, all from a small set of models. The sound models can change dynamically according to changes in the simulation environment. The method is applicable to both stochastic (impulse-based) and non-stochastic (pitched) sounds.

  14. Lipotyphla limb myology comparison.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Pauline; Gasc, Jean-Pierre

    2002-05-01

    Fore- and hindlimb muscles were dissected in four species of Lipotyphla: the western European hedgehog Erinaceus europaeus (Erinaceidae, Erinaceinae); the moonrat Echinosorex gymnura (Erinaceidae, Hylomyinae or Galericinae); the tailless tenrec Tenrec ecaudatus (Tenrecidae, Tenrecinae); and the common European white-toothed shrew Crocidura russula (Soricidae, Soricinae). This work completely reviews the limb musculature of these walking mammals. Twelve myological characters were evaluated in order to disclose phylogenetic relationships. The cladogram obtained supported previous ones based on cranial and dental characters. This study shows that myological characters are valuable in phylogenetic analyses. PMID:11921044

  15. Sounds of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    Starting in the early 1960s, spacecraft-borne plasma wave instruments revealed that space is filled with an astonishing variety of radio and plasma wave sounds, which have come to be called "sounds of space." For over forty years these sounds have been collected and played to a wide variety of audiences, often as the result of press conferences or press releases involving various NASA projects for which the University of Iowa has provided plasma wave instruments. This activity has led to many interviews on local and national radio programs, and occasionally on programs haviang world-wide coverage, such as the BBC. As a result of this media coverage, we have been approached many times by composers requesting copies of our space sounds for use in their various projects, many of which involve electronic synthesis of music. One of these collaborations led to "Sun Rings," which is a musical event produced by the Kronos Quartet that has played to large audiences all over the world. With the availability of modern computer graphic techniques we have recently been attempting to integrate some of these sound of space into an educational audio/video web site that illustrates the scientific principles involved in the origin of space plasma waves. Typically I try to emphasize that a substantial gas pressure exists everywhere in space in the form of an ionized gas called a plasma, and that this plasma can lead to a wide variety of wave phenomenon. Examples of some of this audio/video material will be presented.

  16. Phantom limb pain after lower limb trauma: origins and treatments.

    PubMed

    Foell, Jens; Bekrater-Bodmann, Robin; Flor, Herta; Cole, Jonathan

    2011-12-01

    Phantom sensations, that is, sensations perceived in a body part that has been lost, are a common consequence of accidental or clinical extremity amputations. Most amputation patients report a continuing presence of the limb, with some describing additional sensations such as numbness, tickling, or cramping of the phantom limb. The type, frequency, and stability of these phantom sensations can vary immensely. The phenomenon of painful phantom sensations, that is, phantom limb pain, presents a challenge for practitioners and researchers and is often detrimental to the patient's quality of life. In addition to the use of conventional therapies for chronic pain disorders, recent years have seen the development of novel treatments for phantom limb pain, based on an increasing body of research on neurophysiological changes after amputation. This article describes the current state of research in regard to the demographics, causal factors, and treatments of phantom limb pain. PMID:22184752

  17. Observations of the MF-HF plasma wave emissions in active auroras by the sounding rocket experiments at Syowa station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyaoka, H.; Oya, H.

    1984-09-01

    Plasma waves in the range 0.1 to 10 MHz were observed in the polar ionosphere up to 230 km level by sounding rockets. Four categories of plasma wave emissions are identified with respect to the correlation to precipitating energetic particle data. These are the z mode waves generated by beam instability (cyclotron or inverse Landau type) due to the field-aligned auroral electrons; electrostatic plasma waves in the frequency range lower than the electron cyclotron frequency mode waves; continuum emissions emanating from the upper side of the ionosphere; and leaked auroral kilometric radiation, propagating down towards the ionosphere as whistlers.

  18. Limb Ischemic Perconditioning Attenuates Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption by Inhibiting Activity of MMP-9 and Occludin Degradation after Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changhong; Li, Ning; Wang, Brian; Yang, Yong; Gao, Jinhuan; Li, Sijie; Ding, Yuchuan; Jin, Kunlin; Ji, Xunming

    2015-01-01

    Remote ischemic perconditioning (PerC) has been proved to have neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia, however, the effect of PerC on the BBB disruption and underlying mechanisms remains largely unknown. To address these issues, total 90 adult male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were used. The rats underwent 90-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and the limb remote ischemic PerC was immediately applied after the onset of MCAO. We found that limb remote PerC protected BBB breakdown and brain edema, in parallel with reduced infarct volume and improved neurological deficits, after MCAO. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that MCAO resulted in disrupted continuity of claudin-5 staining in the cerebral endothelial cells with significant gap formation, which was significantly improved after PerC. Western blot analysis demonstrated that expression of tight junction (TJ) protein occludin was significantly increased, but other elements of TJ proteins, claudin-5 and ZO-1, in the BBB endothelial cells were not altered at 48 h after PerC, compared to MCAO group. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9), which was involved in TJ protein degradation, was decreased after PerC. Interestingly, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2), an upstream of MMP-9 signaling, was significantly reduced in the PerC group. Our data suggest that PerC inhibits MMP-9-mediated occludin degradation, which could lead to decreased BBB disruption and brain edema after ischemic stroke. PMID:26618042

  19. Korotkoff Sounds.

    PubMed

    Shennan; Halligan

    1996-12-01

    We were interested in the historical perspective that Arabidze et al. [1] brought to the subject of Korotkoff's auscultatory method of measuring blood pressure. The original description by the Reverend Stephen Hales performing the very first blood pressure measurement (which was actually published in 1733) does not make reference to a column of water as the authors suggest [2]. Hales wrote: 'Then untying the Ligature on the Artery, the Blood rose in the Tube eight Feet three Inches.'. He goes on to state that, 'When it was at its full Height, it would rise and fall at and after each Pulse two, three, or four Inches, and sometimes it would fall twelve or fourteen Inches, and have there for a time the same vibrations up and down at and after each Pulse, as it had, when it was at its full Height; to which it would rise again, after forty or fifty Pulses'. We believe this fall of '12 or 14 in' to have been the first description of blood pressure variability, which has wrongly been attributed to respirations by subsequent authors [3]. The mare's pulse rate was described to be about 50 beats per minute; therefore an unanaesthetized horse would not be likely to have a respiration rate of once per minute. One further important point of error concerning the Korotkoff sounds is their reproducibility. We have demonstrated recently that phase IV is reproduced or identified poorly, both in adults and even during pregnancy, when it has been recommended to be used in favour of phase V. We have also demonstrated that phase I (systolic blood pressure) is perceived to be significantly clearer than phase V [4]. PMID:10226281

  20. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  1. Evaluation of muscle metabolic activity in the lower limb of a transfemoral amputee using a prosthesis by using (18)F-FDG PET imaging--an application of PET imaging to rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Keiko; Yamaji, Takehiko; Ichikawa, Akihiro; Inoue, Tomio; Takagishi, Kenji; Endo, Keigo

    2004-07-01

    This study used FDG PET to evaluate the lower limb muscles metabolic activities of transfemoral amputees during walking with prostheses. As a preliminary study, FDG PET was applied for two normal adult volunteers to evaluate muscle activity in the lower extremities after gait exercise. This same method was applied for two amputee volunteers with prostheses. We found that FDG accumulated more in both gluteus medius muscles after gait exercise compared to other muscles in normal adult volunteers. In the skilled amputee volunteer, FDG uptake increased in the adductor and gluteus medius in the amputated side, while in the unskilled the adductor, gluteus maximus, and gluteus medius showed increased FDG uptake only in the normal side. This result suggests that basic metabolic changes such as an increase in oxidative metabolism and less reliance on glycolytic activity would occur as a result of skeletal muscle training in amputees. PMID:15183449

  2. SPORTS INJURIES OF THE UPPER LIMBS

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rogerio Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Sports injuries of the upper limbs are very common in physical activities and therefore, they need to be studied in detail, taking into consideration specific aspects of the types of sports practiced. Special attention should be paid to the dynamics of the shoulder girdle and the entire scapular belt, since the most appropriate treatment for athletes can only be provided in this manner. This can also help to prevent recurrences, which can occur in some cases because athletes always seek to return to their pre-injury level of sports activity. This article will focus primarily on the management of upper-limb tendon injuries, from the physiopathology through to the new methods of injury treatment that are more prevalent in sports practice in Brazil. PMID:27022529

  3. Active Region Soft X-Ray Spectra as Observed Using Sounding Rocket Measurements from the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), - a Modified SDO/EVE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Woods, T. N.; Jones, A. R.; Caspi, A.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of solar active regions (ARs) in the soft x-ray spectral range (0.5 to 3.0 nm) were made on sounding rocket flight NASA 36.290 using a modified Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), a pinhole camera on the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) sounding rocket instrument. The suite of EVE rocket instruments is designed for under-flight calibrations of the orbital EVE on SDO. While the sounding rocket EVE instrument is for the most part a duplicate of the EVE on SDO, the SAM channel on the rocket version was modified in 2012 to include a free-standing transmission grating so that it could provide spectrally resolved images of the solar disk with the best signal to noise ratio for the brightest features on it, such as ARs. Calibrations of the EVE sounding rocket instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (NIST SURF) have provided a measurement of the SAM absolute spectral response function and a mapping of wavelength separation in the grating diffraction pattern. For solar observations, this spectral separation is on a similar scale to the spatial size of the AR on the CCD, so dispersed AR images associated with emission lines of similar wavelength tend to overlap. Furthermore, SAM shares a CCD detector with MEGS-A, a separate EVE spectrometer channel, and artifacts of the MEGS-A signal (a set of bright spectral lines) appear in the SAM images. For these reasons some processing and analysis of the solar images obtained by SAM must be performed in order to determine spectra of the observed ARs. We present a method for determining AR spectra from the SAM rocket images and report initial soft X-ray spectra for two of the major active regions (AR11877 and AR11875) observed on flight 36.290 on 21 October 2013 at about 18:30 UT. We also compare our results with concurrent measurements from other solar soft x-ray instrumentation.

  4. Making Sound Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter F., III

    2007-01-01

    Sound provides and offers amazing insights into the world. Sound waves may be defined as mechanical energy that moves through air or other medium as a longitudinal wave and consists of pressure fluctuations. Humans and animals alike use sound as a means of communication and a tool for survival. Mammals, such as bats, use ultrasonic sound waves to…

  5. The Sound of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  6. Sounds Exaggerate Visual Shape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeny, Timothy D.; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Ortega, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    While perceiving speech, people see mouth shapes that are systematically associated with sounds. In particular, a vertically stretched mouth produces a /woo/ sound, whereas a horizontally stretched mouth produces a /wee/ sound. We demonstrate that hearing these speech sounds alters how we see aspect ratio, a basic visual feature that contributes…

  7. Using Therapeutic Sound With Progressive Audiologic Tinnitus Management

    PubMed Central

    Henry, James A.; Zaugg, Tara L.; Myers, Paula J.; Schechter, Martin A.

    2008-01-01

    Management of tinnitus generally involves educational counseling, stress reduction, and/or the use of therapeutic sound. This article focuses on therapeutic sound, which can involve three objectives: (a) producing a sense of relief from tinnitus-associated stress (using soothing sound); (b) passively diverting attention away from tinnitus by reducing contrast between tinnitus and the acoustic environment (using background sound); and (c) actively diverting attention away from tinnitus (using interesting sound). Each of these goals can be accomplished using three different types of sound—broadly categorized as environmental sound, music, and speech—resulting in nine combinations of uses of sound and types of sound to manage tinnitus. The authors explain the uses and types of sound, how they can be combined, and how the different combinations are used with Progressive Audiologic Tinnitus Management. They also describe how sound is used with other sound-based methods of tinnitus management (Tinnitus Masking, Tinnitus Retraining Therapy, and Neuromonics). PMID:18664499

  8. Management of Major Limb Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Management of major limb injuries is a daunting challenge, especially as many of these patients have severe associated injuries. In trying to save life, often the limb is sacrificed. The existing guidelines on managing such trauma are often confusing. There is scope to lay down such protocols along with the need for urgent transfer of such patients to a multispecialty center equipped to salvage life and limb for maximizing outcome. This review article comprehensively deals with the issue of managing such major injuries. PMID:24511296

  9. PRECICE intramedullary limb lengthening system.

    PubMed

    Paley, Dror

    2015-05-01

    The PRECICE(®) Intramedullary Limb Lengthening System (Ellipse Technologies Inc., CA, USA) is a remotely controlled, magnetically driven, implantable limb lengthening intramedullary nail system. It has both CE mark and US FDA clearance for its first- (2011) and second-generation (2013) implants. It is indicated for the treatment of limb length discrepancy and short stature. It has been used worldwide in over 1000 cases. Its reported and published results in over 250 cases has been excellent with less pain and lower complication rates than with external fixation methods or previous implantable nail systems. PMID:25692375

  10. Prevalence and Characteristics of Phantom Limb Pain and Residual Limb Pain in the Long Term after Upper Limb Amputation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desmond, Deirdre M.; MacLachlan, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to describe the prevalence and characteristics of phantom limb pain and residual limb pain after upper limb amputation. One-hundred and forty-one participants (139 males; mean age 74.8 years; mean time since amputation 50.1 years) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing residual and phantom limb pain experience. Prevalence…

  11. Characteristics of human knee muscle coordination during isometric contractions in a standing posture: The effect of limb task

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, Toran D.; Manal, Kurt; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Buchanan, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Different functional roles for the hands have been demonstrated, however leg control is not as well understood. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate bilateral knee neuromuscular control to determine if the limb receiving greater attention would have more well-tuned control compared to an unattended limb. Surface electrodes were placed on seven muscles of each limb, before standing on two force platforms. Visual feedback was given of the forces and moments of the “focus limb,” but not the “unattended limb.” Static isometric forces were matched with their focus limb, requiring their unattended limb to push in the opposite direction, using a combination of forward-backward-medial-lateral shear forces while muscle activity was collected bilaterally. There was a significant main effect for limb task (p = 0.02), with the medial hamstrings being more specific (p = 0.001) while performing the unattended limb and the lateral hamstring being more well-tuned (p = 0.007) while performing the focus limb task. The focus limb's medial and lateral gastrocnemius were principally active in the forwards direction, but only the unattended limb's lateral gastrocnemius was active in the backwards direction. Findings suggest unique neuromuscular control strategies are used for the legs depending on limb task. PMID:23790392

  12. Limb and hemispatial hypometria.

    PubMed

    Meador, K J; Moore, E E; Martin, R C; Loring, D W; Hess, D C; Heilman, K M

    2000-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that unilateral cerebral lesions produce hypometric limb movements of the contralateral arm and hemispatial (i.e., directional) hypometria for movements towards contralateral hemispace. In the present study, we investigated 10 patients with right cerebral lesions and 25 healthy controls using a task to uncouple deficits in sensory perceptual systems and motor-action output systems on directional hypometria. This task required participants, with their eyes closed, to reproduce lateral and medial horizontal displacements (15-27 cm) with each arm. Each participant was seated at a waist high table and had their hand placed at an origin point aligned with the axillary fold on the same side. Their hand was moved by the investigator from the origin point to a target point and brought back to the point of origin (input displacement). The participant was then asked to return their hand to either the same target point or to an equidistant target point in the opposite direction. Healthy dextral participants were significantly more hypometric with their right arm, but patients with right cerebral lesions exhibited an opposite pattern with overall left arm hypometria. In addition, patients were significantly more hypometric for movements when output displacements were toward left hemispace. No effect was found for direction of sensory input. The results suggest that the directional hypometria is predominantly produced by hemispatial output deficits. PMID:10761369

  13. Lower-Limb Rehabilitation Robot Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhabba, E. M.; Shafie, A. A.; Khan, M. R.; Ariffin, K.

    2013-12-01

    It is a general assumption that robotics will play an important role in therapy activities within rehabilitation treatment. In the last decade, the interest in the field has grown exponentially mainly due to the initial success of the early systems and the growing demand caused by increasing numbers of stroke patients and their associate rehabilitation costs. As a result, robot therapy systems have been developed worldwide for training of both the upper and lower extremities. This paper investigates and proposes a lower-limb rehabilitation robot that is used to help patients with lower-limb paralysis to improve and resume physical functions. The proposed rehabilitation robot features three rotary joints forced by electric motors providing linear motions. The paper covers mechanism design and optimization, kinematics analysis, trajectory planning, wearable sensors, and the control system design. The design and control system demonstrate that the proposed rehabilitation robot is safe and reliable with the effective design and better kinematic performance.

  14. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Chronic Limb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Naoum, Joseph J.; Arbid, Elias J.

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of chronic limb ischemia involves the restoration of pulsatile blood flow to the distal extremity. Some patients cannot be treated with endovascular means or with open surgery; some may have medical comorbidities that render them unfit for surgery, while others may have persistent ischemia or pain even in the face of previous attempts at reperfusion. In spinal cord stimulation (SCS), a device with electrodes is implanted in the epidural space to stimulate sensory fibers. This activates cell-signaling molecules that in turn cause the release of vasodilatory molecules, a decrease in vascular resistance, and relaxation of smooth muscle cells. SCS also suppresses sympathetic vasoconstriction and pain transmission. When patient selection is based on microcirculatory parameters, SCS therapy can significantly improve pain relief, halt the progression of ulcers, and potentially achieve limb salvage. PMID:23805343

  15. Why study human limb malformations?

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Andrew OM

    2003-01-01

    Congenital limb malformations occur in 1 in 500 to 1 in 1000 human live births and include both gross reduction defects and more subtle alterations in the number, length and anatomy of the digits. The major causes of limb malformations are abnormal genetic programming and intra-uterine disruption to development. The identification of causative gene mutations is important for genetic counselling and also provides insights into the mechanisms controlling limb development. This article illustrates some of the lessons learnt from the study of human limb malformation, organized into seven categories. These are: (1) identification of novel genes, (2) allelic mutation series, (3) pleiotropy, (4) qualitative or (5) quantitative differences between mouse and human development, (6) physical and teratogenic disruption, and (7) unusual biological phenomena. PMID:12587917

  16. Tropospheric Ozone from limb nadir matching of MIPAS and SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahpoe, Nabiz; Ebojie, Felix; Jia, Jia; Weber, Mark; Rozanov, Alexei; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Burrows, John P.; von Clarmann, Thomas; Stiller, Gabriele; Laeng, Alexandra; Lossow, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The tropospheric total ozone column (TTOC) is retrieved by applying the limb nadir matching method (LNM) for two different sensors on board the Envisat satellite. Each sensor provides independent information of the total ozone column (TOC, nadir) and stratospheric ozone column (SOC, limb). The latter is derived from the limb viewing geometry of MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding), while total ozone column (TOC) from the nadir viewing SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging spectrometer for AtMospheric CHartrographY) measurements. The residual ozone column or tropospheric total ozone column (TTOC) is then derived by subtraction of the SOC from the collocated TOC. Although this method is straightforward, the underlying difficulties are the exact knowledge of the tropopause height, matching/collocation of the two measurements, and instrumental differences between two sensors. Our results are compared with available tropospheric ozone columns derived from the SCIAMACHY - SCIAMACHY limb-nadir combination in order to understand the differences and the potential of LNM method for different sensor combination.

  17. Moth hearing and sound communication.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryo; Takanashi, Takuma; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Active echolocation enables bats to orient and hunt the night sky for insects. As a counter-measure against the severe predation pressure many nocturnal insects have evolved ears sensitive to ultrasonic bat calls. In moths bat-detection was the principal purpose of hearing, as evidenced by comparable hearing physiology with best sensitivity in the bat echolocation range, 20-60 kHz, across moths in spite of diverse ear morphology. Some eared moths subsequently developed sound-producing organs to warn/startle/jam attacking bats and/or to communicate intraspecifically with sound. Not only the sounds for interaction with bats, but also mating signals are within the frequency range where bats echolocate, indicating that sound communication developed after hearing by "sensory exploitation". Recent findings on moth sound communication reveal that close-range (~ a few cm) communication with low-intensity ultrasounds "whispered" by males during courtship is not uncommon, contrary to the general notion of moths predominantly being silent. Sexual sound communication in moths may apply to many eared moths, perhaps even a majority. The low intensities and high frequencies explain that this was overlooked, revealing a bias towards what humans can sense, when studying (acoustic) communication in animals. PMID:25261361

  18. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  19. Myoelectric control of artificial limb inspired by quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siomau, Michael; Jiang, Ning

    2015-03-01

    Precise and elegant coordination of a prosthesis across many degrees of freedom represents a significant challenge to efficient rehabilitation of people with limb deficiency. Processing the electrical neural signals collected from the surface of the remnant muscles of the stump is a common way to initiate and control the different movements available to the artificial limb. Based on the assumption that there are distinguishable and repeatable signal patterns among different types of muscular activation, the problem of prosthesis control reduces to one of pattern recognition. Widely accepted classical methods for pattern recognition, however, cannot provide simultaneous and proportional control of the artificial limb. Here we show that, in principle, quantum information processing of the neural signals allows us to overcome the above-mentioned difficulties, suggesting a very simple scheme for myoelectric control of artificial limb with advanced functionalities.

  20. Reflections on the present and future of upper limb prostheses.

    PubMed

    Farina, Dario; Amsüss, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Despite progress in research and media attention on active upper limb prostheses, presently the most common commercial upper limb prosthetic devices are not fundamentally different from solutions offered almost one century ago. Limited information transfer for both control and sensory-motor integration and challenges in socket technology have been major obstacles. By analysing the present state-of-the-art and academic achievements, we provide our opinion on the future of upper limb prostheses. We believe that surgical procedures for muscle reinnervation and osseointegration will become increasingly clinically relevant; muscle electrical signals will remain the main clinical means for prosthetic control; and chronic electrode implants, first in muscles (control), then in nerves (sensory feedback), will become viable clinical solutions. After decades of suspended clinically relevant progress, it is foreseeable that a new generation of upper limb prostheses will enter the market in the near future based on such advances, thereby offering substantial clinical benefit for patients. PMID:26924191

  1. Influences of sensory input from the limbs on feline corticospinal neurons during postural responses

    PubMed Central

    Karayannidou, A; Deliagina, T G; Tamarova, Z A; Sirota, M G; Zelenin, P V; Orlovsky, G N; Beloozerova, I N

    2008-01-01

    The dorsal-side-up body posture of standing quadrupeds is maintained by coordinated activity of all limbs. Somatosensory input from the limbs evokes postural responses when the supporting surface is perturbed. The aim of this study was to reveal the contribution of sensory inputs from individual limbs to the posture-related modulation of pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) arising in the primary motor cortex. We recorded the activity of PTNs from the limb representation of motor cortex in the cat maintaining balance on a platform periodically tilted in the frontal plane. Each PTN was recorded during standing on four limbs, and when two or three limbs were lifted from the platform and thus did not signal its displacement to motor cortex. By comparing PTN responses to tilts in different tests we found that the amplitude and the phase of the response in the majority of them were determined primarily by the sensory input from the corresponding contralateral limb. In a portion of PTNs, this input originated from afferents of the peripheral receptive field. Sensory input from the ipsilateral limb, as well as input from limbs of the other girdle made a much smaller contribution to the PTN modulation. These results show that, during postural activity, a key role of PTNs is the feedback control of the corresponding contralateral limb and, to a lesser extent, the coordination of posture within a girdle and between the two girdles. PMID:17974591

  2. An investigation into the bilateral functional differences of the lower limb muscles in standing and walking.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shengyun; Xu, Jiali; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Guoru

    2016-01-01

    To date, most studies use surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals as the control source on active rehabilitation robots, and unilateral data are collected based on the gait symmetry hypothesis, which has caused much controversy. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the sEMG activity asymmetry of bilateral muscles in lower extremities during functional tasks. Nine participants were instructed to perform static and dynamic steady state tests. sEMG signals from the tibialis anterior, soleus, medial gastrocnemius and lateral gastrocnemius muscles of bilateral lower extremities were recorded in the experiments. Muscle activities are quantified in terms of sEMG amplitude. We investigated whether characteristics of left limb and the one of the right limb have the same statistical characteristics during functional tasks using The Wilcoxon rank-sum test, and studied dynamic signal irregularity degree for sEMG activities via sample entropy. The total of muscle activities showed significant differences between left limb and right limb during the static steady state (p = 0.000). For dynamic steady states, there were significant differences for most muscle activities between left limb and right limb at different speeds (p = 0.000). Nevertheless, there was no difference between the lateral gastrocnemius for bilateral limb at 2.0 kilometers per hour (p = 0.060). For medial gastrocnemius, differences were not found between left limb and right limb at 1.0 and 3.0 kilometers per hours (p = 0.390 and p = 0.085, respectively). Similarly, there was no difference for soleus at 3.0 kilometers per hour (p = 0.115). The importance of the differences in muscle activities between left limb and right limb were found. These results can potentially be used for evaluating lower limb extremity function of special populations (elderly people or stroke patients) in an objective and simple method. PMID:27602282

  3. An investigation into the bilateral functional differences of the lower limb muscles in standing and walking

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shengyun; Xu, Jiali; wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    To date, most studies use surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals as the control source on active rehabilitation robots, and unilateral data are collected based on the gait symmetry hypothesis, which has caused much controversy. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the sEMG activity asymmetry of bilateral muscles in lower extremities during functional tasks. Nine participants were instructed to perform static and dynamic steady state tests. sEMG signals from the tibialis anterior, soleus, medial gastrocnemius and lateral gastrocnemius muscles of bilateral lower extremities were recorded in the experiments. Muscle activities are quantified in terms of sEMG amplitude. We investigated whether characteristics of left limb and the one of the right limb have the same statistical characteristics during functional tasks using The Wilcoxon rank-sum test, and studied dynamic signal irregularity degree for sEMG activities via sample entropy. The total of muscle activities showed significant differences between left limb and right limb during the static steady state (p = 0.000). For dynamic steady states, there were significant differences for most muscle activities between left limb and right limb at different speeds (p = 0.000). Nevertheless, there was no difference between the lateral gastrocnemius for bilateral limb at 2.0 kilometers per hour (p = 0.060). For medial gastrocnemius, differences were not found between left limb and right limb at 1.0 and 3.0 kilometers per hours (p = 0.390 and p = 0.085, respectively). Similarly, there was no difference for soleus at 3.0 kilometers per hour (p = 0.115). The importance of the differences in muscle activities between left limb and right limb were found. These results can potentially be used for evaluating lower limb extremity function of special populations (elderly people or stroke patients) in an objective and simple method. PMID:27602282

  4. Active Region Soft X-Ray Spectra and Temperature Analyses based on Sounding Rocket Measurements from the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), - a Modified SDO/EVE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, Leonid V.; Wieman, Seth; Woods, Thomas N.; Jones, Andrew; Moore, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Some initial results of soft x-ray spectral (0.5 to 3.0 nm) observations of active regions (AR11877 and AR11875) from a sounding rocket flight NASA 36.290 on 21 October 2013 at about 18:30 UT are reported. These observations were made by a Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), a rocket version of the EUV Variability Experiment’s (EVE) channel, a pinhole camera modified for EVE rocket suite of instruments to include a free-standing transmission grating (200 nm period), which provided spectrally-resolved images of the solar disk. Intensity ratios for strong emission lines extracted from temporally averaged SAM spectral profiles of the ARs were compared to appropriately convolved modeled CHIANTI spectra. These ratios represent the AR’s temperature structures, which are compared to the structures derived from some other observations and temperature models.

  5. Isolated Limb Infusion for Limb Salvage in Limb Threatening Extremity Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Nasreen A.; Turaga, Kiran K.; Gonzalez, Ricardo J.; Conley, Anthony; Reed, Damon; Bui, Marilyn M.; Cheong, David; Letson, Douglas G.; Zager, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Locally advanced, limb threatening soft tissue sarcomas (STS) pose a significant treatment challenge. We report our experience using isolated limb infusion (ILI) in patients with unresectable extremity STS. Methods Twenty-two patients with extremity STS underwent 26 ILIs with melphalan and dactinomycin. Patient characteristics, intra-operative parameters and toxicity were recorded. Outcome measures included limb-salvage and in-field response rates. Results Of the 19 lower and 7 upper extremity ILIs, Wieberdink grade III toxicity or less was observed in all. Median follow up was 11 months. Seventeen patients were evaluable at 3 months post ILI with an overall response rate of 42%. Four (24%) had complete response (CR), 3 (18%) partial response (PR), 3 (18%) stable disease (SD) and 7 (41%) progressive disease (PD). Twelve of 17 (71%) underwent successful limb preservation at a median of 9 months post ILI. Two (12%) were downstaged to resectable disease and remain NED after surgery at 30 and 22 months post ILI. Conclusions ILI is an attractive modality that provides regional disease control and limb preservation in patients with limb threatening sarcoma. Although short term results appear encouraging, long term follow up is needed to fully assess the role of ILI in unresectable extremity STS. PMID:23205633

  6. Functional Reorganization of the Primary Somatosensory Cortex of a Phantom Limb Pain Patient.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia; Guo, Xiaoli; Xia, Xiaolei; Peng, Weiwei; Wang, Wuchao; Li, Shulin; Zhang, Ya; Hu, Li

    2016-07-01

    Functional reorganization of the somatosensory system was widely observed in phantom limb pain patients. Whereas some studies demonstrated that the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) of the amputated limb was engaged with the regions around it, others showed that phantom limb pain was associated with preserved structure and functional organization in the former brain region. However, according to the law of use and disuse, the sensitivity of S1 of the amputated limb to pain-related context should be enhanced due to the adaptation to the long-lasting phantom limb pain experience. Here, we collected neurophysiological data from a patient with 21-year phantom limb pain using electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques. EEG data showed that both laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) and tactile-evoked potentials (TEPs) were clearly presented only when radiant-heat laser pulses and electrical pulses were delivered to the shoulder of the healthy limb, but not of the amputated limb. This observation suggested the functional deficit of somatosensory pathways at the amputated side. FMRI data showed that significant larger brain activations by painful rather than non-painful stimuli in video clips were observed not only at visual-related brain areas and anterior/mid-cingulate cortex, but also at S1 contralateral to the amputated limb. This observation suggested the increased sensitivity of S1 of the amputated limb to the pain-related context. In addition, such increase of sensitivity was significantly larger if the context was associated with the amputated limb of the patient. In summary, our findings provided novel evidence for a possible neuroplasticity of S1 of the amputated limb: in an amputee with long-lasting phantom limb pain, the sensitivity of S1 to pain-related and amputated-limb-related context was greatly enhanced. PMID:27389122

  7. Sound wave transmission (image)

    MedlinePlus

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  8. VAS sounding data evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The VAS soundings derived by NOAA personnel and NASA personnel and rawinsonde soundings are compared: (1) directly by plotting on Skew t-log p diagrams; (2) by pairing rawinsonde soundings with the closest satellite soundings and calculating the mean and standard deviations of differences between the two data sets; and (3) by constructing synoptic and subsynoptic scale analyses with rawinsonde and satellite data. Differences for various parameters are discussed.

  9. Sounds in the Ocean at 1-100 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, William S. D.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Andrew, Rex K.; Odom, Robert I.

    2014-01-01

    Very-low-frequency sounds between 1 and 100 Hz propagate large distances in the ocean sound channel. Weather conditions, earthquakes, marine mammals, and anthropogenic activities influence sound levels in this band. Weather-related sounds result from interactions between waves, bubbles entrained by breaking waves, and the deformation of sea ice. Earthquakes generate sound in geologically active regions, and earthquake T waves propagate throughout the oceans. Blue and fin whales generate long bouts of sounds near 20 Hz that can dominate regional ambient noise levels seasonally. Anthropogenic sound sources include ship propellers, energy extraction, and seismic air guns and have been growing steadily. The increasing availability of long-term records of ocean sound will provide new opportunities for a deeper understanding of natural and anthropogenic sound sources and potential interactions between them.

  10. Sounds in the ocean at 1-100 Hz.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, William S D; Stafford, Kathleen M; Andrew, Rex K; Odom, Robert I

    2014-01-01

    Very-low-frequency sounds between 1 and 100 Hz propagate large distances in the ocean sound channel. Weather conditions, earthquakes, marine mammals, and anthropogenic activities influence sound levels in this band. Weather-related sounds result from interactions between waves, bubbles entrained by breaking waves, and the deformation of sea ice. Earthquakes generate sound in geologically active regions, and earthquake T waves propagate throughout the oceans. Blue and fin whales generate long bouts of sounds near 20 Hz that can dominate regional ambient noise levels seasonally. Anthropogenic sound sources include ship propellers, energy extraction, and seismic air guns and have been growing steadily. The increasing availability of long-term records of ocean sound will provide new opportunities for a deeper understanding of natural and anthropogenic sound sources and potential interactions between them. PMID:23876176

  11. LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

    1992-11-10

    This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0{sub 2} removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0{sub 2} emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

  12. Enlarge Your Sound Repertory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carle, Irmgard Lehrer; Martin, Isaiah

    1975-01-01

    Authors served up a variety of techniques for investigating sound sources and sound patterns. Have you considered creating a composition from breathing sounds? Or constructing a conversation in percussion? These ideas are included along with step-by-step directions for making nine percussion instruments. (Editor)

  13. The Sounds of Mandarin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Isabella Y.

    This phonology workbook on the sounds of Mandarin Chinese accompanies a 3-volume set of textbooks for the language. The workbook provides illustrations of the articulation of the sounds and offers exercises and drills for practicing each sound. For related documents in this series, see FL 002 773, FL 002 774, FL 002 776, and FL 002 777. (VM)

  14. The phantom limb in dreams.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Mulder and colleagues [Mulder, T., Hochstenbach, J., Dijkstra, P. U., Geertzen, J. H. B. (2008). Born to adapt, but not in your dreams. Consciousness and Cognition, 17, 1266-1271.] report that a majority of amputees continue to experience a normally-limbed body during their night dreams. They interprete this observation as a failure of the body schema to adapt to the new body shape. The present note does not question this interpretation, but points to the already existing literature on the phenomenology of the phantom limb in dreams. A summary of published investigations is complemented by a note on phantom phenomena in the dreams of paraplegic patients and persons born without a limb. Integration of the available data allows the recommendation for prospective studies to consider dream content in more detail. For instance, "adaptation" to the loss of a limb can also manifest itself by seeing oneself surrounded by amputees. Such projective types of anosognosia ("transitivism") in nocturnal dreams should also be experimentally induced in normally-limbed individuals, and some relevant techniques are mentioned. PMID:18313942

  15. Effects of Adjuvant Mental Practice on Affected Upper Limb Function Following a Stroke: Results of Three-Dimensional Motion Analysis, Fugl-Meyer Assessment of the Upper Extremity and Motor Activity Logs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of adjuvant mental practice (MP) on affected upper limb function following a stroke using three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis. Methods In this AB/BA crossover study, we studied 10 hemiplegic patients who had a stroke within the past 6 months. The patients were randomly allocated to two groups: one group received MP combined with conventional rehabilitation therapy for the first 3 weeks followed by conventional rehabilitation therapy alone for the final 3 weeks; the other group received the same therapy but in reverse order. The MP tasks included drinking from a cup and opening a door. MP was individually administered for 20 minutes, 3 days a week for 3 weeks. To assess the tasks, we used 3D motion analysis and three additional tests: the Fugl-Meyer Assessment of the upper extremity (FMA-UE) and the motor activity logs for amount of use (MAL-AOU) and quality of movement (MAL-QOM). Assessments were performed immediately before treatment (T0), 3 weeks into treatment (T1), and 6 weeks into treatment (T2). Results Based on the results of the 3D motion analysis and the FMA-UE index (p=0.106), the MAL-AOU scale (p=0.092), and MAL-QOM scale (p=0.273), adjuvant MP did not result in significant improvements. Conclusion Adjuvant MP had no significant effect on upper limb function following a stroke, according to 3D motion analysis and three clinical assessment tools (the FMA-UE index and the two MAL scales). The importance of this study is its use of objective 3D motion analysis to evaluate the effects of MP. Further studies will be needed to validate these findings. PMID:27446776

  16. Sound Levels in East Texas Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Aaron Lynn

    A survey of sound levels was taken in several Texas schools to determine the amount of noise and sound present by size of class, type of activity, location of building, and the presence of air conditioning and large amounts of glass. The data indicate that class size and relative amounts of glass have no significant bearing on the production of…

  17. LONG ISLAND SOUND STUDY 2002 CCMP IR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Long Island Sound Study Implementation Review (IR) summarizes the progress and challenges ahead for the for the Long Island Sound Study (LISS) through examination of it activities in relation to the CCMP. The LISS CCMP identified six major areas requiring management action: 1...

  18. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    During the period December 1976 through February 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center, two special soundings were taken at Antigua, West Indies, and at the Churchill Research Range, monthly activities were initiated to establish stratospheric ozone climatology. This report presents the data results and flight profiles for the period covered.

  19. Making Sounds with Rubber Bands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This physical science activity module was designed to facilitate developing concepts related to sound. It is intended for use primarily in elementary grades but may be useful at higher grades. It provides students with hands-on experience and observational skill development. The package provides: (1) a teacher background sheet; (2) an activity…

  20. A nonsense mutation in mouse Tardbp affects TDP43 alternative splicing activity and causes limb-clasping and body tone defects.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Thomas; McGoldrick, Philip; Fratta, Pietro; de Oliveira, Hugo M; Kent, Rosie; Phatak, Vinaya; Brandner, Sebastian; Blanco, Gonzalo; Greensmith, Linda; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in TARDBP, encoding Tar DNA binding protein-43 (TDP43), cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Attempts to model TDP43 dysfunction in mice have used knockouts or transgenic overexpressors, which have revealed the difficulties of manipulating TDP43, whose level is tightly controlled by auto-regulation. In a complementary approach, to create useful mouse models for the dissection of TDP43 function and pathology, we have identified a nonsense mutation in the endogenous mouse Tardbp gene through screening an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutant mouse archive. The mutation is predicted to cause a Q101X truncation in TDP43. We have characterised Tardbp(Q101X) mice to investigate this mutation in perturbing TDP43 biology at endogenous expression levels. We found the Tardbp(Q101X) mutation is homozygous embryonic lethal, highlighting the importance of TDP43 in early development. Heterozygotes (Tardbp(+/Q101X) ) have abnormal levels of mutant transcript, but we find no evidence of the truncated protein and mice have similar full-length TDP43 protein levels as wildtype littermates. Nevertheless, Tardbp(+/Q101X) mice have abnormal alternative splicing of downstream gene targets, and limb-clasp and body tone phenotypes. Thus the nonsense mutation in Tardbp causes a mild loss-of-function phenotype and behavioural assessment suggests underlying neurological abnormalities. Due to the role of TDP43 in ALS, we investigated potential interactions with another known causative gene, mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Tardbp(+/Q101X) mice were crossed with the SOD1(G93Adl) transgenic mouse model of ALS. Behavioural and physiological assessment did not reveal modifying effects on the progression of ALS-like symptoms in the double mutant progeny from this cross. In summary, the Tardbp(Q101X) mutant mice are a useful tool for the dissection of TDP43 protein regulation, effects on splicing, embryonic development and neuromuscular phenotypes

  1. A Nonsense Mutation in Mouse Tardbp Affects TDP43 Alternative Splicing Activity and Causes Limb-Clasping and Body Tone Defects

    PubMed Central

    Fratta, Pietro; de Oliveira, Hugo M.; Kent, Rosie; Phatak, Vinaya; Brandner, Sebastian; Blanco, Gonzalo; Greensmith, Linda; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in TARDBP, encoding Tar DNA binding protein-43 (TDP43), cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Attempts to model TDP43 dysfunction in mice have used knockouts or transgenic overexpressors, which have revealed the difficulties of manipulating TDP43, whose level is tightly controlled by auto-regulation. In a complementary approach, to create useful mouse models for the dissection of TDP43 function and pathology, we have identified a nonsense mutation in the endogenous mouse Tardbp gene through screening an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutant mouse archive. The mutation is predicted to cause a Q101X truncation in TDP43. We have characterised TardbpQ101X mice to investigate this mutation in perturbing TDP43 biology at endogenous expression levels. We found the TardbpQ101X mutation is homozygous embryonic lethal, highlighting the importance of TDP43 in early development. Heterozygotes (Tardbp+/Q101X) have abnormal levels of mutant transcript, but we find no evidence of the truncated protein and mice have similar full-length TDP43 protein levels as wildtype littermates. Nevertheless, Tardbp+/Q101X mice have abnormal alternative splicing of downstream gene targets, and limb-clasp and body tone phenotypes. Thus the nonsense mutation in Tardbp causes a mild loss-of-function phenotype and behavioural assessment suggests underlying neurological abnormalities. Due to the role of TDP43 in ALS, we investigated potential interactions with another known causative gene, mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Tardbp+/Q101X mice were crossed with the SOD1G93Adl transgenic mouse model of ALS. Behavioural and physiological assessment did not reveal modifying effects on the progression of ALS-like symptoms in the double mutant progeny from this cross. In summary, the TardbpQ101X mutant mice are a useful tool for the dissection of TDP43 protein regulation, effects on splicing, embryonic development and neuromuscular phenotypes. These mice are

  2. Effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT 808 nm) on lower limb spastic muscle activity in chronic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    das Neves, Marcele Florêncio; Dos Reis, Mariana César Ribeiro; de Andrade, Eliana Aparecida Fonseca; Lima, Fernanda Pupio Silva; Nicolau, Renata Amadei; Arisawa, Emília Ângela Loschiavo; Andrade, Adriano Oliveira; Lima, Mário Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    A cerebrovascular accident (CVA) may affect basic motor functions, including spasticity that may be present in the upper extremity and/or the lower extremity, post-stroke. Spasticity causes pain, muscle force reduction, and decreases the time to onset of muscle fatigue. Several therapeutic resources have been employed to treat CVA to promote functional recovery. The clinical use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) for rehabilitation of muscular disorders has provided better muscle responses. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the application of LLLT in spastic muscles in patients with spasticity post-CVA. A double-blind clinical trial was conducted with 15 volunteer stroke patients who presented with post-stroke spasticity. Both males and females were treated; the average age was 51.5 ± 11.8 years old; the participants entered the study ranging from 11 to 48 months post-stroke onset. The patients participated in three consecutive phases (control, placebo, and real LLLT), in which all tests of isometric endurance of their hemiparetic lower limb were performed. LLLT (diode laser, 100 mW 808 nm, beam spot area 0.0314 cm(2), 127.39 J/cm(2)/point, 40 s) was applied before isometric endurance. After the real LLLT intervention, we observed significant reduction in the visual analogue scale for pain intensity (p = 0.0038), increased time to onset of muscle fatigue (p = 0.0063), and increased torque peak (p = 0.0076), but no significant change in the root mean square (RMS) value (electric signal in the motor unit during contraction, as obtained with surface electromyography). Our results suggest that the application of LLLT may contribute to increased recruitment of muscle fibers and, hence, to increase the onset time of the spastic muscle fatigue, reducing pain intensity in stroke patients with spasticity, as has been observed in healthy subjects and athletes. PMID:27299571

  3. Influence of adjustments to amputation and artificial limb on quality of life in patients following lower limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Richa; van den Heuvel, Wim J A; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam; van Dijk, Jitse P

    2014-03-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate the relationship between adjustments to amputation and artificial limb, and quality of life (QoL), and to analyse the influence of sociodemographic, medical and amputation-related factors on this relationship. Patients with unilateral and noncongenital lower limb amputation who were using artificial limb were interviewed (n=368) using structured questionnaires. The Trinity Amputation and Prosthesis Experience Scales (TAPES) were used to assess adjustments to amputation and artificial limb and the MOS Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) was used to assess the physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) component summary of QoL. Absence of comorbidity and residual stump pain, being employed, young age, less functional restriction, being more adjusted to limitation, increased social adjustment and less restriction in athletic activity were related to better PCS scores. Absence of comorbidity and phantom limb pain, nonuse of assistive device, being more adjusted to limitation, increased social adjustment and being less functionally restricted were related to higher MCS scores. Comorbidity had a modifying effect on both PCS and MCS scores. In addition, age, being employed and residual stump pain had a modifying influence on PCS, whereas assistive device use and phantom limb pain had a modifying influence on MCS. Our findings show that TAPES subscales have a modifying effect on the associations between several background (sociodemographic and amputation characteristics) and QoL (PCS and MCS). This indicates that adjustments to amputation and artificial limb are the key determinants of QoL in individuals following lower limb amputation. PMID:24157864

  4. Sounds like Team Spirit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2002-01-01

    I recently accompanied my son Dan to one of his guitar lessons. As I sat in a separate room, I focused on the music he was playing and the beautiful, robust sound that comes from a well-played guitar. Later that night, I woke up around 3 am. I tend to have my best thoughts at this hour. The trouble is I usually roll over and fall back asleep. This time I was still awake an hour later, so I got up and jotted some notes down in my study. I was thinking about the pure, honest sound of a well-played instrument. From there my mind wandered into the realm of high-performance teams and successful projects. (I know this sounds weird, but this is the sort of thing I think about at 3 am. Maybe you have your own weird thoughts around that time.) Consider a team in relation to music. It seems to me that a crack team can achieve a beautiful, perfect unity in the same way that a band of brilliant musicians can when they're in harmony with one another. With more than a little satisfaction I have to admit, I started to think about the great work performed for you by the Knowledge Sharing team, including this magazine you are reading. Over the past two years I personally have received some of my greatest pleasures as the APPL Director from the Knowledge Sharing activities - the Masters Forums, NASA Center visits, ASK Magazine. The Knowledge Sharing team expresses such passion for their work, just like great musicians convey their passion in the music they play. In the case of Knowledge Sharing, there are many factors that have made this so enjoyable (and hopefully worthwhile for NASA). Three ingredients come to mind -- ingredients that have produced a signature sound. First, through the crazy, passionate playing of Alex Laufer, Michelle Collins, Denise Lee, and Todd Post, I always know that something startling and original is going to come out of their activities. This team has consistently done things that are unique and innovative. For me, best of all is that they are always

  5. A neural substrate for nonpainful phantom limb phenomena.

    PubMed

    Flor, H; Mühlnickel, W; Karl, A; Denke, C; Grüsser, S; Kurth, R; Taub, E

    2000-05-15

    Activity in the cerebral cortex associated with non-painful phantom limb sensation was studied in 14 upper extremity amputees. In four subjects, repetitive tactile stimulation of the digits or the lower corner of the mouth elicited non-painful phantom sensation in the amputated limb, in the remaining 10 patients no sensation could be evoked. Neuroelectric source imaging revealed significantly elevated activity in SI and posterior parietal cortex, and significantly decreased activity in ipsilateral SII cortex when referred sensations were present. However, nonpainful referred phantom sensations were not associated with a shift of the cortical representation of the mouth into the hand region, as previously suggested. Nonpainful phantom limb experiences seem to have widely distributed neural networks in multiple cortical regions. PMID:10841347

  6. Apparatus for determining changes in limb volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhagat, P. K.; Wu, V. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Measuring apparatus for determining changes in the volume of limbs or other boty extremities by determining the cross-sectional area of such limbs many comprise a transmitter including first and second transducers for positioning on the surface of the limb at a predetermined distance there between, and a receiver including a receiver crystal for positioning on the surface of the limb. The distance between the receiver crystal and the first and second transducers are represented by respective first and second chords of the cross-section of the limb and the predetermined distance between the first and second transducers is represented by a third chord of the limb cross section.

  7. Priming Gestures with Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Guillaume; Heller, Laurie M.; Navolio, Nicole; Zúñiga-Peñaranda, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report a series of experiments about a little-studied type of compatibility effect between a stimulus and a response: the priming of manual gestures via sounds associated with these gestures. The goal was to investigate the plasticity of the gesture-sound associations mediating this type of priming. Five experiments used a primed choice-reaction task. Participants were cued by a stimulus to perform response gestures that produced response sounds; those sounds were also used as primes before the response cues. We compared arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds (key lifts and pure tones) created during the experiment (i.e. no pre-existing knowledge) with ecological associations corresponding to the structure of the world (tapping gestures and sounds, scraping gestures and sounds) learned through the entire life of the participant (thus existing prior to the experiment). Two results were found. First, the priming effect exists for ecological as well as arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds. Second, the priming effect is greatly reduced for ecologically existing associations and is eliminated for arbitrary associations when the response gesture stops producing the associated sounds. These results provide evidence that auditory-motor priming is mainly created by rapid learning of the association between sounds and the gestures that produce them. Auditory-motor priming is therefore mediated by short-term associations between gestures and sounds that can be readily reconfigured regardless of prior knowledge. PMID:26544884

  8. Pediatric limb differences and amputations.

    PubMed

    Le, Joan T; Scott-Wyard, Phoebe R

    2015-02-01

    Congenital limb differences are uncommon birth defects that may go undetected even with prenatal screening ultrasound scans and often go undetected until birth. For children with congenital limb differences, a diagnostic evaluation should be done to rule out syndromes involving other organ systems or known associations. The most common etiology of acquired amputation is trauma. Postamputation complications include pain and terminal bony overgrowth. A multidisciplinary approach to management with the child and family can lead to a successful, functional, and fulfilling life. PMID:25479783

  9. Electrophonic sounds in meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangjie

    2003-06-01

    Recordings about the sounds of meteors existed in ancient Chinese literature before Christ. During recent two hundreds years, especially, recent twenty years, reports and investigations about Electrophonic meteors and Electrophonic sounds have been developed largely. Electrophonic sounds are defined as sounds produced by direct conversion of electromagnetic radiation into audible sounds. It is thought that Electrophonic sounds may be induced in events of bolide, very bright auroral display, nearby strong lightning, earthquake and nuclear explosion. However, on account of its unusually rare chance and its particular physical course, no matter in observations or in theoretical study, there are many difficult and unresolved problems. The historical and present situations about Electrophonic sounds are summarized in this paper.

  10. Functional analysis of limb transcriptional enhancers in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Mark J; Wang, Ying; Deng, Jian Min; Swinton, Paul G; Wei, Caimiao; Guindani, Michele; Schwartz, Robert J; Behringer, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional enhancers are genomic sequences bound by transcription factors that act together with basal transcriptional machinery to regulate gene transcription. Several high-throughput methods have generated large datasets of tissue-specific enhancer sequences with putative roles in developmental processes. However, few enhancers have been deleted from the genome to determine their roles in development. To understand the roles of two enhancers active in the mouse embryonic limb bud we deleted them from the genome. Although the genes regulated by these enhancers are unknown, they were selected because they were identified in a screen for putative limb bud-specific enhancers associated with p300, an acetyltransferase that participates in protein complexes that promote active transcription, and because the orthologous human enhancers (H1442 and H280) drive distinct lacZ expression patterns in limb buds of embryonic day (E) 11.5 transgenic mice. We show that the orthologous mouse sequences, M1442 and M280, regulate dynamic expression in the developing limb. Although significant transcriptional differences in enhancer-proximal genes in embryonic limb buds accompany the deletion of M1442 and M280 no gross limb malformations during embryonic development were observed, demonstrating that M1442 and M280 are not required for mouse limb development. However, M280 is required for the development and/or maintenance of body size; M280 mice are significantly smaller than controls. M280 also harbors an "ultraconserved" sequence that is identical between human, rat, and mouse. This is the first report of a phenotype resulting from the deletion of an ultraconserved element. These studies highlight the importance of determining enhancer regulatory function by experiments that manipulate them in situ and suggest that some of an enhancer's regulatory capacities may be developmentally tolerated rather than developmentally required. PMID:24920384

  11. Functional analysis of limb transcriptional enhancers in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Mark J.; Wang, Ying; Deng, Jian Min; Swinton, Paul G.; Wei, Caimiao; Guindani, Michele; Schwartz, Robert J.; Behringer, Richard R.

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional enhancers are genomic sequences bound by transcription factors that act together with basal transcriptional machinery to regulate gene transcription. Several high-throughput methods have generated large datasets of tissue-specific enhancer sequences with putative roles in developmental processes. However, few enhancers have been deleted from the genome to determine their roles in development. To understand the roles of two enhancers active in the mouse embryonic limb bud we deleted them from the genome. Although the genes regulated by these enhancers are unknown, they were selected because they were identified in a screen for putative limb bud-specific enhancers associated with p300, an acetyltransferase that participates in protein complexes that promote active transcription, and because the orthologous human enhancers (H1442 and H280) drive distinct lacZ expression patterns in limb buds of embryonic day (E) 11.5 transgenic mice. We show that the orthologous mouse sequences, M280 and M1442, regulate dynamic expression in the developing limb. Although significant transcriptional differences in enhancer-proximal genes in embryonic limb buds accompany the deletion of M280 and M1442 no gross limb malformations during embryonic development were observed, demonstrating that M280 and M1442 are not required for mouse limb development. However, M280 is required for the development and/or maintenance of body size; M280 mice are significantly smaller than controls. M280 also harbors an “ultraconserved” sequence that is identical between human, rat, and mouse. This is the first report of a phenotype resulting from the deletion of an ultraconserved element. These studies highlight the importance of determining enhancer regulatory function by experiments that manipulate them in situ and suggest that some of an enhancer's regulatory capacities may be developmentally tolerated rather than developmentally required. PMID:24920384

  12. Visual Presentation Effects on Identification of Multiple Environmental Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Masakura, Yuko; Ichikawa, Makoto; Shimono, Koichi; Nakatsuka, Reio

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how the contents and timing of a visual stimulus affect the identification of mixed sounds recorded in a daily life environment. For experiments, we presented four environment sounds as auditory stimuli for 5 s along with a picture or a written word as a visual stimulus that might or might not denote the source of one of the four sounds. Three conditions of temporal relations between the visual stimuli and sounds were used. The visual stimulus was presented either: (a) for 5 s simultaneously with the sound; (b) for 5 s, 1 s before the sound (SOA between the audio and visual stimuli was 6 s); or (c) for 33 ms, 1 s before the sound (SOA was 1033 ms). Participants reported all identifiable sounds for those audio–visual stimuli. To characterize the effects of visual stimuli on sound identification, the following were used: the identification rates of sounds for which the visual stimulus denoted its sound source, the rates of other sounds for which the visual stimulus did not denote the sound source, and the frequency of false hearing of a sound that was not presented for each sound set. Results of the four experiments demonstrated that a picture or a written word promoted identification of the sound when it was related to the sound, particularly when the visual stimulus was presented for 5 s simultaneously with the sounds. However, a visual stimulus preceding the sounds had a benefit only for the picture, not for the written word. Furthermore, presentation with a picture denoting a sound simultaneously with the sound reduced the frequency of false hearing. These results suggest three ways that presenting a visual stimulus affects identification of the auditory stimulus. First, activation of the visual representation extracted directly from the picture promotes identification of the denoted sound and suppresses the processing of sounds for which the visual stimulus did not denote the sound source. Second, effects based on processing of the

  13. Visual Presentation Effects on Identification of Multiple Environmental Sounds.

    PubMed

    Masakura, Yuko; Ichikawa, Makoto; Shimono, Koichi; Nakatsuka, Reio

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how the contents and timing of a visual stimulus affect the identification of mixed sounds recorded in a daily life environment. For experiments, we presented four environment sounds as auditory stimuli for 5 s along with a picture or a written word as a visual stimulus that might or might not denote the source of one of the four sounds. Three conditions of temporal relations between the visual stimuli and sounds were used. The visual stimulus was presented either: (a) for 5 s simultaneously with the sound; (b) for 5 s, 1 s before the sound (SOA between the audio and visual stimuli was 6 s); or (c) for 33 ms, 1 s before the sound (SOA was 1033 ms). Participants reported all identifiable sounds for those audio-visual stimuli. To characterize the effects of visual stimuli on sound identification, the following were used: the identification rates of sounds for which the visual stimulus denoted its sound source, the rates of other sounds for which the visual stimulus did not denote the sound source, and the frequency of false hearing of a sound that was not presented for each sound set. Results of the four experiments demonstrated that a picture or a written word promoted identification of the sound when it was related to the sound, particularly when the visual stimulus was presented for 5 s simultaneously with the sounds. However, a visual stimulus preceding the sounds had a benefit only for the picture, not for the written word. Furthermore, presentation with a picture denoting a sound simultaneously with the sound reduced the frequency of false hearing. These results suggest three ways that presenting a visual stimulus affects identification of the auditory stimulus. First, activation of the visual representation extracted directly from the picture promotes identification of the denoted sound and suppresses the processing of sounds for which the visual stimulus did not denote the sound source. Second, effects based on processing of the conceptual

  14. Etiology of phantom limb syndrome: Insights from a 3D default space consciousness model.

    PubMed

    Jerath, Ravinder; Crawford, Molly W; Jensen, Mike

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we examine phantom limb syndrome to gain insights into how the brain functions as the mind and how consciousness arises. We further explore our previously proposed consciousness model in which consciousness and body schema arise when information from throughout the body is processed by corticothalamic feedback loops and integrated by the thalamus. The parietal lobe spatially maps visual and non-visual information and the thalamus integrates and recreates this processed sensory information within a three-dimensional space termed the "3D default space." We propose that phantom limb syndrome and phantom limb pain arise when the afferent signaling from the amputated limb is lost but the neural circuits remain intact. In addition, integration of conflicting sensory information within the default 3D space and the loss of inhibitory afferent feedback to efferent motor activity from the amputated limb may underlie phantom limb pain. PMID:26003829

  15. Learning about Vertebrate Limb Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Jennifer O.; Noll, Matthew; Olsen, Shayna

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an upper-level undergraduate laboratory exercise that enables students to replicate a key experiment in developmental biology. In this exercise, students have the opportunity to observe live chick embryos and stain the apical ectodermal ridge, a key tissue required for development of the vertebrate limb. Impressively, every…

  16. Using a virtual integration environment in treating phantom limb pain.

    PubMed

    Zeher, Michael J; Armiger, Robert S; Burck, James M; Moran, Courtney; Kiely, Janid Blanco; Weeks, Sharon R; Tsao, Jack W; Pasquina, Paul F; Davoodi, R; Loeb, G

    2011-01-01

    The Revolutionizing Prosthetics 2009 program conducted by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has resulted in a Virtual Integration Environment (VIE) that provides a common development platform for researchers and clinicians that design, model and build prosthetic limbs and then integrate and test them with patients. One clinical need that arose during the VIE development was a feature to easily create and model animations that represent patient activities of daily living (ADLs) and simultaneously capture real-time surface EMG activity from the residual limb corresponding to the ADLs. An application of this feature is being made by the Walter Reed Military Amputee Research Program (MARP) where they are utilizing the VIE to investigate methods of reducing upper extremity amputee phantom limb pain (PLP). PMID:21335889

  17. Optimal walking speed following changes in limb geometry.

    PubMed

    Leurs, Françoise; Ivanenko, Yuri P; Bengoetxea, Ana; Cebolla, Ana-Maria; Dan, Bernard; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Cheron, Guy A

    2011-07-01

    The principle of dynamic similarity states that the optimal walking speeds of geometrically similar animals are independent of size when speed is normalized to the dimensionless Froude number (Fr). Furthermore, various studies have shown similar dimensionless optimal speed (Fr ∼0.25) for animals with quite different limb geometries. Here, we wondered whether the optimal walking speed of humans depends solely on total limb length or whether limb segment proportions play an essential role. If optimal walking speed solely depends on the limb length then, when subjects walk on stilts, they should consume less metabolic energy at a faster optimal speed than when they walk without stilts. To test this prediction, we compared kinematics, electromyographic activity and oxygen consumption in adults walking on a treadmill at different speeds with and without articulated stilts that artificially elongated the shank segment by 40 cm. Walking on stilts involved a non-linear reorganization of kinematic and electromyography patterns. In particular, we found a significant increase in the alternating activity of proximal flexors-extensors during the swing phase, despite significantly shorter normalized stride lengths. The minimal metabolic cost per unit distance walked with stilts occurred at roughly the same absolute speed, corresponding to a lower Fr number (Fr ∼0.17) than in normal walking (Fr ∼0.25). These findings are consistent with an important role of limb geometry optimization and kinematic coordination strategies in minimizing the energy expenditure of human walking. PMID:21653821

  18. FGF8 and SHH substitute for anterior-posterior tissue interactions to induce limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nacu, Eugeniu; Gromberg, Elena; Oliveira, Catarina R; Drechsel, David; Tanaka, Elly M

    2016-05-19

    In salamanders, grafting of a left limb blastema onto a right limb stump yields regeneration of three limbs, the normal limb and two 'supernumerary' limbs. This experiment and other research have shown that the juxtaposition of anterior and posterior limb tissue plus innervation are necessary and sufficient to induce complete limb regeneration in salamanders. However, the cellular and molecular basis of the requirement for anterior-posterior tissue interactions were unknown. Here we have clarified the molecular basis of the requirement for both anterior and posterior tissue during limb regeneration and supernumerary limb formation in axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum). We show that the two tissues provide complementary cross-inductive signals that are required for limb outgrowth. A blastema composed solely of anterior tissue normally regresses rather than forming a limb, but activation of hedgehog (HH) signalling was sufficient to drive regeneration of an anterior blastema to completion owing to its ability to maintain fibroblast growth factor (FGF) expression, the key signalling activity responsible for blastema outgrowth. In blastemas composed solely of posterior tissue, HH signalling was not sufficient to drive regeneration; however, ectopic expression of FGF8 together with endogenous HH signalling was sufficient. In axolotls, FGF8 is expressed only in the anterior mesenchyme and maintenance of its expression depends on sonic hedgehog (SHH) signalling from posterior tissue. Together, our findings identify key anteriorly and posteriorly localized signals that promote limb regeneration and show that these single factors are sufficient to drive non-regenerating blastemas to complete regeneration with full elaboration of skeletal elements. PMID:27120163

  19. Development of a control system for artificially rehabilitated limbs: a review.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, M S H; Choudhury, I A; Dahari, M

    2015-04-01

    Development of an advanced control system for prostheses (artificial limbs) is necessary to provide functionality, effectiveness, and preferably the feeling of a sound living limb. The development of the control system has introduced varieties of control strategies depending on the application. This paper reviews some control systems used for prosthetics, orthotics, and exoskeletons. The advantages and limitations of different control systems for particular applications have been discussed and presented in a comparative manner to help in deciding the appropriate method for pertinent application. PMID:25491411

  20. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite microwave limb sounder instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.; Chavez, M. C.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Frerking, M. A.; Gram, M. B.; Harris, W. M.; Holden, J. R.; Jarnot, R. F.; Kloezeman, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    The microwave limb sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is the first satellite experiment using limb sounding techniques at microwave frequencies. Primary measurement objectives are stratospheric ClO, O3, H2O, temperature, and pressure. Measurements are of thermal emission: all are performed simultaneously and continuously and are not degraded by ice clouds or volcanic aerosols. The instrument has a 1.6-m mechanically scanning antenna system and contains heterodyne radiometers in spectral bands centred near 63, 183, and 205 GHz. The radiometers operate at ambient temperature and use Schottky-diode mixers with local oscillators derived from phase-locked Gunn oscillators. Frequency tripling by varactor multipliers generates the 183- and 205-GHz local oscillators, and quasi-optical techniques inject these into the mixers. Six 15-channel filter banks spectrally resolve stratospheric thermal emission lines and produce an output spectrum every 2 s. Thermal stability is sufficient for 'total power' measurements which do not require fast chopping. Radiometric calibration, consisting of measurements of cold space and an internal target, is performed every 65-s limb scan. Instrument in-orbit performance has been excellent, and all objectives are being met.

  1. Trabecular bone structural variation throughout the human lower limb.

    PubMed

    Saers, Jaap P P; Cazorla-Bak, Yasmin; Shaw, Colin N; Stock, Jay T; Ryan, Timothy M

    2016-08-01

    Trabecular bone is responsive to mechanical loading, and thus may be a useful tool for interpreting past behaviour from fossil morphology. However, the ability to meaningfully interpret variation in archaeological and hominin trabecular morphology depends on the extent to which trabecular bone properties are integrated throughout the postcranium or are locally variable in response to joint specific loading. We investigate both of these factors by comparing trabecular bone throughout the lower limb between a group of highly mobile foragers and two groups of sedentary agriculturalists. Trabecular bone structure is quantified in four volumes of interest placed within the proximal and distal joints of the femur and tibia. We determine how trabecular structures correspond to inferred behavioural differences between populations and whether the patterns are consistent throughout the limb. A significant correlation was found between inferred mobility level and trabecular bone structure in all volumes of interest along the lower limb. The greater terrestrial mobility of foragers is associated with higher bone volume fraction, and thicker and fewer trabeculae (lower connectivity density). In all populations, bone volume fraction decreases while anisotropy increases proximodistally throughout the lower limb. This observation mirrors reductions in cortical bone mass resulting from proximodistal limb tapering. The reduction in strength associated with reduced bone volume fraction may be compensated for by the increased anisotropy in the distal tibia. A similar pattern of trabecular structure is found throughout the lower limb in all populations, upon which a signal of terrestrial mobility appears to be superimposed. These results support the validity of using lower limb trabecular bone microstructure to reconstruct terrestrial mobility levels from the archaeological and fossil records. The results further indicate that care should be taken to appreciate variation resulting from

  2. The sound of distance.

    PubMed

    Rabaglia, Cristina D; Maglio, Sam J; Krehm, Madelaine; Seok, Jin H; Trope, Yaacov

    2016-07-01

    Human languages may be more than completely arbitrary symbolic systems. A growing literature supports sound symbolism, or the existence of consistent, intuitive relationships between speech sounds and specific concepts. Prior work establishes that these sound-to-meaning mappings can shape language-related judgments and decisions, but do their effects generalize beyond merely the linguistic and truly color how we navigate our environment? We examine this possibility, relating a predominant sound symbolic distinction (vowel frontness) to a novel associate (spatial proximity) in five studies. We show that changing one vowel in a label can influence estimations of distance, impacting judgment, perception, and action. The results (1) provide the first experimental support for a relationship between vowels and spatial distance and (2) demonstrate that sound-to-meaning mappings have outcomes that extend beyond just language and can - through a single sound - influence how we perceive and behave toward objects in the world. PMID:27062226

  3. Insula and inferior frontal triangularis activations distinguish between conditioned brain responses using emotional sounds for basic BCI communication

    PubMed Central

    van der Heiden, Linda; Liberati, Giulia; Sitaram, Ranganatha; Kim, Sunjung; Jaśkowski, Piotr; Raffone, Antonino; Olivetti Belardinelli, Marta; Birbaumer, Niels; Veit, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    In order to enable communication through a brain-computer interface (BCI), it is necessary to discriminate between distinct brain responses. As a first step, we probed the possibility to discriminate between affirmative (“yes”) and negative (“no”) responses using a semantic classical conditioning paradigm, within an fMRI setting. Subjects were presented with congruent and incongruent word-pairs as conditioned stimuli (CS), respectively eliciting affirmative and negative responses. Incongruent word-pairs were associated to an unpleasant unconditioned stimulus (scream, US1) and congruent word-pairs were associated to a pleasant unconditioned stimulus (baby-laughter, US2), in order to elicit emotional conditioned responses (CR). The aim was to discriminate between affirmative and negative responses, enabled by their association with the positive and negative affective stimuli. In the late acquisition phase, when the US were not present anymore, there was a strong significant differential activation for incongruent and congruent word-pairs in a cluster comprising the left insula and the inferior frontal triangularis. This association was not found in the habituation phase. These results suggest that the difference in affirmative and negative brain responses was established as an effect of conditioning, allowing to further investigate the possibility of using this paradigm for a binary choice BCI. PMID:25100958

  4. Insula and inferior frontal triangularis activations distinguish between conditioned brain responses using emotional sounds for basic BCI communication.

    PubMed

    van der Heiden, Linda; Liberati, Giulia; Sitaram, Ranganatha; Kim, Sunjung; Jaśkowski, Piotr; Raffone, Antonino; Olivetti Belardinelli, Marta; Birbaumer, Niels; Veit, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    In order to enable communication through a brain-computer interface (BCI), it is necessary to discriminate between distinct brain responses. As a first step, we probed the possibility to discriminate between affirmative ("yes") and negative ("no") responses using a semantic classical conditioning paradigm, within an fMRI setting. Subjects were presented with congruent and incongruent word-pairs as conditioned stimuli (CS), respectively eliciting affirmative and negative responses. Incongruent word-pairs were associated to an unpleasant unconditioned stimulus (scream, US1) and congruent word-pairs were associated to a pleasant unconditioned stimulus (baby-laughter, US2), in order to elicit emotional conditioned responses (CR). The aim was to discriminate between affirmative and negative responses, enabled by their association with the positive and negative affective stimuli. In the late acquisition phase, when the US were not present anymore, there was a strong significant differential activation for incongruent and congruent word-pairs in a cluster comprising the left insula and the inferior frontal triangularis. This association was not found in the habituation phase. These results suggest that the difference in affirmative and negative brain responses was established as an effect of conditioning, allowing to further investigate the possibility of using this paradigm for a binary choice BCI. PMID:25100958

  5. Rainsticks: Integrating Culture, Folklore, and the Physics of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine; Fies, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this activity is for students to build a rainstick out of materials in their own environment and imitate the sound of rain while investigating the physical principles of sound. Students will be able to relate the sound produced by an instrument to the type and quantity of materials used in its construction.

  6. FINAL REPORT OF FY 1999, 2000, AND 2001 ACTIVITIES: CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRATED SOUNDING SYSTEM IN SUPPORT OF THE DOE/ARM EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Ed R. Westwater CIRES, University of Colorado /NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory 325 Broadway MS R/E/ET1 Boulder, Colorado 80305

    2002-04-30

    OAK B188 FINAL REPORT OF FY 1999, 2000, AND 2001 ACTIVITIES: CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRATED SOUNDING SYSTEM IN SUPPORT OF THE DOE/ARM EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM The basic goals of the research are to develop and test algorithms and deploy instruments that improve measurements of atmospheric quantities relevant to radiative transfer and climate research. Primary among these atmospheric variables are integrated amounts of water vapor and cloud liquid, as well as profiles of temperature, water vapor and cloud liquid. A primary thrust of this research is to combine data from instruments available to ARM to maximize their importance in radiative transfer and climate research. To gather data relevant to these studies, participation in field experiments, especially intensive operating periods, as well as the subsequent analysis and dissemination of collected data, is of primary importance. Examples of relevant experiments include several Water Vapor Intensive Operating Periods at the Southern Great Plains Cloud And Radiation Testbed site, experiments in the Tropical Western Pacific such as PROBE and Nauru'99, and experiments at the North Slope of Alaska/Adjacent Arctic Ocean site. This final report describes our analyses of data taken during these field experiments.

  7. The model of the Uzon-Geizernaya volcano-tectonic depression and Kikhpinych volcano, Kamchatka, from the joint analysis of microseismic sounding data and local geodynamic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugaenko, Yu. A.; Saltykov, V. A.; Gorbatikov, A. V.; Stepanova, M. Yu.

    2015-05-01

    The model of the magmatic system beneath the Uzon-Geizernaya volcano-tectonic depression and adjacent Kikhpinych volcano in Kamchatka is constructed to a depth of 30 km based on the microseismic sounding data. For doing this, measurements of the natural microseismic field by the Guralp CMG-6TD portable broadband seismometer were carried out at 60 points along three profiles with a total length of about 28 km. The revealed structural heterogeneities were interpreted in the common context with the previous geological, geological-morphological, and petrological results. The area of a shallow crystallized magmatic reservoir is identified and spatially localized below the depression. The zones of the presumed concentration of the basaltic melts probably responsible for the local geodynamic activation of the region during the past 15 years are revealed as the peripheral magmatic chamber of the Kikhpinych volcano at a depth of 5-12 km and a deeper (15-20 km) magma storage. The geometry of the identified deep structures is consistent with the local microseismicity and the model of the contemporary magmatic intrusion into the upper crustal layers, which is based on the data of satellite interferometry.

  8. Abnormal cortical sensorimotor activity during “Target” sound detection in subjects with acute acoustic trauma sequelae: an fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Job, Agnès; Pons, Yoann; Lamalle, Laurent; Jaillard, Assia; Buck, Karl; Segebarth, Christoph; Delon-Martin, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    The most common consequences of acute acoustic trauma (AAT) are hearing loss at frequencies above 3 kHz and tinnitus. In this study, we have used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to visualize neuronal activation patterns in military adults with AAT and various tinnitus sequelae during an auditory “oddball” attention task. AAT subjects displayed overactivities principally during reflex of target sound detection, in sensorimotor areas and in emotion-related areas such as the insula, anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortex, in premotor area, in cross-modal sensory associative areas, and, interestingly, in a region of the Rolandic operculum that has recently been shown to be involved in tympanic movements due to air pressure. We propose further investigations of this brain area and fine middle ear investigations, because our results might suggest a model in which AAT tinnitus may arise as a proprioceptive illusion caused by abnormal excitability of middle-ear muscle spindles possibly link with the acoustic reflex and associated with emotional and sensorimotor disturbances. PMID:22574285

  9. Analysis of electron auroras based on the Monte Carlo method: Application to active electron arc auroras observed by the sounding rocket at Syowa Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onda, Kunizo; Ejiri, Masaki; Itikawa, Yukikazu

    A downward electron differential number flux, the absolute photoemission rate for the (0, 1) band of the first negative band system of the molecular nitrogen ion, and the number density of thermal electrons were simultaneously measured by the sounding rocket S-310JA-8 launched toward active auroral arcs at a substorm expansion phase on April 4, 1984, from Syowa Station in Antarctica. We apply the Monte Carlo method to analyze these observed results. The MSIS-86 model is employed to represent the atmospheric number density and temperature in the aurora observed by this experiment. Only N2, O, and O2 are taken into account as constituent elements of the atmosphere. Electrons are injected downward into the upper atmosphere at the altitude of 200 km, at which the downward electron differential number flux was measured. An initial electron energy is considered in the range of 0.1-18 keV. It is assumed that an initial pitch angle is uniformly distributed in the range of [0, π/2]. Excitation and ionization rates of N2, O, and O2 are calculated as a function of altitude, the initial pitch angle, and the initial electron energy. Production and emission rates of the N2+ 1N (0, 1) band are deduced by using these calculated rates. Time variation of the observed absolute intensity of this band is reasonably well reproduced by the Monte Carlo method combined with the measured electron number flux.

  10. Early sound symbolism for vowel sounds

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Ferrinne; Maurer, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Children and adults consistently match some words (e.g., kiki) to jagged shapes and other words (e.g., bouba) to rounded shapes, providing evidence for non-arbitrary sound–shape mapping. In this study, we investigated the influence of vowels on sound–shape matching in toddlers, using four contrasting pairs of nonsense words differing in vowel sound (/i/ as in feet vs. /o/ as in boat) and four rounded–jagged shape pairs. Crucially, we used reduplicated syllables (e.g., kiki vs. koko) rather than confounding vowel sound with consonant context and syllable variability (e.g., kiki vs. bouba). Toddlers consistently matched words with /o/ to rounded shapes and words with /i/ to jagged shapes (p < 0.01). The results suggest that there may be naturally biased correspondences between vowel sound and shape. PMID:24349684

  11. A Comparison of the Diabetes Risk Score in HIV/AIDS Patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) and HAART-Naïve Patients at the Limbe Regional Hospital, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Dimala, Christian Akem; Atashili, Julius; Mbuagbaw, Josephine C.; Wilfred, Akam; Monekosso, Gottlieb L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been associated with dysglycaemia. However, there is scarce data on the risk of developing diabetes mellitus (DM) in HIV/AIDS patients in Africa. Objectives Primarily to quantify and compare the risk of having diabetes mellitus in HIV/AIDS patients on HAART and HAART-naïve patients in Limbe, Cameroon; and secondarily to determine if there is an association between HAART and increased DM risk. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Limbe Regional Hospital HIV treatment center between April and June 2013, involving 200 HIV/AIDS patients (100 on first-line HAART regimens for at least 12 months matched by age and gender to 100 HAART-naïve patients). The Diabetes Risk Score (DRS) was calculated using a clinically validated model based on routinely recorded primary care parameters. A DRS ≥ 7% was considered as indicative of an increased risk of developing DM. Results The median DRS was significantly higher in patients on HAART (2.30%) than in HAART-naïve patients (1.62%), p = 0.002. The prevalence of the increased DM risk (DRS ≥ 7%) was significantly higher in patients on HAART, 31% (95% CI: 22.13–41.03) than in HAART-naïve patients, 17% (95% CI: 10.23–25.82), p = 0.020. HAART was significantly associated with an increased DM risk, the odds ratio of the HAART group compared to the HAART-naïve group was 2.19 (95% CI: 1.12–4.30, p = 0.020). However, no association was found after adjusting for BMI-defined overweight, hypertension, age, sex, family history of DM and smoking (Odds ratio = 1.22, 95% CI: 0.42–3.59, p = 0.708). Higher BMI and hypertension accounted for the increased risk of DM in patients on HAART. Also, more than 82% of the participants were receiving or had ever used Zidovudine based HAART regimens. Conclusion HIV/AIDS patients on HAART could be at a greater risk of having DM than HAART-naïve patients as a result of the effect of HAART on risk factors of DM such as BMI

  12. The Sound and the Fury: Adding Sound to Your PC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Walt

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the concept of adding sound to existing personal computers. Describes hardware and software options and explores uses of computers equipped with sound. Sidebars summarize the development of stereo sound in multimedia products and describe the two major forms of computer sound: Musical Instrument Digital Interface and digital sound waves.…

  13. The perception of phantom limbs. The D. O. Hebb lecture.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V S; Hirstein, W

    1998-09-01

    Almost everyone who has a limb amputated will experience a phantom limb--the vivid impression that the limb is not only still present, but in some cases, painful. There is now a wealth of empirical evidence demonstrating changes in cortical topography in primates following deafferentation or amputation, and this review will attempt to relate these in a systematic way to the clinical phenomenology of phantom limbs. With the advent of non-invasive imaging techniques such as MEG (magnetoencephalogram) and functional MRI, topographical reorganization can also be demonstrated in humans, so that it is now possible to track perceptual changes and changes in cortical topography in individual patients. We suggest, therefore, that these patients provide a valuable opportunity not only for exploring neural plasticity in the adult human brain but also for understanding the relationship between the activity of sensory neurons and conscious experience. We conclude with a theory of phantom limbs, some striking demonstrations of phantoms induced in normal subjects, and some remarks about the relevance of these phenomena to the question of how the brain constructs a 'body image.' PMID:9762952

  14. The many lives of SHH in limb development and evolution.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rios, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The SHH signaling pathway is essential for proper formation of the limb skeleton, as is required for the survival and expansion of distal chondrogenic progenitor cells. At the same time, SHH is important to specify digit identities along the anterior-posterior axis. Upon gain or loss of activity of the SHH pathway, bones are gained, lost or malformed, and such deregulation underlies the aetiology of various human congenital limb defects. Likewise, accumulating evidence suggests that evolutionary tampering with SHH signaling underlies the morphological diversification of the tetrapod appendicular skeleton. This review summarizes the roles of the SHH pathway in the context of limb development and evolution and incorporates recent evidence into a mechanistic view of how the positioning of digit condensations is integrated with the specification of distinct bone morphologies. PMID:26762695

  15. Adaptations to unilateral lower limb suspension in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Gary A.; Duvoisin, Marc R.; Adams, Gregory R.; Meyer, Ronald A.; Belew, Anne H.; Buchanan, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The effect of unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) on neuromuscular function in humans is analyzed. All ambulatory activity on crutches was performed by eight subjects for 6 weeks who wear a shoe with a 10 cm sole on the right foot to unweight the left lower limb. Results show that average muscle cross sectional area (CSA) of the left knee extensor (KE) decreased 16 percent whereas the KE of the nonsuspended right limb showed no changes. Maximal integrated electromyography of vastus lateralis and overall mean power frequency of gastrocnemius medialis and soleus for submaximal isometric actions were both decreased post-ULLS. It is concluded that six weeks of ULLS induces adaptations in the neuromuscular system of humans which are comparable to those induced by bed rest and spaceflight.

  16. Development and the evolvability of human limbs

    PubMed Central

    Young, Nathan M.; Wagner, Günter P.; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt

    2010-01-01

    The long legs and short arms of humans are distinctive for a primate, the result of selection acting in opposite directions on each limb at different points in our evolutionary history. This mosaic pattern challenges our understanding of the relationship of development and evolvability because limbs are serially homologous and genetic correlations should act as a significant constraint on their independent evolution. Here we test a developmental model of limb covariation in anthropoid primates and demonstrate that both humans and apes exhibit significantly reduced integration between limbs when compared to quadrupedal monkeys. This result indicates that fossil hominins likely escaped constraints on independent limb variation via reductions to genetic pleiotropy in an ape-like last common ancestor (LCA). This critical change in integration among hominoids, which is reflected in macroevolutionary differences in the disparity between limb lengths, facilitated selection for modern human limb proportions and demonstrates how development helps shape evolutionary change. PMID:20133636

  17. Gata6-Dependent GLI3 Repressor Function is Essential in Anterior Limb Progenitor Cells for Proper Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Akiyama, Ryutaro; Wong, Julia; Tahara, Naoyuki; Kawakami, Hiroko; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Gli3 is a major regulator of Hedgehog signaling during limb development. In the anterior mesenchyme, GLI3 is proteolytically processed into GLI3R, a truncated repressor form that inhibits Hedgehog signaling. Although numerous studies have identified mechanisms that regulate Gli3 function in vitro, it is not completely understood how Gli3 function is regulated in vivo. In this study, we show a novel mechanism of regulation of GLI3R activities in limb buds by Gata6, a member of the GATA transcription factor family. We show that conditional inactivation of Gata6 prior to limb outgrowth by the Tcre deleter causes preaxial polydactyly, the formation of an anterior extra digit, in hindlimbs. A recent study suggested that Gata6 represses Shh transcription in hindlimb buds. However, we found that ectopic Hedgehog signaling precedes ectopic Shh expression. In conjunction, we observed Gata6 and Gli3 genetically interact, and compound heterozygous mutants develop preaxial polydactyly without ectopic Shh expression, indicating an additional prior mechanism to prevent polydactyly. These results support the idea that Gata6 possesses dual roles during limb development: enhancement of Gli3 repressor function to repress Hedgehog signaling in the anterior limb bud, and negative regulation of Shh expression. Our in vitro and in vivo studies identified that GATA6 physically interacts with GLI3R to facilitate nuclear localization of GLI3R and repressor activities of GLI3R. Both the genetic and biochemical data elucidates a novel mechanism by Gata6 to regulate GLI3R activities in the anterior limb progenitor cells to prevent polydactyly and attain proper development of the mammalian autopod. PMID:27352137

  18. Categorization of Sounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, Roel; Sereno, Joan; Jongman, Allard

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted 4 experiments to test the decision-bound, prototype, and distribution theories for the categorization of sounds. They used as stimuli sounds varying in either resonance frequency or duration. They created different experimental conditions by varying the variance and overlap of 2 stimulus distributions used in a training phase…

  19. Breaking the Sound Barrier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Boehringer, Kim

    2007-01-01

    Students in a fourth-grade class participated in a series of dynamic sound learning centers followed by a dramatic capstone event--an exploration of the amazing Trashcan Whoosh Waves. It's a notoriously difficult subject to teach, but this hands-on, exploratory approach ignited student interest in sound, promoted language acquisition, and built…

  20. School Sound Level Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    California has conducted on-site sound surveys of 36 different schools to determine the degree of noise, and thus disturbance, within the learning environment. This report provides the methodology and results of the survey, including descriptive charts and graphs illustrating typical desirable and undesirable sound levels. Results are presented…

  1. The Bosstown Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary

    Based on the argument that (contrary to critical opinion) the musicians in the various bands associated with Bosstown Sound were indeed talented, cohesive individuals and that the bands' lack of renown was partially a result of ill-treatment by record companies and the press, this paper traces the development of the Bosstown Sound from its…

  2. Synaesthesia in the normal limb.

    PubMed Central

    Mon-Williams, M; Wann, J P; Jenkinson, M; Rushton, K

    1997-01-01

    We explored the degree to which vision may alter kinaesthetic perception by asking participants to view their hand through a prism, introducing different horizontal deviations, while trying to align their fingers above and below a thin table. When the visual image of one hand was displaced this overwhelmed kinaesthetic judgements and participants reliably reported that they felt their limbs were aligned, even when they were laterally mis-aligned by as much as 10 cm. This effect, however, was mediated by 'visual capture' and when the task was attempted in a darkened room with limb position indicated by an LED taped to the finger, kinaesthesis dominated and participants reported that the LED seemed to become detached from their finger tip. In both light and dark conditions the finger was clearly visible and only the background detail was extinguished. Hence, in perceiving limb position, it appears that we believe in what we see, rather than in what we feel, when the visual background is rich, and in what we feel when the visual background is sparse. PMID:9263468

  3. The OMPS Limb Profiler instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rault, D. F.; Xu, P.

    2011-12-01

    The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) will continue the monitoring of the global distribution of the Earth's middle atmosphere ozone and aerosol. OMPS is composed of three instruments, namely the Total Column Mapper (heritage: TOMS, OMI), the Nadir Profiler (heritage: SBUV) and the Limb Profiler (heritage: SOLSE/LORE, OSIRIS, SCIAMACHY, SAGE III). The ultimate goal of the mission is to better understand and quantify the rate of stratospheric ozone recovery. OMPS is scheduled to be launched on the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) platform in October 2011. The focus of the paper will be on the Limb Profiler (LP) instrument. The LP instrument will measure the Earth's limb radiance, from which ozone profile will be retrieved from the upper tropopause uo to 60km. End-to-end studies of the sensor and retrieval algorithm indicate the following expected performance for ozone: accuracy of 5% or better from the tropopause up to 50 km, precision of about 3-5% from 18 to 50 km, and vertical resolution of 1.5-2 km with vertical sampling of 1 km and along-track horizontal sampling of 1 deg latitude. The paper will describe the mission, discuss the retrieval algorithm, and summarize the expected performance. If available, the paper will also present early on-orbit data.

  4. Gremlin1 induces anterior-posterior limb bifurcations in developing Xenopus limbs but does not enhance limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Keenan, Samuel R; Lynn, Jeremy; McEwan, James C; Beck, Caroline W

    2015-11-01

    Gremlin1 (grem1) has been previously identified as being significantly up-regulated during regeneration of Xenopus laevis limbs. Grem1 is an antagonist of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) with a known role in limb development in amniotes. It forms part of a self-regulating feedback loop linking epithelial (FGF) and mesenchymal (shh) signalling centres, thereby controlling outgrowth, anterior posterior and proximal distal patterning. Spatiotemporal regulation of the same genes in developing and regenerating Xenopus limb buds supports conservation of this mechanism. Using a heat shock inducible grem1 (G) transgene to created temperature regulated stable lines, we have shown that despite being upregulated in regeneration, grem1 overexpression does not enhance regeneration of tadpole hindlimbs. However, both the regenerating and contralateral, developing limb of G transgenics developed skeletal defects, suggesting that overexpressing grem1 negatively affects limb patterning. When grem1 expression was targeted earlier in limb bud development, we saw dramatic bifurcations of the limbs resulting in duplication of anterior posterior (AP) pattern, forming a phenotypic continuum ranging from duplications arising at the level of the femoral head to digit bifurcations, but never involving the pelvis. Intriguingly, the original limbs have AP pattern inversion due to de-restricted Shh signalling. We discuss a possible role for Grem1 regulation of limb BMPs in regulation of branching pattern in the limbs. PMID:26527308

  5. A cortical-spinal prosthesis for targeted limb movement in paralysed primate avatars.

    PubMed

    Shanechi, Maryam M; Hu, Rollin C; Williams, Ziv M

    2014-01-01

    Motor paralysis is among the most disabling aspects of injury to the central nervous system. Here we develop and test a target-based cortical-spinal neural prosthesis that employs neural activity recorded from premotor neurons to control limb movements in functionally paralysed primate avatars. Given the complexity by which muscle contractions are naturally controlled, we approach the problem of eliciting goal-directed limb movement in paralysed animals by focusing on the intended targets of movement rather than their intermediate trajectories. We then match this information in real-time with spinal cord and muscle stimulation parameters that produce free planar limb movements to those intended target locations. We demonstrate that both the decoded activities of premotor populations and their adaptive responses can be used, after brief training, to effectively direct an avatar's limb to distinct targets variably displayed on a screen. These findings advance the future possibility of reconstituting targeted limb movement in paralysed subjects. PMID:24549394

  6. Identification of Changing Lower Limb Neuromuscular Activation in Parkinson's Disease during Treadmill Gait with and without Levodopa Using a Nonlinear Analysis Index

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Daniel P.; Paloski, William H.; Layne, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of electromyographic (EMG) data is a cornerstone of research related to motor control in Parkinson's disease. Nonlinear EMG analysis tools have shown to be valuable, but analysis is often complex and interpretation of the data may be difficult. A previously introduced algorithm (SYNERGOS) that provides a single index value based on simultaneous multiple muscle activations (MMA) has been shown to be effective in detecting changes in EMG activation due to modifications of walking speeds in healthy adults. In this study, we investigated if SYNERGOS detects MMA changes associated with both different walking speeds and levodopa intake. Nine male Parkinsonian patients walked on a treadmill with increasing speed while on or off medication. We collected EMG data and computed SYNERGOS indices and employed a restricted maximum likelihood linear mixed model to the values. SYNERGOS was sensitive to neuromuscular modifications due to both alterations of gait speed and intake of levodopa. We believe that the current experiment provides evidence for the potential value of SYNERGOS as a nonlinear tool in clinical settings, by providing a single value index of MMA. This could help clinicians to evaluate the efficacy of interventions and treatments in Parkinson's disease in a simple manner. PMID:25688326

  7. Effect of limb immobilization on skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Current knowledge and questions remaining concerning the effects of limb immobilization on skeletal muscle is reviewed. The most dramatic of these effects is muscle atrophy, which has been noted in cases of muscles fixed at or below their resting length. Immobilization is also accompanied by a substantial decrease in motoneuronal discharges, which results in the conversion of slow-twitch muscle to muscle with fast-twitch characteristics. Sarcolemma effects include no change or a decrease in resting membrane potential, the appearance of extrajunctional acetylcholine receptors, and no change in acetylcholinesterase activity. Evidence of changes in motoneuron after hyperpolarization characteristics suggests that the muscle inactivity is responsible for neuronal changes, rather than vice versa. The rate of protein loss from atrophying muscles is determined solely by the first-order rate constant for degradation. Various other biochemical and functional changes have been noted, including decreased insulin responsiveness and protein synthesis. The model of limb immobilization may also be useful for related studies of muscle adaptation.

  8. Use of a virtual integrated environment in prosthetic limb development and phantom limb pain.

    PubMed

    Alphonso, Aimee L; Monson, Brett T; Zeher, Michael J; Armiger, Robert S; Weeks, Sharon R; Burck, J M; Moran, C; Davoodie, R; Loeb, G; Pasquina, Paul F; Tsao, Jack W

    2012-01-01

    Patients face two major difficulties following limb loss: phantom limb pain (PLP) in the residual limb and limited functionality in the prosthetic limb. Many studies have focused on decreasing PLP with mirror therapy, yet few have examined the same visual ameliorating effect with a virtual or prosthetic limb. Our study addresses the following key questions: (1) does PLP decrease through observation of a 3D limb in a virtual integration environment (VIE) and (2) can consistent surface electromyography (sEMG) signals from the VIE drive an advanced modular prosthetic limb (MPL)? Recorded signals from the residual limb were correlated to the desired motion of the phantom limb, and changes in PLP were scored during each VIE session. Preliminary results show an overall reduction in PLP and a trend toward improvement in signal-to-motion accuracy over time. These signals allowed MPL users to perform a wide range of hand motions. PMID:22954877

  9. Sound-Imitation Word Recognition for Environmental Sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Kazushi; Komatani, Kazunori; Ogata, Tetsuya; Okuno, Hiroshi G.

    Environmental sounds are very helpful in understanding environmental situations and in telling the approach of danger, and sound-imitation words (sound-related onomatopoeia) are important expressions to inform such sounds in human communication, especially in Japanese language. In this paper, we design a method to recognize sound-imitation words (SIWs) for environmental sounds. Critical issues in recognizing SIW are how to divide an environmental sound into recognition units and how to resolve representation ambiguity of the sounds. To solve these problems, we designed three-stage procedure that transforms environmental sounds into sound-imitation words, and phoneme group expressions that can represent ambiguous sounds. The three-stage procedure is as follows: (1) a whole waveform is divided into some chunks, (2) the chunks are transformed into sound-imitation syllables by phoneme recognition, (3) a sound-imitation word is constructed from sound-imitation syllables according to the requirements of the Japanese language. Ambiguity problem is that an environmental sound is often recognized differently by different listeners even under the same situation. Phoneme group expressions are new phonemes for environmental sounds, and they can express multiple sound-imitation words by one word. We designed two sets of phoneme groups: ``a set of basic phoneme group'' and ``a set of articulation-based phoneme group'' to absorb the ambiguity. Based on subjective experiments, the set of basic phoneme groups proved more appropriate to represent environmental sounds than the articulation-based one or a set of normal Japaneses phonemes.

  10. The sound manifesto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, Michael J.; Bisnovatyi, Ilia

    2000-11-01

    Computing practice today depends on visual output to drive almost all user interaction. Other senses, such as audition, may be totally neglected, or used tangentially, or used in highly restricted specialized ways. We have excellent audio rendering through D-A conversion, but we lack rich general facilities for modeling and manipulating sound comparable in quality and flexibility to graphics. We need coordinated research in several disciplines to improve the use of sound as an interactive information channel. Incremental and separate improvements in synthesis, analysis, speech processing, audiology, acoustics, music, etc. will not alone produce the radical progress that we seek in sonic practice. We also need to create a new central topic of study in digital audio research. The new topic will assimilate the contributions of different disciplines on a common foundation. The key central concept that we lack is sound as a general-purpose information channel. We must investigate the structure of this information channel, which is driven by the cooperative development of auditory perception and physical sound production. Particular audible encodings, such as speech and music, illuminate sonic information by example, but they are no more sufficient for a characterization than typography is sufficient for characterization of visual information. To develop this new conceptual topic of sonic information structure, we need to integrate insights from a number of different disciplines that deal with sound. In particular, we need to coordinate central and foundational studies of the representational models of sound with specific applications that illuminate the good and bad qualities of these models. Each natural or artificial process that generates informative sound, and each perceptual mechanism that derives information from sound, will teach us something about the right structure to attribute to the sound itself. The new Sound topic will combine the work of computer

  11. Heart murmurs and other sounds

    MedlinePlus

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... classified ("graded") depending on how loud the murmur sounds with a stethoscope. The grading is on a ...

  12. Multiclass Real-Time Intent Recognition of a Powered Lower Limb Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Varol, Huseyin Atakan; Sup, Frank; Goldfarb, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a control architecture and intent recognition approach for the real-time supervisory control of a powered lower limb prosthesis. The approach infers user intent to stand, sit, or walk, by recognizing patterns in prosthesis sensor data in real-time, without the need for instrumentation of the sound-side leg. Specifically, the intent recognizer utilizes time-based features extracted from frames of prosthesis signals, which are subsequently reduced to a lower dimensionality (for computational efficiency). These data are initially used to train intent models, which classify the patterns as standing, sitting, or walking. The trained models are subsequently used to infer the user’s intent in real-time. In addition to describing the generalized control approach, this paper describes the implementation of this approach on a single unilateral transfemoral amputee subject, and demonstrates via experiments the effectiveness of the approach. In the real-time supervisory control experiments, the intent recognizer identified all 90 activity mode transitions, switching the underlying middle level controllers without any perceivable delay by the user. The intent recognizer also identified six activity mode transitions, which were not intended by the user. Due to the intentional overlapping functionality of the middle level controllers, the incorrect classifications neither caused problems in functionality, nor were perceived by the user. PMID:19846361

  13. Sound as artifact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Jeffrey L.

    A distinguishing feature of the discipline of archaeology is its reliance upon sensory dependant investigation. As perceived by all of the senses, the felt environment is a unique area of archaeological knowledge. It is generally accepted that the emergence of industrial processes in the recent past has been accompanied by unprecedented sonic extremes. The work of environmental historians has provided ample evidence that the introduction of much of this unwanted sound, or "noise" was an area of contestation. More recent research in the history of sound has called for more nuanced distinctions than the noisy/quiet dichotomy. Acoustic archaeology tends to focus upon a reconstruction of sound producing instruments and spaces with a primary goal of ascertaining intentionality. Most archaeoacoustic research is focused on learning more about the sonic world of people within prehistoric timeframes while some research has been done on historic sites. In this thesis, by way of a meditation on industrial sound and the physical remains of the Quincy Mining Company blacksmith shop (Hancock, MI) in particular, I argue for an acceptance and inclusion of sound as artifact in and of itself. I am introducing the concept of an individual sound-form, or sonifact , as a reproducible, repeatable, representable physical entity, created by tangible, perhaps even visible, host-artifacts. A sonifact is a sound that endures through time, with negligible variability. Through the piecing together of historical and archaeological evidence, in this thesis I present a plausible sonifactual assemblage at the blacksmith shop in April 1916 as it may have been experienced by an individual traversing the vicinity on foot: an 'historic soundwalk.' The sensory apprehension of abandoned industrial sites is multi-faceted. In this thesis I hope to make the case for an acceptance of sound as a primary heritage value when thinking about the industrial past, and also for an increased awareness and acceptance

  14. Motor cortex representation of the upper-limb in individuals born without a hand.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Karen T; Sirigu, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The body schema is an action-related representation of the body that arises from activity in a network of multiple brain areas. While it was initially thought that the body schema developed with experience, the existence of phantom limbs in individuals born without a limb (amelics) led to the suggestion that it was innate. The problem with this idea, however, is that the vast majority of amelics do not report the presence of a phantom limb. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied over the primary motor cortex (M1) of traumatic amputees can evoke movement sensations in the phantom, suggesting that traumatic amputation does not delete movement representations of the missing hand. Given this, we asked whether the absence of a phantom limb in the majority of amelics means that the motor cortex does not contain a cortical representation of the missing limb, or whether it is present but has been deactivated by the lack of sensorimotor experience. In four upper-limb amelic subjects we directly stimulated the arm/hand region of M1 to see 1) whether we could evoke phantom sensations, and 2) whether muscle representations in the two cortices were organised asymmetrically. TMS applied over the motor cortex contralateral to the missing limb evoked contractions in stump muscles but did not evoke phantom movement sensations. The location and extent of muscle maps varied between hemispheres but did not reveal any systematic asymmetries. In contrast, forearm muscle thresholds were always higher for the missing limb side. We suggest that phantom movement sensations reported by some upper limb amelics are mostly driven by vision and not by the persistence of motor commands to the missing limb within the sensorimotor cortex. We propose that prewired movement representations of a limb need the experience of movement to be expressed within the primary motor cortex. PMID:21494663

  15. GATA6 is a crucial regulator of Shh in the limb bud.

    PubMed

    Kozhemyakina, Elena; Ionescu, Andreia; Lassar, Andrew B

    2014-01-01

    In the limb bud, patterning along the anterior-posterior (A-P) axis is controlled by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), a signaling molecule secreted by the "Zone of Polarizing Activity", an organizer tissue located in the posterior margin of the limb bud. We have found that the transcription factors GATA4 and GATA6, which are key regulators of cell identity, are expressed in an anterior to posterior gradient in the early limb bud, raising the possibility that GATA transcription factors may play an additional role in patterning this tissue. While both GATA4 and GATA6 are expressed in an A-P gradient in the forelimb buds, the hindlimb buds principally express GATA6 in an A-P gradient. Thus, to specifically examine the role of GATA6 in limb patterning we generated Prx1-Cre; GATA6(fl/fl) mice, which conditionally delete GATA6 from their developing limb buds. We found that these animals display ectopic expression of both Shh and its transcriptional targets specifically in the anterior mesenchyme of the hindlimb buds. Loss of GATA6 in the developing limbs results in the formation of preaxial polydactyly in the hindlimbs. Conversely, forced expression of GATA6 throughout the limb bud represses expression of Shh and results in hypomorphic limbs. We have found that GATA6 can bind to chromatin (isolated from limb buds) encoding either Shh or Gli1 regulatory elements that drive expression of these genes in this tissue, and demonstrated that GATA6 works synergistically with FOG co-factors to repress expression of luciferase reporters driven by these sequences. Most significantly, we have found that conditional loss of Shh in limb buds lacking GATA6 prevents development of hindlimb polydactyly in these compound mutant embryos, indicating that GATA6 expression in the anterior region of the limb bud blocks hindlimb polydactyly by repressing ectopic expression of Shh. PMID:24415953

  16. Assessing upper limb function in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lamers, Ilse; Feys, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The need to fully assess upper limb function in multiple sclerosis (MS) has become increasingly clear with recent studies revealing a high prevalence of upper limb dysfunction in persons with MS leading to increased dependency and reduced quality of life. It is important that clinicians and researchers use tailored outcome measures to systematically describe upper limb (dys)function and evaluate potential deterioration or improvement on treatment. This topical review provides a comprehensive summary of currently used upper limb outcome measures in MS, classified according to the levels of the International Classification of Functioning (ICF). The clinical utility, strengths, weaknesses and psychometric properties of common upper limb outcome measures are discussed. Based on this information, recommendations for selecting appropriate upper limb outcome measures are given. The current shortcomings in assessment which need to be addressed are identified. PMID:24664300

  17. Beyond re-membering: phantom sensations of congenitally absent limbs.

    PubMed

    Brugger, P; Kollias, S S; Müri, R M; Crelier, G; Hepp-Reymond, M C; Regard, M

    2000-05-23

    Phantom limbs are traditionally conceptualized as the phenomenal persistence of a body part after deafferentation. Previous clinical observations of subjects with phantoms of congenitally absent limbs are not compatible with this view, but, in the absence of experimental work, the neural basis of such "aplasic phantoms" has remained enigmatic. In this paper, we report a series of behavioral, imaging, and neurophysiological experiments with a university-educated woman born without forearms and legs, who experiences vivid phantom sensations of all four limbs. Visuokinesthetic integration of tachistoscopically presented drawings of hands and feet indicated an intact somatic representation of these body parts. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of phantom hand movements showed no activation of primary sensorimotor areas, but of premotor and parietal cortex bilaterally. Movements of the existing upper arms produced activation expanding into the hand territories deprived of afferences and efferences. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the sensorimotor cortex consistently elicited phantom sensations in the contralateral fingers and hand. In addition, premotor and parietal stimulation evoked similar phantom sensations, albeit in the absence of motor evoked potentials in the stump. These data indicate that body parts that have never been physically developed can be represented in sensory and motor cortical areas. Both genetic and epigenetic factors, such as the habitual observation of other people moving their limbs, may contribute to the conscious experience of aplasic phantoms. PMID:10801982

  18. Distribution functions and statistical parameters that may be used to characterize limb sounders gravity wave climatologies in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, P.; Luna, D.; de la Torre, A.; Schmidt, T.

    2015-08-01

    The number of gravity wave (GW) activity climatologies in the stratosphere started to increase more than 10 years ago since the appearance of large amounts of limb and nadir satellite sounders data. There have been very few discussions regarding the adequate statistical description of GW activity in terms of a distribution function and its parameters. We put forward the question whether a general statistical functional representation adaptable to the characteristics of GW activity in diverse geographic regions and seasons exists. Here we approach this issue for two different types of limb sounders and in particular we try to find out which parameters may represent at best the climatological features. We study results for a region close to the Patagonian Andes and their prolongation in the Antarctic Peninsula, which is well-known for the generation by topography of intense stratospheric GW, specially during winter and spring. Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) records presently provide over 2000 profiles per day. We used 5 years of COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate) mission GPS RO data, which supplied almost 150,000 retrievals for our study. Three different distribution functions have been approached to describe the GW activity climatologies: gaussian, log-normal and gamma. The latter function has not been used in previous work. It has been shown here that it is a competitive option to the log-normal distribution. In addition, its use allows not only to quantify the GW activity level of each climatology in the stratosphere, but also to find out the number of significant modes that essentially determine it. Alternative parameters to the mean like the median may be used to characterize the climatologies. The use of the median may exhibit advantages in cases where the presence of spurious large GW activity measurements are suspected in GPS RO data. The mean is equally suitable to establish GW activity

  19. To BMP or not to BMP during vertebrate limb bud development.

    PubMed

    Pignatti, Emanuele; Zeller, Rolf; Zuniga, Aimée

    2014-08-01

    The analysis of vertebrate limb bud development provides insight of general relevance into the signaling networks that underlie the controlled proliferative expansion of large populations of mesenchymal progenitors, cell fate determination and initiation of differentiation. In particular, extensive genetic analysis of mouse and experimental manipulation of chicken limb bud development has revealed the self-regulatory feedback signaling systems that interlink the main morphoregulatory signaling pathways including BMPs and their antagonists. It this review, we showcase the key role of BMPs and their antagonists during limb bud development. This review provides an understanding of the key morphoregulatory interactions that underlie the highly dynamic changes in BMP activity and signal transduction as limb bud development progresses from initiation and setting-up the signaling centers to determination and formation of the chondrogenic primordia for the limb skeletal elements. PMID:24718318

  20. Motor impairment evaluation for upper limb in stroke patients on the basis of a microsensor.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuai; Luo, Chun; Ye, Shiwei; Liu, Fei; Xie, Bin; Wang, Caifeng; Yang, Li; Huang, Zhen; Wu, Jiankang

    2012-06-01

    There has been an urgent need for an effective and efficient upper limb rehabilitation method for poststroke patients. We present a Micro-Sensor-based Upper Limb rehabilitation System for poststroke patients. The wearable motion capture units are attached to upper limb segments embedded in the fabric of garments. The body segment orientation relative to the reference frame is computed by fusion of the sensory data, and the upper limb trajectory and movement parameters are obtained. Using the micro-Sensor-based Upper Limb rehabilitation System, the clinical Active Range of Motion scale can be measured automatically; a set of novel quantitative measures, referred to as motor feature indices, are obtained to evaluate the quality of the movement. Experimental results show that the proposed motor feature indices reflect the real motor impairment status very well, providing objective measurements of a patient's functional recovery status in the rehabilitation process. PMID:22470053

  1. A shared role for sonic hedgehog signalling in patterning chondrichthyan gill arch appendages and tetrapod limbs.

    PubMed

    Gillis, J Andrew; Hall, Brian K

    2016-04-15

    Chondrichthyans (sharks, skates, rays and holocephalans) possess paired appendages that project laterally from their gill arches, known as branchial rays. This led Carl Gegenbaur to propose that paired fins (and hence tetrapod limbs) originally evolved via transformation of gill arches. Tetrapod limbs are patterned by asonic hedgehog(Shh)-expressing signalling centre known as the zone of polarising activity, which establishes the anteroposterior axis of the limb bud and maintains proliferative expansion of limb endoskeletal progenitors. Here, we use loss-of-function, label-retention and fate-mapping approaches in the little skate to demonstrate that Shh secretion from a signalling centre in the developing gill arches establishes gill arch anteroposterior polarity and maintains the proliferative expansion of branchial ray endoskeletal progenitor cells. These findings highlight striking parallels in the axial patterning mechanisms employed by chondrichthyan branchial rays and paired fins/limbs, and provide mechanistic insight into the anatomical foundation of Gegenbaur's gill arch hypothesis. PMID:27095494

  2. Primary motor cortex changes after amputation correlate with phantom limb pain and the ability to move the phantom limb.

    PubMed

    Raffin, Estelle; Richard, Nathalie; Giraux, Pascal; Reilly, Karen T

    2016-04-15

    A substantial body of evidence documents massive reorganization of primary sensory and motor cortices following hand amputation, the extent of which is correlated with phantom limb pain. Many therapies for phantom limb pain are based upon the idea that plastic changes after amputation are maladaptive and attempt to normalize representations of cortical areas adjacent to the hand area. Recent data suggest, however, that higher levels of phantom pain are associated with stronger local activity and more structural integrity in the missing hand area rather than with reorganization of neighbouring body parts. While these models appear to be mutually exclusive they could co-exist, and one reason for the apparent discrepancy between them might be that no single study has examined the organisation of lip, elbow, and hand movements in the same participants. In this study we thoroughly examined the 3D anatomy of the central sulcus and BOLD responses during movements of the hand, elbow, and lips using MRI techniques in 11 upper-limb amputees and 17 healthy control subjects. We observed different reorganizational patterns for all three body parts as the former hand area showed few signs of reorganization, but the lip and elbow representations reorganized and shifted towards the hand area. We also found that poorer voluntary control and higher levels of pain in the phantom limb were powerful drivers of the lip and elbow topological changes. In addition to providing further support for the maladaptative plasticity model, we demonstrate for the first time that motor capacities of the phantom limb correlate with post-amputation reorganization, and that this reorganization is not limited to the face and hand representations but also includes the proximal upper-limb. PMID:26854561

  3. Knee functional recovery and limb-to-limb symmetry restoration after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture and ACL reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawasreh, Zakariya Hussein

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common sport injury of young athletes who participate in jumping, cutting, and pivoting activities. Although ACL reconstruction (ACLR) surgery has the goal of enabling athletes to return to preinjury activity levels, treatment results often fall short of this goal. The outcomes after ACLR are variable and less than optimal with low rate of return to preinjury activity level and high risk for second ACL injury. Factors related to the knee functional limitations, strength deficits, and limb-to-limb movement asymmetry may be associated with poor outcomes after ACLR. Additionally, the criteria that are used to determine a patient's readiness to return to the preinjury activity level are undefined which may also be associated with poor outcomes after ACLR. The clinical decision-making to clear patients' for safe and successful return to high physical activities should be based on a universal comprehensive set of objective criteria that ensure normal knee function and limb-to-limb symmetry. A battery of return to activity criteria (RTAC) that emphases normal knee function and limb-to-limb movement symmetry has been constituted to better ensure safe and successful return to preinjury activity level. Yet, only variables related to patients' demographics, concomitant injuries, and treatment measures have been used to predict return to preinjury activity levels after ACLR. However, the ability of RTAC variables that ensure normal knee function and limb movement symmetry to predict the return to participate in the same preinjury activity level after ACLR has not been investigated. In light of this background, the first aim of the present study was to compare functional knee performance-based and patient-reported measures of those who PASS and who FAIL on RTAC at 6 months (6-M) following ACLR with those at 12 months (12-M) and 24 months (24-M) following ACLR and to determine how performance-based and patient-reported measures

  4. Misconceptions About Sound Among Engineering Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejuan, Arcadi; Bohigas, Xavier; Jaén, Xavier; Periago, Cristina

    2012-12-01

    Our first objective was to detect misconceptions about the microscopic nature of sound among senior university students enrolled in different engineering programmes (from chemistry to telecommunications). We sought to determine how these misconceptions are expressed (qualitative aspect) and, only very secondarily, to gain a general idea of the extent to which they are held (quantitative aspect). Our second objective was to explore other misconceptions about wave aspects of sound. We have also considered the degree of consistency in the model of sound used by each student. Forty students answered a questionnaire including open-ended questions. Based on their free, spontaneous answers, the main results were as follows: a large majority of students answered most of the questions regarding the microscopic model of sound according to the scientifically accepted model; however, only a small number answered consistently. The main model misconception found was the notion that sound is propagated through the travelling of air particles, even in solids. Misconceptions and mental-model inconsistencies tended to depend on the engineering programme in which the student was enrolled. However, students in general were inconsistent also in applying their model of sound to individual sound properties. The main conclusion is that our students have not truly internalised the scientifically accepted model that they have allegedly learnt. This implies a need to design learning activities that take these findings into account in order to be truly efficient.

  5. Hybrid Interventions in Limb Salvage

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Tam T.T.; Bechara, Carlos F.

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid interventions have become an integral part of our strategy for limb salvage in patients with multilevel arterial occlusive disease. In this article, we describe the commonly used hybrid interventions and review their indications and outcomes. Iliac stenting and femoral endarterectomy are the two most frequently performed procedures in hybrid cases. Short- and long-term outcomes of hybrid interventions are at least comparable to conventional endovascular and surgical revascularization procedures. Hybrid revascularization offers the efficiency and convenience of a single-stage revascularization. PMID:23805341

  6. Treatment of acute lower limb ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Lukasiewicz, Aleksander

    2016-05-01

    Acute lower limb ischaemia poses a major threat to limb survival. For many years surgical thromboembolectomy was the mainstay of treatment. Recent years have brought an endovascular revolution in the management of acute lower limb ischaemia. A wide range of endovascular procedures can nowadays be employed, providing results at least as good as the traditional surgical approach. This paper is an overview of currently utilised endovascular options as well as recent modifications of standard surgical techniques. PMID:27129066

  7. Electroporation into the Limb: Beyond Misexpression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Ogura, Toshihiko

    Limb development has been studied for over 100 years by several generations of developmental biologists. The developing limb is one of the best models with which to study pattern formation in vertebrates. We have used chick limb development to answer a simple but basic question, namely, why heterogeneous tissues are formed at correct positions and times from a homogeneous population of cells (Pearse & Tabin, 1998).

  8. Sound Visualization and Holography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kock, Winston E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes liquid surface holograms including their application to medicine. Discusses interference and diffraction phenomena using sound wave scanning techniques. Compares focussing by zone plate to holographic image development. (GH)

  9. Velocity of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, A.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a method for the determination of the velocity of sound using a dual oscilloscope on which is displayed the sinusoidal input into a loudspeaker and the signal picked up by a microphone. (GS)

  10. Neuromuscular function in limb girdle dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, A Y; McComas, A J

    1985-01-01

    The contractile properties of ankle dorsiflexor and plantarflexor muscles in 20 patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy have been compared with those in matched controls. Twitch and voluntary torques were significantly smaller in the patient population and in nine patients it was impossible to record a twitch from tibialis anterior, a dorsiflexor muscle studied in detail. The disease process evidently ran a more rapid course in tibialis anterior than in plantarflexor muscles and this susceptibility was related to some aspect of the muscle other than its fibre type composition. Surviving fibres in dorsiflexor and plantarflexor muscles did not reveal evidence of excitation-contraction uncoupling; they exhibited normal post-activation potentiation and fatigue properties. Some patients were initially incapable of exciting their motor units maximally during voluntary contractions. A finding of possible pathogenetic significance was that one patient, with prominent calves, developed exceptionally large voluntary torque in his plantarflexor muscles. PMID:4087001

  11. Temporal and spectral features of sounds of wood-boring beetle larvae: identifiable patterns of activity enable improved discrimination from background noise

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhynchophorus weevil larvae produce economically important damage to ornamental and date palm crops that could be mitigated significantly by early detection and treatment. Acoustic technology has potential to enable early detection, but often it is difficult to distinguish insect sounds from backgr...

  12. The Effect of Clouds Upon Limb Scattered Radiances and the Retrieval of Ozone Profiles Using These Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flittner, D. E.; McPeters, R. D.; Hilsenrath, E.; Janz, S. J.; Herman, B. M.; Loughman, R. P.

    1998-01-01

    The use of limb scattered radiance profiles to retrieve ozone profiles is currently being investigated. The goal is to produce ozone profiles with better vertical resolution than is available with the Backscattered Ultraviolet (BUV) technique and with much greater spatial and temporal coverage than with the solar occultation method (i.e. SAGE II). This method, which uses UV and visible light scattered from the earth's limb, has recently been proven to work for clear sky cases with data from the STS-87 flight of the Shuttle Ozone Sounding Limb Experiment/Limb Ozone Retrieval Experiment (SOLSE/LORE). As to be expected, clouds have a substantial impact upon the limb radiance (increasing the radiance as much as 80-100% is some cases). Here we use a variety of radiative transfer models and limited SOLSE/LORE data to investigate the effect of clouds upon the limb radiance at wavelengths used in the ozone retrieval (approximately 600 nm). Though the presence of clouds can greatly increase the limb radiance, they have a minimal effect upon the retrieved ozone profile, since the retrieval uses a differential absorption technique.

  13. [Phantom limb pain syndrome: therapeutic approach using mirror therapy in a Geriatric Department].

    PubMed

    González García, Paloma; Manzano Hernández, M Pilar; Muñoz Tomás, M Teresa; Martín Hernández, Carlos; Forcano García, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    The clinical use of mirror visual feedback was initially introduced to alleviate phantom pain by restoring motor function through plastic changes in the human primary motor cortex. It is a promising novel technique that gives a new perspective to neurological rehabilitation. Using this therapy, the mirror neuron system is activated and decrease the activity of those systems that perceive protopathic pain, making somatosensory cortex reorganization possible. This paper reports the results of the mirror therapy in three patients with phantom limb pain after recent lower limb amputation, showing its analgesic effects and its benefits as a comprehensive rehabilitation instrument for lower limb amputee geriatric patients. PMID:23498652

  14. Early evolution of limb regeneration in tetrapods: evidence from a 300-million-year-old amphibian

    PubMed Central

    Fröbisch, Nadia B.; Bickelmann, Constanze; Witzmann, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Salamanders are the only tetrapods capable of fully regenerating their limbs throughout their entire lives. Much data on the underlying molecular mechanisms of limb regeneration have been gathered in recent years allowing for new comparative studies between salamanders and other tetrapods that lack this unique regenerative potential. By contrast, the evolution of animal regeneration just recently shifted back into focus, despite being highly relevant for research designs aiming to unravel the factors allowing for limb regeneration. We show that the 300-million-year-old temnospondyl amphibian Micromelerpeton, a distant relative of modern amphibians, was already capable of regenerating its limbs. A number of exceptionally well-preserved specimens from fossil deposits show a unique pattern and combination of abnormalities in their limbs that is distinctive of irregular regenerative activity in modern salamanders and does not occur as variants of normal limb development. This demonstrates that the capacity to regenerate limbs is not a derived feature of modern salamanders, but may be an ancient feature of non-amniote tetrapods and possibly even shared by all bony fish. The finding provides a new framework for understanding the evolution of regenerative capacity of paired appendages in vertebrates in the search for conserved versus derived molecular mechanisms of limb regeneration. PMID:25253458

  15. Mechanical efficiency of limb swing during walking and running in guinea fowl (Numida meleagris)

    PubMed Central

    Rubenson, Jonas; Marsh, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the mechanical determinants of the energy cost of limb swing is crucial for refining our models of locomotor energetics, as well as improving treatments for those suffering from impaired limb-swing mechanics. In this study, we use guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) as a model to explore whether mechanical work at the joints explains limb-swing energy use by combining inverse dynamic modeling and muscle-specific energetics from blood flow measurements. We found that the overall efficiencies of the limb swing increased markedly from walking (3%) to fast running (17%) and are well below the usually accepted maximum efficiency of muscle, except at the fastest speeds recorded. The estimated efficiency of a single muscle used during ankle flexion (tibialis cranialis) parallels that of the total limb-swing efficiency (3% walking, 15% fast running). Taken together, these findings do not support the hypothesis that joint work is the major determinant of limb-swing energy use across the animal's speed range and warn against making simple predictions of energy use based on joint mechanical work. To understand limb-swing energy use, mechanical functions other than accelerating the limb segments need to be explored, including isometric force production and muscle work arising from active and passive antagonist muscle forces. PMID:19228989

  16. Sim1 and Sim2 expression during chick and mouse limb development.

    PubMed

    Coumailleau, Pascal; Duprez, Delphine

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila Single minded (Sim) transcription factor is a master regulator of cell fate during midline development. The homolog mouse Sim1 and Sim2 genes are important for central nervous system development. Loss of mSim1 activity leads to an absence of specific neuroendocrine lineages within the hypothalamus, while overexpression of mSim2 leads to behavioural defects. We now provide evidence that vertebrate Sim genes might be important for limb muscle formation. We have examined by in situ hybridisation the expression of the Sim1 and Sim2 genes during limb development in chick and mouse embryos. The expression of both Sim genes is mainly associated with limb muscle formation. We found that each Sim gene has a similar temporal and spatial expression pattern in chick and mouse embryonic limbs, although with some differences for the Sim2 gene between species. In chick or mouse embryonic limbs, Sim1 and Sim2 display non-overlapping expression domains, suggesting an involvement for Sim1 and Sim2 proteins at different steps of limb muscle formation. Sim1 gene expression is associated with the early step of muscle progenitor cell migration in chick and mouse, while the Sim2 gene is expressed just after the migration process. In addition, chick and mouse Sim2 gene expression is enhanced in limb ventral muscle masses versus dorsal ventral muscle masses. Our results provide a basis for further functional analysis of the Sim genes in limb muscle formation. PMID:19123137

  17. Endovascular Techniques in Limb Salvage: Stents

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Hosam F.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with critical limb ischemia, the first-line approach for limb salvage has shifted over the past decade from bypass surgery to endovascular intervention. Stenting for the treatment of lower-extremity arterial occlusive disease is an important tool and continues to evolve, with new stent designs and technologies that have been developed to provide superior patency rates and limb salvage. In this article, we discuss the role of peripheral stenting in the treatment of patients with critical limb ischemia, including a review of the relevant current literature and the future directions of such interventions. PMID:23805339

  18. Developmental basis for hind-limb loss in dolphins and origin of the cetacean bodyplan

    PubMed Central

    Thewissen, J. G. M.; Cohn, M. J.; Stevens, L. S.; Bajpai, S.; Heyning, J.; Horton, W. E.

    2006-01-01

    Among mammals, modern cetaceans (whales, dolphins, and porpoises) are unusual in the absence of hind limbs. However, cetacean embryos do initiate hind-limb bud development. In dolphins, the bud arrests and degenerates around the fifth gestational week. Initial limb outgrowth in amniotes is maintained by two signaling centers, the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) and the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA). Our data indicate that the cetacean hind-limb bud forms an AER and that this structure expresses Fgf8 initially, but that neither the AER nor Fgf8 expression is maintained. Moreover, Sonic hedgehog (Shh), which mediates the signaling activity of the ZPA, is absent from the dolphin hind-limb bud. We find that failure to establish a ZPA is associated with the absence of Hand2, an upstream regulator of Shh. Interpreting our results in the context of both the cetacean fossil record and the known functions of Shh suggests that reduction of Shh expression may have occurred ≈41 million years ago and led to the loss of distal limb elements. The total loss of Shh expression may account for the further loss of hind-limb elements that occurred near the origin of the modern suborders of cetaceans ≈34 million years ago. Integration of paleontological and developmental data suggests that hind-limb size was reduced by gradually operating microevolutionary changes. Long after locomotor function was totally lost, modulation of developmental control genes eliminated most of the hind-limb skeleton. Hence, macroevolutionary changes in gene expression did not drive the initial reduction in hind-limb size. PMID:16717186

  19. Limb blood flow - Rest and heavy exercise in sitting and supine positions in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Montgomery, L. D.; Brock, P. J.; Van Beaumont, W.

    1979-01-01

    The objectives of the study were twofold: (1) to determine the effect of body position (hydrostatic pressure) on total blood flow in active and passive limbs at rest and after severe exercise; and (2) to further evaluate the impedance technique for measurement of blood flow. To this end, the effect of body position on the redistribution of total blood flow in active (leg) and passive (forearm) limbs during exercise was determined by measuring total limb impedance (blood flow) in five male and one female subjects in sitting and supine positions with a modified Beckman BR-100 rheograph. The results show that, at rest and after exercise, the supine position induces significantly greater flows in the leg but not in the forearm. With severe exercise, blood flows are increased in both passive and active limbs, so that there is probably no net transfer of blood volume from passive to active muscles. The advantages of the impedance technique over other methods are stressed.

  20. Ecological sounds affect breath duration more than artificial sounds.

    PubMed

    Murgia, Mauro; Santoro, Ilaria; Tamburini, Giorgia; Prpic, Valter; Sors, Fabrizio; Galmonte, Alessandra; Agostini, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that auditory rhythms affect both movement and physiological functions. We hypothesized that the ecological sounds of human breathing can affect breathing more than artificial sounds of breathing, varying in tones for inspiration and expiration. To address this question, we monitored the breath duration of participants exposed to three conditions: (a) ecological sounds of breathing, (b) artificial sounds of breathing having equal temporal features as the ecological sounds, (c) no sounds (control). We found that participants' breath duration variability was reduced in the ecological sound condition, more than in the artificial sound condition. We suggest that ecological sounds captured the timing of breathing better than artificial sounds, guiding as a consequence participants' breathing. We interpreted our results according to the Theory of Event Coding, providing further support to its validity, and suggesting its possible extension in the domain of physiological functions which are both consciously and unconsciously controlled. PMID:25637249

  1. Extracellular Control of Limb Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calve, S.; Simon, H.-G.

    Adult newts possess the ability to completely regenerate organs and appendages. Immediately after limb loss, the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes dramatic changes that may provide mechanical and biochemical cues to guide the formation of the blastema, which is comprised of uncommitted stem-like cells that proliferate to replace the lost structure. Skeletal muscle is a known reservoir for blastema cells but the mechanism by which it contributes progenitor cells is still unclear. To create physiologically relevant culture conditions for the testing of primary newt muscle cells in vitro, the spatio-temporal distribution of ECM components and the mechanical properties of newt muscle were analyzed. Tenascin-C and hyaluronic acid (HA) were found to be dramatically upregulated in the amputated limb and were co-expressed around regenerating skeletal muscle. The transverse stiffness of muscle measured in situ was used as a guide to generate silicone-based substrates of physiological stiffness. Culturing newt muscle cells under different conditions revealed that the cells are sensitive to both matrix coating and substrate stiffness: Myoblasts on HA-coated soft substrates display a rounded morphology and become more elongated as the stiffness of the substrate increases. Coating of soft substrates with matrigel or fibronectin enhanced cell spreading and eventual cell fusion.

  2. Progress report of FY 1998 activities: Continued development of an integrated sounding system in support of the DOE/ARM experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    Edgeworth R. Westwater; Yong Han; Vladimir Leuskiy

    1998-09-06

    Both during September 15-30, 1996 and September 15-October 5, 1997, the Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) participated in an experiment at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site that was designed to study many of the ways that ARM is measuring water vapor. These experiments, called the Water Vapor Intensive Operating Periods (WVIOPs), produced some results of significant importance to ARM water vapor measurements. We have spent the major portion of this years activities in analyzing results of these experiments, and improving algorithms for improving the measurement of precipitable water vapor (PWV) from instruments available at ARM. The most important ARM instrument for this measurement continues to be the Microwave Radiometer (MWR). Measurements of water vapor at the North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO) CART site in Barrow, Alaska, area potential problem because of the difficulty of radiosondes to measure low amounts of vapor during cold and extremely dry conditions. The applicability of MWR scaling to radiosondes is questionable because of the low sensitivity of these instrument during dry conditions. It has been suggested by the ARM Instantaneous Radiative Flux Working Group and others that measurements of brightness temperature around 183 GHz could be used to scale during the coldest and driest periods. However, the millimeter wavelengths are vulnerable to cloud effects from both liquid and ice. We have participated in the planning and will participate in the Millimeter wave Arctic Experiment that will evaluate microwave and millimeter wave radiometers during extremely cold conditions. ETL has tested, both in an experiment at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory and during the two Water Vapor Intensive Operating Periods in 1996 and 1997, a 5-mm scanning radiometer that measures low-altitude temperature profiles; both profiles of lapse rate and absolute temperature can be measured with the instrument

  3. Work-Related Upper Limb Disorders: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Stoyneva, Zlatka Borisova; Dermendjiev, Svetlan; Dermendjiev, Tihomir; Dobrev, Hristo

    2015-01-01

    In this study the complex interrelationship between physical factors, job stress, lifestyle and genetic factors on symptoms of work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the upper limbs is demonstrated by a case report and discussion of the literature. A 58 year old woman with long lasting complaints of the upper limbs with increasing intensity and duration, generalisation, combined with skin thickness, Raynaud’s phenomenon, joint disorders, arterial and pulmonary hypertension, metabolic lipid dysfunctions is presented. Occupational history proves continuous duration of service at a job with occupational physical static load with numerous repetitive monotonous systematic motions of fingers and hands as a weaver of Persian rugs followed by work at an automated loom and variable labour activities. Though the complaints dated since the time she was a manual weaver, the manifestations of generalized joint degenerative changes, system sclerosis with Raynaud’s phenomenon with similar upper extremities signs and symptoms discount upper limbs musculoskeletal disorder as caused only or mainly by occupational risk factors. The main principles and criteria for occupational diagnosis of musculoskeletal upper limb disorders and legislative requirements for their reglamentation are discussed.

  4. Somatic and movement inductions phantom limb in non-amputees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, D. M.; Gentiletti, G. G.; Braidot, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    The illusion of the mirror box is a tool for phantom limb pain treatment; this article proposes the induction of phantom limb syndrome on non-amputees upper limb, with a neurological trick of the mirror box. With two study situations: a) Somatic Induction is a test of the literature reports qualitatively, and novel proposal b) Motor Induction, which is an objective report by recording surface EEG. There are 3 cases proposed for Motor illusion, for which grasped movement is used: 1) Control: movement is made, 2) illusion: the mirror box is used, and 3) Imagination: no movement is executed; the subject only imagines its execution. Three different tasks are registered for each one of them (left hand, right hand, and both of them). In 64% of the subjects for somatic experience, a clear response to the illusion was observed. In the experience of motor illusion, cortical activation is detected in both hemispheres of the primary motor cortex during the illusion, where the hidden hand remains motionless. These preliminary findings in phantom limb on non-amputees can be a tool for neuro-rehabilitation and neuro-prosthesis control training.

  5. Muscle phenotype remains unaltered after limb autotomy and unloading.

    PubMed

    Griffis, B; Moffett, S B; Cooper, R L

    2001-01-01

    Loss of chelipeds in crustaceans results in severe atrophy of the major muscle responsible for lifting the limb, the anterior levator. We decided to test if this loss of mechanical load altered muscle phenotype as measured by SDS-PAGE analysis of levator total protein and actomyosin fractions. Levator muscles of adult crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, with either functional regenerate limbs or lack of limb buds (papilla stage) were compared with those from normal contralateral limbs and those from pristine animals. We find that there is no difference in protein profiles among the three conditions. However, the total protein profile for the dually excited levator muscle is unique compared to those of fast or slow muscles of the abdomen (L and SEL, respectively), which receive only phasic or tonic excitatory innervation. The levator myosin heavy chain profile is similar to that of slow phenotype muscles such as the SEL and opener. We conclude that load does not influence levator phenotype. This is likely due either to the intact innervation and continued activation of the levator during atrophy or to the maintenance of passive tension on the muscle. J. Exp. Zool. 289:10-22, 2001. PMID:11169489

  6. Peripheral nervous system origin of phantom limb pain.

    PubMed

    Vaso, Apostol; Adahan, Haim-Moshe; Gjika, Artan; Zahaj, Skerdi; Zhurda, Tefik; Vyshka, Gentian; Devor, Marshall

    2014-07-01

    Nearly all amputees continue to feel their missing limb as if it still existed, and many experience chronic phantom limb pain (PLP). What is the origin of these sensations? There is currently a broad consensus among investigators that PLP is a top-down phenomenon, triggered by loss of sensory input and caused by maladaptive cortical plasticity. We tested the alternative hypothesis that PLP is primarily a bottom-up process, due not to the loss of input but rather to exaggerated input, generated ectopically in axotomized primary afferent neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) that used to innervate the limb. In 31 amputees, the local anesthetic lidocaine was applied intrathecally and/or to the DRG surface (intraforaminal epidural block). This rapidly and reversibly extinguished PLP and also nonpainful phantom limb sensation (npPLS). Control injections were ineffective. For intraforaminal block, the effect was topographically appropriate. The suppression of PLP and npPLS could also be demonstrated using dilute lidocaine concentrations that are sufficient to suppress DRG ectopia but not to block the propagation of impulses generated further distally in the nerve. PLP is driven primarily by activity generated within the DRG. We recommend the DRG as a target for treatment of PLP and perhaps also other types of regional neuropathic pain. PMID:24769187

  7. Vasopressin-induced stimulation of the Na(+)-activated K(+) channels is responsible for maintaining the basolateral K(+) conductance of the thick ascending limb (TAL) in EAST/SeSAME syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lili; Wang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Dandan; Duan, Xinpeng; Zhao, Chunlei; Zu, Mingxue; Meng, Xinxin; Zhang, Chengbiao; Su, Xiao-Tong; Wang, Ming-Xiao; Wang, Wen-Hui; Gu, Ruimin

    2015-11-01

    The renal phenotype of EAST syndrome, a disease caused by the loss-of-function-mutations of Kcnj10 (Kir4.1), is a reminiscence of Gitelman's syndrome characterized by the defective function in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT). The aim of the present study is to test whether antidiuretic hormone (vasopressin)-induced stimulation of the Na(+)-activated 80-150pS K(+) channel is responsible for compensating the lost function of Kcnj10 in the thick ascending limb (TAL) of subjects with EAST syndrome. Immunostaining and western blot showed that the expression of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) was significantly higher in Kcnj10(-/-) mice than those of WT littermates, suggesting that the disruption of Kcnj10 stimulates vasopressin response in the kidney. The role of vasopressin in stimulating the basolateral K(+) conductance of the TAL was strongly indicated by the finding that the application of arginine-vasopressin (AVP) hyperpolarized the membrane in the TAL of Kcnj10(-/-) mice. Application of AVP significantly stimulated the 80-150pS K(+) channel in the TAL and this effect was blocked by tolvaptan (V2 receptor antagonist) or by inhibiting PKA. Moreover, the water restriction for 24h significantly increased the probability of finding the 80-150pS K(+) channel and the K(+) channel open probability in the TAL. The application of a membrane permeable cAMP analog also mimicked the effect of AVP and activated this K(+) channel, suggesting that cAMP-PKA pathway stimulates the 80-150pS K(+) channels. The role of the basolateral K(+) conductance in maintaining transcellular Cl(-) transport is further suggested by the finding that the inhibition of basolateral K(+) channels significantly diminished the AVP-induced stimulation of the basolateral 10pS Cl(-) channels. We conclude that vasopressin stimulates the 80-150pS K(+) channel in the TAL via a cAMP-dependent mechanism. The vasopressin-induced stimulation of K(+) channels is responsible for compensating lost function of Kcnj10 thereby

  8. Microwave limb sounder. [measuring trace gases in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustincic, J. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Trace gases in the upper atmosphere can be measured by comparing spectral noise content of limb soundings with the spectral noise content of cold space. An offset Cassegrain antenna system and tiltable input mirror alternately look out at the limb and up at cold space at an elevation angle of about 22. The mirror can also be tilted to look at a black body calibration target. Reflection from the mirror is directed into a radiometer whose head functions as a diplexer to combine the input radiation and a local ocillator (klystron) beam. The radiometer head is comprised of a Fabry-Perot resonator consisting of two Fabry-Perot cavities spaced a number of half wavelengths apart. Incoming radiation received on one side is reflected and rotated 90 deg in polarization by the resonator so that it will be reflected by an input grid into a mixer, while the klystron beam received on the other side is also reflected and rotated 90 deg, but not without passing some energy to be reflected by the input grid into the mixer.

  9. Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere /LIMS/ experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozewski, R. W.; Hatch, M. R.

    1978-01-01

    The Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) radiometer is a satellite-borne six-channel multispectral scanning radiometer using a two-stage methane and ammonia solid-cryogen cooler to cool the (Hg, Cd)Te focal plane to 65 K. The LIMS experiment employs thermal IR limb sounding to provide vertical-profile measurement of temperature and of concentrations of O3, NO3, and H2O in the stratosphere on a global scale. The goals of the experiment and the expected accuracies of the measurements are outlined, and the radiance measured by the radiometer is analyzed. A program of correlative measurements designed for verification and augmentation of the LIMS data is discussed. Detailed descriptions are given of the LIMS components and optics, the detector capsule assembly, the solid-cryogen cooler, the four operational modes of the LIMS system, and the data-processor electronics. It is noted that prelaunch acceptance testing thus far completed indicates that the LIMS specification design requirements have been met, and the experiment's performance goals can be achieved.

  10. Sound modes in holographic superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, Christopher P.; Yarom, Amos

    2009-11-15

    Superfluids support many different types of sound waves. We investigate the relation between the sound waves in a relativistic and a nonrelativistic superfluid by using hydrodynamics to calculate the various sound speeds. Then, using a particular holographic scalar gravity realization of a strongly interacting superfluid, we compute first, second, and fourth sound speeds as a function of the temperature. The relativistic low temperature results for second sound differ from Landau's well known prediction for the nonrelativistic, incompressible case.

  11. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  12. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  13. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  14. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  15. Pain management in patients following limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Suzanne

    Phantom limb pain is common in patients who have amputations. This article outlines the different theories that explain the pathophysiology of phantom limb pain, including peripheral, spinal and central mechanisms. Treatment options are targeted at addressing these mechanisms, combining analgesic techniques with physical and psychological rehabilitation. PMID:21287925

  16. 21 CFR 890.3475 - Limb orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limb orthosis. 890.3475 Section 890.3475 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3475 Limb orthosis. (a)...

  17. 49 CFR 572.35 - Limbs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limbs. 572.35 Section 572.35 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Test Dummy § 572.35 Limbs....

  18. Interhemispheric sensorimotor integration; an upper limb phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Ruddy, Kathy L; Jaspers, Ellen; Keller, Martin; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    Somatosensory information from the limbs reaches the contralateral Primary Sensory Cortex (S1) with a delay of 23ms for finger, and 40ms for leg (somatosensory N20/N40). Upon arrival of this input in the cortex, motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) are momentarily inhibited. This phenomenon is called 'short latency afferent inhibition (SAI)' and can be used as a tool for investigating sensorimotor interactions in the brain. We used SAI to investigate the process of sensorimotor integration in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the stimulated limb. We hypothesized that ipsilateral SAI would occur with a delay following the onset of contralateral SAI, to allow for transcallosal conduction of the signal. We electrically stimulated the limb either contralateral or ipsilateral to the hemisphere receiving TMS, using a range of different interstimulus intervals (ISI). We tested the First Dorsal Interosseous (FDI) muscle in the hand, and Tibialis Anterior (TA) in the lower leg, in three separate experiments. Ipsilateral SAI was elicited in the upper limb (FDI) at all ISIs that were greater than N20+18ms (all p<.05) but never at any earlier timepoint. No ipsilateral SAI was detected in the lower limb (TA) at any of the tested ISIs. The delayed onset timing of ipsilateral SAI suggests that transcallosal communication mediates this inhibitory process for the upper limb. The complete absence of ipsilateral SAI in the lower limb warrants consideration of the potential limb-specific differences in demands for bilateral sensorimotor integration. PMID:27425210

  19. The Floating Upper Limb: Multiple Injuries Involving Ipsilateral, Proximal, Humeral, Supracondylar, and Distal Radial Limb.

    PubMed

    Manaan, Qazi; Bashir, Adil; Zahoor, Adnan; Mokhdomi, Taseem A; Danish, Qazi

    2016-09-01

    Floating arm injury represents a common yet complicated injury of the childhood severely associated with limb deformation and even morbidity, if not precisely addressed and credibly operated. Here, we report a rare floating upper limb case of a 9-year-old boy with multiple injuries of ipsilateral proximal humeral, supracondylar and distal radial limb. This is the first report to document such a combined floating elbow and floating arm injury in the same limb. In this report, we discuss the surgical procedures used and recovery of the patient monitored to ascertain the effectiveness of the method in limb reorganisation. PMID:27583121

  20. The Floating Upper Limb: Multiple Injuries Involving Ipsilateral, Proximal, Humeral, Supracondylar, and Distal Radial Limb

    PubMed Central

    Manaan, Qazi; Bashir, Adil; Zahoor, Adnan; Mokhdomi, Taseem A.

    2016-01-01

    Floating arm injury represents a common yet complicated injury of the childhood severely associated with limb deformation and even morbidity, if not precisely addressed and credibly operated. Here, we report a rare floating upper limb case of a 9-year-old boy with multiple injuries of ipsilateral proximal humeral, supracondylar and distal radial limb. This is the first report to document such a combined floating elbow and floating arm injury in the same limb. In this report, we discuss the surgical procedures used and recovery of the patient monitored to ascertain the effectiveness of the method in limb reorganisation. PMID:27583121